Note: This page contains sample records for the topic dr agostinho neto from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Drosophila Neto is essential for clustering glutamate receptors at the neuromuscular junction.  

PubMed

Neurotransmitter receptor recruitment at postsynaptic specializations is key in synaptogenesis, since this step confers functionality to the nascent synapse. The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a glutamatergic synapse, similar in composition and function to mammalian central synapses. Various mechanisms regulating the extent of postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) clustering have been described, but none are known to be essential for the initial localization and clustering of iGluRs at postsynaptic densities (PSDs). We identified and characterized the Drosophila neto (neuropilin and tolloid-like) as an essential gene required for clustering of iGluRs at the NMJ. Neto colocalizes with the iGluRs at the PSDs in puncta juxtaposing the active zones. neto loss-of-function phenotypes parallel the loss-of-function defects described for iGluRs. The defects in neto mutants are effectively rescued by muscle-specific expression of neto transgenes. Neto clustering at the Drosophila NMJ coincides with and is dependent on iGluRs. Our studies reveal that Drosophila Neto is a novel, essential component of the iGluR complexes and is required for iGluR clustering, organization of PSDs, and synapse functionality. PMID:22499592

Kim, Young-Jun; Bao, Hong; Bonanno, Liana; Zhang, Bing; Serpe, Mihaela

2012-04-12

2

Drosophila Neto is essential for clustering glutamate receptors at the neuromuscular junction  

PubMed Central

Neurotransmitter receptor recruitment at postsynaptic specializations is key in synaptogenesis, since this step confers functionality to the nascent synapse. The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a glutamatergic synapse, similar in composition and function to mammalian central synapses. Various mechanisms regulating the extent of postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) clustering have been described, but none are known to be essential for the initial localization and clustering of iGluRs at postsynaptic densities (PSDs). We identified and characterized the Drosophila neto (neuropilin and tolloid-like) as an essential gene required for clustering of iGluRs at the NMJ. Neto colocalizes with the iGluRs at the PSDs in puncta juxtaposing the active zones. neto loss-of-function phenotypes parallel the loss-of-function defects described for iGluRs. The defects in neto mutants are effectively rescued by muscle-specific expression of neto transgenes. Neto clustering at the Drosophila NMJ coincides with and is dependent on iGluRs. Our studies reveal that Drosophila Neto is a novel, essential component of the iGluR complexes and is required for iGluR clustering, organization of PSDs, and synapse functionality.

Kim, Young-Jun; Bao, Hong; Bonanno, Liana; Zhang, Bing; Serpe, Mihaela

2012-01-01

3

Neto2 is a KCC2 interacting protein required for neuronal Cl? regulation in hippocampal neurons  

PubMed Central

KCC2 is a neuron-specific K+–Cl? cotransporter that is essential for Cl? homeostasis and fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in the mature CNS. Despite the critical role of KCC2 in neurons, the mechanisms regulating its function are not understood. Here, we show that KCC2 is critically regulated by the single-pass transmembrane protein neuropilin and tolloid like-2 (Neto2). Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 and specifically associates with the active oligomeric form of the transporter. Loss of the Neto2:KCC2 interaction reduced KCC2-mediated Cl? extrusion, resulting in decreased synaptic inhibition in hippocampal neurons.

Ivakine, Evgueni A.; Acton, Brooke A.; Mahadevan, Vivek; Ormond, Jake; Tang, Man; Pressey, Jessica C.; Huang, Michelle Y.; Ng, David; Delpire, Eric; Salter, Michael W.; Woodin, Melanie A.; McInnes, Roderick R.

2013-01-01

4

Dr. Stratakis  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Stratakis work focuses on understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms leading to disorders that affect the adrenal cortex and pituitary gland, which haslong has been a field of research in the NICHD at NIH. Emphasis is on disorders that are hereditary and associated with multiple tumors and abnormalities in other endocrine glands and other tissues. The aim of this work is to understand, diagnose and treat endocrine neoplasias. Dr.

5

Uranium Ore from Morro Do Agostinho, Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Uranium Determination and Planning for Recovery of Uranium and Molybdenum from Their Leach by Ion-Exchange.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three non-destructive methods for determination of uranium from Morro do Agostinho's ore, Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais are presented. Comparative data between chemical analysis (volumetric method) and cited non-destructive methods are shown. Gamma spectr...

H. T. Matsuda

1976-01-01

6

Dr. Martin Luther King  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Martin Luther King shared his insight, goals, and knowledge with the American people. Use this information to learn more about him as we honor Dr. Martin Luther King and the dreams he had for achieving equality for all Americans. Hello 4D! Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Day by learning more about him and what he did to help Americans achieve their goals. As you do your work and review the documents and answer this question- How did Dr. Martin Luther King change society? Please complete Steps 1 and 2. Step 1 1. ...

Flagg, Mrs.

2011-12-10

7

Reply to Dr. Qumsiyeh and Dr. Peppers  

SciTech Connect

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the letter from Dr. Qumsiyeh and Dr. Peppers. The 1;8 unbalanced translocation described in our report was unequivocally diagnosed by conventional cytogenetic studies prior to our analysis with whole chromosome paints (WCP). Examination of at least 50 metaphases with band levels of 550 or more failed to detect any chromosome 1 material on the deleted chromosome 8. Although the partial karyotype in our report is a little dark, it is obvious that the translocation is not balanced. The clinical findings in our patient alone support a diagnosis of 1q42.3 deletion syndrome. 6 refs.

Wiley, J.E.; Kushnick, T. [East Carolina Univ. School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States); Coleman, J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Palmer, S.M. [Integrated Genetics, Miami, FL (United States)

1996-10-16

8

Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports on the career of Theodor Seuss Geisel and suggests activities to celebrate his birthday. Lists selected children's books by Dr. Seuss, selected Seuss videos, Web sites, biographical resources, and biographical videos. (LRW)|

Brodie, Carolyn S.

2002-01-01

9

Dr. MegaVolt  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains information about Tesla coil demonstrations by particle physicist Austin Richards--Dr. MegaVolt--who performs wearing a metal suit that protects him from the multi-kilovolt electrostatic potentials. The gallery provides videos and images from Dr. MegaVolt demonstrations. An explanation of the physics of the Tesla coil is supplied along with information about the development of the suit.

2008-03-10

10

Ask Dr. Math  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ask Dr. Math, which is operated at Drexel University, is the place to go to find answers to almost any kind of mathematics problem. An enormous browseable archive of questions and their solutions is divided into categories ranging from basic addition and subtraction to calculus and fractals. There are sections for elementary, middle school, high school, college students, and beyond. If you can't find the answer to your question, then you can email it to Dr. Math (although a response is not guaranteed). Dr. Math is not actually one person, but over 300 people volunteering from all over the world. The Web site has won numerous Internet awards and has been a favorite site for students for over seven years.

1994-01-01

11

1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

12

Ask Dr. Sue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the need for child care providers to be sure children in their care who are between the ages of 15 months and 5 years have had Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Urges child care center staff to avoid use of bean bag infant cushions and to inform parents about the hazards posed by the cushions. (DR)|

Aronson, Susan S.

1990-01-01

13

Prof. Dr. Carl Bosch  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prof. Dr. Carl Bosch is shown a second time, here lending an ear to either the solo strains of the violin or the laughter of Fritz Gajewski. At the time, defendant Gajewski was enjoying the position as manager of Farben's Agfa photo plants.

OMGUS Military Tribunal

1937-01-01

14

Dr. Walter Lindley Scrapbooks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living in Los Angeles during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, Dr. Walter Lindley was privy to many interesting changes throughout the region. Dr. Lindley created 33 scrapbooks from 1861 to 1922 and they document everything from his candidacy for mayor of Los Angeles to his work in founding a tuberculosis sanitarium in Idyllwild. The scrapbooks include newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and booklets related to his many interests. Created by the Honnold/Mudd Library for The Claremont Colleges, this digital collection allows users to peer into selections from these fascinating scrapbooks. Currently, visitors can look at three of the scrapbook series, and the others will be digitized over time. Visitors can use the search feature here, which can be used to look around by subject, or they may just wish to type in various terms.

15

Dr. Ruth Westheimer  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the most part, the late-night talk\\/variety television genre has been analyzed as little more than a promotional device for producers of popular culture products. Using concepts of dialogic discourse borrowed from M.M. Bakhtin and of star discourse theorized by Jimmie Reeves, this paper explores the ideological complexity available in the content of late-night programming. The various inflections of Dr.

Rodney A. Buxton

1991-01-01

16

Dr. Richardson's Hygeia  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE eloquent address in which Dr. Richardson has sketched the possible Health City of the future might furnish matter for much discussion-among other points, the probable statistics of the community. The author contemplates the possible reduction of the death-rate to 8 per 1,000 in the first generation, and to 5 or less in the next, as suggested by Mr. Chadwick.

