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Sample records for dr agostinho neto

  1. Pharmacological Modulation of GluK1 and GluK2 by NETO1, NETO2, and PSD95.

    PubMed

    Li, Baolin; Rex, Elizabeth; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Ogden, Ann Marie; Bleakman, David; Johnson, Kirk W

    2016-03-01

    The association between the kainate receptors (KARs) GluK1 and GluK2 and the modifying proteins neuropilin- and tolloid-like 1 (NETO1), neuropilin- and tolloid-like 2 (NETO2), and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) is likely to produce distinct GluK1 and GluK2 pharmacology in postsynaptic neurons. However, little is known about their corresponding modulatory effects on GluK1 and GluK2 activity in high-throughput assays for cell-based drug discovery. Using heterologous cells that potentially mimic the response in native cells in a fluorescence imaging plate reader (FLIPR) assay, we have investigated assays that incorporate (1) coexpression of GluK1 or GluK2 with their modulatory proteins (NETO1, NETO2, PSD95) and/or (2) enablement of assays with physiological concentration of native GluK1 and GluK2 agonist (glutamate) in the absence of an artificial potentiator (e.g., concanavalin A [Con A]). We found that in the absence of Con A, both NETO1 and NETO2 accessory proteins are able to potentiate kainate- and glutamate-evoked GluK1-mediated Ca(2+) influx. We also noted the striking ability of PSD95 to enhance glutamate-stimulated potentiation effects of NETO2 on GluK1 without the need for Con A and with a robust signal that could be utilized for high-throughput FLIPR assays. These experiments demonstrate the utility of heterologous cells coexpressing PSD95/NETO2 with GluK1 or GluK2 in native cell-mimicking heterologous cell systems for high-throughput assays and represent new avenues into the discovery of KAR modulating therapies. PMID:26991362

  2. Neto-Mediated Intracellular Interactions Shape Postsynaptic Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Cathy I.; Igiesuorobo, Oghomwen; Wang, Qi; Serpe, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the subunit composition of glutamate receptors are crucial for the formation of neural circuits and for the long-term plasticity underlying learning and memory. Here we use the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) to examine how specific receptor subtypes are recruited and stabilized at synaptic locations. In flies, clustering of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) requires Neto (Neuropillin and Tolloid-like), a highly conserved auxiliary subunit that is essential for NMJ assembly and development. Drosophila neto encodes two isoforms, Neto-? and Neto-?, with common extracellular parts and distinct cytoplasmic domains. Mutations that specifically eliminate Neto-? or its intracellular domain were generated. When Neto-? is missing or is truncated, the larval NMJs show profound changes in the subtype composition of iGluRs due to reduced synaptic accumulation of the GluRIIA subunit. Furthermore, neto-? mutant NMJs fail to accumulate p21-activated kinase (PAK), a critical postsynaptic component implicated in the synaptic stabilization of GluRIIA. Muscle expression of either Neto-? or Neto-? rescued the synaptic transmission at neto null NMJs, indicating that Neto conserved domains mediate iGluRs clustering. However, only Neto-? restored PAK synaptic accumulation at neto null NMJs. Thus, Neto engages in intracellular interactions that regulate the iGluR subtype composition by preferentially recruiting and/or stabilizing selective receptor subtypes. PMID:25905467

  3. Prodomain removal enables neto to stabilize glutamate receptors at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jun; Igiesuorobo, Oghomwen; Ramos, Cathy I; Bao, Hong; Zhang, Bing; Serpe, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of neurotransmitter receptors at postsynaptic specializations is a key step in the assembly of functional synapses. Drosophila Neto (Neuropillin and Tolloid-like protein) is an essential auxiliary subunit of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) complexes required for the iGluRs clustering at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we show that optimal levels of Neto are crucial for stabilization of iGluRs at synaptic sites and proper NMJ development. Genetic manipulations of Neto levels shifted iGluRs distribution to extrajunctional locations. Perturbations in Neto levels also produced small NMJs with reduced synaptic transmission, but only Neto-depleted NMJs showed diminished postsynaptic components. Drosophila Neto contains an inhibitory prodomain that is processed by Furin1-mediated limited proteolysis. neto null mutants rescued with a Neto variant that cannot be processed have severely impaired NMJs and reduced iGluRs synaptic clusters. Unprocessed Neto retains the ability to engage iGluRs in vivo and to form complexes with normal synaptic transmission. However, Neto prodomain must be removed to enable iGluRs synaptic stabilization and proper postsynaptic differentiation. PMID:25723514

  4. Prodomain Removal Enables Neto to Stabilize Glutamate Receptors at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Jun; Igiesuorobo, Oghomwen; Ramos, Cathy I.; Bao, Hong; Zhang, Bing; Serpe, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of neurotransmitter receptors at postsynaptic specializations is a key step in the assembly of functional synapses. Drosophila Neto (Neuropillin and Tolloid-like protein) is an essential auxiliary subunit of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) complexes required for the iGluRs clustering at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we show that optimal levels of Neto are crucial for stabilization of iGluRs at synaptic sites and proper NMJ development. Genetic manipulations of Neto levels shifted iGluRs distribution to extrajunctional locations. Perturbations in Neto levels also produced small NMJs with reduced synaptic transmission, but only Neto-depleted NMJs showed diminished postsynaptic components. Drosophila Neto contains an inhibitory prodomain that is processed by Furin1-mediated limited proteolysis. neto null mutants rescued with a Neto variant that cannot be processed have severely impaired NMJs and reduced iGluRs synaptic clusters. Unprocessed Neto retains the ability to engage iGluRs in vivo and to form complexes with normal synaptic transmission. However, Neto prodomain must be removed to enable iGluRs synaptic stabilization and proper postsynaptic differentiation. PMID:25723514

  5. Neto2-null mice have impaired GABAergic inhibition and are susceptible to seizures

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Dargaei, Zahra; Ivakine, Evgueni A.; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Ng, David; Chevrier, Jonah; Ormond, Jake; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; McInnes, Roderick R.; Woodin, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Neto2 is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the neuron-specific K+-Cl? cotransporter (KCC2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Efficient KCC2 transport is essential for setting the neuronal Cl? gradient, which is required for fast GABAergic inhibition. Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 in neurons, and increases KCC2 function by binding to the active oligomeric form of this cotransporter. In the present study, we characterized GABAergic inhibition and KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride homeostasis in pyramidal neurons from adult hippocampal slices. Using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings we found that the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) was significantly depolarized. We also observed that surface levels of KCC2 and phosphorylation of KCC2 serine 940 (Ser940) were reduced in Neto2?/? neurons compared to wild-type controls. To examine GABAergic inhibition we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and found that Neto2?/? neurons had significant reductions in both their amplitude and frequency. Based on the critical role of Neto2 in regulating GABAergic inhibition we rationalized that Neto2-null mice would be prone to seizure activity. We found that Neto2-null mice demonstrated a decrease in the latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and an increase in seizure severity. PMID:26441539

  6. Neto1 is a novel CUB-domain NMDA receptor-interacting protein required for synaptic plasticity and learning.

    PubMed

    Ng, David; Pitcher, Graham M; Szilard, Rachel K; Sertié, Andréa; Kanisek, Marijana; Clapcote, Steven J; Lipina, Tatiana; Kalia, Lorraine V; Joo, Daisy; McKerlie, Colin; Cortez, Miguel; Roder, John C; Salter, Michael W; McInnes, Roderick R

    2009-02-24

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS), is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1), a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB) domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans. PMID:19243221

  7. Neto1 Is a Novel CUB-Domain NMDA ReceptorInteracting Protein Required for Synaptic Plasticity and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Szilard, Rachel K; Serti, Andra; Kanisek, Marijana; Clapcote, Steven J; Lipina, Tatiana; Kalia, Lorraine V; Joo, Daisy; McKerlie, Colin; Cortez, Miguel; Roder, John C; Salter, Michael W; McInnes, Roderick R

    2009-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS), is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1), a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB) domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans. PMID:19243221

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Dr. Christian Barnard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Christian Barnard Tours Marshall Space Flight Center. Shown in Dr. Von Braun's office are (left to right): Dr. Ernst Sthulinger, a representative from General Electric, Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Dr. Christian Barnard, and Dr. Eberhard Rees.

  9. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

  11. A note on "Electron self-energy in logarithmic electrodynamics" by P. Gaete and J. Helayël-Neto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitman, Dmitry M.; Shabad, Anatoly E.

    2014-11-01

    We propose an identification of the free parameter in the model of nonlinear electrodynamics proposed in Gaete and Helayël-Neto (Eur Phys J C 74:2816, 2014) by equating the second term in the power expansion of its Lagrangian with that in the expansion of the Heiseberg-Euler Lagrangian. The resulting value of the field-energy of a point-like charge makes 0.988 of the electron mass, if the charge is that of the electron.

  12. Dr. Daniel Carter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

  16. Dr Pugh: a poisoner?

    PubMed

    Paull, J D; Morris, G M

    2012-07-01

    On 16 February 1845 the Reverend W. H. Browne, rector of St John's Church in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, wrote in his journal, "My dear Wife died very suddenly almost immediately after and in consequence of taking a preparation of Hyd. Cyan. Acid prepared & supplied by Dr Pugh". This journal entry raises a number of questions. Was Dr Pugh treating a condition which he thought merited that treatment or was it a ghastly mistake? Was Caroline Browne suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis? Was hydrocyanic acid an accepted treatment at that time? Did Mrs Browne take the wrong dose? Was an incorrect concentration of the drug prepared by Dr Pugh? Did he use the wrong pharmacopoeia in preparing the hydrocyanic acid? Why was there no inquest? Only some of these questions can be answered. PMID:23230685

  17. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  18. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon.

  19. Dr. William R. Lucas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Dr. William R. Lucas served as Marshall Space Flight Center Director from June 15, 1974 until July 3, 1986, when he retired after thirty-four years of civil service. Prior to the appointment, Lucas served as Center Deputy Director (1971-1974), Program Development Director (1968-1971), Astronautics Laboratory Director (1966-1968), and Propulsion and Vehicle Laboratory Director (1960-1966).

  20. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. Ask Dr. Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for child care providers to be sure children in their care who are between the ages of 15 months and 5 years have had Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Urges child care center staff to avoid use of bean bag infant cushions and to inform parents about the hazards posed by the cushions. (DR)

  2. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  3. 1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Dr. Janie Merkel

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Ryan; Friend, Janice

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Janie Merkel is the director of Yale’s Chemical Genomics Screening Facility, a high-throughput screening laboratory that is part of the Yale University Center for Genomics and Proteomics. The Screening Facility connects Yale researchers with industry-quality robotic machinery and a diverse group of compound libraries, which have been used successfully to link therapeutic targets with potential therapies. PMID:18449385

  5. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes

  6. Dr. Rocco A. Petrone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Rocco A. Petrone served at director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 26, 1973 to March 15, 1974. Prior to his tenure at Marshall, Petrone served as director of the Apollo program and director of launch operations at Kennedy Space Center. His career in rocket development and space programs began with his participation in the development of the Redstone missiles at the Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Upon his departure from Marshall, Petrone served as NASA Associate Administrator for Center Operations.

  7. Inmemoriam Dr Samten Tenzing.

    PubMed

    Badhu, Badri Prasad

    2015-01-01

    This issue of the journal is dedicated to Dr SamtenTenzing. Born on 21st September 1961, Samten completed his secondary level education from the St Xavier's School, Kathmandu. He was awarded a Colombo Plan Scholarship in 1981 to undergo his MBBS at the Rajendra Medical College, Ranchi University, India after which he joined the same college as an Honorary Junior Resident House Physician in the Department of General Medicine. He returned home and served at the Bir Hospital as a House Surgeon from December 1989 till July 1990. PMID:26695597

  8. Doctors and Dr. Seuss.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Dartmouth College renamed its medical school, founded in 1797, the Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine. Using the renaming of the medical school of Dartmouth College as a foil, I offer in this article a vision of what it might mean to align Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, with doctors by examining Geisel's You're Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children. In this article, I derive four critiques of modern medicine from the book and offer four strategies as to how these critiques could be explored in medical education. If You're Only Old Once! is read as a pathography, I argue that it can be used as a resource for medical education. PMID:25473864

  9. Dr. Barnett's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.

    1990-04-01

    In 1986, AstroPower was a tiny R D company located at the University of Delaware. Like many other entrepreneurs in the field at that time, the company's president, Dr. Allen Barnett, had a good idea, a good research staff, and the dream of becoming a successful manufacturer of photovoltaic (PV) cells. If the Newark, Del. company's projections remain on track, Barnett plans to become the third largest PV manufacturer in the United States by the end of next year. Were it not for the company's performance to date, such a claim might well be dismissed as idle dreaming. AstroPower Inc. is pursuing a two-pronged strategy: to rapidly bring a new thin-crystal silicon PV cell to commercialization; and, in the meantime, to gain experience in manufacturing and distributing conventional single-crystal and polycrystal silicon cells. The company sold approximately 200 kilowatts (kWp) of cells last year (about half single-crystal and half polycrystal). Its current production capacity is 360 kWp. The company and its products are described.

  10. Dr. Hugh Dryden Swearing in Dr. George E. Mueller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller being sworn in, as Associate Administrator for the Office of Manned Space Flight for NASA, by Dr. Hugh L. Dryden NASAs Deputy Administrator. The ceremony took place at NASA HQ in Washington, DC on September 3, 1963. Mueller served as Associate Administrator from 1963 to 1969, where he was responsible for overseeing the completion of Project Apollo and for beginning the development of the Space Shuttle.

  11. 5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 antenna in background. Photograph shows on left side at bottom foundation berm and along right side bottom stanchion concrete foundations at bottom structural steel assembly. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. Dr. John Richardson: Arctic Doctor

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. Stuart

    1988-01-01

    Dr. John Richardson was foremost among a special breed of men, the surgeon-naturalists, one of whom accompanied every exploration party sent out by Great Britain. In addition to performing medical duties, the surgeon-naturalist was expected to identify and collect specimens of plants, animals, and rocks. Dr. Richardson was a member of two of the arctic expeditions led by Sir John Franklin, and participated in the search for the long-overdue third Franklin expedition. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21253036

  13. Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden, had many titles after his name in his lifetime. In 1949 he became the director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Dr. Dryden received many accolades and awards both during his life and after his death, but the greatest and most appropriate honor came on March 26, 1976, when NASA renamed the NASA Flight Research Center as the NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center. At the dedication ceremony NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher stated: 'in 1924, when the fastest racing planes did well to fly at 280 m.p.h., Dryden was already probing the transonic range of . . . flight. Later in the 1920s, he sought to develop methods of accurately measuring . . . turbulence in wind tunnels. In 1938 he was the first American to deliver the Wright Brothers lecture. His 'Turbulence and the Boundary Layer' became a classic summary on the subject. It is most fitting that this Flight Research Center, with its unique and highly specialized capability for solving aerospace problems, should memorialize the genius of Hugh Dryden.' Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the NACA (a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA's director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.

  14. Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove: A Guide to Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carringer, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Article provided an analysis of the films of Stanley Kubrick, credits for the film, Dr. Strangelove, a sequence outline of Dr. Strangelove and study questions relating to the film. It further made suggestions for additional reading. (RK)

  15. White Dwarfs in SDSS DR9 and DR10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile Fusillo, Nicola Pietro; Gnsicke, Boris; Koester, Detlev

    2015-06-01

    Currently the largest catalogue of spectroscopically identified WDs is based on the 7th Data Release (DR) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and contains over 20000 WDs (Kleinman et al. 2013). However, only a fraction of all WDs in the photometric footprint of SDSS have been spectroscopically followed up. Using DR7 spectroscopy as a training sample, we developed a method to select high confidence photometric WD candidates. The novelty of our selection is that it allows us to assign to any object with multi-colour and proper motion data a well-defined "probability of being a white dwarf" (or a contaminant). Exploiting this selection method we compiled a catalogue (Gentile Fusillo et al. in prep) which currently covers the entire photometric footprint of SDSS, 14555sq deg, with a limiting magnitude of g ? 19. The catalogue contains over 20000 high-confidence WDs and WD candidates 11500 of which have not yet been followed up with Sloan spectroscopy. Even though, so far, our catalogue relies only SDSS we plan to extend the sky coverage as additional deep multi-colour large area surveys become available. DR10 includes over 1.4 million spectra taken with the new BOSS spectrograph, which improves over the original SDSS spectograph in both resolution and wavelength coverage, but has so far not been systematically mined for WD science. As part of this project, we also inspected over 8000 BOSS spectra of bright (g ? 19) colour selected sources and classified 1765 new WDs. We used this independent, spectroscopically confirmed sample to further validate our selection method. Finally we discuss possible application of our catalogue , focusing on the selection and follow up of 9 new DZs which show strong pollution from elements other than Ca and IR excess emission emission consistent with the presence of debris discs.

  16. FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Darren

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some acknowledgments. I would like to thank the authors of these papers, Dr Dennis Mather of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering for his encouragement and support, and the reviewers who have taken the time to read and comment on these papers. I would also like to acknowledge the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, particularly Dr Richard Palmer (now retired). They made the editing of this issue a simple and enjoyable process, for me if not for them!

  17. HLA-DR3 and DR7 in coeliac disease: immunogenetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Demarchi, M; Carbonara, A; Ansaldi, N; Santini, B; Barbera, C; Borelli, I; Rossino, P; Rendine, S

    1983-01-01

    The association of HLA-A,B,C, DR polymorphisms and of Bf and GLO with coeliac disease was analysed in 100 Italian children. Primary involvement of HLA-DR3 and DR7 is apparent, while specificities of nearby loci are probably associated secondarily, because of linkage disequilibrium. Direct assessment of D/DR genotype through family studies and mixed lymphocyte cultures led to the recognition of two high risk genotypes DR3/3 and DR3/7, and of two lower risk genotypes DR3/X and DR7/X. The different weight of the HLA-dependent genetic factors is to some extent correlated with the clinical and immunological parameters, suggesting that the low-risk genotypes induce a milder expression of coeliac disease. Furthermore, other genetic factors, such as sex, appear to contribute to the penetrance of the disease, especially in the case of DR3/X and DR7/X. PMID:6603391

  18. 100-DR-1 radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.M.

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the operable unit surface area. The survey methodology was based on utilization of USRADS for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near 6 in. and at 3 ft from the surface soil. The purpose of the survey is to identify the location of unidentified subsurface radioactive material areas and any surface contamination associated with these areas. The radiological surveys were conducted using both a digital count rate meter with a NaI detector reporting in counts per minute (CPM) and a dose rate meter reporting micro-Roentgen per hour (uR) connected to a CHEMRAD Tennessee Corp. Series 2000 USRADS. The count rate meter was set for gross counting, i.e., Window ``out``. The window setting allows detection of low, intermediate, and high energy photons. The USRADS equipment is used to record the detector readings verses the location of the readings, generate a map of the survey area, and save the data on computer storage media.

  19. Interview with Dr. Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Charles Zeanah is the Mary K. Sellars-Polchow Chair in Psychiatry, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans. He is also Executive Director of the Institute for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health at Tulane. He is the recipient of multiple awards including the Irving Phillips Award for Prevention, (AACAP), the Presidential Citation for Distinguished Research and Leadership in Infant Mental Health (American Orthopsychiatric Association), the Sarah Haley Memorial Award for Clinical Excellence (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), the Blanche F. Ittelson Award for Research in Child Psychiatry (APA), and the Serge Lebovici Award for International Contributions in Infant Mental Health (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Dr. Zeanah is a Distinguished Fellow of AACAP, a Distinguished Fellow of the APA and a Board Member of Zero to Three. He is the Editor of Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3rd edition) considered as the state of the art textbook and standard reference in the field of Infant Mental Health. PMID:23667354

  20. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Glineau].

    PubMed

    Jankovi?, S; Susi?, V; Soki?, D; Levi?, Z

    1996-01-01

    With this brief review we honor the memory of the great French doctor Jean Baptiste Edouard Glineau. Dr. Glineau was born on December 23, 1828 at Blaye, Gironde, close to the Bordeaux region. His name is connected with the first clinical description of the disease for which he, both by the right of the primacy as well as ad valorem of his first two names, coined the name "narcolepsy". He was the first to notice the intrinsically evanescent symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime somnolence, imperative sleep habits and cataplexy or "astasia" as he called it, and incorporate them into a single clinical syndrome. In 1881 Glineau discussed Kaffe's case of "maladie du sommeil" as a proof of the existence of the new disease described a year before. As a good clinical observer Glineau noticed the close relation of emotional engagement and astasia. His attitude was that narcolepsy was a nosologic entity, a disease sui generis, but admitted that it could appear purely as a symptom only. This was in discordance with the views in England where (in 1928) Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson repudiated such convictions; in 1930 Lhermitte still shared the same opinion. Glineau differentiated narcolepsy from epilepsy with the elegance of clinical reasoning. Overall, Glineau described three elements of the narcoleptic pentade. Sleep paralyses were first described by Mitchell in 1876, and were first attributed to narcolepsy by Wilson in 1928; in 1930 Lhermitte first described hypnapompic, and Daniels, in 1934, hypnagogic sleep paralysis. Hypnagogic hallucinations were described by Maury in 1848 and subsequently by de Saint Denis in 1867. In twenties they were thoroughly studiesed during the epidemic encephalitis and after the Big War in 1922 by Levy. The life story of Dr. Glineau covers multivarious activities. As a young student of the Rochefort Navy Medical School he took part in the fight against colera which deluged the city of La Rochelle. In 1849 he became the "Intern" of the Navy Hospital and next year a "Surgeon of the Third Class". As a Navy surgeon he visited French colonies in the Indian ocean: first the Reunion island and then Mayotte island of the Commores Archipelago. Of this period he wrote "Voyage a i'lle de la Runion", memoirs published much later, in 1905, in which he described colonial life and abolition of slavery. The story of Elise, a beauteous Creole woman, a concubine of a young naval Commander, who delivered a child that soon died, inexorably points to the autobiographic character of his work. He defended a doctoral thesis "Aperu Medical de I'lle de Mayotte" at Montpellier University School of Medicine in 1858, using the data collected during his year-and-a-half stay on a Mayotte island; at that time he was a "Navy Surgeon of the Second Class". For his dedication in fighting against epidemics that broke out during the French-German war in 1870 he was nominated for the Legion of Honor, but received it only later. In 1871 Glineau introduced "Doctor Glineau's tablets" for the treatment of epilepsy (contained bromide and arsenic). He was a member of the Socit de Mdicine, Socit d' Hypnologie, La-Socit Franaise d' Hygine, and a few others. After retirement at the age of 72, Glineau switched to wine production, continuing the family tradition; for the quality of his Bordeaux wines he was awarded gold medals at the Anvers and Paris Exhibitions. Dr. Glineau died on March 2, 1906, at Argeles Gazost in Pyrnees honored by the titles of Chevalier de la Lgion d' Honneur, Officier d'Academie and Commander of Nichan of the Ottoman Empire. PMID:9132972

  1. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  2. HLA-DR2 subtypes form an additional supertypic family of DR beta alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B S; Rust, N A; McMichael, A J; McDevitt, H O

    1987-01-01

    Homozygous lymphoblastoid cell lines representing Dw subtypes of the DR2 serotype were studied for structural polymorphism at DR beta. These subtypes included Dw2, Dw12, and non-Dw2/non-Dw12. Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that two DR beta genes were expressed in each cell line studied. One of these expressed genes encoded a protein that was nonpolymorphic on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis among all subtypes. The second expressed DR beta gene was polymorphic and migrated to a position on two-dimensional gels dependent on the subtype of the cell line. cDNA sequence analysis of the DR beta genes revealed a DR beta gene identical between the Dw2 and Dw12 subtypes, which correlates with the nonpolymorphic spot on two-dimensional gels. A second gene was sequenced that exhibited variability between the Dw2 and Dw12 subtypes. This variability takes the form of clustered point mutations in the first domain of the molecules. The alleles from the DR beta genes of a non-Dw2/non-Dw12 cell line, AZH, were unusual in sequence. In contrast to other DR beta alleles, the AZH genes may have been generated by a double recombinational event between two DR beta loci from a DR2 parent. The DR2 serotype may also constitute a supertypic "family," with one DR beta gene relatively nonpolymorphic, and one that varies with Dw subtype. Images PMID:2885840

  3. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the NBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun, is shown fitted with suit and diving equipment as he prepares for a tryout in the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, greets vice president Spiro T. Agnew in the Launch Control Center for the Apollo 14 mission. Between Dr. Von Braun and Mr. Agnew are their Royal Highnesses, The Prince and Princess of Spain. The royal visitors greeted the launch control team in th enter after the launch of Apollo 14.

  5. [Interview with Dr. Ricardo Bressani].

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    In an interview Dr. Ricardo Bressani, a chemical engineer by profession and a consultant of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), talks about the search for a product later given the name of Incaparina, which was eventually developed for food supplementation programs by INCAP. Experiments were made with soybeans, cottonseed, and various cereals to arrive at the optimal mixture of 62% cereal and 38% protein for this product. In addition, vitamins and lysine were added. The major demand for this biscuit occurred between 1976 and 1978. Since that time sales have ebbed partly owing to the soaring commodity prices. Incaparina is sold in Guatemala and El Salvador and there are tests going on in Mexico, Colombia, and Cuba to produce it locally. This product is also proof of the benefit of developing leguminous cereal systems. The optimal combination is 70% cereals and 30% legumes, each providing 50% protein. The potential of mixing various other cereals and fruits are also being studied. A large number (up to 60 annually) of nutritional research papers are published on the national level and in Latin America in prestigious scientific journals whose monitoring calls for coordination between different authors. PMID:12295846

  6. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  7. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  8. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    Goddard rocket in launching tower at Roswell, New Mexico, March 21, 1940. Fuel was injected by pumps from the fueling platform at left. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  9. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  10. Childhood Picture of Dr. von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1912-01-01

    This is a childhood picture of Dr. von Braun (center) with his brothers. Dr. Wernher von Braun was born in Wirsitz, Germany, March 23, 1912. His childhood dreams of marned space flight were fulfilled when giant Saturn rockets, developed under his direction at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, boosted the manned Apollo spacecraft to the Moon. His life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  11. Dr. Theodor Billroth and the first laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, A W

    1978-09-01

    This short historical vignette gives details of a courageous surgical feat performed by Dr. Theodor Billroth. Long before the advent of modern medical and surgical knowledge, and without the aid of today's advanced medications and instruments, he undertook the first known successful laryngectomy on a human 105 years ago, and five years later he performed the first hemilaryngectomy. In addition to being an outstanding surgeon, Dr. Billroth was also an accomplished musician. PMID:365070

  12. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  13. [Dr. John Argyropulos (1410-1492)].

    PubMed

    Colovi?, Radoje

    2008-01-01

    Dr. John Argyropulos (Dr. John Argyropulus, Dr. John Argyropoulos) was the last but, along with Dr. John Hortazmen, the most well known professor of Medical School, founded in 1308 by the Serbian king Stefan Uro II Milutin at the Hospital of St. John the Baptist monastery in Constantinople. After the town fell to the Turkish hands, Dr. Argyropulos stayed at Peloponnesus from 1453 to 1456, when he moved to Italy, in which he spent the rest of his life. He is not important only for the Serbs, he is more important for the Greeks and particularly for the Italians and Italy, in which he spent the largest part of his life, in which he achieved the university education, taught the Greek philosophy, language and literature, as well as translated a number of Aristotle's works from old Greek to Latin and New Greek, wrote a number of poems, letters and notes and made a strong influence on a number of Renaissance humanists in Florence, Italy, as well as on a number of intelectuals throghout Europe. We found no evidence that Dr. John Argiropulos either practised medicine in Italy, or that he taught medicine at the Italian medical schools. PMID:19069354

  14. Dr. von Braun with Gen. Ostrander, Dr. Rees, and Gen. Barclay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In this 1959 photo, taken at Cape Canaveral, Florida, Dr. von Braun (2nd from left) Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, is shown conferring with Air Force Major General Donald R. Ostrander (left), on assignment at NASA as launch vehicle director; Dr. Eberhard Rees, deputy to Dr. von Braun, and Army Brigadier General John Barclay, commander of the ABMA.

  15. Characterization of an HLA DR beta pseudogene.

    PubMed Central

    Larhammar, D; Servenius, B; Rask, L; Peterson, P A

    1985-01-01

    The class II molecules of the human major histocompatibility complex include the DR, DC, and SB antigens, each composed of an alpha and a beta polypeptide chain. We have isolated a DR beta gene in overlapping cosmid clones made from genomic DNA of a Dw4/DR4 homozygous individual. This gene consists of six exons and spans greater than 20 kilobases. Upon sequencing, it was found to possess several deleterious mutations, each capable of rendering the gene nonfunctional: (i) four splice junctions deviate from the G-T/A-G rule; (ii) two premature termination codons are present in the first domain exon; (iii) a 2-base-pair insertion causes a translational frame shift in the second domain exon. In addition, several amino acid residues that are conserved in all known expressed beta chains have been replaced in the amino acid sequence predicted from the pseudogene. Analysis of the pattern of nucleotide substitutions in the second domain exon suggests that most amino acid replacements occurred after the gene was inactivated. The inactivation may have been caused by insertion of a Kpn I repeat 5' to the promoter region, thereby interfering with transcription of the gene through removal of transcriptional enhancer elements. The DR beta pseudogene seems to be present also in other DR4 individuals. PMID:3856276

  16. Geophysical survey of 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4, 100-D Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this Geophysical Survey was to verify the location of the 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4. A surface monument currently marks its location. The crib is 10 feet by 10 feet and 15 feet deep. Ground-Penetrating Radar was the geophysical method selected to conduct the investigation.

  17. The 3XMM-DR4 Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.; Watson, M.; Pye, J.; Webb, N.; Schwope, A.; Freyberg, M.; Motch, C.; Ballet, J.; Carrera, F.; Page, M.; Page, C.

    2015-09-01

    The 3XMM-DR4 catalogue is the third generation catalogue of serendipitous X-ray sources from the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton observatory, and has been created by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) on behalf of ESA. Released in July 2013, 3XMM-DR4 contains 531261 detections from 372728 unique sources observed in 7427 XMM-Newton observations, about 50% more than in the preceding 2XMMi-DR3 catalogue, made public in April 2010. We review some of the key science-driven algorithmic and calibration changes to the processing pipeline adopted to enhance the scientific quality of the catalogue, such as the optimised filtering of background flares, improvements to the astrometric analysis and upgrades to the catalogue construction process. Examples of the gains obtained are illustrated.

  18. An interview with Dr Barbara A. Carper.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    In 1978, Dr Barbara A. Carper's foundational work, "Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing," arguably created a paradigm shift in nursing. However, her voice has been absent from the nursing literature in recent years. I was privileged to conduct a personal interview with Dr Carper in 2014. The edited interview includes a synopsis of her background, career trajectory, sources of inspiration, and her perspective on the current state of nursing. She reaffirmed her passion for reflective nursing practice, the importance incorporating the arts and humanities into nursing education, and using an integrated approach with the patterns of knowing in nursing. PMID:25932816

  19. Walt Disney and Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Werhner von Braun, then Chief, Guided Missile Development Operation Division at Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, was visited by Walt Disney in 1954. In the 1950's, von Braun worked with Disney Studio as a technical director, making three films about space exploration for television. A model of the V-2 rocket is in background.

  20. Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - artist's sketch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Artist's depiction of Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden. Dr. Dryden saw his first airplane, the Antoinette, on November 7, 1910. Years later he was fond of remarking. 'The airplane and I grew up together.' In addition to his professional work, Dr. Dryden was a licensed preacher for 45 years. One of his later sermons perhaps best describes his legacy: 'None of us knows what the final destiny of man may be, or if there is any end to his capacity for growth and adaptation. Wherever this venture leads us, I am convinced that the power to leave the Earth -- to travel where we will in space and to return at will -- marks the opening of a brilliant new stage in man's evolution.' The honors, offices and awards bestowed on Hugh Dryden were great both in significance and in number. His honorary degrees numbered 16. In 1962 the Methodist Union named him the Methodist Layman of the Year. Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA -- predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA's director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.

  1. Dr. Israel Cuellar (1946-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.

    2009-01-01

    On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuellar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health…

  2. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has improved schools.

  3. Dr. von Braun tours Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    During his tenure as Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Dr. von Braun enjoyed personally touring the Center's many space-related laboratories and facilities. This photo taken about 1961 shows him examining a test set up in the Center's Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory.

  4. An interview with Dr. Saul Cooperman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Dr. Saul Cooperman, newly appointed Commissioner of Education in New Jersey, discusses his views on state aid cuts; the "Thorough and Efficient" Law, formally known as the Public School Education Act of 1975; paper work, urban education, good schools, and other issues facing New Jersey public education. (Author/LC)

  5. Chamber of Commerce reception for Dr. Lucas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Dr. William R. Lucas, Marshall's fourth Center Director (1974-1986), delivers a speech in front of a picture of the lunar landscape with Earth looming in the background while attending a Huntsville Chamber of Commerce reception honoring his achievements as Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  6. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  7. Dr. Israel Cuellar (1946-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.

    2009-01-01

    On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuellar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health

  8. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has improved schools.…

  9. Dr. Wernher Von Braun presents a certificate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, presents a humorous certificate to Major General Charles W. Eifler, commanding general of Redstone Arsenal, at the close of a farewell luncheon for the general prior to General Eifler moving to a new European duty station.

  10. [Semblance of Dr. Luis Bentez Bribiesca].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gmez, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    La actividad editorial mdica est de luto. Un rgido y doloroso manto luctuoso cubre algunas de las ms importantes revistas biomdicas y clnicas del mbito de Amrica Latina. Desafortunadamente, el Dr. Luis Bentez Bribiesca, destacado colega que dedic gran parte de su vida como investigador y acadmico a la difusin del conocimiento cientfico, falleci el 30 de noviembre de 2015. PMID:26927656

  11. A TRIBUTE TO DR. WILLIAM PENN WATKINSON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. William Penn Watkinson (known to colleagues as "Penn") of EPAs health research lab (National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory) of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, died Wednesday, December 13 after a battle with lung cancer. He was a member of the Pulmonar...

  12. Dr. von Braun Visits Huntsville Boys Club

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and chairman of this year's United Givers Fund (UGF) drive at MSFC, takes time out from the problems of sending a man to the Moon to talk baseball with 11-year-old Randy Smith at the Huntsville Boys Club.

  13. ORAC-DR: Astronomy data reduction pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie; Cavanagh, Brad; Currie, Malcolm J.; Gibb, Andy

    2013-10-01

    ORAC-DR is a generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure; it includes specific data processing recipes for a number of instruments. It is used at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, AAT, and LCOGT. This pipeline runs at the JCMT Science Archive hosted by CADC to generate near-publication quality data products; the code has been in use since 1998.

  14. Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

  15. Analysis of DR4 haplotypes in insulin dependent diabetes (IDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Monos, D.S.; Radka, S.F.; Zmijewski, C.M.; Kamoun, M.

    1986-03-05

    Population studies indicate that HLA-DR4 is implicated in the susceptibility of IDD. However, biochemical characterization of the serologically defined DR4 haplotype from normal individuals revealed five DR4 and three DQW3 molecular forms. Hence, in this study, they investigated the heterogeneity of the DR4 haplotype, using B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) generated from patients with IDD and seropositive for DR4. Class II molecules, metabolically labeled with /sup 35/S-methionine, were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies specific for DR(L243), DQ(N297), DQW3(IVD12) or DR and DQ(SG465) and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The isoelectrofocusing (IEF) conditions employed in this study allow representation only of the DR4 haplotype from either DR3/4 or DR4/4 cell lines. The analysis of six different DR4 haplotypes from seven IDD patients, revealed the presence of two DR4 ..beta.. and two DQW3 ..beta.. chains. Three of the six DR4 ..beta.. haplotypes analyzed shared the same DR4 ..beta.. chain and three others shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared the same DQW3 ..beta.. chain and only one was carrying a different one. Different combinations of the two DR4 and two DQW3 ..beta.. chains constitute three distinct patterns of DR4 haplotypes. These results suggest the prevalence of a DQW3 ..beta.. chain in the small sample of IDD patients studied. Studies of a large number of patients should clarify whether IDD is associated with unique variants of DR4 or DQW3 ..beta.. chains.

  16. Dr.L: Distributed Recursive (Graph) Layout

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-19

    Dr. L provides two-dimensional visualizations of very large abstract graph structures. it can be used for data mining applications including biology, scientific literature, and social network analysis. Dr. L is a graph layout program that uses a multilevel force-directed algorithm. A graph is input and drawn using a force-directed algorithm based on simulated annealing. The resulting layout is clustered using a single link algorithm. This clustering is used to produce a coarsened graph (fewer nodes) which is then re-drawn. this process is repeated until a sufficiently small graph is produced. The smallest graph is drawn and then used as a basis for drawing the original graph by refining the series of coarsened graphs that were produced. The layout engine can be run in serial or in parallel.

  17. Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, Floyd Michael

    2010-10-01

    The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly during his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

  18. Dr.L: Distributed Recursive (Graph) Layout

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-11-19

    Dr. L provides two-dimensional visualizations of very large abstract graph structures. it can be used for data mining applications including biology, scientific literature, and social network analysis. Dr. L is a graph layout program that uses a multilevel force-directed algorithm. A graph is input and drawn using a force-directed algorithm based on simulated annealing. The resulting layout is clustered using a single link algorithm. This clustering is used to produce a coarsened graph (fewer nodes)more » which is then re-drawn. this process is repeated until a sufficiently small graph is produced. The smallest graph is drawn and then used as a basis for drawing the original graph by refining the series of coarsened graphs that were produced. The layout engine can be run in serial or in parallel.« less

  19. Dr. Wernher von Braun In His Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. This photo depicts von Braun in his office at MSFC.

  20. Dr Amos G Babcock - fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    The War of 1812-14 between the United States of America and Great Britain gave rise to several journals relating the sufferings of prisoners of war confined in prison ships and gaols in England. One of these is A Journal of a Young Man from Massachusetts, said to have been written by Dr Amos G Babcock, an American ship's surgeon, and first published in 1816. This article sets out arguments for and against the truth of this assertion. PMID:24585583

  1. [Surgical work of Dr. Vladan Djordjevi?].

    PubMed

    Colovi?, Radoje

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Vladan Djordjevi? was the first surgeon in Serbia in today's meaning of that word. After graduating medicine in Vienna 1869, he spent two years specialising surgery at the First Vienna University Surgical Clinic led by Professor Theodor Billroth, including almost a year as a war surgeon at the Prussian military service during the Prussian-French war (1870/71). After returning to Serbia, Dr. Vladan Djordjevi? dealt with general medical and surgical practice. Different commitments and his own interests gradually distracted him from medicine and surgery, so that he gave them up in 1884. In spite of short practice in surgery, Dr. Vladan Djordjevi? gave an important contribution to surgery in Serbia. Close to 200 surgical procedures, of which we have evidence, constituted an important event for surgery in Serbia where these procedures had not been performed before him. Although a number of surgical procedures he performed was not high, they were important, not only were they the first operations in Serbia, but also they were often serious, sometimes complex and performed under very modest circumstances, but usually with good success. They belong not only to the general surgery, but to a number of surgical specialities, such as ophtalmology, maxillofacial surgery, otorhinolaringology, urology, orthopedic and trauma surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, thoracic surgery and neurosurgery. PMID:18959183

  2. ORAC-DR -- SCUBA-2 Pipeline Data Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Andrew G.; Jenness, Tim

    The ORAC-DR data reduction pipeline is designed to reduce data from many different instruments. This document describes how to use ORAC-DR to process data taken with the SCUBA-2 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope.

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun examines a ruby crystal.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Dr. Eberhard Rees (left), deputy director, technical, examine a ruby crystal used in laser experiments in the Marshall Center's Space Sciences Laboratory.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun talkes with George Hardy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    George Hardy of the Marshall Space Flight center's Astronautics Laboratory, talks with Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), deputy associate administrator for planning. Dr. Von Braun was inspecting the mockup of the Saturn workshop during a visit to the Marshall Center. The visit coincided with the 10th anniversary celebration of the center of which Dr. Von Braun was director until March 1, 1970.

  5. DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - AND COMMUNICATIONS - SEC - INCUBATOR OPENED MAY 1 1999 AS PART OF THE LEWIS INCUBATOR FOR TECHNOLOGY - LIFT

  6. Multiwavelength observations of two B-star nurseries - DR 15 and DR 20

    SciTech Connect

    Odenwald, S.F.; Campbell, M.F.; Shivanandan, K.; Schwartz, P.; Fazio, G.G.; Moseley, H. Colby College, Waterville, ME Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-01-01

    New observations of DR 15 and 20 are reported as part of a study of compact H II regions in the Cyg X region. The radio and FIR data for these objects, when combined with (C-12)O maps, IRAS imagery, and optical photographs, provide new insights into the structure of this complex region and the nature of the star-formation process there. The observations show that DR 15 may consist of one or two B0 ZAMS stars whose H I regions have formed a low-density cavity within a molecular cloud. DR 20 appears to be a young OB cluster. The cluster is dominated by an O5.5 ZAMS star and also contains an approximately 3500-yr-old B0 star appearing as a compact H II region, along with weak FIR sources that may be B0-star candidates. 36 refs.

  7. Dr. Jan Rogers with Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers, project scientist for the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an obejct (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials sciences program.

  8. White dwarfs identified in LAMOST DR 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jincheng; Zhao, Jingkun; Tziamtzis, Anestis; Liu, Jifeng; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a catalogue of 1056 spectroscopically identified hydrogen-dominated white dwarfs (DAWDs), 34 helium-dominated white dwarfs (DBWDs) and 276 white dwarf main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Large sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey data release 2 (DR2). 383 DAWDs, 4 DBWDs and 138 WDMSs are new identifications after cross-match with literature. There are ˜4100 k spectra in total from DR 2. The low ratio of white dwarfs found in LAMOST is attributed to biased selection of LAMOST input catalogue and much brighter targets relative to stars observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, a new DAWD selection method is adopted as a new attempt and supplement to the traditional methods. The effective temperature, surface gravity, mass, cooling age and distance of high signal-to-noise DAWDs are estimated. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be ˜0.6 M⊙, which is consistent with previous work. The parameters of WDMS binaries are also provided in this paper. As the foundation of our future work, which is to identify more WDs with debris disc, WDs found in LAMOST showed a lot of potential. Interesting infrared-excess WDs will be reported in our forthcoming paper.

  9. Dual Agonist Surrobody Simultaneously Activates Death Receptors DR4 and DR5 to Induce Cancer Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Kashyap, Arun K; Yanagi, Teruki; Wimer, Carina; Zhou, Sihong; O'Neil, Ryann; Kurtzman, Aaron L; Faynboym, Alexsandr; Xu, Li; Hannum, Charles H; Diaz, Paul W; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Bhatt, Ramesh R; Reed, John C

    2016-01-01

    Death receptors of the TNF family are found on the surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5) is TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). As most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing proapoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 monospecific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical proapoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(1); 114-24. 2015 AACR. PMID:26516157

  10. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-07

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  11. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  12. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella Typhimurium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  13. [Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Hajime Hoshi].

