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1

"The CUB domain protein Neto1 is an auxiliary protein of native synaptic kainate receptors"  

PubMed Central

Ionotropic glutamate receptors of AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptor (KAR) subtypes mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate CNS. Auxiliary proteins have been identified for AMPA and NMDA receptor complexes, but little is known about KAR complex proteins. We previously identified the CUB-domain protein, Neto1, as an NMDA receptor-associated polypeptide. Here, we show that Neto1 is also an auxiliary subunit for endogenous synaptic KARs. We found that Neto1 and KARs co-immunoprecipitated from brain lysates, from post-synaptic densities (PSDs) and, in a manner dependent on Neto1 CUB domains, when co-expressed in heterologous cells. In Neto1-null mice, there was an ~50% reduction in the abundance of GluK2-KARs in hippocampal PSDs. Neto1 strongly localized to CA3 stratum lucidum and loss of Neto1 resulted in a selective deficit in KAR-mediated neurotransmission at mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses (MF-CA3): KAR-mediated EPSCs in Neto1-null mice were reduced in amplitude and decayed more rapidly than did those in wild-type mice. In contrast, the loss of Neto2, which also localizes to stratum lucidum and interacts with KARs, had no effect on KAR synaptic abundance or MF-CA3 transmission. Indeed MF-CA3 KAR deficits in Neto1/2 double null mutant mice were indistinguishable from Neto1 single null mice. Thus, our findings establish Neto1 as an auxiliary protein required for synaptic function of KARs. The ability of Neto1 to regulate both NMDARs and KARs reveals a unique dual role in controlling synaptic transmission by serving as an auxiliary protein for these two classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors in a synapse specific fashion.

Tang, Man; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Ng, David; Ivakine, Evgueni; McBain, Chris J.; Salter, Michael W.; McInnes, Roderick R.

2011-01-01

2

Drosophila Neto is essential for clustering glutamate receptors at the neuromuscular junction  

PubMed Central

Neurotransmitter receptor recruitment at postsynaptic specializations is key in synaptogenesis, since this step confers functionality to the nascent synapse. The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a glutamatergic synapse, similar in composition and function to mammalian central synapses. Various mechanisms regulating the extent of postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) clustering have been described, but none are known to be essential for the initial localization and clustering of iGluRs at postsynaptic densities (PSDs). We identified and characterized the Drosophila neto (neuropilin and tolloid-like) as an essential gene required for clustering of iGluRs at the NMJ. Neto colocalizes with the iGluRs at the PSDs in puncta juxtaposing the active zones. neto loss-of-function phenotypes parallel the loss-of-function defects described for iGluRs. The defects in neto mutants are effectively rescued by muscle-specific expression of neto transgenes. Neto clustering at the Drosophila NMJ coincides with and is dependent on iGluRs. Our studies reveal that Drosophila Neto is a novel, essential component of the iGluR complexes and is required for iGluR clustering, organization of PSDs, and synapse functionality.

Kim, Young-Jun; Bao, Hong; Bonanno, Liana; Zhang, Bing; Serpe, Mihaela

2012-01-01

3

Neto1 Is a Novel CUB-Domain NMDA Receptor-Interacting Protein Required for Synaptic Plasticity and Learning  

PubMed Central

The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS), is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1), a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB) domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans.

Szilard, Rachel K; Sertie, Andrea; Kanisek, Marijana; Clapcote, Steven J; Lipina, Tatiana; Kalia, Lorraine V; Joo, Daisy; McKerlie, Colin; Cortez, Miguel; Roder, John C; Salter, Michael W; McInnes, Roderick R

2009-01-01

4

Neto1 is a novel CUB-domain NMDA receptor-interacting protein required for synaptic plasticity and learning.  

PubMed

The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS), is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1), a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB) domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans. PMID:19243221

Ng, David; Pitcher, Graham M; Szilard, Rachel K; Sertié, Andréa; Kanisek, Marijana; Clapcote, Steven J; Lipina, Tatiana; Kalia, Lorraine V; Joo, Daisy; McKerlie, Colin; Cortez, Miguel; Roder, John C; Salter, Michael W; McInnes, Roderick R

2009-02-24

5

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun with Dr. Eberhard Rees and R.W. Cook at a press conference concerning Dr. Von Braun's assignment to NASA headquarters and Dr. Rees' subsequent assignment as Marshall Center director.

1999-01-01

6

Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Dr. Christian Barnard.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Christian Barnard Tours Marshall Space Flight Center. Shown in Dr. Von Braun's office are (left to right): Dr. Ernst Sthulinger, a representative from General Electric, Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Dr. Christian Barnard, and Dr. Eberhard Rees.

1999-01-01

7

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

1999-01-01

8

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

1999-01-01

9

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine a ST-100 Stellar Instrument Platform in the astrionics lab. Dr. Von Braun, then deputy associate administrator for planning, NASA, was visiting on the anniversary of the establishment of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

1999-01-01

10

Dr. Paula Johnson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Paula Johnson is a women's health specialist and a pioneer in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. She conceived of and developed one of the first facilities in the country to focus on heart disease in women.

Health, National I.

11

Dr. MegaVolt  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains information about Tesla coil demonstrations by particle physicist Austin Richards--Dr. MegaVolt--who performs wearing a metal suit that protects him from the multi-kilovolt electrostatic potentials. The gallery provides videos and images from Dr. MegaVolt demonstrations. An explanation of the physics of the Tesla coil is supplied along with information about the development of the suit.

2008-03-10

12

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

1999-01-01

13

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

1999-01-01

14

Dr. Wernher von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

2004-01-01

15

Dr. Eberhard Rees  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Eberhard Rees served as director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from March 1, 1970 until January 19, 1973 when he retired from NASA. Prior to his appointment as Director, Rees served as the Center's deputy director under Dr. Wernher von Braun, 1960-1970. Rees came to the United States as part of the Dr. Wernher von Braun's German Rocket team following World War II. He transferred to Huntsville, Alabama from Fort Bliss, Texas in 1950 to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal. From 1956 to 1960 he served as deputy director of development operations at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency under von Braun. In 1960 Rees was transferred to NASA's Marshall Center.

1970-01-01

16

Dr. Wernher von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon.

1960-01-01

17

DrRacket  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

DrRacket, formerly known as DrScheme, is a free downloadable program development environment designed for beginning programmers (although it includes libraries useful to more advanced programmers, e.g. XML, CGI scripting, web server, client/server computing, graphics and GUI, etc.) It implements and enforces several pedagogical subsets of the Scheme language, as well as the full standard Scheme language and extensions. It has been used successfully with students from middle school through upper-level undergraduate by choosing appropriate libraries.

Plt

18

1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

19

Dr. Frank Bottomley  

Microsoft Academic Search

MAY I be permitted to make a correction of an error in Sir Richard Paget's obituary notice of my cousin, Dr. Frank Bottomley, in NATURE of February 16, p. 212? Sir Richard states that Frank Bottomley's stepmother was ``the widowed sister of Lord Kelvin''. Frank Bottomley's father, being a son of Lord Kelvin's sister Anna, could not possibly have married

James Thomson

1922-01-01

20

Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

1974-01-01

21

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

1999-01-01

22

Dr. Walter Lindley Scrapbooks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living in Los Angeles during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, Dr. Walter Lindley was privy to many interesting changes throughout the region. Dr. Lindley created 33 scrapbooks from 1861 to 1922 and they document everything from his candidacy for mayor of Los Angeles to his work in founding a tuberculosis sanitarium in Idyllwild. The scrapbooks include newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and booklets related to his many interests. Created by the Honnold/Mudd Library for The Claremont Colleges, this digital collection allows users to peer into selections from these fascinating scrapbooks. Currently, visitors can look at three of the scrapbook series, and the others will be digitized over time. Visitors can use the search feature here, which can be used to look around by subject, or they may just wish to type in various terms.

23

Dr. von Braun's Bust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a ceremony honoring Dr. Wernher von Braun, who served as Marshall Space Flight Center Director from 1960 to 1970, Marshall officials renamed the 4200 Building Complex as the Wernher von Braun Office Complex and unveiled a bust of the former director. This photograph is a close-up of the bust in the courtyard. The sculptor of the bust is a MSFC employee, Jack Hood.

1994-01-01

24

Dr. Barbara Campbell  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Clemson University Biological Sciences faculty page features Dr. Barbara Campbell, an Assistant Professor involved in several projects studying the metabolic potential of mixed microbial communities at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Projects include a metagenomics approach to understanding the relationship of a mixed episymbiont community associated with the hydrothermal vent annelid, Alvinella pompejana; characterizing the chemoautotrophic potentials of uncultured bacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents; and the whole genome sequencing of a dominant type of chemoautotroph found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The web page includes information about collaborative research, a list of selected publications, and links related to her projects.

Campbell, Barbara; University, Clemson

25

Dr. Dobb's Embedded Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Embedded Systems is one of the specialized sites stemming from Dr. Dobb's Journal. In addition to serving as an excellent source of news and product development articles, the site is a portal to many other Internet resources on embedded system applications. Information tailored to specific programming languages, like C++, Java, and many others, is grouped into separate categories. There are also focuses on Linux-driven handhelds and other embedded operating systems. A list of toolkits for embedded system developers is also provided, which is especially useful for finding open source solutions.

2002-01-01

26

Three MSFC Directors; Dr. Petrone, Dr. Rees, and Dr. von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Directors: at left, Dr. Rocco A. Petrone (1973-1974), who had been named to succeed Dr. Rees, then-present director (Center); Dr. Eberhard Rees (1970-1973); and past director (right), Dr. Wernher von Braun (1960-1970). This photo was taken at the Redstone Arsenal Officers Club where over three hundred people had gathered to honor the career of Dr. Rees which sparned more than thirty years in rocketry and space exploration and wish him well upon his pending retirement on January 26, 1973.

1973-01-01

27

Dr. Wernher Von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On September 8, 1960 President Dwight D. Eisenhower visited Huntsville, Alabama to dedicate a new NASA field center in honor of General George C. Marshall, Eisenhower's wartime colleague and the founder of the famous Marshall Plan for European recover after World War II. The new George C. Marshall Space Flight Center was placed under the control of Dr. Wernher Von Braun shown here talking with President Eisenhower. As parto f his remarks dedicating the center, President Eisenhowe refereed to General Marshall as a 'man of yar, yet a builder of peace'. the Marshall Center's first major assignment including building the huge Saturn V rocket that launched human beings on their first journey to the surface of the moon in 1969.

1960-01-01

28

Dr. Hugh Dryden Swearing in Dr. George E. Mueller  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. George E. Mueller being sworn in, as Associate Administrator for the Office of Manned Space Flight for NASA, by Dr. Hugh L. Dryden NASAs Deputy Administrator. The ceremony took place at NASA HQ in Washington, DC on September 3, 1963. Mueller served as Associate Administrator from 1963 to 1969, where he was responsible for overseeing the completion of Project Apollo and for beginning the development of the Space Shuttle.

1963-01-01

29

5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 antenna in background. Photograph shows on left side at bottom foundation berm and along right side bottom stanchion concrete foundations at bottom structural steel assembly. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

30

[Dr. John Hughlings Jackson].  

PubMed

The great English neurologist, Dr. John Hughlings Jackson was born in Providence Green, Yorkshire, north England, in 1835. He spent his apprenticeship in the city of York, continued his medical education at St. Bartholomew's hospital in London, and qualified in medicine in 1856. After working in the city of York, he studied in London and in 1860 graduated at St. Andrews university in Scotland. He died in London in 1911, famous and celebrated by his colleagues as the "father of British neurology". Jackson was a prolific writer, witty and ingenious person, but also solitary and absent minded, with a lat of "tiny peculiarities of a genius". At first he was committed to become a philosopher but was persuaded by Jonathan Hutchinson, one of his rare friends, to enter medicine. His "Selected Writings" were first published in 1931 and reprinted recently, in 1996, by Arts & Boeve. Jackson, unlike William Richard Gowers, wrote his articles in a style which was not palatable to his contemporary colleagues. This could be the reason that his medical work was not widely known and would have remained in shadow had it not been rediscovered mostly by German neurologists, who preceded their English colleagues and collected the fame. Jackson gave the first classification of epileptic seizures acceptable, to a degree, even today. It was twofold: the first, taxonomic, which corresponds to contemporary classification of seizures, he compared to the attitude of a gardener who classifies flowers according to their beauty, height or color, and was aware of its purely phenotypic, descriptive and utilitarian character; the second was scientific, physiologic and it would correspond nowadays to the current concept of syndromic classification. Jackson was aware that this 'scientific classification' was to await for the future time, when the knowledge of the real nature of epilepsy became fundamentally broadened. On the other hand, he thought that all the epilepsies were partial becoming generalized only secondarily. Partial epilepsies were the starting point in his work. He realized that epileptic attacks are not different types of epilepsies with different pathophysiological mechanisms, but that they differ in respect to the focus of origin; he stressed their gray matter (cortical) arigin with the cause located as the rule "on the side of the brain, opposite to the body convulsed". Jackson's ideas on epileptogenesis and the localization of epileptogenic processes represent his fundamental contribution to the understanding of their pathophysiology. His most philosophical contribution to neurology was the concept of the evolution and dissolution of the nervous system, which was the consequence of his ideas on its organization. Symptoms observed after the lesion of a certain part of the brain are not the consequence of its function; they are the result of the function of the remaining non-lesioned regions which are in a certain way freed from the adjacent or a higher control. This concept of interpretation af the symptoms of the nervous diseases remains applicable even today. Jackson was the first to stress the importance of ophthalmoscopy in neurology in all cases of neurologic disease, especially in cases of optic neuritis (papilloedema) which may be present even if the patient did not notice the minimized visual acuity. The way of thinking that Jackson introduced in medicine and neurology may be his most precious legacy to the generations that followed. PMID:9480576

Jankovi?, S M; Soki?, D V; Levi?, Z; Susi?, V

1997-01-01

31

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Estes Biography  

Cancer.gov

While a student in the laboratory of Dr. Gregory Burton, Dr. Estes studied the contributions of follicular dendritic cells and the germinal center microenvironment to HIV pathogenesis receiving his Ph.D. in Immunology and HIV Pathogenesis from Brigham Young University in 2003. Dr. Estes continued his work as postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr.

32

Dr. T. Dale Stewart's travels.  

PubMed

Renowned forensic physical anthropologist Dr. T. Dale Stewart traveled extensively to countries all over the world. The reasons for his journeys were manifold. He did fieldwork, took part in congresses, visited scientific institutions, and lectured by invitation at various universities. This paper deals with his journeys in general and with his four visits to Czechoslovakia in particular. Three of them were undertaken in connection with scientific congresses dedicated to Dr. Ales Hrdlicka. Dr. Stewart, as Hrdlicka's successor in the Smithsonian Institution, always chose an appropriate topic for his lecture. His visits to Hrdlicka's native country and town contributed to better mutual understanding and exchange of ideas between physical anthropologists and anatomists from both countries, the USA and Czechoslovakia (the today separate Czech and Slovak Republics). PMID:10782944

Prokopec, M

2000-03-01

33

Dr. von Braun With Management Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. von Braun is shown in this photograph, which was probably taken in the early 1960s, with members of his management team. Pictured from left to right are, Werner Kuers, Director of the Manufacturing Engineering Division; Dr. Walter Haeussermarn, Director of the Astrionics Division; Dr. William Mrazek, Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Division; Dr. von Braun; Dieter Grau, Director of the Quality Assurance Division; Dr. Oswald Lange, Director of the Saturn Systems Office; and Erich Neubert , Associate Deputy Director for Research and Development.

1961-01-01

34

FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys,

Darren Goossens

2009-01-01

35

Dr. Felix's Free MEDLINE Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you need to search the National Medical Library's Medline database, Dr. Felix's Free Medline Page is a good place to start. This simple page is a comparison of twenty-eight web based services that offer free access to parts or all of Medline. For each service users can access information about database coverage, registration requirements, usage restrictions, and document delivery. Hypertext links are available from all of the services discussed. Dr. Felix is a quick and convenient way to launch a Medline session that can inform users of the possible limitations of their search right from the start.

Perry, Helga J.

1997-01-01

36

Dr. Siemens's Gas-Grate  

Microsoft Academic Search

HAVING endeavoured for some years past to heat my study by gas appliances, and having utterly failed in obtaining a comfortable temperature of 60°, as a last effort to accomplish my object I had fitted into an ordinary grate Dr. Siemens's arrangement of copper and iron, the construction of which was communicated to the public in the pages of NATURE,

R. Douglas Hale

1880-01-01

37

Dr. Pribut's Running Injuries Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Pribut's Running and Sports Injuries: A Web Hypertext presents a variety of lower extremity running injuries and both self treatment and office treatment. Also running physiology and how to stay out of the doctor's office. Links to other sports areas are also available.

1995-01-01

38

Interim normal limits DR reactor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As specified in PITA IP-26-I, a test has been conducted at DR reactor to find the amount of nonpressure sensitive air entering the reactor, and gain other information on the reactor gas system. The purpose of this document is to place in effect interim no...

D. K. George

1964-01-01

39

Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director Past Issues / Summer 2009 ... NIH and for science in this country." "Dr. Collins is one of our generation's great scientific leaders." — ...

40

FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some acknowledgments. I would like to thank the authors of these papers, Dr Dennis Mather of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering for his encouragement and support, and the reviewers who have taken the time to read and comment on these papers. I would also like to acknowledge the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, particularly Dr Richard Palmer (now retired). They made the editing of this issue a simple and enjoyable process, for me if not for them!

Goossens, Darren

2009-03-01

41

Interview with Dr. Charley Zeanah  

PubMed Central

Dr. Charles Zeanah is the Mary K. Sellars-Polchow Chair in Psychiatry, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans. He is also Executive Director of the Institute for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health at Tulane. He is the recipient of multiple awards including the Irving Phillips Award for Prevention, (AACAP), the Presidential Citation for Distinguished Research and Leadership in Infant Mental Health (American Orthopsychiatric Association), the Sarah Haley Memorial Award for Clinical Excellence (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), the Blanche F. Ittelson Award for Research in Child Psychiatry (APA), and the Serge Lebovici Award for International Contributions in Infant Mental Health (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Dr. Zeanah is a Distinguished Fellow of AACAP, a Distinguished Fellow of the APA and a Board Member of Zero to Three. He is the Editor of Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3rd edition) considered as the state of the art textbook and standard reference in the field of Infant Mental Health.

2013-01-01

42

Dr. von Braun, Dr. Mueller, and Dr. Rees at the Firing Room During the SA-6 Launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph depicts an intense moment during the SA-6 launch at the Firing Room. Dr. von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is at center; to his left is Dr. George Mueller, Associate Director for Marned Space Flight; and far right is Dr. Eberhard Rees, Director for Research and Development, MSFC. The SA-6, the sixth flight of the Saturn 1 vehicle, launched a S-IV stage (a second stage) and an Apollo boilerplate spacecraft.

1964-01-01

43

Molecular analysis of the MHC class II region in DR4, DR7, and DR9 haplotypes.  

PubMed

Within the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) the amount of DNA in the DR-DQ interval has been shown to be haplotype dependent, with those carrying the DR4, DR7, and DR9 specificities having been reported to contain 110-160 kilobases (kb) more DNA than haplotypes carrying the DR3 specificity. Certain subtypes of haplotypes carrying particular DR specificities are more closely associated with autoimmune diseases than others. With the prospect of the DNA perhaps containing a disease susceptibility locus, we have mapped eight DR4 and two DR7 homozygous cell lines and a DR7/9 heterozygous cell line together with a control DR3 cell line using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with the enzymes Bss H II, Pvu I, and Not I/Nru I. Our results, however, show that the presence and amount of the extra DNA is constant irrespective of the subtype. We have also tried to narrow down the position of insertion of the extra DNA using eight further rare-cutting enzymes but, due to the polymorphic nature of sites and/or differences in methylation in this region, it was not possible to refine it further than between DRA and DQA1/B1. This polymorphic nature of the DR-DQ region is unusual, considering the uniformity of rare cutter sites that has been observed within the rest of the class II, and class III, regions. The presence of this, and other, haplotype dependent variations in the DNA content of the DR subregion may be important with respect to recombination and will be particularly interesting if the additional DNA is found to contain novel genes. PMID:1684173

Kendall, E; Todd, J A; Campbell, R D

1991-01-01

44

Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

1965-01-01

45

[Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].  

PubMed

With this brief review we honor the memory of the great French doctor Jean Baptiste Edouard Gélineau. Dr. Gélineau was born on December 23, 1828 at Blaye, Gironde, close to the Bordeaux region. His name is connected with the first clinical description of the disease for which he, both by the right of the primacy as well as ad valorem of his first two names, coined the name "narcolepsy". He was the first to notice the intrinsically evanescent symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime somnolence, imperative sleep habits and cataplexy or "astasia" as he called it, and incorporate them into a single clinical syndrome. In 1881 Gélineau discussed Kaffe's case of "maladie du sommeil" as a proof of the existence of the new disease described a year before. As a good clinical observer Gélineau noticed the close relation of emotional engagement and astasia. His attitude was that narcolepsy was a nosologic entity, a disease sui generis, but admitted that it could appear purely as a symptom only. This was in discordance with the views in England where (in 1928) Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson repudiated such convictions; in 1930 Lhermitte still shared the same opinion. Gélineau differentiated narcolepsy from epilepsy with the elegance of clinical reasoning. Overall, Gélineau described three elements of the narcoleptic pentade. Sleep paralyses were first described by Mitchell in 1876, and were first attributed to narcolepsy by Wilson in 1928; in 1930 Lhermitte first described hypnapompic, and Daniels, in 1934, hypnagogic sleep paralysis. Hypnagogic hallucinations were described by Maury in 1848 and subsequently by de Saint Denis in 1867. In twenties they were thoroughly studiesed during the epidemic encephalitis and after the Big War in 1922 by Levy. The life story of Dr. Gélineau covers multivarious activities. As a young student of the Rochefort Navy Medical School he took part in the fight against colera which deluged the city of La Rochelle. In 1849 he became the "Intern" of the Navy Hospital and next year a "Surgeon of the Third Class". As a Navy surgeon he visited French colonies in the Indian ocean: first the Reunion island and then Mayotte island of the Commores Archipelago. Of this period he wrote "Voyage a i'lle de la Réunion", memoirs published much later, in 1905, in which he described colonial life and abolition of slavery. The story of Elise, a beauteous Creole woman, a concubine of a young naval Commander, who delivered a child that soon died, inexorably points to the autobiographic character of his work. He defended a doctoral thesis "Aperçu Medical de I'lle de Mayotte" at Montpellier University School of Medicine in 1858, using the data collected during his year-and-a-half stay on a Mayotte island; at that time he was a "Navy Surgeon of the Second Class". For his dedication in fighting against epidemics that broke out during the French-German war in 1870 he was nominated for the Legion of Honor, but received it only later. In 1871 Gélineau introduced "Doctor Gélineau's tablets" for the treatment of epilepsy (contained bromide and arsenic). He was a member of the Société de Médicine, Société d' Hypnologie, La-Société Française d' Hygiène, and a few others. After retirement at the age of 72, Gélineau switched to wine production, continuing the family tradition; for the quality of his Bordeaux wines he was awarded gold medals at the Anvers and Paris Exhibitions. Dr. Gélineau died on March 2, 1906, at Argeles Gazost in Pyrnees honored by the titles of Chevalier de la Légion d' Honneur, Officier d'Academie and Commander of Nichan of the Ottoman Empire. PMID:9132972

Jankovi?, S; Susi?, V; Soki?, D; Levi?, Z

1996-01-01

46

SDSS DR7 superclusters. Morphology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: We study the morphology of a set of superclusters drawn from the SDSS DR7. Methods: We calculate the luminosity density field to determine superclusters from a flux-limited sample of galaxies from SDSS DR7 and select superclusters with 300 and more galaxies for our study. We characterise the morphology of superclusters using the fourth Minkowski functional V3, the morphological signature (the curve in the shapefinder's K1-K2 plane) and the shape parameter (the ratio of the shapefinders K1/K2). We investigate the supercluster sample using multidimensional normal mixture modelling. We use Abell clusters to identify our superclusters with known superclusters and to study the large-scale distribution of superclusters. Results: The superclusters in our sample form three chains of superclusters; one of them is the Sloan Great Wall. Most superclusters have filament-like overall shapes. Superclusters can be divided into two sets; more elongated superclusters are more luminous, richer, have larger diameters and a more complex fine structure than less elongated superclusters. The fine structure of superclusters can be divided into four main morphological types: spiders, multispiders, filaments, and multibranching filaments. We present the 2D and 3D distribution of galaxies and rich groups, the fourth Minkowski functional, and the morphological signature for all superclusters. Conclusions: Widely different morphologies of superclusters show that their evolution has been dissimilar. A study of a larger sample of superclusters from observations and simulations is needed to understand the morphological variety of superclusters and the possible connection between the morphology of superclusters and their large-scale environment.

Einasto, M.; Liivamägi, L. J.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, J.; Martínez, V. J.; Heinämäki, P.

2011-08-01

47

Dr. Rees and Dr. von Braun at MSFC's Tenth Arniversary Picnic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Eberhard Rees conversing with former Center Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun, who along with his wife and son, participated in MFSC's Tenth Anniversary Celebration Picnic held at the Center's picnic area.

1970-01-01

48

Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, greets vice president Spiro T. Agnew in the Launch Control Center for the Apollo 14 mission. Between Dr. Von Braun and Mr. Agnew are their Royal Highnesses, The Prince and Princess of Spain. The royal visitors greeted the launch control team in th enter after the launch of Apollo 14.

1999-01-01

49

DR-Fed Active Horn Antenna  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this work is to design and implement a DR-fed active rectangular horn antenna. A rectangular dielectric resonator (DR) of high permittivity is used to couple energy to the waveguide to achieve wider impedance bandwidth, easily fabrication, and integration into planar circuit. A power amplifier having gain of 10 dB is integrated into the horn antenna to

Min-Hsu Chuang; Jean-Fu Kiang

50

Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.  

PubMed

A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals. PMID:21964165

Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

2012-01-01

51

Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

1926-01-01

52

Dr. Susan Prichard and Pine Beetles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video, scientist Dr. Susan Prichard discusses the impact of pine bark beetles on western forests, including information on how climate change, specifically rising temperatures, is exacerbating the problem.

Central, Climate

53

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Keele Biography  

Cancer.gov

The Retroviral Evolution Section (RES) studies various aspects of retroviral transmission, evolution, and immune evasion using sequencing, genetic analyses and molecular biology approaches to better understand the natural course of infection and potential sites and mechanisms of intervention. Dr.

54

Dr. Dianne Gates-Anderson (Spanish)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

(Spanish version) Meg A. Mole interview different chemists to learn about their jobs. Dr. Dianne Gates-Anderson is an Environmental Process Engineer at the Department of Energy, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

2012-01-01

55

Native American Health Education: Dr. Lindberg Recognized  

MedlinePLUS

... Tools NLM Director’s Comments Transcript Native American Health Education: Dr. Lindberg Recognized – 07/14/2014 To use ... Lindberg recently received a special recognition for fostering education about Native American health and illness at the ...

56

Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Goddard rocket in launching tower at Roswell, New Mexico, March 21, 1940. Fuel was injected by pumps from the fueling platform at left. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

1940-01-01

57

Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

2004-01-01

58

Faces of GPM: Dr. Dalia Kirschbaum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Research physical scientist, Dr. Dalia Kirschbaum, is featured in this short (~3 min.) video. Dr. Kirschbaum explains how the integration of her initial interest in math and her subsequent interest in the science of natural disasters lead to her career focus of landslide modeling. Now part of the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) team, she communicates about the GPM mission and data to the public and to others who use it in their work and/or research.

59

Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

1930-01-01

60

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Chertova Biography  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Elena Chertova received her Master’s Degree in Biochemistry from Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia; and PhD from Shemyakin Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Her area of expertise is in studying protein structure, function, and topography. In 1993-1994 she was a visiting scientist at the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. In 1994, Dr.

61

[Dr. John Argyropulos (1410-1492)].  

PubMed

Dr. John Argyropulos (Dr. John Argyropulus, Dr. John Argyropoulos) was the last but, along with Dr. John Hortazmen, the most well known professor of Medical School, founded in 1308 by the Serbian king Stefan Uro II Milutin at the Hospital of St. John the Baptist monastery in Constantinople. After the town fell to the Turkish hands, Dr. Argyropulos stayed at Peloponnesus from 1453 to 1456, when he moved to Italy, in which he spent the rest of his life. He is not important only for the Serbs, he is more important for the Greeks and particularly for the Italians and Italy, in which he spent the largest part of his life, in which he achieved the university education, taught the Greek philosophy, language and literature, as well as translated a number of Aristotle's works from old Greek to Latin and New Greek, wrote a number of poems, letters and notes and made a strong influence on a number of Renaissance humanists in Florence, Italy, as well as on a number of intelectuals throghout Europe. We found no evidence that Dr. John Argiropulos either practised medicine in Italy, or that he taught medicine at the Italian medical schools. PMID:19069354

Colovi?, Radoje

2008-01-01

62

STUDY OF ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HLA-DR4 AND DR53 AND AUTOANTIBODY DETECTION IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study explored the association between HLA-DR4, DR53 and autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its clinical significance.A total of 305 patients with RA and 50 healthy subjects who underwent medical examination were evaluated. H HLA- DR4 and HLA-DR53 and autoantibodies were detected.The results showed frequencies of HLA- DR4 and HLA-DR53 alleles in RA patients were 42.95% and 54.75%

Yongmei Zhou; Liming Tan; Qiuhua Que; Hua Li; Lili Cai; Liping Cao; Qian Ye; Jinwang Xiong

2012-01-01

63

Structural basis of LaDR5, a novel agonistic anti-death receptor 5 (DR5) monoclonal antibody, to inhibit DR5/TRAIL complex formation  

PubMed Central

Background As a member of the TNF superfamily, TRAIL could induce human tumor cell apoptosis through its cognate death receptors DR4 or DR5, which can induce formation of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC) and activation of the membrane proximal caspases (caspase-8 or caspase-10) and mitochondrial pathway. Some monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5 have been reported to have anti-tumor activity. Results In this study, we reported a novel mouse anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, named as LaDR5, which could compete with TRAIL to bind DR5 and induce the apoptosis of Jurkat cells in the absence of second cross-linking in vitro. Using computer-guided molecular modeling method, the 3-D structure of LaDR5 Fv fragment was constructed. According to the crystal structure of DR5, the 3-D complex structure of DR5 and LaDR5 was modeled using molecular docking method. Based on distance geometry method and intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis, the key functional domain in DR5 was predicted and the DR5 mutants were designed. And then, three mutants of DR5 was expressed in prokaryotic system and purified by affinity chromatograph to determine the epitope of DR5 identified by LaDR5, which was consistent with the theoretical results of computer-aided analysis. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the specific epitope located in DR5 that plays a crucial role in antibody binding and even antineoplastic bioactivity. Meanwhile, revealed structural features of DR5 may be important to design or screen novel drugs agonist DR5.

2012-01-01

64

CancerDR: Cancer Drug Resistance Database  

PubMed Central

Cancer therapies are limited by the development of drug resistance, and mutations in drug targets is one of the main reasons for developing acquired resistance. The adequate knowledge of these mutations in drug targets would help to design effective personalized therapies. Keeping this in mind, we have developed a database “CancerDR”, which provides information of 148 anti-cancer drugs, and their pharmacological profiling across 952 cancer cell lines. CancerDR provides comprehensive information about each drug target that includes; (i) sequence of natural variants, (ii) mutations, (iii) tertiary structure, and (iv) alignment profile of mutants/variants. A number of web-based tools have been integrated in CancerDR. This database will be very useful for identification of genetic alterations in genes encoding drug targets, and in turn the residues responsible for drug resistance. CancerDR allows user to identify promiscuous drug molecules that can kill wide range of cancer cells. CancerDR is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdr/

Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Kumar, Shailesh; Gautam, Ankur; Kapoor, Pallavi; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

2013-01-01

65

Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt, a life for astronautics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Irene Bredt (b.1911 at Bonn) obtained her Doctorate in Physics in 1937; in the same year she became a scientific researcher at the German Research Center for Aviation at Trauen, led by Prof. Dr. Eugen Sänger. Soon, the young but efficient Dr. Irene Bredt became the first assistant of Dr. Sänger, who married her (1951). During 1973–1978, Dr. Bredt was

Nicolae-Florin Zaganescu

2004-01-01

66

Geophysical survey of 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4, 100-D Area  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Geophysical Survey was to verify the location of the 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4. A surface monument currently marks its location. The crib is 10 feet by 10 feet and 15 feet deep. Ground-Penetrating Radar was the geophysical method selected to conduct the investigation.

Bergstrom, K.A.

1993-10-01

67

Dr. Wernher von Braun Laid to Rest  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paper Clip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. Dr. von Braun died in Alexandria, Va., on June 16, 1977, seven years after his NASA appointment. This photo was taken at the site where he was laid to rest.

1977-01-01

68

PEP DR1 public catalogs (Lutz+, 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PACS catalogs built by the PEP team, with key contributions by Stefano Berta, Benjamin Magnelli, Paola Popesso, Dieter Lutz, Francesca Pozzi, Bruno Altieri, Herve Aussel, Hoseong Hwang, Emeric Le Floc'h, Georgios Magdis, Raanan Nordon, Albrecht Poglitsch, Laurie Riguccini, Amelie Saintonge, Li Shao. For more details, please refer to Lutz et al. (2011A&A...532A..90L) and to the PDF documentation associated to the release. Data and catalogs can be retrieved from the web page http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php See the PDF documentation associated to the PEP DR1 release, http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_global.pdf and http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_SPIRE.pdf for more details. (69 data files).

Lutz, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brisbin, D.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez-Sanchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wetzstein, M.; Wieprecht, E.

2013-11-01

69

Dr. Rollas: a humble and persistent man.  

PubMed

Dr. Zinnur Rollas is the founder of the Department of Neurosurgery at the Gulhane Military Medical Academy (GMMA). He was educated in the United States and returned to Turkey in order to practice neurosurgery. He is also the first surgeon who performed pediatric neurosurgical procedures at GMMA. Dr. Rollas operated on many pediatric cases of meningocele, myelomeningocele, encephalocele, hydrocephalus and trauma. He not only performed the surgeries but also took the pictures and recorded the data of the patients. Unfortunately, he did not publish any of these cases. In this paper, we tried to document his experience on pediatric neurosurgery, and to summarize the evolution of pediatric neurosurgery at GMMA. PMID:24535813

Tehli, Ozkan; Temiz, Caglar

2014-01-01

70

The ORAC-DR data reduction pipeline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ORAC-DR data reduction pipeline has been used by the Joint Astronomy Centre since 1998. Originally developed for an infrared spectrometer and a submillimetre bolometer array, it has since expanded to support twenty instruments from nine different telescopes. By using shared code and a common infrastructure, rapid development of an automated data reduction pipeline for nearly any astronomical data is possible. This paper discusses the infrastructure available to developers and estimates the development timescales expected to reduce data for new instruments using ORAC-DR.

Cavanagh, B.; Jenness, T.; Economou, F.; Currie, M. J.

2008-03-01

71

Special session in honor Dr. Kiyo Tomiyasu  

Microsoft Academic Search

This session is dedicated to the career of Dr. Kiyo Tomiyasu. His career includes technical accomplishments in microwaves, lasers, and remote sensing of the earth using satellite-borne radiometers, scatterometers, and synthetic radars. He has contributed much to MTT-S, and to IEEE, including awards and contributions to the IEEE Foundation. This special session will include invited speakers to recall activities associated

J. B. Horton

2010-01-01

72

Dr. Israel Cuéllar (1946-2008)  

Microsoft Academic Search

On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuéllar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health services to diverse populations. In particular, the construction of the

Manuel X. Zamarripa

2009-01-01

73

Walt Disney and Dr. Wernher von Braun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Werhner von Braun, then Chief, Guided Missile Development Operation Division at Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, was visited by Walt Disney in 1954. In the 1950's, von Braun worked with Disney Studio as a technical director, making three films about space exploration for television. A model of the V-2 rocket is in background.

1954-01-01

74

ORAC-DR: Astronomy data reduction pipeline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ORAC-DR is a generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure; it includes specific data processing recipes for a number of instruments. It is used at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, AAT, and LCOGT. This pipeline runs at the JCMT Science Archive hosted by CADC to generate near-publication quality data products; the code has been in use since 1998.

Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie; Cavanagh, Brad; Currie, Malcolm J.; Gibb, Andy

2013-10-01

75

Dr. Wernher Von Braun presents a certificate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, presents a humorous certificate to Major General Charles W. Eifler, commanding general of Redstone Arsenal, at the close of a farewell luncheon for the general prior to General Eifler moving to a new European duty station.

1999-01-01

76

Cell death via DR5, but not DR4, is regulated by p53 in myeloma cells.  

PubMed

Myeloma cells are sensitive to TRAIL through the two death receptors DR4 and DR5. Because p53 directly modulates expression of death receptors, we investigated here whether p53 can modulate myeloma sensitivity to TRAIL. We found that p53 affects the sensitivity of myeloma cells to the DR5 agonistic human antibody lexatumumab but not the DR4 antibody mapatumumab. TP53 wild-type myeloma cells overexpressed DR5 in correlation with sensitivity to lexatumumab. Both nongenotoxic (nutlin-3a) and genotoxic (melphalan) p53-inducing stresses increased DR5 expression only in TP53 wild-type cells and synergistically increased lexatumumab efficiency yet did not increase DR4 expression, nor sensitivity to mapatumumab. Silencing of p53 strongly decreased DR5 expression and induced resistance to nutlin-3a and lexatumumab but did not modulate DR4 expression or sensitivity to mapatumumab. Increase of lexatumumab efficiency induced by nutlin-3a was related to a p53-dependent increase of DR5 expression. In primary myeloma cells, nutlin-3a increased DR5 expression and lexatumumab efficiency but did not increase mapatumumab efficiency. Taken together, our findings indicate that p53 controls the sensitivity of myeloma through DR5 but not DR4 and suggest that a subset of patients with multiple myeloma may benefit from DR5 therapy. PMID:22738917

Surget, Sylvanie; Chiron, David; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Descamps, Géraldine; Ménoret, Emmanuelle; Bataille, Régis; Moreau, Philippe; Le Gouill, Steven; Amiot, Martine; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine

2012-09-01

77

Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

2004-01-01

78

Excess of maternal HLA-DR3 antigens in HLA DR3,4 positive Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The susceptibility determinants of Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus are known to be associated with both HLA-DR3 and DR4. In our study we wished to determine if the parental origin of these antigens could influence susceptibility to the disease. We analysed the inheritance of DR3 and DR4 haplotypes from the father or mother (DR3p, DR4p, DR3m and DR4m, respectively), in

I. Deschamps; J. Hors; F. Clerget-Darpoux; E. Gardais; J. J. Robert; A. Marcelli-Berge; H. Lestradet; J. Dausset

1990-01-01

79

Dr. Wernher von Braun In His Office  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. This photo depicts von Braun in his office at MSFC.

1964-01-01

80

Science Sampler: Dr. Vermeij and The Cay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As an interdisciplinary exploration, middle-level students were reading The Cay (1969) by Theodore Taylor in their English classes, honing map skills in social studies, and learning the importance of making observations in science class. Then, inspired by the autobiography of Dr. Geerat Vermeij, the author decided to have her students make observations as he did--using only their sense of touch. Dr. Vermeij, a distinguished professor of geology at the University of California, has been blind since the age of three, but he has an extraordinary gift--he can identify shells using only his hands. Through the activities described here, students not only honed their science process skills, but also gained a deeper appreciation of science as a human endeavor.

Shubin, Joanna

2009-02-01

81

Dr. Wernher Von Braun examines a ruby crystal.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Dr. Eberhard Rees (left), deputy director, technical, examine a ruby crystal used in laser experiments in the Marshall Center's Space Sciences Laboratory.

1999-01-01

82

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Gorelick Biography  

Cancer.gov

Robert J. Gorelick received his Ph.D. in 1985 from the University of Delaware, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry studying enzymology of flavoproteins involved in fatty acid metabolism and electron transport. In 1985, he began his postdoctoral research with the ABL-Basic Research Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, and received an NIH National Research Service Award from 1988 to 1990 focusing efforts on determining the function of retroviral nucleocapsid proteins in virus assembly and infection processes. In 1990, Dr.

83

A famous Turkish dermatologist, Dr. Hulusi Behçet.  