F. de Chaumont

1875-01-01

17

Reply to Dr. Derakhshan  

Microsoft Academic Search

REPLY: In his letter to the editor, Dr. Derakhshan has provided an alternative view to the sensory-modality- based hypothesis of handedness proposed in Goble and Brown (2008b): that of the one-way callosal traffic model. However, this latter model of motor laterality— based primarily on a series of seemingly complementary clinical findings— cannot be fully reconciled with the results of the

Daniel J. Goble; Susan H. Brown

2008-01-01

18

Dr. Dobb's Embedded Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Embedded Systems is one of the specialized sites stemming from Dr. Dobb's Journal. In addition to serving as an excellent source of news and product development articles, the site is a portal to many other Internet resources on embedded system applications. Information tailored to specific programming languages, like C++, Java, and many others, is grouped into separate categories. There are also focuses on Linux-driven handhelds and other embedded operating systems. A list of toolkits for embedded system developers is also provided, which is especially useful for finding open source solutions.

2002-01-01

19

Dr. Barnett's dream  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, AstroPower was a tiny R D company located at the University of Delaware. Like many other entrepreneurs in the field at that time, the company's president, Dr. Allen Barnett, had a good idea, a good research staff, and the dream of becoming a successful manufacturer of photovoltaic (PV) cells. If the Newark, Del. company's projections remain on track, Barnett plans to become the third largest PV manufacturer in the United States by the end of next year. Were it not for the company's performance to date, such a claim might well be dismissed as idle dreaming. AstroPower Inc. is pursuing a two-pronged strategy: to rapidly bring a new thin-crystal silicon PV cell to commercialization; and, in the meantime, to gain experience in manufacturing and distributing conventional single-crystal and polycrystal silicon cells. The company sold approximately 200 kilowatts (kWp) of cells last year (about half single-crystal and half polycrystal). Its current production capacity is 360 kWp. The company and its products are described.

Wilson, A.

1990-04-01

20

Reply to Dr. Rotgers' Letter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Replies to the letter by Rotgers on the current author's original article. Dr. Rotgers' letter is valuable, since it provides an excellent example of the fact that practice does not always conform to the \\

Bruce Dennis Sales

1980-01-01

21

HA/DR Lessons Learned.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Military Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HA/DR) operations over the past 7 years produced common learned lessons. After action reports, studies, and independent articles from the Indonesian tsunami in 2004, Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and the ...

M. T. Koch

2011-01-01

22

100DR1 radiological surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological

Naiknimbalkar

1994-01-01

23

From Dr. Moreau to Dr. Mengele: The Biological Sublime  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the cultural genealogy of the image of Dr. Death: the godlike surgeon with power over life and death, who uses this power to torture and mutilate. First appearing in H. G. Wells's The Island of Doctor Moreau (????), this image has become firmly associated with Nazi medicine, as demonstrated by Lucius Shep- ard's short story ''Mengele'' (????).This

Elana Gomel

2000-01-01

24

Dr. Entrepreneur: Dr. Henry Louis "Skip" Gates, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In an interview, Dr. Henry Louis ("Skip") Gates, Jr., discusses the status of black studies both at his home institution, Harvard University (Massachusetts), and in the academy; the changing image of African American intellectuals; and the challenges of managing a full intellectual career in the current higher education environment. (Author/MSE)|

Black Issues in Higher Education, 1999

1999-01-01

25

Interview with Dr. Bert Vogelstein  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An interview with Dr. Vogelstein; this video is featured on the DVD Learning from Patients: The Science of Medicine, available free from HHMI. This video is five minutes and 51 seconds in length, and available in Quicktime (36 MB) Windows Media Player (51 MB). All Cancer videos are located at: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/cancer/video.html.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (Howard Hughes Medical Institute;)

2007-04-01

26

Comment on Dr. Westermeyer's paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

This commentary on Dr. Westermeyer's paper emphasizes and further explicates several issues which are raised in the original paper. Problems of diagnosis and treatment of PTSD among refugee groups are discussed, as is the need for cross-cultural training of mental health specialists. The lack of attention to the needs of child refugees in services, training, and research is pointed out.

Jean Garrison Athey

1989-01-01

27

Interview with Dr. David Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A brief interview with Dr. Page. This video is featured on the HHMI DVD, The Meaning of Sex: Genes and Gender, available free from HHMI. Also, this video is 6 minutes and 31 seconds in length, and available in QuickTime (40 MB) and Windows Media Player (55 MB). All sex determination videos are located at: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/gender/video.html.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI;)

2008-06-09

28

Interview with Dr. Barbara Meyer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A brief interview with Dr. Meyer. This video is featured on the HHMI DVD, The Meaning of Sex: Genes and Gender, available free from HHMI. Also, this video is 5 minutes and 17 seconds in length, and available in QuickTime (34 MB) and Windows Media Player (51 MB). All sex determination videos are located at: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/gender/video.html.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI;)

2008-06-09

29

DR3 Heterogeneity in American Blacks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The heterogeneity of DR3-associated haplotypes in American Blacks is striking when compared with that in the Caucasoid populations. In American Blacks, only 7.7% of DR3-positive individuals are Dw3. Three DR3-associated haplotypes are generally observed i...

A. H. Johnson T. Fang-Tang S. Rosen-Bronson F. M. Robbins N. Steiner

1989-01-01

30

100-DR-1 radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the operable unit surface area. The survey methodology was based on utilization of USRADS for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near 6 in. and at 3 ft from the surface soil. The purpose of the survey is to identify the location of unidentified subsurface radioactive material areas and any surface contamination associated with these areas. The radiological surveys were conducted using both a digital count rate meter with a NaI detector reporting in counts per minute (CPM) and a dose rate meter reporting micro-Roentgen per hour (uR) connected to a CHEMRAD Tennessee Corp. Series 2000 USRADS. The count rate meter was set for gross counting, i.e., Window ``out``. The window setting allows detection of low, intermediate, and high energy photons. The USRADS equipment is used to record the detector readings verses the location of the readings, generate a map of the survey area, and save the data on computer storage media.

Naiknimbalkar, N.M.

1994-01-28

31

[Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].  

PubMed

With this brief review we honor the memory of the great French doctor Jean Baptiste Edouard Gélineau. Dr. Gélineau was born on December 23, 1828 at Blaye, Gironde, close to the Bordeaux region. His name is connected with the first clinical description of the disease for which he, both by the right of the primacy as well as ad valorem of his first two names, coined the name "narcolepsy". He was the first to notice the intrinsically evanescent symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime somnolence, imperative sleep habits and cataplexy or "astasia" as he called it, and incorporate them into a single clinical syndrome. In 1881 Gélineau discussed Kaffe's case of "maladie du sommeil" as a proof of the existence of the new disease described a year before. As a good clinical observer Gélineau noticed the close relation of emotional engagement and astasia. His attitude was that narcolepsy was a nosologic entity, a disease sui generis, but admitted that it could appear purely as a symptom only. This was in discordance with the views in England where (in 1928) Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson repudiated such convictions; in 1930 Lhermitte still shared the same opinion. Gélineau differentiated narcolepsy from epilepsy with the elegance of clinical reasoning. Overall, Gélineau described three elements of the narcoleptic pentade. Sleep paralyses were first described by Mitchell in 1876, and were first attributed to narcolepsy by Wilson in 1928; in 1930 Lhermitte first described hypnapompic, and Daniels, in 1934, hypnagogic sleep paralysis. Hypnagogic hallucinations were described by Maury in 1848 and subsequently by de Saint Denis in 1867. In twenties they were thoroughly studiesed during the epidemic encephalitis and after the Big War in 1922 by Levy. The life story of Dr. Gélineau covers multivarious activities. As a young student of the Rochefort Navy Medical School he took part in the fight against colera which deluged the city of La Rochelle. In 1849 he became the "Intern" of the Navy Hospital and next year a "Surgeon of the Third Class". As a Navy surgeon he visited French colonies in the Indian ocean: first the Reunion island and then Mayotte island of the Commores Archipelago. Of this period he wrote "Voyage a i'lle de la Réunion", memoirs published much later, in 1905, in which he described colonial life and abolition of slavery. The story of Elise, a beauteous Creole woman, a concubine of a young naval Commander, who delivered a child that soon died, inexorably points to the autobiographic character of his work. He defended a doctoral thesis "Aperçu Medical de I'lle de Mayotte" at Montpellier University School of Medicine in 1858, using the data collected during his year-and-a-half stay on a Mayotte island; at that time he was a "Navy Surgeon of the Second Class". For his dedication in fighting against epidemics that broke out during the French-German war in 1870 he was nominated for the Legion of Honor, but received it only later. In 1871 Gélineau introduced "Doctor Gélineau's tablets" for the treatment of epilepsy (contained bromide and arsenic). He was a member of the Société de Médicine, Société d' Hypnologie, La-Société Française d' Hygiène, and a few others. After retirement at the age of 72, Gélineau switched to wine production, continuing the family tradition; for the quality of his Bordeaux wines he was awarded gold medals at the Anvers and Paris Exhibitions. Dr. Gélineau died on March 2, 1906, at Argeles Gazost in Pyrnees honored by the titles of Chevalier de la Légion d' Honneur, Officier d'Academie and Commander of Nichan of the Ottoman Empire. PMID:9132972