    PubMed

    Misawa, M

    1991-01-01

    Hajime Hoshi is a founder of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company and of Hoshi University. He became acquainted with Dr. Hideyo Noguchi in the United States in 1901 during his study abroad. Hoshi often stayed overnight at Noguchi's apartment in Philadelphia. Hoshi and Noguchi were both from Fukushima, Japan, and Hoshi was three years older than Noguchi. Both persons had been good friends until Hoguchi died in 1928. Hoshi and Noguchi together had met Hirobumo Ito and Thomas Edison. In 1906, Hoshi came back to Japan after a 12-year stay in the United States. The financial support by Hoshi enabled the only and one temporary returning of Noguchi to Japan in 1915. In this paper, the friendship between the famous two persons is described in detail. PMID:11623302

  14. Dr Harold Frederick Shipman: an enigma.

    PubMed

    Gunn, John

    2010-07-01

    Dr. Shipman was the worst known serial killer in British history, at least in terms of numbers of victims, and possibly the worst in world history, if politicians are excluded. He killed at least 215 patients and may have begun his murderous career at the age of 25, within a year of finishing his medical training. His case has had a profound impact on the practice of medicine in the United Kingdom. Was he a special case? What were the origins of this behaviour? Could the behaviour have been prevented? It is necessary to learn what we can from a few personal facts and largely circumstantial evidence. He withheld himself from any useful clinical investigation or treatment once he had been taken into custody. Could he have been treated at any stage? PMID:20549782

  15. Entrevue avec le Dr Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Le Dr Charles Zeanah est titulaire de la chaire de psychiatrie Mary K. Sellars-Polchow, professeur de pédiatrie clinique et vice-président de la pédopsychiatrie au département de psychiatrie et des sciences du comportement de la faculté de médecine de l’Université Tulane, à la Nouvelle-Orléans. Il est également directeur général de l’institut de la santé mentale des nourrissons et des jeunes enfants de Tulane. Il est récipiendaire de nombreux prix, notamment le prix de prévention Irving Phillips (AACAP), la mention élogieuse présidentielle pour sa recherche et son leadership exceptionnels en santé mentale des nourrissons (American Orthopsychiatric Association), le prix d’excellence clinique Sarah Haley Memorial (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), le prix de recherche en pédopsychiatrie Blanche F. Ittelson (APA), et le prix Serge Lebovici Award soulignant les contributions internationales à la santé mentale des nourrissons (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Le Dr Zeanah est fellow distingué de l’AACAP, fellow distingué de l’APA et membre du conseil d’administration de Zero to Three. Il est l’éditeur scientifique de Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3e édition) qui est considéré comme étant le manuel de pointe et la référence de base du domaine de la santé mentale des nourrissons.

  16. Dr. Goddard and a 1918 version of 'Bazooka'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard loading a 1918 version of the Bazooka of World War II. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  17. Dr. Lubos Kohoutek in Mission Control during Skylab 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Lubos Kohoutek, discoverer of the Comet Kohoutek, is seen in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during a visit to JSC. He is talking over a radio-telephone with the Skylab 4 crewmen in the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Professor Kohoutek, a well-known Czechoslovakian astronomer who works at the Hamburg Observatory in West Germany, discussed the comet with Astronauts Gerald P. Carr, Edward G. Gibson, and William R. Pogue. Dr. Zdenek Sekania, who accompanied Dr. Kohoutek on the visit to JSC, is on the telephone in the left background. Dr. Sekania is with the Smithsonian Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  18. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    PubMed

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led. PMID:26742331

  19. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2014-08-22

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  20. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  1. Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Cathleen; Wright, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Cathleen Lewis was interviewed by Rebecca Wright during the presentation of an "Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis" on May 14, 2012. Topics included the care, size, and history of the spacesuit collection at the Smithsonian and the recent move to the state-of-the-art permanent storage facility at the Udvar-Hazy facility in Virginia.

  2. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  3. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun, is shown leaving the suiting-up van wearing a pressure suit prepared for a tryout in the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  4. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper checks the neck ring of a space suit worn by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun before he submerges into the water of the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Wearing a pressurized suit and weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  5. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun, submerges after spending some time under water in the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  6. Dr. Irene Snger-Bredt, a life for astronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaganescu, Nicolae-Florin

    2004-12-01

    Irene Bredt (b.1911 at Bonn) obtained her Doctorate in Physics in 1937; in the same year she became a scientific researcher at the German Research Center for Aviation at Trauen, led by Prof. Dr. Eugen Snger. Soon, the young but efficient Dr. Irene Bredt became the first assistant of Dr. Snger, who married her (1951). During 1973-1978, Dr. Bredt was in correspondence with Prof. Dr. Nikolae-Florin Zaganescu and helped him to familiarize the Romanian readers with Prof. Snger's life and achievements. As for Dr. Bredt's life, she specified three main periods of her activity: 1937-1942, when she was researcher in charge of thermodynamic problems of liquid-fuelled rocket engines at Trauen 1942-1945, when she was Senior Researcher in charge of Ramjet in flight performances at Ainring, and also coauthored the Top Secret Technical report entitled 'A Rocket Engine for a Long-Range Bomber', which was finished in 1941 but edited only in 1944 the post world war II period, when she was Scientific Advisor or Director at various civil and military research institutes, universities, etc. Dr. Irene Snger-Bredt helped her husband to develop many scientific theories like Ramjet thermodynamic theory, and photon rocket theory and also in establishing IAF and IAA. In 1970, Dr. Irene Snger-Bredt was honored with 'Hermann Oberth Gold Medal' for her impressive scientific activity.

  7. Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

  8. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  9. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  10. Dr. Rudolph Binion: professor, mentor, psychohistorian.

    PubMed

    Szaluta, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    As the title of my paper indicates, Dr. Rudolph Binion was my professor, mentor, and a leading psychohistorian. My paper in memoriam to Rudolph Binion is intended as both a retrospective and an introspective account of my relationship with him, as he had a pivotal influence on me when he was my professor at Columbia University. His help and influence continued after I left graduate school. In my paper I also deal with the enormous stresses of navigating through graduate school, for those students whose goal was to earn the Ph.D. degree. Some examinations were dreaded, For Example The "Examination in Subjects," popularly called the "Oral Exam." The "incubation" period was long indeed, frequently averaging nearly ten years, and it was an ordeal, as the rate of attrition was very high. There is then also the question of "ego strength" and that of "transference" toward the professor. Graduate school is indeed a long and strenuous challenge. I took a seminar in modern French history, a requirement for the Master's degree with Professor Binion, which was consequential for me, as he taught me to be objective in writing history. Professor Binion was a demanding and outstanding teacher. PMID:25630197

  11. Portrait of Dr Michael G. Hanna, Jr

    PubMed Central

    Hanna Jr, Michael

    2014-01-01

    While a PhD candidate, doing my thesis at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Biology Division under Dr. Charles Congdon, my introduction to the immune response was studying graft vs. host (GVH) disease as a consequence of bone marrow transplantation in mice. The sequalae of GVH was impressive, and demonstrated the potential of negative clinical consequences of the immune system. The idea of harnessing this immunological phenomena in cancer therapy was appealing even in the late 1960s. The problem was that at the time T-cells as a component of the immune system were identified but not defined. We moved to soluble antigen stimulation in mice and recognized and described the post antigen stimulation changes in lymphatic tissue germinal centers during the first 48 h after the induction of the humoral immune response. We described the extracellular localization of soluble antigens on the surface of dendritic reticular cells of the stroma, directing a response of B-cells to produce antibody against non-self. The ensuing reaction was the rapid proliferation of B-cells toward antibody secreting plasma cells. PMID:25424782

  12. Dr. Yukihiko Nos: living his dream.

    PubMed

    Malchesky, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Yukihiko Nos made many contributions to medical science and in particular in the area of artificial organ technologies and their clinical applications. His passing was a great loss not only to many individuals but also to the field. His enthusiasm and passion for his work was very positive on those with whom he worked while inspiring others in friendly competition. It is very difficult to recount his many accomplishments. I have outlined those developments that I was directly involved with him at the Cleveland Clinic. These developments may be grouped under the heading of Metabolic and Immunologic Support, the name given to our research team. I hope in some small way this review also gives credit to the contributions of the many scientific and clinical professionals that were part of our teams through the years as noted in the extensive reference list provided and the support of the many industrial and corporate sponsors that we were privileged to be associated with and their developments that we studied, improved on, and applied. PMID:23442234

  13. Dr. Hall and the work cure.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2005-01-01

    Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy. PMID:23927746

  14. Dr. Samuel Ting, nobel laureate, visits SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Nobel laureate Professor Samuel C. C. Ting of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology pauses for a photo in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dr. Ting is directing an experiment, an international collaboration of some 37 universities and laboratories, using a state-of-the-art particle physics detector called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which will fly on a future launch to the International Space Station. Using the unique environment of space, the AMS will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS flew initially as a Space Shuttle payload on the June 1998 mission STS-91 that provided the investigating team with data on background sources and verified the detector's performance under actual space flight conditions. The detector's second space flight is scheduled to be launched on mission UF-4 October 2003 for installation on the Space Station as an attached payload. Current plans call for operating the detector for three years before it is returned to Earth on the Shuttle. Using the Space Station offers the science team the opportunity to conduct the long-duration research above the Earth's atmosphere necessary to collect sufficient data required to accomplish the science objectives.

  15. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  16. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure activities evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.G.

    1996-04-11

    This report evaluates the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility. The evaluation compares these activities to the regulatory requirements and closure plan requirements. The report concludes that the areas identified in the closure plan can be clean closed. This report summarizes and evaluates the closure activities performed in support of partial closure of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF). This evaluation will be used in assessing the condition of the 105-DR LSFF for the purpose of meeting the partial clean closure conditions described in the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1995). Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, it is has been determined that the partial clean closure conditions for the 105-DR LSFF have been met.

  17. 78 FR 29781 - Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J. Charbeneau; In the Matter of Detroit Edison Company (Fermi...

  18. Pathogenesis of Afa/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Servin, Alain L.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few years, dramatic increases in our knowledge about diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) pathogenesis have taken place. The typical class of DAEC includes E. coli strains harboring AfaE-I, AfaE-II, AfaE-III, AfaE-V, Dr, Dr-II, F1845, and NFA-I adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC); these strains (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) allow binding to human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) (Afa/DrDAF subclass) or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (Afa/DrCEA subclass). The atypical class of DAEC includes two subclasses of strains; the atypical subclass 1 includes E. coli strains that express AfaE-VII, AfaE-VIII, AAF-I, AAF-II, and AAF-III adhesins, which (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) do not bind to human DAF, and the atypical subclass 2 includes E. coli strains that harbor Afa/Dr adhesins or others adhesins promoting diffuse adhesion, together with pathogenicity islands such as the LEE pathogenicity island (DA-EPEC). In this review, the focus is on Afa/Dr DAEC strains that have been found to be associated with urinary tract infections and with enteric infection. The review aims to provide a broad overview and update of the virulence aspects of these intriguing pathogens. Epidemiological studies, diagnostic techniques, characteristic molecular features of Afa/Dr operons, and the respective role of Afa/Dr adhesins and invasins in pathogenesis are described. Following the recognition of membrane-bound receptors, including type IV collagen, DAF, CEACAM1, CEA, and CEACAM6, by Afa/Dr adhesins, activation of signal transduction pathways leads to structural and functional injuries at brush border and junctional domains and to proinflammatory responses in polarized intestinal cells. In addition, uropathogenic Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following recognition of β1 integrin as a receptor, enter epithelial cells by a zipper-like, raft- and microtubule-dependent mechanism. Finally, the presence of other, unknown virulence factors and the way that an Afa/Dr DAEC strain emerges from the human intestinal microbiota as a “silent pathogen” are discussed. PMID:15831825

  19. 74. ARAII. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. ARA-II. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and others at controls of SL-1. August 8, 1959. Ineel photo no. 59-4109. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Interview with Dr. Omar Khan, noted global health specialist.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rob; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2012-07-01

    Dr. Khan has had a distinguished career in global health. He has served as a faculty member at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. He is currently a family medicine physician at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware, and is President of the Delaware Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Khan has authored more than 55 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has conducted research and lead primary care and public health initiatives in numerous countries. Last year, Dr. Khan also coedited a book titled Megacities and Global Health sponsored by the American Public Health Association with Dr. Gregory Pappas, Deputy Health Commissioner for Washington, DC. PMID:22461688

  1. 10. Copy by Historic American Buildings Survey of Dr. Collins ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Copy by Historic American Buildings Survey of Dr. Collins Marchall photo Unknown photographer (App. 1880-1890) VIEW FROM NORTHWEST (front) - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  3. 2. Photocopy of advertisement (from the collection of Dr. Margaret ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of advertisement (from the collection of Dr. Margaret Ballard, Union, West Virginia) late 19th century AERIAL VIEW OF TOWN - Red Sulphur Springs, Route 12, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  4. 1. Photocopy of engraved flyer (from the collection of Dr. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of engraved flyer (from the collection of Dr. Margaret Ballard, Union, West Virginia) H. Bartsch, engraver late 19th century AERIAL VIEW OF TOWN AND ADVERTISING SLOGANS - Red Sulphur Springs, Route 12, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  5. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  6. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the launch of Apollo 11.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mission officials relax, all smiles, a few moments after the successful launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft by Saturn V vehicle AS-506. Relieved of the tension of waiting through the countdown are (left to right) Charles W. Matthews, NASA deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center; Dr. George E. Meuller, NASA associate administrator for manned spaceflight, and Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, director of the Apollo program.

  8. Immunolocalization of HLA-DR and metallothionein on amalgam tattoos.

    PubMed

    Leite, Camila M A; Botelho, Amanda S; Oliveira, Jamila R; Cardoso, Srgio V; Loyola, Adriano M; Gomez, Ricardo S; Vaz, Ricardo R

    2004-01-01

    Despite studies concerning toxic reactions related to amalgam components in the literature, few studies have been devoted to evaluate local noxious effects of amalgam tattoos (AT) on biological tissues. In addition, little is known about activation of inflammatory cells by mucosa-implanted amalgam debris. Tissue reaction to AT depends on the particle size. Human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) is an activation marker of inflammatory cells associated with antigen presentation. Metallothioneins (MT) are proteins involved with metal detoxication, including mercury and silver. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the immunolocalization of HLA-DR and MT in AT with large or powdered particles. Paraffin-embedded AT tissue blocks were sectioned and subjected to immunohistochemistry for HLA-DR and MT localization. The results demonstrated a dense mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate associated with large and powdered debris and positivity for HLA-DR and MT in inflammatory cells. While blood vessel walls and connective fibers impregnated with powdered particles were negative for HLA-DR, they were positive for MT. In addition, wherever epithelial basement membrane impregnation by powdered amalgam particles was observed, a strong positivity for MT was detected. These findings demonstrate that residual elements of AT still have noxious local effects over tissues. PMID:15776190

  9. Dr-FtsA, an Actin Homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans Differentially Affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ Functions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ) has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA) and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA), has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro. PMID:25551229

  10. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Carlson

    2005-09-22

    Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  11. Relationship between autoimmune hepatitis and HLA-DR4 and DR? allelic sequences in the third hypervariable region in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiong; Qiu, De-Kai

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association of HLA-DRB1 with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in patients from China. METHODS: In 32 patients and 48 healthy controls, polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) was performed to examine the association of certain alleles or polymorphic sequences of HLA-DRB1 with AIH. RESULTS: HLA-DRB1 typing by PCR-SSP showed that DR4 had a significantly increased frequency among patients with AIH versus healthy control (46.9% versus 20.8%; relative risk = 3.35, P = 0.014). In subtypes of DR4, there was a trend of increase in the gene frequency of DRB1 *0405 in patients with AIH versus healthy controls (21.9% vs 6.3%, P = 0.04, but Pc = 0.08). In addition, a significant increase was found in the alleles frequency encoding QRRAA from the third hyperpolymorphic region of DR4 in the patients with AIH (86.7% of DR4 positive patients vs 40.0% in DR4 positive controls, P = 0.016, Pc = 0.028, RR = 9.75). CONCLUSION: AIH in Chinese is associated with HLA-DR4. There is a relationship between QRRAA sequence within the third hyperpolymorphic region of the DRB allele and AIH in Chinese. PMID:11819862

  12. Resveratrol, Sirtuins, and the Promise of a DR Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) delays or prevents age-related diseases and extends lifespan in species ranging from yeast to primates. Although the applicability of this regimen to humans remains uncertain, a proportional response would add more healthy years to the average life than even a cure for cancer or heart disease. Because it is unlikely that many would be willing or able to maintain a DR lifestyle, there has been intense interest in mimicking its beneficial effects on health, and potentially longevity, with drugs. To date, such efforts have been hindered primarily by our lack of mechanistic understanding of how DR works. Sirtuins, NAD+-dependent deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases that influence lifespan in lower organisms, have been proposed to be key mediators of DR, and based on this model, the sirtuin activator resveratrol has been proposed as a candidate DRmimetic. Indeed, resveratrol extends lifespan in yeast, worms, flies, and a short-lived species of fish. In rodents, resveratrol improves health, and prevents the early mortality associated with obesity, but its precise mechanism of action remains a subject of debate, and extension of normal lifespan has not been observed. This review summarizes recent work on resveratrol, sirtuins, and their potential to mimic beneficial effects of DR. PMID:20219519

  13. Interview with Dr. Oleg Atkov [interview by Winston Huff].

    PubMed

    Atkov, O

    1994-01-01

    Last summer International Space University (ISU) was held in Huntsville, Alabama. Leading international space experts came to take part in the activities. Dr. Oleg Atkov, a Russian cardiologist who was also a cosmonaut for eight months in 1984, has extensive experience in cardiovascular medicine and first-hand experience in issues of life support, making him a valuable resource. He also serves on the Journal's Advisory Board. Winston Huff took advantage of the unique opportunity of having Valery Aksamentov, Paul Wieland, and Dr. Atkov together in Huntsville to conduct a general discussion of issues important to those studying life support. Dr. Valery Aksamentov was involved for many years in the development of the Russian life support systems. Dr. Aksamentov now leads the only university program specializing in life support at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. His command of both languages and his technical knowledge were critical to the success of this discussion. Paul Wieland from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is involved with the development of the life support systems for the space station. He and Dr. Aksamentov are topic coordinators for the Journal. The following interview was conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville on August 16, 1993. PMID:11538580

  14. The remains of Dr. Carl Austin Weiss: anthropological analysis.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, D H

    1996-01-01

    Anthropological analysis of the remains of Dr. Carl Austin Weiss revealed biological information consistent with his known characteristics. Postmortem changes included decomposition of amalgam dental restorations, likely releasing mercury that stained the anterior dentition, deposition of sulphur compounds on much of the skeleton, and the formation of numerous small bone fractures. Analysis revealed extensive perimortem trauma, indicating multiple gunshot wounds to the upper body. Trajectory analysis of the bony trauma suggested that at least 20 projectiles penetrated Dr. Weiss's body. They originated from many different directions, but mostly from the posterior. No bony changes associated with perimortem trauma of the hands were noted. PMID:8934701

  15. A periodontal case report by Dr. S.L. Clemens.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J

    2010-07-01

    Mark Twain provides a humorous and insightful look into the origins of periodontal therapy and anesthesia in "Happy Memories of the Dental Chair". The main character of this story is Dr. John Riggs, the father of periodontics. Dr. Horace Wells, a pioneer in the field of anesthesia, also appears in the story. Twain presents his autobiographical experiences with dentistry in his literary work in a form that can be seen to be similar to a case report in a professional dental journal. PMID:20400720

  16. STATISTICAL STUDY OF 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 CROSS-CORRELATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanxia; Zhou Xinlin; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-02-01

    Cross-correlating the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Structural organization of the DR subregion of the human major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed Central

    Spies, T; Sorrentino, R; Boss, J M; Okada, K; Strominger, J L

    1985-01-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid and lambda phage clones comprising 205 kilobases (kb) have been isolated from the DR subregion of the human major histocompatibility complex from a DR4 haplotype. A single DR alpha and three DR beta genes were identified. In one cluster (135 kb), the DR alpha gene is 90 kb distant from the DR beta gene encoding a molecule that carries the MT3 serological specificity. In the second cluster (70 kb), the DR beta gene determining the DR4 specificity is located 22 kb apart from a DR beta pseudogene (DR beta psi). A 3- to 4-kb sequence located at the 5' end of the DR beta (MT3) gene is common to all three DR beta-chain genes. In addition, three more copies of this sequence are spaced between the DR alpha and the DR beta (MT3) genes in the first cluster and one of these, at least, is associated with a DR beta 1 exon, suggesting that additional genes could be encoded in this region and that multiple duplication events have led to its evolution. Images PMID:3860851

  18. Group Achievement Award: The SCUBA team; George Darwin Lecturer: Dr Neil Gehrels; Harold Jeffreys Lecturer: Dr Emma Bunce; Honorary Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    The Group Achievement Award goes to the SCUBA team of W K Gear, W S Holland, E I Robson, C R Cunningham, J F Lightfoot, T Jenness, R J Ivison, J A Stevens, P A R Ade, M J Griffin, W D Duncan, J A Murphy and D A Naylor. The 2009 George Darwin Lecturer is Dr Neil Gehrels, Chief of the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The 2009 Harold Jeffreys Lecturer is Dr Emma Bunce of the University of Leicester.

  19. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  20. Dr. von Braun With a Model of a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney in the mid-1950's.

  1. Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on…

  2. Focus on Fitness: Q&A with Dr. Greene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Greene answers the following question in this brief article focusing on fitness: Everyone knows that children need plenty of exercise to stay healthy--But what does "fitness" really involve for young children? Following this discussion, the topics presented include: snack of the month; nutrition fact; and activities, "Move to the Music" and

  3. Decreased fecundability in Hutterite couples sharing HLA-DR.

    PubMed Central

    Ober, C; Elias, S; Kostyu, D D; Hauck, W W

    1992-01-01

    To study the effects of parental HLA sharing on pregnancy outcome, we initiated population-based studies in the Hutterites. We previously reported longer intervals from marriage to each birth among couples sharing HLA, particularly HLA-DR. In the present report, we present the results of a prospective, 5-year study of fecundability and fetal loss rates in this population. Between April 1986 and April 1991, 154 pregnancies were observed in 104 couples. The median number of months of unprotected intercourse to a positive pregnancy test was significantly longer among couples sharing HLA-DR who stopped nursing prior to the first menses as compared with couples not sharing HLA-DR who stopped nursing prior to the first menses (5.1 vs. 2.0 mo, respectively; P = .016). Fetal loss rates were increased among couples sharing HLA-B as compared with couples not sharing HLA-B (.23 vs. .12, respectively; P = .041, adjusted for age, gravidity, and kinship). These data suggest that our earlier observations of increased birth interval lengths among Hutterite couples sharing HLA were predominantly due to longer intervals until a clinical pregnancy among couples sharing HLA-DR and, to a lesser degree, were due to increased fetal loss rates among couples sharing HLA-B. PMID:1729895

  4. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. 3/4 VIEW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  5. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. 3/4 VIEW FROM ABOVE. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  6. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. BARREL VIEW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  7. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. ELEVATION VIEW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  8. The life and legacy of Dr. Lee Baldwin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper outlines the life and legacy of the late Dr. Ransom L. Baldwin, V. The purpose was to highlight the impact his teaching and research had on the international energy and protein metabolism communities at their fourth international conference. The paper will be presented at the outset of ...

  9. 39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Congressman Gerald R. fod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in April, 1964, Congressman Gerald R. Ford, Jr. Republican of Michigan, was warmly greeted by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director. Ford, along with two other congressmen, visited the center for a briefing on the Saturn program and for a tour of the facilities.

  11. Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger Speaks at Educator Honor Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger, a member of von Braun's original German rocket team who directed the Research Projects Office, spoke about the importance of teachers in his life during a reception honoring educators attending the NASA Student Launch Initiative Rocketry Workshop at the Marshall Space Flight Center in July, 2003.

  12. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys

  13. Focus on Fitness: Q&A with Dr. Greene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Greene answers the following question in this brief article focusing on fitness: Everyone knows that children need plenty of exercise to stay healthy--But what does "fitness" really involve for young children? Following this discussion, the topics presented include: snack of the month; nutrition fact; and activities, "Move to the Music" and…

  14. Another Use for Dr. Seuss: Reading for Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Janice J.; Baker, Pamela Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Time is limited. Teachers often struggle to address the diverse needs of learners in their classrooms, especially when faced with academic and social skills concerns. Finding effective ways to teach social skills in the context of academic instruction makes sense. Books by Dr. Seuss provide a variety of high-interest stories that can be used to

  15. Dr. Alexander O. Gettler's documentation of a radiation hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Sunshine, I.

    1983-12-01

    An example of the forensic scientist's role in the confirmation and subsequent eradication of a most lethal occupational hazard is discussed. the active participation of Dr. Gettler in the detection of radioactive substances in the watch dial industry lead to the removal of this hazard and a healthier work place.

  16. Dr. Chad E. Finn, 2013 Wilder Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Chad Finn took over the leadership of the USDA-ARS small fruit breeding program in Corvallis, Oregon in 1993 after three years working as an extension horticulturist in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since taking over this program he has developed what is...

  17. 28. View of data test area for DR data take ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

  19. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Washington State Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA. Div. of Instructional Programs and Services.

    The Washington State Resource Guide on Martin Luther King, Jr., supplies a wide variety of materials for use with all grade levels in classroom and assembly presentations in public schools. The goal is for every child enrolled in Washington State schools to learn about Dr. King during the days of January 15 to January 17. Resolutions supporting an…

  20. 3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. 18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees west to backside transmitter building 101 and in left foreground showing site well system building. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. 2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 degrees west and and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. 6. View of DR 3 antenna typical backstay concrete stanchion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of DR 3 antenna typical back-stay concrete stanchion showing embedded anchors and structural steel leg with pin attachment. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. 7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete showing embedment anchors, foundation steel base plate, vertical member with small diameter turnbuckles, antenna assembly in background, and story board for scale. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  6. Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on

  7. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large scales and is now in a state of global gravitational collapse. Whether this convergence of flows originated from self-gravity on larger scales or from other processes cannot be determined by the present study. The observed velocity field and velocity dispersion are consistent with results from (magneto)-hydrodynamic simulations where the cores lie at the stagnation points of convergent turbulent flows.

  8. Data and computing intensive applications in GENESI-DR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossu, Roberto; Pacini, Fabrizio; Gonalves, Pedro; Fusco, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, ) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. GENESI-DR provides a framework where data repositories can be easily integrated and users are given a single access point for discovery and access to heterogeneous data and processing resources. Processing services can be easily integrated as well so supporting the users in the analysis of the data. Coupled with high-performance and sizeable computing resources managed by Grid technologies, GENESI-DR provides indeed the necessary flexibility for building a virtual environment that gives transparent, fast, and easy access to data (even heterogeneous and dispersed among different archives), processing services, computing resources, and results. These characteristics make GENESI-DR an ideal platform for processing large amounts of heterogeneous data (e.g., satellite and in-situ data), developing services which require fast production and delivery of results, comparing approaches and fully validating algorithms. Security solutions adopted in GENESI-DR guarantee that only authorized users can access data, processing services and processing resources. GENESI-DR is designed to support the need for an effective exploitation of the large archives. Among the different applications already integrated in GENESI-DR, in this presentation we will describe some results related to Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR). This is an effective technique to detect and monitor ground displacements with centimetre accuracy. The recent development of advanced DInSAR techniques, aimed at the generation of deformation time series, has led to the need of suitable environments and approaches for an effective exploitation of the large archive of SAR data acquired by the ERS, ENVISAT and RADARSAT satellites. Accordingly, we discuss, from a data access and processing point of view, some results obtained merging the robustness of an advanced DInSAR approach (namely the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm proposed and developed by Italian CNR - IREA) with the high computing capability provided by the distributed infrastructure available through GENESI-DR. A similar analysis is currently performed using Cloud Computing resources. As final remark, it is evident the importance that the presented distributed processing solution may have in scenarios as for the Supersite initiative, which is aimed at stimulating "an international and intergovernmental effort to monitor and study selected reference sites by establishing open access to relevant datasets according to GEO principles to foster the collaboration between all various partners and end-users".

  9. Strong association between microsatellites and an HLA-B, DR haplotype (B18-DR3): Implication for microsatellite evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Crouau-Roy, B.; Bouzekri, N.; Clayton, J.

    1996-09-01

    The HLA haplotype B18-DR3 has a widespread geographical distribution, but has its greatest frequencies in Southern Europe, probably vestigial of the earliest populations of this region, particularly in the Pays Basque and Sardinia. This haplotype is of medical significance, being that most implicated as a factor of risk in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, the closely linked microsatellite markers (TNFa,b,c) in the region of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) genes have been used in an attempt to subtype this haplotype in the two populations and/or in healthy and diabetic populations. A total of 79 HLA-B18-DR3 haplotypes were analyzed: 54 in Basques (12 from healthy individuals and 42 from diabetics or their first-degree relatives) and 25 in Sardinians (13 from healthy and 13 from diabetic individuals). The TNF haplotype a1-b5-c2 is completely associated with B18-DR3 in both populations. The homogeneity of the B18-DR3 haplotype in two ethnically pure populations implies stability in evolution, which suggest that the mutation rate of these microsatellite markers must be less than is usually assumed (i.e., {approximately} 5x10{sup {minus}6} per site per generation). Such markers should be powerful tools for studying genetic drift and admixture of populations, but it remains to be established whether this stability is a rule for all microsatellites in HLA haplotypes or whether or whether it is restricted to some microsatellites and/or some HLA haplotypes. The population genetics of those microsatellites associated with HLA B18-DR3 was also studied in a random sample of the Basque population. 44 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. From the editor: an interview with Dr. Scott Grundy.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott; Brown, W Virgil

    2014-01-01

    During the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions in November 2014, this Editor had the opportunity to interview Dr. Scott Grundy regarding the new recommendations for guideline development that was issued by the International Atherosclerosis Society. (The full document is published in this issue of the journal). In developing this report, Dr. Grundy chaired a panel of international experts who spent 1 year in consideration of new evidence and regional concerns regarding the clinical management of lipoprotein disorders and vascular disease prevention. His experience in developing the Adult Treatment Panel Reports from the National Cholesterol Education Program in the United States and his extensive research in lipoprotein physiology and related disorders makes him unique in offering the expertise for worldwide leadership in this effort. PMID:24528682

  11. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the DR21 region.

    The red filaments stretching across this image denote the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These organic molecules, comprised of carbon and hydrogen, are excited by surrounding interstellar radiation and become luminescent at wavelengths near 8.0 microns. The complex pattern of filaments is caused by an intricate combination of radiation pressure, gravity and magnetic fields. The result is a tapestry in which winds, outflows and turbulence move and shape the interstellar medium.

    To the lower left of the mosaic is a large bubble of gas and dust, which may represent the remnants of a past generation of stars.

    The lower panel shows a 24-micron image mosaic, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer aboard Spitzer (MIPS). This image maps the cooler infrared emission from interstellar dust found throughout the interstellar medium. The DR21 complex is clearly seen near the center of the strip, which covers about twice the area of the IRAC image.

    Perhaps the most fascinating feature in this image is a long and shadowy linear filament extending towards the 10 o'clock position of DR21. This jet of cold and dense gas, nearly 50 light-years in extent, appears in silhouette against a warmer background. This filament is too long and massive to be a stellar jet and may have formed from a pre-existing molecular cloud core sculpted by DR21's strong winds. Regardless of its true nature, this jet and the numerous other arcs and wisps of cool dust signify the interstellar turbulence normally unseen by the human eye.

  12. Dr. Howard Jones, Jr. (1910-2015): In Memoriam

    PubMed Central

    Oehninger, S.; Kruger, T.F.

    2015-01-01

    We honor the life of Howard W. Jones, Jr., MD, 104, a pioneer and visionary in reproductive medicine, a dedicated mentor, internationally renowned gynecological surgeon, and the father of in vitro fertilization IVF) in the United States. Dr. Jones founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine, in Norfolk, Virginia, at Eastern Virginia Medical School, in 1983. Today, IVF has grown exponentially not only in its direct application but also in the development of newer techniques would have been unimaginable a couple of decades ago. Throughout the years Dr. Howard has been a teacher and a mentor to many around the world. To us he also was a friend, a supporter at the time of difficult decisions, someone who would inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning and untangling some of the complexities of the field, even of the human condition. His leadership, vision, knowledge, enthusiasm and inquisitive mind will be missed.

  13. [Dr Erwin Treu--the first permanent ophthalmologist in Split].

    PubMed

    Ivanisevi?, Milan; Boji?, Lovro; Bu?an, Kajo; Kovaci?, Zeljko

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Erwin Treu (Kotor, 1875-Skopje, 1937) was the first permanent ophthalmologist in Split, Croatia. He finished his ophthalmological specialization at the Eye Clinic in Prague in 1900 at W.P. Czermak. He originates from Tirol. Dr. Treu led and organized ophthalmological service in Split and worked from 1902 to 1921 in the Split Hospital, and had a private practice until 1923. From 1904 to 1910 he temporarily worked outside Split, in Sibenik, Zadar, Dubrovnik, Kotor and Cetinje. During the First World War he was a military doctor in Split and Trogir. He performed ophthalmological operations, cataracts, glaucomas (iridectomy), strabismus (tenotomies), ocular adnexa, injuries, trachoma etc. In 1923 he left for Skopje where he at first worked as a medical major in Military Hospital, and after that as a primarius in Civil Hospital at the Department of Ophthalmology till the end of his life. PMID:19769288

  14. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  16. ORAC-DR: A generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie

    2015-03-01

    ORAC-DR is a general purpose data reduction pipeline system designed to be instrument and observatory agnostic. The pipeline works with instruments as varied as infrared integral field units, imaging arrays and spectrographs, and sub-millimeter heterodyne arrays and continuum cameras. This paper describes the architecture of the pipeline system and the implementation of the core infrastructure. We finish by discussing the lessons learned since the initial deployment of the pipeline system in the late 1990s.

  17. 21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his newly completed building at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and the alley north of Washington Street in about 1900 or 1901. In 1901, the building seen here was enlarged by the construction of an addition of similar design immediately to the north (left). Virtually the entire west elevation of the initial building is depicted in this view. Credit ADLAPR. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Of brain and bone: the unusual case of Dr. A.

    PubMed

    Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, M L; Slavotinek, A; Dearmond, S J; Cha, Y H; Miller, B L; Rankin, K

    2009-06-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick's disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A's abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A's genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can be dissociated from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the neural basis of social cognition and suggests a possible genetic link between bone disease and FTD. PMID:20183548

  19. Dr. von Braun In Front of a Display of Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    In this photo, Director of the US Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) Development Operations Division, Dr. Wernher von Braun, is standing before a display of Army missiles celebrating ABMA's Fourth Open House. The missiles in the background include (left to right) a satellite on a Juno II shroud with a Nike Ajax pointing left in front of a Jupiter missile. The Lacrosse is in front of the Juno II. The Nike Hercules points skyward in front of the Juno II and the Redstone.

  20. Of Brain and Bone: The Unusual Case of Dr. A

    PubMed Central

    Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, ML; Slavotinek, A; DeArmond, SJ; Cha, YH; Miller, BL; Rankin, K.P

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Picks disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. As abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. As genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can dissociate from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the neural basis of social cognition and suggests a possible genetic link between bone disease and FTD. PMID:20183548

  1. 4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 106 east face through antenna and partial view of satcom communication dome (attached to radar transmitter building 102) in left side of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  3. 8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, third from left vertical member at first level above foundation level, showing small diameter turnbuckle stays, vertical member with flange connection, and various struts and connectors with antenna assembly in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place. PMID:15666497

  5. A famous Turkish dermatologist, Dr. Hulusi Behçet.

    PubMed

    UStün, Cagatay

    2002-01-01

    Dr. Hulusi Behçet (1889-1948) is a famous Turkish dermatologist. He was born in Istanbul on February 20, 1889. His father was Ahmet Behçet and his mother Ayqse Behçet was also Ahmet's cousin. After the Turkish Republic was established and the "Family Name Law" was accepted, his father Ahmet Behçet, who was among the friends of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder of Turkish Republic, received private permission to use his father's name Behçet. Dr. Hulusi Behçet pursued his education at Gülhane Military Medical Academy. After he had become a medical doctor, he specialized in dermatology and venereal disease at Gülhane Military Medical Academy and he completed his specialization in 1914. His first observations on Behçet's Disease started with a patient he met between 1924-1925. Dr. Behçet followed the symptoms of three patients whom he had had for years, then he decided that they were the symptoms of a new disease (1936). He published these cases in the Archives of Dermatology and Veneral Disease. He died from a sudden heart attack on March 8, 1948. Today, this disease is universally called Behçet's Disease in medical literature. PMID:12370137

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun leads a tour of the S-IC checkout area.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees, Charles Schultze, James Webb, Elmer Staats, Comptroller General of the United States, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun tour the S-IC checkout area in the Marshall Space Flight Center quality lab.

  7. 75 FR 68603 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Office of Education Dr. Nancy Foster...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Education Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... successful scholarship candidates, generating internal NOAA reports and articles to demonstrate the success of its program. The Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship Program is available to graduate students...

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries at the Redstone Arsenal airfield.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller, center, associate administrator for manned space flight, is flanked by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, and Dr. Eberhard Rees at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip. the associate adminstrator was making his annual staff visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  10. [The SS dentist Dr. Willy Frank. A biography].

    PubMed

    Huber, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In his role as leading SS dentist in the concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau Dr. Willy Frank was involved in the worst crimes of World War II: In the early summer of 1944 the so called "Hungarian Action" commenced. It planned the extermination of around 450 000 Hungarian Jews within only a few months. Some twenty years later he was sentenced during the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trials to seven years of imprisonment on grounds of his participation in the selection and gassing of the Jews. Before that he had been able to resume his professional worksince 1947 unchecked. PMID:20509438

  11. STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

  12. STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.

  13. 89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at 65 percent completion showing erection process. Antenna system designed and factory construction by D.S. Kennedy & Company., Comasset, MA, 1958. Note scanner radar building in background. Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, 11 July, 1960, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-824. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  14. Dr. Christopher Kraft looks over packaged 'parasol' in bldg 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Christopher C. Kraft J. (left), JSC Director, and George A Post, JSC Crew Systems Division, look over the packaged 'parasol' during fabrication and checkout of the umbrella-like mechanical device in the Technical Services shop in bldg 10 at JSC. The 'parasol' is designed to fit into the T027 experiment photometer canister. The canopy portion of the 'parasol' measures 24 feet by 22 feet. The 'parasol' is one of several sunscreen possibilities being considered for use in shading the overheated Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop.

  15. ORAC-DR: Pipelining With Other People's Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Frossie; Bridger, Alan; Wright, Gillian S.; Jenness, Tim; Currie, Malcolm J.; Adamson, Andy

    As part of the UKIRT ORAC project, we have developed a pipeline (orac-dr) for driving on-line data reduction using existing astronomical packages as algorithm engines and display tools. The design is modular and extensible on several levels, allowing it to be easily adapted to a wide variety of instruments. Here we briefly review the design, discuss the robustness and speed of execution issues inherent in such pipelines, and address what constitutes a desirable (in terms of ``buy-in'' effort) engine or tool.

  16. DR Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services in the West (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility however, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado "test system". We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating reserves: frequency regulation, contingency reserve, and flexibility (or ramping) reserve. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves.

  17. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980

  18. Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature. Reply to Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.A.; Graham, J.M. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} responds to the comments by Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek regarding the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations. The survival time of the patient may depend on the detection of mosicism; the discussion of the existence of full trisomy 22 remains controversial. 2 refs.

  19. Feasibility report: 105-DR as replacement for 105-F

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Following inquiry by Operations regarding the feasibility of operating Building 105-DR in conjunction with the 100-F Area Water Plant with 105-F in a long time shutdown condition, a preliminary study has been made. The results of this study appear herein. A study new under way, GEO-3, considers simultaneous operation of 105-D & 105-DR with separate water plants. Primary consideration in this study is that of furnishing a reliable water supply with improved or simplified operating features and at a minimum cost. In the event 105-F was permanently shut down, the water plant would be available for the production of water for 105-DE provided inter-connection and operation of a widely separated water plant and pile can be accomplished economically and practically. The obvious advantage of the proposed arrangement is the savings, if any, realized by a difference in initial costs and extended operating cost. The purpose of thin report is to investigate the feasibility of the proposed scheme from the standpoint of engineering, operation and economics. Certain probable trouble spots such as steam capacity, corrosion, etc. are mentioned and possible solutions are suggested. However, no recommendations are intended, as the necessary detailed study of these items in considered to be beyond the scope of present request and was not entered into.

  20. Census of Blue Stars in SDSS DR8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2014-12-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g - r)0 < -0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  1. PREFACE: Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination (DR2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Orel, Ann E.

    2011-07-01

    In dissociative recombination (DR), a molecular ion captures an electron and falls apart. One might initially conclude that this process is relatively simple. However, a review of the DR literature over the past 60 years, since the pioneering papers of Sir David Bates [1], shows that the study of DR has proved to be highly challenging for both theorists and experimentalists. Both this challenge and the ubiquitous importance of the process have made its study rewarding, endlessly interesting, and full of surprises. DR is fundamentally the interaction of an electronic continuum with a vibrational continuum often connected by quasibound intermediate states. Autoionization in the first continuum competes with dissociation in the second. DR occurs at the total energy of an ion plus a free electron and is in the same region as vibrationally excited Rydberg states and other neutral superexcited states. All these states interact with each other prior to dissociation, forming a complex that controls the quantum yields of products. The complexity of the process has required both innovation and ingenuity on the part of both theorists and experimentalists. Over the years, it has become apparent that in order to compare theoretical and experimental results, the experiments must identify the electronic, vibrational and for low mass ions, the rotational state. The traditional disagreement between theoretical and experimental results has been due, in part, to the sensitivity of DR cross sections and rate constants to the state of the recombining ion. Great progress has been made in recent years in both flowing afterglow and storage ring experiments aimed at reducing this uncertainty. The latest advances and insights in theory and experiment were the topics of the Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination held at the Granlibakken Lodge at Lake, Tahoe, California, 16-20 August 2010. The conference was part of a series of conferences on DR that started at Chateau Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada in May, 1988 [2] and was followed in May 1992 [3] at L'Abbaye de Saint Jacut de la Mer, Brittany, France, in May, 1995 [4] at Ein Gedi, Israel, in June 1999 [5] on the island of Nsslingen in the Stockholm archipelago, Sweden, in August, 2001 [6] at Chicago, USA, in July, 2004 [7] at the Alte Mlzerei, Mosbach, Germany and in July, 2007 [8] at the Resort d'Amelander Kaap on the island of Ameland, The Netherlands. All papers from the last two conferences and this conference are freely available at http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596. In keeping with the tradition of prior DR conferences, all papers in this volume have been refereed. Our thanks go to the referees for their efforts. Travel support for conference participants was provided by NSF grant ATM-0838061 and NASA grant NNX09AQ73G to SLG. We thank Priscilla Kujawski for proofreading the Dedication. Steven L GubermanAnn E OrelEditors Conference photograph Participants of the 8th International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications. 1. Stephen Pratt18. Randy Vane35. Robert Continetti 2. Chris Greene19. Claude Krantz36. Henrik Buhr 3. Bastiaan Braams20. Xavier Urbain37. Mats Larsson 4. Ed Grant21. Hidekazu Takagi38. Dirk Schwalm 5. Christian Nordhorn22. Brian Mitchell39. Evelyne Roueff 6. Steen Brnsted Nielsen23. Andreas Wolf40. Pascal Pernot 7. Dermot Madden24. Daren Stotler41. Stefan Rosn 8. Radek Plail25. Slava Kokoouline42. Rainer Johnsen 9. Daniel Savin26. David Schultz43. Xiaohong Cai 10. Jonathan Tennyson27. Mourad Telmini44. Dan Haxton 11. Peet Hickman28. Ruth Malenda45. sa Larson 12. Michael Fogle29. Slim Chourou46. Dahbia Talbi 13. Waffeu Tamo Francois Oliver30. Petr Dohnal47. Ann Orel 14. Christian Jungen31. Julia Sttzel48. Steven Guberman 15. Ilya Fabrikant32. Ioan Schneider49. Jane Fox 16. Wolf Geppert33. Nicholas Shuman50. Richard Thomas 17. Old?ich Novotn34. Holger Kreckel51. Fangfang Ruan

  2. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g – r){sub 0} < –0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  3. Pathogenesis of human diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): current insights and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Servin, Alain L

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as "silent pathogens" with the capacity to emerge as "pathobionts" for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  4. Pathogenesis of Human Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Expressing Afa/Dr Adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): Current Insights and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as “silent pathogens” with the capacity to emerge as “pathobionts” for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  5. Overexpression of HLA-DR is associated with prognosis of glioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jinfu; Xia, Tianbao; Zhao, Hongwei; Liu, Jialin; Li, Bin; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Since the poor prognosis of glioma, our study was aimed to find out the role of HLA-DR in the prognosis of glioma patients that may contribute to the timely post-operative treatment on the glioma patients. Methods: 60 glioma patients were enrolled in the prospective cohort study. Western blotting was used to detect the content of HLA-DR. Kaplan-Meier curve was adopted to evaluate the effects of HLA-DR on the survival time of glioma patients. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the roles of clinical features and HLA-DR in the pathogenesis of glioma. Results: The expression level of HLA-DR was higher in tumor tissue, compared with normal tissues (P < 0.05). Moreover, expression levels of HLA-DR were correlated with the factors of pathological degree, Enneking staging and KPS score. The survival rate of patients with high content of HLA-DR was lower than those of patients with low content of HLA-DR. Cox regression analysis indicated that Enneking staging and HLA-DR were all associated with the prognosis of glioma (HR=14.43, 95% CI=1.05-199.16; HR=21.39, 95% CI=2.07-220.76). Conclusion: HLA-DR may serve as a biomarker for the prognosis of glioma patients. PMID:26191254

  6. [Story of three SS dentists during World War II: Pr Hugo Blaschke, Dr Hermann Pook and Dr Willy Frank].