PubMed

Dr. Hulusi Behçet (1889-1948) is a famous Turkish dermatologist. He was born in Istanbul on February 20, 1889. His father was Ahmet Behçet and his mother Ayqse Behçet was also Ahmet's cousin. After the Turkish Republic was established and the "Family Name Law" was accepted, his father Ahmet Behçet, who was among the friends of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder of Turkish Republic, received private permission to use his father's name Behçet. Dr. Hulusi Behçet pursued his education at Gülhane Military Medical Academy. After he had become a medical doctor, he specialized in dermatology and venereal disease at Gülhane Military Medical Academy and he completed his specialization in 1914. His first observations on Behçet's Disease started with a patient he met between 1924-1925. Dr. Behçet followed the symptoms of three patients whom he had had for years, then he decided that they were the symptoms of a new disease (1936). He published these cases in the Archives of Dermatology and Veneral Disease. He died from a sudden heart attack on March 8, 1948. Today, this disease is universally called Behçet's Disease in medical literature. PMID:12370137

UStün, Cagatay

2002-01-01

84

Working with Dr. Per V. Bruel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For more than a decade I have had the pleasure to work as an application specialist together with--and for--Dr. Bruel, one of the founders of the Bruel & Kjaer Company, famous for sound and vibration measurement instrumentation, often nicknamed ''Green Boxes.'' It has been a great experience for me, and I recall this period in my life as one where I was much inspired by Dr. Bruel's methods, both as a private person and with his work as a director for the company and leader of both the sales and the innovation departments. In this presentation I will highlight some funny stories that are told about Dr. Bruel combined with the episodes that I have experienced myself. In short, the most simple way to characterize this rather complex person is maybe by repeating his vision statement for the company: ''We shall have fun and we shall make money. On the other hand we shall not have so much fun that we do not make any money, and we shall not make so much money that we do not have any fun!'' For Per Bruel, acoustics is one of his great hobbies. He has others such as cars, airplanes, motorbikes (he is the lucky owner of a Danish Nimbus) and wine.

Gade Kjaer, Svend

2002-11-01

85

Microvariation creates significant functional differences in the DR3 Molecules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two DR3 molecules differ by four amino acids whose side chains point into the OR antigen-binding groove. To begin to assess the role of microvariation on DR3 function, DRB 1?0302 residues were replaced with DRB 1?0301 residues at ?-chain positions 26, 47, 86, and 47 plus 86. Murine fibroblast cell lines expressing DR(a,?1V0301), DR(a,?1?0302), and the four mutant 0302 molecules

Phillip E. Posch; Hugo A. Araujo; Karen Creswell; Chantai Praud; Armead H. Johnson; Carolyn Katovich Hurley

1995-01-01

86

Dr. von Braun Surrenders to U.S. Army  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun surrenders to U.S. Army Counterintelligence persornel of the 44th Infantry Division in Ruette, Bavaria on May 2, 1945. Left to right are Charles Stewart, CIC agent; Dr. Herbert Axster; Dieter Huzel; Dr. von Braun (arm in cast); Magnus von Braun (brother); and Hans Lindenberg.

1945-01-01

87

Dr. Wernher Von Braun talkes with George Hardy.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

George Hardy of the Marshall Space Flight center's Astronautics Laboratory, talks with Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), deputy associate administrator for planning. Dr. Von Braun was inspecting the mockup of the Saturn workshop during a visit to the Marshall Center. The visit coincided with the 10th anniversary celebration of the center of which Dr. Von Braun was director until March 1, 1970.

1999-01-01

88

[Dr. Voronoff's curious glandular xeno-implants].  

PubMed

Dr. Serge Voronoff visited Brazil during the Jornadas Médicas of 1928, where he demonstrated his xenotransplantation technique to the local medical community. The present article uses newspaper clippings from that time to illustrate how this controversial surgery and Voronoff's alleged miraculous preservation of good health and longevity was viewed in the popular imagination. Voronoff's initiative paved the way for other health professionals to report on their surgical experiences with xenotransplantation and also popularized the topic, which became the subject of Carnival songs and sardonic jokes in the press. An analysis is offered, based on current scientific parameters, along with a suggestion concerning the possible involvement of xenotransplantation in HIV epidemiology. PMID:18453328

Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy; de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

2007-01-01

89

Dr. Jan Rogers with Electrostatic Levitator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Jan Rogers, project scientist for the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an obejct (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials sciences program.

1998-01-01

90

A failure management prototype: DR/Rx  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This failure management prototype performs failure diagnosis and recovery management of hierarchical, distributed systems. The prototype, which evolved from a series of previous prototypes following a spiral model for development, focuses on two functions: (1) the diagnostic reasoner (DR) performs integrated failure diagnosis in distributed systems; and (2) the recovery expert (Rx) develops plans to recover from the failure. Issues related to expert system prototype design and the previous history of this prototype are discussed. The architecture of the current prototype is described in terms of the knowledge representation and functionality of its components.

Hammen, David G.; Baker, Carolyn G.; Kelly, Christine M.; Marsh, Christopher A.

1991-01-01

91

Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)  

ScienceCinema

The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

2012-06-28

92

Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary) [U.S. Energy Secretary

2012-05-07

93

Dr. Goddard and a 1918 version of 'Bazooka'  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert H. Goddard loading a 1918 version of the Bazooka of World War II. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

2004-01-01

94

[Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Hajime Hoshi].  

PubMed

Hajime Hoshi is a founder of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company and of Hoshi University. He became acquainted with Dr. Hideyo Noguchi in the United States in 1901 during his study abroad. Hoshi often stayed overnight at Noguchi's apartment in Philadelphia. Hoshi and Noguchi were both from Fukushima, Japan, and Hoshi was three years older than Noguchi. Both persons had been good friends until Hoguchi died in 1928. Hoshi and Noguchi together had met Hirobumo Ito and Thomas Edison. In 1906, Hoshi came back to Japan after a 12-year stay in the United States. The financial support by Hoshi enabled the only and one temporary returning of Noguchi to Japan in 1915. In this paper, the friendship between the famous two persons is described in detail. PMID:11623302

Misawa, M

1991-01-01

95

Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella Typhimurium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

2003-01-01

96

Better coupling model of DR to microstrip ensures repeatability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lack of simple, accurate models for determining performance of dielectric resonators (DRs) coupled to microstrip lines makes repeatable design of DR filters and oscillators extremely difficult. Here, some DR coupling models are examined in order to clarify why one model is a more accurate method of predicting unloaded Q of the DR. This model is based on the strong points of existing coupled design methods, includes resistive losses and loaded Q, and is valid with or without the use of dielectric spacers between the DR and the substrate.

Champagne, Patrick

1987-09-01

97

Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry  

MedlinePLUS

... Services Advanced Specialty Education Clinics Faculty Practice National Museum of Dentistry Welcome Applications The Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry p Home | About | Visit | Explore | Learn | ...

98

Polymorphism of human Ia antigens: gene conversion between two DR beta loci results in a new HLA-D\\/DR specificity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The polymorphic HLA-DR beta-chains are encoded within the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) by multiple loci resulting from gene duplications. Certain DR haplotypes can be grouped into families based on shared structural factors. We have studied the molecular basis of HLA-DR polymorphism within such a group which includes the haplotypes DR3, DR5 and DRw6. Molecular mapping of the DR beta-chain

Jack Gorski; Bernard Mach

1986-01-01

99

Dr. R. J. McKinlay Gardner Interviewed by Dr. Hon Fong L. Mark.  

PubMed

Dr. Mac Gardner graduated in medicine from the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand in 1968. After hospital residencies he undertook training in clinical genetics in New Zealand, and then the U.K., France and Canada. He returned to New Zealand as a specialist in genetics in 1977, but for the past 14 years he has been a consultant in medical genetics with Genetic Health Services Victoria in Melbourne, Australia. PMID:18322351

Mark, Hon Fong L

2008-01-01

100

Dr. Ball's Two Letters on the Ice Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

SIR R. BALL'S last letter is a little embarrassing for those who have accepted his teaching. In it he claims that however faithless his other supporters may have proved, he can still rely on the countenance of Dr. Wallace. What does it all mean? Dr. Wallace is responsible for a theory of the Glacial period which has been before the

Henry H. Howorth

1896-01-01

101

Dr. David Gandara of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

Dr. David Gandara of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center You will need Adobe Flash Player 8 or later and JavaScript enabled to view this video. You can view the movie here Dr. David Gandara of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center talking about

102

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

2009-01-01

103

Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

1999-01-01

104

Solo and Collaborative Piano Chamber Recital with Dr. Melissa Colgin-Abelne, flute, Dr. Alicia Doyle, lecturer, and Dr. Elisa Wilson, mezzo-soprano  

Microsoft Academic Search

Works Performed: Poem for Flute and Orchestra (piano reduction) by Charles Griffes, with Dr. Colgin-Abeln, flute\\u000aClair de Lune, arrangement for flute and piano by Claude Debussy\\u000aSelect Vocal Works by Gabriel Faure and Select Vocal Works by Charles Ives with Dr. Elisa Wilson, mezzo-soprano\\u000aFrom Goyescas, the Maiden and the Nightingale by Enrique Granados\\u000aA la sombra de Torre

Dena K Jones

2003-01-01

105

SDSS DR7 White Dwarf Catalog  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

Kleinman, S. J.; Kepler, S. O.; Koester, D.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Peçanha, Viviane; Nitta, A.; Costa, J. E. S.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Córsico, A.

2013-01-01

106

Adoption at Dr. Kariadi Hospital Semarang.  

PubMed

18 of the 41 children adopted at Dr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, from 1969-74 were followed up. Most of these children were 3-7 months of age at time of adoption. 5 children had received official approval from the court; of the remaining adoptees, 1 was given temporary approval by the notary and 12 by the local district head. The children's health status was judged to be satisfactory. Psychological evaluation using the Denver Developmental Screening Test indicated no mental retardation; however, IQ level was difficult to determine. Adoption has a long tradition in Indonesia. Parents who wish a child to be adopted submit a letter of transfer to the hospital. Parents who wish to adopt also submit a letter and a health certificate. A social worker investigates the foster parents' economic and educational background and prepares them for their responsibilities. A psychologist investigates the child's mental behavior before and after adoption and obtains information on the prospective parents' desire to adopt. However, unsatisfactory facilities and unskilled personnel have created a lack of sound preparation for the adoption process. PMID:1012724

Soetadji, N; Trastotenojo, M S; Harijono, R; Darsono, S; Alfinah, S; Waspodo, D

1976-01-01

107

Dr. Samuel Ting, nobel laureate, visits SSPF.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nobel laureate Professor Samuel C. C. Ting of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology pauses for a photo in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dr. Ting is directing an experiment, an international collaboration of some 37 universities and laboratories, using a state-of-the-art particle physics detector called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which will fly on a future launch to the International Space Station. Using the unique environment of space, the AMS will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS flew initially as a Space Shuttle payload on the June 1998 mission STS-91 that provided the investigating team with data on background sources and verified the detector's performance under actual space flight conditions. The detector's second space flight is scheduled to be launched on mission UF-4 October 2003 for installation on the Space Station as an attached payload. Current plans call for operating the detector for three years before it is returned to Earth on the Shuttle. Using the Space Station offers the science team the opportunity to conduct the long-duration research above the Earth's atmosphere necessary to collect sufficient data required to accomplish the science objectives.

2000-01-01

108

Treatment of Breast Cancer With Antibodies Against DR4 and DR5 Receptors in Combination With Chemotherapy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall goal of this proposal is to determine the therapeutic potential of apoptosis-inducing anti-human DR5 and DR4 antibodies, alone or together, in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs with activity against breast cancer, for the treatment of me...

D. J. Buchsbaum

2005-01-01

109

Treatment of Breast Cancer With Antibodies Against DR4 and DR5 Receptors in Combination With Chemotherapy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall goal of this proposal is to determine the therapeutic potential of apoptosis-inducing anti-human DR5 and DR4 antibodies, alone or together, in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs with activity against breast cancer, for the treatment of me...

D. J. Buchsbaum

2004-01-01

110

[Dr. Atkins' dietetic revolution: a critique].  

PubMed

Very fat people die earlier than people of normal weight because hypertension, diabetes and coronary disease are more frequent among the markedly obese. Most obese subjects, however, are only slightly overweight and their mortality is not elevated. Reasons for dieting are more often psychological than somatic. 2. Reducing diets are ineffective because the obese rarely follow them. Total fasting and intestinal bypass may provide better results, but are more dangerous. 3. Atkins' diet eliminates carbohydrates from food without restricting protein and fat intake. Deprived of carbohydrates, the body uses fat for fuel. A small part of metabolized fat is eliminated in the urine as ketone bodies, and this is why such diets are called "ketogenic". They have been known at least since 1863. 4. Caloric loss due to ketonuria does not exceed 100 Cal/day in the non-diabetic. It is maximal during total fasting and cannot be increased by a ketogenic diet. 5. In the short run, such diets produce rapid weight loss due to polyuria. On the other hand, refeeding carbohydrates causes water retention and weight gain. 6. The diet decreases appetite: patients eat less without feeling severe hunger and without measuring their food intake. 7. Orthostatic hypotension, fatigue, and nausea are frequent, despite what Dr. ATKINS claims. 8. The diet increases plasma cholesterol and uric acid. It may be dangerous in diabetes (anorexia, acidosis) and in heart or kidney failure (hypokalemia). 9. The diet, though far from good, is better than the book. ATKINS' theories are at best half-truths, and the results he claims lack credibility. The obese subject's disappointment with traditional reducing diets and the book's hard-sell style account for ATKINS' success. PMID:897645

Hirschel, B

1977-07-23

111

Oligonucleotide-genotyping as a method of detecting the HLA-DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, -DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, -DR4-Dw15, and -DR4-D"KT2" haplotypes in the Japanese population.  

PubMed

We synthesized pairs of four different oligonucleotides, F22, F29, F42, and F158, to analyse the HLA-DR2 (DRw15) and -DR4 haplotypes in the Japanese population. After enzymatically amplifying the HLA-DRB1 gene, we hybridized the oligonucleotide probes with DNA extracted from 42 donors. Hybridization was completed between F22 and the DNA of haplotype DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, between F29 and the DNA of DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, between F42 and the DNA of DR4-D"KT2", and between F158 and the DNA of DR4-Dw15. In keeping with the nucleotide sequences of the probes, F29 hybridized also with DNA from the DR9-Dw23 haplotype and F158 with that from some of the DRw8 haplotypes (DRw8-Dw8.3) in the Japanese population. Results of this study demonstrate that the four oligonucleotides make useful probes for detecting the haplotypes above. PMID:2799805

Obata, F; Ito, I; Kaneko, T; Ohkubo, M; Ishimoto, A L; Abe, A; Kashiwagi, N

1989-05-01

112

HLA-DR7Specific monoclonal antibodies and a chimpanzee anti-DR7 serum detect different epitopes on the same molecule  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe here two monoclonal antibodies with HLA-DR7 serologic specificity. The antibodies, SFR16-DR7M, a cytotoxic rat IgM antibody of high affinity, and SFR16-DR7G, a noncytotoxic antibody of the rat IgG 2a class, react with only DR7-positive cells in radioimmunoassay. The cytotoxic activity of SFR16-DR7M correlates completely with the presence of the DR7 specificity, and segregates with the DR7-bearing haplotype in

Susan F. Radka; D. Bernard Amos; Laurie J. Quackenbush; Peter Cresswell

1984-01-01

113

HLA-DR phenotypes in Spanish coeliac children: their contribution to the understanding of the genetics of the disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DR-locus controlled B-cell antigens were studied in 163 unrelated Spanish coeliac children and 68 families of this group, nine of them with more than one coeliac patient, to obtain more information about the association between these antigens and coeliac disease. The results show that the most common coeliac phenotypes are DR3\\/DR7, DR7\\/DR5, DR3\\/other DR, and DR3\\/DR3. The family study

M L Mearin; I Biemond; A S Peña; I Polanco; C Vazquez; G T Schreuder; R R de Vries; J J van Rood

1983-01-01

114

Dr. von Braun tours the North American Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), during his tour of the Space Information Division of North American Aviation (NAA) in Downey, California, where the Saturn SII stage was developed.

1962-01-01

115

Dr. von Braun Tours the North American Aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), during his tour of the Space information Division of North American Aviation (NAA) in Downey, California, where the Saturn SII stage was developed.

1962-01-01

116

Interview with Dr. Omar Khan, noted global health specialist.  

PubMed

Dr. Khan has had a distinguished career in global health. He has served as a faculty member at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. He is currently a family medicine physician at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware, and is President of the Delaware Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Khan has authored more than 55 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has conducted research and lead primary care and public health initiatives in numerous countries. Last year, Dr. Khan also coedited a book titled Megacities and Global Health sponsored by the American Public Health Association with Dr. Gregory Pappas, Deputy Health Commissioner for Washington, DC. PMID:22461688

Simmons, Rob; Khubchandani, Jagdish

2012-07-01

117

Dr. Helen Free, Bayer HealthCare, Diagnostics Division (Spanish)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

(Spanish version) Meg A. Mole interview different chemists to learn about their jobs. Dr. Helen Free has developed many products used by doctors' offices and hospitals to test urine and blood for diseases.

2012-01-01

118

10. Copy by Historic American Buildings Survey of Dr. Collins ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Copy by Historic American Buildings Survey of Dr. Collins Marchall photo Unknown photographer (App. 1880-1890) VIEW FROM NORTHWEST (front) - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

119

Dr. Beronda Montgomery-Kaguri, Michigan State University (Spanish)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

(Spanish version) Meg A. Mole interview different chemists to learn about their jobs. Dr. Beronda Montgomery-Kaguri is a plant biochemist in the Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University.

2012-01-01

120

Science for Kids exclusive: 'Worm wizard,' Dr. Shana Goffredi  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Deep beneath Monterey Bay, California, weird worms topped with bright red, feathery "hats" gorge themselves at a whalebone buffet. In this ...... Dr. Shana K. Goffredi of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, answers a few questions about these unique animals.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS;)

2004-07-30

121

Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the launch of Apollo 11.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mission officials relax, all smiles, a few moments after the successful launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft by Saturn V vehicle AS-506. Relieved of the tension of waiting through the countdown are (left to right) Charles W. Matthews, NASA deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center; Dr. George E. Meuller, NASA associate administrator for manned spaceflight, and Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, director of the Apollo program.

1999-01-01

122

Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

1954-01-01

123

Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

1970-01-01

124

[Dr. Ivo Sercer--a forgotten Croatian ophthalmologist] ].  

PubMed

Dr Ivo Sercer (Rakovac near Karlovac, 1892--Zagreb, 1959) graduated medical studies in Graz (1915) and specialized in ophthalmology. In April 1919 he was appointed head of the ophthalmology department of the City hospital in Subotica, where he worked until his death. Backa, a region spreading between the Danube and the Tisa, was one of Europe's major trachoma focal points and Subotica had an eye hospital ever since 1868. In that city a big City hospital with the medical, surgical and ophthalmological departments opened in 1897, and there Dr Sercer was very actively engaged. In addition to his hospital work Dr Sercer also ran a private practice, treated children in the Home for trachomatous children and worked as school clinic and health insurance ophthalmologist implementing the socio-medical programme for fighting trachoma devised by Dr Andrija Stampar. Regretfully, working outside the strict borders of his native country Dr Sercer has not received due recognition in the history of ophthalmology in Croatia. PMID:11845586

Dugacki, V

2001-01-01

125

CGS4DR: Automated reduction of data from CGS4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CGS4DR is data reduction software for the CGS4 instrument at UKIRT. The software can be used offline to reprocess CGS4 data. CGS4DR allows a wide variety of data reduction configurations, and can interlace oversampled data frames; reduce known bias, dark, flat, arc, object and sky frames; remove the sky, residual sky OH-lines (? < 2.3 ?m) and thermal emission (? ? 2.3 ?m) from data; and add data into groups for improved signal-to-noise. It can also extract and de-ripple a spectrum and offers a variety of ways to plot data, in addition to other useful features. CGS4DR is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

Daly, Phil N.; Beard, Steven M.; Lightfoot, John, L.; Bridger, Alan

2014-06-01

126

Electrophoretic Analysis of Human HLA-DR Antigens from HLA-DR4 Homozygous Cell Lines: Correlation between beta Chain Diversity and HLA-D  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of immunoprecipitated human HLA-DR antigens from cells expressing the HLA-DR4 haplotype shows distinct clustering of beta -chain patterns. Six unique electrophoretic variants were observed among 17 HLA-DR4 homozygous cell lines (HCL) analyzed. These patterns correlate precisely with the HLA-D phenotype of the HCL donor as determined by reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture. All DR4 HCL that belong

Barbara S. Nepom; Gerald T. Nepom; Eric Mickelson; Paolo Antonelli; John A. Hansen

1983-01-01

127

Genomic evaluation of HLA-DR3+ haplotypes associated with type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

We have defined three sets of HLA-DR3(+) haplotypes that provide maximum risk of type 1 disease development in Indians: (1) a diverse array of B8-DR3 haplotypes, (2) A33-B58-DR3 haplotype, and (3) A2-B50-DR3 occurring most predominantly in this population. Further analysis has revealed extensive diversity in B8-DR3 haplotypes, particularly at the HLA-A locus, in contrast to the single fixed HLA-A1-B8-DR3 haplotype (generally referred to as AH8.1) reported in Caucasians. However, the classical AH8.1 haplotype was rare and differed from the Caucasian counterpart at multiple loci. In our study, HLA-A26-B8-DR3 (AH8.2) was the most common B8-DR3 haplotype constituting >50% of the total B8-DR3 haplotypes. Further, A2-B8-DR3 contributed the maximum risk (RR = 48.7) of type 1 diabetes, followed by A2-B50-DR3 (RR = 9.4), A33-B58-DR3 (RR = 6.6), A24-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.5), and A26-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.2). Despite several differences, the disease-associated haplotypes in Indian and Caucasian populations share a frozen DR3-DQ2 block, suggesting a common ancestor from which multiple haplotypes evolved independently. PMID:23387390

Kumar, Neeraj; Kaur, Gurvinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Kanga, Uma; Mehra, Narinder K

2013-04-01

128

Sequence and evolution of HLA-DR7- and -DRw53-associated. beta. -chain genes  

SciTech Connect

cDNA clones representing products of the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..-chain genes were isolated from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line MANN (DR7, DRw53, DQw2, DPw2). The DRw53..beta.. sequence was identical to a DRw53..beta.. sequence derived from cells with a DR4 haplotype. In contrast, the DR7..beta.. sequence was as unrelated to DR4..beta.. sequence as it was to other DR..beta..-related genes, except at the 3'-untranslated region. These results suggest that the DR7 and DR4 haplotypes may have been derived relatively recently from a common ancestral haplotype and that the DR4 and DR7 ..beta..-chain genes have undergone more rapid diversification in the ..beta..1 domains, most probably as a result of natural selection, than have the DRw53..beta..-chain genes. Short tracts of sequence within the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..1 domains were shared with other DR..beta.. sequences, indicating that exchanges of genetic information between ..beta..1 domains of DR..beta..-related genes have played a part in their evolution. Serological analysis of mouse L-cell transfectants expressing surface HLA-DR7 molecules, confirmed by antibody binding and allelic sequence comparison, identified amino acid residues that may be critical to the binding of a monomorphic DR- and CP-specific monoclonal antibody.

Young, J.A.T.; Wilkinson, D.; Bodmer, W.F.; Trowsdale, J.

1987-07-01

129

Group Achievement Award: The SCUBA team; George Darwin Lecturer: Dr Neil Gehrels; Harold Jeffreys Lecturer: Dr Emma Bunce; Honorary Fellow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Group Achievement Award goes to the SCUBA team of W K Gear, W S Holland, E I Robson, C R Cunningham, J F Lightfoot, T Jenness, R J Ivison, J A Stevens, P A R Ade, M J Griffin, W D Duncan, J A Murphy and D A Naylor. The 2009 George Darwin Lecturer is Dr Neil Gehrels, Chief of the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The 2009 Harold Jeffreys Lecturer is Dr Emma Bunce of the University of Leicester.

2009-02-01

130

Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

1999-01-01

131

Dr. von Braun With a Model of a Launch Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney in the mid-1950's.

1950-01-01

132

28. View of data test area for DR data take ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

133

Focus on Fitness: Q&A with Dr. Greene  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dr. Greene answers the following question in this brief article focusing on fitness: Everyone knows that children need plenty of exercise to stay healthy--But what does "fitness" really involve for young children? Following this discussion, the topics presented include: snack of the month; nutrition fact; and activities, "Move to the Music" and…

Greene, Alan

2005-01-01

134

Effect of Selenium on HLA-DR Expression of Thyrocytes  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) represent the most frequent forms of the organ-specific autoimmune thyroid disorders that result from interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Selenium has been shown to exert a beneficial effect on the autoimmune thyroiditis. In spite of therapeutical effect of selenium on autoimmunity, the mechanism of its action has not been revealed. Objective. To determine whether selenium in vitro thyrocytes cultures are able to influence the HLA-DR molecule expression of human thyrocytes and production of free oxygen radicals. Method. Thyrocytes were prepared from human thyroid gland and cultured in vitro in the presence of interferon-? and sodium selenite. The expression of HLA-DR molecules induced by interferon-? in the presence of sodium selenite of various concentration was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Results. Selenium has a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the expression of HLA-DR molecules of thyrocytes induced by interferon-?. This effect of selenium was in the inverse correlation with antioxidative capacity. Conclusion. Beneficial effect of selenium on autoimmune mechanism is a complex mechanism in which the inhibitory effect on HLA-DR molecule expression and antioxidative capacity are involved into therapy of autoimmune thyroiditis.

Balazs, Csaba; Kaczur, Viktoria

2012-01-01

135

39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

136

6. View of DR 3 antenna typical backstay concrete stanchion ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. View of DR 3 antenna typical back-stay concrete stanchion showing embedded anchors and structural steel leg with pin attachment. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

137

Dr. Seuss's Sound Words: Playing with Phonics and Spelling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Boom! Br-r-ring! Cluck! Moo!--exciting sounds are everywhere. Whether visiting online sites that play sounds or taking a "sound hike," ask your students to notice the sounds they hear, then write their own book, using sound words, based on Dr. Seuss's "Mr. Brown Can MOO! Can You?" During the three 45-minute sessions, grade K-2 students will:…

Gardner, Traci

138

7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete showing embedment anchors, foundation steel base plate, vertical member with small diameter turnbuckles, antenna assembly in background, and story board for scale. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

139

Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects a significant gap in knowledge as HLA DP and DQ molecules are presumably equally important,

Peng Wang; John Sidney; Yohan Kim; Alessandro Sette; Ole Lund; Morten Nielsen; Bjoern Peters

2010-01-01

140

Immortal tale or nightmare? Dr Kotnis between art and exploitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes the overlapping and contradictory transnational taste cultures addressed by the 1946 Indian film, Dr Kotnis Ki Amar Kahani, which became re?edited as an American exploitation film, Nightmare in Red China in the 1950s. A biopic featuring an Indian doctor who traveled to China as part of a medical team, the film offers a case study in multiple

Neepa Majumdar

2008-01-01

141

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's Community Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the case of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of

Noel M. Tichy; June Irmiger Taylor

1976-01-01

142

A “City at War”: Commemorating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses fantasy theme analysis to examine public discourse that emerged from a Midwestern town's attempt to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The essay examines “Letters to the Editor” to (a) reveal the fantasy themes that represent the writers' consciousness and possibly that of the larger community and (b) to discuss the themes' rhetorical implications for public memory

Beth A. Messner; Mark T. Vail

2009-01-01

143

Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the case of Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra who was accused of espionage in 1917. Suggests that the espionage charge was a fiction created by newspapers, beginning with "The Providence Journal." Concludes that Muck admitted to being a spy rather than reveal the name of the woman with whom he had an extramarital…

Kagan, Sheldon S.

1993-01-01

144

Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger Speaks at Educator Honor Reception  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger, a member of von Braun's original German rocket team who directed the Research Projects Office, spoke about the importance of teachers in his life during a reception honoring educators attending the NASA Student Launch Initiative Rocketry Workshop at the Marshall Space Flight Center in July, 2003.

2003-01-01

145

Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Congressman Gerald R. fod  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in April, 1964, Congressman Gerald R. Ford, Jr. Republican of Michigan, was warmly greeted by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director. Ford, along with two other congressmen, visited the center for a briefing on the Saturn program and for a tour of the facilities.

1999-01-01

146

Dr. von Braun at the Apollo 14 Launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Future Programs, uses binoculars to monitor data on the closed-circuit TV screen in the Firing Room of the Launch Control Center at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the final preparation for the Apollo 14 launch.

1971-01-01

147

Role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant pleural effusion  

PubMed Central

Context: A good proportion of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion (PE) turn into malignancy over a period of time. Identification of positive biomarker may help in selecting the individuals who require close follow-up. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant PE. Settings and Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 89 patients of suspected malignant PE and 50 normal subjects (NS) were taken as control. Materials and Methods: Patients with exudative PE; who had pleural fluid lymphocyte count greater than 50% and adenosine deaminase less than 30 U/L were taken as cases. We had selected NSs among relatives of patients having normal blood chemistry and radiological investigations. Sensitivity and specificity of the test to differentiate malignant and non-malignant PE and also to identify PE with underlying malignancy was analyzed. Results: Mean value of DR-70 in NS was found to be 0.83 ± 0.273 mg/L without any significant difference between males (0.82 mg/L) and females (0.85 mg/L). Mean value of DR-70 in PE with underlying cancer was 5.03 ± 3.79 mg/L. Sensitivity (80%) and specificity (77.78%) of the test was maximum in PE with underlying cancer using cut-off value of 2 mg/L. Mean value DR-70 in malignant PE was 5.18 ± 3.75 mg/L and in non-malignant PE was 3.73 ± 3.74 mg/L without any statistically significant difference (P = 0.08). Conclusions: DR-70 assay has high sensitivity in detecting underlying lung cancer, but has no role in differentiating malignant PE from non-malignant PE.

Sengupta, Amitabha; Saha, Kaushik; Jash, Debraj; Banerjee, Sourindra Nath; Biswas, Nirendra Mohan; Dey, Atin

2013-01-01

148

Blocking TRAIL-DR5 signaling with soluble DR5 alleviates acute kidney injury in a severely burned mouse model  

PubMed Central

Acute kidney injury (AKI) predicts high mortality in severely burned patients. Apoptosis plays a significant role during AKI; however, the apoptotic mechanisms underlying AKI induced by burn injury are not clear. Here, we report a critical role for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-Death receptor 5 (DR5) signaling in the pathogenesis of AKI. C57BL/6 male mice were subjected to full thickness scald burn. Apoptosis was significantly up-regulated in mouse kidney 24 h after the burn. Meanwhile, the TRAIL and DR5 expression levels were significantly increased in the kidney 24 h after the burn. Soluble DR5 treatment reduced apoptotic cell death and alleviated kidney injury induced by the burn through blocking the interaction of endogenous TRAIL with DR5. These results demonstrated that TRAIL plays a deleterious role in AKI pathogenesis induced by scald burns. Inhibition of TRAIL function in the kidney may represent a novel protective strategy to treat AKI in patients with burns.

Leng, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Qiu; Chen, Zhenyu; Wang, Dechang

2014-01-01

149

Compact groups of galaxies in SDSS DR7 (Mendel+, 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Paper III (Cat. J/MNRAS/395/255) we describe the photometric selection of CGs from the SDSS Data Release 6 (Adelman-McCarthy et al., 2008, Cat. II/282/), which included imaging of the entire SDSS-II Legacy Survey area. Since that paper, SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) has provided an additional ~1200deg2 of spectroscopic data, completing spectroscopic observations of the SDSS-II Legacy Survey footprint. In what follows we use galaxy catalogues drawn from SDSS DR7 and, where available, supplement the CG samples in Paper III with updated spectroscopic information. (2 data files).

Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Simard, L.; Patton, D. R.; McConnachie, A. W.

2012-07-01

150

From the editor: an interview with Dr. Scott Grundy.  

PubMed

During the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions in November 2014, this Editor had the opportunity to interview Dr. Scott Grundy regarding the new recommendations for guideline development that was issued by the International Atherosclerosis Society. (The full document is published in this issue of the journal). In developing this report, Dr. Grundy chaired a panel of international experts who spent 1 year in consideration of new evidence and regional concerns regarding the clinical management of lipoprotein disorders and vascular disease prevention. His experience in developing the Adult Treatment Panel Reports from the National Cholesterol Education Program in the United States and his extensive research in lipoprotein physiology and related disorders makes him unique in offering the expertise for worldwide leadership in this effort. PMID:24528682

Grundy, Scott; Brown, W Virgil

2014-01-01

151

Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the DR21 region.

The red filaments stretching across this image denote the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These organic molecules, comprised of carbon and hydrogen, are excited by surrounding interstellar radiation and become luminescent at wavelengths near 8.0 microns. The complex pattern of filaments is caused by an intricate combination of radiation pressure, gravity and magnetic fields. The result is a tapestry in which winds, outflows and turbulence move and shape the interstellar medium.

To the lower left of the mosaic is a large bubble of gas and dust, which may represent the remnants of a past generation of stars.

The lower panel shows a 24-micron image mosaic, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer aboard Spitzer (MIPS). This image maps the cooler infrared emission from interstellar dust found throughout the interstellar medium. The DR21 complex is clearly seen near the center of the strip, which covers about twice the area of the IRAC image.

Perhaps the most fascinating feature in this image is a long and shadowy linear filament extending towards the 10 o'clock position of DR21. This jet of cold and dense gas, nearly 50 light-years in extent, appears in silhouette against a warmer background. This filament is too long and massive to be a stellar jet and may have formed from a pre-existing molecular cloud core sculpted by DR21's strong winds. Regardless of its true nature, this jet and the numerous other arcs and wisps of cool dust signify the interstellar turbulence normally unseen by the human eye.

2004-01-01

152

Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

1999-01-01

153

Femtosecond laser fabrication of waveguides in DR13-doped PMMA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work demonstrated the fabrication of tubular waveguides in bulk samples of PMMA doped with Disperse Red 13 (DR13) by oscillator only fs-laser micromachining. We studied the influence of the incident pulse energy on the diameter and quality of the fabricated waveguides by analyzing optical microscopy images. HeNe laser (632.8 nm) was coupled into the fabricated waveguides, revealing an annular intensity distribution resulting from the superposition of propagation modes with azimuthal symmetry. The averaged total loss of the fabricated waveguides was estimated as 0.8 dB/mm. Residual birefringence was observed in the produced waveguides, probably generated during the fabrication process, which prevented determining optically induced birefringence owing to the presence of the azochromophore DR13.

Ferreira, P. H. D.; Stefanutti, R.; Pavinatto, F. J.; Mendonça, C. R.

2014-05-01

154

ORAC-DR: One Pipeline for Multiple Telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ORAC-DR, a flexible and extensible data reduction pipeline, has been successfully used for real-time data reduction from UFTI and IRCAM (infrared cameras), CGS4 (near-infrared spectrometer), Michelle (mid-infrared imager and echelle spectrometer), at UKIRT; and SCUBA (sub-millimeter bolometer array) at JCMT. We have now added the infrared imaging spectrometers IRIS2 at the Anglo-Australian Telescope and UIST at UKIRT to the list of officially supported instruments. We also present initial integral field unit support for UIST, along with unofficial support for the imager and multi-object spectrograph GMOS at Gemini. This paper briefly describes features of the pipeline along with details of adopting ORAC-DR for other instruments on telescopes around the world.

Cavanagh, B.; Hirst, P.; Jenness, T.; Economou, F.; Currie, M. J.; Todd, S.; Ryder, S. D.

155

Dr. Wernher Von Braun leads a tour of the S-IC checkout area.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Eberhard Rees, Charles Schultze, James Webb, Elmer Staats, Comptroller General of the United States, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun tour the S-IC checkout area in the Marshall Space Flight Center quality lab.

1999-01-01

156

Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-Dr: California's 2007 Implementation Experience.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with...

A. Chiu D. Hennage G. Wilker M. A. Piette S. Kiliccote

2008-01-01

157

SAIC/NCI-Frederick’s Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) is pleased to announce that Dr  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Martin Fritts, Senior Principal Scientist and Co-Founder of the NCL, Receives the 2010 ASTM International President’s Leadership Award SAIC/NCI-Frederick’s Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) is pleased to announce that Dr. Martin Fritts

158

Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

2008-01-01

159

US Global Change Research Information Office: Ask Dr. Global Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you're interested in finding information on global change, then the Ask Dr. Global Change Web site is for you. Provided by the US Global Change Research Information Office, the site gives visitors the chance to review and search dozens of questions and related answers to various global warming questions. Example questions include What is Global Warming and What is the Greenhouse Effect. It also allows visitors to submit question of their own and explore other provided links.

2002-01-01

160

Of Brain and Bone: The Unusual Case of Dr. A  

PubMed Central

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick’s disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A’s abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A’s genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can dissociate from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the neural basis of social cognition and suggests a possible genetic link between bone disease and FTD.

Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, ML; Slavotinek, A; DeArmond, SJ; Cha, YH; Miller, BL; Rankin, K.P

2009-01-01

161

Spitzer Commissioning Observations of the HII region DR6  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HII region DR6 and the associated infrared star cluster DB7 (Dutra & Bica 2001, A&A, 376) were observed with the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the in-orbit checkout and science verification activities. We present the IRAC images at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 microns of the region. The images reveal a lane of extinction

S. J. Carey; J. Rho; W. T. Reach; W. J. Glaccum; B. Bhattacharya; M. Lacy; S. Laine; P. J. Lowrance; B. O. Nelson; D. Stern; J. A. Surace; G. Wilson

2004-01-01

162

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1993-05-01

163

8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, third from left vertical member at first level above foundation level, showing small diameter turnbuckle stays, vertical member with flange connection, and various struts and connectors with antenna assembly in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

164

‘Panoramas’ and ‘Living Pictures’: Dr Barnardo’s Annual Meetings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual fêtes, bazaars, and dinners associated with Dr Barnardo’s nineteenth?century philanthropic enterprises constituted elaborate public spectacles. This paper focuses in particular on the Annual Meetings held in high?profile venues such as the Royal Albert Hall in the 1890s. Layered audiences, thousands of spectators from the middle classes to royalty, watched as thousands of children performed what Barnardo called ‘panoramas’

Susan Ash

2010-01-01

165

21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his newly completed building at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and the alley north of Washington Street in about 1900 or 1901. In 1901, the building seen here was enlarged by the construction of an addition of similar design immediately to the north (left). Virtually the entire west elevation of the initial building is depicted in this view. Credit ADLAPR. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

166

Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.  

PubMed

On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place. PMID:15666497

Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

2004-11-01

167

Association of HLA-Aw31 and HLA-DR1 with adult rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-nine Israeli Jewish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were studied for their HLA A, B, C, DR antigen frequency. A significant increase in HLA Aw31 and HLA DR1 was observed (p less than 5.10(-5) and p less than 5.10(-3) respectively). 45% of Aw31 positive patients were sero-negative for rheumatoid factor, while most HLA DR1 positive individuals were seropositive. DR5 was

B Schiff; Y Mizrachi; S Orgad; M Yaron; E Gazit

1982-01-01

168

Nonlethal Adherence to Human Neutrophils Mediated by Dr Antigen-Specific Adhesins ofEscherichia coli  

Microsoft Academic Search

UropathogenicEscherichia colistrains express a variety of adhesins, including members of the Dr adhesin family such as the Dr hemagglutinin, AFAI, and AFAIII. CertainE. coliadhesins (e.g., type 1 and Sfimbriae) are known to mediate adherence to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The receptor on erythro- cytes for Dr family adhesins, decay accelerating factor, is also present on PMNs. To determine whether Dr

JAMES R. JOHNSON; KEITH M. SKUBITZ; BOGDAN J. NOWICKI; KAREN JACQUES-PALAZ; ANDROBERT M. RAKITA

169

Liposome-mediated peptide loading of MHC-DR molecules in vivo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amino acid residues 3–15 of mycobacterial HSP60 define a dominant T-cell epitope for HLA-DR3+ve humans and Mamu-DR3+ve rhesus monkeys. Our results show that Mamu-DR3 molecules on PBMC can be efficiently loaded in vivo with the above-mentioned peptides when they are intravenously injected encapsulated in liposomes, but not in the free form. Mamu-DR3 loading is abolished by encapsulation of a nonstimulatory

Bert A.'t Hart; Diënne G. Elferink; Jan Wouter Drijfhout; Gert Storm; Louis van Blooijs; Ronald E. Bontrop; René R. P. de Vries

1997-01-01

170

Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

2007-12-18

171

Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries at the Redstone Arsenal airfield.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. George E. Mueller, center, associate administrator for manned space flight, is flanked by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, and Dr. Eberhard Rees at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip. the associate adminstrator was making his annual staff visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center.

1999-01-01

172

DR. lyp\\/ lyp bone marrow maintains lymphopenia and promotes diabetes in lyp\\/ lyp but not in +\\/+ recipient DR. lyp BB rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lymphopenia is due to a frameshift mutation in Gimap5 on rat chromosome 4 and is linked to type 1 diabetes in the diabetes prone (DP) BB rat. The hypothesis that bone marrow derived cells confer the lymphopenia phenotype was tested by reciprocal bone marrow transplantation in 40-day-old lethally irradiated diabetes resistant (DR) congenic DR.lyp\\/lyp (lymphopenia and diabetes) and DR.+\\/+ (no

Tyson Hawkins; Jessica Fuller; Kara Olson; Sara Speros; Åke Lernmark

2005-01-01

173

Primate DRB genes from the DR3 and DR8 haplotypes contain ERV9 LTR elements at identical positions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HLA-DRB genes of the human major histocompatibility complex constitute a multigene family with a varying number of DRB genes in different haplotypes. To gain further knowledge concerning the evolutionary relationship, the complete nucleotide sequence was determined for a region spanning introns 4 and 5 of the three DRB genes (DRB1*0301, DRB2 and DRB3*0101) from a DR52 haplotype and the

Ann-Cathrin Svensson; Niclas Setterblad; Sunna Sigurdardóttir; Lars Rask; Göran Andersson

1995-01-01

174

T cell recognition of self-human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DR peptides in context of syngeneic HLA-DR molecules  

PubMed Central

It has been suggested that self major histocompatibility complex (MHC) peptides bound to self MHC molecules may be involved in the intrathymic induction of self tolerance. We studied the antigenicity of synthetic peptides derived from the first domain of DR beta 1*0101 chain in a DR beta 1*0101 responder. We found that a peptide corresponding to residues 21-42 of the beta chain could elicit the proliferation of autoreactive T cells. A T cell line (TCL-SUN) and 7 of 9 T cell clones (TCC) derived from TCL-SUN specifically recognized peptide 21-42 in the presence of APCs carrying the DR beta 1*0101 allele. DR beta 1*0101 positive APCs stimulated the TCCs in the absence of peptide, although the magnitude of the response was much lower than in cultures with peptide. This suggests that self DR1 molecules are continuously processed into peptides that are presented by the DR1 molecules on the surface of the cells. The data indicate that some T cells whose TCR binds to self MHC peptides presented by self MHC molecules are not deleted, although their ligand is continuously present. TCCs specific for peptide 21-42 presented in the context of DR1 were also stimulated by cells heterozygous for DR beta 1*0301 and 1601, indicating that some DR peptide-specific autoreactive T cells participate in alloreactivity.