Jankovi?, S; Susi?, V; Soki?, D; Levi?, Z

32

HLA-DR expression and soluble HLA-DR levels in septic patients after trauma.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine if cellular and soluble HLA-DR molecules may be relevant in severely injured patients for the development of gram-positive or gram-negative sepsis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: HLA-DR molecules play a central role in the specific immune response to infection. The reduced HLA-DR expression on monocytes is considered to correlate with infectious complications and the development of sepsis. Data on the role of HLA-DR expression on T cells and soluble HLA-DR molecules are rare. METHODS: HLA-DR expression on monocytes and T cells was measured by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of soluble HLA-DR were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: HLA-DR expression on circulating T cells, calculated as mean fluorescence intensity in channels, was reduced at day 1 after admission in 20 patients with subsequent severe sepsis compared with 46 patients without sepsis. The septic patients immediately after trauma had significantly lower soluble HLA-DR plasma levels than the nonseptic patients. At day 2 after admission, HLA-DR expression on monocytes was significantly lower in the severe sepsis group than in the patients without sepsis, and lasted until day 14 after injury. CONCLUSIONS: In severely injured patients, decreased levels of cellular and soluble HLA-DR appear as early indicators of an immune deviation associated with the development of severe sepsis. Moreover, immune alterations of different cell types may promote distinct kinds of septicemia.

Ditschkowski, M; Kreuzfelder, E; Rebmann, V; Ferencik, S; Majetschak, M; Schmid, E N; Obertacke, U; Hirche, H; Schade, U F; Grosse-Wilde, H

1999-01-01

33

DR interconnection issues: utility vs. provider - who is right?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interconnection of large numbers of distributed resources (DR) to a radial conceived utility electric power system (UEPS) will cause system impacts. Should actions to address these impacts be a responsibility of the mass-produced small DR or the Large DR, all the DR's equally, or just those DR that exceed the margin of integration capacity in the UEPS or the responsibility

R. L. Morgan; C. M. Whitaker

2002-01-01

34

Dr. Susan Prichard and Pine Beetles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video, scientist Dr. Susan Prichard discusses the impact of pine bark beetles on western forests, including information on how climate change, specifically rising temperatures, is exacerbating the problem.

Central, Climate

35

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Chertova Biography  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Elena Chertova received her Master’s Degree in Biochemistry from Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia; and PhD from Shemyakin Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Her area of expertise is in studying protein structure, function, and topography. In 1993-1994 she was a visiting scientist at the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. In 1994, Dr.

36

CancerDR: Cancer Drug Resistance Database  

PubMed Central

Cancer therapies are limited by the development of drug resistance, and mutations in drug targets is one of the main reasons for developing acquired resistance. The adequate knowledge of these mutations in drug targets would help to design effective personalized therapies. Keeping this in mind, we have developed a database “CancerDR”, which provides information of 148 anti-cancer drugs, and their pharmacological profiling across 952 cancer cell lines. CancerDR provides comprehensive information about each drug target that includes; (i) sequence of natural variants, (ii) mutations, (iii) tertiary structure, and (iv) alignment profile of mutants/variants. A number of web-based tools have been integrated in CancerDR. This database will be very useful for identification of genetic alterations in genes encoding drug targets, and in turn the residues responsible for drug resistance. CancerDR allows user to identify promiscuous drug molecules that can kill wide range of cancer cells. CancerDR is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdr/

Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Kumar, Shailesh; Gautam, Ankur; Kapoor, Pallavi; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

2013-01-01

37

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Bess Biography  

Cancer.gov

Mr. Julian Bess, Jr. received his B.S. in Biology from Virginia Tech in 1977 and his M.S. in Biomedical Sciences from Hood College in 1981. He began working at the (now) Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center in 1977 in the Viral Resources Laboratory and later trained in the Protein and Immunochemistry Laboratory directed by Dr. Steve Oroszlan. After receiving his M.S., he became the supervisor of the Biochemistry unit of the Biological Products Laboratory directed by Dr. Larry Arthur.

38

“No Dr. Blue\\/Do Not Resuscitate”  

Microsoft Academic Search

In December 1980 an elementary school teacher in Minnesota obtained a Restraining Order to ensure that a severely brain damaged friend would receive emergency medical care in her nursing home if she needed it. This situation focussed attention on the need for better understanding, among medical professionals and consumers alike, of the significance of a “No Dr. Blue\\/Do Not Resuscitate”

Jane D. Hoyt

1981-01-01

39

DR PARSERS: a generalization of LR parsers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is presented to construct a parser for a visual language whose specification can be done by a context-free grammar. The main idea is to allow a traditional LR parser to choose the next symbol to parse from a two-dimensional space. The positional grammar is defined, and some examples are given. The DR parser, along with the parsing algorithm

Gennaro Costagliola; Shi-kuo Chang

1990-01-01

40

Committee Deliberations - Question #2 (Moderator, Dr. ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... yourself: Why am I doing this, and how does that fix ... we are trying to prove that a product did not cause a ... I do have a comment from Dr. Wolf which I ... More results from www.fda.gov/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials/veterinarymedicineadvisorycommittee

41

Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director  

MedlinePLUS

... Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences, and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in November 2007. Dr. Collins has recently completed a book on personalized medicine, The Language of Life: DNA and the Revolution in Personalized Medicine , to be published in early ...

42

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Ohlen Biography  

Cancer.gov

Claes Ohlen received his Ph.D. from the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden 1992. His graduate work focused on mouse studies of T and NK cells in tumor and transplantation models, as well as genetic and biochemical studies of antigen presentation for T cells. After a post-doc position at Oxford University, UK, Dr.

43

Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has improved schools.…

Journal of Educational Research, 2007

2007-01-01

44

An Interview with Dr. Deborah W. Proctor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an interview, Dr. Deborah W. Proctor, eCurriculum Director for Academic Innovations/ Minnesota Online and Co-Chair for the MERLOT International Conference, outlines her academic path that led to her current position and interests. As e-Curriculum Director for Academic Innovations in the Office of the Chancellor she works with system…

Landsberger, Joe

2007-01-01

45

Welcome and Opening Remarks by Dr. Bernadette Dunham ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... Finally, to round out our panel, Dr. Michael Wolf adds his expertise in Health Literacy and Medication Use. Dr. Wolf also ... More results from www.fda.gov/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials/veterinarymedicineadvisorycommittee

46

HLA-DR expression in human fetal intestinal epithelium.  

PubMed Central

Villus epithelial cells in fetal human small intestine are HLA-DR- until 17 weeks gestation. At 18 weeks HLA-DR begins to be expressed in the epithelial cells, usually at the villus tips. Of 13 specimens examined between 18 and 22 weeks gestation, two were HLD-DR-, seven had HLA-DR expressed only at the villus tips and in four most of the villus epithelial cells were HLA-DR+. The epithelium overlying the Peyer's patches in fetal intestine was also HLA-DR+. T cells in explant cultures of fetal intestine were activated in situ using pokeweed mitogen. The local cell mediated immune reaction increased expression of HLA-DR on the villus and crypt epithelial cells. Organ culture supernatants from explants treated with pokeweed mitogen induced HLA-DR expression on the HT-29 epithelial cell line; an effect inhibited by antibody against human interferon gamma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3

MacDonald, T T; Weinel, A; Spencer, J

1988-01-01

47

Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.  

SciTech Connect

The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly during his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

Hosking, Floyd Michael

2010-10-01

48

Science Sampler: Dr. Vermeij and The Cay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As an interdisciplinary exploration, middle-level students were reading The Cay (1969) by Theodore Taylor in their English classes, honing map skills in social studies, and learning the importance of making observations in science class. Then, inspired by the autobiography of Dr. Geerat Vermeij, the author decided to have her students make observations as he didâusing only their sense of touch. Dr. Vermeij, a distinguished professor of geology at the University of California, has been blind since the age of three, but he has an extraordinary giftâhe can identify shells using only his hands. Through the activities described here, students not only honed their science process skills, but also gained a deeper appreciation of science as a human endeavor.