    PubMed

    Riaud, Xavier

    2006-12-01

    This story of three SS dentists shows very clearly that the medical code of ethics, under a totalitarian regime, ends where ideology begins. Professor Hugo Blaschke provided dental care to the most eminent Nazi leaders, but he also was the senior SS dentist. He was in charge of dental care in the Waffen-SS, and therefore, he had responsibility for the stocks of dental gold collected from the mouths of those who died in the concentration camps, in order to make dentures for his soldiers. Dr Hermann Pook was the dentist in charge of all the other dentists practising in the concentration camps. He was responsible for gathering statistics on the dental care provided for prisoners in the camps. His instructions were very clear: "No conservation or restorative treatment. Only extractions, and with no anaesthesia!" He was also in charge of gathering the gold that was collected in the camps, for the financial department of the SS. Dr Willy Frank, an Auschwitz dentist, took part in the selection of some of the convoys for the gas chambers. His participation in the collection of gold from the mouths of the dead was also established. These three men were sentenced to prison for War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity. PMID:17575817

  7. The Chymistry of "The Learned Dr Plot" (1640-96).

    PubMed

    Roos, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the seventeenth century, there were developing norms of openness in the presentation of scientific knowledge that were at odds with traditions of secrecy among chymists, particularly practitioners of chrysopoeia, or the transmutation of metals. This chapter analyzes how Dr. Robert Plot, the first professor of chymistry at Oxford, negotiated these boundaries within an institutional context. I first delineate his chymical and experimental practice, which incorporated procedures from medieval alchemical sources, particularly the Lullian corpus, as well as more novel practices from seventeenth-century chymistry. Then, I analyze how personal and institutional ambitions and economic considerations shaped to what extent Plot negotiated the boundaries between secrecy and the public dissemination of chymical knowledge. PMID:26103749

  8. The neutral interface adjoining the H II region DR21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallee, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of C100-alpha and C125-alpha atomic carbon recombination lines were made at the Algonquin Radio Observatory, towards the neutral interface separating the H II region DR21 from its associated molecular cloud. An analysis of the Cn-alpha observations in conjunction with a simple model of a neutral interface enabled the derivation of the following parameters: electron density of 300/cu cm, electron temperature of 30 K, microturbulent velocity of 2.3 km/s, and depth of the neutral interface of 0.01 pc. A single, stimulated emission model is sufficient to reproduce the Cn-alpha observations in the wavelength range from 4.6 cm (C100-alpha) to 21 cm (C166-alpha). All the known Cn-alpha data do support a pressure equilibrium between the neutral interface and the H II region, after the usual allowance is made for carbon depletion on grains.

  9. GPS/DR Error Estimation for Autonomous Vehicle Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Song, Jong-Hwa; Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Heo, Moon-Beom; Jee, Gyu-In

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles require highly reliable navigation capabilities. For example, a lane-following method cannot be applied in an intersection without lanes, and since typical lane detection is performed using a straight-line model, errors can occur when the lateral distance is estimated in curved sections due to a model mismatch. Therefore, this paper proposes a localization method that uses GPS/DR error estimation based on a lane detection method with curved lane models, stop line detection, and curve matching in order to improve the performance during waypoint following procedures. The advantage of using the proposed method is that position information can be provided for autonomous driving through intersections, in sections with sharp curves, and in curved sections following a straight section. The proposed method was applied in autonomous vehicles at an experimental site to evaluate its performance, and the results indicate that the positioning achieved accuracy at the sub-meter level. PMID:26307997

  10. In Memoriam: Prof. Dr Dragutin Djurovic (1937-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-12-01

    Prof. dr Dragutin Djurovic was born in Guca, Serbia, on December 20, 1937. He completed his primary and secondary education in Guca and Cacak. In the period 1956-1958, he studied at the General Military Academy in Belgrade. He enrolled at the Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics - Astronomy Group in 1958 and graduated in 1963. After graduation he went to study visits to Paris (1966) and Bruxelles (1972 and 1975). He obtained his MSc degree in 1970 from the University of Belgrade with a thesis entitled "Application of different types of telescopes for astronomical determination of time". His supervisor for the master thesis was Prof. Zaharije Brkic. Dragutin Djurovic defended his PhD thesis "Contribution to determination of Earth-rotation variations and polar motion" at the University of Belgrade in 1974. Most of the thesis-related research was done in Bruxelles during 1972 under the supervision of Prof. Paul Melchior.

  11. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella in simulated low-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  12. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studying Salmonella at Tulane University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson (right) of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  13. A 10,000 YEAR OLD EXPLOSION IN DR21

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Perez-Goytia, Nadia; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Schmid-Burgk, Johannes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene

    2013-03-10

    Sensitive high angular resolution ({approx}2'') CO(2-1) line observations made with the Submillimeter Array of the flow emanating from the high-mass star-forming region DR21 located in the Cygnus X molecular cloud are presented. These new interferometric observations indicate that this well known enigmatic outflow appears to have been produced by an explosive event that took place about 10,000 years ago, and that might be related to the disintegration of a massive stellar system such as the one that occurred in Orion Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinman-Low 500 years ago, but about 20 times more energetic. This result therefore argues in favor of the idea that the disintegration of young stellar systems perhaps is a frequent phenomenon present during the formation of massive stars. However, many more theoretical and observational studies are still needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  14. GPS/DR Error Estimation for Autonomous Vehicle Localization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Song, Jong-Hwa; Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Heo, Moon-Beom; Jee, Gyu-In

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles require highly reliable navigation capabilities. For example, a lane-following method cannot be applied in an intersection without lanes, and since typical lane detection is performed using a straight-line model, errors can occur when the lateral distance is estimated in curved sections due to a model mismatch. Therefore, this paper proposes a localization method that uses GPS/DR error estimation based on a lane detection method with curved lane models, stop line detection, and curve matching in order to improve the performance during waypoint following procedures. The advantage of using the proposed method is that position information can be provided for autonomous driving through intersections, in sections with sharp curves, and in curved sections following a straight section. The proposed method was applied in autonomous vehicles at an experimental site to evaluate its performance, and the results indicate that the positioning achieved accuracy at the sub-meter level. PMID:26307997

  15. Dr. Newell Sill Jenkins: progenitor of cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Hyson, John M; Swank, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Dr. Newell Sill Jenkins was one of the pioneer American dentists who took "American dentistry" to Europe. Among his patients were Composer Richard Wagner, and among his friends, Author Mark Twain. He treated some of the crown head of Europe, and yet found time to participate in organized dentistry and conduct research in cosmetic dentistry. He was the father of the porcelain revival in both Europe and America. Unfortunately, Jenkins' Legacy as the chief proponent of cosmetic dentistry in the late 19th and early 20th centuries has been largely ignored by dental historians. In a 20-year period (1896 to 1916), Jenkins published 32 articles in the dental literature on the esthetic advantages of porcelain fillings. It is time to give Jenkins his just recognition. PMID:13677405

  16. Dr. Richard Grugel examines an ampoule of a succinonitrile mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On Earth when scientists melt metals, bubbles that form in the molten material can rise to the surface, pop and disappear. In microgravity -- the near-weightless environment created as the International Space Station orbits Earth -- the lighter bubbles do not rise and disappear. Prior space experiments have shown that bubbles often become trapped in the final metal or crystal sample -similar to the bubbles trapped in this sample. In the solid, these bubbles, or porosity, are defects that diminish both the material's strength and usefulness. The Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation will melt samples of a transparent modeling material, succinonitrile and succinonitrile water mixtures, shown here in an ampoule being examined by Dr. Richard Grugel, the principal investigator for the experiment at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. As the samples are processed in space, Grugel will be able to observe how bubbles form in the samples and study their movements and interactions.

  17. Replacement of the DR alpha chain with the E alpha chain enhances presentation of Mycoplasma arthritidis superantigen by the human class II DR molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, T; Pergolizzi, R; Ito, K; Silver, J; Atkin, C; Cole, B C; Chang, M D

    1995-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen (MAM) is produced by an organism which can cause chronic proliferative arthritis in rodents. MAM possesses a typical superantigenic activity; it has the ability to activate a large panel of T cells which express specific V beta segments of the T-cell receptor. The presentation of MAM to T cells by antigen-presenting cells is mediated primarily through its binding to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II E alpha chain in mice and the DR alpha chain in humans. However, MAM is much less active for human peripheral blood lymphocytes than for mouse splenocytes. It was suggested that a difference in MAM binding affinity between human and mouse class II molecules may account for their different MAM activities. To examine this possibility, we generated a panel of B-cell transfectants whose DR molecule is composed of either the DR alpha or the E alpha chain paired with a DR3 beta chain. The ability of these transfectants to present MAM to human peripheral T cells was analyzed. Our data show that transfectants expressing E alpha DR beta chimeric molecules have higher MAM-presenting activity than transfectants expressing wild-type DR alpha DR beta molecules, while the latter have higher activity in stimulating DR3-alloreactive T cells. Since both types of transfectants present MAM to T cells expressing the same T-cell receptor V beta gene families, the higher MAM-presenting activity of the E alpha transfectant is not due to its ability to interact with a different set of T cells. Furthermore, both the E alpha 1 and E alpha 2 domains contribute to this increased affinity for MAM binding. Taken together, our data suggest that there may be multiple MAM binding sites on the E alpha and DR alpha chains and residues unique to the E alpha chain may provide additional affinity for MAM. PMID:7642264

  18. Dr. Arvid Lindau and discovery of von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Huntoon, Kristin; Oldfield, Edward H; Lonser, Russell R

    2015-10-01

    Arvid Lindau, MD, PhD, consolidated the disparate array of benign and malignant visceral and nervous system lesions into the neoplastic syndrome known as von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Based on this pioneering work, Dr. Lindau was awarded both a Rockefeller fellowship to work in Dr. Harvey Cushing's laboratory in Boston, Massachusetts, and the Lennmalm Prize. While working in Dr. Cushing's laboratory, Dr. Lindau continued his study of CNS hemangioblastomas. His work with Dr. Cushing led to their lifelong friendship and scientific collaboration. In this paper the authors describe Arvid Lindau's pioneering work in nervous system tumor pathology, his relationship to Dr. Cushing, and his role in advancing neurological surgery and research in Europe. PMID:25748307

  19. Skeletal remains of Dr. Eugenio Antonio Berros Sagredo.

    PubMed

    Solla, H E; I?can, M Y

    2001-02-15

    It is often noted that even a well-designed osteological technique may not provide accurate results when applied to single forensic cases. Case studies are ideal to test if this concern is valid, and forensic anthropology is a testing ground for applying a population based standard to individual skeletal remains. Secondly, the increasing role anthropologists have played in forensic sciences has aided the medicolegal disciplines in a number of ways. For example, identification of skeletal remains is now more accurate than ever before. Many of these cases have brought perpetrators to court for justice. The purpose of this paper is to use osteological techniques to analyze skeletal remains and make a positive identification. The victim was found partially buried in the sand near El Pinar, Uruguay in 1995. The analysis indicated that the victim was a 45-year old, white, male who was about 170cm tall. Based on preliminary evidence that the victim might be Dr. Eugenio Antonio Berros Sagredo, a digital superimposition was made using the victim's photograph and the unknown skull. This examination revealed that the skull corresponded consistently with the individual in the photograph. Results were supported by the fact that personal belongings, such as a medal and wrist watch, also pointed to the same individual. Dental records and radiographs when made available later also indicated the same identity. Dr. Berros was accused of making nerve gas during the dictatorial regime of former Chilean President General Augusto Pinochet. It was also alleged that he made bombs that killed a Spanish diplomat in his laboratory and a Chilean diplomat in Washington, DC. Many complex techniques are often needed to make a positive identification and such was the case for this study. Because of the nature of anthropology as a holistic discipline, such complexity is an integral part of human biology and behavior and can be used successfully in the forensic sciences and medicolegal investigations. PMID:11182273

  20. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Renuka; White, Stephen N; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2012-09-10

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA and DRB transcripts from 24 captive BHS (Ovca-DRA and Ovca-DRB) were sequenced. Based on exon 2 (β1 domain) sequences, eight different Ovca-DRB cDNA sequences were identified in BHS. Six of them were 100% identical to previously reported Ovca-DRB genomic DNA sequences. The new alleles DRB*23 and DRB*24, were closely related to two other Ovca-DRB exon 2 genomic DNA sequences. Nineteen out of 24 BHS (79%) Ovca-DRB exon 3 (β2 domain) sequences were 100% identical to exon 3 sequence of DRB1 of DS (Ovar-DRB1). Ovca-DRA full length cDNA sequences exhibited >99% identity. Based upon exon 2 sequences, this BHS herd yielded higher Ovca-DRB allelic diversity than that reported in the previous study. Positively selected amino acid positions were identified in the peptide-binding groove of BHS and DS, but BHS showed more such sites. This highlights differing population histories, and may suggest differing needs for DR peptide-binding specificities. Presence of glutamine at position 52 (52Q) in some of the desert and captive BHS is predicted to alter the efficiency of DR dimerization, which may influence antigen presentation and T(h) cell activation. Functional assays with unique alleles should reveal whether the presentation of M. haemolytica leukotoxin peptides to T(h) cells by Ovca-DRB alleles is equivalent to that of Ovar-DRB1 alleles. PMID:22750296

  1. The M giant candidates identified in the LAMOST DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing

    2015-08-01

    M giants are red-giant-branch (RGB) stars with low surface temperature and high luminosity in the late-phase of stellar evolution. Its luminous nature allows us to use these stars as good tracers to study the outer Galactic halo and distant substructures. A well classified M-giant stars sample has important scientific values for the statistic research. In order to fully utilize the spectral data of LAMOST spectroscopic survey, we perform a discrimination procedure with the spectral index diagram of TiO5 and CaH2+CaH3 to separate M giants from M dwarfs. Using the M giant spectra identified from the LAMOST DR1 with high signal-to-noise ratio, we have successfully assembled a set of M giant templates from M0 to M6. Then, the template-fit algorithm were used to automatically identify and classify M giants from the LAMOST DR1. In addition, we calculated the heliocentric radial velocity of all M giants by using the cross-correlation method with the template spectrum in a zero-velocity rest frame. Using the relationship between the absolute infrared magnitude MJ and our classified spectroscopic subtype, we derived the spectroscopic distance of M giants, with uncertainties of about 40%. Finally, we present a spectroscopic catalog of 8639 M giants including stellar parameters like photometry, proper motion, radial velocity, distance, spectral type and so on. In particular, the large sample of M giants is carried out for the first time. We will further use this sample to study the sub-structures and tidal stream in the Galactic Anti-Center.

  2. DR 21(OH): A HIGHLY FRAGMENTED, MAGNETIZED, TURBULENT DENSE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Girart, J. M.; Frau, P.; Zhang, Q.; Koch, P. M.; Tang, Y.-W.; Lai, S.-P.; Ho, P. T. P.; Qiu, K.

    2013-07-20

    We present high angular resolution observations of the massive star-forming core DR21(OH) at 880 {mu}m using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The dense core exhibits an overall velocity gradient in a Keplerian-like pattern, which breaks at the center of the core where SMA 6 and SMA 7 are located. The dust polarization shows a complex magnetic field, compatible with a toroidal configuration. This is in contrast with the large, parsec-scale filament that surrounds the core, where there is a smooth magnetic field. The total magnetic field strengths in the filament and in the core are 0.9 and 2.1 mG, respectively. We found evidence of magnetic field diffusion at the core scales, far beyond the expected value for ambipolar diffusion. It is possible that the diffusion arises from fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of turbulence. The dynamics of the DR 21(OH) core appear to be controlled energetically in equal parts by the magnetic field, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and the angular momentum. The effect of the angular momentum (this is a fast rotating core) is probably causing the observed toroidal field configuration. Yet, gravitation overwhelms all the forces, making this a clear supercritical core with a mass-to-flux ratio of {approx_equal} 6 times the critical value. However, simulations show that this is not enough for the high level of fragmentation observed at 1000 AU scales. Thus, rotation and outflow feedback are probably the main causes of the observed fragmentation.

  3. GENESI-DR Portal: a scientific gateway to distributed repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, Pedro; Brito, Fabrice; D'Andria, Fabio; Cossu, Roberto; Fusco, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. "Discovering" which data are available on a "geospatial web" is one of the main challenges ES scientists have to face today. Some well- known data sets are referred to in many places, available from many sources. For core information with a common purpose many copies are distributed, e.g., VMap0, Landsat, and SRTM. Other data sets in low or local demand may only be found in a few places and niche communities. Relevant services, results of analysis, applications and tools are accessible in a very scattered and uncoordinated way, often through individual initiatives from Earth Observation mission operators, scientific institutes dealing with ground measurements, service companies or data catalogues. In the discourse of Spatial Data Infrastructures, there are "catalogue services" - directories containing information on where spatial data and services can be found. For metadata "records" describing spatial data and services, there are "registries". The Geospatial industry coins specifications for search interfaces, where it might do better to reach out to other information retrieval and Internet communities. These considerations are the basis for the GENESI-DR scientific portal, which adopts a simple model allowing the geo-spatial classification and discovery of information as a loosely connected federation of nodes. This network had however to be resilient to node failures and able to scale with the growing addition of new information about data and services. The GENESI-DR scientific portal is still evolving as the project deploys the different components amongst the different partners, but the aim is to provide the connection to information, establish rights, access it and in some cases apply algorithms using the computer power available on the infrastructure with simple interfaces. As information is discovered in the network, it can be further exploited, filtered or enhanced according to the user goals. To implement this vision two specialized graphical interfaces were designed on the portal. The first, concentrates on the text-based search of information, while the second is a command and control of submission and order status on a distributed processing environment. The text search uses natural language features that extract the spatial temporal components from the user query. This is then propagated to the nodes by mapping them to OpenSearch extensions, and then returned to the user as an aggregated list of the resources. These can either be access points to dataset series or services that can be further analysed and processed. At this stage, the user is presented with dedicated interfaces that correspond to context of the action that is performing. Be it a bulk data download, data processing or data mining, the different services offer specialized interfaces that are integrated on the portal. In the overall, the GENESI-DR project identifies best practices and supporting context for the use of a minimal abstract model to loosely connect a federation of Digital Repositories. Surpassing the apparent lack of cost effectiveness of the Spatial Data Infrastructures effort in developing "catalogue services" is achieved by trimming the use cases to the most common and relevant. The GENESI-DR scientific portal is, as such, the visible front-end of a dedicated infrastructure providing transparent access to information and allowing Earth Science communities to easily and quickly derive objective information and share knowledge based on all environmentally sensitive domains.

  4. Impaired lymphocyte responsiveness to phytohaemagglutinin associated with the possession of HLA-B8/DR3.

    PubMed

    Amer, A; Singh, G; Darke, C; Dolby, A E

    1986-10-01

    An examination was made of blastogenic response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) in HLA-B8 and/or DR3 positive subjects and B8/DR3 negative individuals. Both B8 and DR3 antigens were associated with a depression of the response at all three doses of PHA used. The possession of both these antigens did not lead to a further depression of the response. PMID:3492778

  5. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianhui; Wang, Hu; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses. PMID:26273280

  6. HLA-A, -B and -DR allele and haplotype frequencies in Malays.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Too, C L; Azrena, A; Maiselamah, L; Lee, Y Y; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M

    2007-03-01

    One thousand four hundreds and forty-five Malays registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Fifteen HLA-A, twenty nine HLA-B and fourteen HLA-DR alleles were detected. The most common HLA-A alleles and their frequencies were HLA-A24 (0.35), HLA-A11 (0.21) and HLA-A2 (0.15). The most common HLA-B alleles were HLA-B15 (0.26), HLA-B35 (0.11) and HLA-B18 (0.10) while the most common HLA-DR alleles were HLA-DR15 (0.28), HLA-DR12 (0.27) and HLA-DR7 (0.10). A24-B15-DR12 (0.047), A24-B15-DR15 (0.03) and the A24-B35-DR12 (0.03) were the most frequent haplotypes. This data may be useful in determining the probability of finding a matched donor and for estimating the incidence of HLA associated diseases. PMID:17891921

  7. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianhui; Wang, Hu; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses. PMID:26273280

  8. Expression and mutational analysis of DinB-like protein DR0053 in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Appukuttan, Deepti; Seo, Ho Seong; Jeong, Sunwook; Im, Sunghun; Joe, Minho; Song, Dusup; Choi, Jungjoon; Lim, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanism governing radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, current efforts are aimed at identifying potential candidates from a large repertoire of unique Deinococcal genes and protein families. DR0053 belongs to the DinB/YfiT protein family, which is an over-represented protein family in D. radiodurans. We observed that dr0053 transcript levels were highly induced in response to gamma radiation (?-radiation) and mitomycin C (MMC) exposure depending on PprI, RecA and the DrtR/S two-component signal transduction system. Protein profiles demonstrated that DR0053 is a highly induced protein in cultures exposed to 10 kGy ?-radiation. We were able to determine the transcriptional start site of dr0053, which was induced upon irradiation, and to assign the 133-bp promoter region of dr0053 as essential for radiation responsiveness through primer extension and promoter deletion analyses. A dr0053 mutant strain displayed sensitivity to ?-radiation and MMC exposure, but not hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that DR0053 helps cells recover from DNA damage. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that DR0053 is similar to the Bacillus subtilis protein YjoA, which is a substrate of bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases. Taken together, the DNA damage-inducible (din) gene dr0053 may be regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. PMID:25706748

  9. Expression and Mutational Analysis of DinB-Like Protein DR0053 in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Deepti; Seo, Ho Seong; Jeong, Sunwook; Im, Sunghun; Joe, Minho; Song, Dusup; Choi, Jungjoon; Lim, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanism governing radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, current efforts are aimed at identifying potential candidates from a large repertoire of unique Deinococcal genes and protein families. DR0053 belongs to the DinB/YfiT protein family, which is an over-represented protein family in D. radiodurans. We observed that dr0053 transcript levels were highly induced in response to gamma radiation (?-radiation) and mitomycin C (MMC) exposure depending on PprI, RecA and the DrtR/S two-component signal transduction system. Protein profiles demonstrated that DR0053 is a highly induced protein in cultures exposed to 10 kGy ?-radiation. We were able to determine the transcriptional start site of dr0053, which was induced upon irradiation, and to assign the 133-bp promoter region of dr0053 as essential for radiation responsiveness through primer extension and promoter deletion analyses. A dr0053 mutant strain displayed sensitivity to ?-radiation and MMC exposure, but not hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that DR0053 helps cells recover from DNA damage. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that DR0053 is similar to the Bacillus subtilis protein YjoA, which is a substrate of bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases. Taken together, the DNA damage-inducible (din) gene dr0053 may be regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. PMID:25706748

  10. Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, M.S.

    1996-03-09

    Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

  11. Pioneers of Study on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; Achievements by Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa and Dr. Yoshio Ohta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Kazuhiko; Nambu, Akira

    Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa is a pioneer who carried out systematic electron stimulated desorption (ESD) investigations for hydrogen adsorbed on a clean platinum plate (H2/Pt) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in 1942. (His name is spelled as Yosioki Isikawa in the original papers.) Although his papers are referred in several papers on desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET), these seem to be not as well-known as famous ones by Menzel, Gomer, and Redhead in 1964. We describe his pioneering work in this article. He developed an UHV apparatus made of glass with a Pt plate and an oxide cathode pumped by a small mercury pump via a liquid air trap. Clear ESD signals were observed for H2/Pt at excitation energies of 8, 12, 14, 33-46, and 46-51 eV. He assigned the desorbate to atomic hydrogen (H), because it was pumped by a glass wall baked above 350C. Based on these results and the potential curves of H2 in the gas phase, he proposed a model for the ESD of H from H2/Pt that is, the first step is an electronic transition of adsorbed H2, and the second is the desorption of H along the repulsive potential surface of the excited state. This was the first introduction of the notion of DIET. He also carried out an ESD study of H2O/Pt in 1943. We also introduce achievements by Dr. Yoshio Ohta, who was another pioneer in the field of DIET. He measured electron-stimulated ion desorption from an oxidized Ni plate. He found that the threshold excitation energy for ion desorption is 22 eV, and that the kinetic energy of the desorbed ion is 12 eV. To explain these results, he also proposed the concept of DIET.

  12. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The colorful image (top panel) is a large-scale composite mosaic assembled from data collected at a variety of different wavelengths. Views at visible wavelengths appear blue, near-infrared light is depicted as green, and mid-infrared data from the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is portrayed as red. The result is a contrast between structures seen in visible light (blue) and those observed in the infrared (yellow and red). A quick glance shows that most of the action in this image is revealed to the unique eyes of Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon.

    Each of the constituent images is shown below the large mosaic. The Digital Sky Survey (DSS) image (lower left) provides a familiar view of deep space, with stars scattered around a dark field. The reddish hue is from gas heated by foreground stars in this region. This fluorescence fades away in the near-infrared Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) image (lower center), but other features start to appear through the obscuring clouds of dust, now increasingly transparent. Many more stars are discerned in this image because near-infrared light pierces through some of the obscuration of the interstellar dust. Note that some stars seen as very bright in the visible image are muted in the near-infrared image, whereas other stars become more prominent. Embedded nebulae revealed in the Spitzer image are only hinted at in this picture.

    The Spitzer image (lower right) provides a vivid contrast to the other component images, revealing star-forming complexes and large-scale structures otherwise hidden from view. The Spitzer image is composed of photographs obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of nearly 10,000 light-years.

    The red filaments stretching across the Spitzer image denote the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These organic molecules, comprised of carbon and hydrogen, are excited by surrounding interstellar radiation and become luminescent at wavelengths near 8 microns. The complex pattern of filaments is caused by an intricate combination of radiation pressure, gravity, and magnetic fields. The result is a tapestry in which winds, outflows, and turbulence move and shape the interstellar medium.

  13. [WHO AFFECTS THE PATIENT, DR. GOOGLE OR THE DOCTOR?].

    PubMed

    Mishali, Moshe; Avrech, Tova

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade the World Wide Web has become one of the prime sources for medical data searches. The abundance of information and emphasis on consumer communication, which are the main characteristics of the new generation of the web named "Web 2.0", enable users to engage and educate others by sharing and collaborating knowledge. It also enables them to receive medical information based on the experience of other patients, while the duration of the traditional physician's visit has shortened. However, using Web 2.0 for health collaboration has drawbacks as well: When alternative ways of "knowing" replace objective medical facts, there is danger of misinformation and truth "flattening". This article examines the distribution of medical misinformation online: Its characteristics, the nature of the messages presented online and the means that might help protect users and patients from it. The authors hold positions in the Israeli Dairy Board (IDB): Dr. Averch manages the health field on the IDB, and the findings in this article are based on research that she is leading as part of this position, and Dr. Mishali is a trained psychologist, and acts as a strategic consultant for IDB in the field of coping with the opposition to milk and its products. In this article it is initially shown how the characteristics of information distribution in general help spreading medical misinformation online: The decline of doctors' authority as sole providers of medical information, disillusionment and suspicion towards science and the notion of expertise, and the emergence of new ways to evaluate information, based on community ties. The nature of this pseudo-medical information will then be discussed, including the range of the phenomenon and the probability of users to be affected by it. Furthermore, we will raise specific tactics in which anti-establishment messages are portrayed; examples will be given of the use of emotion evoking content in the anti-establishment messages in order to arouse comment. It will be demonstrated in anti-dairy products and anti-vaccination campaigns. The impact of pseudo-medical language on consumers will be debated, although the content can easily be scientifically disproved. Finally, recommendations for a better medical dialogue with the patient, based on the online arena of medical knowledge described, will be provided. PMID:26665743

  14. Vikrant Sahasrabuddhe, MBBS, MPH, DrPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vikrant Sahasrabuddhe received his medical degree from the University of Pune in India, his master's and doctorate degrees in public health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed fellowship training in epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and at the National Cancer Institute. Before joining NCI in 2015, Dr.

  15. Vikrant Sahasrabuddhe, MBBS, MPH, DrPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vikrant Sahasrabuddhe received his medical degree from the University of Pune in India, his master's and doctorate degrees in public health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed fellowship training in epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and at the National Cancer Institute. Before joining NCI in 2015, Dr. |

  16. Dr. Lindberg's Legacy : Charting A New Course | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Language System, and more. Don also created the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). NCBI has been a focal point for " ... D-FL), talks with Dr. Lindberg (right) and National Center for Biotechnology Information Director Dr. David Lipman (center) at a Capitol ...

  17. Dr. Bernard Langer — inductee into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Paul D.; Rotstein, Ori D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dr. Bernard Langer’s induction into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame acknowledges his profound effect on medicine and surgery in Canada and an impact that has been truly international. In this brief biography, we highlight the major accomplishments that have made Dr. Langer a pre-eminent leader, innovator, teacher and exemplary surgeon. PMID:25799243

  18. Dr. Moon Chen: The Insights of a Cancer Scientist Addressing Asian American Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    Throughout most of his career, Dr. Moon S. Chen, Jr. has sought to address Asian American cancer health disparities through research, outreach, and training. He has also helped NCI reach out to the Asian American community to educate this community about cancer. As part of the Meet the Researchers series, Dr. Chen shares his insights with Lifelines.

  19. Dr. von Braun with the Front Page of the Huntsville Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is presented with the front page of the Huntsville Times arnouncing the launch of Explorer I, the first U.S. Earth satellite, which was boosted by the Jupiter-C launch vehicle developed by Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The occasion was the fifth Anniversary of the Explorer I launch in January 1958.

  20. Evolutionary relationship between human major histocompatibility complex HLA-DR haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, A.C.; Setterblad, N.; Pihlgren, U.; Rask, L.; Andersson, G.

    1996-09-01

    HLA-DR haplotypes of the human major histocompatibility complex are organized in five different groups. They can be identified based on the serological specificity expressed by the polymorphic DRB1 locus and by the presence of a characteristic set of DRB genes. The nucleotide sequences of introns 4 and 5 of the two DRB genes (DRB1*01 and DRB6*01) from a DR1 haplotype and the three DRB genes (DRB1*15, DRB6*15, and DRB5*15), from a DR51 haplotype were determined. This study identified endogenous retroviral long terminal repeat elements (ERV9 LTR) located at identical positions in intron 5 of the DRB1 genes in both the DR1 and DR51 haplotypes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a close evolutionary relationship between these two haplotypes. The DRB5 gene, unique for the DR51 haplotype, may have been lost by a recent gene deletion event creating the DR1 haplotype. A model for the evolution of the human DR haplotypes involving separate duplication and contraction events is presented. 55 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Meena Jaggi - Investigating Curcumin (Turmeric) as HPV Repressor for Native American Women

    Cancer.gov

    Often cancer health disparities are the result of complex factors, including environmental, nutrition, lifestyle, etc. According to Dr. Jaggi, there is a relationship between smoking (which is very high in the region) and cervical cancer. Native American women in Northern Plains smoke four times more compared to Caucasian women. Some research suggests that smoking can influence HPV infection, said Dr. Jaggi.

  2. Reflections of a soon-to-be former DR

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.I.

    1997-12-31

    SRP, formerly known as Salt River Project, is actually a combination of two organizations, The Salt River Valley Water Users` Association (the {open_quotes}Association{close_quotes}), and the Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District (the {open_quotes}District{close_quotes}). The Association was incorporated under the laws of the Territory of Arizona in 1903, and is one of the first projects authorized under the Federal Reclamation Act of 1902. The District was formed in 1937 as a political subdivision of the State of Arizona, and is responsible for the construction, operation and maintenance of the Electric System and the irrigation and water supply system. Generation and sale of electrical power and energy represent a significant portion of the District`s investment and revenues. SRP has a total capability of over 5000 MW from hydroelectric, thermal and purchased sources, Of this, almost 2400 MW is provided by Title IV, Phase II affected units. Phase II units must comply with the SO{sub 2} allowance program starting in the year 2000. SRP operates four facilities having Title IV units. The implementation of Title IV requires the selection of a Designated Representative (DR) to represent the utility and all utilities in the participation plants the utility may operate, to be responsible for reporting emissions of sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen to the United States Environmental Protection Agency on a quarterly and annual basis and certify to the accuracy and completeness of the information.

  3. "Treating Lungs": The Scientific Contributions of Dr. Theodor Kolobow.

    PubMed

    Trahanas, John M; Kolobow, Mary Anne; Hardy, Mark A; Berra, Lorenzo; Zapol, Warren M; Bartlett, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    We are fortunate to live in an age in which biomedical technology has provided us with unprecedented ability to supplant the functions of organs and support the physiologic processes of the human body. Ingenious doctors, physiologists, and engineers helped create these advances with new and innovative ideas. One of these pioneers was Dr. Theodor Kolobow. He is best known for one of his earliest inventions, the spiral coil membrane lung. His contributions to medical innovation, however, are diverse, as he also contributed to advances in hemodialysis, improvements in extracorporeal life support technology/circuit components, and through his laboratory experiments helped shape our current understanding of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. In retrospect, much of Kolobow's work was unified by the theme of preventing iatrogenic lung injury caused by mechanical ventilation. This tenet became more obvious as his later studies progressed to developing techniques and devices intended to limit ventilator pressures, and prevent bacterial colonization of the lungs. Although he formally retired from his research endeavors in 2009, the impact of his contributions remains prominent in our everyday use of techniques and equipment that he either originated or helped to develop. PMID:26720733

  4. Identification of the HLA-DM/HLA-DR interface.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew N; Lamikanra, Abigail; Sansom, Clare E; Flower, Darren R; Moss, David S; Travers, Paul J

    2008-02-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM is a critical participant in antigen presentation that catalyzes the dissociation of the Class II-associated Invariant chain-derived Peptide (CLIP) from the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II molecules. There is competition amongst peptides for access to an MHC Class II groove and it has been hypothesised that DM functions as a 'peptide editor' that catalyzes the replacement of one peptide for another within the groove. It is established that the DM catalyst interacts directly with the MHC Class II but the precise location of the interface is unknown. Here, we combine previously described mutational data with molecular docking and energy minimisation simulations to identify a putative interaction site of >4000A2 which agrees with known point mutational data for both the DR and DM molecule. The docked structure is validated by comparison with experimental data and previously determined properties of protein-protein interfaces. A possible dissociation mechanism is suggested by the presence of an acidic cluster near the N terminus of the bound peptide. PMID:17870168

  5. 2012 DR30, The Most Distant Solar System Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Csaba; Szab, G.; Pl, A.; Kiss, L.; Srneczky, K.; Mller, T.; Vilenius, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Conn, B.; Ortiz, J.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Horner, J.; Bannister, M.; Stansberry, J.

    2012-10-01

    2012 DR30, the most distant TNO in the Solar System (a=1103 AU) has recently been observed with the Herschel Space Observatory. Radiometric model results using the far-infrared fluxes and visual range data show a dark and cratered surface (p_V = 6%) and provide a diameter of 200km. If considered as a Centaur, this is the fifth largest object known in this dynamical class. Recent visual range measurements indicate the presence of methane ice on the surface, a feature that has been seen previously for objects with diameters of >=1000km only (like Eris, Makemake and Pluto). The presence of methane ice can be explained assuming that the object spent most of its lifetime in a very cold environment and has been recently placed to its present orbit. This scenario is in agreement with the results of a dynamical study of the object's orbit, also suggesting an Oort-cloud origin. This research has been supported by the following grants: (1) The PECS program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Hungarian Space Office, PECS-98073; (2) C.K. and A.P. acknowledges the support of the Bolyai Research Fellowship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  6. Three Moving Groups Detected in the LAMOST DR1 Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. K.; Zhao, G.; Chen, Y. Q.; Oswalt, T. D.; Tan, K. F.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the kinematics of thick disk and halo stars observed by the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope. We have constructed a sample of 7993 F, G, and K nearby main-sequence stars (d < 2 kpc) with estimates of position (x, y, z) and space velocity (U, V, W) based on color and proper motion from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR9 catalog. Three "phase-space overdensities" are identified in (V, \\sqrt{U^{2}+2V^{2}}) with significance levels of ? > 3. Two of them (the Hyades-Pleiades stream and the Arcturus-AF06 stream) have been identified previously. We also find evidence for a new stream (centered at V ~ -180 km s-1) in the halo. The formation mechanisms of these three streams are analyzed. Our results support the hypothesis that the Arcturus-AF06 stream and the new stream originated from the debris of a disrupted satellite, while the Hyades-Pleiades stream has a dynamical origin.

  7. Three moving groups detected in the LAMOST DR1 archive

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Zhao, G.; Chen, Y. Q.; Tan, K. F.; Oswalt, T. D.; Zhang, Y. E-mail: oswaltt1@erau.edu

    2014-05-20

    We analyze the kinematics of thick disk and halo stars observed by the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope. We have constructed a sample of 7993 F, G, and K nearby main-sequence stars (d < 2 kpc) with estimates of position (x, y, z) and space velocity (U, V, W) based on color and proper motion from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR9 catalog. Three 'phase-space overdensities' are identified in (V, ?(U{sup 2}+2V{sup 2})) with significance levels of ? > 3. Two of them (the Hyades-Pleiades stream and the Arcturus-AF06 stream) have been identified previously. We also find evidence for a new stream (centered at V ? 180 km s{sup 1}) in the halo. The formation mechanisms of these three streams are analyzed. Our results support the hypothesis that the Arcturus-AF06 stream and the new stream originated from the debris of a disrupted satellite, while the Hyades-Pleiades stream has a dynamical origin.

  8. Candidate members of star clusters from LAMOST DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Chao; Chen, Li; Deng, Li-Cai; Hou, Jin-Liang; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Yang, Fan; Wu, Yue; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we provide 2189 photometrically- and kinematically-selected candidate members of 24 star clusters from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. We perform two-step membership identification: selection along the stellar track in the color-magnitude diagram, i.e., photometric identification, and selection from the distribution of radial velocities, i.e. the kinematic identification. We find that the radial velocities from the LAMOST data are very helpful in the membership identification. The mean probability of membership is 40% for the sample selected with radial velocity. With these 24 star clusters, we investigate the performance of the radial velocity and metallicity estimated with the LAMOST pipeline. We find that the systematic offsets in radial velocity and metallicity are 0.85 ± 1.26 km s-1 and -0.08 ± 0.04 dex, with dispersions of 5.47+1.16-0.71 km s-1 and 0.13+0.04-0.02 dex, respectively. Finally, we propose that the photometrically-selected candidate members of the clusters covered by the LAMOST footprint should be assigned higher priority so that more candidate stars can be observed.

  9. Dr. Monaco Examines Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Lisa Monaco, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) project scientist for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development (LOCAD) program, examines a lab on a chip. The small dots are actually ports where fluids and chemicals can be mixed or samples can be collected for testing. Tiny channels, only clearly visible under a microscope, form pathways between the ports. Many chemical and biological processes, previously conducted on large pieces of laboratory equipment, can now be performed on these small glass or plastic plates. Monaco and other researchers at MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama, are customizing the chips to be used for many space applications, such as monitoring microbes inside spacecraft and detecting life on other planets. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the International Space Station (ISS), the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  10. 2011 AMCA Memorial Lecture honoree: Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Terry L; Klein, Terry A

    2011-09-01

    Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr. (1866-1929) was an early-20th-century expert in taxonomy and biology of culicid Diptera. At an early age, Dyar became interested in the biology, life history, and taxonomy of Lepidoptera, which he continued throughout his entire career. Dyar pursued his passion for entomology, and during his formative years, professionals sent Lepidoptera specimens to him for identification. As his prominence was well known to Leland Howard, then the honorary curator of the US National Museum of Natural History, he was asked and accepted the position as honorary custodian of Lepidoptera in 1897, which later included periods of service with the US Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and the US Army Officers' Reserve Corps. This position went without stipend and it was Dyar's personal wealth that allowed him to continue his love of entomology. However, the museum did provide limited staff and funds for illustrators, supplies, and travel. In the early 1900s, his interests expanded to include mosquitoes where he concentrated on their life histories and taxonomy. Throughout his career, Dyar often criticized colleagues, both personally and in publications, often with interludes of peace to coauthor articles and books. His legacy of original scientific work is of lasting significance to public health and entomology communities, in recognition of which he was selected as the 2011 AMCA memorial lecture honoree. PMID:22017104

  11. Kinematics and activity of M dwarfs in LAMOST DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhen-Ping; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Song, Yi-Han; Pan, Jing-Chang; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-06-01

    We report on the first investigation into kinematics and chromospheric activity of M dwarfs from the Guo Shou Jing Telescope (also called the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope LAMOST) data release one (DR1). The sample comprises 71 304 M dwarfs. Their fundamental parameters such as spectral types, radial velocities, important molecular band indices and magnetic activities are measured. Their distances are determined by a spectroscopic parallax relation. Space motion (U, V, W) and Galactocentric cylindrical coordinates (R, ?, Z) for the M dwarfs are also computed. We examine velocity dispersion as a function of height from the Galactic plane and find that all three components of velocity dispersion increase with height as measured with respect to the Galactic plane. The investigation into chromospheric activities along the height from the Galactic plane confirms that M dwarfs closer to the Galactic plane are more likely to be active. We take a pure kinematical approach to select thin disk stars and thick disk stars from our sample, then to investigate the differences in properties between these two populations. Our analysis is in excellent agreement with previous studies and leads to a better understanding of the structure of the Galactic disk. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  12. The Dr Pheo Blog and virtual counselling for rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run

    2015-01-01

    Patients with suspected or diagnosed rare diseases face challenges. Their own physicians usually do not have a large experience in a particular rare disease, specialists may not be easily accessible, and medical knowledge on rare diseases is either not readily available or too general to be applied to the patients' individual situations. As a specialist with experience in pheochromocytoma, I therefore started a blog to disseminate knowledge about the tumour and to discuss readers' questions about it (http://drpheo.blogspot.com/). Between 2009 and 2014, the blog was viewed 81,223 times and received 1286 comments during the 5-year period. About half of the comments contained mostly questions (questioning comments), including 429 directly on pheochromocytoma (7.5/month). The majority of the questioning comments were about the diagnosis (62%) and natural history (21%) of pheochromocytoma, with the remainder on management (14%) and follow-up or prognosis (4%). Many readers' comments started with encouraging words about the blog and remarked how difficult it was to find useful information on pheochromocytoma elsewhere. Experience with the Dr Pheo Blog suggests that physician specialist-written blogs are potentially an effective and convenient way of providing pertinent knowledge on rare diseases to the public. PMID:25059244

  13. Asylum Doctor Extraordinaire: Dr. Thomas Drapes (1847-1919).

    PubMed

    Kelly, B D

    2015-09-01

    Dr. Thomas Drapes (1847-1919) was resident medical superintendent of Enniscorthy District Asylum in County Wexford, Ireland from 1883 to 1919, and one of the leading figures in Irish asylum medicine for several decades. Drapes' career was as complex as it was remarkable. Drapes was elected president of the Medico-Psychological Association for the term 1911-12 but had to decline on health grounds. In 1912, however, he was unanimously elected as co-editor of the Journal of Mental Science, to which he devoted his considerable energies and intellect. Drapes published widely, opposing Emil Kraepelin's proposed division of "functional" psychosis into manic-depressive illness and dementia praecox; openly examining the use of "punitive measures" in asylums (Enniscorthy had notably low rates of restraint and seclusion); and publicly bemoaning the folly of "psychophysical parallelism", or the spurious division between mental and physical symptoms in medicine. Although not immune to passing trends in medical thought (e.g. regarding sterilisation of the mentally ill to prevent further mental disorder), Drapes was generally independent-minded, insightful and incisive, and his legacy was to help shape Irish mental health care for many decades. PMID:25833354

  14. [Life and work of Dr. Jovan Jovanovi? Zmaj].