1992-01-01

175

GENESI-DR Portal: a scientific gateway to distributed repositories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. "Discovering" which data are available on a "geospatial web" is one of the main challenges ES scientists have to face today. Some well- known data sets are referred to in many places, available from many sources. For core information with a common purpose many copies are distributed, e.g., VMap0, Landsat, and SRTM. Other data sets in low or local demand may only be found in a few places and niche communities. Relevant services, results of analysis, applications and tools are accessible in a very scattered and uncoordinated way, often through individual initiatives from Earth Observation mission operators, scientific institutes dealing with ground measurements, service companies or data catalogues. In the discourse of Spatial Data Infrastructures, there are "catalogue services" - directories containing information on where spatial data and services can be found. For metadata "records" describing spatial data and services, there are "registries". The Geospatial industry coins specifications for search interfaces, where it might do better to reach out to other information retrieval and Internet communities. These considerations are the basis for the GENESI-DR scientific portal, which adopts a simple model allowing the geo-spatial classification and discovery of information as a loosely connected federation of nodes. This network had however to be resilient to node failures and able to scale with the growing addition of new information about data and services. The GENESI-DR scientific portal is still evolving as the project deploys the different components amongst the different partners, but the aim is to provide the connection to information, establish rights, access it and in some cases apply algorithms using the computer power available on the infrastructure with simple interfaces. As information is discovered in the network, it can be further exploited, filtered or enhanced according to the user goals. To implement this vision two specialized graphical interfaces were designed on the portal. The first, concentrates on the text-based search of information, while the second is a command and control of submission and order status on a distributed processing environment. The text search uses natural language features that extract the spatial temporal components from the user query. This is then propagated to the nodes by mapping them to OpenSearch extensions, and then returned to the user as an aggregated list of the resources. These can either be access points to dataset series or services that can be further analysed and processed. At this stage, the user is presented with dedicated interfaces that correspond to context of the action that is performing. Be it a bulk data download, data processing or data mining, the different services offer specialized interfaces that are integrated on the portal. In the overall, the GENESI-DR project identifies best practices and supporting context for the use of a minimal abstract model to loosely connect a federation of Digital Repositories. Surpassing the apparent lack of cost effectiveness of the Spatial Data Infrastructures effort in developing "catalogue services" is achieved by trimming the use cases to the most common and relevant. The GENESI-DR scientific portal is, as such, the visible front-end of a dedicated

Goncalves, Pedro; Brito, Fabrice; D'Andria, Fabio; Cossu, Roberto; Fusco, Luigi

2010-05-01

176

Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules  

PubMed Central

Background MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects a significant gap in knowledge as HLA DP and DQ molecules are presumably equally important, and have only been studied less because they are more difficult to handle experimentally. Results In this study, we aimed to narrow this gap by providing a large scale dataset of over 17,000 HLA-peptide binding affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated their performance. Conclusion We found that 1) prediction methodologies developed for HLA DR molecules perform equally well for DP or DQ molecules. 2) Prediction performances were significantly increased compared to previous reports due to the larger amounts of training data available. 3) The presence of homologous peptides between training and testing datasets should be avoided to give real-world estimates of prediction performance metrics, but the relative ranking of different predictors is largely unaffected by the presence of homologous peptides, and predictors intended for end-user applications should include all training data for maximum performance. 4) The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform the NN-align method, but further research into how to best combine MHC class II binding predictions is required.

2010-01-01

177

My friend Dr Knox: a pupil writes about the anatomist.  

PubMed

Thomas Giordani Wright, a medical apprentice in Newcastle upon Tyne, attended Dr Robert Knox's anatomy classes in Edinburgh between November 1825 and April 1826, only two years before Burke and Hare began murdering people and selling the bodies of their victims to Knox's anatomy school. In March 1829, soon after the crimes came to light and Burke had been found guilty of murder and executed, Wright commented on the case in his diary, describing the practices in the dissection rooms and giving his views on Robert Knox, the teacher who had become his friend. PMID:16353861

Johnson, A

2005-12-01

178

STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.

1995-01-01

179

STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

1996-01-01

180

Dr. von Braun and Army Ballistics Missile Agency (ABMA) Group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph of Dr. von Braun, shown here to the left of General Bruce Medaris, was taken in the fall of 1959, immediately prior to Medaris' retirement from the Army. At the time, von Braun and his associates worked for the Army Ballistics Missile Agency in Huntsville, Alabama. Those in the photograph have been identified as Ernst Stuhlinger, Frederick von Saurma, Fritz Mueller, Hermarn Weidner, E.W. Neubert (partially hidden), W.A. Mrazek, Karl Heimburg, Arthur Rudolph, Otto Hoberg, von Braun, Oswald Lange, Medaris, Helmut Hoelzer, Hans Maus, E.D. Geissler, Hans Heuter, and George Constan.

1959-01-01

181

Dr. Collins and the Case of the Mysterious Infection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this case study, Dr. Collins must diagnose and prescribe treatment for a young patient with a serious infection. Students receive pieces of the case in a progressive disclosure format and answer questions about bacterial infection, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance. The case was designed for the seminar component of a large-enrollment, introductory biology course. In addition to seminar, students in the course also attend lecture and laboratory. Teaching assistants lead the 12-student seminars, during which students engage in directed inquiry exercises such as this case.

Lemons, Paula P.; Huber, Sarah K.

2001-01-01

182

Dr. Christopher Kraft looks over packaged 'parasol' in bldg 10  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Christopher C. Kraft J. (left), JSC Director, and George A Post, JSC Crew Systems Division, look over the packaged 'parasol' during fabrication and checkout of the umbrella-like mechanical device in the Technical Services shop in bldg 10 at JSC. The 'parasol' is designed to fit into the T027 experiment photometer canister. The canopy portion of the 'parasol' measures 24 feet by 22 feet. The 'parasol' is one of several sunscreen possibilities being considered for use in shading the overheated Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop.

1973-01-01

183

Infrared Spectroscopy Data Reduction with ORAC-DR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ORAC-DR is a flexible and extensible data reduction pipeline suitable for both on-line and off-line use. Since its development it has been in use on-line at UKIRT for data from the infrared cameras UFTI and IRCAM and at JCMT for data from the sub-millimetre bolometer array SCUBA. We have now added a suite of on-line reduction recipes that produces publication quality (or nearly so) data from the CGS4 near-infrared spectrometer and the MICHELLE mid-infrared Echelle spectrometer. As an example, this paper briefly describes some pipeline features for one of the more commonly used observing modes.

Economou, F.; Jenness, T.; Cavanagh, B.; Wright, G. S.; Bridger, A. B.; Kerr, T. H.; Hirst, P.; Adamson, A. J.

184

89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at 65 percent completion showing erection process. Antenna system designed and factory construction by D.S. Kennedy & Company., Comasset, MA, 1958. Note scanner radar building in background. Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, 11 July, 1960, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-824. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

185

Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature. Reply to Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek  

SciTech Connect

This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} responds to the comments by Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek regarding the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations. The survival time of the patient may depend on the detection of mosicism; the discussion of the existence of full trisomy 22 remains controversial. 2 refs.

Bacino, C.A.; Graham, J.M. Jr. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1996-03-01

186

Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR- CAFTA): Understanding the Reasons Why the Dominican Republic (DR) Joined the CAFTA Negotiations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2004, the Dominican Republic (DR) joined the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) negotiations, which had been started between the nations of Central America and the United States. For the DR, this was a major step towards permanently opening u...

D. J. Garcia-Rojas

2009-01-01

187

DR 21(OH): A Highly Fragmented, Magnetized, Turbulent Dense Core  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present high angular resolution observations of the massive star-forming core DR21(OH) at 880 ?m using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The dense core exhibits an overall velocity gradient in a Keplerian-like pattern, which breaks at the center of the core where SMA 6 and SMA 7 are located. The dust polarization shows a complex magnetic field, compatible with a toroidal configuration. This is in contrast with the large, parsec-scale filament that surrounds the core, where there is a smooth magnetic field. The total magnetic field strengths in the filament and in the core are 0.9 and 2.1 mG, respectively. We found evidence of magnetic field diffusion at the core scales, far beyond the expected value for ambipolar diffusion. It is possible that the diffusion arises from fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of turbulence. The dynamics of the DR 21(OH) core appear to be controlled energetically in equal parts by the magnetic field, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and the angular momentum. The effect of the angular momentum (this is a fast rotating core) is probably causing the observed toroidal field configuration. Yet, gravitation overwhelms all the forces, making this a clear supercritical core with a mass-to-flux ratio of ~= 6 times the critical value. However, simulations show that this is not enough for the high level of fragmentation observed at 1000 AU scales. Thus, rotation and outflow feedback are probably the main causes of the observed fragmentation.

Girart, J. M.; Frau, P.; Zhang, Q.; Koch, P. M.; Qiu, K.; Tang, Y.-W.; Lai, S.-P.; Ho, P. T. P.

2013-07-01

188

Nonlethal adherence to human neutrophils mediated by Dr antigen-specific adhesins of Escherichia coli.  

PubMed Central

Uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains express a variety of adhesins, including members of the Dr adhesin family such as the Dr hemagglutinin, AFAI, and AFAIII. Certain E. coli adhesins (e.g., type 1 and S fimbriae) are known to mediate adherence to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The receptor on erythrocytes for Dr family adhesins, decay accelerating factor, is also present on PMNs. To determine whether Dr family adhesins mediate adherence to PMNs and to characterize the specificity and consequences of such adherence, we studied agglutination of PMNs and adherence to PMNs by recombinant E. coli strains expressing various mannose-resistant or mannose-sensitive adhesins, in the presence or absence of inhibitors of adherence. Dr family adhesins, like type 1 fimbriae, mediated concentration-dependent adherence to PMNs. Adherence to PMNs was mannose sensitive for type 1 fimbriae but mannose resistant for Dr family adhesins. Chloramphenicol inhibited PMN adherence for the Dr hemagglutinin with the same potency as that with which it inhibited hemagglutination, but it was inactive against PMN adherence and hemagglutination mediated by other members of the Dr adhesin family. In contrast to PMN adherence mediated by type 1 fimbriae, adherence mediated by the Dr hemagglutinin did not lead to significantly increased bacterial killing. These data suggest that Dr family adhesins mediate a novel pattern of adherence to PMNs, probably by recognizing decay accelerating factor, with minimal consequent bacterial killing.

Johnson, J R; Skubitz, K M; Nowicki, B J; Jacques-Palaz, K; Rakita, R M

1995-01-01

189

HLA-DR signaling inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis in A375 melanoma cells.  

PubMed

Although melanocytes are devoid of the human major histocompatibility complex class II (HLA II) molecules, melanomas often display constitutive expression of these molecules, particularly HLA-DR. This constitutive expression of HLA-DR molecules is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis but the molecular basis for this association remains poorly understood. Within the hypothesis of a role in immune escape, we analyzed the regulation of Fas-mediated apoptosis by HLA-DR signaling in the HLA-DR-positive malignant melanoma cell line A375. Our study demonstrates that engagement of HLA-DR molecules with anti-HLA-DR-specific monoclonal antibody L243 significantly reduces Fas-mediated apoptosis; DNA fragmentation and cell death were decreased by 50% and 40%, respectively. We found that while HLA-DR signaling does not affect Fas receptor expression, it significantly reduces Fas-induced activation of caspase-8 and Bid. Furthermore, inhibition studies and expression of dominant negative form of Mek-1 demonstrated that HLA-DR-mediated inhibition of caspase-8/Bid activation and apoptosis are dependent on the activation of the MAPK/Erk pathway. Together, our results provide evidence that HLA-DR signaling activates the MAPK/Erk pathway in A375 melanoma cells, which has a functional role in the resistance of these cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis. These observations underline the potential importance that HLA-DR signaling might have in melanoma immune escape and tumor progression. PMID:15302575

Aoudjit, Fawzi; Guo, Wenyan; Gagnon-Houde, Jean-Vincent; Castaigne, Jean-Gabriel; Alcaide-Loridan, Catherine; Charron, Dominique; Al-Daccak, Reem

2004-09-10

190

Examination of HLA-DR4 as a severity marker for rheumatoid arthritis in Greek patients.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES--Previous reports have shown that HLA-DR4 may be a severity marker for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients of northern European origin. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relation in Greek patients with RA, as RA in Greece differs from the RA described previously on clinical, serological, and immunological grounds. METHODS--Eighty four patients were studied in whom HLA-DR typing was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism and the subtypes of HLA-DR4 were determined by the polymerase chain reaction. The absence or presence of HLA-DR4 and its subtypes was correlated with the clinical and serological characteristics of the patients and with the side effects due to disease modifying drugs. RESULTS--Twenty one of the 84 (25%) patients with RA were DR4+. There was no difference between the DR4+ and DR4-patients with respect to duration of disease, severity of arthritis, functional grade, and joint erosion score. The DR4+ group were more likely to have side effects due to disease modifying drugs (43%) than DR4- patients (36%), but this difference was not statistically significant. DR4-patients had more extra-articular manifestations, including Sjögren's syndrome (47 v 19%). Analysis of the DR4 subtypes showed that Dw15 was the most common variant (9/21 patients; 43%). There was no statistical difference in the clinical manifestations among patients with different DR4 subtypes. The same was also true when the clinical picture was correlated with the 'shared RA epitope' (QKRAA/QRRAA/RRRAA), which is common to all HLA-DRB1 alleles positively associated with RA. CONCLUSIONS--These results suggest that HLA-DR4 is not a severity marker in Greek patients with RA and further indicate differences in the clinical expression of RA in Greece.

Boki, K A; Drosos, A A; Tzioufas, A G; Lanchbury, J S; Panayi, G S; Moutsopoulos, H M

1993-01-01

191

Hepatitis C Virus Sensitizes Host Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis by Up-Regulating DR4 and DR5 via a MEK1-Dependent Pathway  

PubMed Central

Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the leading cause of liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is believed that continuous liver cell apoptosis contributes to HCV pathogenesis. Recent studies have shown that HCV infection can sensitize host cells to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced apoptosis, but the mechanism by which HCV regulates the TRAIL pathway remains unclear. Methods and Results Using a sub-genomic replicon and full length virus, JFH-1, we demonstrate that HCV can sensitize host cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulating two TRAIL receptors, death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5). Furthermore, the HCV replicon enhanced transcription of DR5 via Sp1, and the HCV-mediated up-regulation of DR4 and DR5 required MEK1 activity. HCV infection also stimulated the activity of MEK1, and the inhibition of MEK1 activity or the knockdown of MEK1 increased the replication of HCV. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that HCV replication sensitizes host cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulating DR4 and DR5 via a MEK1 dependent pathway. These findings may help to further understand the pathogenesis of HCV infection and provide a therapeutic target.

Deng, Zhongfan; Yan, Huijuan; Hu, Jiajie; Zhang, Shengwei; Peng, Peng; Liu, Qingzhen; Guo, Deyin

2012-01-01

192

[Portrait of Dr Milenko Petrovi? (1884-1950)].  

PubMed

Dr Milenko Petrovi? was one of the very distinguished physicians in the history of Sombor city, who significantly contributed to the development of health care in Voivodina. His father Dimitrije was a professor in the High Teacher-training School in Sombor, recognized writer and politician of his epoch. He was born in Sombor in 1884, where he was educated and finished grammar school. For medical studies he moved to Budapest as a boarder of the famous Tekelianum, and graduated in 1908. He started specialisation in surgery, but being a great patriot he voluntarily recruited in the Serbian army to fight in Balkan liberation wars against Turkey. For his excellent work as a war surgeon he obtained many recognitions. After completing specialization in surgery in Debrecin, he returned to his native city Sombor, where he intended to practice as a physician, but because af the outbreak of the first world he was mobilized and sent to the front in Galicia. After the war he again returned to Sombor where he was immediatelly nominated for the main county physician and then begins his fruitful many year's work on the establishment and promotion of the health care in Sombor and broader territory. As the main county phsician he initiated the foundation and construction of the hospital in Sombor, because of high mortality rate among children, and spreading of contagious diseases like tuberculosis and trachoma. The construction of the hospital was completed in 1925 and Dr. Petrovi? was appointed its first director and this duty he performed for many years till the World War 2 in 1941. Under his management the hospital in Sombor became one of the best quality hospitals in the country and gave a big contribution to the promotion of health of the inhabitants of Voivodina. In spite of his extensive duties in the hospital. Dr. Milenko Petrovi? was very much engaged in social work, as the president of library "Laza Kosti ?". in the Soko association, Fire brigade, Rotary club, and he was a collaborator in the Red cross, Adriatic guard, and in Church community. Since 1930 he worked as a professor of Hygiene in the High Teacher-training School, just like his father. He was arrested and persecuted not only during the Seecond World War, but after the war as well by communist authorities, because he was regarded as nationalist, monarchist, and anticommunist. He died unrecognized in 1950, and now finally came the time for objective evaluation and recognition of his valuable professsional work. PMID:19368288

Kljai?, Leposava; Borota, Radoslav

2008-01-01

193

Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.  

PubMed

A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain. PMID:2715056

Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

1989-05-01

194

Identification and functional characterization of DR6, a novel death domain-containing TNF receptor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tumor nectosis factor (TNF) receptors are key players in inflammation and immune regulation. A new member of this family, termed death receptor-6 (DR6), has been identified. Like other death receptors, DR6 is a type I transmembrane receptor, possesses four extracellular cysteine-rich motifs and a cytoplasmic death domain. DR6 is expressed in most human tissues and abundant transcript was detected in

Guohua Pan; Johannes H Bauer; Valsala Haridas; Shuxia Wang; Ding Liu; Guoliang Yu; Claudius Vincenz; Bharat B Aggarwal; Jian Ni; Vishva M Dixit

1998-01-01

195

In vitro Antibacterial Activity of DR3355, the S-(––)Isomer of Ofloxacin  

Microsoft Academic Search

DR-3355, the S-(––)-isomer of ofloxacin, possessed generally twice higher activity than ofloxacin, and its action was bactericidal. The difference in antibacterial activity of these compounds was attributable to their inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase. DR-3355 was characterized by its higher potency against gram-positive cocci and obligate anaerobes than ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. DR-3355 was somewhat less potent than ciprofloxacin against Entewbacteriaceae

Teruo Fujimoto; Susumu Mitsuhashi

1990-01-01

196

The bactericidal activity of DR3355, an optically active isomer of ofloxacin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. The bactericidal activity of compound DR-3355, an optically active isomer of ofloxacin, was measured against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis, in nutrient broth and in phosphate-buffered saline. DR-3355 was found to be approximately twice as active as ofloxacin in terms of the concentration at which maximum bacterial kill was achieved. Hence it appears that DR-3355 is twice

C. S. Lewin; S. G. B. Amyes

1989-01-01

197

105DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of

Knaus

1995-01-01

198

Differences in Self-peptide Binding between T1D-related Susceptible and Protective DR4 Subtypes  

PubMed Central

HLA-DR0401, 0403 and 0405 are associated with variable T1D susceptibilities when linked with a common HLA-DQ8 (DQA1*0301/DQB1*0302). It is unknown how the modest differences within the peptide binding regions of DR4 subtypes lead to distinct autoimmune risks. Since all Class II HLA molecules share the same intracellular compartments during biosynthesis, it is possible that DQ and DR compete with one another to bind and present antigenic peptides. As such, it is reasonable to hypothesize that a strong DR4 self-peptide binder down-modulates DQ8 epitope presentation more than a weak one. In this study, we first examined the binding of the peptides derived from two putative beta-cell autoantigens – GAD65 and insulin. Protective DR0403 bound similar number of self-peptides as susceptible DR0401 while highly susceptible DR0405 bound substantially less self-peptides than rest two molecules. Kinetic assays were used to further compare the stability of peptide:DR complexes formed between DR0401, 0403 and selected GAD65 peptides, which also bound DQ8. Two peptides with naturally processed DQ8 epitopes bound protective DR0403 with longer half-life and lower dissociation rate than susceptible DR0401, confirming DR0403 as a better peptide competitor than DR0401. The distinguishing peptide binding features of DR0401, DR0403, and DR0405 highlighted in this study help to explain the hierarchy of genetic associations between T1D and these DR4 subtypes. The enhanced peptide competition of DR0403 leads to a down-modulation of DQ8 epitope presentation, as compared to weak competitors such as DR0401 and DR0405, and therefore contributes to disease protection.

Ge, Xinhui; James, Eddie A.; Reijonen, Helena; Kwok, William W.

2011-01-01

199

XCS-DR1 Cluster Catalogue (Mehrtens+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 256 are new to the literature and 357 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 463 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06

Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Hilton, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Hosmer, M.; Hoyle, B.; Collins, C. A.; Liddle, A. R.; Viana, P. T. P.; Nichol, R. C.; Stott, J. P.; Dubois, E. N.; Kay, S. T.; Sahlen, M.; Young, O.; Short, C. J.; Christodoulou, L.; Watson, W. A.; Davidson, M.; Harrison, C. D.; Baruah, L.; Smith, M.; Burke, C.; Mayers, J. A.; Deadman, P.-J.; Rooney, P. J.; Edmondson, E. M.; West, M.; Campbell, H. C.; Edge, A. C.; Mann, R. G.; Sabirli, K.; Wake, D.; Benoist, C.; da Costa, L.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R.

2013-04-01

200

SDSS DR7 white dwarf catalog (Kleinman+, 2013)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here, we report on the white dwarf catalog built from the SDSS DR7 (Cat. II/294). We have applied automated techniques supplemented by complete, consistent human identifications of each candidate white dwarf spectrum. We make use of the latest SDSS reductions and white dwarf model atmosphere improvements in our spectral fits, providing logg and Teff determinations for each identified clean DA and DB where we use the word "clean" to identify spectra that show only features of non-magnetic, nonmixed, DA or DB stars. Our catalog includes all white dwarf stars from the earlier Kleinman et al. (2004, Cat. J/ApJ/607/426) and Eisenstein et al. (2006, Cat. J/ApJS/167/40) catalogs, although occasionally with different identifications. (1 data file).

Kleinman, S. J.; Kepler, S. O.; Koester, D.; Pelisoli, I.; Pecanha, V.; Nitta, A.; Costa, J. E. S.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, C.-W.; Harris, H. C.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

2013-01-01

201

Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella in simulated low-g  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

2003-01-01

202

Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studying Salmonella at Tulane University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Cheryl Nickerson (right) of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

2003-01-01

203

Emily and Dr. Haskins Classroom Expectations, Pragmatics, and Clinical Acumen  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case study on clinical practice, preparation, and acumen follows the story of Emily, an intelligent, hard working, and motivated student who yet encounters difficulties in the clinical fieldwork component of her senior seminar. A follow-up section of the case switches to the perspective of Dr. Haskins, Emily’s supervisor in the clinic, who sees in Emily a student ill-prepared to deal with clients. Students read the case study and discuss a series of open-ended questions that explore various aspects of performing and supervising clinical fieldwork. The case can be used in introductory survey courses in the allied health field or education, with advanced students about to start their fieldwork, or with students finishing graduate work and about to become supervisors themselves.

Behrens, Susan; Carozza, Linda

2007-01-01

204

A 10,000 YEAR OLD EXPLOSION IN DR21  

SciTech Connect

Sensitive high angular resolution ({approx}2'') CO(2-1) line observations made with the Submillimeter Array of the flow emanating from the high-mass star-forming region DR21 located in the Cygnus X molecular cloud are presented. These new interferometric observations indicate that this well known enigmatic outflow appears to have been produced by an explosive event that took place about 10,000 years ago, and that might be related to the disintegration of a massive stellar system such as the one that occurred in Orion Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinman-Low 500 years ago, but about 20 times more energetic. This result therefore argues in favor of the idea that the disintegration of young stellar systems perhaps is a frequent phenomenon present during the formation of massive stars. However, many more theoretical and observational studies are still needed to confirm our hypothesis.

Zapata, Luis A.; Perez-Goytia, Nadia; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Schmid-Burgk, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-264, 04510 DF (Mexico)

2013-03-10

205

Dr. Richard Grugel examines an ampoule of a succinonitrile mixture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Earth when scientists melt metals, bubbles that form in the molten material can rise to the surface, pop and disappear. In microgravity -- the near-weightless environment created as the International Space Station orbits Earth -- the lighter bubbles do not rise and disappear. Prior space experiments have shown that bubbles often become trapped in the final metal or crystal sample -similar to the bubbles trapped in this sample. In the solid, these bubbles, or porosity, are defects that diminish both the material's strength and usefulness. The Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation will melt samples of a transparent modeling material, succinonitrile and succinonitrile water mixtures, shown here in an ampoule being examined by Dr. Richard Grugel, the principal investigator for the experiment at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. As the samples are processed in space, Grugel will be able to observe how bubbles form in the samples and study their movements and interactions.

2003-01-01

206

SPECTRO-ASTROMETRY OF WATER IN DR TAURI  

SciTech Connect

We present high-resolution, near-infrared spectro-astrometric (SA) data for the T Tauri star DR Tau using NIRSPEC at the Keck II telescope. Spectro-astrometry obtains sub-seeing spatial information from emission lines originating in a non-point source object, such as a circumstellar disk. We report the first detection of water SA signatures in a protoplanetary disk. Three water features near 3 {mu}m were averaged together to produce the total signal analyzed. Using a disk model, we constrained the position angle of the disk ({approx}140 Degree-Sign ), the inclination of the disk ({approx}13 Degree-Sign ), and the emitting region of the emission lines ({approx}0.056-0.38 AU).

Brown, Logan R.; Troutman, Matthew R.; Gibb, Erika L., E-mail: lrbv3b@mail.umsl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 503 Benton Hall, One University Boulevard, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States)

2013-06-10

207

User's Manual for FEMOM3DR. Version 1.0  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

FEMoM3DR is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute radiation characteristics of antennas on 3D body using combined Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique. The code is written to handle different feeding structures like coaxial line, rectangular waveguide, and circular waveguide. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM and triangular elements with roof-top basis functions for MoM. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrary shaped three dimensional bodies with inhomogeneous lossy materials; and due to MoM the computational domain can be terminated in any arbitrary shape. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computers on which the code is intended to run.

Reddy, C. J.

1998-01-01

208

Dr. von Braun Standing by Five F-1 Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pioneer of America's space program, Dr. von Braun stands by the five F-1 engines of the Saturn V launch vehicle. This Saturn V vehicle is an actual test vehicle which has been displayed at the U.S. Space Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Designed and developed by Rocketdyne under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, a cluster of five F-1 engines was mounted on the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage. The engines measured 19-feet tall by 12.5-feet at the nozzle exit and burned 15 tons of liquid oxygen and kerosene each second to produce 7,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of a 364-foot long rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon.

2004-01-01

209

DR 21(OH): A HIGHLY FRAGMENTED, MAGNETIZED, TURBULENT DENSE CORE  

SciTech Connect

We present high angular resolution observations of the massive star-forming core DR21(OH) at 880 {mu}m using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The dense core exhibits an overall velocity gradient in a Keplerian-like pattern, which breaks at the center of the core where SMA 6 and SMA 7 are located. The dust polarization shows a complex magnetic field, compatible with a toroidal configuration. This is in contrast with the large, parsec-scale filament that surrounds the core, where there is a smooth magnetic field. The total magnetic field strengths in the filament and in the core are 0.9 and 2.1 mG, respectively. We found evidence of magnetic field diffusion at the core scales, far beyond the expected value for ambipolar diffusion. It is possible that the diffusion arises from fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of turbulence. The dynamics of the DR 21(OH) core appear to be controlled energetically in equal parts by the magnetic field, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and the angular momentum. The effect of the angular momentum (this is a fast rotating core) is probably causing the observed toroidal field configuration. Yet, gravitation overwhelms all the forces, making this a clear supercritical core with a mass-to-flux ratio of {approx_equal} 6 times the critical value. However, simulations show that this is not enough for the high level of fragmentation observed at 1000 AU scales. Thus, rotation and outflow feedback are probably the main causes of the observed fragmentation.

Girart, J. M.; Frau, P. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Zhang, Q. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koch, P. M.; Tang, Y.-W.; Lai, S.-P.; Ho, P. T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Qiu, K., E-mail: girart@ice.cat [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2013-07-20

210

Introducing Dr. Varga and Some of His Ideas for Probability in the Junior School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dr. Varga's description of the beginning of the Hungarian Project (primary mathematics) is recorded along with two examples of assignments to generate exploration and discussion involving probability. (MN)

Sherwood, Philip

1978-01-01

211

HLA-DR and -DQ phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND—Susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is partially genetically determined and the HLA class II genes are candidates for a role in genetic susceptibility to IBD, because their products play a central role in the immune response. Multiple studies have reported associations between HLA-DR or -DQ phenotypes and either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, but much of the data are still controversial.?AIMS—To estimate overall associations between HLA class II phenotypes and IBD, and to establish the relative risk conferred by HLA-DR and -DQ phenotypes by meta-analysis.?METHODS—Medline was searched for publications reporting on the relation between IBD and HLA class II phenotypes. Raw data were extracted by recalculating the number of phenotypes or the number of alleles of the main antigens. Odds ratios and confidence intervals were calculated according to the Mantel-Haenszel method.?RESULTS—DR2, DR9, and DRB1*0103 were positively associated with ulcerative colitis, and a negative association was found for DR4 and ulcerative colitis. For Crohn's disease a positive association was found with DR7, DRB3*0301, and DQ4 and a negative association with DR2 and DR3.?CONCLUSIONS—Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are associated with specific HLA class II phenotypes. Further analysis of these phenotypes and subgroup analysis may elucidate how these alleles contribute to susceptibility to IBD.???Keywords: ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease; HLA-DR; HLA-DQ

Stokkers, P; Reitsma, P; Tytgat, G; van Deventer, S J H

1999-01-01

212

DR3(w18),DQw4 Haplotype Differs from DR3(w17),DQw2 Haplotypes at Multiple Class II Loci.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The polymorphism of HLA class II molecules in man is particularly evident when comparisons between population groups are made. This study describes a DR3 haplotype commonly present in the American black population. Unlike the Northern European population,...

C. K. Hurley F. M. Robbins J. Gorski N. Steiner P. K. Gregersen

1989-01-01

213

Experimental and clinical characteristics in myelodysplastic syndrome patients with or without HLA-DR15 allele.  

PubMed

We studied the effects of the presence of the HLA-DR15 allele on the experimental and clinical features of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) by assessing the clinical data of 136 patients with MDS. We observed that the frequency of HLA-DR15 expression in MDS patients (38.7%) was significantly higher than that in the healthy controls (p < 0.01). We noted the following observations with regard to disease progression: None of the 46 HLA-DR15 positive patients with international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scores DR15-negative patients with the same IPSS score developed AML within a shorter follow-up period (p = 0.039). Furthermore, the incidence of poor chromosomal abnormalities, the percentage of patients with IPSS scores >or=1.5 and the presence of >or=5% blasts in the bone marrow in the DR15-positive patients were lower than the corresponding findings in the DR15-negative patients. In addition, we also recorded the following observations with regard to bone marrow (BM) failure: The bicytopenia/pancytopenia ratio in the DR15-positive patients was higher than that in the DR15-negative patients (92.4 vs. 78.3%; p = 0.029). The peripheral-neutrophil count and the platelet count in the DR15-positive patients were lower than those in the DR15-negative patients (p = 0.028 and p = 0.011, respectively). Moreover, hypocellularity was more easily detectable in the DR15-positive patients (26.4 vs. 16.9%). In addition, the BM CD4+ lymphocyte count and the CD4/CD8 ratio in the DR15-positive patients were higher than the corresponding values in the DR15-negative patients (p < 0.05 for both). However, there were no significant differences between the polarization of T-helper (T(h)) and T-cytotoxic (T(c)) cells and the cytokine levels in these two patient groups. We concluded that the presence of the HLA-DR15 allele is indicative of a genetic susceptibility to MDS and, the presence of the HLA-DR15 allele showed less association with disease progression and greater association with BM failure. PMID:19593744

Xiao, Li; Qiong, Liao; Yan, Zhang; Zheng, Zhang; Luxi, Song; Li, Xu; Ying, Tao; Yizhi, Liu; Quan, Pu

2010-06-01

214

Early onset of diabetes in the proband is the major determinant of risk in HLA DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 siblings.  

PubMed

Islet autoimmunity is initiated in infancy, and primary prevention trials require children at high genetic risk to be identified before autoantibodies appear. To inform screening strategies, we evaluated risks of autoimmunity and diabetes associated with HLA DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 in U.K. families. Extended HLA haplotypes were determined in 2,134 siblings from the Bart's-Oxford Study followed to a median age of 22 years. Risks of diabetes and islet autoimmunity (more than two antibodies) were estimated by survival analysis. Of 138 informative DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 siblings, 63% shared both haplotypes with their diabetic proband, 29% shared one, and 8% shared neither. In HLA-identical DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 siblings, the cumulative risk of diabetes by age 15 was 17% (vs. 6% in those sharing one haplotype or none; P = 0.095). Risk varied, however, with the age at the onset of diabetes in the proband; the cumulative risk of autoimmunity and/or diabetes by age 15 was 61% in siblings of probands diagnosed when younger than 10 years old compared with only 4.7% in those diagnosed after age 10 years (P < 0.001). The age of the proband at diagnosis, but not HLA haplotype sharing, was an independent determinant of sibling risk. This suggests that non-HLA genes or epigenetic/environmental factors that accelerate the progression of type 1 diabetes in the proband strongly affect risk in siblings. PMID:24203724

Gillespie, Kathleen M; Aitken, Rachel J; Wilson, Isabel; Williams, Alistair J K; Bingley, Polly J

2014-03-01

215

Star Formation in the DR21 Region (A)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

The colorful image (top panel) is a large-scale composite mosaic assembled from data collected at a variety of different wavelengths. Views at visible wavelengths appear blue, near-infrared light is depicted as green, and mid-infrared data from the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is portrayed as red. The result is a contrast between structures seen in visible light (blue) and those observed in the infrared (yellow and red). A quick glance shows that most of the action in this image is revealed to the unique eyes of Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon.

Each of the constituent images is shown below the large mosaic. The Digital Sky Survey (DSS) image (lower left) provides a familiar view of deep space, with stars scattered around a dark field. The reddish hue is from gas heated by foreground stars in this region. This fluorescence fades away in the near-infrared Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) image (lower center), but other features start to appear through the obscuring clouds of dust, now increasingly transparent. Many more stars are discerned in this image because near-infrared light pierces through some of the obscuration of the interstellar dust. Note that some stars seen as very bright in the visible image are muted in the near-infrared image, whereas other stars become more prominent. Embedded nebulae revealed in the Spitzer image are only hinted at in this picture.

The Spitzer image (lower right) provides a vivid contrast to the other component images, revealing star-forming complexes and large-scale structures otherwise hidden from view. The Spitzer image is composed of photographs obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of nearly 10,000 light-years.

The red filaments stretching across the Spitzer image denote the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These organic molecules, comprised of carbon and hydrogen, are excited by surrounding interstellar radiation and become luminescent at wavelengths near 8 microns. The complex pattern of filaments is caused by an intricate combination of radiation pressure, gravity, and magnetic fields. The result is a tapestry in which winds, outflows, and turbulence move and shape the interstellar medium.

2004-01-01

216

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Amelie G. Ramirez, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.  

Cancer.gov

Amelie G. Ramirez, Dr.P.H., is a Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where she also is founding director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research, which researches health disparities. In 2006, Dr.

217

Enhancing Anti-Breast Cancer Immunity by Blocking Death Receptor DR5.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As described in the 2008 progress report, the revised hypothesis is that agonist DR5 Ab induced by DNA vaccination will trigger tumor cell apoptosis without compromising T cell activity. The specific aims are to (1)Construct and test DR5 vaccines to induc...

W. Wei

2009-01-01

218

Kinetic analysis of peptide loading onto HLA-DR molecules mediated by HLA-DM.  

PubMed Central

The nonclassical major histocompatibility complex class II molecule HLA-DM (DM) has recently been shown to play a central role in the class II-associated antigen presentation pathway: DM releases invariant chain-derived CLIP peptides (class II-associated invariant chain protein peptide) from HLA-DR (DR) molecules and thereby facilitates loading with antigenic peptides. Some observations have led to the suggestion that DM acts in a catalytic manner, but so far direct proof is missing. Here, we investigated in vitro the kinetics of exchange of endogenously bound CLIP for various peptides on DR1 and DR2a molecules: we found that in the presence of DM the peptide loading process follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics with turnover numbers of 3-12 DR molecules per minute per DM molecule, and with KM values of 500-1000 nM. In addition, surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that DM interacts efficiently with DR-CLIP complexes but only weakly with DR-peptide complexes isolated from DM-positive cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence that DM functions as an enzyme-like catalyst of peptide exchange and favors the generation of long-lived DR-peptide complexes that are no longer substrates for DM.

Vogt, A B; Kropshofer, H; Moldenhauer, G; Hammerling, G J

1996-01-01

219

Web Conference with Dr. Hans Keirstead: Stem Cells and Human Disease  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a 2009 web conference between Dr. Has Keirstead at UCI and an undergraduate class of Dr. Michael Barresi at Smith College. The primary literature discussed is listed on the web site. There are some audio problems with the conference, but the impact of the material is significant so we have submitted it in spite of this.

PhD Michael JF Barresi (Smith College Biological Sciences)

2009-11-30

220

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Sora Park Tanjasiri, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Sora Park Tanjasiri is a Professor in the Department of Health Science at California State University, Fullerton. Her work focuses on the community health needs of diverse populations, with a focus on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). Dr. Tanjasiri's research involves participatory action research principles and techniques, and her health issues of interest include tobacco prevention, cancer early detection, and cancer control.

221

CRCHD Principal Investigator: Sora Park Tanjasiri, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Sora Park Tanjasiri is a Professor in the Department of Health Science at California State University, Fullerton. Her work focuses on the community health needs of diverse populations, with a focus on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). Dr. Tanjasiri's research involves participatory action research principles and techniques, and her health issues of interest include tobacco prevention, cancer early detection, and cancer control.

222

Dr. James McGee shows three astronauts how to handle non-poisonous snake  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. James W. McGee (right), Medical Operations Office, Manned Spacecraft Center, shows three astronauts how to handle a non-poisonous snake during desert survival training in Washington state. Left to right, are Astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly, Alfred M. Worden, and John L. Swigert Jr.; and Dr. McGee. The astronauts are dressed in faked Arab clothing.

1967-01-01

223

Expression and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Maize Transposable Element MuDR and Its Derivatives  

PubMed Central

The transposition of Mu elements underlying Mutator activity in maize requires a transcriptionally active MuDR element. Despite variation in MuDR copy number and RNA levels in Mutator lines, transposition events are consistently late in plant development, and Mu excision frequencies are similar. Here, we report previously unsuspected and ubiquitous MuDR homologs that produce both RNA and protein. MuDR transcript levels are proportional to MuDR copy number, and homolog transcript levels increase in active Mutator lines. A subset of homologs exhibits constitutive transcription in MuDR? and epigenetically silenced MuDR lines, suggesting independent transcriptional regulation. Surprisingly, immunodetection demonstrated nearly invariant levels of MuDR and homolog protein products in all tested Mutator and non-Mutator stocks. These results suggest a strict control over protein production, which might explain the uniform excision frequency of Mu elements. Moreover, the nonfunctional proteins encoded by homologs may negatively regulate Mutator activity and represent part of the host defense against this transposon family.

Rudenko, George N.; Walbot, Virginia

2001-01-01

224

Dr. Moon Chen: The Insights of a Cancer Scientist Addressing Asian American Cancer Disparities  

Cancer.gov

Throughout most of his career, Dr. Moon S. Chen, Jr. has sought to address Asian American cancer health disparities through research, outreach, and training. He has also helped NCI reach out to the Asian American community to educate this community about cancer. As part of the “Meet the Researchers” series, Dr. Chen shares his insights with Lifelines.

225

Laboratory Evaluation of the Hach DR-EL Direct Reading, Portable Engineers' Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hach DR-EL colorimeter has been observed in a number of wastewater treatment plant laboratories about the state where they are presumably being used for routine laboratory analyses. The Hach DR-EL, will be an excellent contribution to wastewater treat...