Shubin, Joanna

2009-02-01

49

A Visit With Dr. Francis Crick  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Francis Crick speaks of his discovery, with James Watson, of the structure of DNA and of his more recent interest in the brain and consciousness in a 1989 interview with Carolina Biological. Linked to the interview is an activity, "A Tour Through DNA" by Kathy Paris, and a Glossary. The Paris activity provides guidelines for students as they "lead tours" through the DNA molecule.

Biological, Carolina

1997-01-01

50

NCI at Frederick: Dr. Lifson Biography  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Lifson received his M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School in 1982, then pursued residency and research fellowship training in the Department of Pathology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He became involved in AIDS-related research in 1983, playing a key role in establishing the first program in the United States to try to prevent transfusion-mediated transmission of AIDS through laboratory testing, while also conducting basic in vitro studies of AIDS pathogenesis.

51

On the trail of Dr. Fifer.  

PubMed Central

A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history. Images p1398-a

Asche, G

1996-01-01

52

A pioneering female neurosurgeon: Dr. Aysima Altinok.  

PubMed

This article will look at how one female neurosurgeon in Turkey made her mark in the field. In 1954, Dr. Aysima Altinok began her residency training in neurosurgery at Haydarpa?a Numune Hospital where the first official department of neurosurgery in Turkey had been founded five years earlier. On November 22, 1959, she successfully completed her training and was certified officially as a neurosurgeon. Hence, Dr. Altinok was a leader in neurosurgery. Dr. Altinok was the chief of the department of neurosurgery from 1968 to 1992 at Bakirköy Mental and Psychological Health Hospital in Istanbul. She was among the founders of the Turkish Neurosurgical Society in 1968 and was awarded the honour of "Medical Doctor of the Year in Turkey" by the Ministry of Health in 1990. On May 15, 1996, she was accepted as an honorary member of Turkish Society of Neurosurgery for her contributions to neurosurgery. For proving the capability of a woman as a neurosurgeon, her contribution to the world history of neurosurgery should be respected. PMID:17700990

Balak, N; Elmaci, I

2007-08-13

53

An Analysis of Dr. Phil's Advice About Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

As marriage and family therapists, it is important to be familiar with the advice America is receiving from television's most popular therapist, Dr. Phil. Using feminist family therapy theory as the guiding lens, 28 episodes of Dr. Phil were analyzed. Findings from this study indicate that advice on the Dr. Phil show is conflicting; he encourages equal partnerships while simultaneously

Sara B. Martinez; Toni Schindler Zimmerman; Jennifer Matheson; James Banning

2011-01-01

54

Dr. Mark Seward's Gila Monster Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"A leading authority on captive propagation of the Gila monster, _Heloderma suspectum_," Dr. Mark Seward created this website to disseminate information about Gila monsters. The site links to various Natural History sub-sections including Morphology, Range, Food and Metabolism, and more. For those interested in learning about captive breeding of Gila Monsters, the site also includes information about Acquisition, Husbandry, and Reproduction. These subject areas contain sub-categories like Feeding, Handling, Mating, Hatching, and more. This site also includes Free Gila Monster Videos for download.

Seward, Mark

55

Entrevue avec le Dr Charley Zeanah  

PubMed Central

Le Dr Charles Zeanah est titulaire de la chaire de psychiatrie Mary K. Sellars-Polchow, professeur de pédiatrie clinique et vice-président de la pédopsychiatrie au département de psychiatrie et des sciences du comportement de la faculté de médecine de l’Université Tulane, à la Nouvelle-Orléans. Il est également directeur général de l’institut de la santé mentale des nourrissons et des jeunes enfants de Tulane. Il est récipiendaire de nombreux prix, notamment le prix de prévention Irving Phillips (AACAP), la mention élogieuse présidentielle pour sa recherche et son leadership exceptionnels en santé mentale des nourrissons (American Orthopsychiatric Association), le prix d’excellence clinique Sarah Haley Memorial (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), le prix de recherche en pédopsychiatrie Blanche F. Ittelson (APA), et le prix Serge Lebovici Award soulignant les contributions internationales à la santé mentale des nourrissons (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Le Dr Zeanah est fellow distingué de l’AACAP, fellow distingué de l’APA et membre du conseil d’administration de Zero to Three. Il est l’éditeur scientifique de Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3e édition) qui est considéré comme étant le manuel de pointe et la référence de base du domaine de la santé mentale des nourrissons.

2013-01-01

56

Dr. Seuss Is on the Loose! Planning Month-Long Activities Using Dr. Seuss Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper contains activities for classes and small groups using 24 Dr. Seuss stories. The rhymes and illustrations can spark creative writing and inspire imaginative bulletin board displays. The ideas and activities presented are useful with most elementary grades by making adjustments for student abilities. Many of the titles contain political…

Tuten-Puckett, Katharyn

57

Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)  

ScienceCinema

The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

58

Molecular Diversity of HLA-DR4 Haplotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding beta chains of the DR and DQ regions and alpha chains of the DQ region were isolated and sequenced from four homozygous DR4 cell lines of different HLA-D types: GM3103(Dw4), FS(Dw10), BIN40(Dw14), and KT3(Dw15). When compared with each other and with a previously published sequence from a DR4 (Dw13 cell line), the variability of DRbeta

Peter K. Gregersen; Ming Shen; Qien-Li Song; Parvin Merryman; Steve Degar; Tetsunori Seki; Joan Maccari; Donna Goldberg; Hattie Murphy; John Schwenzer; Chang Yi Wang; Robert J. Winchester; Gerald T. Nepom; Jack Silver

1986-01-01

59

Dr Harold Frederick Shipman: an enigma.  

PubMed

Dr. Shipman was the worst known serial killer in British history, at least in terms of numbers of victims, and possibly the worst in world history, if politicians are excluded. He killed at least 215 patients and may have begun his murderous career at the age of 25, within a year of finishing his medical training. His case has had a profound impact on the practice of medicine in the United Kingdom. Was he a special case? What were the origins of this behaviour? Could the behaviour have been prevented? It is necessary to learn what we can from a few personal facts and largely circumstantial evidence. He withheld himself from any useful clinical investigation or treatment once he had been taken into custody. Could he have been treated at any stage? PMID:20549782

Gunn, John

2010-07-01

60

Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

61

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.|

Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

2009-01-01

62

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure activities evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility. The evaluation compares these activities to the regulatory requirements and closure plan requirements. The report concludes that the areas identified in the closure plan can be clean closed. This report summarizes and evaluates the closure activities performed in support of partial closure of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF). This evaluation will be used in assessing the condition of the 105-DR LSFF for the purpose of meeting the partial clean closure conditions described in the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1995). Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, it is has been determined that the partial clean closure conditions for the 105-DR LSFF have been met.

Adler, J.G.

1996-04-11

63

Molecular Analysis of Thymopentin Binding to HLA-DR Molecules  

PubMed Central

Thymopentin (TP5) triggers an immune response by contacting with T cells; however the molecular basis of how TP5 achieves this process remains incompletely understood. According to the main idea of immunomodulation, we suppose that it would be necessary for TP5 to form complex with human class II major histocompatibility complex DR molecules (HLA-DR) before TP5 interacts with T cells. The uptake of TP5 by EBV-transformed B cells expressing HLA-DR molecules and the histogram of fluorescence intensities were observed by using fluorescent- labeled TP5, testifying the direct binding of TP5 to HLA-DR. The binding specificity was confirmed by the inhibition with unlabeled TP5, suggesting the recognition of TP5 by HLA-DR. To confirm the interaction between TP5 and HLA-DR, the complex formation was predicted by using various modeling strategies including six groups of trials with different parameters, alanine substitutions of TP5, and the mutants of HLA-DR. The results demonstrated that TP5 and its alanine substitutions assumed distinct conformations when they bound to HLA-DR. The observation further showed that there was flexibility in how the peptide bound within the binding cleft. Also, the molecular analysis supplemented a newly important discovery to the effect of Val anchor on TP5 binding HLA-DR, and revealed the important effects of Glu11 and Asn62 on the recognition of TP5. These results demonstrated the capability of TP5 to associate with HLA-DR in living antigen presenting cells (APC), thereby providing a new and promising strategy to understand the immunomodulation mechanism induced by TP5 and to design potential immunoregulatory polypeptides.

Liu, Zuojia; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

2007-01-01

64

Dr. Yukihiko Nosé: living his dream.  