    PubMed

    Lesi?, Aleksandar; Bumbasirevi?, Marko; Zizi?-Borjanovi?, Slavica

    2006-10-01

    The year of 2004 was the 100th anniversary of death of the poet and physician Dr. Jovan Jovanovi? Zmaj. Jovan Jovanovi? Zmaj was born in 1833 in Novi Sad, and died in 1904 in Sremska Kamenica J.J. Zmaj himself studied law and worked in the Novi Sad magistrate court. It was not until he turned 30 that he began practicing medicine. He developed as a poet as early as during his studies. He remained loyal to the vocations of physician and poet throughout his life. He wrote over 5000 poems, ranging from those for children through those for adults and those with which he addressed the rulers satirically. He was a founder of a number of magazines (Javor, Neven, Komarac, Danica). At that time of Romanticism, the work of J.J. Zmaj also had a national character. However, he succeeded in achieving something more: he introduced a literary genre till then unknown in Serb literature--literature for children. Through his genre he promoted not only Serbian language but also hygiene, by which he played a significant health care role, similar to that played by his friend Milan Jovanovi? Batut, only from a different aspect. He also used to draw, and his drawing of the emblem of the Serbian Literary Association has remained on the cover of every book published by it until these days. PMID:18172968

  15. Cholera, canals, and contagion: Rediscovering Dr. Beck's report.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Ashleigh R; Chan, Christina H; Fisman, David N

    2011-08-01

    Cholera first appeared in North America (in Montreal and Quebec) in 1832 and spread rapidly across the eastern half of the continent. The dispatch of American disease control experts to Lower Canada in anticipation of cholera's spread implies that medical professionals expected spread, possibly from contagion, even though the notion that cholera was contagious was disparaged in medical writings of the time, and would be until John Snow's landmark work in London in the 1850s. Snow's insights derived largely from his observations on spatial and temporal patterns of cholera cases. We discuss a document from the 1832 epidemic, the report of Dr. Lewis Beck to New York's Governor Throop, which anticipates Snow in presenting geospatial data that imply cholera's contagiousness. Beck shows that the movements of immigrants along the newly completed New York state canal system resulted in sequential cholera outbreaks along the canal's path. Although aware of the degree to which this suggested contagion, Beck argues strenuously against the contagiousness of cholera. We explore the social context of early nineteenth-century medicine that probably led Beck to disbelieve his own observations, and to favor a medical model inconsistent with his data. Themes that emerge from our inquiry include belief in disease as a physical manifestation of defective morality, stigmatization of the poor and immigrant groups, and reluctance to overturn prevailing medical models that themselves reflected the economic position of medical practitioners. We show that these themes continue to serve as obstacles to innovation in medical and public health practice today. PMID:21544099

  16. The life-work of Prof. MUDr. Zdenek Lojda, Dr.Sc., Dr. Med. et Iur. h.c.

    PubMed

    Hach, P

    2008-01-01

    Professor Zdenek Lojda, MD., Dr.Sc., Dr. Med.h.c., Dr. Jur. h.c., vice-rector emeritus of the Charles University and director emeritus of the Institute of Histology and Embryology of the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague died on the 24th April 2004. Born in Trebc (in a local maternal hospital on the 7th December 1927) he grew up in Moravsk Budejovice where he graduated from a primary and secondary school (he passed out each class as well as the leaving exam at the local gymnasium in 1946 cum laude). He was growing up in an inspiring atmosphere of a family of a professor at gymnasium that helped him to form his fundamental moral attitude and to gain high knowledge of an almost Renaissance comprehension. He was a gifted linguist (he spoke fluently several languages including Latin) and musician (he did community singing among others) and he was interested in natural sciences. In 1946 he enrolled for the medical faculty and coincidentally he was grouped among students that completed histology and embryology at the Institute of Embryology headed by professor Zdenek Frankenberger, MD., who had recognised his interest in this field of study. The young student gave himself and his free time to the work of an unqualified lab-worker and only later he became assistant conducting practical tutorials. He took his degree cum laude in 1952 and he received certificate of competence because of his excellent results. He showed his preoccupation with histology (strongly influenced by the personality of professor Frankenberger) after the graduation when he entered the job of the assistant professor at the Institute of Embryology and he stayed there until 1961. When he was about to decide which problems he should target, professor Frankenberger drew his attention to a very interesting part of histology that was just in advance and that was the use of diazonic salts for formation of colour reaction product demonstrating enzyme activity in tissues. In 1962 professor Frankenberger retired and Lojda left the Institute of Embryology for the 4th internal clinic to work in the Laboratory of Angiology housed at the 1st (Hlava) Institute of Pathologic Anatomy. This step influenced Lojda's professional occupations: in the Laboratory of Angiology he studied enzymes of blood vessel wall; the problems in gastroenterology solved at the 4th internal clinic and teaching hospital brought him to issues connected with enzyme garniture of the intestinal mucosal epithelium; his engagement at the Hlava Institute where he worked as well as house officer and later as pathology teacher caused that he subordinated his interest in enzyme garniture of various tissues to study and explanation of pathological processes using functional morphology. In years 1966 to 1975 he earned his master degree in pathology, he habilitated in pathology and was promoted to a professorship in pathology. PMID:19548603

  17. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Knaus, Z.C.

    1995-06-12

    This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The LSFF was established to investigate fire fighting and safety associated with alkali metal fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities. The decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan identifies the decontamination procedures, sampling locations, any special handling requirements, quality control samples, required chemical analysis, and data validation needed to meet the requirements of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  18. [Dr Guillermo Contreras Da Silva, a relevant figure in the development of Chilean microbiology].

    PubMed

    Cabello, Felipe C

    2008-02-01

    The influence of the work of Dr. Guillermo Contreras Da Silva and his colaborators on the evolution of microbiology in Chile is briefly analyzed. Dr. Contreras was trained in modern virology at Yale University with Dr. J. Melnick under the sponsorhip of the Rockefeller Foundation. During this training, he used serological methods to classify Cocksakie viruses. After his return to Chile, he studied the epidemiology of enteroviruses, including poliovirus. His laboratory, the country's first in modern virology, took an active role in Chile's first Sabin polio vaccination in 1961. Dr. Contreras and his group transformed the teaching and the character of microbiology in Chile from a descriptive medically oriented discipline into an autonomous, quantitative and experimental science. They modernized microbiology with the introduction of molecular biology and microbial genetics and fostered collaborations with allied biological sciences. Dr. Contreras was a Guggenheim Fellow, and until his retirement, was the Chief of the Viral Products Division, Bureau of Biologies, Ottawa, Canada. PMID:18483682

  19. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. Nadine Foreman, M.D., August 19, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Dr. Nadine Foreman was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Foreman was selected for interview because of the position she held at the University of California, San Francisco. Following a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Foreman describes her work with Dr. Mayo Soley using I-131 in treatment of hyperthyroidism, selection criteria for patients in the radioiodine project, work with Dr. Earl Miller, work at Highland Hospital, radioiodine treatment of diffuse toxic goiter (myxedema), the radiophosphorus and radioiodine programs with Dr. Bert Low-Beer, and treatment of polycythemia vera.

  20. Dr. Gu Baochang speaks out on son preference in China.

    PubMed

    Bai, F

    1995-08-01

    In an interview, Dr. Gu Baochang of China discussed the topics of son preference and the increasing male-to-female sex ratio at birth in China. Gu noted that prior to 1980 the sex ratio in China was normal but that it reached a high of 113.9 in 1989 as fertility dropped. The yearly sex ratio figures continue to be close to normal for first parity births but become increasingly unbalanced for higher order births. The reasons for this abnormal sex ratio at birth are the underreporting of female births (which is estimated to account for 50-75% of the abnormality but is decreasing), sex selective abortion (which is becoming the major factor), and the lesser influence of the infanticide of female babies. The preference for sons which persists in China, Taiwan, and the Republic of Korea is determined by the issues of family labor, elderly support, women's status, and carrying on the family line. All of these issues will be influenced by socioeconomic development, which can vary in different regions of a country. Thus, Shanghai has achieved replacement level fertility with a normal sex ratio. Also, to improve efforts at fertility transition, the evaluation of family planning programs should include the incidence of son preference, and the programs should emphasize reproductive health and women's status. The issue of son preference can be explored from a broad perspective by examining the experience of other Asian countries, some of which have normal sex ratios, others of which have excess infant and child mortality. The Chinese government is trying to curb son preference by making efforts to improve the status of women and girls and by banning the illegal use of the sonogram. Eventually, as society evolves and people become achieve economic development, a normal sex ratio and low fertility will be achieved. PMID:12290273

  1. Dr. Nicholas Ionescu-Pallas at His 70-th Anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Valentin I.

    The article is devoted to 70-th Anniversary of Dr. Nicholas Ionescu-Pallas (borne on July 30, 1932 in Pallas village close to the town of Constanţa, Romania as the son of Ion Ionescu and Maria Dincă), an outstanding Romanian physicist with contributuions in a large area of theoretical and experimental physics, from Theoretical Classical and Quantum Mechanics to General Relativity and Gravitation. He was graduated from the University of Bucharest (1955), a disciple of Professor Ion Agârbiceanu, Doctor of Physics in 1971. He is the author of more than 300 scientific papers and 3 fundamental monographs in these areas, unique in Romania, and of great international circulation. He was one of the creators of the First Romanian Laser. He was elected the Honorary President of the Romanian Society on Genereal Relativity and Gravitation. A great erudition by Ionescu-Pallas allowed him to make also contributions in History of Sciencs. He has been a member of the Academic Commitee for the Philosophy and history of science, of the European Physical Society (1971), of the European Group for Atomic spectroscopy (1970), of the Institute for Scientific Culture E. Majorana (1976), of the International Society of Gravitation and General Relativity (1978) and of the Astronomical Society of India (1982). He was a representative of the intellectuals in the Scientific Council of the Institute for Atomic Physics, 1970-1975; a member of the National Commitee for physics in 1970, and a member of the Coordinating Commitee for the Romanian Enclclopaedia of Physics in 1983. His biographical data are available in Men of Achievement, Who's Who in the World, and Short History of the Romanian Scientific and Technical Creativeness.

  2. [Dr Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis- the "Leopard" from Vis].

    PubMed

    Jamnicki Dojmi, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Dr Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis (1845-1927) was a descendant of a respectful aristocratic family from Vis. His father was Peter Dojmi di Delupis (1809-1886), an attorney, a moderate pro-Italian autonomist, and a mayor of Vis, and his mother was Margherita Siminati. As soon as he graduated from the Medical University of Graz in 1870, he joined the Ottoman army as a physician for a two-year journey in which he reached as far as Baghdad and Basra. He left notes about this dramatic, juvenile adventure in his diaries. In 1878, he married a Viennese girl Maria Neidl and brought her home to Vis, where he got a position of municipal doctor. He had an extraordinary diagnosing acuity, great sympathy for patients, and was always willing to help, which is why he was adored by all the people of Vis, whether they agreed with his autonomist ideas or not, and soon became "the father of Vis". He was the first to warn of leprosy in Dalmatia, when he diagnosed two cases in Vis. Beside medicine and politics, he was also a passionate botanist. He was the first to seed palms in Vis and to grow a palm nursery with his agronomist son Peter Dojmi, for the whole of Dalmatia. He also tried breeding ostriches and growing Mexican coffee. He funded a small meteorological station in Vis, and planned to open a health resort with professor Schröter from Vienna. Even though Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis held the great Italian culture very dear, his vocation as a physician and humanist inclination never let him burn with the fervour of a political extremist. Thanks to his psychophysical stability, he overcame numerous difficulties in life and retained faith in people. All these traits evoke Prince Salina, the leading character of the renowned novel Il gattopardo (The Leopard) by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, which is why the author has so entitled this article "The Gattopardo of Vis". PMID:22292541

  3. Morphology and Absolute Magnitudes of the SDSS DR7 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, B.; Andrei, A. H.; Antn, S.

    2014-10-01

    The ESA mission Gaia will furnish a complete census of the Milky Way, delivering astrometrics, dynamics, and astrophysics information for 1 billion stars. Operating in all-sky repeated survey mode, Gaia will also provide measurements of extra-galactic objects. Among the later there will be at least 500,000 QSOs that will be used to build the reference frame upon which the several independent observations will be combined and interpreted. Not all the QSOs are equally suited to fulfill this role of fundamental, fiducial grid-points. Brightness, morphology, and variability define the astrometric error budget for each object. We made use of 3 morphological parameters based on the PSF sharpness, circularity and gaussianity, which enable us to distinguish the "real point-like" QSOs. These parameters are being explored on the spectroscopically certified QSOs of the SDSS DR7, to compare the performance against other morphology classification schemes, as well as to derive properties of the host galaxy. We present a new method, based on the Gaia quasar database, to derive absolute magnitudes, on the SDSS filters domain. The method can be extrapolated all over the optical window, including the Gaia filters. We discuss colors derived from SDSS apparent magnitudes and colors based on absolute magnitudes that we obtained tanking into account corrections for dust extinction, either intergalactic or from the QSO host, and for the Lyman ? forest. In the future we want to further discuss properties of the host galaxies, comparing for e.g. the obtained morphological classification with the color, the apparent and absolute magnitudes, and the redshift distributions.

  4. Induction and increase of HLA-DR antigen expression by immune interferon on ML-3 cell line enhances the anti-HLA-DR immunotoxin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chiron, M; Jaffrezou, J P; Carayon, P; Bordier, C; Roubinet, F; Xavier, C; Brandely, M; Laurent, G

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of induction and increase target antigen expression on immunotoxin potency, we measured the potentiating effect of recombinant immune interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) on the cytotoxicity of an anti HLA-DR ricin A-chain immunotoxin (2G5 RTA-IT) on the myeloid cell line ML-3. After 48 h of incubation with rIFN-gamma (500 U/ml) the percentage of 2G5-positive cells increased from 40% to 79%, and the 2G5 mean density was enhanced by 10-fold (11,000 versus 110,000 molecules/cell). Concurrently, rIFN-gamma pretreatment induced a dramatic improvement of 2G5 RTA-IT dose-effect cytotoxicity, as well as immunotoxin cytotoxicity kinetics. When 2G5 RTA-IT was used at the optimal dose of 10(-8)M (the maximum dose which avoided non-specific ricin A-chain cytotoxicity), the immunotoxin-induced cell kill increased with the percentage of DR-positive ML-3 cells according to a similar linear-logarithmic function of rIFN-gamma concentration. Moreover, in the same range of rIFN-gamma concentrations, the killing values and the percentage of DR-positive ML-3 cells were similar if not identical. These findings imply that the enhancement of 2G5 RTA-IT cytotoxicity by rIFN-gamma is mainly related to the rIFN-gamma 2G5 antigen induction on HLA-DR negative cells when immunotoxin was used at 10(-8) M. Furthermore, 2G5 RTA-IT dose-effect cytotoxicity on DR-expressing ML-3 cells, when used at lower concentrations, was also increased by rIFN-gamma in a dose-dependent manner. This result suggests that for immunotoxin concentrations close to the limiting membrane saturation dose (10(-10)M), rIFN-gamma may not solely act by inducing HLA-DR expression on DR-negative ML-3 subpopulation but also by increasing individual cellular DR density on DR expressing ML-3 cells. Finally, our study showed that immunotoxin potency on malignant cell populations which display an heterogeneous antigen expression, could be greatly improved by the use of rIFN-gamma. PMID:2122930

  5. HLA-DR typing in coeliac disease: evidence for genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, A; Taylor, C J; Dillon-Remmy, M; Woodrow, J C; McConnell, R B

    1984-01-01

    Sixty nine propositi from a family study of coeliac disease were typed for HLA-DR antigens. Sixty three (91%) were found to carry the antigen DR3, which was a significantly greater proportion (p = 9.6 X 10(-24] than among the 168 controls (26%). Concurrently 42 children with the disease were DR typed. Not only was the frequency of DR3 significantly increased in these patients (86% versus 26% in controls; p = 3.1 X 10(-12] but so also was the frequency of DR7 (patients 60%, controls 29%; p = 5.8 X 10(-4]. When those propositi whose coeliac disease presented before the age of 20 were combined with the childhood coeliac group and a comparison made between these patients and the remainder of the propositi, all of whom presented when they were older than 20, the childhood onset group had a significant excess of DR7 (p = 2.2 X 10(-3] and a significant deficiency of DR2 (p = 3.5 X 10(-3]. These findings indicate that childhood coeliac disease and adult coeliac disease are genetically heterogeneous. PMID:6439322

  6. Mechanism by which HLA-DR4 regulates sex-bias of arthritis in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Marshall; Trejo, Theodore; Luthra, Harvinder; Griffiths, Marie; David, Chella S; Taneja, Veena

    2010-08-01

    HLA class II allele DRB1*0401 is associated with predisposition to Rheumatoid Arthritis in humans as well as collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Predominantly females develop arthritis in humans and DR4 transgenic mice; however the mechanism of sex-bias is still unknown. We have investigated the molecular basis by which DR4 is associated with sex-bias of arthritis. Here we show that differential antigen-specific immune mechanisms in DR4 male and female mice lead to increased susceptibility in female mice. B cells are hyperactive and present DR-restricted peptides robustly in females compared to males. Antigen-specific response showed that females produced B cell modulating cytokines like IL-13 while males produced IFNgamma. Male transgenic mice have higher number of T and B regulatory cells. An exogenous supply of 17beta estradiol in male mice led to enhanced expression of DR4 and antigen-specific response to DR4-restricted peptides. On the other hand, castration increased the incidence of arthritis. We propose that sex-bias in arthritis involves B cells and presentation of antigen by HLA-DR4 leading to activation of autoreactive cells and autoantibodies production in females, while regulatory B cells in males protect them from pathogenesis. The transgenic mice expressing RA susceptible haplotype simulate human RA and may be valuable to study gender differences observed in patients. PMID:20061120

  7. HLA-DR and -DQ phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stokkers, P; Reitsma, P; Tytgat, G; van Deventer, S J H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is partially genetically determined and the HLA class II genes are candidates for a role in genetic susceptibility to IBD, because their products play a central role in the immune response. Multiple studies have reported associations between HLA-DR or -DQ phenotypes and either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, but much of the data are still controversial.
AIMS—To estimate overall associations between HLA class II phenotypes and IBD, and to establish the relative risk conferred by HLA-DR and -DQ phenotypes by meta-analysis.
METHODS—Medline was searched for publications reporting on the relation between IBD and HLA class II phenotypes. Raw data were extracted by recalculating the number of phenotypes or the number of alleles of the main antigens. Odds ratios and confidence intervals were calculated according to the Mantel-Haenszel method.
RESULTS—DR2, DR9, and DRB1*0103 were positively associated with ulcerative colitis, and a negative association was found for DR4 and ulcerative colitis. For Crohn's disease a positive association was found with DR7, DRB3*0301, and DQ4 and a negative association with DR2 and DR3.
CONCLUSIONS—Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are associated with specific HLA class II phenotypes. Further analysis of these phenotypes and subgroup analysis may elucidate how these alleles contribute to susceptibility to IBD.


Keywords: ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease; HLA-DR; HLA-DQ PMID:10446108

  8. Lymphocyte responses to DR1/4 restricted peptides in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, M A; Watson, L; Geursen, A; Tan, P L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether analog and unrelated DR1/4 binding peptides alter DR1/4 restricted responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS--PBL from 25 patients with RA and 12 healthy controls were cultured with DR1/4 restricted peptides of the influenza haemagglutinin, amino acids 307-319 (HA) and matrix proteins, amino acids 17-29 (IM). Responses were determined by 3H-thymidine uptake proliferation assays and limiting dilution analysis. Competitor peptides were analogs HA-R312 and HA-K313 differing from HA by one amino acid at the 312 or 313 position respectively or unrelated peptides which bind to DR1/4. RESULTS--The responses of eight patients with RA to the two stimulatory influenza peptides did not differ significantly from controls and this was confirmed by the frequency estimate of T cells in PBL which responded to HA (mean frequency: 1 in 9.0 x 10(4), n = 5, in DR1/4+ RA patients, 1 in 7.6 x 10(4), n = 5, in DR1/4+ healthy controls). DR1/4 binding analogs of the HA peptide inhibited HA specific peptide responses of PBL from patients with RA and controls. Inhibition was also detected with unrelated peptides which bind to DR1/4 but to which the individual did not respond. CONCLUSION--Similar responses to two DR1/4 restricted peptides were observed in patients with RA and controls. Both antigen analog- and unrelated peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) can result in the inhibition of antigen specific responses in multi-clonal human lymphocyte populations. However, an analog peptide may be stimulatory in some individuals. These results provide some initial data for the development of a rational approach to MHC-specific immunomodulation in rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:8154934

  9. Dr. Ray Gause examines student Skylab experiment ED-52 Web Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Ray Gause of the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) places dinner, in the form of a housefly, in the web of Arabella - the prime spider for the ED-52 Web Formation Experiment. Arabella can be delineated near the end of the black pen in Dr. Gause's hand. The experiment is one of 25 student experiments accepted for the Skylab program and will be performed during the Skylab 3 mission. Judy Miles, a 17-year-old high school student from Lexington, Massachusetts, is the student experimenter and Dr. Gause is the NASA student advisor.

  10. [Dr Alexander M. Kellas and the first Mount Everest expedition].

    PubMed

    Hauge, A

    1997-03-20

    In 1921 the government of Tibet gave permission for a British party to attempt Mount Everest from the northern Tibetan side. Little was known about the physiological and medical problems associated with ascents to extreme altitudes. The person who knew most about these topics was Dr. Alexander Kellas, lecturer in medical chemistry at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School. He had made a number of expeditions to the Sikkim Himal and the Tibetan border before the first world war, and had become increasingly interested in the problems caused by altitude. He was invited to join the Everest expedition but died on the approach march at Kampa Dzong on the Tibetan plateau, within sight of the mountain. Before he went on the expedition Kellas wrote an article entitled A consideration of the possibility of ascending Mt. Everest. This paper was never published, but the manuscript exists in the archives of the Royal Geographical Society and the Alpine Club in London. As Kellas saw it, the main issue was whether sufficient adaptation could occur to allow a climber to ascend from a camp at about 7,700 m to the summit (8,848 m) in one day without supplementary oxygen. His conclusion was that this was possible and, in fact, the first such ascent by Habeler and Messner in 1978 started from a camp at 7,900 m. Kellas calculated the pressure on the summit to be 251 mmHg, a more accurate figure than estimates based on the "Standard Atmosphere" Kellas estimated maximum oxygen uptake at the summit to be 970 ml/min, and the current value is thought to be about 1,070 ml/min. His estimates of the climbing rate near the summit closely parallels the rate of Habeler and Messner. Kellas had a talent for asking the right questions. He applied his considerable knowledge of physiology to the topic of high altitude, and his suggestions and recommendations were of consistently high quality. He deserves to be better known, both for his geographical surveys and for his pioneer work on high altitude medicine and acclimatisation. The 1921 expedition, after many failed attempts, discovered a possible route to the top of Mount Everest, which was used on all the summit attempts between the two world wars. The route went from Kharta, over the pass Lhakpa La, across East Rongbuk glacier and up via the north col. PMID:9148480

  11. 78 FR 21699 - Notice of the Next CAFTA-DR Environmental Affairs Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... government parties to the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR... a request for applications. No granting of money is directly associated with this request...

  12. High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / ... heavier and older, what does recent research on cholesterol and heart health tell us that Americans need ...

  13. VISIT TO DR SHARP - BEN PINKEL - ABE SILVERSTEIN - OSCAR SCHEY - JESSE HALL - JOHN COLLINS BY CONGRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    VISIT TO DR SHARP - BEN PINKEL - ABE SILVERSTEIN - OSCAR SCHEY - JESSE HALL - JOHN COLLINS BY CONGRESSMAN CARL HENSHAW FROM CALIFORNIA - NORWICK ROSS DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE - SENOR BUCH DE PERADA REPRESENTATIVE FROM MEXICO -

  14. ISS Update: Dr. Steve Squyres, NEEMO 16 Aquanaut and Cornell Professor - Duration: 13 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Dr. Steve Squyres, NEEMO 16 Aquanaut and Cornell Professor, about simulating a mission to an asteroid underwater. The Aquarius habitat simulates the isola...

  15. Description of work for 100-DR-2 Operable Unit Vadose Drilling/test pits

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the scope of work for the boreholes/test pits of the 100-DR-2 Operable Unit. Sampling and field activities include: Soil screening; geologic sampling; soil sampling (physical property); analytical sampling and depths; and geophysical logging.

  16. Ask Dr. Sue--Updates: Infectious Diseases, SIDS, HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes new concerns about infectious diseases in childcare settings (tuberculosis, gastrointestinal infections, and lice); sleep position and SIDS; HIV/AIDS issues; and the use of sterilized sand in sand boxes. (DR)

  17. For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Feature: Senior Living For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key Past Issues / ... home. "Watching my children grow closer to my parents has been a blessing, and having us nearby ...

  18. NES Live Video Chat: Dr. John C. Mather - Duration: 42 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NES welcomed Nobel Prize winner Dr. John C. Mather for a video webchat on May 17, 2011. He spoke about the James Webb Space Telescope and how it gives us a look into the past to see how galaxies ha...

  19. Possible association between HLA-DR5 and superficial spreading melanoma (SSM).

    PubMed

    Mueller-Eckhardt, G; Schendel, D J; Hundeiker, M; Riedel, T; O'Neill, G J; Riethmller, G; Mueller-Eckhardt, C

    1984-12-15

    Previous analyses of possible associations between MHC determinants and cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) have been inconclusive. We have investigated 98 patients with special emphasis on histologically determined subtypes of MM, and 5 multiple-case families. In addition to HLA-ABC and DR typing, complement allotypes of C2, C4A, C4B, BF were determined. Among the unrelated patients HLA-DR5 and, secondarily, B49 were observed to be associated with superficial spreading (SSM) but not with nodular (NM) or lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM). In families with MM, no definite segregation of the disease according to HLA and complement haplotypes was discernible. Moreover, no coincidence of haplotypes occurred in patients of the different families. HLA region recombinations including B/DR and/or DR/GLO were found in all the families investigated. PMID:6334654

  20. Dr Mary Crosse, OBE, MD (1900–1972) and the premature baby

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, P M

    2007-01-01

    On behalf of Birmingham's Department of Public Health, Dr Crosse developed the Sorrento Premature Baby Unit in 1931 and pioneered the modern care of these small newborn infants in Britain. PMID:17337665

  1. Dr. Grant Heikan examines lunar material in sieve from sample container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Grant Heikan, Manned Spacecraft Center and a Lunar Sample preliminary Examination Team member, examines lunar material in a sieve from the bulk sample container which was opened in the Biopreparation Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory.

  2. Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Cheryl; Loveless, Bill

    2014-04-11

    Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

  3. Dr. Ravindra Lal follows a live downlink of experiments operations on shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Dr. Ravindra Lal, principal investigator for a crystal growth experiment for Spacelab 3, follows a live downlink of the experiments operations in the shuttle science module. He is in the payload operations control center (POCC) in JSC's mission control center.

  4. GOES-R with Dr. Kathy Sullivan and Tim Samaras - Duration: 3 minutes, 36 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This short video features highlights from a live Nationwide broadcast that took place on April 3, 2012, from the studio of NASA Goddard TV. NOAA’s Deputy Administrator and Chief Scientist Dr. Ka...

  5. Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Cheryl; Loveless, Bill

    2014-03-18

    Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

  6. Eye-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... new patient comes in because they scratched their eye while working in the yard, or they think ...

  7. Dr. Michael DeBakey "is a magician of the heart…"

    MedlinePLUS

    ... today for just this kind of research, an artificial heart, or the vital parts of one, could ... In 1963, he made history by installing an artificial pump to assist a patient's damaged heart. Dr. ...

  8. Activation of TRAIL-DR5 pathway promotes sensorineural degeneration in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan; Soares, Vitor Y R; Kristiansen, Arthur G; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2016-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family cytokines are important mediators of inflammation. Elevated levels of serum TNF-α are associated with human sensorineural hearing loss via poorly understood mechanisms. We demonstrate, for the first time, expression of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its signaling death receptor 5 (DR5) in the murine inner ear and show that exogenous TRAIL can trigger hair cell and neuronal degeneration, which can be partly prevented with DR5-blocking antibodies. PMID:26791792

  9. DCEG Special Seminar - Dr. Yu Wang, Director, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Prior to leading the China CDC, Dr. Wang was Vice President of the Peking University Health Science Center and had important leadership positions in the Ministry of Science and Technology.China CDCs outstanding contributions in disease control and prevention in the post-Wenchuan earthquake relief and his many other achievements have led to numerous awards from the Ministries of Health and Human Resources, and State Council, municipal governments and other organizations. Dr.

  10. The relationship between homeopathy and the Dr Bach system of flower remedies: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    van Haselen, R A

    1999-07-01

    The relationship between homeopathy and the Dr Bach system of flower remedies is explored. A historical perspective is given, doctrinal similarities and dissimilarities between both systems are discussed and the relationship between remedies used in homeopathy as well as in Dr Bach's system of flower remedies is explored. It is concluded that although both systems are clearly different, some common ground exists and that both systems may have a complementary role which is perhaps insufficiently recognised. PMID:10449052

  11. Dr. von Braun Presents a Hard Hat to Lady Bird Johnson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center Director Dr. Wernher von Braun presents Lady Bird Johnson with an inscribed hard hat during the First Lady's March 24, 1964 visit. While at the Marshall Center, Mrs. Johnson addressed Center employees, toured facilities and witnessed test firings of a Saturn I first stage and an F-1 engine. Dr. von Braun is wearing a Texas hat presented to him months earlier by Lyndon Johnson during a visit to the Johnson ranch in Texas.

  12. DR beta-RFLP analysis of serologically DRw6 compatible kidney donor/recipient pairs.

    PubMed

    Endreffy, E; Petri, I B; Csajbk, E; Mrton, J; Kaiser, G I; Rask, I

    1993-01-01

    HLA-DR beta-RFLP analysis of serologically 1 or 2 DR-antigen compatible renal allograft donors and recipients (D/R), selected for DRw6 antigen (study group), or for other DR antigens (control group) and its correlation with the graft outcome revealed that: 1. In the study group where donors and recipients were selected for matching in DRw6 antigen, 8 out of ten D/R pairs turned out to be incorrectly classified due to a number of mismatches in the HLA-DR locus RFLP analysis. In the control group, only 2 out of ten patients matched poorly by means of RFLP. The difference between the two groups was significant. 2. A significantly higher incidence of rejection episodes was seen in the study group (2.7 +/- 1.5) than in the controls (1.4 +/- 0.5). 3. The total dose of methylprednisolone necessary for suppressing the rejection episodes was higher in the study group (6.0 +/- 2.9 g) than in the control one (4.07 +/- 2.77 g), but the difference was not significant. 4. The graft survival 2 years after transplantation was 30% in the study group and 70% in the control group. PMID:7902315

  13. Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

  14. The life and contribution of Dr. Ronald Gitelman: a pioneer of modern chiropractic science

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The life and contribution to chiropractic science of Dr. Ronald Gitelman is reviewed. Methods: Sources for this article included review of the notes prepared by Dr. Joseph Keating in his biography of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); review of the important articles published by Dr. Gitelman; review of the important projects undertaken by him along with various colleagues; notes from reminiscences obtained from many of these colleagues and discussions with his family. Discussion: Dr. Gitelmans academic career spanned from 1963 to the late 1980s. During that time, he made foundational contributions to the development of chiropractic science including: developing the Archives (1974), the first collection of scientific articles supporting chiropractic science (which was subsequently published as the Chiropractic Archives Research Collection (CRAC)); delivering one of the few chiropractic papers at the seminal NINCDS conference (1975) and, developing the collaboration between CMCC and Dr. Kirkaldy-Willis at the University of Saskatoon (1976). He practiced in Toronto from 1961 to 2007. Summary: Dr. Gitelman was a pioneer in the development of chiropractic science. He died on October 7, 2012. PMID:23482630

  15. The structure of HLA-DR52c: Comparison to other HLA-DRB3 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Shaodong; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2008-09-05

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules present antigens to CD4{sup +} T cells. In addition to the most commonly studied human MHCII isotype, HLA-DR, whose {beta} chain is encoded by the HLA-DRB1 locus, several other isotypes that use the same {alpha} chain but have {beta} chains encoded by other genes. These other DR molecules also are expressed in antigen-presenting cells and are known to participate in peptide presentation to T cells and to be recognized as alloantigens by other T cells. Like some of the HLA-DRB1 alleles, several of these alternate DR molecules have been associated with specific autoimmune diseases and T cell hypersensitivity. Here we present the structure of an HLA-DR molecule (DR52c) containing one of these alternate {beta} chains (HLA-DRB3*0301) bound to a self-peptide derived from the Tu elongation factor. The molecule shares structurally conserved elements with other MHC class II molecules but has some unique features in the peptide-binding groove. Comparison of the three major HLA-DBR3 alleles (DR52a, b, and c) suggests that they were derived from one another by recombination events that scrambled the four major peptide-binding pockets at peptide positions 1, 4, 6, and 9 but left virtually no polymorphisms elsewhere in the molecules.

  16. A study of inter-observer variations of pulmonary nodule marking and characterizing on DR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Fan, Li; Xie, Yongming; Qian, Jian-Zhong; Jin, Zhenyu

    2005-04-01

    As new imaging technologies, such as Digital Radiograph (DR), advance, radiologists nowadays are able to detect smaller nodules than before. However, inter-observer variations exhibited in diagnosis still remain as critical challenges that need to be studied and addressed. In this research, inter-observer variation of pulmonary nodule marking and characterizing on DR images was studied in two phases, with the first phase focused on the analysis of inter-observer variations, and the second phase focused on the reduction of variations by using a computer system (IQQA(R)-Chest) that provides intelligent qualitative and quantitative analysis to help radiologists in the softcopy reading of DR chest images. Large inter-observer variations in pulmonary nodule identification and characterization on DR chest images were observed, even between expert radiologists. Experimental results also showed that less experienced radiologists could greatly benefit from the computer assistance, including substantial decrease of inter-observer variation and improvement of nodule detection rates. Moreover, radiologists with different levels of skillfulness may achieve similar high level performance after using the computer system. The computer system showed a high potential for providing a valuable assistance to the examination of DR chest images, especially as DR is adopted to screen large populations for lung cancer.

  17. Contributions of Dr. George Washington Carver to global food security: historical reflections of Dr. Carver’s fungal plant disease survey in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. George Washington Carver was a world renowned scientist whose research in the agricultural sciences in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s was critical for improving the living standards of American farmers especially in the southern United States. Although best known for developing the many uses o...

  18. Special issue dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Edward H

    2002-01-01

    This special issue of the "Cardiovascular Drug Reviews" is dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr., who died on Dec. 9th, 2000 at the Princeton Medical Center in New Jersey at the age of 85. Dr. Ahrens was the Director of the Lipid Metabolism Laboratory at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Alexander Scriabine conceived the idea for the issue at the special memorial symposium held at the Rockefeller University on Feb. 05, 2002 under the auspices of The New York Lipid and Vascular Biology Research Club. Dr. Ahrens was the first president of the club. He started this club with Drs. Howard Eder and DeWitt Goodman. Dr. Eder thought that it would be a fitting attribute to honor one of the founding fathers of the club by hosting a memorial symposium. I, as the President of the club for that academic year, had no hesitation in accepting the proposal. This year will be the 40th anniversary of the club and its continued success provides a glimpse of the fine legacy left behind by Dr. Ahrens. Dr. Ahrens also played a pivotal role in the establishment of the Journal of Lipid Research. This is the 43rd year of the journal and in this commemorative issue we are reproducing a review he wrote for the 25th anniversary of the journal. I was never personally acquainted with Dr. Ahrens. However, I am honored that I got this opportunity to pay tribute to a great scientist whose work has contributed immensely to the progress of lipid research. He was a person who touched many lives and still continues to do so. My involvement in the remembrance of Dr. Ahrens shows that science not only impacts your contemporaries but also generations that follow you. Scientific research is a journey where you can leave your trails behind and be remembered for your work long after your departure from this world. Dr. Ahrens contributed immensely to the understanding of cholesterol metabolism. In the early stages of his career he showed that phospholipids solubilize fat in the blood. Now we know that a monolayer of phospholipids surrounds the neutral lipid core of cholesterol esters and triglycerides in lipoproteins. This monolayer contains proteins, called apolipoproteins, which play a major role in lipoprotein catabolism. Lipoproteins are the major vehicles that transport triglycerides and cholesterol in the plasma. He also described a new form of primary biliary cirrhosis characterized by the presence of xanthomas and hyperlipidemia with normal translucent plasma. Subsequently, his group at the Rockefeller Institute developed methods for the separation of lipids using silicic acid columns, isolated highly unsaturated long chain fish oil fatty acids using gas-liquid chromatography, standardized techniques to study sterol metabolism, and introduced the concept of using beta-sitosterolemia as an internal marker for cholesterol balance studies. These studies revealed that individuals show a reproducible response to a given regimen when studied over time. In contrast, different individuals may respond differently to the same regimen. Throughout his career, Dr. Ahrens championed metabolic studies in humans and has passionately argued for the continuation of such investigations. Dr. Ahrens also left behind trails of "graduates." Several of them are currently prominent scientists in their own fields. In this issue, Drs. Davignon and Samuel share their feelings for him in the form of "Remembrance" and "Curriculum Vitae." Dr. Salen has submitted a preview of his research progress towards the understanding of sitosterolemia. Dr. Hudgins and associates have acknowledged the efforts of Dr. Ahrens in binding LDL apheresis technique to the United States of America and have previewed the use of this procedure in the treatment of hypercholesterolemic patients. The contributions of these and other graduates will keep his legacy alive for a long time to come. We are truly grateful for this opportunity to pay homage to such a distinguished scientist. PMID:12481196

  19. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2012-06-28

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  20. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-22

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  1. Identification and distribution of three serologically undetected alleles of HLA-DR by oligonucleotide x DNA typing analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiercy, J.M.; Gorski, J.; Jeannet, M.; Mach, B.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the molecular biology of human major histocompatibility complex class II genes (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR) have shown that the genetic complexity and allelic polymorphism are greater than expected. In the case of HLA-DR, three DR ..beta..-chain loci have been identified and linked, two of which (DR ..beta..I and DR ..beta..III, now assigned names HLA-DR1B and HLA-DR3B) are functional. The authors have shown that the HLA micropolymorphism detected at the DNA sequence level can easily be analyzed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides (HLA oligotyping). In the case of the HLA DRw52 supertypic specificity, which includes the DR3, DR5, DRw6, and DRw8 haplotypes, three alleles, referred to as DRw52a, DRw52b, and DRw52c, have recently been identified at the HLA-DR3B locus by DNA sequencing. Hybridization with locus- and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes (designated 52a, 52b, and 52c) has been performed on DNA from normal individuals forming a panel of 82 haplotypes to establish the distribution of these three alleles. Individuals of the DR3 haplotype had either the DRw52a or DRw52b allele, and individuals of extended haplotype HLA-A1,B8,DR3 had only the DRw52a allele. DR5 individuals all had the DRw52b allele, while individuals of DRw6 haplotype had the DRw52a, -52b, or -52c allele. None of these three alleles are found in DRw8 individuals. Analysis of this micropolymorphism, undetectable by common typing procedures, is therefore now operational for more accurate HLA matching for transplantation and for improving correlations between HLA and disease susceptibility.

  2. DrRad51 is required for chiasmata formation in meiosis in planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis.

    PubMed

    Chinone, Ayako; Matsumoto, Midori

    2014-05-01

    Rad51, a conserved eukaryotic protein, mediates the homologous-recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks that occur during both mitosis and meiosis. During prophase I of meiosis, homologous recombination enhances the linkage between homologous chromosomes to increase the accuracy of segregation at anaphase I. In polyploidy situations, however, difficulties with homologous chromosome segregation often disrupt meiosis. Yet, triploid individuals of the planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis are able to produce functional gametes through a specialized form of meiosis. To shed light on the molecular mechanisms that promote successful meiosis in triploid D. ryukyuensis, we investigated rad51 gene function. We isolated three genes of the Rad51 family, the Rad51 homolog Dr-rad51 and the Rad51 paralogs Dr-rad51B and Dr-rad51C. Dr-rad51 was expressed in germ-line and presumably in somatic stem cells, but was not necessary for the regeneration of somatic tissue. RNA-interference (RNAi) depletion of Dr-rad51 during sexualization did not affect chromosome behavior in zygotene oocytes, but did result in the loss of chiasmata at the diplotene stage. Thus, homologous recombination does not appear to be necessary for synapsis, but is needed for crossover and proper segregation in D. ryukyuensis. PMID:24488935

  3. Expression and function of the TL1A/DR3 axis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Chiara; Lovato, Ornella; Bertolaso, Anna; Zoratti, Elisa; Malpeli, Giorgio; Mimiola, Elda; Tinelli, Martina; Aprili, Fiorenza; Tecchio, Cristina; Perbellini, Omar; Scarpa, Aldo; Zamò, Alberto; Cassatella, Marco Antonio; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Scupoli, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    TNF-like ligand 1A (TL1A) and its unique receptor death receptor 3 (DR3) acts as broad T-cell costimulator involved in regulatory mechanisms of adaptive immune response under physiological and pathological settings. Moreover, we have recently shown that TL1A negatively regulates B-cell proliferation. Despite increasing interest on the TL1A/DR3-axis functions, very little is known on its expression and role in leukemia. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of TL1A/DR3 axis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). DR3 was differentially expressed in activated CLL cells and predominantly detected in patients with early clinical stage disease. Soluble TL1A has been revealed in the sera of CLL patients where higher TL1A levels were associated with early stage disease. T cells, monocytes and leukemic B cells have been identified as major sources of TL1A in CLL. The relevance of these findings has been sustained by functional data showing that exogenous TL1A reduces CLL proliferation induced by stimulation of the B cell receptor. Overall, these data document the expression of the TL1A/DR3 axis in early-stage CLL. They also identify a novel function for TL1A as a negative regulator of leukemic cell proliferation that may influence the CLL physiopathology and clinical outcome at an early-stage disease. PMID:26393680

  4. Definition of MHC and T cell receptor contacts in the HLA-DR4restricted immunodominant epitope in type II collagen and characterization of collagen-induced arthritis in HLA-DR4 and human CD4 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ellen Christina; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Jacobsen, Helle; Madsen, Lars S.; Andersen, Claus B.; Engberg, Jan; Rothbard, Jonathan B.; McDevitt, Grete Sønderstrup; Malmström, Vivianne; Holmdahl, Rikard; Svejgaard, Arne; Fugger, Lars

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the HLA-DR4 and DR1 alleles. The target autoantigen(s) in RA is unknown, but type II collagen (CII) is a candidate, and the DR4- and DR1-restricted immunodominant T cell epitope in this protein corresponds to amino acids 261–273 (CII 261–273). We have defined MHC and T cell receptor contacts in CII 261–273 and provide strong evidence that this peptide corresponds to the peptide binding specificity previously found for RA-associated DR molecules. Moreover, we demonstrate that HLA-DR4 and human CD4 transgenic mice homozygous for the I-Abβ0 mutation are highly susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis and describe the clinical course and histopathological changes in the affected joints. PMID:9636191

  5. Collected Papers in Structural Mechanics Honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Compiler); Nemeth, Michael P. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    This special publication contains a collection of structural mechanics papers honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr. presented at the 46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference held in Austin, Texas, April 18-21, 2005. Contributors to this publication represent a small number of those influenced by Dr. Starnes' technical leadership, his technical prowess and diversity, and his technical breath and depth in engineering mechanics. These papers cover some of the research areas Dr. Starnes investigated, which included buckling, postbuckling, and collapse of structures; composite structural mechanics, residual strength and damage tolerance of metallic and composite structures; and aircraft structural design, certification and verification. He actively pursued technical understanding and clarity, championed technical excellence, and modeled humility and perseverance.