W. S. Midkiff F. Cadena-Cepeda E. T. Davidson P. E. McGinnis

1972-01-01

226

A DR6/p75NTR complex is responsible for ?-amyloid-induced cortical neuron death  

PubMed Central

The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a known mediator of ?-amyloid (A?)-induced neurotoxicity implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we demonstrate that death receptor 6 (DR6) binds to p75NTR and is a component of the p75NTR signaling complex responsible for A?-induced cortical neuron death. Cortical neurons isolated from either DR6 or p75NTR null mice are resistant to A?-induced neurotoxicity. Blocking DR6 function in cortical neurons by anti-DR6 antibodies that block the binding of DR6 to p75NTR receptor complex or by a dominant negative DR6 construct lacking the cytoplasmic signaling death domain attenuates A?-induced caspase 3 activation and cell death. DR6 expression is upregulated in AD cortex and correlates with elevated neuronal death. Targeting the disruption of the DR6/p75NTR complex to prevent A? cytotoxicity represents a new approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as AD.

Hu, Y; Lee, X; Shao, Z; Apicco, D; Huang, G; Gong, B J; Pepinsky, R B; Mi, S

2013-01-01

227

Hybrid-dimension association rules for diseases track record analysis at Dr. Soetomo General Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. Soetomo General Hospital already has a Hospital Information System which has been computerized for data storage of each recapitulated patient's disease. Since data recapitulated the patient's disease is increasing, Dr. Soetomo Hospital needed an application which can provide information for decision makers. One application that can help in decision making is data mining. Data mining with hybrid-dimension association rules

Silvia Rostianingsih; Gregorius Satia Budhi; Ni Wayan Yessy Dwijayanti

2011-01-01

228

HLA-DR?1 constructs block CD74 expression and MIF effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.  

PubMed

CD74, the cell-surface form of the MHC class II invariant chain, is a key inflammatory factor that is involved in various immune-mediated diseases as part of the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) binding complex. However, little is known about the natural regulators of CD74 in this context. In order to study the role of the HLA-DR molecule in regulating CD74, we used the HLA-DR?1 domain, which was shown to bind to and downregulate CD74 on CD11b(+) monocytes. We found that DR?1 directly inhibited binding of MIF to CD74 and blocked its downstream inflammatory effects in the spinal cord of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Potency of the DR?1 domain could be destroyed by trypsin digestion but enhanced by addition of a peptide extension (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein [MOG]-35-55 peptide) that provided secondary structure not present in DR?1. These data suggest a conformationally sensitive determinant on DR?1-MOG that is responsible for optimal binding to CD74 and antagonism of MIF effects, resulting in reduced axonal damage and reversal of ongoing clinical and histological signs of EAE. These results demonstrate natural antagonist activity of DR?1 for MIF that was strongly potentiated by the MOG peptide extension, resulting in a novel therapeutic, DR?1-MOG-35-55, that within the limitations of the EAE model may have the potential to treat autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:24683185

Meza-Romero, Roberto; Benedek, Gil; Yu, Xiaolin; Mooney, Jeffery L; Dahan, Rony; Duvshani, Nerri; Bucala, Richard; Offner, Halina; Reiter, Yoram; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A

2014-05-01

229

Verification of the code DYN3D/R with the help of international benchmarks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Different benchmarks for reactors with quadratic fuel assemblies were calculated with the code DYN3D/R. In this report comparisons with the results of the reference solutions are carried out. The results of DYN3D/R and the reference calculation for the ei...

U. Grundmann U. Rohde

1997-01-01

230

Portrait of a transformational leader: the legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the leadership of Dr Martin Luther King Jr in relation to four characteristics of transformational leadership Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper draws upon excerpts from archival sources of personal correspondence and statements by Dr Martin Luther King Jr stored at the King Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Findings – The research finds that

David McGuire; Kate Hutchings

2007-01-01

231

The relationship between homeopathy and the Dr Bach system of flower remedies: A critical appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between homeopathy and the Dr Bach system of flower remedies is explored. A historical perspective is given, doctrinal similarities and dissimilarities between both systems are discussed and the relationship between remedies used in homeopathy as well as in Dr Bach's system of flower remedies is explored. It is concluded that although both systems are clearly different, some common

RA van Haselen

1999-01-01

232

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan  

SciTech Connect

This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The LSFF was established to investigate fire fighting and safety associated with alkali metal fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities. The decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan identifies the decontamination procedures, sampling locations, any special handling requirements, quality control samples, required chemical analysis, and data validation needed to meet the requirements of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Knaus, Z.C.

1995-06-12

233

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. Nadine Foreman, M.D., August 19, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Nadine Foreman was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Foreman was selected for interview because of the position she held at the University of California, San Francisco. Following a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Foreman describes her work with Dr. Mayo Soley using I-131 in treatment of hyperthyroidism, selection criteria for patients in the radioiodine project, work with Dr. Earl Miller, work at Highland Hospital, radioiodine treatment of diffuse toxic goiter (myxedema), the radiophosphorus and radioiodine programs with Dr. Bert Low-Beer, and treatment of polycythemia vera.

NONE

1995-07-01

234

Dr. Monaco Examines Lab-on a-Chip  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Lisa Monaco, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) project scientist for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development (LOCAD) program, examines a lab on a chip. The small dots are actually ports where fluids and chemicals can be mixed or samples can be collected for testing. Tiny channels, only clearly visible under a microscope, form pathways between the ports. Many chemical and biological processes, previously conducted on large pieces of laboratory equipment, can now be performed on these small glass or plastic plates. Monaco and other researchers at MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama, are customizing the chips to be used for many space applications, such as monitoring microbes inside spacecraft and detecting life on other planets. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the International Space Station (ISS), the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

2003-01-01

235

Three Moving Groups Detected in the LAMOST DR1 Archive  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze the kinematics of thick disk and halo stars observed by the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope. We have constructed a sample of 7993 F, G, and K nearby main-sequence stars (d < 2 kpc) with estimates of position (x, y, z) and space velocity (U, V, W) based on color and proper motion from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR9 catalog. Three "phase-space overdensities" are identified in (V, \\sqrt{U^{2}+2V^{2}}) with significance levels of ? > 3. Two of them (the Hyades-Pleiades stream and the Arcturus-AF06 stream) have been identified previously. We also find evidence for a new stream (centered at V ~ -180 km s-1) in the halo. The formation mechanisms of these three streams are analyzed. Our results support the hypothesis that the Arcturus-AF06 stream and the new stream originated from the debris of a disrupted satellite, while the Hyades-Pleiades stream has a dynamical origin.

Zhao, J. K.; Zhao, G.; Chen, Y. Q.; Oswalt, T. D.; Tan, K. F.; Zhang, Y.

2014-05-01

236

Cholera, canals, and contagion: Rediscovering Dr. Beck's report.  

PubMed

Cholera first appeared in North America (in Montreal and Quebec) in 1832 and spread rapidly across the eastern half of the continent. The dispatch of American disease control experts to Lower Canada in anticipation of cholera's spread implies that medical professionals expected spread, possibly from contagion, even though the notion that cholera was contagious was disparaged in medical writings of the time, and would be until John Snow's landmark work in London in the 1850s. Snow's insights derived largely from his observations on spatial and temporal patterns of cholera cases. We discuss a document from the 1832 epidemic, the report of Dr. Lewis Beck to New York's Governor Throop, which anticipates Snow in presenting geospatial data that imply cholera's contagiousness. Beck shows that the movements of immigrants along the newly completed New York state canal system resulted in sequential cholera outbreaks along the canal's path. Although aware of the degree to which this suggested contagion, Beck argues strenuously against the contagiousness of cholera. We explore the social context of early nineteenth-century medicine that probably led Beck to disbelieve his own observations, and to favor a medical model inconsistent with his data. Themes that emerge from our inquiry include belief in disease as a physical manifestation of defective morality, stigmatization of the poor and immigrant groups, and reluctance to overturn prevailing medical models that themselves reflected the economic position of medical practitioners. We show that these themes continue to serve as obstacles to innovation in medical and public health practice today. PMID:21544099

Tuite, Ashleigh R; Chan, Christina H; Fisman, David N

2011-08-01

237

2012 DR30, The Most Distant Solar System Object  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

2012 DR30, the most distant TNO in the Solar System (a=1103 AU) has recently been observed with the Herschel Space Observatory. Radiometric model results using the far-infrared fluxes and visual range data show a dark and cratered surface (p_V = 6%) and provide a diameter of 200km. If considered as a Centaur, this is the fifth largest object known in this dynamical class. Recent visual range measurements indicate the presence of methane ice on the surface, a feature that has been seen previously for objects with diameters of >=1000km only (like Eris, Makemake and Pluto). The presence of methane ice can be explained assuming that the object spent most of its lifetime in a very cold environment and has been recently placed to its present orbit. This scenario is in agreement with the results of a dynamical study of the object's orbit, also suggesting an Oort-cloud origin. This research has been supported by the following grants: (1) The PECS program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Hungarian Space Office, PECS-98073; (2) C.K. and A.P. acknowledges the support of the Bolyai Research Fellowship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Kiss, Csaba; Szabó, G.; Pál, A.; Kiss, L.; Sárneczky, K.; Müller, T.; Vilenius, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Conn, B.; Ortiz, J.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Horner, J.; Bannister, M.; Stansberry, J.

2012-10-01

238

Groups in the Millennium Simulation and in SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Millennium N-body simulation and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey seventh data release (SDSS DR7) galaxy and galaxy group catalogues are compared to study the properties of galaxy groups and the distribution of galaxies in groups. We construct mock galaxy group catalogues for a Millennium semi-analytical galaxy catalogue by using the same friends-of-friends method, which was used by Tago et al to analyse the SDSS data. We analyse in detail the group luminosities, group richnesses, virial radii, sizes of groups and their rms velocities for four volume-limited samples from observations and simulations. Our results show that the spatial densities of groups agree within one order of magnitude in all samples with a rather good agreement between the mock catalogues and observations. All group property distributions have similar shapes and amplitudes for richer groups. For galaxy pairs and small groups, the group properties for observations and simulations are clearly different. In addition, the spatial distribution of galaxies in small groups is different: at the outskirts of the groups the galaxy number distributions do not agree, although the agreement is relatively good in the inner regions. Differences in the distributions are mainly due to the observational limitations in the SDSS sample and to the problems in the semi-analytical methods that produce too compact and luminous groups.

Nurmi, P.; Heinämäki, P.; Sepp, T.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Gramann, M.; Einasto, M.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, J.

2013-11-01

239

CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells are increased in patients with severe aplastic anemia.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate the number and function of CD8+HLA-DR+ cells, which are considered to be activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), in peripheral blood to further examine the pathogenesis of severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Thirty-eight patients with SAA were included in the present study. Patients were screened for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria by flow cytometry using anti-CD55 and anti-CD59 antibodies. The number of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was measured by three-color flow cytometry using anti-CD8-peridinin chlorophyll, anti-CD3-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and anti-HLA-DR-FITC antibodies. The expression of perforin, granzyme B, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and FasL in CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was detected by flow cytometry with the appropriate monoclonal antibodies. Total RNA was prepared from purified CD8+HLA-DR+ cells of healthy controls and SAA patients, and then polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. Apoptosis of CD8+HLA-DR+ cells was detected by flow cytometry following staining with Annexin V. The proportion of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood and was identified to be significantly higher in untreated SAA than in remission patients and in the controls. The expression of perforin, granzyme B, TNF-? and FasL in CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry and PCR, which revealed increased expression in the untreated SAA group compared with that in the control group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of CD3- bone marrow cells from normal individuals was enhanced following co-culture with CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells from untreated SAA patients. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells may contribute to bone marrow failure in SAA. PMID:24969051

Xing, Limin; Liu, Chunyan; Fu, Rong; Wang, Huaquan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Le; Li, Lijuan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Honglei; Zhang, Tian; Shao, Zonghong

2014-09-01

240

HLA-DR regulation and the influence of GM-CSF on transcription, surface expression and shedding  

PubMed Central

Low surface HLA-DR expression is a feature in sepsis. However, the mechanisms that regulate HLA-DR expression have not been elucidated. The current study investigates regulation of HLA-DR gene transcription, post transcriptional events and shedding of surface HLA-DR, as well as the regulation of HLA-DR by GM-CSF and an immunomodulatory cytokine. Plasma and PBMC were collected from septic patients and healthy volunteers. An ELISA was developed to measure soluble HLA. PCR techniques were used to determine HLA-DR mRNA levels, and flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were used for measurement of surface expressed and intracellular HLA-DR. Septic patients fulfilling the criteria of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) for sepsis were recruited for the study (n=70). HLA-DR was measured on three consecutive days, days seven and fourteen. Patients were excluded from the study if on immunosuppressive therapy. Results: Higher levels of shed HLA-DR were found in the plasma of septic patients compared to healthy controls. The level of HLA-DR mRNA was significantly lower in septic patients compared to healthy controls, however an increased intracellular HLA-DR expression was observed. When HL-60 cells were treated with GM-CSF, gene transcription, surface expression and shedding of HLA-DR were all up-regulated. These results indicate that the mechanisms involved in the regulation of HLA-DR in sepsis include shedding of HLA-DR from the cell surface and regulation of HLA-DR gene transcription. Post-translational processing of HLA-DR was also seen to be compromised. GM-CSF was shown to regulate HLA-DR at all these levels.

2004-01-01

241

Dr. Nicholas Ionescu-Pallas at His 70-th Anniversary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The article is devoted to 70-th Anniversary of Dr. Nicholas Ionescu-Pallas (borne on July 30, 1932 in Pallas village close to the town of Constan?a, Romania as the son of Ion Ionescu and Maria Dinc?), an outstanding Romanian physicist with contributuions in a large area of theoretical and experimental physics, from Theoretical Classical and Quantum Mechanics to General Relativity and Gravitation. He was graduated from the University of Bucharest (1955), a disciple of Professor Ion Agârbiceanu, Doctor of Physics in 1971. He is the author of more than 300 scientific papers and 3 fundamental monographs in these areas, unique in Romania, and of great international circulation. He was one of the creators of the First Romanian Laser. He was elected the Honorary President of the Romanian Society on Genereal Relativity and Gravitation. A great erudition by Ionescu-Pallas allowed him to make also contributions in History of Sciencs. He has been a member of the Academic Commitee for the Philosophy and history of science, of the European Physical Society (1971), of the European Group for Atomic spectroscopy (1970), of the Institute for Scientific Culture E. Majorana (1976), of the International Society of Gravitation and General Relativity (1978) and of the Astronomical Society of India (1982). He was a representative of the intellectuals in the Scientific Council of the Institute for Atomic Physics, 1970-1975; a member of the National Commitee for physics in 1970, and a member of the Coordinating Commitee for the Romanian Enclclopaedia of Physics in 1983. His biographical data are available in Men of Achievement, Who's Who in the World, and Short History of the Romanian Scientific and Technical Creativeness.

Vlad, Valentin I.

242

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dr. George Voelz was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). This oral history covers Dr. Voelz's research on Manhattan Engineering District plutonium workers, the acute and long term effects of radiation...

1995-01-01

243

Genetic and biochemical characteristics of the histone-like protein DR0199 in Deinococcus radiodurans.  

PubMed

Bacterial histone-like proteins are important for nucleoid structure, cell growth, DNA replication, recombination and gene regulation. In this study, we focused on the role of DR0199 (the EbfC orthologue), a newly identified member of the nucleoid-associated protein family in Deinococcus radiodurans. The survival fraction of DR0199-null mutant decreased by tenfold after treatment with 50 mM H(2)O(2), nearly sixfold at a 10 kGy dose of gamma ray and nearly eightfold at a UV exposure of 1000 J m(-2) compared with wild-type cells. The results of fluorescence labelling assays indicated that DR0199 protein localized in the nucleoid area of cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that D. radiodurans DR0199 is a DNA-binding protein. Furthermore, DNA protection assays suggested that DR0199 shields DNA from hydroxyl radical- and DNase I-mediated cleavage. The supercoiling of relaxed plasmid DNA in the presence of topoisomerase I revealed that DR0199 constrains DNA supercoils in vitro. Collectively, these findings suggest that DR0199 is a protein with DNA-protective properties and histone-like features that are involved in protecting D. radiodurans DNA from damage. PMID:22282513

Wang, Hu; Wang, Fei; Hua, Xiaoting; Ma, Tingting; Chen, Jianhui; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

2012-04-01

244

Dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A technique for dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS) in computed tomography (CT) is proposed in this work. In DR-PICCS, a standard FBP reconstructed image is forward projected to get a fully sampled projection data set. Meanwhile, it is low-pass filtered and used as the prior image in the PICCS reconstruction framework. Next, the prior image and the forward projection data are used together by the PICCS algorithm to obtain a low noise DR-PICCS reconstruction, which maintains the spatial resolution of the original FBP images. The spatial resolution of DR-PICCS was studied using a Catphan phantom by MTF measurement. The noise reduction factor, CT number change and noise texture were studied using human subject data consisting of 20 CT colonography exams performed under an IRB-approved protocol. In each human subject study, six ROIs (two soft tissue, two colonic air columns, and two subcutaneous fat) were selected for the CT number and noise measurements study. Skewness and kurtosis were used as figures of merit to indicate the noise texture. A Bland-Altman analysis was performed to study the accuracy of the CT number. The results showed that, compared with FBP reconstructions, the MTF curve shows very little change in DR-PICCS reconstructions, spatial resolution loss is less than 0.1 lp/cm, and the noise standard deviation can be reduced by a factor of 3 with DR-PICCS. The CT numbers in FBP and DR-PICCS reconstructions agree well, which indicates that DR-PICCS does not change CT numbers. The noise textures indicators measured from DR-PICCS images are in a similar range as FBP images.

Tang, Jie; Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Chen, Guang-Hong

2011-03-01

245

HLA-DR antigens on differentiating human mammary gland epithelium and breast tumours.  

PubMed Central

The staining pattern of a monoclonal antibody directed to the monomorphic determinant of HLA-DR antigens was examined on sections of human mammary gland tissues at various stages of differentiation as well as on 50 benign and 72 malignant breast lesions. Normal resting breast epithelium lacked HLA-DR, whereas late-pregnant and lactating epithelia expressed high levels of HLA-DR antigens, followed by a decline in the post-weaning regression period. Most benign breast lesions revealed heterogeneous staining ranging from very few up to 20-25% positive epithelial Greater variability was observed among carcinomas, where a small group (approximately 7%) of cases showing 40-95% positive tumour cells was found, in addition to negative tumours and those with the minority of HLA-DR expressing carcinoma cells. The density of the leukocytic infiltrate was higher in carcinomas than in either normal breast tissue or benign lesions, the HLA-DR phenotype of the mononuclear infiltrating cells lacking any obvious correlation with the HLA-DR status of the epithelial component. Immunoblotting analyses of whole-tissue lysates separated by SDS-PAGE confirmed the immunohistochemical data and demonstrated the reactivity with only one protein band predicted for HLA-DR alpha-chain. The combination of immunohistochemistry and autoradiography on sections of human reduction mammoplasty organoids cultured in collagen gels and labelled with tritiated thymidine revealed a lack of HLA-DR expression on proliferating breast epithelial cells suggesting factors other than cell kinetics must be responsible for induction of HLA-DR antigens seen in pregnant and lactating breast epithelium and some tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10

Bartek, J.; Petrek, M.; Vojtesek, B.; Bartkova, J.; Kovarik, J.; Rejthar, A.

1987-01-01

246

Separation of four class II molecules from DR2 and DRw6 homozygous B lymphoid cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four human class 11 molecules, one FA, one DC1, and two DR-like molecules, were isolated from DR2 and DRw6 homozygous cell lines by means of a variety of monoclonal antibodies and were compared with each other by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Anti-DR2 or anti-DR3 + 5 + w6 sera immunoprecipitated two distinct light chains (L1 and L2) and one heavy

Hiroo Maeda; Ranko Hirata

1984-01-01

247

Dr. Ray Gause examines student Skylab experiment ED-52 Web Formation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Ray Gause of the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) places dinner, in the form of a housefly, in the web of Arabella - the prime spider for the ED-52 Web Formation Experiment. Arabella can be delineated near the end of the black pen in Dr. Gause's hand. The experiment is one of 25 student experiments accepted for the Skylab program and will be performed during the Skylab 3 mission. Judy Miles, a 17-year-old high school student from Lexington, Massachusetts, is the student experimenter and Dr. Gause is the NASA student advisor.

1973-01-01

248

The SN host galaxies in SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The wide interest of the scientific community on SNe has triggered new, deep SN searches which, in a few years have enormously increased the number of SN discoveries. Unfortunately in a lot of cases, especially in deep SN searches, identification of host galaxies and their physical properties are incorrect or even absent. To solve this problem we cross-matched Asiago Supernovae Catalogue (ASC) with the SDSS DR7 in term to directly identify SN host galaxies and create a homogeneous database with the hosts integral properties. We provide accurate coordinates, morphological type, spectral and activity classes, SDSS magnitudes, apparent diameters, axial ratios, and position angles of galaxies. All SN type classifications taken from the ASC were checked through a complete search of the literature, IAU circulars and Sternberg Astronomical Institute SNe Catalogue. Our sample consists of 3072 SNe in 2918 hosts which are located in SDSS area. For 2808 SNe (in 2654 hosts) we directly identified host galaxies, which is about 91% of our sample. From this 91% 1600 host galaxies in ASC are marked as anonymous. Identifications of most of them have been done for first time. 1038 hosts (with 1107 SNe) have nuclear SDSS spectra. Photometrical information is available for the local position of 663 SNe. Spectra from direct positions of 83 SNe are also available. Detailed morphological classification has done for 1585 hosts. We found that approximately 10% of our sample galaxies have SDSS morphological classification which is dramatically different from the ASC (mainly from RC3) and HyperLeda database. In most cases, the morphological bias can be due to the over-exposure of the high surface brightness galaxies. The creation of this homogeneous database will help to understand how the different type SNe events and their spatial distribution are correlated with the properties of the nuclei (activity class, chemistry, stellar population etc.) and global physical parameters (morphology, size, absolute magnitudes etc.) of the host galaxies and also how they interact with close and far environments properties of these galaxies, as well as minimize possible selection effects and errors which often arise when information for studied objects is selected from different sources and catalogues.

Hakobyan, A. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Petrosian, A. R.; Aramyan, L. S.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Turatto, M.

2010-06-01

249

Dr. Louis Sullivan: Treating America's Most Critical Health and Human Services Ills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interview with Dr. Louis Sullivan, Secretary of Health and Human Services. Discusses his views on health education, budget, access to health care, minority health, abortion, infant mortality, drugs, the Head Start Program, federal planning effects, and family influences. (JS)

Cox, William E,; Matthews, Frank L.

1989-01-01

250

Ask Dr. Sue--Updates: Infectious Diseases, SIDS, HIV/AIDS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes new concerns about infectious diseases in childcare settings (tuberculosis, gastrointestinal infections, and lice); sleep position and SIDS; HIV/AIDS issues; and the use of sterilized sand in sand boxes. (DR)

Aronson, Susan S.

1995-01-01

251

ISAAC Photometric Comparison of ECLIPSE Jitter and the ORAC-DR Equivalent Recipe for ISAAC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by a request from astronomers demanding accurate and consistent infrared photometry, I compare the photometry and quality of mosaics generated by the ECLIPSE jitter task and the ORAC-DR JITTER_SELF_FLAT recipe in two fields. The current (v4.9.0) ECLIPSE produces photometry a few percent fainter than ORAC-DR; the systematic trend with magnitude seen in v4.4.1 is now removed. Random errors arising from poor flat-fielding are not resolved. ECLIPSE generates noisier mosaics; ORAC-DR has poorer bias removal in crowded fields and defaults to larger mosaics. ORAC-DR runs a few times slower than ECLIPSE, but its recipe development is measured in weeks, not years.

Currie, M. J.

2005-12-01

252

High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / ... heavier and older, what does recent research on cholesterol and heart health tell us that Americans need ...

253

75 FR 68603 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Office of Education Dr. Nancy Foster...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Scholarship Program is available to graduate students pursuing masters and doctoral degrees in the areas of marine biology, oceanography and maritime archaeology. The OEd requires applicants to the Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship Program to complete an...

2010-11-08

254

ISS Update: Dr. Steve Squyres, NEEMO 16 Aquanaut and Cornell Professor  

NASA Video Gallery

ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Dr. Steve Squyres, NEEMO 16 Aquanaut and Cornell Professor, about simulating a mission to an asteroid underwater. The Aquarius habitat simulates the isola...

255

Dr. Grant Heikan examines lunar material in sieve from sample container  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Grant Heikan, Manned Spacecraft Center and a Lunar Sample preliminary Examination Team member, examines lunar material in a sieve from the bulk sample container which was opened in the Biopreparation Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory.

1969-01-01

256

Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week  

ScienceCinema

Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

257

Eye Expert Dr. Emily Chew: 3 Ways to Keep Your Sight  

MedlinePLUS

... Issues Feature: Vision Eye Expert Dr. Emily Chew: 3 Ways to Keep Your Sight Past Issues / Summer ... a healthy diet. New research shows that omega-3 fatty acids may protect the retina from wear. ...

258

Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week  

ScienceCinema

Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

Martin, Cheryl; Loveless, Bill

2014-04-11

259

APOLLO 14 DR. WERNHER VON BRAUN WATCHES FROM FIRING ROOM 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun, the NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Future Programs, uses binoculars to monitor data on closed- circuit television screens in Firing Room 2 of the Launch Control Center during final Apollo 14 launch preparations today.

1971-01-01

260

Reactivation of death receptor 4 (DR4) expression sensitizes medulloblastoma cell lines to TRAIL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Object Apoptosis, a key cellular response to therapeutic agents is often inactivated in tumor cells. In this study, we evaluated\\u000a the expression of the tumor necrosis family of death receptors, DR4 and DR5, in medulloblastoma tumor samples and cell lines to determine if epigenetic modulation of gene expression could sensitize\\u000a tumor cell lines to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Methods Human medulloblastoma samples

Dolly G. Aguilera; Chandra M. Das; Neeta D. Sinnappah-Kang; Celine Joyce; Pete H. Taylor; Sijin Wen; Martin Hasselblatt; Werner Paulus; Greg Fuller; Johannes E. Wolff; Vidya Gopalakrishnan

2009-01-01

261

Targeting TRAIL death receptor 4 with trivalent DR4 Atrimer complexes.  

PubMed

TRAIL is a trimeric protein that potently induces apoptosis in cancer cells by binding to the trimeric death receptors (DR4 or DR5). Death receptors are attractive therapeutic targets through both the recombinant TRAIL ligand as well as receptor agonist monoclonal antibodies. Although efficacy of the ligand is hampered by its short half-life, agonistic antibodies have a much longer half-life and have shown some clinical efficacy as antitumor agents. However, the efficacy of these antibodies may be limited by their bivalent nature that does not optimally mimic the trimeric ligand. To overcome limitations of currently used death receptor-targeting agents, we engineered trimeric proteins called Atrimer complexes that selectively bind DR4 and potently induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Atrimer complexes are based on human tetranectin, a trimeric plasma protein of approximately 60 kDa. Loop regions within the tetranectin C-type lectin domains (CTLD) were randomized to create a large phage display library that was used to select DR4-binding complexes. A panel of unique and potent agonist DR4 Atrimer complexes with subnanomolar affinity to DR4 and no detectable binding to DR5 or the decoy receptors was identified. Mechanism of action studies with a selected Atrimer complex, 1G(2), showed that Atrimer complexes induce caspase-dependent and DR4-specific apoptosis in cancer cells while sparing normal human fibroblasts and, importantly, hepatocytes. This proof-of-principle study supports the use of alternative proteins engineered to overcome limitations of therapeutically desirable molecules such as TRAIL. PMID:22802267

Allen, Joshua E; Ferrini, Roger; Dicker, David T; Batzer, Glenda; Chen, Elise; Oltean, Daniela I; Lin, Bing; Renshaw, Mark W; Kretz-Rommel, Anke; El-Deiry, Wafik S

2012-10-01

262

GENESI-DR: Discovery, Access and on-Demand Processing in Federated Repositories  

Microsoft Academic Search

GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR

Roberto Cossu; Fabrizio Pacini; Andrea Parrini; Eliana Li Santi; Luigi Fusco

2010-01-01

263

“Jobs for all”: Another dream of the rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote extensively on economic matters, especially unemployment policy. King supported\\u000a a federal job guarantee for anyone ready and willing to work. He believed it would provide employment and income security,\\u000a as well as increased public and community services. Dr. King's writings on employment are reviewed and discussed. His policy\\u000a proposals are just as

Mathew Forstater

2002-01-01

264

Inactivating Mutations of KILLER\\/DR5 Gene in Gastric Cancers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: The KILLER\\/death receptor (DR)5 has been identified as a potent inducer of apoptosis, and mapped to chromosome 8p21-22, showing frequent allelic loss in gastric cancer. The p53-induced apoptosis is an important biological process to prevent the development of cancer, and is mediated in part by expression of KILLER\\/DR5 only in cells with wild-type p53 protein, but not

Won Sang Park; Jong Heun Lee; Min Sun Shin; Jik Young Park; Hong Sug Kim; Young Sil Kim; Cho Hyun Park; Sang Kyu Lee; Sug Hyung Lee; Shi Nae Lee; Hyang Kim; Nam Jin Yoo; Jung Young Lee

2001-01-01

265

APP binds DR6 to trigger axon pruning and neuron death via distinct caspases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Naturally occurring axonal pruning and neuronal cell death help to sculpt neuronal connections during development, but their mechanistic basis remains poorly understood. Here we report that beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and death receptor 6 (DR6, also known as TNFRSF21) activate a widespread caspase-dependent self-destruction program. DR6 is broadly expressed by developing neurons, and is required for normal cell body death

Anatoly Nikolaev; Todd McLaughlin; Dennis D. M. O'Leary; Marc Tessier-Lavigne

2009-01-01

266

HLA-DR, -DQB Typing of Steroid-Sensitive Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome Children in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The association between human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) in children has been discussed in various studies. Methods: In this study, 59 Chinese children with steroid-sensitive nephritic syndrome (SSNS) in Taiwan were enrolled, and 33 patients underwent renal biopsy. Results: The frequency of HLA-DR11 was found to be significantly higher and HLA-DR14 was lower in SSNS

Yuan-Yuan Huang; Fang-Ju Lin; Lin-Shien Fu; Joung-Liang Lan

2009-01-01

267

DCEG Special Seminar - Dr. Yu Wang, Director, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention  

Cancer.gov

Prior to leading the China CDC, Dr. Wang was Vice President of the Peking University Health Science Center and had important leadership positions in the Ministry of Science and Technology.China CDC’s outstanding contributions in disease control and prevention in the post-Wenchuan earthquake relief and his many other achievements have led to numerous awards from the Ministries of Health and Human Resources, and State Council, municipal governments and other organizations. Dr.

268

The relationship between homeopathy and the Dr Bach system of flower remedies: a critical appraisal.  

PubMed

The relationship between homeopathy and the Dr Bach system of flower remedies is explored. A historical perspective is given, doctrinal similarities and dissimilarities between both systems are discussed and the relationship between remedies used in homeopathy as well as in Dr Bach's system of flower remedies is explored. It is concluded that although both systems are clearly different, some common ground exists and that both systems may have a complementary role which is perhaps insufficiently recognised. PMID:10449052

van Haselen, R A

1999-07-01

269

Electron swarm characteristic energies (Dr\\/mu) in tetrafluoromethane (CF4) at low E\\/N  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electron swarm characteristic energies (Dr\\/ mu , where Dr is the lateral diffusion coefficient and mu the mobility) have been measured in pure CF4 at 293 K, using the Townsend-Huxley method. For E\\/N values (the ratio of applied electric field to gas number density) less than 23 Td (1 Td=10-21 Vm2), dissociative attachment does not interfere with the measurements. For

M. G. Curtis; I. C. Walker; K. J. Mathieson

1988-01-01

270

Strong HLA-DR expression in large bowel carcinomas is associated with good prognosis.  

PubMed Central

One hundred large bowel carcinomas operated on between 1978 and 1982 were studied immunohistochemically with regard to expression of HLA-DR antigens. Three sections from each tumour were investigated by a semiquantitative scoring system, and a mean score for each patient established. Based on this scoring system, the tumours were divided into three groups: 0; 0.1-1.0; and > 1.0. All patients were followed until death (n = 68) or until June 1, 1992, and all cancer-specific deaths (n = 56) have been recorded. Analysis of survival in the whole patient group showed significant difference between the three levels of tumour HLA-DR expression (P = 0.006); patients who had tumours with strong HLA-DR expression showing the best survival. In a stratified analysis after Dukes' stages there was still a significant difference (P > 0.001) between the three levels of HLA-DR staining intensity. After a multiple regression analysis (Cox) with correction for different variables, the HLA-DR expression maintained its significance as a risk factor. To our knowledge this is the first time a relationship between intensity of tumour DR expression and survival has been shown in large bowel carcinoma. Images Figure 1

Andersen, S. N.; Rognum, T. O.; Lund, E.; Meling, G. I.; Hauge, S.

1993-01-01

271

A study of inter-observer variations of pulmonary nodule marking and characterizing on DR images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As new imaging technologies, such as Digital Radiograph (DR), advance, radiologists nowadays are able to detect smaller nodules than before. However, inter-observer variations exhibited in diagnosis still remain as critical challenges that need to be studied and addressed. In this research, inter-observer variation of pulmonary nodule marking and characterizing on DR images was studied in two phases, with the first phase focused on the analysis of inter-observer variations, and the second phase focused on the reduction of variations by using a computer system (IQQA(R)-Chest) that provides intelligent qualitative and quantitative analysis to help radiologists in the softcopy reading of DR chest images. Large inter-observer variations in pulmonary nodule identification and characterization on DR chest images were observed, even between expert radiologists. Experimental results also showed that less experienced radiologists could greatly benefit from the computer assistance, including substantial decrease of inter-observer variation and improvement of nodule detection rates. Moreover, radiologists with different levels of skillfulness may achieve similar high level performance after using the computer system. The computer system showed a high potential for providing a valuable assistance to the examination of DR chest images, especially as DR is adopted to screen large populations for lung cancer.

Song, Wei; Fan, Li; Xie, Yongming; Qian, Jian-Zhong; Jin, Zhenyu

2005-04-01

272

A meta-analysis of HLA-DR polymorphism and genetic susceptibility to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.  

PubMed

Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) has been hypothesized as a multifactorial disorder initiated by an environment trigger in individuals with predisposing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Published data on the association between HLA-DR polymorphism and IDC risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. A total of 19 case-control studies including 1,378 cases and 10,383 controls provided data on the association between HLA-DR polymorphism and genetic susceptibility to IDC. Overall, statistically elevated frequencies of HLA-DR4 (OR 1.58; 95% CI 1.21-2.07; P=0.0009) and HLA-DR5 (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.05-1.73; P=0.02) alleles were found in patients with IDC compared with controls. Individuals with HLA-DR3 antigen have a protective effect against IDC (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.58-0.90; P=0.004). In summary, this meta-analysis indicated that certain HLA-DR alleles may be genetic markers for susceptibility and resistance to IDC. PMID:21556773

Jin, Bo; Luo, Xin-Ping; Ni, Huan-Chun; Shen, Wei; Shi, Hai-Ming; Li, Yong

2012-01-01

273

Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

Not Available

1994-06-01

274

DR 21(OH), a cluster in the making. 1: Observations in carbon monosulphide and methanol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The star formation region DR 21(OH) was observed in the J=5-4 transitions of CS and C34S, and in several J=5-4 transitions of methanol. High velocity wings are detected in CS towards the main DR 21(OH) peak, extending over 80 km/s. They are very faint, and the outer wings are detected only at the center position. Since the outflow is not seen in the CO J=1-0 or 2-1 transitions, the CS observations suggest that this is a young, compact, dense and hot outflow. Many of the known NH3 cores are also seen in CS and methanol. Three known submm-continuum sources, DR 21(OH)S, DR 21(OH)SW, and DR 21(OH)NW, are suprisingly faint in the CS J=5-4 line, probably because the gas, though sufficiently dense, is too cold to fully excite the CS J=5-4 transition. They are, however, strong in methanol. An additional source, DR 21(OH)SE, is strong in CS but weak in methanol. The methanol lines were interpreted with an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis to estimate rotational temperatures and column densities at the main peaks, and the results discussed in the context of chemical models.

Richardson, K. J.; Sandell, G.; Cunningham, C. T.; Davies, S. R.

1994-06-01

275

Transcriptional activation of HLA-DR alpha by interferon gamma requires a trans-acting protein.  

PubMed Central

Stimulation of the human epithelial-like cell line, HeLa, with interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) induces steady-state levels of HLA-DR alpha mRNA. Using a sensitive RNase-mapping procedure, we detect induced HLA-DR alpha mRNA as early as 8 hr after IFN-gamma treatment; maximal accumulation occurs by 48 hr. Treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, abolishes the IFN-gamma-induced accumulation of HLA-DR alpha mRNA, indicating that de novo synthesis of a trans-acting protein factor is required for induction of this major histocompatibility complex class II gene. Nuclear run-off transcription assays revealed that IFN-gamma acts by directly stimulating the transcription rate of HLA-DR alpha. Similarly, IFN-gamma increased the transcription rate of the class I HLA-A2-encoding gene as well as that of the human invariant chain gene. IFN-gamma-induced transcription of HLA-DR alpha and of the invariant chain gene was blocked by treatment with cycloheximide, but IFN-gamma-induced transcription of HLA-A2 was unaffected. Our findings show that transcriptional induction of HLA-DR alpha and the invariant chain gene by IFN-gamma requires the action of an unidentified trans-acting protein. Images

Blanar, M A; Boettger, E C; Flavell, R A

1988-01-01

276

The structure of HLA-DR52c: Comparison to other HLA-DRB3 alleles  

PubMed Central

Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules present antigens to CD4+ T cells. In addition to the most commonly studied human MHCII isotype, HLA-DR, whose ? chain is encoded by the HLA-DRB1 locus, several other isotypes that use the same ? chain but have ? chains encoded by other genes. These other DR molecules also are expressed in antigen-presenting cells and are known to participate in peptide presentation to T cells and to be recognized as alloantigens by other T cells. Like some of the HLA-DRB1 alleles, several of these alternate DR molecules have been associated with specific autoimmune diseases and T cell hypersensitivity. Here we present the structure of an HLA-DR molecule (DR52c) containing one of these alternate ? chains (HLA-DRB3*0301) bound to a self-peptide derived from the Tu elongation factor. The molecule shares structurally conserved elements with other MHC class II molecules but has some unique features in the peptide-binding groove. Comparison of the three major HLA-DBR3 alleles (DR52a, b, and c) suggests that they were derived from one another by recombination events that scrambled the four major peptide-binding pockets at peptide positions 1, 4, 6, and 9 but left virtually no polymorphisms elsewhere in the molecules.

Dai, Shaodong; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

2008-01-01

277

Redundancy in Antigen-Presenting Function of the HLA-DR and -DQ Molecules in the Multiple Sclerosis-Associated HLA-DR2 Haplotype1  

PubMed Central

The three HLA class II alleles of the DR2 haplotype, DRB1*1501, DRB5*0101, and DQB1*0602, are in strong linkage disequilibrium and confer most of the genetic risk to multiple sclerosis. Functional redundancy in Ag presentation by these class II molecules would allow recognition by a single TCR of identical peptides with the different restriction elements, facilitating T cell activation and providing one explanation how a disease-associated HLA haplotype could be linked to a CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Using combinatorial peptide libraries and B cell lines expressing single HLA-DR/DQ molecules, we show that two of five in vivo-expanded and likely disease-relevant, cross-reactive cerebrospinal fluid-infiltrating T cell clones use multiple disease-associated HLA class II molecules as restriction elements. One of these T cell clones recognizes >30 identical foreign and human peptides using all DR and DQ molecules of the multiple sclerosis-associated DR2 haplotype. A T cell signaling machinery tuned for efficient responses to weak ligands together with structural features of the TCR-HLA/peptide complex result in this promiscuous HLA class II restriction.

Sospedra, Mireia; Muraro, Paolo A.; Stefanova, Irena; Zhao, Yingdong; Chung, Katherine; Li, Yili; Giulianotti, Marc; Simon, Richard; Mariuzza, Roy; Pinilla, Clemencia; Martin, Roland

2009-01-01

278

Special issue dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr.  