PubMed

Dr. Yukihiko Nosé made many contributions to medical science and in particular in the area of artificial organ technologies and their clinical applications. His passing was a great loss not only to many individuals but also to the field. His enthusiasm and passion for his work was very positive on those with whom he worked while inspiring others in friendly competition. It is very difficult to recount his many accomplishments. I have outlined those developments that I was directly involved with him at the Cleveland Clinic. These developments may be grouped under the heading of Metabolic and Immunologic Support, the name given to our research team. I hope in some small way this review also gives credit to the contributions of the many scientific and clinical professionals that were part of our teams through the years as noted in the extensive reference list provided and the support of the many industrial and corporate sponsors that we were privileged to be associated with and their developments that we studied, improved on, and applied. PMID:23442234

Malchesky, Paul S

2013-01-01

65

Dr. Hall and the work cure.  

PubMed

Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy. PMID:23927746

Reed, Kathlyn L

2005-01-01

66

This Is Not Dr. Conn's Aldosterone Anymore  

PubMed Central

In 1955, Dr. Jerome Conn described a patient with severe hypertension and hypokalemia and an aldosterone-secreting adenoma. The prevalence of hyperaldosteronism is increased among patients with obesity or resistant hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers reduce the secretion of aldosterone, but with chronic treatment aldosterone concentrations “escape” back to baseline values. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism reduces mortality in patients with heart disease who are already taking an ACE inhibitor and diuretic. In addition to affecting sodium and potassium homeostasis via classical MR-dependent pathways, aldosterone induces inflammation and causes cardiovascular remodeling and renal injury. Some of these effects involve MR-independent pathways. At the same time, ligands other than aldosterone can activate the MR. This paper reviews mechanism(s) for the proinflammatory and profibrotic effects of aldosterone and presents data indicating that endogenous aldosterone, acting at the MR, contributes to many of the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic effects of angiotensin II in vivo.

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01

67

Why can Sensitization by a HLA-DR2 Mismatch lead to Antibodies that react also with HLA-DR1?  

PubMed Central

HLAMatchmaker is a matching algorithm that can be used to characterize antibodies specific for structurally defined epitopes. Under auspices of the 15th International Histocompatibility Workshop we are conducting a multilaboratory collaborative project to characterize these epitopes and also determine how often they induce specific antibodies in patients with rejected kidney transplants. This report addresses the reactivity of post-allograft nephrectomy sera tested for DRB antibodies with Luminex assays using single alleles. This analysis was done for 19 informative kidney transplant cases contributed by 13 laboratories worldwide. There were 11 cases with a single DR2 mismatch (DR15 or DR16) and 9 of them (82%) showed antibodies with both DR2 and DR1. Although these antigens might share an epitope recognized by these antibodies, this interpretation is incorrect. The HLAMatchmaker analysis offers a clearly different explanation that involves antibodies induced by DR51 which commonly associates with DR2. DR51 has an epitope defined by the 96EV eplet which is also present on DR1 but no other DR antigen. This means that the reactivity with DR51 and DR1 reflects the presence of 96EV-specific antibodies. Conversely, we analyzed eight patients sensitized by a single DR1 mismatch which has no associated DR51. All of them reacted also with DR51 and this could only be explained with antibodies against the shared 96EV eplet. These findings demonstrate that 96EV represents a highly immunogenic epitope that can induce cross-sensitization between antigens encoded by the different DRB loci and also that DR51 is important in determining DRB mismatch acceptability of potential donors. This analysis has also demonstrated that antibody responses are restricted to a few epitopes on these immunizing DR antigens. For DR2 they are 142M3 (unique for DR2), 71QAA (shared with DB5*02) and 96QV (shared with DR10). DR51 mismatches appear to have three immunogenic eplets: 96EV (shared with DR1), 108T3 (unique for DR51) and 40HFD (shared with DR9). Immunogenic eplets on DR1 are 12LKF2 (unique for DR1), 14FEH (shared with DR9 and DR10) and 25HRL (shared with DR10).

Marrari, Marilyn; Duquesnoy, Rene J.

2009-01-01

68

White dwarf-main sequence binaries identified within SDSS DR7 and UKIDSS DR5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop optical and near-infrared colour-selection criteria based on the model colours of binaries consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star. Using our colour-selection algorithm, we present a catalogue of 523 white dwarf-main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), most of them previously identified. Among them, we identify 86 objects as new WDMS binaries. 95 WDMS candidates are also found from the photometric SDSS DR7, cross-matched with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Sky Survey Data Release 5 (UKIDSS DR5). Based on a ?2 minimization technique, we derive independent stellar parameters such as the effective temperatures, surface gravities, masses and distances of the white dwarfs and secondary stars and the metallicities of the secondaries. Meanwhile, we determine the cooling age via interpolation through evolutionary models for the effective temperature and surface gravity of each DA white dwarf. Distributions of these stellar parameters have been used to study both the general properties and the completeness of WDMS binaries. A comparison between the distances measured to the white dwarfs and the secondary stars shows a clear trend towards higher distances for the white dwarf component. It is found that the mean cooling age of the WDMS sample is t¯ cool ˜ 4.2× 108 yr and our sample contains at least 11 per cent old systems, which were formed about 1.0 × 109 yr ago. The new and updated WDMS binaries will improve the completeness of the catalogue of WDMS binaries.

Liu, Cheng; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Fenghui; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Dengkai; Liu, Jinzhong

2012-08-01

69

The DraC usher in Dr fimbriae biogenesis of uropathogenic E. coli Dr + strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biogenesis of Dr fimbriae encoded by the dra gene cluster of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains requires the chaperone-usher pathway. This secretion system is based on two non-structural assembly components, the\\u000a DraB periplasmic chaperone and DraC outer-membrane usher. The DraB controls the folding of DraE subunits, and DraC forms the\\u000a assembly and secretion platform for polymerization of subunits in linear fibers.

Beata Zalewska-Pi?tek; Marta Kur; Sabina Wilkanowicz; Rafa? Pi?tek; Józef Kur

2010-01-01

70

Oligonucleotide-genotyping as a method of detecting the HLA-DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, -DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, -DR4-Dw15, and -DR4-D"KT2" haplotypes in the Japanese population.  

PubMed

We synthesized pairs of four different oligonucleotides, F22, F29, F42, and F158, to analyse the HLA-DR2 (DRw15) and -DR4 haplotypes in the Japanese population. After enzymatically amplifying the HLA-DRB1 gene, we hybridized the oligonucleotide probes with DNA extracted from 42 donors. Hybridization was completed between F22 and the DNA of haplotype DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, between F29 and the DNA of DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, between F42 and the DNA of DR4-D"KT2", and between F158 and the DNA of DR4-Dw15. In keeping with the nucleotide sequences of the probes, F29 hybridized also with DNA from the DR9-Dw23 haplotype and F158 with that from some of the DRw8 haplotypes (DRw8-Dw8.3) in the Japanese population. Results of this study demonstrate that the four oligonucleotides make useful probes for detecting the haplotypes above. PMID:2799805

Obata, F; Ito, I; Kaneko, T; Ohkubo, M; Ishimoto, A L; Abe, A; Kashiwagi, N

1989-05-01

71

[Interview with Dr. Sami Ben Ghachem].  

PubMed

Gynecologist Dr. Sami Ben Ghachem has practiced at the Regional Hospital of Beja, Tunisia, for 20 years. The first tubal ligation had already been performed before the creation of the National Office of the Family and Population and the official launching of the family planning program. 500-600 minilaparotomies were performed per year. The first laparoscopy was performed in 1976, and in 1977 a record 1152 tubal ligations were performed. Some 23,200 women have now undergone the procedure, out of a population of around 70,000 fertile-aged women in the governorate. Along with the IUD, sterilization has contributed to the achievement of one of the lowest natural increase rates in Tunisia, 1.18%, compared to the national average of 1.70%. Sterilization and IUDs have been the appropriate methods for the largely rural population. As the region becomes more developed and educational standards rise, the demand for different maternal-child health services also rises. An integrated approach has been followed at the Regional Hospital. An infertility service allowed the program to gain the confidence of the population. The hospital has participated in several training programs with Johns Hopkins University and has provided training in tubal ligation. The number of births declined from 8651 in 1981 to 5600 in 1996 in the governorate of Beja, a decline of about 30%. The regional hospital has been provided facilities for ultrasound and is expected to offer mammography in the near future. In early 1998, the governorate of Beja will have a new maternity hospital with a neonatology clinic that will allow it to become a referral center for all the governorates in northwest Tunisia. PMID:12293314

Chelbi, M

1997-09-01

72

HLA-DR phenotypes in Spanish coeliac children: their contribution to the understanding of the genetics of the disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DR-locus controlled B-cell antigens were studied in 163 unrelated Spanish coeliac children and 68 families of this group, nine of them with more than one coeliac patient, to obtain more information about the association between these antigens and coeliac disease. The results show that the most common coeliac phenotypes are DR3\\/DR7, DR7\\/DR5, DR3\\/other DR, and DR3\\/DR3. The family study