  6. Pulmonary histiocytosis X. Immunoperoxidase staining for HLA-DR antigen and S100 protein.

    PubMed

    Flint, A; Lloyd, R V; Colby, T V; Wilson, B W

    1986-10-01

    Immunoperoxidase staining for S100 protein and HLA-DR antigen was used to identify histiocytosis X (HX) cells in 23 cases of pulmonary histiocytosis X (PHX), three cases of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and one case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. S100 protein was present in HX cells in 22 of the PHX cases; HLA-DR antigen was present in HX cells from 16 cases. Varying numbers of peribronchiolar and interstitial cells were positive for either S100 or HLA-DR in two of the three cases of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and in the case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Immunoperoxidase staining for chromogranin showed isolated neuroendocrine cells within the mucosa and wall or airways, sites in which HX cells were occasionally found. As other types of dendritic cells, as well as some neuroendocrine cells, may contain S100 protein, positive staining for S100 is not specific for HX cells. PMID:3533003

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP-DR1) catalogs (Lutz+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brisbin, D.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez-Sanchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wetzstein, M.; Wieprecht, E.

    2013-11-01

    PACS catalogs built by the PEP team, with key contributions by Stefano Berta, Benjamin Magnelli, Paola Popesso, Dieter Lutz, Francesca Pozzi, Bruno Altieri, Herve Aussel, Hoseong Hwang, Emeric Le Floc'h, Georgios Magdis, Raanan Nordon, Albrecht Poglitsch, Laurie Riguccini, Amelie Saintonge, Li Shao. For more details, please refer to Lutz et al. (2011A&A...532A..90L) and to the PDF documentation associated to the release. Data and catalogs can be retrieved from the web page http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php See the PDF documentation associated to the PEP DR1 release, http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_global.pdf and http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_SPIRE.pdf for more details. (69 data files).

  8. Design and fabrication of DR1/PC-based electro-optic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Wang, Xibin; Sun, Jingwen; Sun, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Changming; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Daming

    2015-05-01

    A Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) electro-optic (E-O) switch based on a guest-host material DR1/PC was designed and fabricated. The optical properties and long-term stability of the material were studied. By optimizing the concentration of DR1, the DR1/PC material exhibited an E-O coefficient of 12.8 pm/V at 1310 nm. The characteristic parameters of the waveguide were calculated, and the fabrication process was strictly controlled. The MZI switch on-off time was found to be about 50 ns. The extinction ratio was measured to be about 13.4 dB. At room temperature, the switch could keep operating for at least 150 days.

  9. Association between risk for pre-eclampsia and HLA DR4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-17

    Dr. Kilpatrick and colleagues report results of a family study showing an association between HLA DR4 and mild and proteinuric pre-eclampsia in a British (Edinburgh) maternal population. Among 76 parous sisters of women with protein uric pre-eclampsia, they found that sisters with pregnancy-induced hypertension (pre-eclampsia with or without proteinuria) had a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen than did normotensive sisters. In addition, they cited unpublished findings in which they found a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen in a large sample of pre-eclamptic women and their babies than in appropriate controls. The authors have completed a study of HLA antigens and pregnancy outcome among a coherent of 715 black (50.9%) and white (49.1%) primigravida who were delivered at a medical center in southern USA. HLA DR typing was done by the one-color fluorescence technique with reagents. On the basis of standard criteria for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, 6.9 of the cohort had mild non-proteinuric pre-eclampsia, 8.8% had pregnancy-induced hypertension, and 9.5% had combined pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Whereas black women had higher rates than white women in all three clinical categories (eg, pregnancy-induced hypertension 10.7% vs 6.8%, respectively), differences were not significant and frequencies of HLA DR4 antigen were higher among normotensives in both races (results not shown). They therefore pooled the two racial groups for analyses.

  10. On the exoneration of Dr. William H. Stewart: debunking an urban legend

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is one of the most infamous quotes in the history of biomedicine: It is time to close the book on infectious diseases, and declare the war against pestilence won. Long attributed to the United States Surgeon General, Dr. William H. Stewart (1965-1969), the statement is frequently used as a foil by scientific and lay authors to underscore the ever-increasing problems of antibiotic-resistant and emerging infections. However, the primary source for the quote has never been identified. Methods We undertook a comprehensive search of multiple databases encompassing medical literature, news articles, and congressional records to attempt to identify sources for the quote. Results No source of the quote was identified. However, a trail of source documents was identified that clearly serves as the basis for subsequent, incorrect attribution of the quote to Dr. Stewart. In multiple source documents, Dr. Stewart made statements to the opposite effect, clearly recognizing that infectious diseases had not been conquered. The urban legend was created by a combination of lack of primary witnesses to the originating speech, misunderstanding of points made by Dr. Stewart in the speech, and increasing societal concern about emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Conclusions Attribution to Dr. Stewart of a belief that it was time to close the book on infectious diseases is an urban legend; he never made any such statement. Numerous other verifiable sources, however, confirm that other people in academia adopted this belief. Dr. Stewart should no longer be cited in this regard, and should be replaced with verifiable sources. PMID:23849720

  11. Thermal methanol emission in the DR21 complex. Interferometric maps: a comparison with maser emission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liechti, S.; Walmsley, C. M.

    1997-05-01

    We present interferometric observations with ~3.5" resolution of the 2_k_->1_k_ methanol lines towards the methanol masers in the DR21/DR21(OH) complex. These transitions are not masing and hence our measurements can be used to place limits on the methanol mass associated with the maser spots. We do not find in general good correlation between the peaks of "non-maser" methanol emission and the positions of Class I methanol masers. In particular, we put an upper limit on 2_k_->1_k_ emission towards the 8_0_->7_1_A^+^ maser DR21(OH)-1 from Plambeck and Menten (1990) (hereafter PM90). We do find however evidence for coincidence between the peak of the 2_1_->1_1_E emission in our map with the Class I masers towards DR21-W. We conclude that methanol Class I masers are likely to originate in a region considerably smaller than our synthesised beam (3.5") and with methanol column density of order 10^16^cm^-2^. It seems reasonable that they might form in regions of diameter 1000AU and mass 0.01Msun_. Our data also show differences between the distribution of methanol and that of other species which suggest large spatial variations in the methanol abundance. In particular, we see evidence for high methanol column density towards the submillimeter continuum source DR21(OH)-MM1. In the western lobe of the DR21 outflow, the thermal methanol emission appears to be "sandwiched" between vibrationally excited H_2_ emission, tracing the outflow shock front, and CS emission tracing the dense ambient medium. This is consistent with the idea that methanol can be enhanced in shock regions, where the outflow impinges on the surrounding dense molecular clumps, releasing methanol from dust grain ice mantles.

  12. A novel HLA-DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct treats experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Benedek, Gil; Zhu, Wenbin; Libal, Nicole; Casper, Amanda; Yu, Xiaolin; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemoattraction of leukocytes into the brain after induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) increases the lesion size and worsens disease outcome. Our previous studies demonstrated that partial MHC class II constructs can reverse this process. However, the potential application of pMHC to human stroke is limited by the need to rapidly match recipient MHC class II with the ?1 domain of the pMHC construct. We designed a novel recombinant protein comprised of the HLA-DR?1 domain linked to MOG-35-55 peptide but lacking the ?1 domain found in pMHC and treated MCAO after 4 h reperfusion in humanized DR2 mice. Infarct volumes were quantified after 96 h reperfusion and immune cells from the periphery and CNS were evaluated for expression of CD74 and other cell surface, cytokine and pathway markers. This study demonstrates that four daily treatments with DR?1-MOG-35-55 reduced infarct size by 40 % in the cortex, striatum and hemisphere, inhibited the migration of activated CD11b+CD45high cells from the periphery to the brain and reversed splenic atrophy. Furthermore, DR?1-MOG-35-55 bound to CD74 on monocytes and blocked both binding and downstream signaling of macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) that may play a key role in infarct development. The novel DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct is highly therapeutic in experimental stroke and could be given to all patients at least 4 h after stroke onset without the need for tissue typing due to universal expression of DR?1 in humans. PMID:24122483

  13. A novel HLA-DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct treats experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Gil; Zhu, Wenbin; Libal, Nicole; Casper, Amanda; Yu, Xiaolin; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Alkayed, Nabil J; Offner, Halina

    2014-03-01

    Chemoattraction of leukocytes into the brain after induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) increases the lesion size and worsens disease outcome. Our previous studies demonstrated that partial MHC class II constructs can reverse this process. However, the potential application of pMHC to human stroke is limited by the need to rapidly match recipient MHC class II with the ?1 domain of the pMHC construct. We designed a novel recombinant protein comprised of the HLA-DR?1 domain linked to MOG-35-55 peptide but lacking the ?1 domain found in pMHC and treated MCAO after 4 h reperfusion in humanized DR2 mice. Infarct volumes were quantified after 96 h reperfusion and immune cells from the periphery and CNS were evaluated for expression of CD74 and other cell surface, cytokine and pathway markers. This study demonstrates that four daily treatments with DR?1-MOG-35-55 reduced infarct size by 40 % in the cortex, striatum and hemisphere, inhibited the migration of activated CD11b+CD45high cells from the periphery to the brain and reversed splenic atrophy. Furthermore, DR?1-MOG-35-55 bound to CD74 on monocytes and blocked both binding and downstream signaling of macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) that may play a key role in infarct development. The novel DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct is highly therapeutic in experimental stroke and could be given to all patients at least 4 h after stroke onset without the need for tissue typing due to universal expression of DR?1 in humans. PMID:24122483

  14. Dr. Tom Chalmers, 1917-1995: the trials of a randomizer

    PubMed Central

    Maclure, Malcolm

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Chalmers, an American physician who played a pivotal role in the scientific development of the randomized control trial and meta-analysis, died late last year. Shortly before Chalmers' death, Dr. Malcolm Maclure of the British Columbia Ministry of Health conducted a wideranging interview with him about his life and the past and future of clinical trials and evidence-based medicine. The first part is published below; the second part will appear in the Oct. 1 issue of CMAJ. Imagesp758-a PMID:8823220

  15. Preparation and spectral characterization of polymeric nanocapsules containing DR1 organic dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifimehr, Mohammad Reza; Ghanbari, Khadijeh; Ayoubi, Kazem; Mohajerani, Ezedin

    2015-07-01

    In order to provide necessary degree of freedom for organic dye molecules in optical applications and also for safety improvement, water insoluble Disperse Red 1 (DR1) dye molecules were placed inside the polymeric nanocapsules along with suitable surfactants and using controlled phase-separation method. TEM images were used to investigate the morphology of prepared nanocapsules. Total dye concentration for a solution consist of obtained polymeric nanocapsules was determined using decomposition of nanocapsules and a reference absorption spectrum. Absorption spectrum of a solution containing DR1 and dichloromethane was also compared with prepared nanocapsules at the same dye concentration, thereby a red-shift in absorption spectrum was detected.

  16. [Tribute to Dr. Manuel Carpio on the CL anniversary of his death].

    PubMed

    Athi-Gallo, Fermn

    2010-01-01

    This year marks de CL anniversary of de death of Dr. Don Manuel Carpio (1791-1860), native Cosamaloapan, Veracruz, Mexico. The spirit that is researched and practiced medicine in Mexico would not be so gifted with humanism, without the contributions of mister Carpio, doctor who devotes his life to academia and research, putting aside traditional medicine, to take the decisive step to anatomic-pathological medicine. This paper aims to capture the character of Dr. Carpio, forged in an emerging Mexico, where medicine just left behind atavistic traditions. PMID:20964075

  17. Interview with Dr. Mark Cockett: Current Trends in Screening for Antiviral Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Brahme, Nina N.; Noblin, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Mark Cockett is Vice President of Infectious Diseases and Applied Genomics at Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS). In this interview, we ask Dr. Cockett about considerations that major pharmaceutical companies such as BMS make when screening for and developing antiviral small molecule therapeutics. We discuss the rationale behind an unbiased screening approach that led to recent published work identifying a hepatitis C-specific NS5A inhibitor. We conclude by asking about the emerging role of academia in antiviral drug discovery and future directions of pathogen drug discovery in general. PMID:21165343

  18. Mode-cut optical limiting in polymer fibers with DR1/PMMA cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiya; Bian, Shaoping; Kim, Sun Il; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2003-02-01

    The principle of mode-cut optical limiting in fibers is reviewed briefly, and a calculation method based on angular spectrum analysis is proposed. Experiments that show high efficiency holographic grating generation and self defocusing in disperse-red-1 (DR1) doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (DR1/PMMA) bulk material suggest that it is a good candidate to be used as a core material in polymer fibers to achieve mode-cut optical limiting. Such fibers are fabricated in our lab and its optical limiting effect is reported.

  19. Commentary and Casual Observations on the SDSS DR7 Spectroscopic Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holberg, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The SDSS DR7 sample of white dwarfs provides a very large and homogeneous spectroscopic population of relatively distant hot white dwarfs where the number of stars per unit distance peaks near 120 pc. This is in contrast to the local sample (< 20pc) of white dwarfs where the space density and the relative population of WD spectral types are well established. Although there is almost no spatial overlap between the SDSS sample and the local sample it is possible to draw some useful conclusions regarding the DR7 sample.

  20. The medical ethics of the 'father of gynaecology', Dr J Marion Sims.

    PubMed Central

    Ojanuga, D

    1993-01-01

    Vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) was a common ailment among American women in the 19th century. Prior to that time, no successful surgery had been developed for the cure of this condition until Dr J Marion Sims perfected a successful surgical technique in 1849. Dr Sims used female slaves as research subjects over a four-year period of experimentation (1845-1849). This paper discusses the controversy surrounding his use of powerless women and whether his actions were acceptable during that historical period. PMID:8459435

  1. BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Craig; Horowitz, Scott; Maguire, Jeff; Velasco, Paulo Tabrares; Springer, David; Coates, Peter; Bell, Christy; Price, Snuller; Sreedharan, Priya; Pickrell, Katie

    2014-04-01

    This project targeted the development of a software tool, BEopt-CA (Ex) (Building Energy Optimization Tool for California Existing Homes), that aims to facilitate balanced integration of energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), and photovoltaics (PV) in the residential retrofit1 market. The intent is to provide utility program managers and contractors in the EE/DR/PV marketplace with a means of balancing the integration of EE, DR, and PV

  2. Treatment with agonistic DR3 antibody results in expansion of donor Tregs and reduced graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Su; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Baker, Jeanette; Pierini, Antonio; Schneidawind, Dominik; Pan, Yuqiong; Beilhack, Andreas; Park, Chung-Gyu; Negrin, Robert S

    2015-07-23

    The paucity of regulatory T cells (Tregs) limits clinical translation to control aberrant immune reactions including graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recent studies showed that the agonistic antibody to DR3 (?DR3) expanded CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in vivo. We investigated whether treating donor mice with a single dose of ?DR3 could alleviate acute GVHD in a MHC-mismatched bone marrow transplantation model. ?DR3 induced selective proliferation of functional Tregs. CD4(+) T cells isolated from ?DR3-treated mice contained higher numbers of Tregs and were less proliferative to allogeneic stimuli. In vivo GVHD studies confirmed that Tregs from ?DR3-treated donors expanded robustly and higher frequencies of Tregs within donor CD4(+) T cells were maintained, resulting in improved survival. Conventional T cells derived from ?DR3-treated donors showed reduced activation and proliferation. Serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN?, IL-1?, and TNF?) and infiltration of donor T cells into GVHD target tissues (gastrointestinal tract and liver) were decreased. T cells from ?DR3-treated donors retained graft-vs-tumor (GVT) effects. In conclusion, a single dose of ?DR3 alleviates acute GVHD while preserving GVT effects by selectively expanding and maintaining donor Tregs. This novel strategy will facilitate the clinical application of Treg-based therapies. PMID:26063163

  3. Human leukocyte antigen DR surface expression on CD14+ monocytes during adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dring, Michaela; Rohrer, Karin Melanie; Erbacher, Annika; Gieseke, Friederike; Schwarze, Carl-Philipp; Bader, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hofbeck, Michael; Kerst, Gunter

    2015-02-01

    The human leukocyte antigen DR surface expression on CD14+ monocytes reflects the degree to which these cells have been activated. Given the central role monocytes and macrophages play in the immune system, a decreased human leukocyte antigen DR expression on CD14+ monocytes results in a hallmark of altered immune status during systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We hypothesize that human leukocyte antigen DR expression might be similarly altered after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and during post-transplant complications. Using flow cytometry, this study investigates the human leukocyte antigen DR surface expression of CD14+ monocytes in 30 pediatric and young adult patients up to 1year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Normal values were derived from a control group of healthy children, adolescents, and young adults. Human leukocyte antigen DR expression decreased significantly prior and during bacterial infection or sepsis. By contrast, human leukocyte antigen DR expression levels were elevated before and at the time of viremia. Human leukocyte antigen DR expression was also elevated during acute graft-versus-host disease. In contrast, the expression was reduced when patients had hepatic veno-occlusive disease. A significant decrease of human leukocyte antigen DR expression was associated with a relapse of the underlying disease and before death. Human leukocyte antigen DR expression on CD14+ monocytes appears to be a promising parameter that might allow identification of patients at risk after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25113134

  4. HLA-DR polymorphism in a Senegalese Mandenka population: DNA oligotyping and population genetics of DRB1 specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Tiercy, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Excoffier, L; Shi-Isaac, X; Jeannet, M; Mach, B; Langaney, A

    1992-01-01

    HLA class II loci are useful markers in human population genetics, because they are extremely variable and because new molecular techniques allow large-scale analysis of DNA allele frequencies. Direct DNA typing by hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (HLA oligotyping) after enzymatic in vitro PCR amplification detects HLA allelic polymorphisms for all class II loci. A detailed HLA-DR oligotyping analysis of 191 individuals from a geographically, culturally, and genetically well-defined western African population, the Mandenkalu, reveals a high degree of polymorphism, with at least 24 alleles and a heterozygosity level of .884 for the DRB1 locus. The allele DRB1*1304, defined by DNA sequencing of the DRB1 first-domain exon, is the most frequent allele (27.1%). It accounts for an unusually high DR13 frequency, which is nevertheless within the neutral frequency range. The next most frequent specificities are DR11, DR3, and DR8. Among DRB3-encoded alleles, DR52b (DRB3*02) represents as much as 80.7% of all DR52 haplotypes. A survey of HLA-DR specificities in populations from different continents shows a significant positive correlation between genetic and geographic differentiation patterns. A homozygosity test for selective neutrality of DR specificities is not significant for the Mandenka population but is rejected for 20 of 24 populations. Observed high heterozygosity levels in tested populations are compatible with an overdominant model with a small selective advantage for heterozygotes. PMID:1496990

  5. MTB-DR-RIF 9G test: Detection and discrimination of tuberculosis andmulti-drug resistant tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Cho, Nam Hoon; Sung, Nackmoon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Yang, Jeongseong; Kim, Taisun

    2015-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the novel MTB-DR-RIF 9G test for the accurate detection and discrimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis (MTB-DR-RIF) in the clinical samples. The procedure included the amplification of a nucleotide fragment of the rpoB gene of the MTB and MTB-DR-RIF strains and their hybridization with the immobilized probes. The MTB-DR-RIF 9G test was evaluated for its ability to detect and discriminate MTB and MTB-DR-RIF strains in 113 known clinical samples. The accuracy of the MTB-DR-RIF 9G test was determined by comparing its results with sequencing analysis and drug susceptibility testing. The sensitivity and specificity of the MTB-DR-RIF 9G test at 95% confidence interval were found to be 95.4% (89.5-98.5) and 100% (69.2-100), respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the MTB-DR-RIF 9G test at 95% confidence interval were found to be 100% (85.0-95.9) and 66.7% (38.4-88.18), respectively. Sequencing analysis of all samples indicated that the mutations present in the regions identified with the MTB-DR-RIF 9G assay can be detected accurately. PMID:26381057

  6. [Evaluation of the gingival status by quantification of the T6 (CD1a) and HLA-DR antigens].

    PubMed

    Sagredo, E; Pino, A; Ibaez, P

    1990-09-01

    The number/mm2 of sections of Langerhans cells (LC's) expressing antigens T6 and/or HLA-DR was determined in eight human gingival samples which consisting of normal gingivae, contraceptive induced hyperplastic, traumatic, inflammatory and diphenylhydantoin hyperplasic gingivae. All samples, except those from normal gingivae, showed inflammatory and/or hyperplasic histopathological patterns. In the immunostained samples, LC's appeared in variable numbers and were randomly distributed between the keratinocytes. All pathological samples, except the inflammatory gingiva showed HLA-DR+ keratinocytes. Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney statistical tests suggested the existence of three subpopulations of LC's: T6+/DR+; T6-/DR+ and T6+/DR-. The subpopulation T6+/DR+ was predominant in conditions of normal immune response. The subpopulation T6-/DR+ suggested the presence of newly incorporated LC's from the lamina propia. T6+/DR- subpopulations could indicate the existence of a system to avoid overstimulation. It is concluded that quantitative evaluation of T6 and HLA-DR expression was representative of the gingival conditions and the disease activity. PMID:1701432

  7. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Dr. George Voelz was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). This oral history covers Dr. Voelz`s research on Manhattan Engineering District plutonium workers, the acute and long term effects of radiation, his inhalation studies, and his activities at the 1961 INL reactor accident (SL-1 Reactor). After a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Voelz his remembrances on tissue studies of plutonium workers, the plutonium injection studies of 1945-1946, the controlled environmental radioiodine tests of 1963-1968, and tracer studies with human volunteers at Los Alamos. Dr. Voelz states his opinions concerning misconceptions about the Los Alamos Human Radiation Experiments.

  8. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  9. Replicating a Successful Authentic Science Research Program: An Interview with Dr. Robert Pavlica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, George

    2005-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Robert Pavlica discusses the Byram Hills High School Authentic Science Program, which he founded and directs. This program has been replicated in school districts throughout the country, and the expense to start and maintain it is minimal. Students are self-selected into the program based on their desire to study and…

  10. Characterizing Interstellar Ammonia Masers in the Galactic Star Forming Region DR21(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Amanda J.; Hoffman, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Green Bank Telescope, we observed the (J,K)=(10,6), (11,6), (12,6), and (8,3) transitions of ammonia in DR21(OH). We detected neither emission nor absorption, with an upper limit of 3?=0.11 Jy. From observations in 1984, DR21(OH) is known to have a (9,6) maser. There are three suggested possibilities for maser emission at higher rotational levels of ammonia: (1) there could be a maser in the adjacent (10,6) level, (2) there could be a maser in alternating levels, including (11,6), or (3) there could be no pumping above (9,6). NGC 7538 is known to have both a (9,6) and (10,6) maser, with a flux density ratio of 4.83:1, and no maser in either (11,6) or (12,6). If the excitation conditions in DR21(OH) are the same as in NGC 7538, a (10,6) maser with a flux density of 0.15 Jy would be expected in DR21(OH) but is not observed. Other possibilities are also discussed in detail.This work is supported by Wittenberg University through the Physics Department.

  11. 76 FR 14407 - Exchange of Letters Between Dr. Murray M. Lumpkin, Deputy Commissioner, International Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of exchange of letters between Dr. Murray M. Lumpkin, Deputy Commissioner, International and Special Programs, FDA and Mr. Martin Heraghty, Assistant Secretary General, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF), concerning certification requirements for caseins, caseinates, and mixtures thereof exported from Ireland to the......

  12. Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune: A Life Devoted to Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kim Cliett

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the leadership traits of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, an African-American woman of history, using the servant leadership theory developed by Robert K. Greenberg and the ten characteristics of servant leadership as conceived by Larry C. Spears. This exploration seeks to identify the significant

  13. In response to Dr. Jose AP da Silva: fall prevention with vitamin D clarifications needed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We agree with Dr. da Silva, and wish to clarify three issues raised by the recent IOM report concerning our 2009 meta-analysis on vitamin D and fall prevention. 1. The IOM questioned the inclusion of Broe et al., which did not pre-specify falls as a primary or secondary outcome. While this did viol...

  14. Algebra Project DR K-12 Cohorts--Demonstration Project: Summative Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Algebra Project DR K-12, funded by the National Science Foundation as a Research and Development Project, addressed the challenge of offering significant STEM content for students to ensure public literacy and workforce readiness. The project's primary purpose was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a model for establishing four-year…

  15. Dr. Bowdler's Legacy: A History of Expurgated Books in England and America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Noel

    This history of expurgation of English and American literature from 1724 until the 1960's focuses on the influence of changing taste upon literature, especially the changing standards of what constitutes decency. Discussed are (1) expurgations of literary works in the 18th century and the causes of bowdlerism; (2) Dr. Bowdler, his sister (the true

  16. Challenging the Status Quo in Canada's Education System: The Legacy of Dr. Judy Lupart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Vianne

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Judy Lupart has had a distinguished career as a researcher, teacher, and leader in the field of education, and some of her most important work has stemmed from her creation of and continuing involvement in "Exceptionality Education Canada." Two articles she wrote for the journal, one in 1992 and one in 2002, are of particular note. To the

  17. Citizenship Ceremony for Dr. von Braun and German-Born Scientists and Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    In a swearing-in ceremony held at Huntsville High School, one hundred and three German-born scientists and engineers, along with family members, took the oath of citizenship to become United States citizens. Among those taking the oath was Dr. Wernher von Braun, located in the second row, right side, third from the end.

  18. Connect the Book. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this month's featured book is "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." The book was written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Jump at the Sun, 2001. 40p. ISBN 0786807148). This pictorial biography of the world-renowned civil rights leader has one of the most striking

  19. If Dr. King Were a Principal: Building the "Beloved Community" in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Michael; Woolworth, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a more humanistic vision of educational community, one that is substantive in content yet flexible in its application to the diverse contexts in which American schooling occurs. In doing so, the authors turn specifically to the nonviolent philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and consider what a school

  20. It Really Is All about the Child: An Interview with Dr. Edward Hallowell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dane L.

    2012-01-01

    In a decade when brain research has helped people understand learning difficulties in children, and people have seen increased media attention on the use of medications to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults, Dr. Edward (Ned) Hallowell has worked tirelessly to educate the medical profession, parents,…

  1. Why We Do Not Have Ethical Conduct: A Response to Dr. Sternberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Jamin

    2014-01-01

    In "We Need to Teach for Ethical Conduct," Dr. Robert Sternberg argued that students act unethically because they are unable to transfer principles of ethics into practice. While I agree that this is partially the case, it is also the case that unethical behavior is a result of the prevailing educational-philosophy: radical

  2. The Research of Dr. Joanne Simpson: Fifty Years Investigating Hurricanes, Tropical Clouds and Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W. -K.; Halverson, J.; Adler, R.; Garstang, M.; Houze, R., Jr.; LeMone, M.; Pielke, R., Sr.; Woodley, W.; O'C.Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This AMS Meteorological Monographs is dedicated to Dr. Joanne Simpson for her many pioneering research efforts in tropical meteorology during her fifty-year career. Dr. Simpson's major areas of scientific research involved the "hot tower" hypothesis and its role in hurricanes, structure and maintenance of trade winds, air-sea interaction, and observations and the mechanism for hurricanes and waterspouts. She was also a pioneer in cloud modeling with the first one-dimensional model and had the first cumulus model on a computer. She also played a major role in planning and leading observational experiments on convective cloud systems. The launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, a joint U.S.-Japan project, in November of 1997 made it possible for quantitative measurements of tropical rainfall to be obtained on a continuous basis over the entire global tropics. Dr. Simpson was the TRAM Project Scientist from 1986 until its launch in 1997. Her efforts during this crucial period ensured that the mission was both well planned scientifically and well engineered as well as within budget. In this paper, Dr. J. Simpson's nine specific accomplishments during her fifty-year career: (1) hot tower hypothesis, (2) hurricanes, (3) airflow and clouds over heated islands, (4) cloud models, (5) trade winds and their role in cumulus development, (6) air-sea interaction, (7) cloud-cloud interactions and mergers, (8) waterspouts, and (9) TRMM science, will be described and discussed.

  3. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders

  4. Study on integrated vehicle navigation system of "Beidou" Double-Star/DR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Jianye; Zhai, Linpei; Xiu, Jihong

    2005-12-01

    Vehicle navigation is the corn element of Intelligent Transport System. The integrated system of "Beidou" Double-star/DR is studied in this paper according to the present state of vehicle navigation in our country. "Beidou" Double-star navigation position system is one regional satellite position system built up by our country, which can provide rapidly not only highly precision position and brevity telegram service. However, when the vehicles go around the tall buildings, high mountain area, wayside trees and in the tunnels, all signal may not be received. If the satellite navigation position system is used only, the precision will be reduced. Therefore, this paper proposes a nonlinear self-adaptive Kalman filter model and its algorithm for a Double-star/DR integrated navigation system in land vehicles, and verifies effectively the algorithm and scheme through the means of simulation. Next, this paper introduces map match approach. The roads are segmented and character information is brought out. Then, proper search rules and map match algorithm are adopted. According to the current vehicle position information that Double-Star/DR system provides, the nearest road can be found in the map database. The vehicle position will be matched and displayed on the road. The result of the experiment shows that the Double-Star/DR integrated algorithm and map match can improve reliability and the precision of vehicle navigation system efficiently.

  5. Profiles in Performing Arts Medicine Courage--A Tribute to Dr. Alice Brandfonbrener.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Ralph A

    2015-09-01

    I was honored and privileged to join Dr. Robert Sataloff in delivering a tribute to Dr. Alice Brandfonbrener at the 2015 Symposium on the Medical Problems of Performing Artists in Snowmass, Colorado. As virtually everyone who reads this journal knows, Dr. Brandfonbrener organized the first symposium (then focused on the medical problems of musicians), was the founding editor of Medical Problems of Performing Artists, and was the first president of the Performing Arts Medicine Association. She died in 2014, just prior to last year's symposium. This year, after Dr. Sataloff presented a very engaging overview of Alice's career and impressive accomplishments, I gave a short address that was based on some of the editorials Alice wrote in this journal during her 20 year tenure as editor. I have chosen a few examples of how the courage that she demonstrated in launching an international medical conference, a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a professional association continued to present itself in her writing. PMID:26395621

  6. Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, 1858-1964: Teacher, Scholar, and Timeless Womanist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    The study examines the various accomplishments and achievements of Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, a social activist-educator, scholar and an early model for African-American feminist theory. Cooper was a great public intellectual and teacher, as she highly attacked the prevalence of racism, sexism and poverty through her writings and by working with

  7. Association between human leukocyte antigen-DR and demylinating Guillain-Barr syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zaki N.; Zalzala, Haider H.; Mohammedsalih, Hyam R.; Mahdi, Batool M.; Abid, Laheeb A.; Shakir, Zena N.; Fadhel, Maithem J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find an association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 alleles frequencies in a sample of Iraqi patients with Guillain-Barr syndrome (GBS) and compare with a healthy control group. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study consisting of 30 Iraqi Arab patients with GBS attending the Neurological Department in the Neuroscience Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq between September 2012 and June 2013. The control group comprised 42 apparently healthy volunteers. Human leukocyte antigen genotyping for HLA DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers method. The allele frequencies were compared across both groups. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II HLA-DR genotyping and serotyping were performed by software analysis. Results: We found increased frequencies of HLA genotype DRB1*03:01 (p=0.0009), DRB1*07:01 (p=0.0015), and DRB4*01:01 (p<0.0001) in patients with GBS compared with healthy controls. The HLA DR6 was increased in the control group (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Our results suggest an association between HLA-DRB1*03:01, DRB1*07:01, DRB4*01:01, and HLA DR3, DR7 and a susceptibility to GBS. PMID:25274590

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun on Tour With U.S. congressman Armistead Seldon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    U.S. representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) tries on an astronaut maneuvering unit mockup during a tour of the Saturn I workshop at the Marshall Space Flight center. Explaining the unit and the workshop to Representative Seldon is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Center.

  9. Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.; Tovesson, Fredrik K.; Sierk, Arnold John

    2014-02-06

    The following slides were presented as part of the LDRD 20120077DR Progress Appraisal Review held Tuesday, February 4, 2014. This is part of an ongoing project assessment the previous of which was documented in LA-UR-13-21182. This presentation documents the progress made against the goals agreed to as part of the 2013 review.

  10. African American Women Scholars and International Research: Dr. Anna Julia Cooper's Legacy of Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Stephanie Y.

    2009-01-01

    EIn this article, the author presents a little-known but detailed history of Black women's tradition of study abroad. Specifically, she situates Dr. Anna Julia Cooper within the landscape of historic African American students who studied in Japan, Germany, Jamaica, England, Italy, Haiti, India, West Africa, and Thailand, in addition to France. The…

  11. Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, 1858-1964: Teacher, Scholar, and Timeless Womanist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    The study examines the various accomplishments and achievements of Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, a social activist-educator, scholar and an early model for African-American feminist theory. Cooper was a great public intellectual and teacher, as she highly attacked the prevalence of racism, sexism and poverty through her writings and by working with…

  12. Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Teach the Film in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, J. Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan focusing on the film, "Dr. Strangelove" by Stanley Kubrick, and describes the film in detail. Reviews the historical background about the film to assist students in understanding the themes presented. Discusses the characters in the film and their possible real-life counterparts. (CMK)

  13. Dr. von Braun Relaxes After the Successful Launch of Apollo 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, first director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, relaxes following the successful launch of the Saturn V carrying Apollo 11 to the moon. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  14. Narrating International and National Trends in US Science Education: An Autobiographical Approach Showcasing Dr. Robert Yager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Geeta; Martin-Hansen, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This biographical piece is based on a conversation involving Bob Yager, Geeta Verma, and Lisa Martin-Hansen which took place at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) conference in March, 2008. The unique aspect of this autobiographical piece is that it highlights Dr. Yager's account about the emergence of the science

  15. Why We Do Not Have Ethical Conduct: A Response to Dr. Sternberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Jamin

    2014-01-01

    In "We Need to Teach for Ethical Conduct," Dr. Robert Sternberg argued that students act unethically because they are unable to transfer principles of ethics into practice. While I agree that this is partially the case, it is also the case that unethical behavior is a result of the prevailing educational-philosophy: radical…

  16. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  17. Photographer: Digital Telepresence: Dr Murial Ross's Virtual Reality Application for Neuroscience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Photographer: Digital Telepresence: Dr Murial Ross's Virtual Reality Application for Neuroscience Research Biocomputation. To study human disorders of balance and space motion sickness. Shown here is a 3D reconstruction of a nerve ending in inner ear, nature's wiring of balance organs.

  18. Facilitating Research, Fueling Collaboration: Dr. Frank McCormick on the RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    Frank McCormick, Ph.D., leads the NCI-sponsored RAS Initiative at the Frederick National Laboratories for Cancer Research (FNLCR). In this interview, Dr. McCormick talks about the history, the challenges, and the future of RAS research.

  19. Effect of HLA DR epitope de-immunization of Factor VIII in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moise, Leonard; Song, Chang; Martin, William D; Tassone, Ryan; De Groot, Anne S; Scott, David W

    2012-03-01

    T cell-dependent development of anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies that neutralize FVIII activity is a major obstacle to replacement therapy in hemophilia A. To create a less immunogenic therapeutic protein, recombinant FVIII can be modified to reduce HLA binding of epitopes based on predicted anchoring residues. Here, we used immunoinformatic tools to identify C2 domain HLA DR epitopes and predict site-specific mutations that reduce immunogenicity. Epitope peptides corresponding to original and modified sequences were validated in HLA binding assays and in immunizations of hemophilic E16 mice, DR3 and DR4 mice and DR3×E16 mice. Consistent with immunoinformatic predictions, original epitopes are immunogenic. Immunization with selected modified sequences lowered immunogenicity for particular peptides and revealed residual immunogenicity of incompletely de-immunized modified peptides. The stepwise approach to reduce protein immunogenicity by epitope modification illustrated here is being used to design and produce a functional full-length modified FVIII for clinical use. PMID:22222093

  20. Dr. Clarke vs. the "Ladies": Coeducation and Women's Roles in the 1870's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seller, Maxine S.

    Negative reaction to the theories forwarded in Dr. Edward H. Clarke's 1873 treatise against coeducation, "Sex in Education or A Fair Chance for the Girls," has been largely neglected. The book appeared at a time when conspicuous numbers of women were extending their activities by campaigning for suffrage; working in factories, schools, and…

  1. If Dr. King Were a Principal: Building the "Beloved Community" in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Michael; Woolworth, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a more humanistic vision of educational community, one that is substantive in content yet flexible in its application to the diverse contexts in which American schooling occurs. In doing so, the authors turn specifically to the nonviolent philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and consider what a school…

  2. Connect the Book. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this month's featured book is "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." The book was written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Jump at the Sun, 2001. 40p. ISBN 0786807148). This pictorial biography of the world-renowned civil rights leader has one of the most striking…

  3. Has the Dream Been Fulfilled? Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. & President Barack Hussein Obama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Nichelle Boyd; Moore, Virginia J.; Williams-Black, Thea H.

    2015-01-01

    Equality for all was the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and he knowingly laid the foundation for and inspired the first African-American President of the United States of America, Barack Hussein Obama, who also had the dream of "Change" for America. These men exhibited how working together can make dreams become reality. For the

  4. Algebra Project DR K-12 Cohorts--Demonstration Project: Summative Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Algebra Project DR K-12, funded by the National Science Foundation as a Research and Development Project, addressed the challenge of offering significant STEM content for students to ensure public literacy and workforce readiness. The project's primary purpose was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a model for establishing four-year

  5. An Interview with Dr. Roach van Allen (Leaders in Reading Research and Instruction).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searfoss, Lyndon; Jerrolds, Bob W.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dr. Roach van Allen in which he describes how he became involved in education, who influenced him professionally, his proudest accomplishments (a theoretical model for a language experience program), what he sees as the current problems in reading education, and what he sees in the future. (RS)

  6. Global Transcriptome and Physiological Responses of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 Exposed to Distinct Classes of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Aram; Jang, Hyun-Jin; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of antibiotics on environment-originated nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species have been poorly explored. To understand the antibiotic-resistance mechanisms that function in nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species, we used an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technique to perform global gene-expression profiling of soil-borne Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 after exposing the bacteria to 4 classes of antibiotics (ampicillin, Amp; kanamycin, Km; tetracycline, Tc; norfloxacin, Nor). Interestingly, the well-known two global regulators, the soxR and the rpoE genes are present among 41 commonly upregulated genes under all 4 antibiotic-treatment conditions. We speculate that these common genes are essential for antibiotic resistance in DR1. Treatment with the 4 antibiotics produced diverse physiological and phenotypic changes. Km treatment induced the most dramatic phenotypic changes. Examination of mutation frequency and DNA-repair capability demonstrated the induction of the SOS response in Acinetobacter especially under Nor treatment. Based on the RNA-seq analysis, the glyoxylate-bypass genes of the citrate cycle were specifically upregulated under Amp treatment. We also identified newly recognized non-coding small RNAs of the DR1 strain, which were also confirmed by Northern blot analysis. These results reveal that treatment with antibiotics of distinct classes differentially affected the gene expression and physiology of DR1 cells. This study expands our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic-stress response of environment-originated bacteria and provides a basis for future investigations. PMID:25330344

  7. Dr. Clarke vs. the "Ladies": Coeducation and Women's Roles in the 1870's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seller, Maxine S.

    Negative reaction to the theories forwarded in Dr. Edward H. Clarke's 1873 treatise against coeducation, "Sex in Education or A Fair Chance for the Girls," has been largely neglected. The book appeared at a time when conspicuous numbers of women were extending their activities by campaigning for suffrage; working in factories, schools, and

  8. The first data release (DR1) of the LAMOST regular survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhao, Gang; Deng, Li-Cai; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Jing, Yi-Peng; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Chu, Yao-Quan; Li, Guo-Ping; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Wu, Yue; Cai, Yan; Cao, Shu-Yun; Cao, Zi-Huang; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Chen, Hai-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Kun-Xin; Chen, Li; Chen, Xue-Lei; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ying; Christlieb, Norbert; Chu, Jia-Ru; Cui, Chen-Zhou; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Du, Bing; Fan, Dong-Wei; Feng, Lei; Fu, Jian-Ning; Gao, Peng; Gong, Xue-Fei; Gu, Bo-Zhong; Guo, Yan-Xin; Han, Zhan-Wen; He, Bo-Liang; Hou, Jin-Liang; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hou, Wen; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Hu, Ning-Sheng; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Huo, Zhi-Ying; Jia, Lei; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Jiang, Xiang; Jiang, Zhi-Bo; Jin, Ge; Kong, Xiao; Kong, Xu; Lei, Ya-Juan; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Chang-Hua; Li, Guang-Wei; Li, Hai-Ning; Li, Jian; Li, Qi; Li, Shuang; Li, Sha-Sha; Li, Xin-Nan; Li, Yan; Li, Yin-Bi; Li, Ye-Ping; Liang, Yuan; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Liu, Chao; Liu, Gen-Rong; Liu, Guan-Qun; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Wen-Zhi; Luo, Yu; Mao, Yin-Dun; Newberg, Heidi; Ni, Ji-Jun; Qi, Zhao-Xiang; Qi, Yong-Jun; Shen, Shi-Yin; Shi, Huo-Ming; Song, Jing; Song, Yi-Han; Su, Ding-Qiang; Su, Hong-Jun; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Tao, Qing-Sheng; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Dan; Wang, Da-Qi; Wang, Feng-Fei; Wang, Guo-Min; Wang, Hai; Wang, Hong-Chi; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jian-Ling; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jun-Xian; Wang, Lei; Wang, Meng-Xin; Wang, Shou-Guan; Wang, Shu-Qing; Wang, Xia; Wang, Ya-Nan; Wang, You; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wang, You-Fen; Wei, Peng; Wei, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Hong; Wu, Ke-Fei; Wu, Xue-Bing; Wu, Yu-Zhong; Xing, Xiao-Zheng; Xu, Ling-Zhe; Xu, Xin-Qi; Xu, Yan; Yan, Tai-Sheng; Yang, De-Hua; Yang, Hai-Feng; Yang, Hui-Qin; Yang, Ming; Yao, Zheng-Qiu; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Hui; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Yuan, Hai-Long; Yuan, Wei-Min; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, En-Peng; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Li-Pin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Zheng-Chao; Zhao, Ming; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Zou, Si-Cheng; Zuo, Fang

    2015-08-01

    The Large sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) general survey is a spectroscopic survey that will eventually cover approximately half of the celestial sphere and collect 10 million spectra of stars, galaxies and QSOs. Objects in both the pilot survey and the first year regular survey are included in the LAMOST DR1. The pilot survey started in October 2011 and ended in June 2012, and the data have been released to the public as the LAMOST Pilot Data Release in August 2012. The regular survey started in September 2012, and completed its first year of operation in June 2013. The LAMOST DR1 includes a total of 1202 plates containing 2 955 336 spectra, of which 1 790 879 spectra have observed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) ≥ 10. All data with SNR ≥ 2 are formally released as LAMOST DR1 under the LAMOST data policy. This data release contains a total of 2 204 696 spectra, of which 1 944 329 are stellar spectra, 12 082 are galaxy spectra and 5017 are quasars. The DR1 not only includes spectra, but also three stellar catalogs with measured parameters: late A,FGK-type stars with high quality spectra (1061 918 entries), A-type stars (100 073 entries), and M-type stars (121 522 entries). This paper introduces the survey design, the observational and instrumental limitations, data reduction and analysis, and some caveats. A description of the FITS structure of spectral files and parameter catalogs is also provided.