PubMed

This special issue of the "Cardiovascular Drug Reviews" is dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr., who died on Dec. 9th, 2000 at the Princeton Medical Center in New Jersey at the age of 85. Dr. Ahrens was the Director of the Lipid Metabolism Laboratory at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Alexander Scriabine conceived the idea for the issue at the special memorial symposium held at the Rockefeller University on Feb. 05, 2002 under the auspices of The New York Lipid and Vascular Biology Research Club. Dr. Ahrens was the first president of the club. He started this club with Drs. Howard Eder and DeWitt Goodman. Dr. Eder thought that it would be a fitting attribute to honor one of the founding fathers of the club by hosting a memorial symposium. I, as the President of the club for that academic year, had no hesitation in accepting the proposal. This year will be the 40th anniversary of the club and its continued success provides a glimpse of the fine legacy left behind by Dr. Ahrens. Dr. Ahrens also played a pivotal role in the establishment of the Journal of Lipid Research. This is the 43rd year of the journal and in this commemorative issue we are reproducing a review he wrote for the 25th anniversary of the journal. I was never personally acquainted with Dr. Ahrens. However, I am honored that I got this opportunity to pay tribute to a great scientist whose work has contributed immensely to the progress of lipid research. He was a person who touched many lives and still continues to do so. My involvement in the remembrance of Dr. Ahrens shows that science not only impacts your contemporaries but also generations that follow you. Scientific research is a journey where you can leave your trails behind and be remembered for your work long after your departure from this world. Dr. Ahrens contributed immensely to the understanding of cholesterol metabolism. In the early stages of his career he showed that phospholipids solubilize fat in the blood. Now we know that a monolayer of phospholipids surrounds the neutral lipid core of cholesterol esters and triglycerides in lipoproteins. This monolayer contains proteins, called apolipoproteins, which play a major role in lipoprotein catabolism. Lipoproteins are the major vehicles that transport triglycerides and cholesterol in the plasma. He also described a new form of primary biliary cirrhosis characterized by the presence of xanthomas and hyperlipidemia with normal translucent plasma. Subsequently, his group at the Rockefeller Institute developed methods for the separation of lipids using silicic acid columns, isolated highly unsaturated long chain fish oil fatty acids using gas-liquid chromatography, standardized techniques to study sterol metabolism, and introduced the concept of using beta-sitosterolemia as an internal marker for cholesterol balance studies. These studies revealed that individuals show a reproducible response to a given regimen when studied over time. In contrast, different individuals may respond differently to the same regimen. Throughout his career, Dr. Ahrens championed metabolic studies in humans and has passionately argued for the continuation of such investigations. Dr. Ahrens also left behind trails of "graduates." Several of them are currently prominent scientists in their own fields. In this issue, Drs. Davignon and Samuel share their feelings for him in the form of "Remembrance" and "Curriculum Vitae." Dr. Salen has submitted a preview of his research progress towards the understanding of sitosterolemia. Dr. Hudgins and associates have acknowledged the efforts of Dr. Ahrens in binding LDL apheresis technique to the United States of America and have previewed the use of this procedure in the treatment of hypercholesterolemic patients. The contributions of these and other graduates will keep his legacy alive for a long time to come. We are truly grateful for this opportunity to pay homage to such a distinguished scientist. PMID:12481196

Ahrens, Edward H

2002-01-01

279

Unusual HLA-DR,DQ haplotypes found in South African families of black, Asian Indian, and mixed ancestral origin.  

PubMed

Four non-Caucasoid families with the unusual HLA-DR,DQ haplotypes DRw17,DQw7; DR9,DQw2; DR4,DQw2; and DR4,DQw5 were studied. All four haplotypes showed identical serological patterns to those seen with the equivalent Caucasoid antigens, but no HLA-Dw specificities could be assigned. TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns observed using DRB, DQB, and DQA probes showed that the DRw17,DQw7 haplotype may have originated from a homologous crossover between a DRw17,DQw2 haplotype and a haplotype with DQw7. The results obtained for the DR9,DQw2 and DR4,DQw2 haplotypes suggest that these could have resulted from recombination events with an ancestral "black" DQw2 haplotype. From the RFLP data, it is difficult to postulate the origin of the DR4,DQw5 haplotype being from a single recombination event. PMID:1679051

Oudshoorn, M; Martell, R W; Arendse, B; du Toit, E D

1991-05-01

280

High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2012-05-22

281

High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)  

ScienceCinema

Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2012-06-28

282

HLA-DP/DR interaction in early onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis.  

PubMed

We investigated the polymorphic second exon of the HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB1 genes, using in vitro DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oligonucleotide hybridization in 136 patients with early onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis (EOPA-JCA) and 199 healthy controls. The analysis of the HLA-DRB1 system revealed that most of the DRB1 alleles are not indifferent with respect to susceptibility to EOPA-JCA. There is a hierarchy of susceptible (DRB1*08, DR5), "permissive" (DRB1*01), moderately "protective" (DR2, DRB1*04), and "protective" (DRB1*07) alleles. In contrast, no hierarchy could be shown for the HLA-DPB1 system. DPB1*0201 was found to be susceptible. The relatively frequent alleles DPB1*0402 and DPB1*0401 seem to be indifferent. The associations with DPB1*0201, DR5, and DRB1*08 are independent of each other: that is to say they, are not brought about by linkage disequilibrium. The susceptible alleles DPB1*0201 and DR5 show evidence for interaction in the pathogenesis of EOPA-JCA. Interaction seems likely between DPB1*0201 and DRB1*08, DR5 and DRB1*08, or between DR6 and DRB1*08. The strongest interaction exists between DPB1*0201 and a common DQ factor associated with both DR5 and DRB1*08. Finally, we observed a hierarchy among the various marker combinations, where the risk of developing EOPA-JCA increases with the number of associated markers present in an individual. PMID:8436419

Paul, C; Schoenwald, U; Truckenbrodt, H; Bettinotti, M P; Brünnler, G; Keller, E; Nevinny-Stickel, C; Yao, Z; Albert, E D

1993-01-01

283

Thyroglobulin peptides associate in vivo to HLA-DR in autoimmune thyroid glands.  

PubMed

Endocrine epithelial cells, targets of the autoimmune response in thyroid and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases, express HLA class II (HLA-II) molecules that are presumably involved in the maintenance and regulation of the in situ autoimmune response. HLA-II molecules thus expressed by thyroid cells have the "compact" conformation and are therefore expected to stably bind autologous peptides. Using a new approach to study in situ T cell responses without the characterization of self-reactive T cells and their specificity, we have identified natural HLA-DR-associated peptides in autoimmune organs that will allow finding peptide-specific T cells in situ. This study reports a first analysis of HLA-DR natural ligands from ex vivo Graves' disease-affected thyroid tissue. Using mass spectrometry, we identified 162 autologous peptides from HLA-DR-expressing cells, including thyroid follicular cells, with some corresponding to predominant molecules of the thyroid colloid. Most interestingly, eight of the peptides were derived from a major autoantigen, thyroglobulin. In vitro binding identified HLA-DR3 as the allele to which one of these peptides likely associates in vivo. Computer modeling and bioinformatics analysis suggested other HLA-DR alleles for binding of other thyroglobulin peptides. Our data demonstrate that although the HLA-DR-associated peptide pool in autoimmune tissue mostly belongs to abundant ubiquitous proteins, peptides from autoantigens are also associated to HLA-DR in vivo and therefore may well be involved in the maintenance and the regulation of the autoimmune response. PMID:18566446

Muixí, Laia; Carrascal, Montserrat; Alvarez, Iñaki; Daura, Xavier; Martí, Mercè; Armengol, Maria Pilar; Pinilla, Clemencia; Abian, Joaquín; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; Jaraquemada, Dolores

2008-07-01

284

Anomalous expression of the HLA-DR alpha and beta chains in ovarian and other cancers.  

PubMed

Tumor formation in immunocompetent hosts is believed to be dependent on the ability of tumor cells to evade the immune system, as suggested by the alterations of expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and related molecules in a number of cancers. Our previous serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) study revealed that HLA-DRA (encoding the alpha chain of HLA-DR) is one of the most highly overexpressed genes in ovarian cancer. This finding was unanticipated, as overexpression of MHC molecules would be expected to increase tumor immunogenicity, therefore compromising tumor growth. We have now examined the expression of HLA-DR alpha chain in ovarian and a variety of other cancers using tissue arrays and found it overexpressed in a majority of the cancer tissues investigated. In contrast, the HLA-DR beta chain, which together with the alpha chain forms the functional HLA-DR complex, was not frequently found expressed in cancer, resulting to a lack of mature HLA-DR in these tissues. Interestingly, HLADRA and HLADRB transcripts were both found expressed in many other cancer types, including ovarian cancer, suggesting that the downregulation of HLADR beta chain is a post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanism. In addition, we observed high levels of the invariant chain (Ii/CD74) expression in both the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of ovarian tumor cells, possibly contributing to the lack of mature HLA-DR protein expression. Interestingly, we found that IFN-gamma could induce mature HLA-DR at the surface of normal ovarian cells, while this ability was reduced in tumor cells. Together, these data suggest that, while ovarian tumors overexpress HLA-DR alpha, perhaps as a result of inflammatory events in the tumor microenvironment, the tumor cells may have compensatory mechanisms to reduce the production of functional MHC class II molecules, thus reducing immunogenicity and favoring tumor growth. In addition, because of its ubiquitous expression in ovarian and other cancers, HLA-DR alpha may represent a novel biomarker for malignancy. PMID:15467430

Rangel, Leticia B A; Agarwal, Rachana; Sherman-Baust, Cheryl A; Mello-Coelho, Valeria de; Pizer, Ellen S; Ji, Hongxiu; Taub, Dennis D; Morin, Patrice J

2004-10-01

285

HLA class II DR, DQ, and DP restriction fragment length polymorphisms in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

HLA class II restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were studied in 43 individuals with established seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in a group of healthy controls. All patients and controls were tissue typed for HLA-A, B, and DR antigens. Rapid, initial screening for RA associated RFLPs was conducted by pooling DNA samples from 11 HLA-DR4 positive patients with RA and comparing the RFLP patterns with those seen in a pool of DNA samples drawn from 11 HLA-DR4 positive healthy controls. Candidate RA associated RFLPs were examined in our full panel of patients with RA and controls. In most cases the RFLPs detected showed no significant association with RA. An exception was a 13.0 kb DraI DQ beta associated RFLP, which, when HLA-DR4 positive patients with RA and controls were considered alone, showed a weak positive association with susceptibility to RA. This RFLP was not associated with known DR, DQ, or Dw specificities. These results show a distinct paucity of class II RA associated RFLPs but may indicate a role for DQ beta genetic variation in the aetiology of RA. Images

Howell, W M; Evans, P R; Wilson, P J; Cawley, M I; Smith, J L

1989-01-01

286

DrRad51 is required for chiasmata formation in meiosis in planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis.  

PubMed

Rad51, a conserved eukaryotic protein, mediates the homologous-recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks that occur during both mitosis and meiosis. During prophase I of meiosis, homologous recombination enhances the linkage between homologous chromosomes to increase the accuracy of segregation at anaphase I. In polyploidy situations, however, difficulties with homologous chromosome segregation often disrupt meiosis. Yet, triploid individuals of the planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis are able to produce functional gametes through a specialized form of meiosis. To shed light on the molecular mechanisms that promote successful meiosis in triploid D. ryukyuensis, we investigated rad51 gene function. We isolated three genes of the Rad51 family, the Rad51 homolog Dr-rad51 and the Rad51 paralogs Dr-rad51B and Dr-rad51C. Dr-rad51 was expressed in germ-line and presumably in somatic stem cells, but was not necessary for the regeneration of somatic tissue. RNA-interference (RNAi) depletion of Dr-rad51 during sexualization did not affect chromosome behavior in zygotene oocytes, but did result in the loss of chiasmata at the diplotene stage. Thus, homologous recombination does not appear to be necessary for synapsis, but is needed for crossover and proper segregation in D. ryukyuensis. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 81: ???-???, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24488935

Chinone, Ayako; Matsumoto, Midori

2014-05-01

287

Biofilm formation as a virulence determinant of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr+ strains.  

PubMed

Urinary tract infections are the most common health problem affecting millions of people each year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are the major factor causing lower and upper urinary tract infections. UPEC produce several virulence factors among which are surface exposed adhesive organelldes (pili/fimbriae) responsible for colonization, invasion and amplification within uroepithelial cells. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr IH11128 is associated with Dr fimbriae belonging to the Dr family of adhesins (associated with diarrhea and urinary tract infections) and a DraD protein capping the linear fiber at the bacterial cell surface. In this study we revealed that biofilm development can be another urovirulence determinant allowing pathogenic E. coli Dr+ to survive within the urinary tract. E. coli strains were grown in rich or minimal media, allowed to adhere to abiotic surfaces and analyzed microscopically by staining of cells with cristal violet. We found that both Dr fimbriae and DraD, exposed at the cell surface in two forms, fimbria-associated or fimbria non-associated, (DraE+/DraD+, DraE+/DraD- or DraE-/DraD+ E. coli strains) are required for biofilm formation. Additionally, we demonstrated the biofilm formation capacity of E. coli strains deficient in the surface secretion or production of the DraE adhesin. PMID:19899615

Zalewska-Piatek, Beata M; Wilkanowicz, Sabina I; Piatek, Rafa? J; Kur, Józef W

2009-01-01

288

Afa\\/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Infection in T84 Cell Monolayers Induces Increased Neutrophil Transepithelial Migration, Which in Turn Promotes Cytokine-Dependent Upregulation of Decay-Accelerating Factor (CD55), the Receptor for Afa\\/Dr Adhesins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are inflammatory bowel diseases thought to involve strains of Esch- erichia coli. We report here that two wild-type Afa\\/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli (DAEC) strains, C1845 and IH11128, which harbor the fimbrial F1845 adhesin and the Dr hemagglutinin, respectively, and the E. coli laboratory strain HB101, transformed with the pSSS1 plasmid to produce Afa\\/Dr F1845

Frederic Betis; Patrick Brest; Veronique Hofman; Julie Guignot; Imad Kansau; Bernard Rossi; Alain Servin; Paul Hofman

2003-01-01

289

HLA-DM Interactions with Intermediates in HLA-DR Maturation and a Role for HLA-DM in Stabilizing Empty HLA-DR Molecules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cell lines which lack HLA-DM ex- pression accumulate class II molecules associated with residual invariant (I) chain fragments (class II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP)). In vitro, HLA-DM catalyzes CLIP dissoci- ation from class II-CLIP complexes, promoting binding of antigenic peptides. Here the physi- cal interaction of HLA-DM with HLA-DR molecules was investigated. HLA-DM

Lisa K. Denzin; Craig Hammond; Peter Cresswell

290

In vitro adherence properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus DR20 and Bifidobacterium lactis DR10 strains and their antagonistic activity against an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Adhesion and colonisation properties of three probiotic strains namely, Lactobacillus rhamnosus DR20, L. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis DR10, were determined in vitro using the differentiated human intestinal cell-lines including HT-29, Caco-2, and HT29-MTX, and compared with properties of L. acidophilus LA-1 and L. rhamnosus GG (two commercial probiotic strains). Two independent methods were employed to quantitate the "adhesiveness" of each strain. In the first method, the bacteria adhered to human cells were detected by Gram staining and counted in different fields under a microscope. Bacteria were also radio-labelled and extent of adhesion determined by scintillation counting. All three strains showed strong adhesion with the human intestinal cell lines in vitro. Adhesion indices of the three strains to two cell lines, i.e. HT-29, and Caco-2 varied between 99 +/- 17 and 219 +/- 36. With mucus-secreting cell-line HT29-MTX, the adhesion indices of all the strains were 2-3 times higher. The adhesion indices of L. acidophilus LA-1 and L. rhamnosus GG were comparable to the other three probiotic strains. We also investigated the inhibitory effect of adhering strains against the intestinal cell monolayer colonization by a known enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli (strain O157:H7). Pre-treatment of E. coli O157:H7 with 2.5-fold concentrated cell-free culture supernatants from L. acidophilus HN017, L. rhamnosus DR20 and B. lactis DR10 reduced the culturable E. coli numbers on TSB plates and also reduced the invasiveness and cell association characteristics of this toxic strain. The inhibitory molecules secreted into the spent media by these strains were partially affected by treatments with lactate dehydrogenase, trypsin and proteinase K suggesting that overall inhibition may be due to a synergistic action of lactic acid and proteinaceous substances. PMID:11518430

Gopal, P K; Prasad, J; Smart, J; Gill, H S

2001-08-01

291

Aberrant expression of HLA-DR antigen on valvular fibroblasts from patients with active rheumatic carditis.  

PubMed Central

Immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase staining was used to investigate the expression of Class II major histocompatibility antigens in myocardial tissue of 16 patients with acute rheumatic carditis. Aberrant expression of HLA-DR was examined using monoclonal anti-Ia antibodies and was detected on the valvular fibroblasts of those valves with ongoing active carditis. Sections of myocardial and valvular tissue from normal controls or from patients dying of other cardiac diseases did not express HLA-DR. The aberrant expression of HLA-DR on valvular fibroblasts could be important in triggering autoimmune destruction in that these cells could present self-antigens to sensitized T-lymphocytes which could initiate autoantibody production or direct destruction of local tissue. Images Fig. 2

Amoils, B; Morrison, R C; Wadee, A A; Marcus, R; Ninin, D; King, P; Sareli, P; Levin, S; Rabson, A R

1986-01-01

292

VLA HI Zeeman Observations of the Cygnus X Region: DR 22 And ON 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Very Large Array in Socorro, New Mexico has been used to study the Zeeman Effect in the 21cm HI line seen in absorption against radio sources in the Cygnus X region. Cygnus X is geometrically favorable for Zeeman effect observations as the region lies along the mean field direction of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) of the galaxy. We present observations of two compact HII regions within Cygnus X, DR 22 and ON 2. The data show magnetic field strengths of the order -80 ?G toward DR 22 alone with no significant detections toward ON 2. This information is used to estimate the magnetic energy of the DR 22 star-forming cloud, and allows for a complete analysis of the energetics of the region revealing the role of the magnetic field. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

Mayo, Elizabeth A.; Troland, T. H.

2010-01-01

293

[Notes and brief thoughts about Dr. Luis Cifuentes Delatte (1907-2005)].  

PubMed

This paper offers a brief biographical sketch of Dr. Luis Cifuentes Delatte (1907-2005) and his professional and educational activities developed in his late years in the Department of Urology at Fundacion Jimenez Diaz (1979-1987), from the perspective, the testimony and particular point of view of the author. In addition, we emphasize the friendship of Dr. Luis Cifuentes with the philosopher Xavier Zubiri (1898-1983) and his cultural links with the intellectual society of his time, his origin and personal trajectory from the Ortega's philosophical-humanist view. In the same way we emphasize Dr. Luis Cifuentes Delatte's contribution to the National Academy of Medicine, where he was member (1972-2005), summarizing his lectures; we also briefly show some of the, unfortunately scarce, autobiographical memories the distinguished urologist published. PMID:19166104

Gómiz-León, Juan José

2008-12-01

294

Collected Papers in Structural Mechanics Honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This special publication contains a collection of structural mechanics papers honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr. presented at the 46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference held in Austin, Texas, April 18-21, 2005. Contributors to this publication represent a small number of those influenced by Dr. Starnes' technical leadership, his technical prowess and diversity, and his technical breath and depth in engineering mechanics. These papers cover some of the research areas Dr. Starnes investigated, which included buckling, postbuckling, and collapse of structures; composite structural mechanics, residual strength and damage tolerance of metallic and composite structures; and aircraft structural design, certification and verification. He actively pursued technical understanding and clarity, championed technical excellence, and modeled humility and perseverance.

Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Compiler); Nemeth, Michael P. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

2006-01-01

295

DRB genotyping supports recessive inheritance of DR3-associated susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed Central

The mode of inheritance of HLA-associated susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus was investigated by the antigen genotype frequency among patients method in a white Caucasian population and a North Indian Asian population. DR genotypes were determined by DRB/DQB RFLP analysis. In white Caucasians, simple recessive and simple additive inheritance of a single HLA-associated disease susceptibility allele were rejected (P less than .025 and P less than 10(-6), respectively). The data were compatible with a three-allele model of disease susceptibility. In North Indian Asians, simple additive inheritance was rejected (P less than 10(-6)). The observed genotype frequencies were compatible with a single DR3-associated disease susceptibility allele which is inherited recessively. These data show that study of DR genotypes in populations of different ethnic origins may further the understanding of inherited susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

Jenkins, D; Fletcher, J; Penny, M A; Mijovic, C H; Jacobs, K H; Bradwell, A R; Barnett, A H

1991-01-01

296

Targeting the Apoptotic Pathway in Chondrosarcoma Using Recombinant Human Apo2L/TRAIL (dulanermin), a Dual Pro-apoptotic Receptor (DR4/DR5) Agonist  

PubMed Central

Recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL (dulanermin) is based on the ligand for death receptors (DR4 and DR5), which promotes apoptosis. We report a patient with refractory chondrosarcoma who demonstrated a prolonged response to dulanermin, and explore mechanisms of response and resistance. This heavily pretreated patient had progressive metastatic chondrosarcoma to the lung. On dulanermin (8 mg/kg IV on days 1 through 5 in a 21-day cycle) the patient achieved a sustained partial response with only sub-centimeter nodules remaining. After 62 months of dulanermin treatment, progressive disease in the lungs was noted, and the patient underwent a resection that confirmed chondrosarcoma. DR4 was detected (immunohistochemistry) in the patient’s tumor, which may have enabled the response. However, up-regulation of pro-survival proteins, namely, phosphorylated (p)-NF-kappaBp65 (Ser 536), p-STAT3 (Tyr 705), pERK 1/2 (Thr 202/Tyr 204), p-mTOR (Ser 2448), FASN and Bcl-2, was also detected, which may have provided the underlying mechanisms for acquired dulanermin resistance. The patient was restarted on dulanermin and has continued on this treatment for an additional 16 months since surgery (78 months since initiation of treatment), with his most recent CT scans showing no evidence of disease.

Subbiah, Vivek; Brown, Robert E; Buryanek, Jamie; Trent, Jonathan; Ashkenazi, Avi; Herbst, Roy; Kurzrock, Razelle

2012-01-01

297

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is primarily associated with HLA-DR8 but not DQ4 on the DR8-DQ4 haplotype  

PubMed Central

Objective: To unveil the primary association of JIA—that is, with DR8 or DQ4. Methods: DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 alleles of 585 Norwegian and 47 Polish unrelated patients with JIA (categorised as pauciarticular and rheumatoid factor negative polyarticular JIA), and of 3155 Norwegian and 158 Polish unrelated controls, were typed using a polymerase chain reaction or oligonucleotide hybridisation and sequence-specific primers method. Results: Several haplotypes which encoded DR8 (that is, carried DRB1*08) and which did not encode DQ4 (that is, did not carry DQA1*0401) were found. Such haplotypes were found in three Norwegian patients and two controls (p=0.029). In the Polish population such haplotypes were found among four patients with JIA and two controls (p=0.025). No haplotypes which carried DQA1*0401 and DQB1*0402 in the absence of DRB1*08 were found, either among patients with JIA (Polish and Norwegian) or among the controls (Polish). Conclusion: On the DR8-DQ4 haplotype the DRB1*08 allele is primarily associated with JIA.

Smerdel, A; Ploski, R; Flato, B; Musiej-Nowakowska, E; Thorsby, E; Forre, O

2002-01-01

298

Characterization of a Novel Anti-DR5 Monoclonal Antibody WD1 with the Potential to Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis  

PubMed Central

TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a TNF family member capable of inducing apoptosis. Death receptor 5 (DR 5) is a key receptor of TRAIL and plays an important role in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DR5, cDNA encoding soluble DR5 (sDR5) was firstly amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers, and then inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a. The recombinant plasmid was expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3), and sDR5 was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. As an antigen, sDR5 was used to immunize mice. Hybridomas secreting antibodies against sDR5 were identified. One positive clone was selected to produce antibody, WD1. ELISA and immunofluorescence demonstrated that WD1 could bind recombinant sDR5 and membranebound DR5 (mDR5) on Jurkat and Molt-4 cells. ATPLite assays showed that Jurkat and Molt-4 cells were sensitive to the antibody in a dose dependent manner. The Annexin V/PI assays and Giemsa's staining both showed that WD1 could induce Jurkat cell apoptosis efficiently. Transient transfection of 293T cells and indirect immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that mAb (WD1) couldn't cross-react with DR4. Our findings indicated that the novel antibody, WD1 could act as a direct agonist, bind DR5 characteristically, and initiate efficient apoptotic signaling and tumor regression. Thus, WD1 would be a leading candidate for potential cancer therapeutics.

Wang, Jing; Lin, Zhou; Qiao, Chunxia; Lv, Ming; Yu, Ming; Xiao, He; Wang, Qingyang; Wang, Liyan; Feng, Jiannan; Shen, Beifen; Ma, Yangfang; Li, Yan

2008-01-01

299

Electrical behavior of a Teflon AF-DR1\\/PMMA film-system as nonlinear optical electret  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teflon AF, a new fluoroplastic amorphous materials with many new excellent features, is deposited on the DR1\\/PMMA sample by spin coating to form a Teflon AF-DR1\\/PMMA system in order that the poling stability of DR1\\/PMMA can be improved. In this paper, the experimental results of isothermal surface voltage decay and the thermally stimulated current spectra are reported and discussed

Tingji Lu; Hongyan Zhang

1996-01-01

300

A novel HLA-DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct treats experimental stroke  

PubMed Central

Chemoattraction of leukocytes into the brain after induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) increases the lesion size and worsens disease outcome. Our previous studies demonstrated that partial MHC class II constructs can reverse this process. However, the potential application of pMHC to human stroke is limited by the need to rapidly match recipient MHC class II with the ?1 domain of the pMHC construct. We designed a novel recombinant protein comprised of the HLA-DR?1 domain linked to MOG-35-55 peptide but lacking the ?1 domain found in pMHC and treated MCAO after 4 h reperfusion in humanized DR2 mice. Infarct volumes were quantified after 96 h reperfusion and immune cells from the periphery and CNS were evaluated for expression of CD74 and other cell surface, cytokine and pathway markers. This study demonstrates that four daily treatments with DR?1-MOG-35-55 reduced infarct size by 40 % in the cortex, striatum and hemisphere, inhibited the migration of activated CD11b+CD45high cells from the periphery to the brain and reversed splenic atrophy. Furthermore, DR?1-MOG-35-55 bound to CD74 on monocytes and blocked both binding and downstream signaling of macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) that may play a key role in infarct development. The novel DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct is highly therapeutic in experimental stroke and could be given to all patients at least 4 h after stroke onset without the need for tissue typing due to universal expression of DR?1 in humans.

Benedek, Gil; Zhu, Wenbin; Libal, Nicole; Casper, Amanda; Yu, Xiaolin; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

2014-01-01

301

A novel HLA-DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct treats experimental stroke.  

PubMed

Chemoattraction of leukocytes into the brain after induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) increases the lesion size and worsens disease outcome. Our previous studies demonstrated that partial MHC class II constructs can reverse this process. However, the potential application of pMHC to human stroke is limited by the need to rapidly match recipient MHC class II with the ?1 domain of the pMHC construct. We designed a novel recombinant protein comprised of the HLA-DR?1 domain linked to MOG-35-55 peptide but lacking the ?1 domain found in pMHC and treated MCAO after 4 h reperfusion in humanized DR2 mice. Infarct volumes were quantified after 96 h reperfusion and immune cells from the periphery and CNS were evaluated for expression of CD74 and other cell surface, cytokine and pathway markers. This study demonstrates that four daily treatments with DR?1-MOG-35-55 reduced infarct size by 40 % in the cortex, striatum and hemisphere, inhibited the migration of activated CD11b+CD45high cells from the periphery to the brain and reversed splenic atrophy. Furthermore, DR?1-MOG-35-55 bound to CD74 on monocytes and blocked both binding and downstream signaling of macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) that may play a key role in infarct development. The novel DR?1-MOG-35-55 construct is highly therapeutic in experimental stroke and could be given to all patients at least 4 h after stroke onset without the need for tissue typing due to universal expression of DR?1 in humans. PMID:24122483

Benedek, Gil; Zhu, Wenbin; Libal, Nicole; Casper, Amanda; Yu, Xiaolin; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Alkayed, Nabil J; Offner, Halina

2014-03-01

302

Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production using waste vegetable oil by Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2.  

PubMed

To produce polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from inexpensive substrates by bacteria, vegetable-oil-degrading bacteria were isolated from a rice field using enrichment cultivation. The isolated Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 showed clear orange or red spots of accumulated PHA granules when grown on phosphate and nitrogen limited medium containing vegetable oil as the sole carbon source and stained with Nile blue A. Up to 37.34% (w/w) of intracellular PHA was produced from corn oil, which consisted of three major 3-hydroxyalkanoates; octanoic (C8:0, 37.75% of the total 3-hydroxyalkanoate content of PHA), decanoic (C10:0, 36.74%), and dodecanoic (C12:0, 11.36%). Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated up to 23.52% (w/w) of PHAMCL from waste vegetable oil. The proportion of 3- hydroxyalkanoate of the waste vegetable-oil-derived PHA [hexanoic (5.86%), octanoic (45.67%), decanoic (34.88%), tetradecanoic (8.35%), and hexadecanoic (5.24%)] showed a composition ratio different from that of the corn-oil-derived PHA. Strain DR2 used three major fatty acids in the same ratio, and linoleic acid was the major source of PHA production. Interestingly, the production of PHA in Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 could not occur in either acetate- or butyrate-amended media. Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated a greater amount of PHA than other well-studied strains (Chromobacterium violaceum and Ralstonia eutropha H16) when grown on vegetable oil. The data showed that Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 was capable of producing PHA from waste vegetable oil. PMID:18756101

Song, Jin Hwan; Jeon, Che Ok; Choi, Mun Hwan; Yoon, Sung Chul; Park, Woojun

2008-08-01

303

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Kathryn L. Braun, DrPH  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Kathryn L. Braun is Professor and Chair of the DrPH Program in the Department of Public Health Sciences. She has a joint appointment with the School of Social Work, where she serves as Co-Investigator of the National Resource Center for Native Hawaiian Elders. She is affiliated with the UH Center on Aging, through which she serves as evaluator for the Hawai'i Healthy Aging Partnership, dedicated to building capacity to deliver evidence-based health promotion programs for older adults.

304

Interview with Dr. Mark Cockett: Current Trends in Screening for Antiviral Therapeutics  

PubMed Central

Dr. Mark Cockett is Vice President of Infectious Diseases and Applied Genomics at Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS). In this interview, we ask Dr. Cockett about considerations that major pharmaceutical companies such as BMS make when screening for and developing antiviral small molecule therapeutics. We discuss the rationale behind an unbiased screening approach that led to recent published work identifying a hepatitis C-specific NS5A inhibitor. We conclude by asking about the emerging role of academia in antiviral drug discovery and future directions of pathogen drug discovery in general.

Brahme, Nina N.; Noblin, Devin J.

2010-01-01

305

Coexpression of Aspartic Proteinases and Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR in Human Transplanted Lung  

PubMed Central

Aspartic proteinases have recently been shown to be implicated in antigen processing. We explored the expression of two aspartic proteinases, cathepsins E and D, and of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) molecules in a consecutive series of 80 transbronchial biopsies from transplanted lungs. For controls, we studied five normal donor lungs (not suitable for transplantation on account of thoracic trauma) and macroscopically normal areas of three cancer-affected lungs. Two of the five unsuitable donor lungs showed minimal inflammatory changes. Macroscopically normal samples from the three cancerous lungs showed mild and focal inflammatory infiltrates. In histologically normal lungs, HLA-DR expression was limited to professional antigenpresenting cells. Macroscopically normal lung samples with minimal inflammatory changes from both donor and cancer lungs showed variable HLA-DR expression by alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells and by endothelial cells. All transplanted lung biopsies showed HLA-DR expression by epithelial (alveolar and bronchial) and endothelial cells, with a trend for increased positivity in acute rejection. Cathepsin E was restricted to Clara and to rare bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue-related epithelial cells in histologically normal lung samples, whereas minimal de novo cathepsin E expression by rare alveolar pneumocytes was noted in control lung samples exhibiting minimal inflammatory changes. In all transplanted lung biopsies, cathepsin E was diffusely expressed de novo by hyperplastic alveolar epithelial cells, regardless of the presence or degree of rejection. Cathepsin D was expressed only by alveolar macrophages and by ciliated bronchial cells of normal, minimally inflamed, and transplanted lungs. In transplanted lung, Clara cells and several hyperplastic alveolar pneumocytes coexpressed HLA-DR and cathepsin E, whereas all alveolar macrophages and a few ciliated cells coexpressed cathepsin D and HLA-DR The present investigation suggests that the de novo expression of cathepsin E and HLA-DR by hyperplastic alveolar pneumocytes of transplanted lung may be crucial for antigen processing and presentation to recipient competent T cells, and thus for the triggering of the immune-inflammatory cascade that leads to rejection. ImagesFigure 5Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6

Arbustini, Eloisa; Morbini, Patrizia; Diegoli, Marta; Grasso, Maurizia; Fasani, Roberta; Vitulo, Patrizio; Fiocca, Roberto; Cremaschi, Paolo; Volpato, Gino; Martinelli, Luigi; Vigano, Mario; Samloff, I Michael; Solcia, Enrico

1994-01-01

306

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dr. George Voelz was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). This oral history covers Dr. Voelz`s research on Manhattan Engineering District plutonium workers, the acute and long term effects of radiation, his inhalation studies, and his activities at the 1961 INL reactor accident (SL-1 Reactor). After a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Voelz his remembrances on tissue studies of plutonium workers, the plutonium injection studies of 1945-1946, the controlled environmental radioiodine tests of 1963-1968, and tracer studies with human volunteers at Los Alamos. Dr. Voelz states his opinions concerning misconceptions about the Los Alamos Human Radiation Experiments.

NONE

1995-05-01

307

HLA-DR polymorphism in a Senegalese Mandenka population: DNA oligotyping and population genetics of DRB1 specificities.  

PubMed Central

HLA class II loci are useful markers in human population genetics, because they are extremely variable and because new molecular techniques allow large-scale analysis of DNA allele frequencies. Direct DNA typing by hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (HLA oligotyping) after enzymatic in vitro PCR amplification detects HLA allelic polymorphisms for all class II loci. A detailed HLA-DR oligotyping analysis of 191 individuals from a geographically, culturally, and genetically well-defined western African population, the Mandenkalu, reveals a high degree of polymorphism, with at least 24 alleles and a heterozygosity level of .884 for the DRB1 locus. The allele DRB1*1304, defined by DNA sequencing of the DRB1 first-domain exon, is the most frequent allele (27.1%). It accounts for an unusually high DR13 frequency, which is nevertheless within the neutral frequency range. The next most frequent specificities are DR11, DR3, and DR8. Among DRB3-encoded alleles, DR52b (DRB3*02) represents as much as 80.7% of all DR52 haplotypes. A survey of HLA-DR specificities in populations from different continents shows a significant positive correlation between genetic and geographic differentiation patterns. A homozygosity test for selective neutrality of DR specificities is not significant for the Mandenka population but is rejected for 20 of 24 populations. Observed high heterozygosity levels in tested populations are compatible with an overdominant model with a small selective advantage for heterozygotes.

Tiercy, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Excoffier, L; Shi-Isaac, X; Jeannet, M; Mach, B; Langaney, A

1992-01-01

308

Association of HLA-DR, DQ genotype with different beta-cell functions at IDDM diagnosis in Japanese children.  

PubMed

Japanese IDDM patients have been demonstrated to have unique and different HLA associations from white patients. To elucidate the effect of HLA-associated genetic factors on the clinical heterogeneity of IDDM in Japanese people, HLA-DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 genotypes in 88 childhood-onset Japanese IDDM patients were examined by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) or sequence-specific primers (SSP). Of the 88 IDDM patients, 26 (29.5%) had DRB1*0405-DQA1*0302-DQB1*0401/X (DR4-DQ4/X), 38 (43.2%) had DRB1*0901-DQA1*0302-DQB1*0303/X (DR9-DQ9/X), and 9 (10.2%) were DR4/9-DQ4/9 heterozygous in the present study (X does not contain protective alleles). Clinical heterogeneity such as age distribution at onset, prevalence and serum level of anti-GAD antibodies (GADAb), and residual pancreatic beta-cell function after diagnosis were compared between patients with HLA-DR4-DQ4 and DR9-DQ9. The frequency of DR9-DQ9 genotype was significantly higher in the younger (0-10 years) than in the older (11-16 years) age-group of onset, but the frequency of DR4-DQ4 was higher in the older (11-16 years) age-group. Although no association of DR-DQ genotypes with the prevalence and serum level of GADAb was found among newly diagnosed patients, long-standing DR9-DQ9 patients had significantly higher levels of GADAb than those with DR4-DQ4. While no difference in time course of serum C-peptide (CPR) levels was detected between GADAb+ and GADAb- patients, a remarkable difference was demonstrated between DR9-DQ9 and DR4-DQ4 patients. The residual pancreatic beta-cell function was retained more in patients with DR4-DQ4 than in those with DR9-DQ9 at diagnosis through 12-18 months after diagnosis. These results suggest that the DR9-DQ9 genotype may induce stronger autoimmune destructive response (T-helper 1 function) against target beta-cells than the DR4-DQ4 genotype does. Our findings may warrant further studies on the association of diabetogenic autoimmune response with HLA class II molecules and contribute to a clarification of interracial differences in HLA-encoded susceptibility to IDDM. PMID:9356042

Sugihara, S; Sakamaki, T; Konda, S; Murata, A; Wataki, K; Kobayashi, Y; Minamitani, K; Miyamoto, S; Sasaki, N; Niimi, H

1997-11-01

309

The HLA-DR phenotype of the responder is predictive of humoral response against HLA class I antigens.  

PubMed

Recent studies suggest that the immunogenicity of an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility should be considered in the context of the HLA phenotype of the recipient. The HLA-DR phenotype of the responder is thought to be predictive for the strength of the alloimmune response. In order to analyze the humoral response against HLA class I antigens in the context of the HLA-DR phenotype of the responder, we selected all HLA-DR homozygous Dutch patients that were present on the Eurotransplant waiting list between 1967 and 2000 (n=1,317 patients). By logistic regression it was determined whether antibody production against a specific HLA class I antigen is associated with a particular HLA-DR antigen in the patient. Furthermore, it was analyzed whether a patient, expressing a particular HLA-DR antigen, preferentially produces antibodies against particular HLA class I antigens. The results demonstrate that patients, homozygous for a certain HLA-DR antigen, cannot be considered high or low responders when analyzing the antibody response in terms of panel reactive antibody (PRA) value. However, a correlation can be found between the HLA-DR phenotype of the patient and the specific antibody response against HLA class I antigens. For example, antibodies against HLA-A10, -A11, -A19, and -B35 are produced more frequently by HLA-DR6 positive individuals, whereas antibodies against HLA-A3, -B5, -B7, -B8, and -B12 are produced more frequently by HLA-DR4 positive individuals. These data confirm that the HLA-DR phenotype of the responder plays a determinative role in the immunogenicity of mismatched HLA antigens. The results indicate that selection of HLA class I mismatches of the donor in the context of the HLA-DR phenotype of the responder might reduce the incidence of humoral graft rejection and minimize the sensitization grade of retransplant candidates. PMID:14700591

Dankers, Marlies K A; Roelen, Dave L; Nagelkerke, Nico J D; de Lange, Peter; Persijn, Guido G; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Claas, Frans H J

2004-01-01

310

Role of polymorphic residues of human leucocyte antigen-DR molecules on the binding of human immunodeficiency virus peptides.  

PubMed Central

A study was made of the binding properties of 96 human immunodeficiency virus peptides to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR1 and HLA-DR103 molecules, which differ by three amino acids at positions 67, 70 and 71 in the beta chains. The affinity of the peptides was characterized by their inhibitory concentrations in competitive binding assays which displace half of the labelled influenza haemagglutinin peptide HA306-318 (IC50). Among the high-affinity peptides (IC50 < or = 1 microM), seven bound to DR1, three to DR103 and five equally well to both alleles (promiscuous peptides). Thirty-two other peptides showed medium or low affinity for DR molecules. The role of polymorphic residues was analysed using six mutated DR molecules, intermediates between DR1 and DR103 and differing by one or two substitutions at positions 67, 70 or 71. We reached the same conclusions when using DR1-specific or DR103-specific peptides: modification of residue 70 had no effect on peptide affinity, but single substitution at positions 67 or 71 decreased the allele specificity of the peptides while double substitution at 67 and 71 completely reversed the peptide specificity. In functional assays, DR-binding peptides are able to outcompete specific T-cell proliferation. Furthermore, modification at position 67 or 70 significantly affects the T-cell response and mutation at position 71 abolishes completely the T-cell proliferation. Thus, the polymorphic positions 67 and 71 contributed to the peptide binding with direct effects on T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition while position 70 seems to be mostly engaged in TCR interactions. Furthermore, our results suggest that polymorphic residues may select allele-specific peptides and also influence the conformation of promiscuous peptides.

Jurcevic, S; Praud, C; Coppin, H L; Bertrand, A; Ricard, S; Thomsen, M; Lakhdar-Ghazal, F; De Preval, C

1996-01-01

311

Fowler Prize for Astronomy: Dr Sarah Bridle; Fowler Prize for Geophysics: Dr David Tsiklauri; The Jackson-Gwilt Medal: Prof. Peter Ade; Award for Service: Prof. Sir Arnold Wolfendale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fowler Prize for Astronomy is given to Dr Sarah Bridle of University College London. The Fowler Prize for Geophysics is given to Dr David Tsiklauri of the University of Salford. The Jackson-Gwilt Medal is awarded to Prof. Peter Ade of Cardiff University. The Award for Service to Astronomy is given to Prof. Sir Arnold Wolfendale of Durham University.