M L Mearin; I Biemond; A S Peña; I Polanco; C Vazquez; G T Schreuder; R R de Vries; J J van Rood

1983-01-01

73

Polymorphism of HLA-DR beta Chains in DR4, -7, and -9 Haplotypes: Implications for the Mechanisms of Allelic Variation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones corresponding to the DRbeta 1 and DRbeta 2 loci from two homozygous B-cell lines typed as DR7 (Burkhart) and DR9 (ISK). These nucleotide sequences were compared to beta 1 and beta 2 chains of other DR haplotypes. The first-domain sequences of beta 2 chains are identical in DR4 and DR7 haplotypes. In addition,

Peter K. Gregersen; Tetsuya Moriuchi; Robert W. Karr; Fumiya Obata; Junko Moriuchi; Joan Maccari; Donna Goldberg; Robert J. Winchester; Jack Silver

1986-01-01

74

Study of association between HLA-DR4 and DR53 and autoantibody detection in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

The present study explored the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4, DR53, and auto antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its clinical significance. A total of 305 patients with RA and 50 healthy subjects who underwent medical examination were evaluated. HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR53 and auto antibodies were detected. The results showed that frequencies of HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR53 alleles in RA patients were 42.95% and 54.75%, respectively, which were significantly different from those in control group (p < 0.01). Frequencies of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (CCP), anti-RA33, anti-keratin antibody (AKA), and anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) in RA patients (n = 305) were 72.13%, 36.39%, 44.92%, and 60.98%, respectively. Results of rheumatoid factor (RF) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were 148.29 ± 391.01 IU/mL and 18.14 ± 26.87 mg/L, respectively, which were significantly different from those in control group (p < 0.01, t-test). The results indicated that the HLA- DR4 gene was clearly associated with susceptibility of RA. Combined detection of related auto antibodies might improve diagnosis rate of RA significantly, and the positive rate was higher than that for a single antibody. PMID:23537298

Zhou, Yongmei; Tan, Liming; Que, Qiuhua; Li, Hua; Cai, Lili; Cao, Liping; Ye, Qian; Xiong, Jinwang

2013-01-01

75

2. Photocopy of advertisement (from the collection of Dr. Margaret ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Photocopy of advertisement (from the collection of Dr. Margaret Ballard, Union, West Virginia) late 19th century AERIAL VIEW OF TOWN - Red Sulphur Springs, Route 12, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

76

1. Photocopy of engraved flyer (from the collection of Dr. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Photocopy of engraved flyer (from the collection of Dr. Margaret Ballard, Union, West Virginia) H. Bartsch, engraver late 19th century AERIAL VIEW OF TOWN AND ADVERTISING SLOGANS - Red Sulphur Springs, Route 12, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

77

Teleconference with Dr. Lynn Drake, April 1, 2010 - Laviv  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... was to mainly obtain Dr. Drake's response to the Agency's comments and questions, and any ... is looking at and how, and set up a grading scale. ... More results from www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/cellulargenetherapyproducts/approvedproducts

78

Dr. Beronda Montgomery-Kaguri, Michigan State University (Spanish)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

(Spanish version) Meg A. Mole interview different chemists to learn about their jobs. Dr. Beronda Montgomery-Kaguri is a plant biochemist in the Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University.

2012-01-01

79

Dr. Beronda Montgomery-Kaguri, Michigan State University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Meg A. Mole interview different chemists to learn about their jobs. Dr. Beronda Montgomery-Kaguri is a plant biochemist in the Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University.

2012-01-01

80

Science for Kids exclusive: 'Worm wizard,' Dr. Shana Goffredi  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Deep beneath Monterey Bay, California, weird worms topped with bright red, feathery "hats" gorge themselves at a whalebone buffet. In this ...... Dr. Shana K. Goffredi of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, answers a few questions about these unique animals.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS;)

2004-07-30

81

74. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy of a photograph, Dr. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

74. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy of a photograph, Dr. A. Bertram Gilliland, Photographer, ca. 1922 NORTH CORNER OF PARADE, SHOWING OFFICERS' QUARTERS AND SOLDIERS' BARRACKS. - Fort Mifflin, Mud Island, Marine & Penrose Ferry Roads, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

82

Dr. Helen Free, Bayer HealthCare, Diagnostics Division (Spanish)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

(Spanish version) Meg A. Mole interview different chemists to learn about their jobs. Dr. Helen Free has developed many products used by doctors' offices and hospitals to test urine and blood for diseases.

2012-01-01

83

High-Resolution Far-Infrared Observations of DR 21  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present new, high angular resolution two-color maps of the compact H II region DR 21 at 50 mum and 100 mum made with the 0.91 m telescope of NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). From the maps we estimate the total fluxes of DR 21 at 50 mum and 100 mum to be 1.5 × 104 Jy and 3.8 ×

Cecilia Colome; Paul M. Harvey; Daniel F. Lester; Murray F. Campbell; Harold M. Butner

1995-01-01

84

Class I Methanol Emission Around DR 21 (OH)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of new observations of the vicinity of DR 21 (OH) conducted on the 20-m Onsala radio telescope are presented. The goal was to search for associations between molecular hydrogen emission tracing shock waves and class I methanol maser emission. Observations at 44 and 36 GHz have shown that an extensive region of faint methanol maser emission elongated North-South is probably present in the vicinity of DR 21(OH). The linear size of this structure may be a factor of ten larger than the central region in DR 21(OH) that emits at 44 GHz. Three maser emission peaks are clearly visible in the northern (DR 21N), central (DR 21(OH)), and southern (vicinity of DR 21 West) parts of this structure. Many other structures are also embedded in this region, including the protostellar disk ERO 3 previously detected at 6.7 GHz. Maser components of these objects are formed with velocities from -5 to-2 km/s, with a velocity gradient from -5 in the North to -2 km/s in the South. The spatial resolution of the map is not high enough to distinguish fine structures at 44 GHz associated with spots and jets emitting in molecular hydrogen.

Polushkin, S. V.; Val'Tts, I. E.

2010-06-01

85

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035  

SciTech Connect

Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

R. A. Carlson

2005-09-22

86

TRAIL death receptors DR4 and DR5 mediate cerebral microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis induced by oligomeric Alzheimer's A?  

PubMed Central

Vascular deposition of amyloid-? (A?) in sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease, through poorly understood molecular mechanisms, leads to focal ischemia, alterations in cerebral blood flow, and cerebral micro-/macro-hemorrhages, significantly contributing to cognitive impairment. Here, we show that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors DR4 and DR5 specifically mediate oligomeric A? induction of extrinsic apoptotic pathways in human microvascular cerebral endothelial cells with activation of both caspase-8 and caspase-9. The caspase-8 inhibitor cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (cFLIP) is downregulated, and mitochondrial paths are engaged through BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid) cleavage. Upregulation of DR4 and DR5 and colocalization with A? at the cell membrane suggests their involvement as initiators of the apoptotic machinery. Direct binding assays using receptor chimeras confirm the specific interaction of oligomeric A? with DR4 and DR5 whereas apoptosis protection achieved through RNA silencing of both receptors highlights their active role in downstream apoptotic pathways unveiling new targets for therapeutic intervention.

Fossati, S; Ghiso, J; Rostagno, A

2012-01-01

87

[The HLA-DR determinants in chronic inflammatory rheumatism].  