  9. Effect of HLA DR epitope de-immunization of Factor VIII in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Song, Chang; Martin, William D.; Tassone, Ryan; De Groot, Anne S.; Scott, David W.

    2011-01-01

    T cell-dependent development of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies that neutralize FVIII activity is a major obstacle to replacement therapy in hemophilia A. To create a less immunogenic therapeutic protein, recombinant FVIII can be modified to reduce HLA binding of epitopes based on predicted anchoring residues. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify C2 domain HLA DR epitopes and predict site-specific mutations that reduce immunogenicity. Epitope peptides corresponding to original and modified sequences were validated in HLA binding assays and in immunizations of hemophilic E16 mice, DR3 and DR4 mice and DR3xE16 mice. Consistent with immunoinformatics predictions, original epitopes are immunogenic. Immunization with selected modified sequences lowered immunogenicity for particular peptides and revealed residual immunogenicity of incompletely de-immunized modified peptides. The stepwise approach to reduce protein immunogenicity by epitope modification illustrated here is being used to design and produce a functional full-length modified FVIII for clinical use. PMID:22222093

  10. Has the Dream Been Fulfilled? Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. & President Barack Hussein Obama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Nichelle Boyd; Moore, Virginia J.; Williams-Black, Thea H.

    2015-01-01

    Equality for all was the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and he knowingly laid the foundation for and inspired the first African-American President of the United States of America, Barack Hussein Obama, who also had the dream of "Change" for America. These men exhibited how working together can make dreams become reality. For the…

  11. Inhibition of B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling suppresses DR5 expression and impairs response of cancer cells to DR5-mediated apoptosis and T cell-induced killing.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y-T; Deng, J; Yue, P; Owonikoko, T K; Khuri, F R; Sun, S-Y

    2016-01-28

    Inhibition of B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling is an effective therapeutic strategy against certain types of cancers such as melanoma and thyroid cancer. While demonstrated to be effective anticancer agents, B-Raf or MEK inhibitors have also been associated with early tumor progression and development of secondary neoplasms. The ligation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with its receptor, death receptor 5 (DR5), leading to induction of apoptosis, offers a promising anticancer strategy. Importantly, this is also a natural immunosurveillance mechanism against cancer development. We previously demonstrated that activated B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling positively regulates DR5 expression. Hence, our current work sought to address whether B-Raf/MEK/ERK inhibition and the consequent suppression of DR5 expression impede cancer cell response to DR5 activation-induced apoptosis and activated immune cell-induced killing. We found that both B-Raf (for example, PLX4032) and MEK inhibitors (for example, AZD6244 and PD0325901) effectively inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced DR5 levels in both human thyroid cancer and melanoma cells. Similar to the observed effect of genetic knockdown of the B-Raf gene, pre-treatment of cancer cell lines with either B-Raf or MEK inhibitors attenuated or abolished cellular apoptotic response induced by TRAIL or the DR5 agonistic antibody AMG655 or cell killing by activated T cells. Our findings clearly show that inhibition of B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling suppresses DR5 expression and impairs DR5 activation-induced apoptosis and T cell-mediated killing of cancer cells. These findings suggest a potential negative impact of B-Raf or MEK inhibition on TRAIL- or DR5-mediated anticancer therapy and on TRAIL/DR5-mediated immune-clearance of cancer cells. PMID:25867065

  12. 76 FR 11526 - In the Matter of Dr. Gary Kao; Order Prohibiting Involvement In NRC-Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... entities participating under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Dr. Gary Kao; Order Prohibiting Involvement In NRC-Licensed Activities I Dr....

  13. Reactions to "Ethical Challenges and Complexities of Including People with Intellectual Disability as Participants in Research" by Dr Teresa Iacono

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; Handen, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    The authors' reaction to Dr Teresa Iacono's article "Ethical challenges and complexities of including people with intellectual disability as participants in research" is presented. Among other things, they find that Dr Iacono has done an outstanding job of describing creative solutions for obtaining appropriate informed consent from people with

  14. Guest Expert: Dr. Leslie Ford -- On Clinical Trial Accrual: A Little Planning Goes A Long Way | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    We are honored to introduce as our guest expert for July, Dr. Leslie G. Ford, M.D. , Associate Director for Clinical Research in the Division of Cancer Prevention at NCI. Dr. Ford, a pioneer in the field of chemoprevention, is an international authority on clinical trials and has been an advocate for clinical trials professionals throughout her career.

  15. Role of VMH ketone bodies in adjusting caloric intake to increased dietary fat content in DIO and DR rats.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henry M; Levin, Barry E

    2015-05-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential role of astrocyte-derived ketone bodies in regulating the early changes in caloric intake of diet induced-obese (DIO) versus diet-resistant (DR) rats fed a 31.5% fat high-energy (HE) diet. After 3 days on chow or HE diet, DR and DIO rats were assessed for their ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) ketone bodies levels and neuronal ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) sensing using microdialysis coupled to continuous food intake monitoring and calcium imaging in dissociated neurons, respectively. DIO rats ate more than DR rats over 3 days of HE diet intake. On day 3 of HE diet intake, DR rats reduced their caloric intake while DIO rats remained hyperphagic. Local VMH astrocyte ketone bodies production was similar between DR and DIO rats during the first 6 h after dark onset feeding but inhibiting VMH ketone body production in DR rats on day 3 transiently returned their intake of HE diet to the level of DIO rats consuming HE diet. In addition, dissociated VMN neurons from DIO and DR rats were equally sensitive to the largely excitatory effects of ?-hydroxybutyrate. Thus while DR rats respond to increased VMH ketone levels by decreasing their intake after 3 days of HE diet, this is not the case of DIO rats. These data suggest that DIO inherent leptin resistance prevents ketone bodies inhibitory action on food intake. PMID:25786485

  16. Induction of the TRAIL receptor KILLER/DR5 in p53-dependent apoptosis but not growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Wu, G S; Burns, T F; McDonald, E R; Meng, R D; Kao, G; Muschel, R; Yen, T; el-Deiry, W S

    1999-11-11

    The TRAIL death receptor KILLER/DR5 is induced by DNA damaging agents in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Here we show that, unlike the p53-target CDK-inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1, the TRAIL death receptor KILLER/DR5 is only induced in cells undergoing p53-dependent apoptosis and not cell cycle arrest. Thus GM glioblastoma cells carrying an inducible MMTV-driven p53 gene undergo cell cycle arrest and upregulate p21 but not KILLER/DR5 expression upon dexamethasone exposure. WI38 normal lung fibroblasts undergoing cell cycle arrest in response to ionizing irradiation also induce p21 but not KILLER/DR5 gene expression. KILLER/DR5 upregulation is also deficient in irradiated lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients with Ataxia Teleangiectasia suggesting a role for the ATM-p53 pathway in regulating KILLER/DR5 expression after DNA damage. Inhibition of transcription by Actinomycin D blocks both KILLER/DR5 and p21 induction in cells undergoing p53-dependent apoptosis. Our results suggest that the p53-dependent transcriptional induction of KILLER/DR5 death receptor is restricted to cells undergoing apoptosis and not cells undergoing exclusively p53-dependent G1 arrest. PMID:10597242

  17. Transforming growth factor beta 1 repression of the HLA-DR alpha gene is mediated by conserved proximal promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Reimold, A M; Kara, C J; Rooney, J W; Glimcher, L H

    1993-10-15

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a pleiotropic cytokine that decreases the expression of class II MHC Ag in the melanoma cell line Hs294T(c). To investigate the mechanism of this repression, we have examined the effect of TGF-beta 1 on expression of the HLA-DR alpha gene. Both the constitutive level of HLA-DR protein and DR alpha mRNA were repressed by treatment with TGF-beta 1. The proximal 176 bp of the DR alpha promoter were sufficient to confer TGF-beta 1 repression on a reporter gene. Deletional and mutational analysis of the DR alpha promoter revealed that the conserved S and X1 promoter elements were important for basal expression of DR alpha and also mediated the down-regulation by TGF-beta 1. Mobility shift assays and in vivo footprinting showed no change in occupancy of the proximal DR alpha promoter after TGF-beta 1 treatment. These results identify the DNA elements that mediate repression of the HLA-DR alpha gene by TGF-beta 1 and suggest that TGF-beta 1 acts at these sites without causing a change in promoter occupancy. PMID:8409394

  18. 76 FR 62494 - Designation of Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri, Also Known as Dr. Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Designation of Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri, Also Known as Dr. Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri... January 23, 2003, I hereby determine that the individual known as Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri, also known as Dr. Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri, also known as Ibrahim `Awad Ibrahim al-Badri...

  19. Professional Development: What Works? Q&A with Dr. Hilda Borko. REL Mid-Atlantic Teacher Effectiveness Webinar Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this webinar, Dr. Hilda Borko, professor, Stanford University Graduate School of Education, presented examples of promising models of professional development, including the Problem-Solving Cycle, Learning and Teaching Geometry, and the use of videos as tools for teacher learning. This Q&A addressed the questions participants had for Dr.…

  20. SU-E-T-185: Feasibility Study of Dose Rate Modulated Arc Therapy (DrMAT) for Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    KO, Y; Cho, B; Yi, B; Kwak, J; Song, S; Je, H; Ahn, S; Noh, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show the feasibility of clinical application of DrMAT for SBRT in lung cancer patients. DrMAT is a form of dynamic conformal arc therapy where MLC segments and dose rates are controlled through simple field weight optimization. Methods: To show feasibility a new treatment plan was created based on the CT of SBRT lung cancer patients. Static plans with 33 fields are made, which have 11deg in between each field and are acquired rotating gantry angle from 180deg to 188deg in CCW direction, total 352deg is rotated. MLC maintained static aperture for each field. To optimize 33 individual fields, field weight was adjusted accordingly using weight optimization algorithm. Keeping weights and MU of static plan, static MLC aperture was converted to multiple arc segments. Arc plan could be created with the fields in the intervals of 11deg. Static MLC should be converted to arc segment MLC. Dynamic conformal arc therapy plan consists of 33 arc fields, is converted to one dose rate modulated arc therapy (DrMAT) plan. DrMAT plan consists of 166 control points which becomes a single arc plan that changes the shape of MLC for every 2.2deg. The resulting DrMAT plan is not an inverse plan it is a simple form of dynamic conformal arc plan using field weight obtained from static plan. This is compared and evaluated with the VMAT plan. Results: DrMAT and VMAT plans have been compared based on the RTOG1021. Both DrMAT and VMAT plans satisfy 100% irradiation to 95% of PTV and critical organs did not exceed dose limit suggested in RTOG1021. DrMAT plan is almost similar with VMAT plan in Result. Conclusion: Field weight optimization method did not show better Resultcompared to VMAT optimization. However, considering simplicity, DrMAT satisfies the condition in RTOG1021. Therefore clinical application of DrMAT is feasible.

  1. Widespread Alu repeat-driven expansion of consensus DR2 retinoic acid response elements during primate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Laperriere, David; Wang, Tian-Tian; White, John H; Mader, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors whose signaling controls numerous aspects of development and physiology. Many receptors recognize DNA hormone response elements formed by direct repeats of RGKTCA motifs separated by 1 to 5 bp (DR1-DR5). Although many known such response elements are conserved in the mouse and human genomes, it is unclear to which extent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors has evolved specifically in primates. Results We have mapped the positions of all consensus DR-type hormone response elements in the human genome, and found that DR2 motifs, recognized by retinoic acid receptors (RARs), are heavily overrepresented (108,582 elements). 90% of these are present in Alu repeats, which also contain lesser numbers of other consensus DRs, including 50% of consensus DR4 motifs. Few DR2s are in potentially mobile AluY elements and the vast majority are also present in chimp and macaque. 95.5% of Alu-DR2s are distributed throughout subclasses of AluS repeats, and arose largely through deamination of a methylated CpG dinucleotide in a non-consensus motif present in AluS sequences. We find that Alu-DR2 motifs are located adjacent to numerous known retinoic acid target genes, and show by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in squamous carcinoma cells that several of these elements recruit RARs in vivo. These findings are supported by ChIP-on-chip data from retinoic acid-treated HL60 cells revealing RAR binding to several Alu-DR2 motifs. Conclusion These data provide strong support for the notion that Alu-mediated expansion of DR elements contributed to the evolution of gene regulation by RARs and other nuclear receptors in primates and humans. PMID:17239240

  2. Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela: Third Lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series (includes opening remarks from Dr. Bill Brinkman and introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Incandela, Joseph

    2012-09-14

    In July of 2012, scientists leading two different research teams, working independently of each other, announced that they had almost certain proof of the long-sought Higgs boson. Though Cern did not call the discovery "official", many physicists conceded the evidence was now so compelling they had surely found the missing particle. The formal confirmation will come over the next few months of further investigation. The experiments are taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and this third lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series is given by one of those announcing scientists in July. He is Dr. Joseph Incandela, the current spokesperson for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at CERN. He was heavily involved in the search for the top quark at Fermi and is from the University of California, Santa Barbara. The title he gives his presentation is "Searching for the genetic code of our universe: Discovery at the LHC."

  3. Dr. Artist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Thomas R.

    The world is in the middle of a major paradigm shift, as the paradigm of dominion over nature is coming to an end with the acceptance of the arts and other subjectively oriented technologies as useful in our effort to live in the universe. Little by little, awareness of this fundamental change in world view is emerging. The importance of art in

  4. Dr Google

    PubMed Central

    Pías-Peleteiro, Leticia; Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess and analyze the information and recommendations provided by Google Web Search™ (Google) in relation to web searches on the HPV vaccine, indications for females and males and possible adverse effects. Materials and Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study of the results of 14 web searches. Comprehensive analysis of results based on general recommendation given (favorable/dissuasive), as well as compliance with pre-established criteria, namely design, content and credibility. Sub-analysis of results according to site category: general information, blog / forum and press. Results: In the comprehensive analysis of results, 72.2% of websites offer information favorable to HPV vaccination, with varying degrees of content detail, vs. 27.8% with highly dissuasive content in relation to HPV vaccination. The most frequent type of site is the blog or forum. The information found is frequently incomplete, poorly structured, and often lacking in updates, bibliography and adequate citations, as well as sound credibility criteria (scientific association accreditation and/or trust mark system). Conclusions: Google, as a tool which users employ to locate medical information and advice, is not specialized in providing information that is necessarily rigorous or valid from a scientific perspective. Search results and ranking based on Google's generalized algorithms can lead users to poorly grounded opinions and statements, which may impact HPV vaccination perception and subsequent decision making. PMID:23744505

  5. GENESI-DR - A single access point to Earth Science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossu, R.; Goncalves, P.; Pacini, F.

    2009-04-01

    The amount of information being generated about our planet is increasing at an exponential rate, but it must be easily accessible in order to apply it to the global needs relating to the state of the Earth. Currently, information about the state of the Earth, relevant services, analysis results, applications and tools are accessible in a very scattered and uncoordinated way, often through individual initiatives from Earth Observation mission operators, scientific institutes dealing with ground measurements, service companies, data catalogues, etc. A dedicated infrastructure providing transparent access to all this will support Earth Science communities by allowing them to easily and quickly derive objective information and share knowledge based on all environmentally sensitive domains. The use of high-speed networks (GÉANT) and the experimentation of new technologies, like BitTorrent, will also contribute to better services for the Earth Science communities. GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories), an ESA-led, European Commission (EC)-funded two-year project, is taking the lead in providing reliable, easy, long-term access to Earth Science data via the Internet. This project will allow scientists from different Earth Science disciplines located across Europe to locate, access, combine and integrate historical and fresh Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors archived in large distributed repositories. GENESI-DR builds a federated collection of heterogeneous digital Earth Science repositories to establish a dedicated infrastructure providing transparent access to all this and allowing Earth Science communities to easily and quickly derive objective information and share knowledge based on all environmentally sensitive domains. The federated digital repositories, seen as services and data providers, will share access to their resources (catalogue functions, data access, processing services etc.) and will adhere to a common set of standards / policies / interfaces. The end-users will be provided with a virtual collection of digital Earth Science data, irrespectively of their location in the various single federated repositories. GENESI-DR objectives have lead to the identification of the basic GENESI-DR infrastructure requirements: • Capability, for Earth Science users, to discover data from different European Earth Science Digital Repositories through the same interface in a transparent and homogeneous way; • Easiness and speed of access to large volumes of coherently maintained distributed data in an effective and timely way; • Capability, for DR owners, to easily make available their data to a significantly increased audience with no need to duplicate them in a different storage system. Data discovery is based on a Central Discovery Service, which allows users and applications to easily query information about data collections and products existing in heterogeneous catalogues, at federated DR sites. This service can be accessed by users via web interface, the GENESI-DR Web Portal, or by external applications via open standardized interfaces exposed by the system. The Central Discovery Service identifies the DRs providing products complying with the user search criteria and returns the corresponding access points to the requester. By taking into consideration different and efficient data transfer technologies such as HTTPS, GridFTP and BitTorrent, the infrastructure provides easiness and speed of access. Conversely, for data publishing GENESI-DR provides several mechanisms to assist DR owners in producing a metadata catalogues. In order to reach its objectives, the GENESI-DR e-Infrastructure will be validated against user needs for accessing and sharing Earth Science data. Initially, four specific applications in the land, atmosphere and marine domains have been selected, including: • Near real time orthorectification for agricultural crops monitoring • Urban area mapping in support of emergency response • Data assimilation in GlobModel, addressing major environmental and health issues in Europe, with a particular focus on air quality • SeaDataNet to aid environmental assessments and to forecast the physical state of the oceans in near real time. Other applications will complement this during the second half of the project. GENESI-DR also aims to develop common approaches to preserve the historical archives and the ability to access the derived user information as both software and hardware transformations occur. Ensuring access to Earth Science data for future generations is of utmost importance because it allows for the continuity of knowledge generation improvement. For instance, scientists accessing today's climate change data in 50 years will be able to better understand and detect trends in global warming and apply this knowledge to ongoing natural phenomena. GENESI-DR will work towards harmonising operations and applying approved standards, policies and interfaces at key Earth Science data repositories. To help with this undertaking, GENESI-DR will establish links with the relevant organisations and programmes such as space agencies, institutional environmental programmes, international Earth Science programmes and standardisation bodies.

  6. VERY LARGE ARRAY DETECTION OF THE 36 GHz ZEEMAN EFFECT IN DR21W REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Momjian, Emmanuel; Sjouwerman, Lorant O.; Fish, Vincent L.

    2012-09-20

    We report on the observation of the 36 GHz methanol maser line in the star-forming region DR21W to accurately measure the Zeeman effect. The Zeeman signature reported by Fish et al. became suspicious after an instrumental effect was discovered in the early days of the commissioning of the Very Large Array Wide-band Digital Architecture correlator. We conclude that the previously reported magnetic field strength of 58 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) is instrumental in nature and thus incorrect. With the improved performance of the array, we now deduce a 3{sigma} limit of -4.7 to +0.4 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) for the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength in DR21W.

  7. Dr Karel Fleischmann: the story of an artist and physician in Ghetto Terezin.

    PubMed

    Hoenig, Leonard J; Spenser, Tomas; Tarsi, Anita

    2004-02-01

    Dr Karel Fleischmann (1897-1944) was a Jewish dermatologist and noted Czech artist. During World War II, Fleischmann was confined by the Nazis in Ghetto Terezin (Theresienstadt), which was located in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia. While at Terezin, Fleischmann became a leader of the ghetto's health care system and administered programs that helped to dramatically reduce the high mortality rate of the Jewish population from disease. In his spare time, Fleischmann drew works of art that portrayed the daily life and suffering of the Jews in Ghetto Terezin. Although Fleischmann perished in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, his artwork survived the war. This article pays tribute to Dr Karel Fleischmann by telling the story of his life and by citing selections from his art, poetry and prose. PMID:15125504

  8. Dr. William Theodore Hodge: pioneer surgeon-apothecary in early-twentieth-century Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Kamien, Max

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 I chanced upon the lonely grave of Dr. William Theodore Hodge, buried in 1934, in the Derby Pioneer and Aboriginal Cemetery. He turned out to be the founding doctor of the practice in which I have worked for the past thirty years. Dr. Hodge migrated from England in 1896. He was the first western trained doctor to work in the Perth suburb of Claremont and in the wheat-belt town of Kellerberrin. He was an innovative and inventive modern doctor who became a legend in the Kimberley where he died tragically, on the day prior to his retirement, at the age of seventy-five. His story is illustrative of the life and medical practice of a pioneering doctor in metropolitan, rural, and remote practice in Western Australia at the end of the nineteenth and the early years of the twentieth centuries. PMID:20973339

  9. GENESI-DR: Discovery, Access and on-Demand Processing in Federated Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossu, Roberto; Pacini, Fabrizio; Parrini, Andrea; Santi, Eliana Li; Fusco, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. In fact, a common dedicated infrastructure such as the GENESI-DR one permits the Earth Science communities to derive objective information and to share knowledge in all environmental sensitive domains over a continuum of time and a variety of geographical scales so addressing urgent challenges such as Global Change. GENESI-DR federates data, information and knowledge for the management of our fragile planet in line with one of the major goals of the many international environmental programmes such as GMES, GEO/GEOSS. As of today, 12 different Digital Repositories hosting more than 60 heterogeneous dataset series are federated in GENESI-DR. Series include satellite data, in situ data, images acquired by airborne sensors, digital elevation models and model outputs. ESA has started providing access to: Category-1 data systematically available on Internet; level 3 data (e.g., GlobCover map, MERIS Global Vegetation Index); ASAR products available in ESA Virtual Archive and related to the Supersites initiatives. In all cases, existing data policies and security constraints are fully respected. GENESI-DR also gives access to Grid and Cloud computing resources allowing authorized users to run a number of different processing services on the available data. The GENESI-DR operational platform is currently being validated against several applications from different domains, such as: automatic orthorectification of SPOT data; SAR Interferometry; GlobModel results visualization and verification by comparison with satellite observations; ozone estimation from ERS-GOME products and comparison with in-situ LIDAR measures; access to ocean-related heterogeneous data and on-the-fly generated products. The project is adopting, ISO 19115, ISO 19139 and OGC standards for geospatial metadata discovery and processing, is compliant with the basis of INSPIRE Implementing Rules for Metadata and Discovery, and uses the OpenSearch protocol with Geo extensions for data and services discovery. OpenSearch is now considered by OGC a mass-market standard to provide machine accessible search interface to data repositories. GENESI-DR is gaining momentum in the Earth Science community thanks to the active participation to the GEO task force "Data Integration and Analysis Systems" and to the several collaborations with EC projects. It is now extending international cooperation agreements specifically with the NASA (Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services), with CEODE (the Center of Earth Observation for Digital Earth of Beijing), with the APN (Asia-Pacific Network), with University of Tokyo (Japanese GeoGrid and Data Integration and Analysis System).

  10. Excess clustering on large scales in the MegaZ DR7 photometric redshift survey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shaun A; Abdalla, Filipe B; Lahav, Ofer

    2011-06-17

    We observe a large excess of power in the statistical clustering of luminous red galaxies in the photometric SDSS galaxy sample called MegaZ DR7. This is seen over the lowest multipoles in the angular power spectra C_{?} in four equally spaced redshift bins between 0.45?z?0.65. However, it is most prominent in the highest redshift band at ?4? and it emerges at an effective scale k?0.01??h?Mpc(-1). Given that MegaZ DR7 is the largest cosmic volume galaxy survey to date (3.3(Gpch(-1))(3)) this implies an anomaly on the largest physical scales probed by galaxies. Alternatively, this signature could be a consequence of it appearing at the most systematically susceptible redshift. There are several explanations for this excess power that range from systematics to new physics. We test the survey, data, and excess power, as well as possible origins. PMID:21770561

  11. Culturing the throat to protect the heart: Dr. Milton Markowitz and the prevention of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Murray, T; Grey, M

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly review how the understanding of rheumatic fever has evolved over the last 50 years. Particular emphasis is given to the identification of the Group A streptococcus as the causative agent of rheumatic fever and the use of antibiotics to treat and prevent rheumatic fever. Throughout his 50-year career, Dr. Milton Markowitz, former chairman of the department of pediatrics at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, has been involved in these advances as an international expert on rheumatic fever prevention. Using archival materials, including some of the earliest literature descriptions of rheumatic fever, as well as an extended interview with Dr. Markowitz, the authors present a unique personal perspective both on the history of rheumatic fever and the context within which the scientific advances that have led to contemporary treatment and prevention strategies have evolved. PMID:11100629

  12. Isomerization and optical bistability of DR1 doped organic-inorganic sol-gel thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tianxi; Que, Wenxiu; Shao, Jinyou

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the isomerization process of the disperse red 1 (DR1) doped TiO2/ormosil thin film, both the photo-isomerization and the thermal isomerization of the thin films were observed as a change of the absorption spectrum. Under a real-time heat treatment, the change of the linear refractive index shows a thermal stable working temperature range below Tg. The optical bistability (OB) effect of the DR1 doped thin films based on different matrices was studied and measured at a wavelength of 532 nm. Results indicate that the TiO2/ormosils based thin film presents a better OB-gain than that of the poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based thin film due to its more rigid network structure. Moreover, it is also noted that higher titanium content is helpful for enhancing the OB-gain of the as-prepared hybrid thin films.

  13. Fascaplysin sensitizes cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through upregulating DR5 expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Chen, Haimin; Yan, Xiaojun; Zheng, Yanling

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the molecular mechanism of anti-tumor effect of fascaplysin, a nitrogenous red pigment firstly isolated from a marine sponge. Microarray analysis show that the TNF and TNF receptor superfamily in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human hepatocarcinoma cells (BEL-7402) were significantly regulated by fascaplysin. Western Blot results reveal that fascaplysin increased the expression of cleaved caspase-9, active caspase-3, and decreased the level of procaspase-8 and Bid. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests indicate that fascaplysin sensitized cells to tumor necrosis-related apoptosisinducing ligand-(TRAIL) induced apoptosis, which was markedly blocked by TRAIL R2/Fc chimera, a dominant negative form of TRAIL receptor DR5. Therefore, our results demonstrate that fascaplysin promotes apoptosis through the activation of TRAIL signaling pathway by upregulating DR5 expression.

  14. MULTI-SCALE MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF SDSS DR5 SURVEY USING THE METRIC SPACE TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yongfeng; Batuski, David J.; Khalil, Andre

    2009-12-20

    Following the novel development and adaptation of the Metric Space Technique (MST), a multi-scale morphological analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5) was performed. The technique was adapted to perform a space-scale morphological analysis by filtering the galaxy point distributions with a smoothing Gaussian function, thus giving quantitative structural information on all size scales between 5 and 250 Mpc. The analysis was performed on a dozen slices of a volume of space containing many newly measured galaxies from the SDSS DR5 survey. Using the MST, observational data were compared to galaxy samples taken from N-body simulations with current best estimates of cosmological parameters and from random catalogs. By using the maximal ranking method among MST output functions, we also develop a way to quantify the overall similarity of the observed samples with the simulated samples.

  15. Objective measures of laryngeal imaging: what have we learned since Dr. Paul Moore.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peak

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Paul Moore pioneered the use of high-speed cinematography for observation of normal and abnormal vocal fold vibrations during phonation. His analysis of the glottal area waveform, opening and closing speed index, and open quotient from the high-speed films were labor intensive but relevant today. With advances in digital image capture and automated image extraction techniques, stroboscopy and high-speed images of vocal fold vibration may be analyzed with objective measures. Digital high-speed image capture in color is now clinically practical at high resolution. Digital kymography now allows analysis of the vibratory waveform from each vocal fold. Serial capture and comparison can document changes in vibratory function with treatment. Quantification of vocal fold vibration using such techniques is now practical. This is a review of vocal fold vibration capture and analysis techniques since Dr. Moore. PMID:24094798

  16. Dr. Smith Goes to Washington: A Physicist Wanders the Halls of Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, Benn

    2005-03-23

    Dr. Tannenbaum was the 2002-2003 APS Congressional Science Fellow. He worked in the office of U.S. Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) on nuclear nonproliferation issues. His work in Congressman Markey's office focused on issues including missile defense, the nuclear program in Iran, prevention of the transfer of U.S. nuclear technology to North Korea, and the security of nuclear sites in Iraq. Dr. Tannenbaum will discuss this experience and observations concerning 'underinformed and uninformed' decision-making in Congress. He will also briefly discuss goals of the Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Finally, he will discuss ways in which physicists can get more involved in the political process.

  17. Structural studies of the nudix hydrolase DR1025 from deinococcus radiodurans and its ligand complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ranatunga, Wasantha; Hill, Emma E.; Mooster, Jana L.; Holbrook, Elizabeth L.; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Xu, WenLian; Bessman, Maurice J.; Brenner, Steve n E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2004-01-29

    We have determined the crystal structure, at 1.4, of the Nudix hydrolase DR1025 from the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The protein forms an intertwined homodimer by exchanging N-terminal segments between chains. We have identified additional conserved elements of the Nudix fold, including the metal-binding motif, a kinked b-strand characterized by a proline two positions upstream of the Nudix consensus sequence, and participation of the N-terminal extension in the formation of the substrate-binding pocket. Crystal structures were also solved of DR1025 crystallized in the presence of magnesium and either a GTP analog or Ap4A (both at 1.6 resolution). In the Ap4Aco-crystal, the electron density indicated that the product of asymmetric hydrolysis, ATP, was bound to the enzyme. The GTP analog bound structure showed that GTP was bound almost identically as ATP. Neither nucleoside triphosphate was further cleaved.

  18. [Instituto de Investigaciones Clinicas "Dr. Amrico Negrette": 55 years of excellent research versus global economic recession].

    PubMed

    Valero Cedeo, Nereida Josefina

    2014-12-01

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Clnicas "Dr. Amrico Negrette" belongs to the Faculty of Medicine at University of Zulia in Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela. It was created on December 4, 1959 by Dr. Amrico Negrette. Today, with 55 years of existence, the Institute seeks to fulfill the mission that characterizes it, based on the values instilled by its founder and maintained by subsequent generations, whose research projects are implemented through seven research sections: Biochemistry, Hematologic Research, Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Immunology and Cell Biology, Clinical Neurochemistry, Parasitology and Virology. The research originated in these laboratories have become national and international points of reference, despite the current economic situation with budget deficits that put at risk the quality and originality of their projects with negative consequences on the productivity and applications for health population, reasons of biomedical research. PMID:25558749

  19. Oh, the places you may go--just follow Dr. Seuss.

    PubMed

    Luechauer, David; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    All physicians have mentors, role models, and even historical figures in medicine to whom they turn for advice on everything from treating their patients to running their practices. To be sure, many physicians have learned valuable lessons from Osler, Halstead, Fleming, Pasteur, and a long list of former professors, supervisors, and practice partners. In this article, however, we suggest that modern physicians can turn to a most unlikely source of wisdom and knowledge. We would like to put the spotlight on another doctor--Dr. Seuss. It may be hard to believe, but modern physicians can learn much about the care of patients and the business of running their practices from the very same books they are reading with their children and grandchildren. The idea that well-trained and sophisticated physicians can learn from Dr. Seuss is not as far-fetched as it may seem initially. PMID:26062332

  20. Dr. Yvonne Pendleton: A Prestigious Role Model of the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Gustavo; Prado, Hilary

    2009-10-01

    This project embodies the progression of Dr. Yvonne Pendleton through the beginnings of her fascination with science, her achievements in astrophysics, and contributions to scientific communities as a whole. As a woman of authority in a male-dominated field of study, Dr. Yvonne Pendleton has challenged the misconception that society attains of women in physics. As Senior Advisor for Research and Analysis for NASA, she recently investigated the organic component of the interstellar medium and the incorporation of that material into the early solar nebula. Through various obstacles, she continues to devote much of her free time to the encouragement of students at the high school, collegiate, graduate, and post-graduate levels.

  1. Dr. David Brown poses with a portrait of Ronald McNair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla., Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, poses with a portrait of NASA astronaut Ronald McNair. The portrait was presented to the school by Walt Disney World during a tribute to McNair. The school had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut who was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  2. [United Nations world population prize to Dr. Halfdan Mahler. Acceptance speech].

    PubMed

    Mahler, H

    1995-06-01

    The professional achievements of Halfdan Mahler, for which he was awarded the 1995 UN World Population Prize, are summarized, and Dr. Mahler's acceptance speech is presented. Dr. Mahler worked for reproductive health and sustainable development during his six years as secretary general of the IPPF. Under his leadership, the IPPF established world standards for family planning and reproductive health. Dr. Mahler also guided creation and implementation of the long-term IPPF strategic plan, Vision 2000. During his tenure as director general of the World Health Organization from 1973 to 1988, he established the special program of education, development, and training for research in human reproduction. Dr. Mahler's acceptance speech sketched a world of the future in which women control their reproductive lives and enjoy equality with men in work and at home, where adolescents understand and control their sexuality, where all children are desired and cared for, and where hard work brings success even in the poorest population sectors. The challenges of achieving this vision are enormous. The world's population will have doubled to 10 billion, and tensions and inequities will persist. But if the vision is not fulfilled, the present population will triple to 15 billion and competition for every kind of resource will be intolerable. In order to succeed, the rights to free and informed reproductive decision making must be guaranteed for every couple. Harmful practices that violate the right to autonomous reproductive decision making, such as early marriage or female genital mutilation, must be eliminated. Governments must commit themselves to educating and providing resources to women so that they can exercise their rights. Family planning services must be extended to the poor and marginal population sectors that still are denied access, and to adolescents who are at risk of unwanted pregnancy and disease. PMID:12319907

  3. Dr. Hans Rosling, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    ScienceCinema

    Rosling, Hans (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org)

    2014-04-11

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Hans Rosling (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org), gave this keynote address.

  4. Dr. Marco Marra: Pioneer and Visionary in Cancer Genomics Research | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Marco Marra is a highly distinguished genomics and bioinformatics researcher. He is the Director of Canada’s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre at the BC Cancer Agency and holds a faculty position at the University of British Columbia. The Centre is a state-of-the-art sequencing facility in Vancouver, Canada, with a major focus on the study of cancers.  Many of their research projects are undertaken in collaborations with other Canadian and international institutions.

  5. [Establishment and application of DR automatic system based on DICOM3.0 BPE].

    PubMed

    Wang, Longchen; Hu, Shundong; Li, Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new application of PACS in our hospital. Through the integration of PACS, HIS and RIS, digital transformation is made in every step. The functional modules of Body Parts Examined in DICOM is set and good link between PACS and DR is made. So the equipment can retrieval the inspection area automatically and make adjustment on the parameters correspondingly. It makes the workflow optimized and improves the efficiency greatly. PMID:22571147

  6. With stroke of pen, FERC puts DR on par with supply side options

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-15

    In mid October 2008, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) finalized new rules intended to strengthen the operation and improve the competitiveness of organized U.S. wholesale electric markets. FERC intends to increase the use of demand response (DR), encourage long-term power contracts, strengthen the role of market monitors, and enhance the responsiveness of regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system operators (ISOs). The FERC order applies to existing U.S. organized wholesale markets.

  7. [The Nobel Prize for nitric oxide. The unjust exclusion of Dr. Salvador Moncada].

    PubMed

    de Berrazueta, J R

    1999-04-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded jointly to North-American scientists, Dr Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro and Ferid Murad, for their discoveries in relation to "nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system". This has raised an important polemic because of the exclusion the South-American scientist, now nationalized British, Dr. Salvador Moncada. This short historical review examines some of the fundamental contributions to the knowledge in this field. It shows the sequence of the discoveries and the communication of them to the scientific community by the rewarded scientists and by Dr. Moncada. It is based on some fundamental publications in order to better understand this story, which does not coincide with the writing in 1996 by the Lasker Prize Committee, and which in 1998 was re-written again by the Nobel Committee of the Swedish Academy. More than 90 universities, academies and societies have acknowledged Dr. Moncada up to now with priority in the discovery of the fact that nitric oxide is released by endothelial cells, and the revealing of its metabolic way. More than 20,000 citations of their fundamental papers endorse in the scientific community his primacy in this field. Even Robert Furchgott, author of the brilliant discovery of the endothelium derived relaxing factor, that opened this field to the science, declared about the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize: "I feel that the Nobel Prize Committee could have made an exception this year and chosen a fourth person, Salvador Moncada (to share the prize)". PMID:10217961

  8. MiR-210 inhibits NF-?B signaling pathway by targeting DR6 in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; Cao, Xiaorui; Li, Jun; Zhao, Guangyue

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degradation of articular cartilage and joint inflammation. MicroRNAs have been proved to play an important role in the regulation of chondrogenesis. Previous study showed that microRNA-210 (miR-210) was probably associated with osteoarthritis, while the function of miR-210 in osteoarthritis still remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of miR-210 on osteoarthritis. In the in vitro study, miR-210 level in chondrocytes was decreased after treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Transfection with miR-210 mimic inhibited LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production, cell viability reduction and cell apoptosis. Results of luciferase activity assay showed that miR-210 targeted 3?-UTR of death receptor 6 (DR6) to inhibit its expression. MiR-210 mimic and DR6 siRNA transfection inhibited the activation of NF-?B pathway and cell apoptosis of chondrocytes. For the in vivo study, OA model was established on rats by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). MiR-210 expression is reduced in OA rats. MiR-210 over-expressing lentivirus was injected into the OA rats. Cytokines production, and NF-?B and DR6 expression in OA rats was inhibited by miR-210 overexpression. The results demonstrated that miR-210 decreased inflammation in articular cavity in OA rats by targeting DR6 and inhibiting NF-?B signaling pathway. PMID:26244598

  9. Dr. Hans Rosling, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    SciTech Connect

    Rosling, Hans

    2014-03-06

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Hans Rosling (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org), gave this keynote address.

  10. Structure of an N-terminally truncated Nudix hydrolase DR2204 from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Gonalves, A M D; Fioravanti, E; Stelter, M; McSweeney, S

    2009-11-01

    Nudix pyrophosphatases are a well represented protein family in the Deinococcus radiodurans genome. These hydrolases, which are known to be enzymatically active towards nucleoside diphosphate derivatives, play a role in cleansing the cell pool of potentially deleterious damage products. Here, the structure of DR2204, the only ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase in the D. radiodurans genome that is known to be active towards flavin adenosine dinucleotide (FAD), is presented at 2.0 angstrom resolution. PMID:19923723

  11. Dr. Zompo: an online data repository for Zostera marina and Posidonia oceanica ESTs.

    PubMed

    Wissler, L; Dattolo, E; Moore, A D; Reusch, T B H; Olsen, J L; Migliaccio, M; Bornberg-Bauer, E; Procaccini, G

    2009-01-01

    As ecosystem engineers, seagrasses are angiosperms of paramount ecological importance in shallow shoreline habitats around the globe. Furthermore, the ancestors of independent seagrass lineages have secondarily returned into the sea in separate, independent evolutionary events. Thus, understanding the molecular adaptation of this clade not only makes significant contributions to the field of ecology, but also to principles of parallel evolution as well. With the use of Dr. Zompo, the first interactive seagrass sequence database presented here, new insights into the molecular adaptation of marine environments can be inferred. The database is based on a total of 14 597 ESTs obtained from two seagrass species, Zostera marina and Posidonia oceanica, which have been processed, assembled and comprehensively annotated. Dr. Zompo provides experimentalists with a broad foundation to build experiments and consider challenges associated with the investigation of this class of non-domesticated monocotyledon systems. Our database, based on the Ruby on Rails framework, is rich in features including the retrieval of experimentally determined heat-responsive transcripts, mining for molecular markers (SSRs and SNPs), and weighted key word searches that allow access to annotation gathered on several levels including Pfam domains, GeneOntology and KEGG pathways. Well established plant genome sites such as The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) and the Rice Genome Annotation Project are interfaced by Dr. Zompo. With this project, we have initialized a valuable resource for plant biologists in general and the seagrass community in particular. The database is expected to grow together with more data to come in the near future, particularly with the recent initiation of the Zostera genome sequencing project.The Dr. Zompo database is available at http://drzompo.uni-muenster.de/ PMID:20157482

  12. A study in dualism: The strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shubh M.; Chakrabarti, Subho

    2008-01-01

    R. L. Stevenson's novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a prominent example of Victorian fiction. The names Jekyll and Hyde have become synonymous with multiple personality disorder. This article seeks to examine the novel from the view point of dualism as a system of philosophy and as a religious framework and also from the view point of Freud's structural theory of the mind. PMID:19742237

  13. Ocular myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor ? subunit immunization in HLA DR3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Saini, Shamsher S; Wang, Jun; Li, Jing; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Huda, Ruksana; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-12-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) are preferentially involved in myasthenia gravis (MG) and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody positive MG patients may occasionally present with isolated ocular symptoms. Although experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by whole AChR immunization closely mimics clinical and immunopathological aspects of MG, EOM are usually not affected. We have previously developed an EAMG model, which imitates EOM symptoms of MG by immunization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic mice with ? or ?-subunits of human AChR (H-AChR). To investigate the significance of the ?-subunit in ocular MG, we immunized HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice with recombinant H-AChR ?-subunit expressed in Escherichia coli. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice showed significantly higher clinical ocular and generalized MG severity scores and lower grip strength values than HLA-DQ8 mice. H-AChR ?-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mice had higher serum anti-AChR antibody (IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, IgG2c and IgM) levels, neuromuscular junction IgG and complement deposit percentages than ?-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. Control mice immunized with E. coli extract or complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) did not show clinical and immunopathological features of ocular and generalized EAMG. Lymph node cells of ?-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 mice showed significantly higher proliferative responses than those of ?-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 mice, crude E. coli extract-immunized and CFA-immunized transgenic mice. Our results indicate that the human AChR ?-subunit is capable of inducing myasthenic muscle weakness. Diversity of the autoimmune responses displayed by mice expressing different HLA class II molecules suggests that the interplay between HLA class II alleles and AChR subunits might have a profound impact on the clinical course of MG. PMID:26493475

  14. 75 FR 51869 - CAFTA-DR Consultation Request Regarding Guatemala's Apparent Failure to Effectively Enforce its...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice that on July 30, 2010, pursuant to the Labor Chapter (Chapter 16) of the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR), the United States requested consultations with the Government of Guatemala to discuss Guatemala's apparent failure to meet its obligation under Article 16.2.1(a)......