2009-02-01

312

Stories from the Creativity Garden: a series of interviews with Dr. Mary Murdock  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project explores the curricular development of the Creativity Domain fromthe perspective of Dr. Mary Murdock in a series of informal discussions and video clips with me. We discuss some of the curriculum highlights and processes that she has worked with from her time as a graduate assistant in Georgia to her tenure at Buffalo State College. The recordings have

Carol Yeager

2008-01-01

313

Dr. Gordon Fahrni, who lived history of both Canada and the CMA, dies at 108  

PubMed Central

Dr. Gordon Samuel Fahrni, Canada's oldest physician and a past president of the CMA, died Nov. 3 at the age of 108. He will be remembered for a lifetime of service to the profession as a clinician, teacher, military physician, scientist, writer and leader in organized medicine. Imagesp1773-ap1774-ap1775-a

Rafuse, Jill

1995-01-01

314

Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, 1858-1964: Teacher, Scholar, and Timeless Womanist  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examines the various accomplishments and achievements of Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, a social activist-educator, scholar and an early model for African-American feminist theory. Cooper was a great public intellectual and teacher, as she highly attacked the prevalence of racism, sexism and poverty through her writings and by working with…

Giles, Mark S.

2006-01-01

315

Narrating International and National Trends in US Science Education: An Autobiographical Approach Showcasing Dr. Robert Yager  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This biographical piece is based on a conversation involving Bob Yager, Geeta Verma, and Lisa Martin-Hansen which took place at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) conference in March, 2008. The unique aspect of this autobiographical piece is that it highlights Dr. Yager's account about the emergence of the science…

Verma, Geeta; Martin-Hansen, Lisa

2009-01-01

316

Selection and implementation of Dr. Martha Rogers' nursing conceptual model in an acute care setting.  

PubMed

The Nursing Service of the San Diego Veteran's Administration Medical Center identified the need to implement a nursing conceptual model as a basis for practice. The process of choosing and implementing Dr. Martha Rogers' conceptual model is discussed and examples of clinical application are included. PMID:2790665

Heggie, J R; Schoenmehl, P A; Chang, M K; Grieco, C

1989-01-01

317

Dr. Paul Ferrara, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 2001, Dr. Paul Ferrara, Director of the Virginia Division of Forensic Science, located some swabs from the rape kit, which were left in the lab notebook of the original forensic scientist assigned to Marvin AndersonÃÂs case. Using this sample, the Innocence Project was able to do the DNA profiling to exonerate Marvin Anderson.

2008-10-06

318

Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The following slides were presented as part of the LDRD 20120077DR Progress Appraisal Review held Tuesday, February 4, 2014. This is part of an ongoing project assessment the previous of which was documented in LA-UR-13-21182. This presentation documents ...

A. J. Sierk F. K. Tovesson M. C. White

2014-01-01

319

Why We Do Not Have Ethical Conduct: A Response to Dr. Sternberg  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "We Need to Teach for Ethical Conduct," Dr. Robert Sternberg argued that students act unethically because they are unable to transfer principles of ethics into practice. While I agree that this is partially the case, it is also the case that unethical behavior is a result of the prevailing educational-philosophy: radical…

Carson, Jamin

2014-01-01

320

Incidencia de enfermedades quirúrgicas neonatales en el Hospital Universitario Dr. José Eleuterio González  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe and analyze the incidence of congenital anomalies that require surgical correction in newborns treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of the Hospital Universitario Dr. Jose Eleuterio González from January 2003 to December 2004 and compare the results to those in the literature. Material and methods: The charts of patients admitted to the NICU between January

Cynthia Marisol; Rodríguez Treviño; Eleazar Martínez Vargas; José Aquilino Pino Pérez; Leticia Valenzuela García; Isaías Rodríguez Balderrama

321

Knowledge based framework for localization of retinal landmarks from diabetic retinopathy (DR) images  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose an algorithm for the detection of retinal landmarks (optic nerve head or optic disc, macula, and vasculature) based on optic cup location and anatomical structural details from diabetic retinopathy (DR) images of both left and right eye. Our algorithm uses color fundus images obtained from mydriatic camera. The algorithm proceeds through four main steps 1. Color image pre-processing-

Joshi Manisha Shivram; Rekha Patil

2010-01-01

322

Dr. George Mueller Follows the Progress of the Apollo 11 Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. George E. Mueller, Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, NASA, follows the progress of the Apollo 11 mission. This photo was taken on July 16, 1969 in the Launch Control Center at the Spaceport on the morning of the launch.

1969-01-01

323

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1990-09-01

324

Interview with Dr. Charles Nolan: Dean of Admissions, Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with Dr. Charles Nolan, the former Dean of Admission at the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, in Needham, Massachusetts. Chartered in 1997, Olin College has taken a new approach to undergraduate engineering education by providing its students with both a solid engineering background and knowledge in the…

Helms, Robin Matross

2003-01-01

325

The association of HLA-DR3 with specific IgE to inhaled acid anhydrides.  

PubMed

We have undertaken a case referent study of the association between HLA allele frequency and specific IgE antibody to acid anhydride-human serum albumin (AA-HSA) conjugates among acid anhydride workers. Thirty cases with radio-allergosorbent test score versus AA-HSA conjugates > 2 were compared with 30 referents without specific IgE selected from the same factory sites as the cases and matched for age, sex, duration of exposure, atopic status, and smoking habit. We found a significant excess of HLA-DR3 in the cases with specific IgE to acid anhydrides when compared with the referents (50% versus 14%, Fisher's statistic = 8.4; odds ratio = 6, p = 0.05 corrected). The excess of HLA-DR3 was particularly associated with IgE versus trimellitic anhydride, with HLA-DR3 present in eight of 11 workers with and in two of 14 referents without IgE (Fisher's statistic = 8.5, odds ratio = 16, p = 0.004). The proportion of HLA-DR3 among the phthalic anhydride workers was not different in those with IgE (two of 12) from their referents (two of 14). These findings suggest MHC II proteins are an important determinant of the specificity of the IgE response to an inhaled hapten. PMID:7812558

Young, R P; Barker, R D; Pile, K D; Cookson, W O; Taylor, A J

1995-01-01

326

In memorium Dr. Agatha Gijzen (1904-1995), eminent museum historian and zoo biologist  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr Agatha Gijzen (Rotterdam *9 October 1904, Merksem\\/Belgium †19 February 1995) was a remarkable zoologist in more than one respect. Although her professional career, spanning more than three and a half decades, was largely spent as a staff zoologist in the service of the famous Antwerp\\/ Planckendael zoological gardens complex in Belgium (1947-1974), she had already made her name as

Bruggen van A. C

1996-01-01

327

A Professional Point of View from a Personal Perspective: Revisiting 1985 Interview with Dr. Natalie Barraga.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This reprint of a 1985 interview with Natalie Barraga, a leader and researcher in visual impairment, is prefaced by personal comments of the interviewer and also includes comments by Dr. Barraga in 2003. These comments address trends in personnel preparation, proposed changes in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, early intervention…

Barraga, Natalie; Bina, Michael J.

2003-01-01

328

Peptide binding specificity of HLA-DR4 molecules: correlation with rheumatoid arthritis association  

PubMed Central

We have investigated whether sequence 67 to 74 shared by beta chains of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated HLA-DR molecules imparts a specific pattern of peptide binding. The peptide binding specificity of the RA-associated molecules, DRB1*0401, DRB1*0404, and the closely related, RA nonassociated DRB1*0402 was, therefore, determined using designer peptide libraries. The effect of single key residues was tested with site-directed mutants of DRB1*0401. The results have demonstrated striking differences between RA-linked and unlinked DR allotypes in selecting the portion of peptides that interacts with the 67-74 area. Most differences were associated with a single amino acid exchange at position 71 of the DR beta chain, and affected the charge of residues potentially contacting position 71. The observed binding patterns permitted an accurate prediction of natural protein derived peptide sequences that bind selectively to RA-associated DR molecules. Thus, the 67-74 region, in particular position 71, induces changes of binding specificity that correlate with the genetic linkage of RA susceptibility. These findings should facilitate the identification of autoantigenic peptides involved in the pathogenesis of RA.

1995-01-01

329

Energy crisis: alternate solutions by 1982. [Dr. Edward Teller appraisal of President's plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. Teller reviews the proposals announced by President Carter in his April 1977 program. He agrees with the program as a whole, but disagrees with some issues. Some facts are pointed out to refute the President's statement that we are running out of oil. Other areas of disagreement involve curing the nation's energy ills by condoning more government interference and

1977-01-01

330

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune: A Life Devoted to Service  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the leadership traits of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, an African-American woman of history, using the servant leadership theory developed by Robert K. Greenberg and the ten characteristics of servant leadership as conceived by Larry C. Spears. This exploration seeks to identify the significant…

Long, Kim Cliett

2011-01-01

331

If Dr. King Were a Principal: Building the "Beloved Community" in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors offer a more humanistic vision of educational community, one that is substantive in content yet flexible in its application to the diverse contexts in which American schooling occurs. In doing so, the authors turn specifically to the nonviolent philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and consider what a school…

Hillis, Michael; Woolworth, Stephen

2008-01-01

332

Branded: The Economic Geographies of Streets Named in Honor of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the economic geographies of streets named for Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (MLK Streets), which are an increasingly common means by which various community members across the United States are attempting to commemorate the slain civil rights leader. It is our intent to characterize these negatively \\

Matthew L. Mitchelson; Derek H. Alderman; E. Jeffrey Popke

2007-01-01

333

The rhetoric of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Comedy and context in tragic collision  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several critics of the rhetoric of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., have noted changes in the content and style of his address toward the end of his career. None, though, have made a systematic generic assessment of those changes, nor have they linked such generic transformations to King's altered situation, the new type of movement he was then leading, the

Edward C. Appel

1997-01-01

334

Regional Trade Agreements and Implications for US Agriculture: The Case of CAFTA-DR  

Microsoft Academic Search

At present the United States is actively engaged in twelve bilateral and five regional trade agreements or initiatives (Table 1). These agreements are designed to provide the United States with additional access to foreign markets and help foster positive relationships with trading part- ners. Among these is the Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). Given the current debate on

Mechel S. Paggi; P. Lynn Kennedy; Fumiko Yamazaki; Timothy E. Josling

2005-01-01

335

Providing for Giftedness throughout the Educational Process. An Interview with Dr. Donald J. Treffinger.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An interview with Dr. Donald J. Treffinger, an author and educator involved in gifted education, reveals his views regarding a "better blend" between gifted programing activities and the total school program. Such an approach would include more students in a larger variety of enrichment activities. (CB)

Sansone, Rosemary M.

1987-01-01

336

High incidence of anticytomegalovirus drug resistance among D+R- kidney transplant recipients receiving preemptive therapy.  

PubMed

Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis is recommended in D+R- kidney transplant recipients (KTR), but is associated with a theoretical increased risk of developing anti-CMV drug resistance. This hypothesis was retested in this study by comparing 32 D+R- KTR who received 3 months prophylaxis (valganciclovir) with 80 D+R- KTR who received preemptive treatment. The incidence of CMV infections was higher in the preemptive group than in the prophylactic group (60% vs. 34%, respectively; p = 0.02). Treatment failure (i.e. a positive DNAemia 8 weeks after the initiation of anti-CMV treatment) was more frequent in the preemptive group (31% vs. 3% in the prophylactic group; p = 0.001). Similarly, anti-CMV drug resistance (UL97?or?UL54?mutations) was also more frequent in the preemptive group (16% vs. 3% in the prophylactic group; p = 0.05). Antiviral treatment failures were associated with anti-CMV drug resistance (p = 0.0001). Patients with a CMV load over 5.25 log(10) copies/mL displayed the highest risk of developing anti-CMV drug resistance (OR = 16.91, p = 0.0008). Finally, the 1-year estimated glomerular filtration rate was reduced in patients with anti-CMV drug resistance (p = 0.02). In summary, preemptive therapy in D+R- KTR with high CMV loads and antiviral treatment failure was associated with a high incidence of anti-CMV drug resistance. PMID:21967659

Couzi, L; Helou, S; Bachelet, T; Moreau, K; Martin, S; Morel, D; Lafon, M E; Boyer, B; Alain, S; Garrigue, I; Merville, P

2012-01-01

337

Effect of HLA DR epitope de-immunization of Factor VIII in vitro and in vivo  

PubMed Central

T cell-dependent development of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies that neutralize FVIII activity is a major obstacle to replacement therapy in hemophilia A. To create a less immunogenic therapeutic protein, recombinant FVIII can be modified to reduce HLA binding of epitopes based on predicted anchoring residues. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify C2 domain HLA DR epitopes and predict site-specific mutations that reduce immunogenicity. Epitope peptides corresponding to original and modified sequences were validated in HLA binding assays and in immunizations of hemophilic E16 mice, DR3 and DR4 mice and DR3xE16 mice. Consistent with immunoinformatics predictions, original epitopes are immunogenic. Immunization with selected modified sequences lowered immunogenicity for particular peptides and revealed residual immunogenicity of incompletely de-immunized modified peptides. The stepwise approach to reduce protein immunogenicity by epitope modification illustrated here is being used to design and produce a functional full-length modified FVIII for clinical use.

Moise, Leonard; Song, Chang; Martin, William D.; Tassone, Ryan; De Groot, Anne S.; Scott, David W.

2011-01-01

338

HLA-DR Predicts the Prognosis in Scandinavian Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although most patients with sarcoidosis have a good prognosis, a significant proportion runs a more severe and prolonged disease course. There is no marker to distinguish these subpopulations of pa- tients, however. To investigate the relationship between HLA haplotype and clinical course, 122 Scan- dinavian patients with sarcoidosis were genomically typed for HLA-DR, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification

MARY BERLIN; ANNA FOGDELL-HAHN; OLLE OLERUP; ANDERS EKLUND; JOHAN GRUNEWALD

339

It Really Is All about the Child: An Interview with Dr. Edward Hallowell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a decade when brain research has helped people understand learning difficulties in children, and people have seen increased media attention on the use of medications to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults, Dr. Edward (Ned) Hallowell has worked tirelessly to educate the medical profession, parents,…

Peters, Dane L.

2012-01-01

340

Putting Functional Behavioral Assessment into Practice: A Conversation with Dr. Richard Van Acker.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this interview, Dr. Richard Van Acker discusses federal requirements for functional behavioral assessments (FBAs) and the teamwork involved in conducting an FBA. Various components of FBAs and the approximate time required are outlined and examples are provided of structured data collection for use in the FBA. (CR)

Bullock, Lyndal M.; Gable, Robert A.

1999-01-01

341

Photographer: Digital Telepresence: Dr Murial Ross's Virtual Reality Application for Neuroscience  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Photographer: Digital Telepresence: Dr Murial Ross's Virtual Reality Application for Neuroscience Research Biocomputation. To study human disorders of balance and space motion sickness. Shown here is a 3D reconstruction of a nerve ending in inner ear, nature's wiring of balance organs.

1995-01-01

342

Integration of RFID, GNSS and DR for Ubiquitous Positioning in Pedestrian Navigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Location determination of pedestrians in urban and indoor environment can be very challenging if GNSS signals are blocked and only pseudorange measurements to less than four statellites are avialable. Therefore a combination with other wireless technologies for absolute position determination and dead reckoning (DR) for relative positioning has to be performed. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an emerging technology that

Guenther Retscher; Qing Fu

2007-01-01

343

Data fusion of ALV GPS\\/DR integrated navigation system based on BP neural network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrated navigation system of ALV is discussed in this paper, a data fusion method based on BP (back propagation) neural network is proposed for ALV's GPS\\/DR integrated navigation. System models have been established based on this data fusion method. Integrated navigation system uses GPS parameters as criterion to judge the validity of GPS. When GPS is valid, neural network is

Meiling Wang; Yongwei Fu

2009-01-01

344

Citizenship Ceremony for Dr. von Braun and German-Born Scientists and Engineers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a swearing-in ceremony held at Huntsville High School, one hundred and three German-born scientists and engineers, along with family members, took the oath of citizenship to become United States citizens. Among those taking the oath was Dr. Wernher von Braun, located in the second row, right side, third from the end.

1955-01-01

345

African American Women Scholars and International Research: Dr. Anna Julia Cooper's Legacy of Study Abroad  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

EIn this article, the author presents a little-known but detailed history of Black women's tradition of study abroad. Specifically, she situates Dr. Anna Julia Cooper within the landscape of historic African American students who studied in Japan, Germany, Jamaica, England, Italy, Haiti, India, West Africa, and Thailand, in addition to France. The…

Evans, Stephanie Y.

2009-01-01

346

Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the Marshall Space Flight Center's neutral buoyancy simulator.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director, points and asks a question about the operation of the center's neutral buoyancy facility in the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. The facility was used to test and evaluate hardware and operations hat were planned for Apollo applications program flights.

1999-01-01

347

Dr. Wernher Von Braun on Tour With U.S. congressman Armistead Seldon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

U.S. representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) tries on an astronaut maneuvering unit mockup during a tour of the Saturn I workshop at the Marshall Space Flight center. Explaining the unit and the workshop to Representative Seldon is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Center.

1999-01-01

348

GENESI-DR - A single access point to Earth Science data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The amount of information being generated about our planet is increasing at an exponential rate, but it must be easily accessible in order to apply it to the global needs relating to the state of the Earth. Currently, information about the state of the Earth, relevant services, analysis results, applications and tools are accessible in a very scattered and uncoordinated way, often through individual initiatives from Earth Observation mission operators, scientific institutes dealing with ground measurements, service companies, data catalogues, etc. A dedicated infrastructure providing transparent access to all this will support Earth Science communities by allowing them to easily and quickly derive objective information and share knowledge based on all environmentally sensitive domains. The use of high-speed networks (GÉANT) and the experimentation of new technologies, like BitTorrent, will also contribute to better services for the Earth Science communities. GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories), an ESA-led, European Commission (EC)-funded two-year project, is taking the lead in providing reliable, easy, long-term access to Earth Science data via the Internet. This project will allow scientists from different Earth Science disciplines located across Europe to locate, access, combine and integrate historical and fresh Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors archived in large distributed repositories. GENESI-DR builds a federated collection of heterogeneous digital Earth Science repositories to establish a dedicated infrastructure providing transparent access to all this and allowing Earth Science communities to easily and quickly derive objective information and share knowledge based on all environmentally sensitive domains. The federated digital repositories, seen as services and data providers, will share access to their resources (catalogue functions, data access, processing services etc.) and will adhere to a common set of standards / policies / interfaces. The end-users will be provided with a virtual collection of digital Earth Science data, irrespectively of their location in the various single federated repositories. GENESI-DR objectives have lead to the identification of the basic GENESI-DR infrastructure requirements: • Capability, for Earth Science users, to discover data from different European Earth Science Digital Repositories through the same interface in a transparent and homogeneous way; • Easiness and speed of access to large volumes of coherently maintained distributed data in an effective and timely way; • Capability, for DR owners, to easily make available their data to a significantly increased audience with no need to duplicate them in a different storage system. Data discovery is based on a Central Discovery Service, which allows users and applications to easily query information about data collections and products existing in heterogeneous catalogues, at federated DR sites. This service can be accessed by users via web interface, the GENESI-DR Web Portal, or by external applications via open standardized interfaces exposed by the system. The Central Discovery Service identifies the DRs providing products complying with the user search criteria and returns the corresponding access points to the requester. By taking into consideration different and efficient data transfer technologies such as HTTPS, GridFTP and BitTorrent, the infrastructure provides easiness and speed of access. Conversely, for data publishing GENESI-DR provides several mechanisms to assist DR owners in producing a metadata catalogues. In order to reach its objectives, the GENESI-DR e-Infrastructure will be validated against user needs for accessing and sharing Earth Science data. Initially, four specific applications in the land, atmosphere and marine domains have been selected, including: • Near real time orthorectification for agricultural crops monitoring • Urban area mapping in support of emergency response • Data assimilation in GlobModel,

Cossu, R.; Goncalves, P.; Pacini, F.

2009-04-01

349

The Physical and Kinematic Structure of the DR 21 (OH) Star Formation Region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The DR 21 (OH) region is an area of dense molecular gas, which appears to contain a cluster of newly forming stars. DR 21 (OH) lies approximately 2.6 pc to the north of the DR 21 HII region, the strongest and best studied 5 GHz source in the Cygnus X molecular cloud complex (Mangum, Wootten, & Mundy 1992; Downes & Rinehart 1966; Harris 1973). Measurements of the H2CO, CS, and CO emission toward the DR 21 (OH) molecular cloud were made by Mangum using the VLA, the OVRO Millimeter Array, and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. CS and H2CO molecular emission from this region was examined to determine kinetic temperature and spatial density structure, while CS and CO emission was utilized to probe the outflow properties of the young stellar objects. For the DR 21 (OH) main region a third line component has been discerned in addition to the two previously detected line components, dubbed MM1 and MM2 (Mangum, Wootten, & Mundy 1992). This third component constitutes a newly resolved broad wing component indicating an outflow. Careful inspection of the CO and CS emission reveals what appears to be a bipolar outflow that is most likely associated with the MM1 source. Calibrated values for the radiative temperature of each emission line were input into a Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) model, which models the source radiative transfer mechanisms to estimate spatial density, kinetic temperature, and molecular abundance. The densities determined from LVG modeling of the wing component were used along with spectral observations of its spatial extent to determine the flux density of the outflow. Information gained from the analysis of the kinetic temperature, spatial density, and outflow structure has been used to derive the history of the star formation process in this region. Financial support provided by the NSF REU Program.

Kaleida, C. C.; Mangum, J. G.

2003-12-01

350

Adrenocortical cells of the zona reticularis normally express HLA-DR antigenic determinants.  

PubMed Central

A distinct population of normal human adrenocortical cells from adult glands spontaneously express HLA-DR, and occasionally also HLA-DQ, antigenic determinants in vivo and in vitro, as detected by immunofluorescence techniques using monoclonal antibodies on frozen tissue sections, primary cultures, and viable cell suspensions. In vivo, these antigenic determinants were found to be confined to the compact-type cells in the zona reticularis. In vitro, the adrenocortical identity of these HLA-DR+ cells was conclusively established by the characteristic change in their morphologic features induced by ACTH1-24 and by the simultaneous detection of tissue-specific adrenal autoantigens in double-label immunofluorescence staining. The cell surface expression of HLA-DR determinants by compact cells persisted in culture for several weeks and was not significantly affected by treatment with ACTH1-24. On the other hand, fetal adrenocortical cells of both transient and definitive zones were invariably negative for the expression of these HLA Class II antigenic determinants. Because normal human adrenocortical cells also express on their surface the molecules which constitute specific autoantigens in autoimmune adrenalitis, these findings argue against the notion that an ectopic HLA-DR expression associated with an otherwise "silent" autoantigen might trigger an organ-specific autoimmune response against endocrine cells. In addition, the expression of HLA-DR determinants by viable normal reticularis cells provides a readily detectable surface marker which may allow the physical separation of this population for studies in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

Khoury, E. L.; Greenspan, J. S.; Greenspan, F. S.

1987-01-01

351

Dr. Albert Priddy, still image with audioSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Albert Priddy was the first superintendent of the Virginia Colony for Epileptics, which was founded in the first decade of the 20th century. It opened approximately in 1912. Dr. Priddy was very concerned about the expanding numbers of people who populated almshouses and prisons, and other kinds of mental institutions, and he was a strong supporter of the theories of the eugenics movement. He pushed for an expansion of the Virginia Colony in 1916 to include people who he designated as feebleminded. And as a result of his efforts, legislation was put into effect that not only expanded the Colony but changed its name, to the Virginia Colony for the Epileptic and the Feebleminded. Dr. Priddy began sterilizing inmates there, or residents, in 1916, even though the law that was written to cover the Colony didn't explicitly allow that, and as a result of his extracurricular operations, in 1918 he was sued by a family from Richmond. He had sterilized the mother of that family and one of the daughters and he'd taken a second daughter into custody in the Colony. When the husband and father of that family, the Mallory family, learned of Dr. Priddy's work, he brought suit to release his wife and his daughters and also to obtain a judgment of damages against Dr. Priddy in a Richmond court. Priddy eventually won the lawsuit, but his concern that he might be sued again forced him to stop sterilizations at that time and to work more explicitly on a sterilization law, that would give him both the power to operate on people as well as that would indemnify him and hold him harmless from any lawsuits like the one he had suffered in the Mallory case.

2008-10-06

352

The role of low-mass star clusters in forming the massive stars in DR 21  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied the young low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar population associated with the massive star-forming region DR 21 by using archival X-ray Chandra observations and by complementing them with existing optical and infrared (IR) surveys. The Chandra observations have revealed for the first time a new highly extincted population of PMS low-mass stars previously missed in observations at other wavelengths. The X-ray population exhibits three main stellar density peaks, coincident with the massive star-forming regions, being the DR 21 core the main peak. The cross-correlated X-ray/IR sample exhibits a radial `Spokes-like' stellar filamentary structure that extends from the DR 21 core towards the northeast. The near-IR data reveal a centrally peaked structure for the extinction, which exhibits its maximum in the DR 21 core and gradually decreases with the distance to the N-S cloud axis and to the cluster centre. We find evidence of a global mass segregation in the full low-mass stellar cluster, and of a stellar age segregation, with the youngest stars still embedded in the N-S cloud, and more evolved stars more spatially distributed. The results are consistent with the scenario where an elongated overall potential well created by the full low-mass stellar cluster funnels gas through filaments feeding stellar formation. Besides the full gravitational well, smaller scale local potential wells created by dense stellar sub-clusters of low-mass stars are privileged in the competition for the gas of the common reservoir, allowing the formation of massive stars. We also discuss the possibility that a stellar collision in the very dense stellar cluster revealed by Chandra in the DR 21 core is the origin of the large-scale and highly energetic outflow arising from this region.

Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

2014-01-01

353

Unlike mammalian GRIFIN, the zebrafish homologue (DrGRIFIN) represents a functional carbohydrate-binding galectin  

PubMed Central

Galectins, a family of ß-galactoside-binding proteins, participate in a variety of biological processes, such as early development, tissue organization, immune regulation, and tumor evasion and metastasis. Although as many as fifteen bona fide galectins have been identified in mammals, but the detailed mechanisms of their biological roles still remain unclear for most. This fragmentary knowledge extends to galectin-like proteins such as the rat lens crystallin protein GRIFIN (Galectin related inter fiber protein) and the galectin-related protein GRP (previously HSPC159; hematopoietic stem cell precursor) that lack carbohydrate-binding activity. Their inclusion in the galectin family has been debated, as they are considered products of evolutionary co-option. We have identified a homologue of the GRIFIN in zebrafish (Danio rerio) (designated DrGRIFIN), which like the mammalian equivalent is expressed in the lens, particularly in the fiber cells, as revealed by whole mount in situ hybridization and immunostaining of 2 dpf (days post fertilization) embryos. As evidenced by RT-PCR, it is weakly expressed in the embryos as early as 21 hpf (hour post fertilization) but strongly at all later stages tested (30 hpf and 3, 4, 6, and 7 dpf). In adult zebrafish tissues, however, DrGRIFIN is also expressed in oocyte, brain, and intestine. Unlike the mammalian homologue, DrGRIFIN contains all amino acids critical for binding to carbohydrate ligands and its activity was confirmed as the recombinant DrGRIFIN could be purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on a lactosyl-Sepharose column. Therefore, DrGRIFIN is a bona fide galectin family member that in addition to its carbohydrate-binding properties, may also function as a crystallin.

Ahmed, Hafiz; Vasta, Gerardo R.

2009-01-01

354

Description of Work for Drilling at the 183-DR Site in Support of the In situ Gaseous Reduction Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document describes field activities associated with installation of boreholes to verify the presence of hexavalent chromium in the vadose zone at the former location of the 183-DR facility, a water treatment plant, in the 100 D/DR Area of the U.S. De...

E. D. Thornton K. B. Olsen R. Schalla

2000-01-01

355

Physical, chemical and biological variability in the Dr. C. Gelsi reservoir (NW Argentine): A temporal and spatial approach´ A  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical, chemical and biological variability in the Dr. C. Gelsi reservoir (NW Argentine): A temporal and spatial approach With the purpose of understanding the phytoplankton dynamics in two vertical profiles of the Dr. C. Gelsi reservoir (Tucum´ an, Argentina, monthly samplings were conducted from October 1997 to March 1999 in the limnetic zone and at the intersection of the Sal´i

B. C. Tracanna; S. N. Mart ´; M. J. Amoroso; N. Romero; P. Chaile; A. Mangeaud

356

Crystal Structure of the HLA-DM - HLA-DR1 Complex Defines Mechanisms for Rapid Peptide Selection  

PubMed Central

Summary HLA-DR molecules bind microbial peptides in an endosomal compartment and present them on the cell surface for CD4 T cell surveillance. HLA-DM plays a critical role in the endosomal peptide selection process. The structure of the HLA-DM – HLA-DR complex shows major rearrangements of the HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Flipping of a tryptophan away from the HLA-DR1 P1 pocket enables major conformational changes that position hydrophobic HLA-DR residues into the P1 pocket. These conformational changes accelerate peptide dissociation and stabilize the empty HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Initially, incoming peptides have access to only part of the HLA-DR groove and need to compete with HLA-DR residues for access to the P2 site and the hydrophobic P1 pocket. This energetic barrier creates a rapid and stringent selection process for the highest-affinity binders. Insertion of peptide residues into the P2 and P1 sites reverses the conformational changes, terminating selection through DM dissociation.

Pos, Wouter; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Call, Melissa J.; Schulze, Monika-Sarah E. D.; Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Pyrdol, Jason; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

2012-01-01

357

Transforming growth factor beta 1 repression of the HLA-DR alpha gene is mediated by conserved proximal promoter elements.  

PubMed

Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a pleiotropic cytokine that decreases the expression of class II MHC Ag in the melanoma cell line Hs294T(c). To investigate the mechanism of this repression, we have examined the effect of TGF-beta 1 on expression of the HLA-DR alpha gene. Both the constitutive level of HLA-DR protein and DR alpha mRNA were repressed by treatment with TGF-beta 1. The proximal 176 bp of the DR alpha promoter were sufficient to confer TGF-beta 1 repression on a reporter gene. Deletional and mutational analysis of the DR alpha promoter revealed that the conserved S and X1 promoter elements were important for basal expression of DR alpha and also mediated the down-regulation by TGF-beta 1. Mobility shift assays and in vivo footprinting showed no change in occupancy of the proximal DR alpha promoter after TGF-beta 1 treatment. These results identify the DNA elements that mediate repression of the HLA-DR alpha gene by TGF-beta 1 and suggest that TGF-beta 1 acts at these sites without causing a change in promoter occupancy. PMID:8409394

Reimold, A M; Kara, C J; Rooney, J W; Glimcher, L H

1993-10-15

358

Guest Expert: Dr. Leslie Ford -- On Clinical Trial Accrual: A Little Planning Goes A Long Way | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

We are honored to introduce as our guest expert for July, Dr. Leslie G. Ford, M.D. , Associate Director for Clinical Research in the Division of Cancer Prevention at NCI. Dr. Ford, a pioneer in the field of chemoprevention, is an international authority on clinical trials and has been an advocate for clinical trials professionals throughout her career.

359

Reactions to "Ethical Challenges and Complexities of Including People with Intellectual Disability as Participants in Research" by Dr Teresa Iacono  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors' reaction to Dr Teresa Iacono's article "Ethical challenges and complexities of including people with intellectual disability as participants in research" is presented. Among other things, they find that Dr Iacono has done an outstanding job of describing creative solutions for obtaining appropriate informed consent from people with…

Aman, Michael G.; Handen, Benjamin

2006-01-01

360

All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: How Dr. Seuss Reinforces Management Concepts and Promotes Community Citizenship  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors recommend that management educators add the works of Dr. Seuss to their repertoire of teaching tools. After describing why instructors should use Dr. Seuss's stories to foster understanding of concepts in management and organizational behavior, the authors describe a Seuss-based project at two levels that (a) helps students identify…

Comer, Debra R.; Holbrook, Robert L., Jr.

2005-01-01

361

From the Grass: An Interview with Dr. Krzysztof Pawlowski, Rector of WSB-NLU in Nowy Sacz, Poland.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides a transcript of an interview with Dr. Krzysztof Pawlowski, founder and president of the Wyzsza Szkola Biznesu (Higher Business School) of National-Louis University (WSB-NLU), the first private higher business school licensed by the Polish Ministry of Education. First, Dr. Pawlowski describes his initial establishment in 1991…

Paradiso, James; Pawlowski, Krzysztof

362

Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela: Third Lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series (includes opening remarks from Dr. Bill Brinkman and introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)  

SciTech Connect

In July of 2012, scientists leading two different research teams, working independently of each other, announced that they had almost certain proof of the long-sought Higgs boson. Though Cern did not call the discovery "official", many physicists conceded the evidence was now so compelling they had surely found the missing particle. The formal confirmation will come over the next few months of further investigation. The experiments are taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and this third lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series is given by one of those announcing scientists in July. He is Dr. Joseph Incandela, the current spokesperson for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at CERN. He was heavily involved in the search for the top quark at Fermi and is from the University of California, Santa Barbara. The title he gives his presentation is "Searching for the genetic code of our universe: Discovery at the LHC."

Incandela, Joseph (Spokesperon for the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at Large Hadron Collider) [Spokesperon for the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at Large Hadron Collider

2012-09-14

363

De novo expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) and loss of beta-catenin expression in tubular epithelial cells: a possible event in epithelial-mesenchymal transition in canine renal diseases.  

PubMed

Tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) plays a central role in the progression to end-stage renal disease. Tubular epithelial cells (TECs) undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and may contribute to the progression of TIF. Using immunohistochemistry, the primary aim of this study was to assess the expression of ?-catenin, human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) and vimentin in renal biopsies from dogs with spontaneous kidney diseases of varying severities. Morphological diagnosis, severity of inflammation, TIF, HLA-DR expression and clinicopathological variables were compared in dogs with renal injury to identify any potential relationship between the different factors; ?-catenin down-regulation was used as a marker of EMT. Fibrosis, HLA-DR expression, serum creatinine concentration (SCr), and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPC) were all increased and ?-catenin expression decreased in dogs with primary glomerular disease compared with dogs with acute tubular necrosis. HLA-DR expression by TECs was positively correlated to fibrosis, inflammation, UPC, and SCr. ?-catenin expression was negatively correlated to fibrosis, inflammation and HLA-DR expression. The progression of renal failure correlated closely with tubulointerstitial damage. De novo HLA-DR expression associated with ?-catenin down-regulation by TECs may represent a possible step in the progression of TIF and EMT. PMID:23850018

Benali, S L; Lees, G E; Nabity, M B; Mantovani, R; Bonsembiante, F; Aresu, L

2013-10-01

364

Phenotypic and physiological changes in Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 with exogenous plasmid.  

PubMed

The genus Acinetobacter has been recognized to take up exogenous DNA from the environment. In this study, we conducted natural transformation with a novel diesel-degrading Acinetobacter sp. strain, designated strain DR1, using the broad host range plasmid pRK415. Many factors, including temperature, quantities of DNA, and aeration have proven critically important for efficient natural transformation. Interestingly, the Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 (pRK415) differed both phenotypically and physiologically from the wild-type strain in several regards, including motility, biofilm formation ability, and responses to oxidative stress: the transformed cells were rendered more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide, and their motilities and biofilm formation activity were also attenuated. Our data demonstrated that caution should be exercised when conducting genetic manipulation with plasmids, due to the possibility that phenotypic and physiological changes in the host might occur along with the uptake of plasmids. PMID:20607540

Park, Jungsoon; Park, Woojun

2011-01-01

365

Dr. Smith Goes to Washington: A Physicist Wanders the Halls of Congress  

ScienceCinema

Dr. Tannenbaum was the 2002-2003 APS Congressional Science Fellow. He worked in the office of U.S. Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) on nuclear nonproliferation issues. His work in Congressman Markey's office focused on issues including missile defense, the nuclear program in Iran, prevention of the transfer of U.S. nuclear technology to North Korea, and the security of nuclear sites in Iraq. Dr. Tannenbaum will discuss this experience and observations concerning 'underinformed and uninformed' decision-making in Congress. He will also briefly discuss goals of the Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Finally, he will discuss ways in which physicists can get more involved in the political process.

366

HLA-DR, DP and DQ expression in the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease.  

PubMed Central

Frozen sections of jejunal mucosa from control subjects and patients with both treated and untreated coeliac disease were examined for HLA class II DR, DP and DQ expression. Different staining patterns with monoclonal antibodies to the different class II subgroups were observed with the control subjects. There was some inter-subject variation but in general DR greater than DP greater than DQ staining was observed with the villous enterocytes staining most strongly with the staining decreasing towards the crypt bases. The patients with treated coeliac disease gave a similar pattern to the controls. The patients with untreated coeliac disease generally gave a more intense and relatively uniform staining of both surface and crypt enterocytes for all class II subgroups. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5

Marley, N J; Macartney, J C; Ciclitira, P J

1987-01-01

367

Second-order nonlinear susceptibilities in nonelectrically poled DR1PMMA guest-host polymers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The presentation will report nonelectrical poling behaviors of guest-host polymers, consisting of Disperse Red1 (DR1) and poly (methyl methacrylate) and related second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities. Our present experimental results found the emissions of the second harmonic generations from the polymer thin films on SiO2 glass substrates after annealing the materials at the temperatures higher than the glass transition temperatures of the PMMA even in the absence of applying the external electric fields. The hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl groups of the DR1 and the silanols of the substrate surely played essential roles for breaking the centrosymmetry in the alignments of the guests. The optimized conditions of the nonelectrical poling procedures were examined from the standpoints of the polymer film thickness and the concentrations of the guest chromophores.

Sugita, A.; Sato, Y.; Ito, K.; Kawata, Y.; Tasaka, S.

2014-03-01

368

GENESI-DR: Discovery, Access and on-Demand Processing in Federated Repositories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. In fact, a common dedicated infrastructure such as the GENESI-DR one permits the Earth Science communities to derive objective information and to share knowledge in all environmental sensitive domains over a continuum of time and a variety of geographical scales so addressing urgent challenges such as Global Change. GENESI-DR federates data, information and knowledge for the management of our fragile planet in line with one of the major goals of the many international environmental programmes such as GMES, GEO/GEOSS. As of today, 12 different Digital Repositories hosting more than 60 heterogeneous dataset series are federated in GENESI-DR. Series include satellite data, in situ data, images acquired by airborne sensors, digital elevation models and model outputs. ESA has started providing access to: Category-1 data systematically available on Internet; level 3 data (e.g., GlobCover map, MERIS Global Vegetation Index); ASAR products available in ESA Virtual Archive and related to the Supersites initiatives. In all cases, existing data policies and security constraints are fully respected. GENESI-DR also gives access to Grid and Cloud computing resources allowing authorized users to run a number of different processing services on the available data. The GENESI-DR operational platform is currently being validated against several applications from different domains, such as: automatic orthorectification of SPOT data; SAR Interferometry; GlobModel results visualization and verification by comparison with satellite observations; ozone estimation from ERS-GOME products and comparison with in-situ LIDAR measures; access to ocean-related heterogeneous data and on-the-fly generated products. The project is adopting, ISO 19115, ISO 19139 and OGC standards for geospatial metadata discovery and processing, is compliant with the basis of INSPIRE Implementing Rules for Metadata and Discovery, and uses the OpenSearch protocol with Geo extensions for data and services discovery. OpenSearch is now considered by OGC a mass-market standard to provide machine accessible search interface to data repositories. GENESI-DR is gaining momentum in the Earth Science community thanks to the active participation to the GEO task force "Data Integration and Analysis Systems" and to the several collaborations with EC projects. It is now extending international cooperation agreements specifically with the NASA (Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services), with CEODE (the Center of Earth Observation for Digital Earth of Beijing), with the APN (Asia-Pacific Network), with University of Tokyo (Japanese GeoGrid and Data Integration and Analysis System).

Cossu, Roberto; Pacini, Fabrizio; Parrini, Andrea; Santi, Eliana Li; Fusco, Luigi

2010-05-01

369

[The anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp: The beginning of a medical utopia].  

PubMed

The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp was painted by Rembrandt Harmen-szoon van Rijn at the early age of 26 years. In the XVII century these paintings were very popular in the Netherlands, and in this country the cities flourished as cultural centers searching the anatomy knowledge. Nicolaes Tulp was one of the persons in the center of Amsterdam's scene during XVII century. In 1632 Tulp was 39 years old, and he was an anatomist and a surgeon. Rembrandt masterly shows an autopsy performed by Dr. Tulp. This picture is the description of the beginning of a medical intellectual utopia: the absolute visibility of the disease. Unfortunately this utopia is blind to the complete visibility of the psycho-socio-cultural dimensions of the ill. PMID:21879195

Rosler, Roberto; Young, Pablo

2011-04-01

370

Fascaplysin sensitizes cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through upregulating DR5 expression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the molecular mechanism of anti-tumor effect of fascaplysin, a nitrogenous red pigment firstly isolated from a marine sponge. Microarray analysis show that the TNF and TNF receptor superfamily in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human hepatocarcinoma cells (BEL-7402) were significantly regulated by fascaplysin. Western Blot results reveal that fascaplysin increased the expression of cleaved caspase-9, active caspase-3, and decreased the level of procaspase-8 and Bid. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests indicate that fascaplysin sensitized cells to tumor necrosis-related apoptosisinducing ligand-(TRAIL) induced apoptosis, which was markedly blocked by TRAIL R2/Fc chimera, a dominant negative form of TRAIL receptor DR5. Therefore, our results demonstrate that fascaplysin promotes apoptosis through the activation of TRAIL signaling pathway by upregulating DR5 expression.