PubMed

The authors present a study of the incidence of HLA-DR antigens in 113 controls and in a Breton population suffering from chronic inflammatory rheumatism. They found 80 cases of rheumatoid arthritis and found a significant increase incidence of the DR4 antigen in rheumatoid arthritis (54% compared with 19.5%; pc less than 10(-4); RR = 4.8) and a decreased incidence of the DR2 antigen (12.5% compared with 35%; pc less than 10(-2); RR = 0.27). The increased incidence of DR4 does not seem to be related to the presence of rheumatoid factor. Out of the 95 cases of chronic inflammatory rheumatism treated, 33 cases of drug intolerance (cutaneous and/or renal to gold salts or D-penicillamine) were reported. The authors found a decreased incidence of the DR2 antigen in the patients who presented a drug intolerance, which was partially significant in the group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (p less than 0.04; pc less than 0.3). This is an important argument in favour of the supposed protective role of this antigen. PMID:6193576

Chalès, G; Fauchet, R; Pawlotsky, Y; Gueguen, M; Coutard, J; Duval, A; Pittie, P

1983-06-01

88

Genomic evaluation of HLA-DR3+ haplotypes associated with type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

We have defined three sets of HLA-DR3(+) haplotypes that provide maximum risk of type 1 disease development in Indians: (1) a diverse array of B8-DR3 haplotypes, (2) A33-B58-DR3 haplotype, and (3) A2-B50-DR3 occurring most predominantly in this population. Further analysis has revealed extensive diversity in B8-DR3 haplotypes, particularly at the HLA-A locus, in contrast to the single fixed HLA-A1-B8-DR3 haplotype (generally referred to as AH8.1) reported in Caucasians. However, the classical AH8.1 haplotype was rare and differed from the Caucasian counterpart at multiple loci. In our study, HLA-A26-B8-DR3 (AH8.2) was the most common B8-DR3 haplotype constituting >50% of the total B8-DR3 haplotypes. Further, A2-B8-DR3 contributed the maximum risk (RR = 48.7) of type 1 diabetes, followed by A2-B50-DR3 (RR = 9.4), A33-B58-DR3 (RR = 6.6), A24-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.5), and A26-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.2). Despite several differences, the disease-associated haplotypes in Indian and Caucasian populations share a frozen DR3-DQ2 block, suggesting a common ancestor from which multiple haplotypes evolved independently. PMID:23387390

Kumar, Neeraj; Kaur, Gurvinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Kanga, Uma; Mehra, Narinder K

2013-02-06

89

Statistical Study of 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 Cross-correlation Sample  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cross-correlating the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhou, Xin-Lin; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Wu, Xue-Bing

2013-02-01

90

Group Achievement Award: The SCUBA team; George Darwin Lecturer: Dr Neil Gehrels; Harold Jeffreys Lecturer: Dr Emma Bunce; Honorary Fellow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Group Achievement Award goes to the SCUBA team of W K Gear, W S Holland, E I Robson, C R Cunningham, J F Lightfoot, T Jenness, R J Ivison, J A Stevens, P A R Ade, M J Griffin, W D Duncan, J A Murphy and D A Naylor. The 2009 George Darwin Lecturer is Dr Neil Gehrels, Chief of the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The 2009 Harold Jeffreys Lecturer is Dr Emma Bunce of the University of Leicester.

2009-02-01

91

The Problem With Dr Bob's Alternative Vaccine Schedule  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 2007, Dr Robert Sears, in response to growing parental concerns about the safety of vaccines, published The Vaccine Book: Making the Right Decision for Your Child. Sears' book is enormously popular, having sold 40 000 copies. At the back of the book, Sears includes \\

Paul A. Offit; Charlotte A. Moser

2009-01-01

92

SDSS Quasar Catalog, DR9Q (Paris+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SDSS-DR9 Quasar Catalog presents photometric and spectroscopic properties of 87,822 quasars observed by the SDSS-III/BOSS survey. We provide the catalog in the form of a fits file but also an ascii file. We also provide a supplemental list containing 949 quasars with exactly the same format as the main catalog. (4 data files).

Paris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Aubourg, E.; Bailey, S.; Ross, N. P.; Myers, A. D.; Strauss, M. A.; Anderson, S. F.; Arnau, E.; Bautista, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Bolton, A. S.; Bovy, J.; Brandt, W. N.; Brewington, H.; Brownstein, J. R.; Busca, N.; Capellupo, D.; Carithers, W.; Croft, R. A. C.; Dawson, K.; Delubac, T.; Ebelke, G.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Engelke, P.; Fan, X.; Filiz, Ak N.; Finley, H.; Font-Ribera, A.; Ge, J.; Gibson, R. R.; Hall, P. B.; Hamann, F.; Hennawi, J. F.; Ho, S.; Hogg, D. W.; Ivezic, Z.; Jiang, L.; Kimball, A. E.; Kirky, D.; Kirkpatrick, J. A.; Lee, K.-G.; Le Goff, J.-M.; Lundgren, B.; MacLeod, C. L.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Maraston, C.; McGreer, I. D.; McMahon, R. G.; Miralda-Escude, J.; Muna, D.; Noterdaeme, P.; Oravetz, D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pan, K.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pieri, M. M.; Richards, G. T.; Rollinde, E.; Sheldon, E. S.; Schlegel, D. J.; Schneider, D. P.; Slosar, A.; Shelden, A.; Shen, Y.; Simmons, A.; Snedden, S.; Suzuki, N.; Tinker, J.; Viel, M.; Weaver, B. A.; Weinberg, D. W.; White, M.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yeche, C.

2012-10-01

93

The No-Nonsense Education of Dr. Lloyd Hackley.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an interview, Lloyd Hackney, Chairman of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), responds to questions about black higher education and the role of HBCUs, including HBCUs' public image, the effects of Dr. Hackney's own educational experience on his views, the Clinton Administration's actions,…

Black Issues in Higher Education, 1996

1996-01-01

94

SDSS DR7 superclusters. The catalogues (Liivamagi+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excerpt of the SDSS DR7 supercluster catalogue containing four tables: two for the main and two for LRG samples. For both samples, one table contains the fixed threshold superclusters and the adaptively assigned threshold superclusters. Full dataset for all density thresholds is accessible at http://meteo.physic.ut.ee/~juhan/super/ . (4 data files).

Liivamagi, L. J.; Tempel, E.; Saar, E.

2012-01-01

95

This is Kuxaankutaan's (Dr. Frederica de Laguna's) Song  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1949 to 1954, Dr. Frederica Annis de Leo de Laguna, then Chair of Sociology and Anthropology, Bryn Mawr College, recorded from our Yakutat elders the history and culture of the Yakutat Tlingit. This paper describes the other side of Freddy, as an adopted clan member who was fascinated with Tlingit music. In the dedication to the song, she acknowledged

Elaine Abraham; Judith Ramos; Chew Shaa

2006-01-01

96

This is Kuxaankutaan's (Dr. Frederica de Laguna's) Song  

Microsoft Academic Search

:From 1949 to 1954, Dr. Frederica Annis de Leo de Laguna, then Chair of Sociology and Anthropology, Bryn Mawr College, recorded from our Yakutat elders the history and culture of the Yakutat Tlingit. This paper describes the other side of Freddy, as an adopted clan member who was fascinated with Tlingit music. In the dedication to the song, she acknowledged

Elaine Abraham; Judith Ramos; Chew Shaa

2006-01-01

97

This Is Kuxaankutaan's (Dr. Frederica de Laguna's) Song  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1949 to 1954, Dr. Frederica Annis de Leo de Laguna, then Chair of Sociology and Anthropology, Bryn Mawr College, recorded from our Yakutat elders the history and culture of the Yakutat Tlingit. This paper describes the other side of Freddy, as an adopted clan member who was fascinated with Tlingit music. In the dedication to the song, she acknowledged

Judith Ramos; Chew Shaa

2006-01-01

98

This Is Kuxaankutaan's (Dr. Frederica de Laguna's) Song  

Microsoft Academic Search

:From 1949 to 1954, Dr. Frederica Annis de Leo de Laguna, then Chair of Sociology and Anthropology, Bryn Mawr College, recorded from our Yakutat elders the history and culture of the Yakutat Tlingit. This paper describes the other side of Freddy, as an adopted clan member who was fascinated with Tlingit music. In the dedication to the song, she acknowledged

Judith Ramos; Chew Shaa

2006-01-01

99

Dr Jacob van der Land, marine biologist extraordinary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This contribution is an attempt to sketch the life and works of Dr Jacob van der Land, curator of worms and chief marine biologist of the National Museum of Natural History, on the occasion of his official retirement. Born in 1935, Jacob van der Land read biology at Leiden University (1958-1964), where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1970 on a

Bruggen van A. C

2001-01-01

100

39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

101

28. View of data test area for DR data take ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

102

2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 degrees west and and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

103

3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

104

6. View of DR 3 antenna typical backstay concrete stanchion ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. View of DR 3 antenna typical back-stay concrete stanchion showing embedded anchors and structural steel leg with pin attachment. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

105

18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees west to backside transmitter building 101 and in left foreground showing site well system building. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

106

Keeping the Dream Alive. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents activities for teaching elementary students about Dr. Martin Luther King's life, the civil rights movement, and King's accomplishments. Suggestions include shoebox dioramas, acronym games, oral histories, multicultural awareness activities, pledge cards, community service projects, special commemorative ceremonies, and a book of dreams.…

Cassells, Linda; And Others

1993-01-01

107

Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

Prevention Researcher, 2004

2004-01-01

108

Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines the case of Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra who was accused of espionage in 1917. Suggests that the espionage charge was a fiction created by newspapers, beginning with "The Providence Journal." Concludes that Muck admitted to being a spy rather than reveal the name of the woman with whom he had an extramarital…

Kagan, Sheldon S.