  15. Differential regulation of interleukin-8 gene transcription by death receptor 3 (DR3) and type I TNF receptor (TNFRI).

    PubMed

    Su, Wenlynn B; Chang, Ying-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Wan; Hsieh, Shie-Liang

    2006-02-01

    TL1A induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophage in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Overexpression of its cognate receptor DR3 can induce a higher amount of IL-8 protein secretion than that induced by TNFRI even though both receptors activate IL-8 gene transcription in a similar fashion. The underlying mechanism for the regulation of the IL-8 gene transcription by DR3 has not been investigated yet. Here, we used HEK293 cells as a model system to dissect the possible signaling components that are involved in the regulation of DR3-mediated IL-8 gene expression. Although both DR3 and TNFRI activated TRAF2 and NF-kappaB to induce IL-8 gene transcription, the kinase cascades that transduce signals for DR3- and TNFRI-induced IL-8 gene transcription are different. The axis TAK1/ASK1-MKK4/MKK7-JNK2 is responsible for DR3-mediated IL-8 gene expression whereas the axis ASK1-MKK4-JNK1/JNK2/p38MAPK is the choice for TNFRI-mediated activation of IL-8 gene expression. This indicates that the downstream signaling pathways of DR3 and TNFRI for IL-8 secretion are divergent even though both receptors contain death-domain and induce IL-8 secretion via TRAF2. PMID:16324699

  16. Hypoxia increases membranal and secreted HLA-DR in endothelial cells, rendering them T-cell activators.

    PubMed

    Lahat, Nitza; Bitterman, Haim; Weiss-Cerem, Lea; Rahat, Michal A

    2011-10-01

    Transplantation involves preoperative ischemic periods that contribute to endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and T-cell activation, leading to graft rejection. As hypoxia is a major constituent of ischemia, we evaluated its effect on the ability of ECs to express HLA-DR, which is required for presentation of antigens to T cells, and by itself serves as an important target for allogeneic T cells. Primary human umbilical vein ECs (HUVEC) and the human endothelial cell line EaHy926 were incubated in normoxia or hypoxia (PO(2) < 0.3%). Hypoxia increased the membranal expression (by 4-6 fold, P < 0.01) and secretion (by sixfold, P < 0.05) of HLA-DR protein, without influencing the accumulation of its mRNA. Alternative splicing, attenuated trafficking, or shedding from the plasma membrane were not observed, but the lysosomal inhibitor bafilomycin A1 reduced HLA-DR secretion. Hypoxia-induced endothelial HLA-DR elevated and diminished the secretion of IL-2 and IL-10, respectively, from co-cultured allogeneic CD4(+) T cells in a HLA-DR-dependent manner, as demonstrated by the use of monoclonal anti-HLA-DR. Our results indicate a yet not fully understood post-translational mechanism(s), which elevate both membranal and soluble HLA-DR expression. This elevation is involved in allogeneic T-cell activation, highlighting the pivotal role of ECs in ischemia/hypoxia-associated injury and graft rejection. PMID:21806687

  17. [Frequency of the occurrence of spliced variants of the messenger RNA DR3/LARD in herpesviral infection].

    PubMed

    Utkin, O V; Starikova, V D; Novikov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of frequency of the occurrence of membrane and soluble forms of the mRNA DR3/LARD in blood in herpesviral infection of various etiology was studied. Four forms of the mRNA DR3/LARD were detected with various frequencies in blood cells of healthy volunteers. Patients with herpesviral infection of various etiology were studied using RT-PCR. Two forms encoded membrane molecules (mRNA LARD 1a, mRNA DR3beta) and two other forms accorded soluble forms of receptor (mRNA LARD 3, mRNA soluble DR3beta). It was revealed that the frequency of the occurrence of mRNA soluble DR3beta form decreased in patients with the varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in comparison with healthy volunteers. However, the patients with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection did not display significant change in occurrence of mRNA soluble DR3beta form. As a whole, changes in frequency of occurrence of spliced variants of mRNA DR3/LARD are directed toward modulation of apoptosis and restraint antiviral immune response. PMID:25929035

  18. Lack of the HLA-DR2 specificity in multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis.

    PubMed Central

    Spaide, R F; Skerry, J E; Yannuzzi, L A; DeRosa, J T

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of the HLA-B7 and HLA-DR2 specificities in 17 unrelated patients with multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis, 11 with and six without subretinal neovascularisation, was evaluated and compared with those of two different groups. The first group was 17 patients with subretinal neovascularisation associated with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, and the second was a group of 105 eye patients with no retinal disease. HLA-DR2 was not found in any patient with multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis, but it was found in 13 patients with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (p = 6.72 x 10(-5), comparison of the groups with subretinal neovascularisation). The lack of HLA-DR2 was also significant in comparison with the control group of eye patients (p = 0.041). This study suggests that patients with multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis and presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome have differing genetic predispositions, though the fundus pictures in these entities have many similarities. Images PMID:1697479

  19. The cometary H II regions of DR 21: Bow shocks or champagne flows or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immer, K.; Cyganowski, C.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2014-03-01

    We present deep Very Large Array H66? radio recombination line (RRL) observations of the two cometary H II regions in DR 21. With these sensitive data, we test the "hybrid" bow shock/champagne flow model previously proposed for the DR 21 H II regions. The ionized gas down the tail of the southern H II region is redshifted by up to ~30 km s-1 with respect to the ambient molecular gas, as expected in the hybrid scenario. The RRL velocity structure, however, reveals the presence of two velocity components in both the northern and southern H II regions. This suggests that the ionized gas is flowing along cone-like shells, swept-up by stellar winds. The observed velocity structure of the well-resolved southern H II region is most consistent with a picture that combines a stellar wind with stellar motion (as in bow shock models) along a density gradient (as in champagne flow models). The direction of the implied density gradient is consistent with that suggested by maps of dust continuum and molecular line emission in the DR 21 region. The image cubes are only available as a FITS file at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A39Table 2, Fig. 4, and Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. [Dr. Sklenar's Kombucha mushroom infusion--a biological cancer therapy. Documentation No. 18].

    PubMed

    Hauser, S P

    1990-02-27

    Kombucha, a fungal infusion, is a 'symbiotic mixture' of bacteria, yeasts, tea and sugar. A number of components are listed, but exact analyses are not published. On the basis of 'thorough detoxification', Kombucha is claimed to be a prophylactic and therapeutic agent in countless diseases, such as rheumatism, intestinal disorders, ageing and cancer. All 'stages of the Sklenar blood picture' have to be treated with Kombucha Drink, Kombucha Drops, coli preparations and Gelum oral-rd for a period of months. A litre-bottle costs 13 DM, the blood analysis 150 Sfr. In the 1960's Dr. R. Sklenar developed a 'biological cancer therapy with Kombucha as the main agent' and his own system of diagnosing cancer. Sklenar's diagnosis of cancer is based on iris diagnosis and demonstration of the causative organism by means of a 'Blood picture according to Dr. Sklenar'. He claims, on one hand, that cancer is only one of the many metabolic diseases and, on the other, that viruses, in his view parasitic microorganisms in general, are responsible for the pathogenesis of cancer. No preclinical and nor investigations are available, as 'success has proved him (Dr. Sklenar) to be right'. The seven 'case histories' described have no solid medical data. There is so far no evidence to support the claim that Kombucha offers 'effective biological treatment of cancer'. PMID:2333452

  1. Deletion mutant defines DQ beta variants with DR4 positive DQw3 positive haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Nepom, B.S.; Kim, S.J.; Nepom, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    We describe the production of an HLA deletion mutation by radiation mutagenesis of a DR4- and DQw3-homozygous, Dw4- and Dw14-heterozygous cell line designed to analyze polymorphisms associated with DR4 and DQw3. Southern blot analysis confirms a deletion of class I and class II genes on one haplotype. Variation in DQ beta alleles associated with DQw3 was previously described by characteristic RFLP patterns for a DQ beta bene. One pattern, which correlated precisely with A-10-83 monoclonal antibody reactivity (TA10), defined an allele which we call DQ''3.1''. The mutant cell line has lost the polymorphic bands on Southern blots corresponding to the DQ''3.1'' allele, while the intact Dw14 haplotype retains the alternate allele at DQ beta which is DQw-3 positive. TA10-negative. These data demonstrate the segregation of two DQw3 positive DQ beta allelic variants, both associated with DR4, which can be distinguished on the basis of both RFLP and monoclonal antibody reactivity.

  2. The life and viper of Dr Patrick Russell MD FRS (1727-1805): physician and naturalist.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, B J

    1994-11-01

    It is nearly two hundred years since the publication in 1796 of An Account of Indian Serpents collected on the Coast of Coromandel by Patrick Russell. Within the folio is a drawing and description of the venomous snake called Katuka Rekula Poda in the local Telugu language, whose venom was shown experimentally by Dr Russell to be nearly as lethal as that of Cobra de Capello. The snake is now known as Vipera russelli or Russell's viper. Dr Russell was representative of the naturalistic tendency of British medicine in the late 18th century. He was a keen observer and skilled doctor in clinical practice, particularly in Aleppo, Syria, during an outbreak of the plague, and indefatigable in his study of plant and animal life both in Aleppo and later in the Madras Province of India. As a physician as well as Naturalist to the East India Company in the Carnatic he was concerned with the problem of snakebite. His first aim was to find a means whereby the non-specialist could distinguish between poisonous and harmless snakes and so combat the terrible notion that all bites were mortal. His writing, encompassing social and natural histories and climaxed by a study of snakes, has left a rich legacy. Dr Patrick Russell was a man of the highest integrity and ability, a physician and naturalist par excellence. PMID:7886689

  3. Circular Dichrosim Studies on the Deinococcus Radiodurans Nudix Hydrolase DR_0079: an Atypical Thermal Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2010-07-01

    We have recently determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 [Proteins 56:28-39]. The protein is a monomer and contains the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed b-sheet sandwiched between a-helices. The protein¹s physical properties were further characterized by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. A CD thermal melt indicates an inflection point at ~52ºC. However, unlike typical CD thermal melts, the ellipticity at 220 nm decreases upon passing through the inflection point suggesting that the amount of secondary structure in the protein has increased after heating. NMR spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography indicates that heating effects the irreversible formation of a large molecular weight complex. After cooling, the ellipiticity at 220 nm increases further, and overall, the CD spectrum at 25ºC shows that heat-treated DR0079 has more ³structure² than non-heat treated DR0079.

  4. Solution Structure of Hypothetical Nudix Hydrolase DR0079 from Extremely Radiation-Resistant Deinococcus radiodurans Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-07-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based methods including residual dipolar coupling restraints, we have determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 (171 residues, MW= 19.3 kDa). The protein contains eight b-strands and three a-helices organized into three subdomains; an N-terminal b-sheet (1-34), a central Nudix core (35-140), and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (141-171). The Nudix core and C-terminal helix-turn-helix form the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed b-sheet sandwiched between a-helices. The residues that compose the signature Nudix sequence, GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U= I, L, or V and X= any amino acid), are contained in a turn-helix-turn motif on the face of the mixed b-sheet. Chemical shift mapping experiments suggest that DR0079 binds Mg2+, but, precipitates out of solution in the presence of excess Mn2+. Experiments designed to determine the biological function of the protein indicate th at it is not a type I isopentenyl-diphosphate d-isomerase and it does not bind a,b-methyleneadenosine 5-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and guanosine 5-[b,g-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP). The structure of DR0079 is compared to other known Nudix protein structures, a potential substrate binding surface is proposed, and its possible biological function discussed.

  5. Solution structure of hypothetical nudix hydrolase dr0079 from extremely radiation-resistant deinococcus radiodurans bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, G.W.; Ni, S.; Holbrook, S.R.; Kennedy, M.A.

    2003-12-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based methods, including residual dipolar coupling restraints, we have determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 (171 residues, MW 19.3 kDa). The protein contains eight-strands and three-helices organized into three subdomains: an N-terminal-sheet (1 34), a central Nudix core (35 140), and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (141 171). The Nudix core and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix form the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed-sheet sandwiched between-helices. The residues that compose the signature Nudix sequence, GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where UI, L, or V and X any amino acid), are contained in a turn-helix-turn motif on the face of the mixed-sheet. Chemical shift mapping experiments suggest that DR0079 binds Mg2. Experiments designed to determine the biological function of the protein indicate that it is not a type I isopentenyl-diphosphate-isomerase and that it does not bind, -methyleneadenosine 5-triphosphate (AMPCPP) or guanosine 5-[ ,-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP). In this article, the structure of DR0079 is compared to other known Nudix protein structures, a potential substrate-binding surface is proposed, and its possible biological function is discussed.

  6. Solution structure of hypothetical Nudix hydrolase DR0079 from extremely radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans bacterium.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Ni, Shuisong; Holbrook, Stephen R; Kennedy, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based methods, including residual dipolar coupling restraints, we have determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 (171 residues, MW = 19.3 kDa). The protein contains eight beta-strands and three alpha-helices organized into three subdomains: an N-terminal beta-sheet (1-34), a central Nudix core (35-140), and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (141-171). The Nudix core and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix form the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed beta-sheet sandwiched between alpha-helices. The residues that compose the signature Nudix sequence, GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U = I, L, or V and X = any amino acid), are contained in a turn-helix-turn motif on the face of the mixed beta-sheet. Chemical shift mapping experiments suggest that DR0079 binds Mg2+. Experiments designed to determine the biological function of the protein indicate that it is not a type I isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase and that it does not bind alpha,beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMPCPP) or guanosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP). In this article, the structure of DR0079 is compared to other known Nudix protein structures, a potential substrate-binding surface is proposed, and its possible biological function is discussed. PMID:15162484

  7. DR Tauri: Temporal variability of the brightness distribution in the potential planet-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunngrber, R.; Wolf, S.; Ratzka, Th.; Ober, F.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the variability of the brightness distribution and the changing density structure of the protoplanetary disk around DR Tau, a classical T Tauri star. DR Tau is known for its peculiar variations from the ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared (MIR). Our goal is to constrain the temporal variation of the disk structure based on photometric and MIR interferometric data. Methods: We observed DR Tau with the MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI) at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) at three epochs separated by about nine years, two months, respectively. We fit the spectral energy distribution and the MIR visibilities with radiative transfer simulations. Results: We are able to reproduce the spectral energy distribution as well as the MIR visibility for one of the three epochs (third epoch) with a basic disk model. We were able to reproduce the very different visibility curve obtained nine years earlier with a very similar baseline (first epoch), using the same disk model with a smaller scale height. The same density distribution also reproduces the observation made with a higher spatial resolution in the second epoch, i.e. only two months before the third epoch. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under the programs 074.C-0342(A) and 092.C-0726(A,B).

  8. The Characteristic of an Anti-Human DR5 Antibody A6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yugang; Zhao, Kunpeng; Chen, Jugao; Zhang, Jiyan; Yu, Ming; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of many cancer treatments is due to their ability to induce apoptosis. DR5 can activate apoptosis pathway after binding with its natural ligand, tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L). Both TRAIL and agonistic anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody are currently being explored for cancer therapy. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity of our previously prepared monoclonal antibody A6 against DR5 were investigated here. A6 could cause viability loss of Jurkat cells in both time- and dose-dependent manner which could be attributed to the activation of apoptosis pathway. Caspases 3, 8 and 9 were activated in Jurkat cells and the caspase specific inhibitors, such as broad caspases inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, caspase 8 specific inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK and caspase 9 specific inhibitor Z-LEHD-FMK could recover the viability loss caused by A6. The function and molecular mechanism of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis were also investigated and compared with those of A6. Although A6 and TRAIL recognize a different epitope, they could induce a similar reaction in Jurkat cells. PMID:18582399

  9. Purification and characterization of DR_2577 (SlpA) a major S-layer protein from Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W.; Esposito, Francesca; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The protein DR_2577 is a major Surface layer component of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In the present study DR_2577 has been purified and its oligomeric profile characterized by means of size exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis. DR_2577 was found to be organized into three hierarchical orders characterized by monomers, stable dimers formed by the occurrence of disulfide bonds, and hexamers resulting from a combination of dimers. The structural implications of these findings are discussed providing new elements for a more integrated model of this S-layer. PMID:26074883

  10. Envelope glycoproteins are dispensable for insertion of host HLA-DR molecules within nascent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Genevive; Beausjour, Yannick; Thibodeau, Jacques; Tremblay, Michel J

    2005-05-10

    HLA-DR is a host-derived protein present at the surface of HIV-1. To clarify the mechanism through which this molecule is inserted within viruses, we monitored whether the incorporation process might be influenced by the level of virus-encoded envelope (Env) glycoproteins. Wild-type virions and viruses either lacking or bearing lower levels of Env were produced in different cell types. Results from a virus capture test indicate that HLA-DR is efficiently incorporated and at comparable levels in the tested virus preparations. Therefore, Env does not play an active role in the acquisition of host HLA-DR by emerging HIV-1 particles. PMID:15840527

  11. Purification and characterization of DR_2577 (SlpA) a major S-layer protein from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Esposito, Francesca; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The protein DR_2577 is a major Surface layer component of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In the present study DR_2577 has been purified and its oligomeric profile characterized by means of size exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis. DR_2577 was found to be organized into three hierarchical orders characterized by monomers, stable dimers formed by the occurrence of disulfide bonds, and hexamers resulting from a combination of dimers. The structural implications of these findings are discussed providing new elements for a more integrated model of this S-layer. PMID:26074883

  12. Relationship of lmp2 and DR3 genes with susceptibility to type I diabetes mellitus in south China Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ding, He-Lin; Cheng, Hua; Fu, Zu-Zhi; Deng, Qing-Li; Yan, Li; Yan, Tang

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship of lmp2 and DR3 genes with type I diabetes mellitus. METHODS: lmp2 genotypes and DR3 were identified in 68 patien ts with type I diabetes mellitus (I-DM) and 71 healthy controls. Then, I-D M patients and controls were respectively allocated into DR3-positive and DR3- negative groups. The frequencies of lmp2 and DR3 gene in random subjects, an d lmp2 genotypes in DR3-matched subjects were compared between I-DM patie nts and controls. At the same time, I-DM patients were divided into 3 groups b ased on the onset age of diabetics: group A ? 14 years, group B 15-30 years and group C ? 31 years. RESULTS: The frequency of DR3 in I-DM patients was significantly higher than that in controls (47% vs 21%, P < 0.005), and it was significantly higher in group A than that in group B + C (70% vs 36%, ?2 = 7.07, P < 0.01). There was a significant difference among groups with different onset age of diabetics (?2 = 8.19, rp = 0.33, P < 0.05). In random subjects, the frequency of lmp2 R/R in I-DM patients was lower (43% vs 61%, P < 0.05) and lmp2-R/H higher (53% vs 28%, P < 0.05) than that in controls, and there was no significant difference among groups with different onset age of diabetics. In DR3-positive subjects, the frequency of lmp2-R/R in I-DM patients was lower (47% vs 87%, P < 0.05) and lmp2- R/H higher (47% vs 13%, P < 0.05) than that in controls. In DR3-negative subjects, the frequency of lmp2-R/H in I-DM patients was higher than that in controls (58% vs 32%, P < 0.01), but the frequency of lmp 2-R/R and lmp2-H/H was not significantly different between these two groups. CONCLUSION: DR3 gene may be one of the susceptible genes of I-DM, and significantly related to the onset age of diabetics, and the persons with DR3 may have an younger onset age of diabetes. The lmp2-R/R may be the protective genotype of I-DM, and lmp2-R/H the susceptible genotype. These were not affected by DR3 gene. lmp2 genotypes were not related with the onset age of diabetics. PMID:11819535

  13. Development of experimental model of chronic pyelonephritis with Escherichia coli O75:K5:H-bearing Dr fimbriae: mutation in the dra region prevented tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Goluszko, P; Moseley, S L; Truong, L D; Kaul, A; Williford, J R; Selvarangan, R; Nowicki, S; Nowicki, B

    1997-04-01

    Escherichia coli that express Dr fimbriae and related adhesins recognize the common receptor decay accelerating factor. E. coli strains that express adhesins of the Dr family were postulated to be associated with cystitis (30-50%), pregnancy-associated pyelonephritis (30%), and chronic diarrhea (50%). In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that E. coli renal interstitial binding mediated by the Dr adhesin may be important for the development of chronic pyelonephritis. An insertional dra mutant, E. coli DR14, of the clinical E. coli isolate IH11128 bearing Dr fimbriae, was constructed and used to characterize persistence of infection and interstitial tropism in an experimental model of ascending pyelonephritis. Quantitative cultures of kidney homogenates indicated that Dr hemagglutinin positive (Dr+) E. coli IH11128 established a 1-yr colonization of renal tissue. In the Dr hemagglutinin negative (Dr-) group, 50% of animals cleared infection within 20 wk and 100% between 32 to 52 wk. Dr+ E. coli colonized the renal interstitium. Significant histological changes corresponding to tubulointerstitial nephritis including interstitial inflammation, fibrosis, and tubular atrophy were found in the kidney tissue of the Dr+ but not the Dr- group. A substantial amount of fimbrial antigen was detected in the parenchymal regions affected by interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. The obtained results are consistent with the hypothesis that mutation within the dra region, affecting E. coli binding to tubular basement membranes, prevented renal interstitial tropism and the development of the changes characteristically seen in tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:9120010

  14. [Dr. Stéphane Leduc and the first treatments of cancer by irradiation in Nantes and France].

    PubMed

    Drouin, E; Bataille, F-R; Mahé, M-A

    2014-11-01

    In August 1883, a Chair of physics was created in Nantes with Dr. Leduc (1853-1939) as the first teacher. Physician and biophysicist, he was a pioneer and visionary in many areas, including the "synthetic biology". Dr. Leduc immediately understood the importance of the discovery of the X-ray by Röntgen in 1896 for medicine. As early as in 1905, he successfully treated cancers with irradiation. In 1935, he was awarded a gold key by the American Congress of Physical Therapy for his accomplishments. The teachings of Dr Leduc largely influenced his student and successor, Dr René Gauducheau's (1881-1968) orientation towards physical and radiological sciences. This latter introduced radium therapy, and began his endeavor for the creation of a cancer center which opened its doors in 1924, recently becoming the Institut de Cancérologie de l'Ouest in 2011. PMID:25267323

  15. HLA-DR antigen expression on T cells from cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis and aseptic meningo-encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Fredrikson, S; Karlsson-Parra, A; Olsson, T; Link, H

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR expression on T lymphocytes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and acute aseptic meningo-encephalitis (AM), and from blood only from healthy controls was examined by a new double-immunofluorescence labelling assay using species-specific second layers on prefixed cell samples. Thirteen of 16 patients with AM (81%) had an elevated percentage of DR positive T cells in CSF against only two of 20 patients with MS (10%). Our data indicate that AM, an acute infection of the central nervous system (CNS), is accompanied by accumulation in CSF of activated, DR positive T cells as a reflection of actively involved cellular immunity within the CNS, while this accumulation of DR positive T cells is not seen in MS, a chronic inflammatory CNS disease, despite some of the patients being examined during clinical exacerbations. PMID:3308214

  16. Mobile Technology and Health Care, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rapidly. Where are the largest investments in the new technologies? The largest are in mobile phone and "tele- ... Director Dr. Francis Collins Do you believe these new technologies can help to control the global threat from ...

  17. NCI's Dr. Barry Kramer on C-SPAN Over-Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Barnett Kramer on Over-Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer.Dr.?Barnett Kramer talked about a study published in theJournal of American Medical Associationon the changing the definition of cancer that could reduce unnecessary treatments for benign cancers.?He also responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. For more information view the full article at:C-SPAN |

  18. Modeling the Ternary Complex TCR-V?/CollagenII(261273)/HLA-DR4 Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Giardina, Bruno; Bianchi, Caterina; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Pirolli, Davide; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; De Santis, Maria; Di Sante, Gabriele; Ria, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Background It is known that genetic predisposition to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with the MHC class II allele HLA-DR4 and that residues 261273 of type II collagen (huCollp261) represent an immunodominant T cell epitope restricted by the DR4 molecule. Despite recent advances in characterization of MHC and T cell receptor (TCR) contacts to this epitope, the atomic details of TCR/huCollp261/HLA-DR4 ternary complex are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have used computational modeling to get insight into this interaction. A three-dimensional model of the TCR V? domain from a DR4+ patient affected by RA has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the TCR V? domain in complex with huCollp261/HLA-DR4 was obtained from a docking approach in conjunction with a filtering procedure based on biochemical information. The best complex from the docking experiments was then refined by 20 ns of molecular dynamics simulation in explicit water. The predicted model is consistent with available experimental data. Our results indicate that residues 97101 of CDR3? are critical for recognition of huCollp261/HLA-DR4 by TCR. We also show that TCR contacts on p/MHC surface affect the conformation of the shared epitope expressed by DR alleles associated with RA susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance This work presents a three-dimensional model for the ternary complex TCR-V?/collagenII(261273)/HLA-DR4 associated with rheumatoid arthritis that can provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of self reactivity. PMID:20644721

  19. NCI's Dr. Barry Kramer on C-SPAN Over-Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Barnett Kramer on Over-Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer. Dr. Barnett Kramer talked about a study published in the Journal of American Medical Association on the changing the definition of cancer that could reduce unnecessary treatments for benign cancers. He also responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. For more information view the full article at: C-SPAN |

  20. Patients with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage show higher levels of DR+ activated T-cells that are less responsive to mitogens.

    PubMed

    Kuon, R J; Schaumann, J; Goeggl, T; Strowitzki, T; Sadeghi, M; Opelz, G; Daniel, V; Toth, B

    2015-11-01

    In 50% of recurrent miscarriages (RM) the cause remains unknown and standardized immunological diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic RM (iRM) is yet not established. In this prospective case-control study, out of 220 RM patients screened, 97 iRM patients were identified and compared to 26 healthy controls without a previous pregnancy or blood transfusion in order to identify deregulated immunological parameters. Blood levels of lymphocyte subpopulations, cytokines and neopterin were determined by FACS, ELISA, and Luminex technique. Lymphocyte function was studied by in-vitro lympocyte proliferation tests. As compared to controls, patients had significantly higher proportions of activated CD3+DR+, CD4+DR+ and CD8+DR+ lymphocytes, elevated levels of neopterin and a lower in-vitro proliferation of lymphocytes (all p<0.05). Within the iRM patients higher proportions of CD3+DR+ T-lymphocytes correlated with higher proportions and absolute numbers of CD4+DR+ and CD8+DR+ T-lymphocytes and lower CD16+CD56+ NK-cells. Further, it was associated with lower absolute numbers of CD19+ B-lymphocytes, CD3+CD25+ T-lymphocytes and CD45+ total lymphocytes (all p<0.05). In addition we found decreased in-vitro lymphocyte proliferation in iRM patients with high CD3+DR+ T-lymphocytes (p<0.05). In summary patients with iRM showed increased activated T-cells that are less responsive to mitogens in-vitro. The inverse relationship of increased DR but decreased CD25 expression on CD3+ T-cells and the decreased in-vitro proliferation characterize an immunological disorder with similarities to T-cell exhaustion in patients with HIV and cancer. These abnormalities potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of iRM and might be a target for future immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:26398781

  1. DNA sequence and characterization of human class II major histocompatibility complex beta chains from the DR1 haplotype.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J I; Estess, P; St John, T; Saiki, R; Watling, D L; Erlich, H A; McDevitt, H O

    1985-01-01

    Two HLA class II beta-chain clones from a cell line homozygous for the DR1 haplotype have been characterized and sequenced. They represent a DR beta chain (2918.4) and a DQ beta chain (2918.8). Clone 2918.4 has been used to select mRNA from a lymphoblastoid cell line, and this was injected into Xenopus oocytes with mRNA selected with a DR alpha chain. The translation products were immunoprecipitated with a beta-chain-specific monoclonal antibody and electrophoresed on two-dimensional gels. This revealed positive signals in the positions predicted for beta and alpha chains. Sequence comparisons of 2918.4 with previously published DR beta-chain sequences confirm the presence of two regions of variability in the membrane distal domain. Analysis of the sequence of 2918.8 identified it as a DQ beta chain identical to one previously published from a DR3,w6 cell line. We speculate, therefore, that the DQ beta sequence represents the DQ1 specificity shared by the DR1 and DRw6 haplotypes. Images PMID:3858829

  2. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a high-affinity zinc importer (DrZIP1) from zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient to all organisms and a potential toxicant to aquatic animals. It is therefore of importance to understand the mechanism of zinc regulation. In the present study, we molecularly cloned and functionally characterized a zinc transporter of the SLC39A family [commonly referred to as the ZIP (Zrt- and Irt-related protein) family] from the gill of zebrafish (Danio rerio) (DrZIP1). DrZIP1 protein was found to localize at the plasma membrane and to function as a zinc uptake transporter when being expressed in either chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) embryonic 214 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes. In comparison with pufferfish transporter proteins (FrZIP2 and FrECaC) that are known to facilitate cellular zinc uptake, DrZIP1 appears to have high affinity to bind and transport zinc, suggesting that it may be a high-affinity zinc uptake transporter (Km<0.5?M) in fish. Orthologues of DrZIP1 were also identified in both freshwater and seawater pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes), indicating that these proteins may be functionally conserved among different fish species. DrZIP1 mRNA is expressed in all the tissues examined in the present study and thus DrZIP1 may be a constitutive zinc uptake transporter in many cell types of zebrafish. PMID:15683366

  3. Studying the biology of hope: An interview with Lee S. Berk, DrPH, MPH. Interview by Sheldon Lewis.

    PubMed

    Berk, Lee S

    2007-01-01

    Dr Lee S. Berk is a pioneering medical researcher studying the neuroendocrine and immune effects of positive emotions. He is an associate professor of Health Promotion and Education, School of Public Health, and associate research professor of Pathology and Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, both at Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, California. Dr Berk is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Association for Integrative Medicine. He is also nationally board certified as a health education specialist and has served as a member of the board of directors for the American College of Lifestyle Medicine in Loma Linda, California. Dr Berk is a member of the editorial board of Advances in Mind Body Medicine. During the Society for Neurosciences' annual 2001 meeting Dr Berk presented and received major media coverage of a landmark paper entitled, "The Anticipation of a Laughter Eustress Event Modulates Mood States Prior to the Actual Humor Experience." More recently Dr Berk presented at the FASEB (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) annual 2006 meeting in the American Physiological Society section another landmark paper entitled, "Beta-Endorphin and HGH Increase are Associated With Both the Anticipation and Experience of Mirthful Laughter," with further major media coverage. Recently, Dr Berk spoke about his work with Sheldon Lewis, editor in chief of Advances. PMID:20664125

  4. Molecular jets in the DR21/W75N high-mass star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Davis, Chris J.; Rowles, Jonathan H.; Knight, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Molecular jets have been discovered in large numbers, spread throughout star formation regions. They can usually be traced back to embedded driving protostars. We here investigate a squadron of such molecular hydrogen jets in the DR21/W75N region through echelle spectroscopy of the near-infrared v = 1-0 S(1) emission line centred at 2.122 ?m. We detect 79 components, a number of which possess radial velocities in excess of 80 km s-1. The majority of the components exhibit blueshifts. The regions closer to DR21 exhibit more blue-shifted components suggesting that extinction is important across individual flows and is higher near DR21. We provide a classification scheme for the resulting collection of position-velocity diagrams, including other published data. One prominent class is associated with pairs of shocks well separated in radial velocity. We use hydrodynamic simulations with molecular cooling and chemistry to show that these are associated with Mach discs and bow shocks. We also employ a steady-state bow shock model to interpret other revealing position-velocity diagrams. We consider mechanisms which can generate vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules moving at speeds well beyond the breakdown speed permitted for shock excitation. We conclude that the molecules have formed within the jets well before being excited by internal shocks triggered by impacts with the ambient clouds. We also note the relatively high number of high blue-shifted radial velocity components and argue that these must be associated with high-density molecular jets from Class 0 protostars which are obscured unless we are selectively viewing within a conical cavity containing the jet.

  5. Engineering Synthetic Multistress Tolerance in Escherichia coli by Using a Deinococcal Response Regulator, DR1558.

    PubMed

    Appukuttan, Deepti; Singh, Harinder; Park, Sun-Ha; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Jeong, Sunwook; Seo, Ho Seong; Choi, Yong Jun; Lim, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    Cellular robustness is an important trait for industrial microbes, because the microbial strains are exposed to a multitude of different stresses during industrial processes, such as fermentation. Thus, engineering robustness in an organism in order to push the strains toward maximizing yield has become a significant topic of research. We introduced the deinococcal response regulator DR1558 into Escherichia coli (strain Ec-1558), thereby conferring tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in strain Ec-1558 was reduced due to the increased KatE catalase activity. Among four regulators of the oxidative-stress response, OxyR, RpoS, SoxS, and Fur, we found that the expression of rpoS increased in Ec-1558, and we confirmed this increase by Western blot analysis. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that DR1558 bound to the rpoS promoter. Because the alternative sigma factor RpoS regulates various stress resistance-related genes, we performed stress survival analysis using an rpoS mutant strain. Ec-1558 was able to tolerate a low pH, a high temperature, and high NaCl concentrations in addition to H2O2, and the multistress tolerance phenotype disappeared in the absence of rpoS. Microarray analysis clearly showed that a variety of stress-responsive genes that are directly or indirectly controlled by RpoS were upregulated in strain Ec-1558. These findings, taken together, indicate that the multistress tolerance conferred by DR1558 is likely routed through RpoS. In the present study, we propose a novel strategy of employing an exogenous response regulator from polyextremophiles for strain improvement. PMID:26655758

  6. Probing the Gas Phase Folding Kinetics of Peptide Ions by IR Activated DR-ECD

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng; Cournoyer, Jason J.; OConnor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of infrared (IR) irradiation on the electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation pattern of peptide ions was investigated. IR heating increases the internal energy of the precursor ion, which often amplifies secondary fragmentation, resulting in the formation of w-type ions as well as other secondary fragments. Improved sequence coverage was observed with IR irradiation before ECD, likely due to the increased conformational heterogeneity upon IR heating, rather than faster breakdown of the initially formed product ion complex, as IR heating after ECD did not have similar effect. Although the ECD fragment ion yield of peptide ions does not typically increase with IR heating, in double resonance (DR) ECD experiments, fragment ion yield may be reduced by fast resonant ejection of the charge reduced molecular species, and becomes dependent on the folding state of the precursor ion. In this work, the fragment ion yield was monitored as a function of the delay between IR irradiation and the DR-ECD event to study the gas phase folding kinetics of the peptide ions. Furthermore, the degree of intra-complex hydrogen transfer of the ECD fragment ion pair was used to probe the folding state of the precursor ion. Both methods gave similar refolding time constants of ~1.5 s?1, revealing that gaseous peptide ions often refold in less than a second, much faster than their protein counterparts. It was also found from the IR-DR-ECD study that the intra-molecular H transfer rate can be an order of magnitude higher than that of the separation of the long-lived c/z product ion complexes, explaining the common observation of c and z type ions in ECD experiments. PMID:18400512

  7. Compressor Calorimeter Test of R-410A Alternatives R-32, DR-5, and L-41a

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Mahderekal, Isaac; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2013-02-01

    As a contribution to the AHRI Low-GWP Alternative Refrigerants Evaluation Program (AREP), this study compares performance of alternative refrigerants R32, DR-5, and L-41A to that of refrigerant R-410A (baseline) in a scroll compressor designed for air-conditioning and heat pump applications. Compressor calorimeter tests were performed to evaluate the performance of the lower-GWP alternative refrigerants in place of the common refrigerant R-410A in a 36,000 Btu/hr compressor calorimeter using a compressor having a nominal rated capacity of 21,300 Btu/hr. Tests were conducted over a suction dew point temperature range of 10 F to 55 F in 5 F increments and a discharge dew point temperature range of 70 F to 140 F in 10 F increments. All the tests were performed with 20 F superheat, 40 F superheat and 65 F suction temperature. A liquid subcooling level of 15 F was maintained for all the test conditions. The tests showed that performance of these three lower-GWP alternative refrigerants is comparable to that of R-410A. For the 20 F superheat and 15 F subcooling test conditions, EERs of R32, DR-5, and L-41A were 90% to 99%, 96% to 99%, and 94% to 101%, respectively, compared to that of R-410A. Similarly, cooling capacities of R32, DR-5, and L-41A were 98% to 103%, 92% to 96%, and 84% to 92%, respectively, compared to that of R-410A.

  8. Barremian decapod crustaceans from Serre de Bleyton (Drôme, SE France)

    PubMed Central

    Hyžný, Matúš; Kroh, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Based on mostly small-sized isolated cheliped fingers, a new decapod crustacean assemblage is described from the Barremian of Serre de Bleyton (Drôme, SE France). The assemblage is composed mostly of representatives of the crab family Dynomenidae. In addition, remains of astacidean lobsters, axiidean shrimps, paguroid hermit crabs and brachyurous crabs of the families Necrocarcinidae and ?Cenomanocarcinidae occur in low numbers. Graptocarcinus moosleitneri (Dynomenidae) and ?Paranecrocarcinus schloegli (Necrocarcinidae) are introduced as new species. They both exhibit presence of multi-setal pores on dactyli that are interpreted as parts of a sieving mechanism used in feeding. The stratigraphic range of Graptocarcinus is extended herein to the Barremian. PMID:26097276

  9. Dr. David Brown poses with students at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Brown (right), a NASA astronaut, poses with students in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. From left, the students are Kristin Rexford, Danitra Anderson, Dominique Smith, Fallon Davis, and Qiana Taylor. Brown was at the school to attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair. The school had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut who was one of a crew of seven, who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  10. Mind, brain, body, and soul: a review of the electrophysiological undercurrents for Dr. Frankenstein.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W

    2004-01-01

    Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is perhaps the most famous work of medical science fiction. She and her husband, the poet Percy Shelley, were aware of nascent neuroscience experimentation and the effects of electricity on neuromuscular function. Such experiments generated theories of voluntary, involuntary, and unconscious neuromuscular function; animal electricity; and the anima--the human vital principle. In Germany and Italy, investigators were performing bizarre electrical experiments on animals and humans to "reanimate" lifeless limbs and bodies. These demonstrations and theories find expression in Frankenstein and provide models for Dr. Frankenstein and his creation. PMID:15509919

  11. Dr Anthony Dobell, Legendary McGill Trailblazer: May 7, 1927, to June 17, 2015.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David S

    2015-12-01

    Anthony R. C. Dobell died on June 17, 2015, at the age of 88. Dobell was the first Canadian president of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. He was a pioneer in the development of pediatric and adult cardiac surgery at McGill University. He was inspired by Dr John Gibbon during his residency training at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He developed a McGill-based residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery and always took pride in the legacy of more than 40 residents scattered throughout North America. PMID:26652547

  12. Dr. Herbert J. Hall: Originator of Honest Work for Occupational Therapy 1904-1923 [Part II].

    PubMed

    Anthony, Susan Hall

    2005-01-01

    While establishing a sanatorium and confirming the value of his innovative use of crafts as a medical tool, Dr. Herbert J. Hall gave lectures and published many articles and books to proclaim his discoveries. Others were experimenting with occupational therapy practices in different forms within mental institutions. Their views and perspectives differed from Hall's practice, the main issues being the market value of crafts and their use as a diversion. This article also includes Hall's psychological principles of indirection, equivalents, immunity, and substitution, and the graded process as observed and applied to the disabled. PMID:23927745

  13. The 'Prof. Dr. Rmulo Lambre' Collection: an Argentinian sample of modern skeletons.

    PubMed

    Salceda, S A; Desntolo, B; Mancuso, R Garca; Plischuk, M; Inda, A M

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the 'Prof. Dr. Rmulo Lambre' skeletal collection. The Lambre Collection is housed in the School of Medical Sciences of the National University of La Plata and it consists of skeletal remains ceded by the Municipal Cemetery of La Plata. The collection has more than four hundred skeletons, with information on age, sex, nationality, date and cause of death. It was created for teaching and research purposes in compliance with current legislation, and its management meets guidelines specified in the Declaration of the Argentinian Association for Biological Anthropology on Research Ethics on Human Remains (2007). PMID:22769855

  14. Elective trepanation for acute epidural hematoma by Dr. Nicolaes Tulp (1593-1674).

    PubMed

    van Alphen, H A

    2001-02-01

    The improved knowledge of human anatomy in the 16th century led to an increase in the practice of cranial trepanation in clinical cases, and detailed definitions of indications for performing this operation were provided by several authors. It was not until the 18th century, however, that detailed data on patient selection, decision making, and the postoperative course of this surgical procedure became available through individual case reports. In this historical context, a report written in 1641 by the Dutch physician Dr. Nicolaes Tulp is remarkable. This report, one of the first individual commentaries on the surgical treatment of an acute epidural hematoma, has not yet gained international recognition. PMID:11220385

  15. Herd-boy, court physician, MP, spy: the life of Dr John Hutton of Dumfries.

    PubMed

    Howard, J V

    2005-06-01

    Dr John Hutton, a graduate of the Universities of Edinburgh and Padua, became the first Treasurer of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh (1681-82), and Court Physician to King William III and Queen Mary (1688-1702). Later he was involved as a secret agent at the Court of Hanover, and was also MP for Dumfries Burghs (1710-12). He died in London, in November 1712, bequesting to the Presbytery of Dumfries a library of 1,500 volumes, including many medical books, much of which survives in New College Library, Edinburgh. An educational trust, established by Hutton for his native parish of Caerlaverock, continued till 1935. PMID:16060066

  16. Immunoregulatory T cells, LFA-3 and HLA-DR in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Aml Mohamed; Hammouda, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the changes in the expression of T-cell activation markers, namely CD4+ CD25+ and CD8+ in patients with AITD, namely Graves disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as well as colloid nodular goitre. HLA-DR, LFA-3, and peripheral total lymphocytic count are also measured. Materials and Methods: We compared the expression of CD4, CD25, and CD8 surface markers in peripheral blood lymphocyte in Graves disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as autoimmune thyroid diseases, as well as colloid goitre in comparison with healthy controls. Also, LFA-3 and HLA-DR were measured in the same groups using three-color flow cytometry. Total lymphocytic count in peripheral blood, thyroid function tests, antithyroid antibodies were also included in the laboratory investigations. The total number of participants was 65. All were recruited from endocrine clinics in a tertiary care hospital in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. All participants underwent history taking, clinical examination, laboratory workup, and radiological investigations. Neck ultrasound, technecium pertechnetate?? thyroid uptake, and fine-needle aspiration and cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid were done when indicated. The study was approved by the Hospital Research Isthics Committee and informed consents were obtained from all participants before enrollment in the study. Results: In comparison with thecontrol group, activation markers CD4, CD25, and CD8 were lower in the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Lymphocyte function antigen-3 (CD58) and total lymphocytic count were higher in the AIT diseases whereas HLA-DR was lower than that in the control group. The CD4/CD8 ratio was lower in the AITD compared with the healthy euthyroid subjects. No difference was found between patients with colloid nodular goitre and the healthy control in any of the study variables except for LFA-3 which was significantly higher in the colloid goitre group. Conclusion: Our findings indicate downregulation of CD4+ CD25+ Treg as well as CD8+ T cells in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Downregulation of suppressor T lymphocytes helps initiation, progression, and maintenance of the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Lower HLA-DR and higher CD58 in AITDs indicate their role in the expression of the autoantigen and its escape from the immune surveillance. High levels of LFA-3 in colloid goitre indicate that the autoimmune process needs interacting factors, and not only the high level of LFA-3. PMID:25143920

  17. HLA-DR/DQ Genotypes in Kurd Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relation to Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Mohammad T.; Sulaiman, Dhia M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Specific alleles present at the HLA-DR/DQ loci seem to be associated with disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Aim: In the present study, our aim was to investigate the distribution of HLA-DR/DQ alleles among Kurd patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to ascertain their relationship with disease activity. Materials and Methods: Sixty five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 65 apparently healthy subjects participated in the study. Diagnosis and disease activity were confirmed. Blood analyses, including those of laboratory markers of disease activity, were done. The 28 joint disease activity score (DAS-28) was calculated. HLA-DR/DQ typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).The association between HLA-DR/DQ genotypes and disease activity was determined. Results: The most frequent alleles which were identified in RA patients were HLA-DRBI*01(23.1%) and HLA-DQBI*6(34.6%), whereas in healthy subjects, they were HLA-DRBI*11(17.7%) and HLA-DQBI*03(35.4%). Patients with active disease had high frequencies of HLA-DQBI*6 (40.0%) as compared to those with moderate disease activity (16.7%); OR=3.33. Patients with severe RA had increased frequencies of HLA-DQBI*6 (56.3%) as compared to those with mild RA (10.0%); OR = 11.57. Patients with positive rheumatoid factor (RF) and positive Anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (Anti-CCP), also had high frequencies of HLA-DQBI*06 (38.4% and 39.4%) as compared to frequencies of 11.1% and 15.4% which were seen in patients with negative rheumatoid factor and negative anti-CCP (OR= 4.98 and3.10) respectively. Conclusion: HLA-DQBI*06 was found to be more common in Kurd patients and it was significantly associated with disease activity; this may indicate a high risk for developing a more progressive type of the disease. PMID:24995169

  18. Shut out of medicine in Canada, Dr. Leonora Howard King blazed a trail in China.

    PubMed Central

    Negodaeff-Tomsik, M

    1996-01-01

    After being denied the opportunity to study medicine and work at home, Dr. Leonora Howard King became Canada's first female medical missionary to China. Although she attempted to wear both the religious and secular hats handed her by the Women's Foreign Missionary Society, Howard King found that she was too busy meeting the medical needs of destitute women and children to proselytize. She won the favour of Chinese royalty, and after treating hundreds of wounded soldiers during the 1894-95 war with Japan became the first Western woman to become a mandarin, an honour bestowed by her adopted country. Images p1742-a PMID:8976342

  19. [Dr. Bruno Curinaldi (1854-1944): from Zadar over Mostar to Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Vucak, Ivica

    2009-01-01

    Dr Curinaldi was a fortunate combination of Italian background, Austro-Hungarian education, and life in a Croatian community where Catholicism met Islam. In a word, he was a genuine European multicultural intellectual. Ninety years of life and sixty-six years of medical career from Zadar to Mostar and to Sarajevo at the turn of the 20th century speak not only about his personal development and dilemmas, but also about social turmoils of the times. His life teaches us that a physician, in addition to his calling to always strive to help the sick and weak, must never forget his role of educator and active member of the community. PMID:20166773

  20. Multimodality of Rich Clusters from the SDSS DR8 Within the Supercluster-Void Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the relations between the multimodality of galaxy clusters drawn from the SDSS DR8 and the environment where they reside. We find that multimodal clusters reside in higher density environment than unimodal clusters. We determine morphological types of superclusters and show that clusters in superclusters of spider morphology have higher probabilities to have substructure and larger peculiar velocities of their main galaxies than clusters in superclusters of filament morphology. Our study shows the importance of the role of superclusters as high density environment which affects the properties of galaxy systems in them.