Wang, Feng; Chen, Haimin; Yan, Xiaojun; Zheng, Yanling

2013-05-01

371

VERY LARGE ARRAY DETECTION OF THE 36 GHz ZEEMAN EFFECT IN DR21W REVISITED  

SciTech Connect

We report on the observation of the 36 GHz methanol maser line in the star-forming region DR21W to accurately measure the Zeeman effect. The Zeeman signature reported by Fish et al. became suspicious after an instrumental effect was discovered in the early days of the commissioning of the Very Large Array Wide-band Digital Architecture correlator. We conclude that the previously reported magnetic field strength of 58 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) is instrumental in nature and thus incorrect. With the improved performance of the array, we now deduce a 3{sigma} limit of -4.7 to +0.4 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) for the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength in DR21W.

Momjian, Emmanuel; Sjouwerman, Lorant O. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fish, Vincent L., E-mail: emomjian@nrao.edu [MIT Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States)

2012-09-20

372

Tryptophol induces death receptor (DR) 5-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.  

PubMed

Tryptophol is a natural component isolated from vinegar produced from the boiled extract of black soybean. We have reported that tryptophol induces apoptosis in U937 cells via activation of caspase-8 followed by caspase-3. Tryptophol, however, did not affect human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). In this study, we found that tryptophol enhances formation of a death-inducing signaling complex including death receptor (DR) 5. Cell viability and induction of apoptosis by tryptophol was reduced by transfection with decoy receptor (DcR) 1. These results indicate that tryptophol induces apoptosis through DR5 and that the resistance of PBL to tryptophol-induced apoptosis might be due to competition from DcR1. PMID:17690453

Inagaki, Shyuichiro; Morimura, Shigeru; Tang, Yueqin; Akutagawa, Hiroshi; Kida, Kenji

2007-08-01

373

Strive toward data harmony of multi sensor aerosol data - Tribute to Dr. Gregory Leptoukh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) has been involved with aerosol data synergy activities and projects over recent years, led by Dr. Gregory Leptoukh. His particular interests centered on issues related to comparison and harmonization of several aspects of aerosol data, such as data quality, bias adjustment, and data provenance. A thorough understanding of these issues is needed to guide multi-sensor data usage and avoid apples-to-oranges inter-comparison and data fusion. In this talk, I will highlight these activities/projects. These would include the tools developed, but also the projects that address specific user needs and innovative services, such as GIOVANNI-MAPSS, AeroStat, NEESPI, MAIRS, ATDD, MDSA, LTA-SWDB, etc. I will also discuss preliminary results from new projects and future goals that build on the ground breaking work, left by Dr. Leptoukh.

Wei, J. C.; Lynnes, C.; Kempler, S. J.; Shen, S.

2012-12-01

374

Adherent cells from rheumatoid synovia: identity of HLA-DR positive stellate cells.  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid synovia were enzymatically digested and the in vitro morphology of different types of plastic adherent cells was observed. Four main types of cells were found after 24 hours in culture: stellate cells which had nuclei resembling those of classical cultured fibroblasts, but which stained positively with I2 antibody (anti-HLA-DR antibody); fibroblastic cells; cells which resembled morphologically in vitro macrophages and which were I2 and OKM-1 positive; round monocytes. The stellate cells did not stain with anti-S-100 or OKT-6 antibodies, which are used to detect classical antigen presenting dendritic cells. Furthermore, in the presence of indomethacin the stellate shaped cells were replaced by new I2 positive cells with a typical fibroblast shape. These results support the view that the stellate cells in synovial cell cultures represent HLA-DR positive fibroblasts, probably B cells of synovial lining. Images

Heino, J; Viander, M; Peltonen, J; Kouri, T

1987-01-01

375

Use of Neural Networks for the Identification of New z > 3.6 QSOs from FIRST-SDSS DR5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We aim to obtain a complete sample of z ? 3. 6 radio QSOs from FIRST sources having star-like counterparts in the SDSS DR5 photometric survey (r AB ? 20. 2). The starting sample of FIRST-DR5 pairs includes 4,250 objects with DR5 spectra, 52 of these being z ? 3. 6 QSOs. Simple supervised neural networks, trained on these sources, using optical photometry and radio data, are very effective for identifying high-z QSOs, yielding 96% completeness and 62% efficiency. Applying these networks to the 4,415 FIRST-DR5 sources without DR5 spectra we found 58 z ? 3. 6 QSO candidates. We obtained spectra of 27 of them, confirming 17 as high-z QSOs. Spectra of 13 additional candidates from the literature and SDSS DR6 revealed seven more z ? 3. 6 QSOs, giving an overall efficiency of 60% (24/40). None of the non-candidates with spectra from NED or DR6 is a z ? 3. 6 QSO, consistently with a high completeness. The initial sample of high-z QSOs is increased from 52 to 76 sources (a factor 1.46). From the new identifications and candidates we estimate an incompleteness of SDSS for the spectroscopic classification of FIRST 3. 6 ? z ? 4. 6 QSOs of 15% for r ? 20. 2.

Carballo, R.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Benn, C. R.; Jiménez-Luján, F.

376

PRESIDENT KENNEDY TOURS CAPE CANAVERAL FACILITIES WITH DR. KURT H. DEBUS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Kennedy and Dr. Kurt Debus head for the car that will take them on a tour of our Nation's space facilities. The President, Vice President, and the Space Committee are among those being briefed at four locations on our space program. The tour includes Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsville, Alabama, Atlantic Missile Range, Manned Space Flight Center, Houston, Texas, and McDonnell Aircraft at St. Louis, Mo.

1962-01-01

377

Serological recognition of HLA-DR allodeterminant corresponding to DNA sequence involved in gene conversion  

Microsoft Academic Search

HLA class 11 molecules were isolated from mouse L cells transfected with a DRa gene and an allele, 52a, of locus DRßIII from an HLA-homozygous cell line, AVL, of the DR3 haplotype. The isolated molecules were found to possess a new allospecificity, named TR81. This specificity behaved allelic to the previously described DRßIII locus. The TR81 specificity was also present

Christine C. Berte; Nobuyuki Tanigaki; Roberto Tosi; Jack Gorski; Bernard Mach I

1988-01-01

378

Dr. Hans Rosling, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit  

ScienceCinema

The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Hans Rosling (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org), gave this keynote address.

379

Dr. Hans Rosling, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit  

ScienceCinema

The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Hans Rosling (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org), gave this keynote address.

Rosling, Hans (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org)

2014-04-11

380

With stroke of pen, FERC puts DR on par with supply side options  

SciTech Connect

In mid October 2008, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) finalized new rules intended to strengthen the operation and improve the competitiveness of organized U.S. wholesale electric markets. FERC intends to increase the use of demand response (DR), encourage long-term power contracts, strengthen the role of market monitors, and enhance the responsiveness of regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system operators (ISOs). The FERC order applies to existing U.S. organized wholesale markets.

NONE

2009-01-15

381

A doctor's duty is to heal the unhealthy: the story of Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad.  

PubMed

Mahathir Mohamad was born in 1925 in Alor Star, Kedah. He entered the King Edward VII College of Medicine in Singapore in 1947 and graduated in 1953. His years in the medical school equipped young Mahathir with the training necessary to assess and diagnose a problem, before dispensing the appropriate treatment. Throughout his later years in the political limelight, Dr Mahathir recognised the very important role the medical college had in laying the strong foundation for his successful career. He joined UMNO in 1945, already interested in politics at the tender age of 20; he was first elected into Parliament in 1964. The vigorous expression of his candid views did not go down well during the troubled days following the 13 May 1969 racial riots and he was expelled from UMNO, his writings were banned, and he was considered a racial extremist. Nevertheless, his intellectual and political influence could not be ignored for long; he returned to Parliament in 1974, and became the fourth, and longest serving, Prime Minister of Malaysia in 1981. Dr Mahathir has found fame as a Malay statesman, and an important Asian leader of the twentieth century with much written, locally and internationally, debating his policies. This article, using Dr Mahathir's own writings, starts with his description of his early life, proceeds to look at his medical career, then touches on his diagnosis of the problems plaguing the Malays, before concluding with his views on the need to stand up to the prejudices and pressures of the Western world. Throughout his life, Dr Mahathir behaved as the ever-diligent medical doctor, constantly studying the symptoms to diagnose the cause of the ills in his community and country, before proceeding to prescribe the correct treatment to restore good health. It is a measure of his integrity and intellectual capability that he did not seek to hide his failures, or cite unfinished work in an attempt to cling to political power. PMID:16010379

Ong, H T

2005-07-01

382

Data-driven insights into deletions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex chromosomal DR region using spoligoforests.  

PubMed

Biomarkers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) mutate over time. Among the biomarkers of MTBC, spacer oligonucleotide type (spoligotype) and Mycobacterium Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU) patterns are commonly used to genotype clinical MTBC strains. In this study, we present an evolution model of spoligotype rearrangements using MIRU patterns to disambiguate the ancestors of spoligotypes, in a large patient dataset from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Based on the contiguous deletion assumption and rare observation of convergent evolution, we first generate the most parsimonious forest of spoligotypes, called a spoligoforest, using three genetic distance measures. An analysis of topological attributes of the spoligoforest and number of variations at the direct repeat (DR) locus of each strain reveals interesting properties of deletions in the DR region. First, we compare our mutation model to existing mutation models of spoligotypes and find that our mutation model produces as many within-lineage mutation events as other models, with slightly higher segregation accuracy. Second, based on our mutation model, the number of descendant spoligotypes follows a power law distribution. Third, contrary to prior studies, the power law distribution does not plausibly fit to the mutation length frequency. Finally, the total number of mutation events at consecutive DR loci follows a bimodal distribution, which results in accumulation of shorter deletions in the DR region. The two modes are spacers 13 and 40, which are hotspots for chromosomal rearrangements. The change point in the bimodal distribution is spacer 34, which is absent in most MTBC strains. This bimodal separation results in accumulation of shorter deletions, which explains why a power law distribution is not a plausible fit to the mutation length frequency. PMID:22343484

Ozcaglar, Cagri; Shabbeer, Amina; Kurepina, Natalia; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

2011-01-01

383

PlanetDR, a scalable architecture for federated repositories supporting IMS Learning Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Please, cite this publication as: Blat, J., Griffiths, D., Navarrete, T., Santos, J.L., García, P., & Pujol, J. (2006). PlanetDR, a scalable architecture for federated repositories supporting IMS Learning Design. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgaria: TENCompetence. Retrieved June 30th, 2006, from http:\\/\\/dspace.learningnetworks.org

Josep Blat; David Griffiths; Toni Navarrete; José Luis Santos; Pedro García; Jordi Pujol

2006-01-01

384

Dr. David Brown poses with a portrait of Ronald McNair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla., Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, poses with a portrait of NASA astronaut Ronald McNair. The portrait was presented to the school by Walt Disney World during a tribute to McNair. The school had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut who was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

1999-01-01

385

Distribution of HLA-DR?1 alleles among well-characterized rheumatoid arthritis patients from Western India.  

PubMed

An association between human leukocyte antigen-DR?1*04 and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been known for more than 25 years. It has been observed in many different populations, and it accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic component of RA susceptibility. Our aim was to study the distribution of HLA-DR?1 alleles in well-characterized RA patients from Western India. Polymerase chain reaction-based sequence-specific oligonucleotide probing (PCR-SSOP) technique was used to identify HLA-DR?1 alleles among 80 clinically well-defined patients and 90 normal controls from same ethnicity. A significant increase in the frequency of DR?1*04 was observed among RA patients (PF% 30 vs. 7.7, OR 4.959, p value 0.00018), whereas DR?1*03 and *14 were significantly decreased among patients when compared with controls (DR?1*03, PF% 8.75 vs. 26.6, OR 0.2637, p value 0.00253; DR?1*14, PF% 17.5 vs. 30.0, OR 0.4949, p value 0.05722). Our results suggest that DR?1*04 was strongly associated with well-characterized RA patients from Western India, whereas DR?1*03 and *14 may be protective alleles for RA. The identification of susceptible allele in patients with RA may help physician to make early decisions regarding initiation of early intensive therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biological agents to decrease disability in RA patients. PMID:23636621

Prasannavar, Devaraj J; Yeola, A; Pradhan, V; Patwardhan, Manisha; Rajadhyaksha, A; Ghosh, K

2014-05-01

386

Environmental Setting of the Granger Drain and DR2 Basins, Washington, 2003-04  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Granger Drain and DR2 basins are located in the Yakima River basin in south central Washington. These agricultural basins are one of five areas in the United States selected for study as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program Agricultural Chemicals: Source, Transport, and Fate Study. The Program is designed to describe water-quality conditions and trends based on representative surface- and ground-water resources across the Nation. The objective of the Agricultural Chemicals topical study is to investigate the sources, transport, and fate of selected agricultural chemicals in a variety of agriculturally diverse environmental settings. The Granger Drain and DR2 basins were selected for the Agricultural Chemicals topical study because they represent the irrigated agricultural setting that characterizes eastern Washington. These basins are located in one of the most productive agricultural areas in the United States. This report describes the environmental setting of the Granger Drain and DR2 basins in the context of how agricultural practices, including agricultural chemical applications and irrigation methods, interface with natural settings and hydrologic processes.

Payne, Karen L.; Johnson, Henry M.; Black, Robert W.

2007-01-01

387

Teaching glucocorticoid negative feedback and adrenocortical regulation using a classic paper by Dr. Dwight Ingle.  

PubMed

The American Physiological Society (APS) Legacy Project and its accompanying Essays on APS Classic Papers have allowed the scientific community on-line access to the entire collection of APS publications since their inception in 1898 (http://www.the-aps.org/publications/legacy/ and http://www.the-aps.org/publications/classics/). The availability of the classic physiological studies provides a unique teaching opportunity. The classic paper of Dr. Dwight Ingle represents just such a study. Dr. Ingle demonstrated that, using only purified extracts of the pituitary (ACTH) and adrenal cortex (corticosterone) and hypophysectomized rats, he could establish several of the basic principles of the control of adrenal function and glucocorticoid negative feedback that are now standard teaching material in endocrinology. An annotated figure from Dr. Ingle's paper is provided, which, when assigned to undergraduate or graduate students, will allow discovery learning. Furthermore, the brilliance and imagination of the physiologists of the last century are highlighted, which allows an appreciation of the seminal work of our predecessors. PMID:16109792

Raff, Hershel

2005-09-01

388

The life and viper of Dr Patrick Russell MD FRS (1727-1805): physician and naturalist.  

PubMed

It is nearly two hundred years since the publication in 1796 of An Account of Indian Serpents collected on the Coast of Coromandel by Patrick Russell. Within the folio is a drawing and description of the venomous snake called Katuka Rekula Poda in the local Telugu language, whose venom was shown experimentally by Dr Russell to be nearly as lethal as that of Cobra de Capello. The snake is now known as Vipera russelli or Russell's viper. Dr Russell was representative of the naturalistic tendency of British medicine in the late 18th century. He was a keen observer and skilled doctor in clinical practice, particularly in Aleppo, Syria, during an outbreak of the plague, and indefatigable in his study of plant and animal life both in Aleppo and later in the Madras Province of India. As a physician as well as Naturalist to the East India Company in the Carnatic he was concerned with the problem of snakebite. His first aim was to find a means whereby the non-specialist could distinguish between poisonous and harmless snakes and so combat the terrible notion that all bites were mortal. His writing, encompassing social and natural histories and climaxed by a study of snakes, has left a rich legacy. Dr Patrick Russell was a man of the highest integrity and ability, a physician and naturalist par excellence. PMID:7886689

Hawgood, B J

1994-11-01

389

Deletion mutant defines DQ beta variants with DR4 positive DQw3 positive haplotypes  

SciTech Connect

We describe the production of an HLA deletion mutation by radiation mutagenesis of a DR4- and DQw3-homozygous, Dw4- and Dw14-heterozygous cell line designed to analyze polymorphisms associated with DR4 and DQw3. Southern blot analysis confirms a deletion of class I and class II genes on one haplotype. Variation in DQ beta alleles associated with DQw3 was previously described by characteristic RFLP patterns for a DQ beta bene. One pattern, which correlated precisely with A-10-83 monoclonal antibody reactivity (TA10), defined an allele which we call DQ''3.1''. The mutant cell line has lost the polymorphic bands on Southern blots corresponding to the DQ''3.1'' allele, while the intact Dw14 haplotype retains the alternate allele at DQ beta which is DQw-3 positive. TA10-negative. These data demonstrate the segregation of two DQw3 positive DQ beta allelic variants, both associated with DR4, which can be distinguished on the basis of both RFLP and monoclonal antibody reactivity.

Nepom, B.S.; Kim, S.J.; Nepom, G.T.

1986-10-01

390

Solution Structure of Hypothetical Nudix Hydrolase DR0079 from Extremely Radiation-Resistant Deinococcus radiodurans Bacterium  

SciTech Connect

Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based methods including residual dipolar coupling restraints, we have determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 (171 residues, MW= 19.3 kDa). The protein contains eight b-strands and three a-helices organized into three subdomains; an N-terminal b-sheet (1-34), a central Nudix core (35-140), and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (141-171). The Nudix core and C-terminal helix-turn-helix form the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed b-sheet sandwiched between a-helices. The residues that compose the signature Nudix sequence, GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U= I, L, or V and X= any amino acid), are contained in a turn-helix-turn motif on the face of the mixed b-sheet. Chemical shift mapping experiments suggest that DR0079 binds Mg2+, but, precipitates out of solution in the presence of excess Mn2+. Experiments designed to determine the biological function of the protein indicate th at it is not a type I isopentenyl-diphosphate d-isomerase and it does not bind a,b-methyleneadenosine 5-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and guanosine 5-[b,g-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP). The structure of DR0079 is compared to other known Nudix protein structures, a potential substrate binding surface is proposed, and its possible biological function discussed.

Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Kennedy, Michael A.

2004-07-01

391

Solution structure of hypothetical nudix hydrolase dr0079 from extremely radiation-resistant deinococcus radiodurans bacterium  

SciTech Connect

Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based methods, including residual dipolar coupling restraints, we have determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 (171 residues, MW 19.3 kDa). The protein contains eight-strands and three-helices organized into three subdomains: an N-terminal-sheet (1 34), a central Nudix core (35 140), and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (141 171). The Nudix core and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix form the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed-sheet sandwiched between-helices. The residues that compose the signature Nudix sequence, GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where UI, L, or V and X any amino acid), are contained in a turn-helix-turn motif on the face of the mixed-sheet. Chemical shift mapping experiments suggest that DR0079 binds Mg2. Experiments designed to determine the biological function of the protein indicate that it is not a type I isopentenyl-diphosphate-isomerase and that it does not bind, -methyleneadenosine 5-triphosphate (AMPCPP) or guanosine 5-[ ,-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP). In this article, the structure of DR0079 is compared to other known Nudix protein structures, a potential substrate-binding surface is proposed, and its possible biological function is discussed.

Buchko, G.W.; Ni, S.; Holbrook, S.R.; Kennedy, M.A.

2003-12-01

392

A further biochemical characterization of DrPLL the thermophilic lactonase from Deinococcus radiodurans.  

PubMed

Recently, the cloning of the ORF Dr0930 from Deinococcus radiodurans displaying, as primary activity, a lactonase activity and a promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity was reported. The crystal structure of the resulting recombinant enzyme has been solved, and many mutants have been generated in order to increase the phosphotriesterase activity, with the aim to reach the level of activity of the related pPTE from Pseudomonas diminuta. In this paper we report an additional biochemical characterization of DrPLL and show that this enzyme has an optimal temperature for catalysis of 85 °C and possesses promiscuous carboxylesterase, phophodiesterase and thioesterase activities which were not previously described. A metal analysis was performed on the purified protein by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS ELAN DRC-e), which confirmed the presence of Ni(2+) as a main metal in the recombinant protein. Surprisingly, the specificity constants (s=k(cat)/K(M)) for the pNP-decanoate and pNP-dodecanoate esters were only one order of magnitude lower than that for the lactone substrate thio-buthyl-?-butyric-lactone (TBBL), and the K(M) value for TBBL was more than ten-fold higher than those for the esters. We named this enzyme DrPLL, based on its structural and biochemical features it belongs to the Phosphotriesterase Like Lactonase group, a small protein family belonging to the amidohydrolase superfamily. PMID:22789107

Mandrich, Luigi; Di Gennaro, Spartaco; Palma, Achille; Manco, Giuseppe

2013-01-01

393

Segregation of HLA-DR2 among affected and non-affected offspring of 66 families with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Segregation of HLA-DR2 among affected and unaffected offspring was studied in 66 HLA-genotyped families with Type 1 diabetes in whom at least one parent carried DR2. The frequency of DR2-positive parents (21%) was not different from that of control families (29%). Among the diabetic probands, the gene frequency of DR2 was significantly decreased compared with control subjects (0.05 versus 0.17,

I. Deschamps; I. Goderel; H. Lestradet; M. Schmid; M. Busson; D. Cohen; J. Hors

1984-01-01

394

Human Skin Cells Synthesize HLA-DR Molecules of the Same Charge and Molecular Weight as those Synthesized by Autologous Lymphocytes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 5 and 14% of human skin cells, separated by trypsinization, express HLA-DR antigen as detected by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-DR antibody. To determine the source and structure of these DR molecules, skin cell suspensions were biosynthetically labeled with 35S-methionine and the radiolabeled DR molecules were analyzed by the method of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results indicated the

Vera B. Morhenn; Dominique J. Charron; Edgar G. Engleman

1982-01-01

395

DR4004, a putative 5HT 7 receptor antagonist, also has functional activity at the dopamine D2 receptor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tetrahydrobenzindole, 2a-(4-(4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridyl)butyl)-2a,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[cd]indol-2(1H)-one (DR4004) has been described as a highly selective antagonist for the 5-hydroxytryptamine7 (5-HT7) receptor [J. Med. Chem. 42 (1999) 533]. Consistent with original data, DR4004 bound to rat hypothalamic membranes with an affinity of 7.3±0.2 (pKi±S.E.M.) for the 5-HT7 receptor. However, competition binding studies showed that DR4004 had poor receptor selectivity with the following affinity profile; dopamine

Helen A Kogan; Charles A Marsden; Kevin C. F Fone

2002-01-01

396

Definition of high-risk type 1 diabetes HLA-DR and HLA-DQ types using only three single nucleotide polymorphisms.  

PubMed

Evaluating risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) depends on determining an individual's HLA type, especially of the HLA DRB1 and DQB1 alleles. Individuals positive for HLA-DRB1*03 (DR3) or HLA-DRB1*04 (DR4) with DQB1*03:02 (DQ8) have the highest risk of developing T1D. Currently, HLA typing methods are relatively expensive and time consuming. We sought to determine the minimum number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that could rapidly define the HLA-DR types relevant to T1D, namely, DR3/4, DR3/3, DR4/4, DR3/X, DR4/X, and DRX/X (where X is neither DR3 nor DR4), and could distinguish the highest-risk DR4 type (DR4-DQ8) as well as the non-T1D-associated DR4-DQB1*03:01 type. We analyzed 19,035 SNPs of 10,579 subjects (7,405 from a discovery set and 3,174 from a validation set) from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium and developed a novel machine learning method to select as few as three SNPs that could define the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ types accurately. The overall accuracy was 99.3%, area under curve was 0.997, true-positive rates were >0.99, and false-positive rates were <0.001. We confirmed the reliability of these SNPs by 10-fold cross-validation. Our approach predicts HLA-DR/DQ types relevant to T1D more accurately than existing methods and is rapid and cost-effective. PMID:23378606

Nguyen, Cao; Varney, Michael D; Harrison, Leonard C; Morahan, Grant

2013-06-01

397

Definition of High-Risk Type 1 Diabetes HLA-DR and HLA-DQ Types Using Only Three Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms  

PubMed Central

Evaluating risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) depends on determining an individual’s HLA type, especially of the HLA DRB1 and DQB1 alleles. Individuals positive for HLA-DRB1*03 (DR3) or HLA-DRB1*04 (DR4) with DQB1*03:02 (DQ8) have the highest risk of developing T1D. Currently, HLA typing methods are relatively expensive and time consuming. We sought to determine the minimum number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that could rapidly define the HLA-DR types relevant to T1D, namely, DR3/4, DR3/3, DR4/4, DR3/X, DR4/X, and DRX/X (where X is neither DR3 nor DR4), and could distinguish the highest-risk DR4 type (DR4-DQ8) as well as the non-T1D–associated DR4-DQB1*03:01 type. We analyzed 19,035 SNPs of 10,579 subjects (7,405 from a discovery set and 3,174 from a validation set) from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium and developed a novel machine learning method to select as few as three SNPs that could define the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ types accurately. The overall accuracy was 99.3%, area under curve was 0.997, true-positive rates were >0.99, and false-positive rates were <0.001. We confirmed the reliability of these SNPs by 10-fold cross-validation. Our approach predicts HLA-DR/DQ types relevant to T1D more accurately than existing methods and is rapid and cost-effective.

Nguyen, Cao; Varney, Michael D.; Harrison, Leonard C.; Morahan, Grant

2013-01-01

398

Effect of S8DR Chromium Diffusion Treatment on the Creep Rupture Properties of Processed Hastelloy-N Tubing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Process development personnel have been seeking means of improving the (after thermal exposure) adhesion of the S8DR ceramic coating to chromized Hastelloy N tubing. This effort has led to the incorporation of an elevated temperature chromium diffusion tr...

G. G. Allaria

1967-01-01

399

The crystal structure of death receptor 6 (DR6): a potential receptor of the amyloid precursor protein (APP).  

PubMed

Death receptors belong to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) super family and are intimately involved in the signal transduction during apoptosis, stress response and cellular survival. Here we present the crystal structure of recombinantly expressed death receptor six (DR6), one family member that was recently shown to bind to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and hence to be probably involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The extracellular cysteine rich region of DR6, the typical ligand binding region of all TNFRs, was refined to 2.2 Å resolution and shows that its four constituting cysteine rich domains (CRDs) are arranged in a rod-like overall structure, which presents DR6-specific surface patches responsible for the exclusive recognition of its ligand(s). Based on the structural data, the general ligand binding modes of TNFRs and molecular modeling experiments we were able to elucidate structural features of the potential DR6-APP signaling complex. PMID:21463639

Kuester, Miriam; Kemmerzehl, Steffen; Dahms, Sven O; Roeser, Dirk; Than, Manuel E

2011-06-01

400

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Assessment Teams for First Responders in Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR) Missions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Immediately following a natural disaster requiring Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR), a myriad of organizations respond. Typically, these early responders send small assessment teams to determine critical needs, which are then paired with th...

A. T. Bell

2012-01-01

401

Serotonin type 1D receptors (5HT1DR) are differentially distributed in nerve fibres innervating craniofacial tissues  

PubMed Central

We tested the hypothesis that the 5HT1DR, the primary antinociceptive target of triptans, is differentially distributed in tissues responsible for migraine pain. The density of 5HT1DR was quantified in tissues obtained from adult female rats with Western blot analysis. Receptor location was assessed with immunohistochemistry. The density of 5HT1DR was significantly greater in tissues known to produce migraine-like pain (i.e. circle of Willis and dura) than in structures in which triptans have no antinociceptive efficacy (i.e. temporalis muscle). 5HT1DR-like immunoreactivity was restricted to neuronal fibres, where it colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive fibres. These results are consistent with our hypothesis that the limited therapeutic profile of triptans could reflect its differential peripheral distribution and that the antinociceptive efficacy reflects inhibition of neuropeptide release from sensory afferents. An additional site of action at sympathetic efferents is also suggested.

Harriott, AM; Gold, MS

2009-01-01

402

Dissociation of caspase-mediated events and programmed cell death induced via HLA-DR in follicular lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class II antigen-mediated apoptosis has been documented in antigen-presenting cells and B lymphoproliferations. Characteristics of the apoptosis include rapidity and selectivity for mature cells. Follicular lymphomas are particularly refractory to apoptosis. The B-cell lymphoma Ramos shares characteristics of this subgroup and is insensitive to apoptosis via simple HLA-DR engagement. However, oligomerization of HLA-DR antigens induced caspase

M Carmagnat; B Drénou; H Chahal; J M Lord; D Charron; J Estaquier; N A Mooney

2006-01-01

403

1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 down-regulation of HLA-DR on human peripheral blood monocytes.  

PubMed Central

The regulatory activity of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) on human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR (MHC class II) antigen expression in monocytes from normal human peripheral blood was examined. Using forward light and side scatter by flow cytometry most cells within the discrete monocyte area expressed high levels of HLA-DR antigens following 4-day culture in medium alone (culture-enhanced HLA-DR) and expression was further up-regulated in the presence of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (IFN-gamma-enhanced HLA-DR). Treatment with 1,25-(OH)2D3 markedly inhibited both culture and IFN-gamma-enhanced HLA-DR but not HLA-ABC (MHC class I). This 1,25-(OH)2D3 inhibition was as effective as PGE2 and hydrocortisone. To ascertain if HLA-DR was specifically down-regulated on monocytes, the effect of vitamin D3 analogues in CD33+ cells was examined. Incubation of the CD33+ cells with 1,25-(OH)2D3, 24-25-(OH)2D3 and 25-OHD3 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of culture-enhanced HLA-DR paralleling the vitamin D3-receptor affinities of these compounds. Northern analysis also demonstrated that 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment markedly decreased both expression of culture-enhanced and IFN-gamma-enhanced HLA-DR beta chain messenger RNA (mRNA) in monocyte-enriched populations. In total, our findings are consistent with the proposal that vitamin D3 analogues can contribute to down-regulating immune responses as a consequence of inhibiting class II expression. Images Figure 4

Tokuda, N; Mizuki, N; Kasahara, M; Levy, R B

1992-01-01

404

[Is the fluorescence cytotoxicity test for the determination of HLA-DR antigens more sensitive than the classical microcytotoxicity test?].  

PubMed

The authors compare the sensitivity of the testing methods for determining HLA-DR antigens on B-lymphocytes and monocytes (classical eosin technique) with the fluorescence cytotoxic tests (FCT). The assessment of results of DR specificity determination in blood donors and patients with blood disease showed comparability of the tests. The rate of concordance ranged from 88-89%. The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each method. PMID:2790911

Prazák, J; Májský, A

1989-08-11

405

Widespread Alu repeat-driven expansion of consensus DR2 retinoic acid response elements during primate evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Nuclear receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors whose signaling controls numerous aspects of development and physiology. Many receptors recognize DNA hormone response elements formed by direct repeats of RGKTCA motifs separated by 1 to 5 bp (DR1-DR5). Although many known such response elements are conserved in the mouse and human genomes, it is unclear to which extent transcriptional regulation by

David Laperriere; Tian-Tian Wang; John H White; Sylvie Mader

2007-01-01

406

HLA-DR and HLA-DQ are not markers for rapid disease progression in primary sclerosing cholangitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: The association between primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the HLA haplotype A1, B8, DR3, DQ2 is well established. During the last few years, several additional HLA associations have been suggested in PSC. Furthermore, two different HLA-DR specificities have been reported to be markers for rapid disease progression. Our aim was to critically evaluate all of the current and as

Olle Olerup; Rolf Olsson; Rolf Hultcrantz; Ulrika Broome

1995-01-01

407

Recombinant gamma interferon induces HLA-DR expression on squamous cell carcinoma, trichilemmoma, adenocarcinoma cell lines, and cultured human keratinocytes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon on the induction of HLA-DR expression by two human squamous cell carcinoma, three trichilemmoma, one eccrine carcinoma, two adenocarcinoma cell lines, and cultured human keratinocytes in vitro. None of eight epithelial cell lines or keratinocytes expressed HLA-DR without gamma interferon treatment. In contrast, pure gamma interferon (500 IU\\/ml, 72-h treatment) induced

K. Kameyama; T. Tone; H. Eto; S. Takezaki; T. Kanzaki; S. Nishiyama

1987-01-01

408

Characterisation of cellulose-binding proteins that are involved in the adhesion mechanism of Fibrobacter intestinalis DR7  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cellulose-binding proteins (CBP) isolated from cell envelopes of the cellulolytic bacterium Fibrobacter intestinalis strain DR7 were studied in order to investigate the adhesion mechanism. The proteins were examined for their reaction with\\u000a antibodies that specifically block bacterial adhesion, response to glycosylation staining and monosaccharide composition.\\u000a To this end, the effect of some monosaccharides (CBP components) on blocking of DR7 adhesion

J. Miron; C. W. Forsberg

1999-01-01

409

Comparative Genomic Analysis of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 To Determine Strain-Specific Genomic Regions and Gentisate Biodegradation ? †  

PubMed Central

The comparative genomics of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 assayed with A. baylyi ADP1, A. calcoaceticus PHEA-2, and A. baumannii ATCC 17978 revealed that the incorporation of phage-related genomic regions and the absence of transposable elements have contributed to the large size (4.15 Mb) of the DR1 genome. A horizontally transferred genomic region and a higher proportion of transcriptional regulator- and signal peptide-coding genes were identified as characteristics of the DR1 genome. Incomplete glucose metabolism, metabolic pathways of aromatic compounds, biofilm formation, antibiotics and metal resistance, and natural competence genes were conserved in four compared genomes. Interestingly, only strain DR1 possesses gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (nagI) and grows on gentisate, whereas other species cannot. Expression of the nagI gene was upregulated during gentisate utilization, and four downstream open reading frames (ORFs) were cotranscribed, supporting the notion that gentisate metabolism is a unique characteristic of strain DR1. The genomic analysis of strain DR1 provides additional insights into the function, ecology, and evolution of Acinetobacter species.

Jung, Jaejoon; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun

2011-01-01

410

Heterogeneous epithelial expression of class II (HLA-DR) determinants and secretory component related to dysplasia in ulcerative colitis.  

PubMed Central

The intensity and degree of heterogeneous epithelial marker expression were evaluated immunohistochemically in 29 mucosal biopsy specimens from 7 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with dysplasia. Biopsy specimens from UC patients with mild (n = 7) or severe (n = 6) inflammation and from histologically normal samples (n = 7) served as controls. HLA-DR showed heterogeneous epithelial expression in all lesions with high grade dysplasia and in 6 of 8 with low grade dysplasia. SC was heterogeneous stained in 17 of 21 lesions with high grade dysplasia and in all but two lesions with low grade dysplasia. In histologically normal mucosa, SC was homogeneously expressed and epithelial DR was virtually absent. In mildly inflamed UC lesions, SC exhibited patchy distribution in only one sample and DR in two, whereas both SC and DR showed a slight degree of heterogeneous expression in all lesions with severe inflammation. Moreover, the overall intensity of SC staining tended to decrease with increasing degree of inflammation, whereas the opposite was seen for DR. Decreased SC and increased DR expression thus seemed to be related to intensified inflammatory activity, whereas heterogeneous expression of these markers was significantly more related to dysplasia. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

Rognum, T. O.; Brandtzaeg, P.; Elgjo, K.; Fausa, O.

1987-01-01

411

Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a high-affinity zinc importer (DrZIP1) from zebrafish (Danio rerio)  

PubMed Central

Zinc is a vital micronutrient to all organisms and a potential toxicant to aquatic animals. It is therefore of importance to understand the mechanism of zinc regulation. In the present study, we molecularly cloned and functionally characterized a zinc transporter of the SLC39A family [commonly referred to as the ZIP (Zrt- and Irt-related protein) family] from the gill of zebrafish (Danio rerio) (DrZIP1). DrZIP1 protein was found to localize at the plasma membrane and to function as a zinc uptake transporter when being expressed in either chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) embryonic 214 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes. In comparison with pufferfish transporter proteins (FrZIP2 and FrECaC) that are known to facilitate cellular zinc uptake, DrZIP1 appears to have high affinity to bind and transport zinc, suggesting that it may be a high-affinity zinc uptake transporter (Km<0.5 ?M) in fish. Orthologues of DrZIP1 were also identified in both freshwater and seawater pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes), indicating that these proteins may be functionally conserved among different fish species. DrZIP1 mRNA is expressed in all the tissues examined in the present study and thus DrZIP1 may be a constitutive zinc uptake transporter in many cell types of zebrafish.

2005-01-01

412

Investigating the protective role of death receptor 3 (DR3) in renal injury using an organ culture model.  

PubMed

Death receptor 3 (DR3; also designated as Wsl-1, Apo3, LARD, TRAMP, TNFRSF25, and TR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that has emerged as a major regulator of inflammation and autoimmune diseases. DR3 contains a homologous intracellular region called the death domain (DD) that can bind adaptor proteins, which also contain a DD, initiating cellular responses such as caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. However, in other circumstances DR3 can initiate induction of transcription genes and gene products that can prevent cell death from occurring. Our laboratory has reported an inducible expression of DR3 in human and mouse tubular epithelial cells in renal injury, but its function in these setting still remains unclear. To directly manipulate and evaluate the role of DR3 in vivo, I have used an in vitro organ culture (OC) model, which I have developed in our laboratory. In this chapter, I will describe in detail the OC model used to study the role of DR3 in renal injury and discuss its advantages and limitations. In my hands, the OC model has proven to be an efficient tool for studying human cell heterogeneity, basal and regulated receptor expression, signalling pathways, and various biological responses not readily achievable in traditional cell culture models. Various assays can be carried out on organ cultures including histology, biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology, which will not be described in detail in this chapter. PMID:24788174

Al-Lamki, Rafia S

2014-01-01

413

Shared epitopes of the HLA-DR10 molecule recognized by murine and human mAbs.  

PubMed

In order to produce mAbs directed specifically against HLA-DR10 molecule, transfected mouse L cells, expressing the DRB1*1001 allele, were used to immunize C3H mice over a period of 4 weeks. Two mAbs, 2C12 and 4B6, derived from this fusion were found to recognize, with different affinity, polymorphic epitopes of DR10 that are shared with DR1, 3, 7, and 9. These mAbs were screened on a large panel of homozygous B lymphoblastoid cell lines using microlymphocytotoxicity and the results were confirmed by flow cytometry. The reactive pattern of 2C12 and 4B6 was compared to that of MP10 human mAb also recognizing the DR10 specificity in addition to DR1, 2 and 9. Based on serologic specificity and cellular absorption experiments, we conclude that the epitopes the murine and human mAbs respectively recognize on the DR10 molecule, are probably different. PMID:7684257

Pistillo, M P; Sun, P F; Mantero, S; Ferrara, G B

1993-04-01

414

Filamentous hemagglutinin has a major role in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to human WiDr cells.  

PubMed

[35S]methionine-labeled Bordetella pertussis adhered to monolayers of WiDr cells, an epitheliumlike cell line from a human intestinal carcinoma. Adherence was proportional to the density of the WiDr cells and to the concentration of B. pertussis in the assay. Adherence of virulent phase I strains Tohama phase I, 114, and BP338 was much greater than adherence of avirulent strains Tohama phase III and 423 phase IV. Mutants deficient in the production of the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) were hemagglutination negative and adhered to WiDr cells much less efficiently than the parent strains. Preincubation of B. pertussis cells with FHA increased their hemagglutination activity and adherence to WiDr cells. Goat antibody to FHA inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the adherence of strain Tohama I but not the adherence of FHA-deficient mutant Tohama 325. At similar protein concentrations, normal goat antibody, goat antibody to pertussis toxin, or the Fab fragments of goat antibody to serotype 2 fimbriae had no effect on adherence. Also, an FHA-positive strain without fimbriae showed high adherence, while a fimbriated FHA-deficient mutant adhered poorly. Our data indicate that FHA plays a major role in adherence of B. pertussis to human WiDr cells. Fimbriae do not appear to mediate attachment of B. pertussis to WiDr cells. PMID:2872165

Urisu, A; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

1986-06-01

415

The octamer motif is a B-lymphocyte-specific regulatory element of the HLA-DR. alpha. gene promoter  

SciTech Connect

The human class II gene, HLA-DR{alpha}, contains an octanucleotide sequence ATTTGCAT located {approx}40 base pairs upstream of the transcription initiation site. The authors have investigated the transcriptional function of the DR{alpha} octamer in human B-lymphoblastoid cells and non-B cells. Deletion and substitution mutagenesis of the octamer sequence greatly reduced the activity of the DR{alpha} promoter in both in vivo and in vitro cell-free transcription systems of B-cell origin. Conversely, these mutations did not affect promoter activity in several non-B-cell lines that express the DR{alpha} gene. Removal of octamer-binding proteins by in vivo titration with an octamer-containing competitor plasmid reduced DR{alpha} promoter activity in B-lymphoblastoid cells. These results suggest that a protein-octamer interaction, most likely involving the B-cell-specific octamer binding protein (OTF-2), is required for DR{alpha} promoter function in B-lymphoblastoid cells but not in non-B cells.

Sherman, P.A.; Basta, P.V.; Wloch, M.K.; Ting, J.P.Y. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)); Heguy, A.; Roeder, R.G. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (USA))

1989-09-01

416

Chemistry of C3 and carbon chain molecules in DR21(OH)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. C3 is the smallest pure carbon chain detected in the dense environment of star-forming regions, although diatomic C2 is detected in diffuse clouds. Measurement of the abundance of C3 and the chemistry of its formation in dense star-forming regions has remained relatively unexplored. Aims: We aim to identify the primary C3 formation routes in dense star-forming regions following a chemical network producing species like CCH and c-C3H2 in the star-forming cores associated with DR21(OH), a high-mass star-forming region. Methods: We observed velocity resolved spectra of four ro-vibrational far-infrared transitions of C3 between the vibrational ground state and the low-energy ?2 bending mode at frequencies between 1654-1897 GHz using HIFI on board Herschel, in DR21(OH). Several transitions of CCH and c-C3H2 were also observed with HIFI and the IRAM 30 m telescope. Rotational temperatures and column densities for all chemical species were estimated. A gas and grain warm-up model was used to obtain estimates of densities and temperatures of the envelope. The chemical network in the model was used to identify the primary C3 forming reactions in DR21(OH). Results: We detected C3 in absorption in four far-infrared transitions, P(4), P(10), Q(2), and Q(4). The continuum sources MM1 and MM2 in DR21(OH), though spatially unresolved, are sufficiently separated in velocity to be identified in the C3 spectra. All C3 transitions are detected from the embedded source MM2 and the surrounding envelope, whereas only Q(4) and P(4) are detected toward the hot core MM1. The abundance of C3 in the envelope and MM2 is ~6 × 10-10 and ~3 × 10-9, respectively. For CCH and c-C3H2, we only detect emission from the envelope and MM1. The observed CCH, C3 and c-C3H2 abundances are most consistent with a chemical model with nH2 ~ 5 × 106 cm-3, a post-warm-up dust temperature Tmax = 30 K, and a time of ~0.7-3 Myr. Conclusions: Post-warm-up gas phase chemistry of CH4 released from the grain at t ~ 0.2 Myr and lasting for 1 Myr can explain the observed C3 abundance in the envelope of DR21(OH), and no mechanism involving photodestruction of PAH molecules is required. The chemistry in the envelope is similar to the warm carbon chain chemistry found in lukewarm corinos. We interpret the observed lower C3 abundance in MM1 as compared to MM2 and the envelope to be due to the destruction of C3 in the more evolved MM1. The timescale for the chemistry derived for the envelope is consistent with the dynamical timescale of 2 Myr derived for DR21(OH) in other studies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia, with important participation from NASA.

Mookerjea, B.; Hassel, G. E.; Gerin, M.; Giesen, T.; Stutzki, J.; Herbst, E.; Black, J. H.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Menten, K. M.; Kre?owski, J.; De Luca, M.; Csengeri, T.; Joblin, C.; Ka?mierczak, M.; Schmidt, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.

2012-10-01

417

Evaluation of the pDR-1200 real-time aerosol monitor.  

PubMed

The objective of this research was to characterize the ability of the pDR-1200 real-time aerosol monitor to measure aerosols of varying size, composition, and origin. Particle aspiration and transmission efficiency was characterized at airflow rates of 2 L/min, 5 L/min, and 10 L/min in a wind tunnel in both static and orientation-averaged configurations. At 10 L/min, the particle cut point for 50% penetration of particles through the device (d(50)) was approximately 6 micro m, while at 2 L/min and 5 L/min the d(50) was significantly larger, about 9 micro m (p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in particle penetration efficiency between facing-the-wind and orientation-averaged configurations (p(avg) = 0.66). The pDR-1200 response factor, which is defined as the ratio the time-averaged, monitor-reported concentration to a gravimetric filter concentration measured directly downstream of the sensing zone, was evaluated for four aerosol types: Arizona road dust, background ambient aerosol, environmental tobacco smoke, and diesel particulate matter. These aerosols, each of varying refractive index and particle size distribution, produced significant changes in the measured response factor (p < 0.01). The pDR-1200 both overestimated and underestimated (up to a factor of 7) the gravimetrically determined aerosol concentration. These discrepancies further reinforce the need to calibrate the instrument in situ for each aerosol of interest. Inter-instrument variability was generally low for co-located monitors. PMID:18365888

Benton-Vitz, Kaila; Volckens, John

2008-06-01

418

New ultracool subdwarfs identified in large-scale surveys using Virtual Observatory tools. I. UKIDSS LAS DR5 vs. SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: The aim of the project is to improve our knowledge of the low-mass and low-metallicity population to investigate the influence of metallicity on the stellar (and substellar) mass function. Methods: We present the results of a photometric and proper motion search aimed at discovering ultracool subdwarfs in large-scale surveys. We employed and combined the Fifth Data Release (DR5) of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 complemented with ancillary data from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), the DEep Near-Infrared Survey (DENIS) and the SuperCOSMOS Sky Surveys (SSS). Results: The SDSS DR7 vs. UKIDSS LAS DR5 search returned a total of 32 ultracool subdwarf candidates, only two of which are recognised as a subdwarf in the literature. Twenty-seven candidates, including the two known ones, were followed-up spectroscopically in the optical between 600 and 1000 nm, thus covering strong spectral features indicative of low metallicity (e.g., CaH), 21 with the Very Large Telescope, one with the Nordic Optical Telescope, and five were extracted from the Sloan spectroscopic database to assess (or refute) their low-metal content. We confirm 20 candidates as subdwarfs, extreme subdwarfs, or ultra-subdwarfs with spectral types later than M5; this represents a success rate of ? 60%. Among those 20 new subdwarfs, we identify two early-L subdwarfs that are very likely located within 100 pc, which we propose as templates for future searches because they are the first examples of their subclass. Another seven sources are solar-metallicity M dwarfs with spectral types between M4 and M7 without H? emission, suggesting that they are old M dwarfs. The remaining five candidates do not have spectroscopic follow-up yet; only one remains as a bona-fide ultracool subdwarf after revision of their proper motions. We assigned spectral types based on the current classification schemes and, when possible, we measured their radial velocities. Using the limited number of subdwarfs with trigonometric parallaxes, we estimated distances ranging from ~95 to ~600 pc for the new subdwarfs. We provide mid-infrared photometry extracted from the WISE satellite databases for two subdwarfs and discuss their colours. Finally, we estimate a lower limit of the surface density of ultracool subdwarfs about 5000-5700 times lower than that of solar-metallicity late-M dwarfs. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 084.C-0928A.Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

Lodieu, N.; Espinoza Contreras, M.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Solano, E.; Aberasturi, M.; Martín, E. L.

2012-06-01

419

The environmental dependence of different colors in the CMASS sample of the SDSS DR9  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I investigate the environmental dependence of galaxy colors in the CMASS sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9 (SDSS DR9). To decrease the radial selection effect, I divide the CMASS sample into subsamples with a redshift binning size of ?z = 0.01 and analyze the environmental dependence of the u ? r, u ? g, g ? r, r ? i and i ? z colors for these subsamples in each redshift bin. Statistical analysis shows that all five colors weakly correlate with the local environment, which may mean that the environmental processes responsible for a galaxy's properties proceed slowly over cosmic time.

Deng, Xin-Fa

2014-05-01

420

A Crusade Against Scorpion Sting: Life and Works of Dr. Himmatrao Bawaskar  

PubMed Central

In the times of rapid advancement of science and technology, advance medical equipment and hi tech hospitals represent the face of medical science. The aspirations and ambitions of medical professionals are also shifting, with growing concerns of deterioration of doctor patient relationship as well as disconnect between services and the community needs. The life of Dr Himmatrao Bawaskar defies several conventions of today's medical practice. His outstanding dedication towards patients and commitment to provide high quality care in resource poor setting makes him an ideal role model for younger generation of physicians in India.

Kale, Ajinkya A.

2012-01-01

421

Dr. Ruth Westheimer: upsetting the normalcy of the late-night talk show.  

PubMed

For the most part, the late-night talk/variety television genre has been analyzed as little more than a promotional device for producers of popular culture products. Using concepts of dialogic discourse borrowed from M.M. Bakhtin and of star discourse theorized by Jimmie Reeves, this paper explores the ideological complexity available in the content of late-night programming. The various inflections of Dr. Ruth Westheimer within the broadcast context of the late-night talk/variety genre provide the focus of this analysis. PMID:1856465

Buxton, R A

1991-01-01

422

HLA-DR/DQ Genotypes in Kurd Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relation to Disease Activity  

PubMed Central

Background: Specific alleles present at the HLA-DR/DQ loci seem to be associated with disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Aim: In the present study, our aim was to investigate the distribution of HLA-DR/DQ alleles among Kurd patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to ascertain their relationship with disease activity. Materials and Methods: Sixty five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 65 apparently healthy subjects participated in the study. Diagnosis and disease activity were confirmed. Blood analyses, including those of laboratory markers of disease activity, were done. The 28 joint disease activity score (DAS-28) was calculated. HLA-DR/DQ typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).The association between HLA-DR/DQ genotypes and disease activity was determined. Results: The most frequent alleles which were identified in RA patients were HLA-DRBI*01(23.1%) and HLA-DQBI*6(34.6%), whereas in healthy subjects, they were HLA-DRBI*11(17.7%) and HLA-DQBI*03(35.4%). Patients with active disease had high frequencies of HLA-DQBI*6 (40.0%) as compared to those with moderate disease activity (16.7%); OR=3.33. Patients with severe RA had increased frequencies of HLA-DQBI*6 (56.3%) as compared to those with mild RA (10.0%); OR = 11.57. Patients with positive rheumatoid factor (RF) and positive Anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (Anti-CCP), also had high frequencies of HLA-DQBI*06 (38.4% and 39.4%) as compared to frequencies of 11.1% and 15.4% which were seen in patients with negative rheumatoid factor and negative anti-CCP (OR= 4.98 and3.10) respectively. Conclusion: HLA-DQBI*06 was found to be more common in Kurd patients and it was significantly associated with disease activity; this may indicate a high risk for developing a more progressive type of the disease.

Rasool, Mohammad T.; Sulaiman, Dhia M.

2014-01-01

423

Interview with Dr Robin Rothrock: the RNA purification market. 26 July 2005.  

PubMed

Dr Robin Rothrock, Director of Market Research at Bioinformatics LLC, talked to Lynsey Alger about the RNA purification market. The process of RNA purification is one of growing importance, not only among basic researchers, but increasingly among those involved in clinical research, particularly as purified RNA represents the base material for a vast number of innovative and widely used techniques, such as real-time and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and DNA microarrays. This interview examines the current and future status of the RNA purification market, with a focus on the different types of purification approaches available to researchers as well as the key companies involved in their production. PMID:16118695

Alger, Lynsey

2005-09-01

424

Dr. David Brown poses with students at Ronald McNair Middle School  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. David Brown (right), a NASA astronaut, poses with students in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. From left, the students are Kristin Rexford, Danitra Anderson, Dominique Smith, Fallon Davis, and Qiana Taylor. Brown was at the school to attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair. The school had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut who was one of a crew of seven, who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

1999-01-01

425

Audio Interview with Dr. Carol Stoker about MARTE and the Rio Tinto  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features links to broadcast quality audio files and transcripts from an interview with Dr. Carol Stoker about the Mars Analog Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) which is to take place near the Rio Tinto in Spain. Interview topics include the MARTE expedition, the definition of an extremophile, the significance of the color and pH of Rio Tinto, equipment for the MARTE experiment, the possibility of a Mars drilling mission, and the resemblance of Rio Tinto geochemistry to that of Mars.

Stoker, Carol

2009-06-18

426

Memorial tribute to astrobiology pioneers Dr. David S. Mckay and academician Georgy A. Zavarzin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the past two years, the world has lost two great pioneers of the field of Astrobiology-Dr. David Stewart McKay who worked at the NASA-Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, USA and Academician Georgy Alexandrovich Zavarzin of the Institute of Microbiology of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Professor of the Moscow State University in Moscow, Russia. The Volume of the Proceedings of the 2013 SPIE Instruments, Methods, and Missions for Astrobiology XVI is dedicated to the memory of these great scientists. We remember our dear friends and review some of their many important contributions to Planetary Science, Geology, Meteoritics, Microbiology and Astrobiology.

Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Rozhnov, Sergei V.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

2013-09-01

427

Peptides Presented by HLA-DR Molecules in Synovia of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis*  

PubMed Central

Disease-associated HLA-DR molecules, which may present autoantigens, constitute the greatest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA). The peptides presented by HLA-DR molecules in synovia have not previously been defined. Using tandem mass spectrometry, rigorous database searches, and manual spectral interpretation, we identified 1,427 HLA-DR-presented peptides (220–464 per patient) from the synovia of four patients, two diagnosed with RA and two diagnosed with LA. The peptides were derived from 166 source proteins, including a wide range of intracellular and plasma proteins. A few epitopes were found only in RA or LA patients. However, two patients with different diseases who had the same HLA allele had the largest number of epitopes in common. In one RA patient, peptides were identified as originating from source proteins that have been reported to undergo citrullination under other circumstances, yet neither this post-translational modification nor anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were detected. Instead, peptides with the post-translational modification of S-cysteinylation were identified. We conclude that a wide range of proteins enter the HLA-DR pathway of antigen-presenting cells in the patients' synovial tissue, and their HLA-DR genotype, not the disease type, appears to be the primary determinant of their HLA-DR-peptide repertoire. New insights into the naturally presented HLA-DR epitope repertoire in target tissues may allow the identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes, and this could lead to innovative therapeutic interventions.

Seward, Robert J.; Drouin, Elise E.; Steere, Allen C.; Costello, Catherine E.

2011-01-01

428

Peptides presented by HLA-DR molecules in synovia of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.  

PubMed

Disease-associated HLA-DR molecules, which may present autoantigens, constitute the greatest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA). The peptides presented by HLA-DR molecules in synovia have not previously been defined. Using tandem mass spectrometry, rigorous database searches, and manual spectral interpretation, we identified 1,427 HLA-DR-presented peptides (220-464 per patient) from the synovia of four patients, two diagnosed with RA and two diagnosed with LA. The peptides were derived from 166 source proteins, including a wide range of intracellular and plasma proteins. A few epitopes were found only in RA or LA patients. However, two patients with different diseases who had the same HLA allele had the largest number of epitopes in common. In one RA patient, peptides were identified as originating from source proteins that have been reported to undergo citrullination under other circumstances, yet neither this post-translational modification nor anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were detected. Instead, peptides with the post-translational modification of S-cysteinylation were identified. We conclude that a wide range of proteins enter the HLA-DR pathway of antigen-presenting cells in the patients' synovial tissue, and their HLA-DR genotype, not the disease type, appears to be the primary determinant of their HLA-DR-peptide repertoire. New insights into the naturally presented HLA-DR epitope repertoire in target tissues may allow the identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes, and this could lead to innovative therapeutic interventions. PMID:21081667

Seward, Robert J; Drouin, Elise E; Steere, Allen C; Costello, Catherine E

2011-03-01

429

The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.  

PubMed Central

In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

Brunicardi, F. Charles; Cotton, Ronald T.; Cole, George W.; Martinez, George

2007-01-01

430

Effect of dabrafenib on melanoma cell lines harbouring the BRAFV600D/R mutations  

PubMed Central

Background Conventional therapeutic agents are largely unsatisfactory into the treatment of malignant melanoma. Recently, an innovative approach based on inhibitors of the mutated BRAF gene (which represents the most prevalent alteration in melanoma patients) appears very promising from the clinical point of view. On this regard, a new compound, dabrafenib (GSK2118436), has been demonstrated to be effective in patients carrying the BRAFV600E/K mutations. We here tested dabrafenib for its capability to inhibit cell growth on primary melanoma cell lines, established from patients' tumour tissues and carrying the BRAFV600D/R mutations. Methods Three melanoma cell lines were tested: M257 wild-type BRAF, LCP BRAFV600R and WM266 BRAFV600D. The MTT assays were performed using standardized approaches. To evaluate the inhibition of MAPK pathway and the consequent inhibition of cellular proliferation, the phosphorylation of ERK was examined by Western Blot analysis performed on total protein extracts from cell lines after treatment with dabrafenib. Results Our experiments demonstrated an effective action of Dabrafenib (GSK2118436) and the inhibition of MAPK pathway in melanoma cell lines carrying BRAFV600D/R mutations. Conclusion These results could be helpful to enlarge the number of melanoma patients who may benefit of a more effective targeted treatment.

2013-01-01

431

Dr. Harvey Cushing's attempts to cure migraine based on theories of pathophysiology.  

PubMed

A multitude of theories characterized medical thought on migraine in the early 20th century. Newly discovered historical case files revealed Dr. Harvey Cushing's previously unpublished early attempts at surgical cure of migraine. Following institutional review board approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the authors reviewed the microfilm surgical records for The Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. Patients undergoing surgical intervention by Dr. Harvey Cushing for the treatment of migraine were selected for further review. All 4 patients in the series were women and ranged in age from 29 to 41 years old. The women were admitted and observed in the hospital until a migraine occurred. Surgeries were performed while the women were in the midst of an attack. Cushing used surgical strategies including decompression, temporal artery ligation, and removal of the spine of the second vertebra. In each case, the patients' headaches eventually returned following surgery. Cushing relied on a combination of contemporary theories on migraine including humeral science, vasospastic theory, organic cause, and increased intracranial pressure. His unpublished efforts foreshadowed future surgical efforts at curing migraines. PMID:21682563

Latimer, Katherine; Pendleton, Courtney; Rosenberg, Jason; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

2011-11-01

432

Analysis of ROC on chest direct digital radiography (DR) after image processing in diagnosis of SARS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, also called Infectious Atypical Pneumonia), which initially broke out in late 2002, has threatened the public"s health seriously. How to confirm the patients contracting SARS becomes an urgent issue in diagnosis. This paper intends to evaluate the importance of Image Processing in the diagnosis on SARS at the early stage. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis has been employed in this study to compare the value of DR images in the diagnosis of SARS patients before and after image processing by Symphony Software supplied by E-Com Technology Ltd., and DR image study of 72 confirmed or suspected SARS patients were reviewed respectively. All the images taken from the studied patients were processed by Symphony. Both the original and processed images were taken into ROC analysis, based on which the ROC graph for each group of images has been produced as described below: For processed images: a = 1.9745, b = 1.4275, SA = 0.8714; For original images: a = 0.9066, b = 0.8310, SA = 0.7572; (a - intercept, b - slop, SA - Area below the curve). The result shows significant difference between the original images and processed images (P<0.01). In summary, the images processed by Symphony are superior to the original ones in detecting the opacity lesion, and increases the accuracy of SARS diagnosis.

Lv, Guozheng; Lan, Rihui; Zeng, Qingsi; Zheng, Zhong

2004-05-01

433

Activating Death Receptor DR5 as a Therapeutic Strategy for Rhabdomyosarcoma  

PubMed Central

Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. It is believed to arise from skeletal muscle progenitors, preserving the expression of genes critical for embryonic myogenic development such as MYOD1 and myogenin. RMS is classified as embryonal, which is more common in younger children, or alveolar, which is more prevalent in elder children and adults. Despite aggressive management including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, the outcome for children with metastatic RMS is dismal, and the prognosis has remained unchanged for decades. Apoptosis is a highly regulated process critical for embryonic development and tissue and organ homeostasis. Like other types of cancers, RMS develops by evading intrinsic apoptosis via mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. However, the ability to induce apoptosis via the death receptor-dependent extrinsic pathway remains largely intact in tumors with p53 mutations. This paper focuses on activating extrinsic apoptosis as a therapeutic strategy for RMS by targeting the death receptor DR5 with a recombinant TRAIL ligand or agonistic antibodies directed against DR5.

Kang, Zhigang; Sun, Shi-Yong; Cao, Liang

2012-01-01

434

An analysis of OH excited state absorption lines in DR 21 and K3-50  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analysis of the OH absorption line zones observed toward the compact H II regions DR 21 and K3-50. Using as parameters the kinetic and dust temperatures, the H2 number density and the ratio of OH-H2 number densities to the velocity gradient, the model quantitatively reproduces the absorption line data for the six main line transitions in 2 Pi3/2 J = 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. Observed upper limits for the absorption or emission in the satellite lines of 2 Pi3/2 J = 5/2 are crucial in constraining the range of derived parameters. Physical conditions derived for DR 21 show that the kinetic temperature centers around 140 K, the H2 number density around 10 exp 7/cu cm, and that the OH column density in the excited state absorption zone lies between 1 x 10 exp 15/sq cm and 2 x 10 exp 15/sq cm. Including contributions from a J = 3/2 absorption zone, the total OH column density is more than a factor of 2 lower than estimates based upon LTE (Walmsley et al., 1986). The OH absorption zone in K3-50 tends toward higher density and displays a larger column density, while the kinetic temperature is similar. For both sources, the dust temperature is found to be significantly lower than the kinetic temperature.

Jones, K. N.; Doel, R. C.; Field, D.; Gray, M. D.; Walker, R. N. F.

1992-10-01

435

Functional expression of a cattle MHC class II DR-like antigen on mouse L cells  

SciTech Connect

Cattle DRA and DRB genes, cloned by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, were transfected into mouse L cells. The cattle DR-expressing L-cell transfectant generated was analyzed serologically, biochemically, and functionally. Sequence analysis of the transfected DRB gene clearly showed showed that it was DRB3 allele DRB3*0101, which corresponds to the 1D-IEF-determined allele DRBF3. 1D-IEF analysis of the tranfectant confirmed that the expressed DR product was DRBF3. Functional integrity of the transfected gene products was demonstrated by the ability of the transfectant cell line to present two antigens (the foot-and-mouth disease virus-derived peptide FMDV15, and ovalbumin) to antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cells from both the original animal used to obtain the genes, and also from an unrelated DRBF3{sup +} heterozygous animal. Such transfectants will be invaluable tools, allowing us to dissect the precise contributions each locus product makes to the overall immune response in heterozygous animals, information essential for rational vaccine design. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Fraser, D.C.; Craigmile, S.; Campbell, J.D.M. [Roslin Inst., Midlothian (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Roslin Inst., Midlothian (United Kingdom); and others

1996-09-01

436

Chemotherapeutic activity of levofloxacin (HR 355, DR-3355) against systemic and localized infections in laboratory animals.  

PubMed

Ofloxacin, its optical isomers levofloxacin (HR 355, DR-3355) and D-ofloxacin (DR-3354) and ciprofloxacin were administered orally to mice and rats which had systemic and localized infections. Both levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were equally effective in treating systemic murine infections caused by staphylococci. Enterobacteriaceae or Pseudomonas aeruginosa with ED50s ranging from 0.18 to 15.8 mg/kg and 0.42 to 16.3 mg/kg respectively and both these agents were twice as effective as ofloxacin which had an ED50 0.41 to 39.7 mg/kg. In contrast, D-ofloxacin was either inactive or exhibited only modest chemotherapeutic activity against the staphylococci and the Gram-negative organisms tested. When given to mice to treat staphylococcal abscesses and lung infections due to Klebsiella pneumoniae DT-S levofloxacin was up to four times more effective and produced a more pronounced bactericidal effect against the pathogens in vivo than the reference compounds. Despite possessing a similar, if not lesser, in-vitro activity against the infecting pathogens, levofloxacin was more effective than ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in rats with localized infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa. PMID:7559192

Klesel, N; Geweniger, K H; Koletzki, P; Isert, D; Limbert, M; Markus, A; Riess, G; Schramm, H; Iyer, P

1995-06-01

437

Identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presented by human bronchoalveolar lavage cells in sarcoidosis  

PubMed Central

Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, most commonly affecting the lungs. Activated CD4+ T cells accumulate in the lungs of individuals with sarcoidosis and are considered to be of central importance for inflammation. We have previously shown that Scandinavian sarcoidosis patients expressing the HLA-DR allele DRB1*0301 are characterized by large accumulations in the lungs of CD4+ T cells expressing the TCR AV2S3 gene segment. This association afforded us a unique opportunity to identify a sarcoidosis-specific antigen recognized by AV2S3+ T cells. To identify candidates for the postulated sarcoidosis-specific antigen, lung cells from 16 HLA-DRB1*0301pos patients were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. HLA-DR molecules were affinity purified and bound peptides acid eluted. Subsequently, peptides were separated by reversed-phase HPLC and analyzed by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. We identified 78 amino acid sequences from self proteins presented in the lungs of sarcoidosis patients, some of which were well-known autoantigens such as vimentin and ATP synthase. For the first time, to our knowledge, we have identified HLA-bound peptides presented in vivo during an inflammatory condition. This approach can be extended to characterize HLA-bound peptides in various autoimmune settings.

Wahlstrom, Jan; Dengjel, Jorn; Persson, Bengt; Duyar, Huseyin; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanovi?c, Stefan; Eklund, Anders; Weissert, Robert; Grunewald, Johan

2007-01-01

438

Optical absorption and SHG in PMMA:DR1 thin films as function of poling time  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amorphous, PMMA: DR1: surfactant and PMMA:DR1:TEOS thin films were prepared by dip-coating. All films were calcined at 70 °C for 3 hours. For nanostructured thin films two ionic surfactants were used, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to obtain two different nanostructures of the PMMA matrix: lamellar, and hexagonal, respectively. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to determine the long-order structure tailored in the films. The measurements of the optical absorption and the second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity were carried out at different orientation arrangements of the chromophores embedded in the films. The chromophore orientation distributions were obtained by means of the corona technique. These distributions depend on the corona poling time. We physically modeled the optical absorption and the second harmonic generation experimental results as function of the corona poling time, employing only one fitting parameter related to the matrix-chromophore interactions. The physical model and the experimental results were in an excellent agreement. The experimental results fitted by the model are shown in plots of order parameter against corona poling time and SHG intensity against corona poling time. The amorphous films provide a larger SHG intensity values than those obtained from the nanostructured films. Thin films with lamellar structure have a SHG intensity bigger than those from hexagonal and PMMA:TEOS thin films.

García-Macedo, Jorge A.; Franco, Alfredo; Valverde-Aguilar, Guadalupe; Aguilar-Gutiérrez, Carlos

2007-10-01

439

Employing a recombinant HLA-DR3 expression system to dissect major histocompatibility complex II-thyroglobulin peptide dynamism: a genetic, biochemical, and reverse immunological perspective.  

PubMed

Previously, we have shown that statistical synergism between amino acid variants in thyroglobulin (Tg) and specific HLA-DR3 pocket sequence signatures conferred a high risk for autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Therefore, we hypothesized that this statistical synergism mirrors a biochemical interaction between Tg peptides and HLA-DR3, which is key to the pathoetiology of AITD. To test this hypothesis, we designed a recombinant HLA-DR3 expression system that was used to express HLA-DR molecules harboring either AITD susceptibility or resistance DR pocket sequences. Next, we biochemically generated the potential Tg peptidic repertoire available to HLA-DR3 by separately treating 20 purified human thyroglobulin samples with cathepsins B, D, or L, lysosomal proteases that are involved in antigen processing and thyroid biology. Sequences of the cathepsin-generated peptides were then determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight-mass spectroscopy, and algorithmic means were employed to identify putative AITD-susceptible HLA-DR3 binders. From four predicted peptides, we identified two novel peptides that bound strongly and specifically to both recombinant AITD-susceptible HLA-DR3 protein and HLA-DR3 molecules expressed on stably transfected cells. Intriguingly, the HLA-DR3-binding peptides we identified had a marked preference for the AITD-susceptibility DR signatures and not to those signatures that were AITD-protective. Structural analyses demonstrated the profound influence that the pocket signatures have on the interaction of HLA-DR molecules with Tg peptides. Our study suggests that interactions between Tg and discrete HLA-DR pocket signatures contribute to the initiation of AITD. PMID:19776016

Jacobson, Eric M; Yang, Heyi; Menconi, Francesca; Wang, Rong; Osman, Roman; Skrabanek, Luce; Li, Cheuk Wun; Fadlalla, Mohammed; Gandhi, Alisha; Chaturvedi, Vijaya; Smith, Eric P; Schwemberger, Sandy; Osterburg, Andrew; Babcock, George F; Tomer, Yaron

2009-12-01

440

A Surgeon's Historical Perspective: Dr. Leonard Furlow on the Early Years of Human Composite Flexor Tendon Allografts.  

PubMed

"I think that probably convenience is what did in the flexor mechanism allograft," Dr. Leonard Furlow explained in response to why tendon allografts in the 1960s were overshadowed by the Hunter rod, which is still routinely used for flexor tendon reconstruction today. At 83 years old, Dr. Furlow had graciously made the trip from his home in Gainesville, FL up to Charlottesville, VA for a special interview with the Department of Plastic Surgery at the University of Virginia. Furlow is perhaps better known for developing the double-opposing Z-plasty for cleft palate repair, but his interest in hand surgery led to a year in Chapel Hill, NC where he trained with the creator of the flexor mechanism allograft, Dr. Erle E. Peacock, Jr. Through innovative experimental work on flexor tendon reconstruction, Peacock had pioneered the use of fresh composite tendon allografts, which transplant the unscarred synovial space between the tendon and its sheath such that scar formation only occurs outside the sheath. Inspired by our recent research interest in this subject, we asked Dr. Furlow to reflect on his experience with the tendon allograft in the 1960s with the late Dr. Peacock. The picture he painted was of a simple, elegant, and astonishingly successful solution for flexor tendon reconstruction that suffered from a lack of practicality at the time. PMID:25003448

Tilt, Alexandra; DeGeorge, Brent R; Furlow, Leonard T; Drake, David B

2014-08-01

441

Molecular genetic analysis of nonclassic steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency associated with HLA-B14,DR1.  

PubMed

Nonclassic steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a frequent, relatively mild disorder of cortisol biosynthesis, characterized by variable signs of postnatal androgen excess. It is inherited as an allelic variant of the gene designated CYP21B, which encodes 21-hydroxylase. CYP21B is located in the HLA histocompatibility complex, and a "nonclassic" allelic variant is often associated with characteristic HLA antigens--B14,DR1. We cloned and analyzed the CYP21B gene from a patient homozygous for HLA-B14,DR1 who had nonclassic 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Five deviations from the normal genetic sequence of CYP21B were found, but only one appeared likely to affect the functional integrity of the protein: codon 281, GTG, encoding valine, was changed to TTG, leucine. We constructed an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to the mutant DNA sequence surrounding codon 281 and hybridized the probe with DNA samples digested with the restriction endonuclease Taql. Samples from eight patients with nonclassic 21-hydroxylase deficiency who had the haplotype HLA-B14,DR1 contained a hybridizing fragment 3700 base pairs long, indicating the presence of the valine-281 mutation in the CYP21B gene. In contrast, unaffected subjects and one patient with nonclassic deficiency who did not have HLA-B14,DR1 had no evidence of this mutation. We conclude that the mutation in codon 281 is a consistent molecular genetic marker for nonclassic 21-hydroxylase deficiency associated with HLA-B14,DR1. PMID:3260007

Speiser, P W; New, M I; White, P C

1988-07-01

442

Alveolar epithelial cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis display upregulation of TRAIL, DR4 and DR5 expression with simultaneous preferential over-expression of pro-apoptotic marker p53  

PubMed Central

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, debilitating, and fatal lung disease of unknown aetiology with no current cure. The pathogenesis of IPF remains unclear but repeated alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injuries and subsequent apoptosis are believed to be among the initiating/ongoing triggers. However, the precise mechanism of apoptotic induction is hitherto elusive. In this study, we investigated expression of a panel of pro-apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory proteins in 21 IPF and 19 control lung tissue samples. We reveal significant upregulation of the apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and its cognate receptors DR4 and DR5 in AEC within active lesions of IPF lungs. This upregulation was accompanied by pro-apoptotic protein p53 overexpression. In contrast, myofibroblasts within the fibroblastic foci of IPF lungs exhibited high TRAIL, DR4 and DR5 expression but negligible p53 expression. Similarly, p53 expression was absent or negligible in IPF and control alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes. No significant differences in TRAIL expression were noted in these cell types between IPF and control lungs. However, DR4 and DR5 upregulation was detected in IPF alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes. The marker of cellular senescence p21WAF1 was upregulated within affected AEC in IPF lungs. Cell cycle regulatory proteins Cyclin D1 and SOCS3 were significantly enhanced in AEC within the remodelled fibrotic areas of IPF lungs but expression was negligible in myofibroblasts. Taken together these findings suggest that, within the remodelled fibrotic areas of IPF, AEC can display markers associated with proliferation, senescence, and apoptotosis, where TRAIL could drive the apoptotic response. Clear understanding of disease processes and identification of therapeutic targets will direct us to develop effective therapies for IPF.

Akram, Khondoker M; Lomas, Nicola J; Forsyth, Nicholas R; Spiteri, Monica A

2014-01-01

443

Weak or absent evidence for the association of HLA-DR antigens with risk of thyroid carcinoma: a meta-analysis of observational studies.  

PubMed

Inconsistent reports of associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and thyroid cancers exist. We conducted a comprehensive search of the PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases. Using random-effects modeling, subgroup analyses, meta-regression and prediction interval (PI) estimation, we combined the existing evidence from 13 studies (977 cases of thyroid cancer and 3735 controls). Only HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR11 were significantly associated; however, the evidence for HLA-DR11 came from only three studies while that for HLA-DR1 had large between-study heterogeneity. All the PIs estimated in the study straddled unity. Therefore, current evidence for the studied association is incomplete as well as uncertain. Attempts to include HLA-DR typing as a prognostic or therapeutic marker may be premature at this time. PMID:21812765

Kamdi, A S; Kandavalli, N B; Emusu, D; Jain, N; Mamtani, M; Porterfield, J R

2011-11-01

444

Enhancement by gamma-interferon of in vivo tumor radiolocalization by a monoclonal antibody against HLA-DR antigen  

SciTech Connect

Athymic nu/nu (nude) mice bearing s.c. human breast tumors were treated systemically with recombinant human gamma-interferon. These tumors were phenotypically negative for HLA-DR prior to therapy, but after 4 days of treatment, 80% of the cells expressed this antigen in vivo as assessed by immunoperoxidase (F. R. Balkwill et al., Eur. J. Cancer Clin. Oncol., in press, 1986). A radioiodine-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (TAL-1B5) against HLA-DR specifically localized to the tumors in recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated but not in control mice. An isotype-identical murine monoclonal antibody that did not react with control or recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated tumors did not show any specific localization. These results demonstrate that specific localization to tumors of radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR can be facilitated by systemic therapy with gamma-interferon.

Rowlinson, G.; Balkwill, F.; Snook, D.; Hooker, G.; Epenetos, A.A.

1986-12-01

445

Immune response to Amb a VI (Ra6) is associated with HLA-DR5 in allergic humans  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-pure short ragweed pollen allergen Amb a VI (Ra6), mol. wt. 11,500 daltons, was used to explore the relationship between HLA-DR and specific immune responsiveness in 115 Caucasian subjects who were skin-test positive to short ragweed or 5 other common inhalant allergens. Immune responsiveness to Amb a VI was assessed by measuring IgE and IgG antibodies (Abs) by double Ab radioimmunoassay. A striking and significant association was found between IgEAb responsiveness to Amb a VI and the possession of HLA-DR5: 13/16 (81%) of responders vs. 12/99 (12%) of non-responders were DR5+ (p = 8 x 10/sup -8/). The association with IgGAb responsiveness was less striking (p = 0.003). These results add to the growing body of evidence that studies using ultra-pure allergens provide valuable insight into the genetic basis of human immune responsiveness.

Marsh, D.G.; Freidhoff, L.R.; Bias, W.B.; Roebber, M.

1986-03-01

446

Expression of HLA-DR molecules by keratinocytes, and presence of Langerhans cells in the dermal infiltrate of active psoriatic plaques  

PubMed Central

Immunoperoxidase staining of skin sections and immunofluorescence analysis of keratinocyte suspensions obtained from suction blisters of psoriatic plaques were performed using an mAb, Josh 524.4.1, and Fab'2 fragments of a rabbit antiserum, both of which are directed against nonpolymorphic determinants of HLA-DR molecules. HLA-DR+ keratinocytes were present in plaques, but not normal-appearing skin, from a significant portion of patients with active psoriasis. Double-labelling immunofluorescence experiments with either the monoclonal or polyclonal anti-HLA-DR antibody, in conjunction with the mAb OKT6, which identifies DR+ Langerhans cells, demonstrated that HLA-DR molecules were present on OKT6- keratinocytes. The dermal infiltrate of psoriatic plaques contained T cells expressing the activation antigens, IL-2 receptor (Tac) and HLA-DR, as well as macrophages and OKT6+ cells. There was little difference in the characteristics of the dermal infiltrate between the lesions with or without HLA-DR+ keratinocytes. OKT6+ presumptive Langerhans cells were also found in the dermal infiltrates of patients with lichen planus, contact dermatitis, spongiotic dermatitis, erythema multiforme, basal and squamous cell carcinoma. Studies of keratinocyte suspensions showed that 7-84% of keratinocytes were HLA-DR+. Flow cytometry experiments showed that keratinocytes at all stages of differentiation were HLA-DR+. However, the stem cell-enriched population contained the highest proportion of HLA-DR+ cells. HLA-DR expression by keratinocytes correlated with disease activity. The expression was reversible with successful medical therapy. HLA-DR+ keratinocytes may activate T cells directly or may present an as yet unknown antigen to T cells. These studies provide further support for the hypothesis that immunological mechanisms play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

1986-01-01

447

Increased Rate of Apoptosis and Diminished Phagocytic Ability of Human Neutrophils Infected with Afa\\/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

The proinflammatory effect of Afa\\/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa\\/Dr DAEC) strains have been recently demonstrated in vitro by showing that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transepithelial migration is induced after bacterial colonization of apical intestinal monolayers. The effect of Afa\\/Dr DAEC-PMN interaction on PMN behavior has been not investigated. Because of the putative virulence mechanism of PMN apoptosis during infectious diseases

Patrick Brest; Frederic Betis; Nicolas Cuburu; Eric Selva; Magali Herrant; Alain Servin; Patrick Auberger; Paul Hofman

2004-01-01

448

A T cell epitope-based vaccine protects against chlamydial infection in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice.  

PubMed

Vaccination with recombinant chlamydial protease-like activity factor (rCPAF) has been shown to provide robust protection against genital Chlamydia infection. Adoptive transfer of IFN-? competent CPAF-specific CD4? T cells was sufficient to induce early resolution of chlamydial infection and reduction of subsequent pathology in recipient IFN-?-deficient mice indicating the importance of IFN-? secreting CD4? T cells in host defense against Chlamydia. In this study, we identify CD4? T cell reactive CPAF epitopes and characterize the activation of epitope-specific CD4? T cells following antigen immunization or Chlamydia challenge. Using the HLA-DR4 (HLA-DRB1*0401) transgenic mouse for screening overlapping peptides that induced T cell IFN-? production, we identified at least 5 CPAF T cell epitopes presented by the HLA-DR4 complex. Immunization of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice with a rCPAFep fusion protein containing these 5 epitopes induced a robust cell-mediated immune response and significantly accelerated the resolution of genital and pulmonary Chlamydia infection. rCPAFep vaccination induced CPAF-specific CD4? T cells in the spleen were detected using HLA-DR4/CPAF-epitope tetramers. Additionally, CPAF-specific CD4? clones could be detected in the mouse spleen following Chlamydia muridarum and a human Chlamydia trachomatis strain challenge using these novel tetramers. These results provide the first direct evidence that a novel CPAF epitope vaccine can provide protection and that HLA-DR4/CPAF-epitope tetramers can detect CPAF epitope-specific CD4? T cells in HLA-DR4 mice following C. muridarum or C. trachomatis infection. Such tetramers could be a useful tool for monitoring CD4? T cells in immunity to Chlamydia infection and in developing epitope-based human vaccines using the murine model. PMID:24096029

Li, Weidang; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Lanka, Gopala Krishna; Chetty, Senthilnath L; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Chambers, James P; Zhong, Guangming; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

2013-11-19

449

Rheumatic heart disease in Uganda: the association between MHC class II HLA DR alleles and disease: a case control study  

PubMed Central

Background Rheumatic heart disease (RHD), the only long term consequence of acute rheumatic fever, remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among young adults in Uganda. An inherited susceptibility to acute rheumatic fever centers around the major histocompatibility class II human leucocyte antigens. However, there is paucity of data from sub-Saharan Africa. This study compares the frequency of HLA class II DR alleles between RHD cases and normal controls in Uganda. Methods One hundred ninety-nine participants including 96 established RHD cases aged 5–60 years and 103 age and sex matched normal controls were recruited for participation. DNA was manually extracted from buffy coat samples and HLA analysis was performed. HLA-DR allelic frequency comparison between cases and controls were estimated using conditional logistic regression with 95% confidence intervals. P -values were corrected for multiple hypothesis testing. Results 199 participants (103 female, 51.8%) completed the study. The mean (SD) age in years for cases and controls were 29.6 (10.2) and 29(18), respectively. After conditional logistic regression and multiple hypothesis testing, HLA-DR1was associated with a decreased risk of RHD (OR?=?0.42, CI 0.21-085, P?=?0.01, Corrected P value (PC)?=?0.09,) while HLA-DR11 was associated with increased risk of RHD (OR?=?3.31, CI 1.57-6.97, P?=?<0.001, Pc?DR1 was more common in normal controls while HLA- DR11 was more common among RHD cases suggesting a disease susceptibility association. In future studies, high resolution HLA analysis and genome wide studies should be carried out to confirm this pattern.

2014-01-01

450

Interview: Dr Mario Raviglione, Director of the Stop TB Department World Health Organization  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) is a very global disease; there are over 9 million new incidences of TB every year with the vast majority of cases emerging in the developing world. As one of three major diseases associated with poverty it affects the areas where poverty is most prevalent, notably Asia and Africa. While the incidence rate has bee