  1. President Nixon and Dr. Paine Wait to Meet Apollo 11 Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon and Dr. Thomas O. Paine, NASA Administrator, watch Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin Jr., walk from the recovery helicopter to the Mobile Quarantine Facility aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. The President later congratulated the astronauts by microphone, speaking through a window of the quarantine trailer. During the eight-day space mission, Armstrong and Aldrin explored the Moon's surface and brought back rock samples for scientists to study. Collins piloted the command module in the lunar orbit during their 22-hour stay on the moon. The extravehicular activity lasted more than two hours.

  2. A Crusade Against Scorpion Sting: Life and Works of Dr. Himmatrao Bawaskar

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Ajinkya A.

    2012-01-01

    In the times of rapid advancement of science and technology, advance medical equipment and hi tech hospitals represent the face of medical science. The aspirations and ambitions of medical professionals are also shifting, with growing concerns of deterioration of doctor patient relationship as well as disconnect between services and the community needs. The life of Dr Himmatrao Bawaskar defies several conventions of today's medical practice. His outstanding dedication towards patients and commitment to provide high quality care in resource poor setting makes him an ideal role model for younger generation of physicians in India. PMID:24479002

  3. Dr. Robert Clark studies levels of radiation Skylab 2 crew was exposed to

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    In the Radiation Counting Laboratory sixty feet underground at JSC, Dr. Robert S. Clark prepares to load pieces of iridium foil - sandwiched between plastic sheets - into the laboratory's radiation detector. The iridium foil strips were worn by the crew of the second Skylab flight in personal radiation dosimeters throughout their 59.5 days in space. Inside the radiation detector assembly surrounded by 28 tons of lead shielding, the sample will be tested to determine the total neutron dose to which the astronauts were exposed during their long stay aboard the space station.

  4. HLA DR-DQ genotyping by capillary electrophoresis for risk assessment for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lavant, Ewa H; Carlson, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    The risk for celiac disease (CD) is clearly related to specific HLA DQA1 and DQB1 alleles, but HLA -typing is often considered too costly for frequent use.Here we present a method using sequence-specific primed PCR (PCR-SSP) for HLA-DR-DQ genotyping optimized for capillary electrophoresis on Applied Biosystems 3130xl Genetic Analyzer. Requiring a total of three PCR reactions and a single electrophoretic step, this method reduces the reagent expenses and technical time for directed HLA typing to distinguish risk alleles for CD, with a sufficient throughput for large-scale screening projects. PMID:22976110

  5. Notes on the history of the Dr. Senckenbergische Anatomie in Frankfurt/Main. Part II. The Dr. Senckenbergische Anatomie during the Third Reich and its body supply.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Thomas Theo; Korf, Horst-Werner; Benzenhöfer, Udo; Schomerus, Christof; Wicht, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    In order to be able to understand how body supply was maintained at the Dr. Senckenbergische Anatomie from 1933 to 1945 - with special emphasis on victims of the National Socialist regime - we have collected information from various and often fragmentary sources. The documents reveal that during this period at least 474 bodies were brought to the anatomical institute. Among them were the bodies of at least 71 prisoners, 51 of whom had been executed, and the bodies of 8 inmates of (labor-) camps. 356 unclaimed bodies were received, some of them may stem from victims of "euthanasia" programs. The sources of 39, as of yet, unnamed bodies could not be verified. The current collections and the catalogs were screened for remains of victims of the National Socialist regime, but none were found. The vast majority of the bodies were used for teaching purposes. Hans Schreiber, one of the directors of the institute, whose biography is provided here, used at least 9 additional executed individuals for his research. Wherever possible, we have identified the victims of the National Socialist regime, executed persons and the inmates of (labor-) camps, whose bodies were used by the anatomists in Frankfurt, by name. Among the victims was Georg Fröba, a communist philanthropist, whose biography is provided. PMID:26198687

  6. Induction of mouse syngeneic MLR by in vivo xenogeneic immunization with HLA-DR antigens.

    PubMed

    Viguier, M; Trannoy, E; Seman, M; Debre, P

    1990-08-01

    To study in mice the effects of in vivo xenogenic immunization with human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens, the animals were injected with HLA-DR antigens and their proliferative responses tested in vitro. The results showed that small amounts of HLA-DR proteins, acting as nominal antigens, were not only able to prime mice for a secondary in vitro xenogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction but also induced a syngeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. In contrast, allogeneic or syngeneic immunization of mice with soluble MHC class II molecules failed to stimulate an autoreactive response. The syngeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction was primarily directed against syngeneic MHC class II molecules since the murine T lymphocytes reacted against MHC class II-positive dendritic spleen cells and MHC class II-transfected mouse fibroblasts. A self-reactive T-cell line induced under these experimental conditions did not react in xenogeneic and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions. However, these T lymphocytes proliferated when human peripheral blood lymphocytes of various haplotypes were presented in the context of syngeneic mouse antigen presenting cells. PMID:1697289

  7. HLA-DR4 allele frequencies on Indian and Mestizo population from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcn, G; Gamboa, R; Zuiga, J; Hernndez-Pacheco, G; Ramos-Kuri, M; Castillo, E; Gmez-Casado, E; Martnez-Laso, J; Arnaiz-Villena, A; Granados, J

    2000-03-01

    Using PCR-SSOP and sequencing, we examined DRB1*04 nucleotide polymorphism in 137 DR4-positive Mexican healthy individuals (46 Mexican Mestizos, 64 Mazatecans, and 27 Nahuas), carrying a total of 147 DR4 haplotypes. Eleven different DRB1*04 alleles were detected in Mexican Mestizo population, whereas, in the two Indian groups a restricted polymorphism was observed (5 variants in Mazatecans and 4 in Nahuas). DRB1*0407 was the most frequent allele (gf = 0.106 in Mexican Mestizos, gf = 0.281 in Mazatecans, and gf = 0.189 in Nahuas). In spite of the restriction in polymorphism, there were differences on DRB1*04 alleles found in Mexicans mainly between Mazatecan and Nahua populations. DRB1*0403 was characteristic allele in Nahua ethnic group, whereas, 0404 and 0411 were predominant alleles in Mazatecans. This data corroborates the restricted polymorphism of DRB1*04 alleles in American populations. In spite of the restriction in this polymorphism, differences in frequencies of DRB1*04 alleles could help distinguish each population. PMID:10689126

  8. Archaeology, science and forensic anthropology: a tribute to Dr T. Dale Stewart.

    PubMed

    Bass, W M; Bennett, J L

    2000-03-01

    The name, T. Dale Stewart is synonymous with physical anthropology. To many members of the physical anthropology section, particularly those born in the latter half of this century, he is perhaps best known for his 1979 Essentials of Forensic Anthropology. Without a doubt, much of the foundation of this discipline rests upon his teachings and influence. Few knew him in the capacity that William M. Bass did, as T. Dale Stewart was a member of Bass doctoral committee. Bass was greatly influenced during the time he spent working with Dr. Stewart in the 1950's and the instruction and guidance Stewart instilled in Bass has and will continue to be passed on to subsequent generations. Research was Dale Stewart's main emphasis and he succeeded in demonstrating the value of investigation and how results were crucial in explaining many of the processes manifest on skeletal material. Clearly his hypothesis-based approach became essential to skeletal biology and numerous procedures and methods employed in the field are synonymous with the teachings of Dr. T. Dale Stewart. By reflecting on several recently completed interdisciplinary research projects, the far-reaching impact of his knowledge and instruction can be demonstrated. PMID:10782946

  9. Dr. Harvey Cushing's attempts to cure migraine based on theories of pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Katherine; Pendleton, Courtney; Rosenberg, Jason; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Quiones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-11-01

    A multitude of theories characterized medical thought on migraine in the early 20th century. Newly discovered historical case files revealed Dr. Harvey Cushing's previously unpublished early attempts at surgical cure of migraine. Following institutional review board approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the authors reviewed the microfilm surgical records for The Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. Patients undergoing surgical intervention by Dr. Harvey Cushing for the treatment of migraine were selected for further review. All 4 patients in the series were women and ranged in age from 29 to 41 years old. The women were admitted and observed in the hospital until a migraine occurred. Surgeries were performed while the women were in the midst of an attack. Cushing used surgical strategies including decompression, temporal artery ligation, and removal of the spine of the second vertebra. In each case, the patients' headaches eventually returned following surgery. Cushing relied on a combination of contemporary theories on migraine including humeral science, vasospastic theory, organic cause, and increased intracranial pressure. His unpublished efforts foreshadowed future surgical efforts at curing migraines. PMID:21682563

  10. The Young Stellar Population of the Cygnus-X DR15 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Gálvez, S.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Ybarra, J. E.; Alves, J. F.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the young stellar population in the Cygnus-X DR15 region. We studied young stars that were forming or recently formed at and around the tip of a prominent molecular pillar and an infrared dark cloud. Using a combination of ground-based near-infrared, space-based infrared, and X-ray data, we constructed a point source catalog from which we identified 226 young stellar sources, which we classified into evolutionary classes. We studied their spatial distributions across the molecular gas structures and identified several groups that possibly belong to distinct young star clusters. We obtained samples of these groups and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compared with those of artificial clusters, allowing us to make first order estimates of the mean ages and age spreads of the groups. We used a 13CO(1-0) map to investigate the gas kinematics at the prominent gaseous envelope of the central cluster in DR15, and we inferred that the removal of this envelope is relatively slow compared to other cluster regions, in which the gas dispersal timescale could be similar or shorter than the circumstellar disk dissipation timescale. The presence of other groups with slightly older ages, associated with much less prominent gaseous structures, may imply that the evolution of young clusters in this part of the complex proceeds in periods that last 3-5 Myr, perhaps after a slow dissipation of their dense molecular cloud birthplaces.

  11. A pioneer of Australian paediatrics: Dr Henry Edward Brown (1858-1931).

    PubMed

    Isles, Alan F; Roper, Peter; Pearn, John H

    2014-11-13

    The emergence of paediatrics as a specialty in Australian medicine dates from the last two decades of the 19th century. Among the pioneers of pre-Federation paediatrics, we include Dr Henry Edward Brown (1858-1931), an Irish-born physician and surgeon who became the first paediatrician to practise in the northern half of the Australian continent. In 1885, he was appointed as the medical superintendent of the Rockhampton Children's Hospital, itself a pioneer institution in the care of sick and injured children. Dr H.E. Brown also served as medical officer of health concurrently in three Queensland shires. He was a leader in the literary and sporting life of the busy port town of Rockhampton and a scholar and significant philanthropist in the domain of French literature. His life was and remains an exemplar of a class of pre-Federation paediatricians who established the ethos of clinical and societal service, which remains as a core feature of the speciality discipline of paediatrics in the 21st century. PMID:25393888

  12. Analysis of ROC on chest direct digital radiography (DR) after image processing in diagnosis of SARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guozheng; Lan, Rihui; Zeng, Qingsi; Zheng, Zhong

    2004-05-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, also called Infectious Atypical Pneumonia), which initially broke out in late 2002, has threatened the public"s health seriously. How to confirm the patients contracting SARS becomes an urgent issue in diagnosis. This paper intends to evaluate the importance of Image Processing in the diagnosis on SARS at the early stage. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis has been employed in this study to compare the value of DR images in the diagnosis of SARS patients before and after image processing by Symphony Software supplied by E-Com Technology Ltd., and DR image study of 72 confirmed or suspected SARS patients were reviewed respectively. All the images taken from the studied patients were processed by Symphony. Both the original and processed images were taken into ROC analysis, based on which the ROC graph for each group of images has been produced as described below: For processed images: a = 1.9745, b = 1.4275, SA = 0.8714; For original images: a = 0.9066, b = 0.8310, SA = 0.7572; (a - intercept, b - slop, SA - Area below the curve). The result shows significant difference between the original images and processed images (P<0.01). In summary, the images processed by Symphony are superior to the original ones in detecting the opacity lesion, and increases the accuracy of SARS diagnosis.

  13. Activating Death Receptor DR5 as a Therapeutic Strategy for Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zhigang; Sun, Shi-Yong; Cao, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. It is believed to arise from skeletal muscle progenitors, preserving the expression of genes critical for embryonic myogenic development such as MYOD1 and myogenin. RMS is classified as embryonal, which is more common in younger children, or alveolar, which is more prevalent in elder children and adults. Despite aggressive management including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, the outcome for children with metastatic RMS is dismal, and the prognosis has remained unchanged for decades. Apoptosis is a highly regulated process critical for embryonic development and tissue and organ homeostasis. Like other types of cancers, RMS develops by evading intrinsic apoptosis via mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. However, the ability to induce apoptosis via the death receptor-dependent extrinsic pathway remains largely intact in tumors with p53 mutations. This paper focuses on activating extrinsic apoptosis as a therapeutic strategy for RMS by targeting the death receptor DR5 with a recombinant TRAIL ligand or agonistic antibodies directed against DR5. PMID:22577581

  14. Activating Death Receptor DR5 as a Therapeutic Strategy for Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhigang; Sun, Shi-Yong; Cao, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. It is believed to arise from skeletal muscle progenitors, preserving the expression of genes critical for embryonic myogenic development such as MYOD1 and myogenin. RMS is classified as embryonal, which is more common in younger children, or alveolar, which is more prevalent in elder children and adults. Despite aggressive management including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, the outcome for children with metastatic RMS is dismal, and the prognosis has remained unchanged for decades. Apoptosis is a highly regulated process critical for embryonic development and tissue and organ homeostasis. Like other types of cancers, RMS develops by evading intrinsic apoptosis via mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. However, the ability to induce apoptosis via the death receptor-dependent extrinsic pathway remains largely intact in tumors with p53 mutations. This paper focuses on activating extrinsic apoptosis as a therapeutic strategy for RMS by targeting the death receptor DR5 with a recombinant TRAIL ligand or agonistic antibodies directed against DR5. PMID:22577581

  15. High times, fair maidens, and sweet air: romantic interludes in the life of Dr. Crawford Long.

    PubMed

    Lyke, Austin

    2014-10-01

    How does one's knowledge of pain affect the physical "being" of pain? Following German idealist philosophy, unconsciousness to such knowledge would seemingly abdicate the very nature of pain. "Nothing exists but thoughts!--the universe is composed of impressions, ideas, pleasures, and pains!" Humphry Davy exclaimed upon leaping out of the laughing gas chamber where he had breathed some 100 quarts of nitrous oxide. The discovery of nitrous oxide gas as an agent of transubstantiation led to the discovery of the medical science of anesthesia by a genius, but backcountry physician, Dr. Crawford Long in 1841. This paper presupposes that the Romantically introspective effects of diethyl ether inhalation led Dr. Long to yearn melancholically for his lover and underestimate his momentous discovery, as the physical abdication of pain could not quench the doctor's subliminal anguish. Within is an account of the arcane nature of one of medicine and history's most significant discoveries, one wrought out of intelligence and the wondrous curiosity of the Romantic period. PMID:25345268

  16. Dr. Byron McKeeby's contribution to Grant Wood's "American Gothic".

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-07-01

    Grant Wood (1891-1942) was a major American regionalist artist from Iowa who produced his world famous icon, American Gothic in 1930. Along with Mona Lisa and Whistler's Mother, this work has become one of the most recognized paintings in the world. While it has been greatly admired by most of its viewers, it has been criticized by others. Currently on display at the Art Institute of Chicago, this oil painting portrays a grim faced farmer and his somber daughter who are resolutely standing in front of their rural, Gothic Revival farmhouse. The tall, gaunt farmer, looking straight ahead, firmly holds a pitchfork whose tines point upward, while his daughter, with her eyes averted appears to be showing disapproval. In American art, it is unusual to find the hard, cold realism and honest, direct and earthy qualities that Wood captures in American Gothic. Wood's actual intention was to present the work as a subtle and witty commentary on midwestern, rural life. To achieve his goal, Wood emulated the meticulous style and technique of the 16th century Flemish masters. His sister, Nan Wood Graham (1900-1990), and his 62-year-old dentist, Dr. Byron H. McKeeby (1867-1950), posed for the painting. This article describes how Grant developed this artistic style which is reflected in American Gothic. Additionally, it examines the strained interactions between Grant Wood, the artist, and Dr. Byron McKeeby, the model. PMID:15293719

  17. Functional expression of a cattle MHC class II DR-like antigen on mouse L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, D.C.; Craigmile, S.; Campbell, J.D.M.

    1996-09-01

    Cattle DRA and DRB genes, cloned by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, were transfected into mouse L cells. The cattle DR-expressing L-cell transfectant generated was analyzed serologically, biochemically, and functionally. Sequence analysis of the transfected DRB gene clearly showed showed that it was DRB3 allele DRB3*0101, which corresponds to the 1D-IEF-determined allele DRBF3. 1D-IEF analysis of the tranfectant confirmed that the expressed DR product was DRBF3. Functional integrity of the transfected gene products was demonstrated by the ability of the transfectant cell line to present two antigens (the foot-and-mouth disease virus-derived peptide FMDV15, and ovalbumin) to antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cells from both the original animal used to obtain the genes, and also from an unrelated DRBF3{sup +} heterozygous animal. Such transfectants will be invaluable tools, allowing us to dissect the precise contributions each locus product makes to the overall immune response in heterozygous animals, information essential for rational vaccine design. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Dr Ross McIntire, otolaryngologist, and his care of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    The role that otolaryngologist Ross McIntire, MD, played in the care of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd President of the United States, was documented by reviewing primary source material pertaining to the relationship of McIntire and Roosevelt. This included material from various archives including the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library at Hyde Park, New York; United States National Archives; and numerous autobiographies and diaries. McIntire's belief in the value of confidentiality and to provide information only on a need-to-know basis is consistent with the strategy that he had devised earlier for protecting his patient's privacy. In the context of his time and his position, Dr McIntire served his patient and his country well by making appropriate medical and wise personal judgments. The career of Dr Ross T. McIntire, otolaryngologist and personal physician to the 32nd president of the United States, engenders a sense of honor to our profession. PMID:19559948

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Census of blue stars in SDSS DR8 (Scibelli+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibelli, S.; Newberg, H. J.; Carlin, J. L.; Yanny, B.

    2015-02-01

    We present a census of the 12060 spectra of blue objects ((g-r)0<-0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. (3 data files).

  20. The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brunicardi, F. Charles; Cotton, Ronald T.; Cole, George W.; Martinez, George

    2007-01-01

    In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:17304963

  1. SDSS DR4: Progress on the hot white dwarf luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzesinski, J.; Nitta, A.; Kleinman, S. J.; Hgelmeyer, S.; Dreizler, S.; Liebert, J.; Harris, H.

    2009-06-01

    A large collection of white dwarf (WD) spectra from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 4 (DR4) WD catalog data allowed us to obtain a luminosity function (LF) for the hottest WDs. The LF was calculated basing on spectra of the WDs from a special class of SDSS objects called hot standards (HS), for which the WD sample completeness can be estimated. WD distances were determined from the observed and absolute SDSS g filter magnitudes derived from WD stellar atmosphere model fits to the SDSS spectra. The result LF covers -0.5 up to 7 absolute bolometric magnitude range. It shows a slight disagreement at the cold end comparing to the literature LFs but it can be due to some problems with HS WD sample completeness estimations. It is clearly visible that the LF has unexpected plateau between 1.5 and 4 absolute bolometric magnitudes. There is nothing similar visible in a LF built only for non-DA WDs. The plateau might be real but we are concern that its existence can be connected to the problems with spectra calibration of the blue objects in SDSS DR4 data and lack of good stellar atmosphere models for the hottest DA white dwarfs.

  2. Peptides Presented by HLA-DR Molecules in Synovia of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Seward, Robert J.; Drouin, Elise E.; Steere, Allen C.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    Disease-associated HLA-DR molecules, which may present autoantigens, constitute the greatest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA). The peptides presented by HLA-DR molecules in synovia have not previously been defined. Using tandem mass spectrometry, rigorous database searches, and manual spectral interpretation, we identified 1,427 HLA-DR-presented peptides (220464 per patient) from the synovia of four patients, two diagnosed with RA and two diagnosed with LA. The peptides were derived from 166 source proteins, including a wide range of intracellular and plasma proteins. A few epitopes were found only in RA or LA patients. However, two patients with different diseases who had the same HLA allele had the largest number of epitopes in common. In one RA patient, peptides were identified as originating from source proteins that have been reported to undergo citrullination under other circumstances, yet neither this post-translational modification nor anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were detected. Instead, peptides with the post-translational modification of S-cysteinylation were identified. We conclude that a wide range of proteins enter the HLA-DR pathway of antigen-presenting cells in the patients' synovial tissue, and their HLA-DR genotype, not the disease type, appears to be the primary determinant of their HLA-DR-peptide repertoire. New insights into the naturally presented HLA-DR epitope repertoire in target tissues may allow the identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes, and this could lead to innovative therapeutic interventions. PMID:21081667

  3. Inhibition of IGF-1R-Dependent PI3K Activation Sensitizes Colon Cancer Cells Specifically to DR5-Mediated Apoptosis But Not to rhTRAIL

    PubMed Central

    Pennarun, Bodvael; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Oenema, Tjitske; Stegehuis, Janet H.; de Vries, Elisabeth G.E.; de Jong, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) initiates apoptosis in tumor cells upon binding to its cognate agonistic receptors, death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). The activity of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) survival pathway is often increased in cancer, influencing both cell proliferation and apoptosis. We hypothesized that inhibiting the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) using NVP-AEW541, a small molecular weight tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the IGF-1R, could increase death receptor (DR)-mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Methods: The analyses were performed by caspase assay, flow cytometry, Western blotting, immunoprecipitation and fluorescent microscopy. Results: Preincubation with NVP-AEW541 surprisingly decreased apoptosis induced by recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) or an agonistic DR4 antibody while sensitivity to an agonistic DR5 antibody was increased. NVP-AEW541 could inhibit IGF-1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. The effects of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 on TRAIL-induced apoptosis were similar to those of NVP-AEW541, further supporting a role for IGF-1R-mediated activation of PI3K. We show that PI3K inhibition enhances DR5-mediated caspase 8 processing but also lowers DR4 membrane expression and DR4-mediated caspase 8 processing. Inhibition of PI3K reduced rhTRAIL sensitivity independently of the cell line preference for either DR4- or DR5-mediated apoptosis signaling. Conclusion: Our study indicates that individual effects on DR4 and DR5 apoptosis signaling should be taken into consideration when combining DR-ligands with PI3K inhibition. PMID:20978316

  4. Analysis of HLA-DR from alveolar macrophages and blood monocytes by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, T.J.; Monos, D.S.; Spear, B.T.; Rossman, M.D.; Zmijewski, C.M.; Kamoun, M.; Daniele, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    Human blood monocytes (BM) are more effective than alveolar macrophages (AM) in promoting lymphocyte proliferation to antigen. To further understand these differences, the HLA-DR molecules synthesized by these two cell types were compared. AM were prepared by adherence of cells obtained by bronchoscopic lavage; BM were prepared by adherence of blood mononuclear cells from the same normal volunteer. Cells were cultured for 7 hours with /sup 3/H-leucine and HLA-DR was immunoprecipitated with the murine monoclonal antibody L243. Immunoprecipitates were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In three experiments, protein synthetic rate was greater and more HLA-DR was immunoprecipitated per cell in BM than in AM. Isoelectric focusing showed identical charge variation for BM and AM. However, molecular weight analysis of AM HLA-DR revealed multiple bands of slightly different molecular weight for each beta-chain peptide, whereas only a single band occurred with BM HLA-DR. Neuraminidase treatment reduced the charge heterogeneity but did not affect the molecular weight differences. These findings may relate to the differential ability of AM and BM to promote lymphocyte proliferation to antigen.

  5. Phragmites sp. physiological changes in a constructed wetland treating an effluent contaminated with a diazo dye (DR81).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Renata Alexandra; Duarte, Joana Gouveia; Vergine, Pompilio; Antunes, Carlos D; Freire, Filipe; Martins-Dias, Susete

    2014-01-01

    The role of Phragmites sp. in phytoremediation of wastewaters containing azo dyes is still, in many ways, at its initial stage of investigation. This plant response to the long-term exposure to a highly conjugated di-azo dye (Direct Red 81, DR81) was assessed using a vertical flow constructed wetland, at pilot scale. A reed bed fed with water was used as control. Changes in photosynthetic pigment content in response to the plant contact with synthetic DR81 effluent highlight Phragmites plasticity. Phragmites leaf enzymatic system responded rapidly to the stress imposed; in general, within 1 day, the up-regulation of foliar reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzymes (especially superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and peroxidase) was noticed as plants entered in contact with synthetic DR81 effluent. This prompt activation decreased the endogenous levels of H?O? and the malonyldialdehyde content beyond reference values. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity intensification was not enough to cope with stress imposed by DR81. GPX activity was pivotal for the detoxification pathways after a 24-h exposure. Carotenoid pool was depleted during this shock. After the imposed DR81 stress, plants were harvested. In the next vegetative cycle, Phragmites had already recovered from the chemical stress. Principal component analysis (PCA) highlights the role of GPX, GST, APX, and carotenoids along catalase (CAT) in the detoxification process. PMID:24809499

  6. A surgeon's historical perspective: Dr. Leonard Furlow on the early years of human composite flexor tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Tilt, Alexandra; DeGeorge, Brent R; Furlow, Leonard T; Drake, David B

    2014-08-01

    "I think that probably convenience is what did in the flexor mechanism allograft," Dr. Leonard Furlow explained in response to why tendon allografts in the 1960s were overshadowed by the Hunter rod, which is still routinely used for flexor tendon reconstruction today. At 83 years old, Dr. Furlow had graciously made the trip from his home in Gainesville, FL up to Charlottesville, VA for a special interview with the Department of Plastic Surgery at the University of Virginia. Furlow is perhaps better known for developing the double-opposing Z-plasty for cleft palate repair, but his interest in hand surgery led to a year in Chapel Hill, NC where he trained with the creator of the flexor mechanism allograft, Dr. Erle E. Peacock, Jr. Through innovative experimental work on flexor tendon reconstruction, Peacock had pioneered the use of fresh composite tendon allografts, which transplant the unscarred synovial space between the tendon and its sheath such that scar formation only occurs outside the sheath. Inspired by our recent research interest in this subject, we asked Dr. Furlow to reflect on his experience with the tendon allograft in the 1960s with the late Dr. Peacock. The picture he painted was of a simple, elegant, and astonishingly successful solution for flexor tendon reconstruction that suffered from a lack of practicality at the time. PMID:25003448

  7. Systemic administration of 6-OHDA to rhesus monkeys upregulates HLA-DR expression in brain microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Joers, Valerie; Vermilyea, Scott; Dilley, Kristine; Emborg, Marina E

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently developed a nonhuman primate model of cardiac dysautonomia by systemic dosing of the catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The aim of this study was to assess whether systemic 6-OHDA affects the central nervous system of nonhuman primates, in particular the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system. Methods Brain sections from adult rhesus monkeys that received systemic 6-OHDA (50 mg/kg intravenously; n=5) and were necropsied 3 months later, as well as normal controls (n=5) were used in this study. Tissue was cut frozen at 40 ?m on a sliding microtome, processed for immunohistochemistry, and blindly evaluated. Results Neither the optical density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-ir; a dopaminergic neuronal marker) in the caudate and putamen nucleus nor the TH-ir cell number and volume in the substantia nigra showed significant differences between groups. Yet within groups, statistical analysis revealed significant individual differences in the 6-OHDA-treated group, with two animals showing a lower cell count and volume. Optical density quantification of ?-synuclein-ir in the substantia nigra did not show differences between groups. As ?-synuclein intracellular distribution was noted to vary between animals, it was further evaluated with a semiquantitative scale. A greater intensity and presence of ?-synuclein-positive nigral cell bodies was associated with larger TH-positive nigral cell volumes. Increased human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR; a microglial marker) expression was observed in 6-OHDA-treated animals compared with controls. HLA-DR-ir was primarily localized in endothelial cells and perivascular spaces throughout cortical and subcortical structures. Semiquantitative evaluation using a rating scale revealed higher HLA-DR-ir in blood vessels of 6-OHDA-treated animals than controls, specifically in animals with the lowest number of dopaminergic nigral neurons. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that systemic 6-OHDA administration to rhesus monkeys can affect the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system and upregulate inflammatory markers in the cerebrovasculature that persist 3 months post neurotoxin challenge. The variability of the subject response suggests differences in individual sensitivity to 6-OHDA. PMID:25258551

  8. Liposome-bound TRAIL induces superior DR5 clustering and enhanced DISC recruitment in histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Diego; Gallego-Lleyda, Ana; Anel, Alberto; Martinez-Lostao, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Human Apo2-Ligand/TRAIL is a promising antitumor agent. Our group demonstrated that TRAIL was physiologically released to the extracellular medium inserted in lipid vesicles, known as exosomes. Recently we demonstrated that artificial lipid nanoparticles coated with bioactive TRAIL (LUV-TRAIL), which resemble the natural exosomes, greatly improved TRAIL activity compared with the soluble form of this death ligand and were able to induce apoptosis in hematological malignancies. In this study we have deepened the underlying mechanism of action of LUV-TRAIL in hematologic cells. Using histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells, we demonstrated that TRAIL signaling almost exclusively depends on DR5 despite these cells expressing high amounts of DR4, and proved that LUV-TRAIL's higher pro-apoptotic effect relies on its superior ability to induce DR5 clustering on cell surface, therefore enhancing DISC recruitment and triggering caspase activation more efficiently than the soluble form of TRAIL. PMID:25882551

  9. Summary of Symposium on Cloud Systems, Hurricanes and TRMM: Celebration of Dr. Joanne Simpson's Career, The First Fifty Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Adler, R.; Braun, S.; Einaudi, F.; Ferrier, B.; Halverson, J.; Heymsfield, G.; Kummerow, C.; Negri, A.; Kakar, R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A symposium celebrating the first 50 years of Dr. Joanne Simpson's career took place at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center from December 1 - 3, 1999. This symposium consisted of presentations that focused on: historical and personal points of view concerning Dr. Simpson's research career, her interactions with the American Meteorological Society, and her leadership in TRMM; scientific interactions with Dr. Simpson that influenced personal research; research related to observations and modeling of clouds, cloud systems and hurricanes; and research related to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). There were a total of 36 presentations and 103 participants from the US, Japan and Australia. The specific presentations during the symposium are summarized in this paper.

  10. [Relation between the clinical course of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada's disease and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4 subtypes].

    PubMed

    Islam, S M; Numaga, J; Fujino, Y; Matsuki, K; Maeda, H; Masuda, K

    1994-08-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada's disease (VKH) is an autoimmune disorder affecting melanocyte-containing tissues. VKH is strongly related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4, a heterogeneous HLA specificity consisting of at least 12 different genotypes. The disease has two types: prolonged and non-prolonged, depending upon the clinical course. Fifty-four Japanese patients comprising 27 with the prolonged type, 15 with the non-prolonged type, and 12 new cases of VKH were included in this study. Ninety-three percent of the patients with all types had HLA-DR4. All 27 patients with the prolonged type had either the DRB1*0405 or *0410 genotype, and the non-prolonged type included two DR4-negative and four DRB1*0405 and *0410 negative patients. Our results indicate that the clinical course of VKH is determined partly by the patient's HLA genotype. PMID:7942344

  11. Micro-Macro Analysis of Viscoelastic Unidirectional Laminated Composite Plates Using DR Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatgar, Seyed Reza; Salehi, Manouchehr; Aghdam, Mohammad Mohammadi

    2010-10-01

    The Dynamic Relaxation (DR) technique together with finite difference discritization is used to study the bending behavior of Mindlin composite plate including geometric nonlinearity. The overall behavior of the unidirectional composite is obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) micromechanical model, in any combination of normal and shear loading conditions, based on the assumptions of Simplified Unit Cell Method (SUCM). The composite system consists of nonlinear viscoelastic matrix reinforced by transversely isotropic elastic fibers. A recursive formulation for the hereditary integral of the Schapery viscoelastic constitutive equation in multiaxial stress state is used to model the nonlinear viscoelastic matrix material in the material level. The creep tests data is used for verification of the predicted response of the current approach. Under uniform lateral pressure, the laminated plate deformation with clamped and hinged edged constraints is predicted for various time steps.

  12. [Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919) and the National Library in Jerusalem].

    PubMed

    Ohry, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919), was a Russian physician, and founder of the Jewish National Library in JerusaLem. After completing his studies at the Jewish school and at the gymnasium of Grodno, Chazanowicz went to Königsberg, Germany to study medicine and finished his studies in 1872. Returning to Russia, he began to practice at Byelostok's Jewish hospital. Chazanowicz founded the Hovevei Ziyyon ["Lovers of Zion"] society and also the Linat Ha-Zedek ("Hospice for the Poor")--caring for the poor. In 1890 he visited Palestine and conceived the idea of founding a library in Jerusalem, together with the B'nai B'rith organization. In 1896 he sent his large collection of books, amounting to nearly 10,000 volumes, to Jerusalem as the beginning of the Abarbanel library. The enlargement of this library and the collection of funds to erect a special building for it became the life-work of Chazanowicz. PMID:24605410

  13. Superestructuras en el universo: caracterizacin e identificacin en el catlgo SDSS-DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luparello, H. E.; Lares, M.; Garca Lambas, D.; Padilla, N.

    Superclusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the Universe. These structures are not presently virialized, so the application of theoreti- cal arguments in their identification is not straightforward. Luparello et al., (2011) present an identification method and establish the values of the pa- rameters in order to ensure that superstructures in the present Universe will evolve into virialized structures. In this work we define and characterize the largest structures in the Universe, in the framework of the cosmological model CDM. We briefly describe the Future Virialized Structures (FVS) identification method applied to the seventh data release of the Sloan Dig- ital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7, Abazajian et al., 2009) in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.12 and present the main properties of the FVS catalogue. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  14. Thermal regime database of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant cooler--Lake Dr?ksiai.

    PubMed

    Sarauskiene, Diana

    2002-10-01

    The hydrothermal regime of the Lake Dr?ksiai has changed when it became a cooler for the Ignalina NPP. For 18 years, 1981-1998, the hydrologists from Lithuanian Energy Institute have been investigating thermal state of the lake. The water temperature data owned by the laboratory is unique as it has been collected sequentially during 18 yr under wide range of different weather and INPP capacity conditions. Gathered information consists of lake surface temperature, related meteorological data and INPP operating capacity data. This information enables not only to state that the relationship between hydrological and meteorological/INPP capacity data exists (that is already known) but also to analyze its character. The aim of this study was to build computer database for data analysis and management as well as to create digital maps for further modelling and forecasting. ArcView software package was used for data set management and visualization. PMID:12381019

  15. GOSSS-DR1: The First Data Release of the Galactic O-star Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, Alfredo; Maz Apellniz, Jess; Barb, Rodolfo H.; Walborn, Nolan R.; Alfaro, Emilio J.; Gamen, Roberto C.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Arias, Julia I.; Gallego Calvente, A. T.

    2013-06-01

    Coinciding with this meeting, we are publishing the first data release of GOSSS. This release contains [a] revised spectral classifications and [b] blue-violet R~2500 spectra in FITS format for ~400 Galactic O stars, including all brighter than B=8. DR1 (and future releases) will take place through GOSC, the Galactic O-Star Catalog (http://gosc.iaa.es), which will be updated for the occasion. Since 2011 GOSC runs on a MySQL database and allows for queries based on coordinates, spectral class, photometry, and other parameters. Future data releases will include the rest of the stars observed in GOSSS (currently 1521 with ~1000 more planned in the next two years).

  16. [Dr Anto Mari? (1897-1982): a journey from alcohology and dermatovenereology to psychiatry and balneology].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Vucak I

    2011-01-01

    Dr Anto Mari? (1897-1982) was born in Vuki? in Bosnia. He completed medical studies in Vienna and Prague. He published his results from the Department for dermatovenerology at Sarajevo State Hospital, Bosnia. He engaged himself in the movement against alcoholism, too. Later he moved to the Neuropsychiatry ward in Belgrade and was appointed manager in a new psychiatry hospital in Kovin, Serbia. For years he had been a community physician in Stanii? in Vojvodina. During the Second World War, he worked in the psychiatric hospital Vrap?e at the outskirts of Zagreb, Croatia and after the war he became the head of a thermal spa in Srebrenica, Bosnia. After specialisation in balneology, he came to Rijeka to overlook the reconstruction of a thermal spa near Buzet in Istria. He made use of his long experience in dermatovenerology, neuropsychiatry and balneology to promote the importance of the unity between physical and psychological for maintaining human health.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-DR9 photometric redshifts (Brescia+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; de Stefano, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present an application of a machine learning method to the estimation of photometric redshifts for the galaxies in the SDSS Data Release 9 (SDSS-DR9). Photometric redshifts for more than 143 million galaxies were produced. The MLPQNA (Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm) model provided within the framework of the DAMEWARE (DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource) is an interpolative method derived from machine learning models. The obtained redshifts have an overall uncertainty of σ=0.023 with a very small average bias of about 3x10-5 and a fraction of catastrophic outliers of about 5%. After removal of the catastrophic outliers, the uncertainty is about σ=0.017. The catalogue files report in their name the range of DEC degrees related to the included objects. (60 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XCS-DR1 Cluster Catalogue (Mehrtens+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Hilton, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Hosmer, M.; Hoyle, B.; Collins, C. A.; Liddle, A. R.; Viana, P. T. P.; Nichol, R. C.; Stott, J. P.; Dubois, E. N.; Kay, S. T.; Sahlen, M.; Young, O.; Short, C. J.; Christodoulou, L.; Watson, W. A.; Davidson, M.; Harrison, C. D.; Baruah, L.; Smith, M.; Burke, C.; Mayers, J. A.; Deadman, P.-J.; Rooney, P. J.; Edmondson, E. M.; West, M.; Campbell, H. C.; Edge, A. C.; Mann, R. G.; Sabirli, K.; Wake, D.; Benoist, C.; da Costa, L.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R.

    2013-04-01

    The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 256 are new to the literature and 357 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 463 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06

  19. In Memoriam: Prof. Dr Jelena Milogradov-Turin (1935-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    Prof. dr Jelena Milogradov-Turin was born in Belgrade to a family of Russian immigrants on 28 January 1935. She completed her primary and secondary education in Belgrade and after that enrolled at the Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics - Physics Group, from which she graduated in 1959. She obtained her MSc degree in 1972 from the University of Manchester, England, with a thesis entitled "The Survey of the Region 6^{h} < ? < 19^{h}, -25 ? ? ? 70 at 38 MHz ". Her supervisor was a fellow of the Royal Society, Sir Francis Graham-Smith, later on appointed the 13th Astronomer Royal. She defended her PhD thesis "The All Sky Survey at 38 MHz and the Galactic Spectral Index" in the field of astronomical/astrophysical sciences, at the University of Belgrade in 1982.

  20. Far-infrared spectroscopy of the DR 21 star formation region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Adair P.; Haas, M. R.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Erickson, E. F.

    1990-01-01

    Far-IR line and continuum observations of the DR 21 star formation region are presented. It is shown that the extended emission in the 63 micron forbidden O I, 35 micron forbidden Si II, and 158 micron forbidden C II lines is most likely produced in dense, warm photodissociation regions on the surfaces of atomic and molecular clumps of size smaller than 0.6 pc. The gas temperatures in these photoelectrically heated, predominantly atomic layers are 250-500 K and are maintained by FUV fluxes 10,000 or more times the average interstellar radiation field. Gas densities in the surface layers are in the range 10,000-50,000/cu cm. The gas phase abundance of Si(+) is inferred to be about 5 x 10 to the -6th relative to hydrogen, or about 0.15 of its solar abundance. The mass of atomic gas is at least 200 solar masses.