1993-01-01

109

73. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy of a photograph, Dr. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

73. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy of a photograph, Dr. A. Bertram Gilliland, Photographer, ca. 1922 NORTHEAST END OF PARADE, SHOWING SOLDIERS' BARRACKS AND STOREHOUSE, RAILROAD TRACKS IN FOREGROUND. - Fort Mifflin, Mud Island, Marine & Penrose Ferry Roads, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

110

Green Eggs and Market Plans: Learning Marketing from Dr Seuss  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr Seuss's work spanned several decades, with the publication of a range of children's books which acted both as literary training, and introduction to marketing texts . At the time, their value as marketing texts were unrecognised by industry and academia, who failed to notice the lessons concerning relationship marketing, promotion, service recovery, and the dangers of product over complication

Stephen Dann

2000-01-01

111

GOES-R with Dr. Kathy Sullivan and Tim Samaras  

NASA Video Gallery

This short video features highlights from a live Nationwide broadcast that took place on April 3, 2012, from the studio of NASA Goddard TV. NOAA’s Deputy Administrator and Chief Scientist Dr. Kathryn Sullivan and Severe Storm Chaser and Engineer Tim Samaras talk about an important new satellite, GOES-R, that will be able to see tornadoes like never before.

Silvia Stoyanova

2012-04-26

112

Digital Transmission Evaluation Project DR8A Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Avantek DR8A radio was tested in back-to-back configuration to determine transfer parameters and to refine standard test techniques. The radio operates at a baseband rate of 12.5526 Mb/s (192 voice channels) in a 7 MHz bandwidth in the 8 GHz band. The...

J. Hamant E. F. New J. Phillips

1975-01-01

113

Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on…

Robertson, William H.

2009-01-01

114

Gender-Dependent HLA-DR-Restricted Epitopes Identified from Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent clinical trials, a herpes simplex virus (HSV) recombinant glycoprotein D (gD) vaccine was more efficacious in woman than in men. Here we report six HLA-DR-restricted T-cell gD epitope peptides that bind to multiple HLA-DR (DR1, DR4, DR7, DR13, DR15, and DRB5) molecules that represent a large proportion of the human population. Four of these peptides recalled naturally primed

Xiuli Zhang; Florence A. Castelli; Xiaoming Zhu; Michele Wu; Bernard Maillere; Lbachir BenMohamed

2008-01-01

115

Six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles, three of DR8, two of DR11, and one of DR6, reflect a variety of mechanisms which generate polymorphism in the MHC.  

PubMed

We have sequenced DNA from six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles initially detected by PCR/SSOP analysis. Three DR8 associated alleles differed from previously known alleles by single nucleotide substitutions. DRB1*0807 and DRB1*0811 both vary from DRB1*08021 at codon 57 resulting in two different amino acids at this residue. DRB1*0807 was identified in samples of Brazilian origin while *0811 was identified among samples from the Tlingit Native American population of Southeast Alaska. DRB1*0814, identified in a family of Chinese origin, differed from DRB1*08032 at codon 12 at both the nucleotide and the amino acid level. In addition, two alleles of DR11, DRB1*1113 and *1119, were each detected in Caucasian individuals. DRB1*1113 differs from other DR11 alleles at codons 37, 67, 70 and 74, while DRB1*1119 differs from *1101 by a single nucleotide substitution at codon 67. Finally, DRB1*1418 was detected in a sample from an Asian or Pacific Islander and shares sequences with several other DR52-associated DRB1 alleles. These six DRB1 alleles appear to have been generated by either gene conversion events, DRB1*1113 and *1418, or by point mutations, DRB1*0814, *0807, *0811 and *1119, although the single nucleotide substitutions found in the latter three alleles are also present in at least one other DRB1 allele and, therefore, could have been the product of gene conversions. PMID:8883301

Smith, A G; Nelson, J L; Regen, L; Guthrie, L A; Donadi, E; Mickelson, E M; Hansen, J A

1996-08-01

116

Type 1 diabetes risk for HLA-DR3 haplotypes depends on genotypic context: Association of DPB1 and HLA class I loci among DR3 and DR4 matched Italian patients and controls  

PubMed Central

Patients with high-risk HLA-DR-DQ genotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D) were compared to HLA-matched controls to evaluate T1D risk for other HLA loci, including HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and DPB1. Patients (n=133) with high-risk genotypes (DR3/DR3, DR3/DR4, DR4/DR4) were selected from the Lazio (Rome) region of Italy. Screening of more than 9000 subjects from the Lazio region and northern Italy yielded 162 controls with high- T1D-risk haplotypes. Although the overall distributions were not significantly different, allele frequency differences were discovered between the controls from Lazio and those from Northern Italy for some alleles previously shown to affect T1D risk, such as A*3002, DPB1*0301, and DPB1*0402. Therefore, Lazio patient data were compared both to the Lazio subset of controls (n=53) and to the entire group of controls for association analyses. Significant allele frequency differences between patients and DR-DQ-matched controls were found for specific alleles at all loci. Data for the DR3/DR3 subset of patients and controls showed an increase of Cw*0702 in patients. Reduced patient, compared to control, frequencies were seen for several alleles, including A*0101, B*0801, and Cw*0701, all found on the highly-conserved, extended DR3 haplotype known as 8.1 in DR3/DR3, but not DR3/DR4, subgroup. DPB1*0101, often found on 8.1 haplotypes, was also less frequent in DR3/DR3 patients than controls. Analysis of family-based data from the HBDI repository was consistent with the observed results from the Italian subjects, suggesting the presence of a T1D-protective locus at or near A*0101 and a second T1D-protective locus at or near DPB1*0101. These data suggest that T1D risk conferred by the 8.1 haplotype is genotype dependent.

Noble, Janelle A.; Martin, Adelle; Valdes, Ana M.; Lane, Julie A.; Galgani, Andrea; Petrone, Antonio; Lorini, Renata; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Erlich, Henry A.

2008-01-01

117

Type 1 diabetes risk for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3 haplotypes depends on genotypic context: association of DPB1 and HLA class I loci among DR3- and DR4-matched Italian patients and controls.  

PubMed

Patients with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-DQ genotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D) were compared with HLA-matched controls to evaluate T1D risk for other HLA loci, including HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and DPB1. Patients (n = 133) with high-risk genotypes (DR3/DR3, DR3/DR4, DR4/DR4) were selected from the Lazio (Rome) region of Italy. Screening of more than 9000 patients from the Lazio region and northern Italy yielded 162 controls with high-T1D-risk haplotypes. Although the overall distributions did not differ significantly, allele frequency differences were discovered between the controls from Lazio and controls from northern Italy for some alleles previously determined to affect T1D risk, such as A*3002, DPB1*0301, and DPB1*0402. Therefore, Lazio patient data were compared both with the Lazio subset of controls (n = 53) and with the entire group of controls for association analyses. Significant allele frequency differences between patients and DR-DQ-matched controls existed for specific alleles at all loci. Data for the DR3/DR3 subset of patients and controls demonstrated an increase of Cw*0702 in patients. Compared with controls, reduced patient frequencies were seen for several alleles, including A*0101, B*0801, and Cw*0701, all on the highly conserved, extended DR3 haplotype known as 8.1 in DR3/DR3, but not DR3/DR4, subgroup. DPB1*0101, often reported on 8.1 haplotypes, was also less frequent in DR3/DR3 patients than controls. Analysis of family-based data from the HBDI repository was consistent with the observed results from the Italian patients, indicating the presence of a T1D-protective locus at or near A*0101 and a second T1D-protective locus at or near DPB1*0101. These data indicate that T1D risk conferred by the 8.1 haplotype is genotype dependent. PMID:18486765

Noble, Janelle A; Martin, Adelle; Valdes, Ana M; Lane, Julie A; Galgani, Andrea; Petrone, Antonio; Lorini, Renata; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Erlich, Henry A

2008-03-26

118

Dr. Tom Chalmers, 1917-1995: the tribulations of a trialist. Interview by Malcolm Maclure.  

PubMed Central

This article is the second part of an interview Dr. Malcolm Maclure had with Dr. Thomas Chalmers shortly before Chalmers' death late in 1995. It probes his role as a champion of randomized clinical trials.

Chalmers, T C

1996-01-01

119

The contributions of Dr. Gies: promoting standards of dental education, research.  

PubMed

Dr. Ranney provides a commentary about two 1924 articles published in The Journal of the American Dental Association by Dr. William John Gies that highlight his many contributions to dental education. PMID:23449900

Ranney, Richard R

2013-03-01

120

Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-Dr: California's 2007 Implementation Experience.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with...

A. Chiu D. Hennage G. Wilker M. A. Piette S. Kiliccote

2008-01-01

121

SAIC/NCI-Frederick’s Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) is pleased to announce that Dr  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Martin Fritts, Senior Principal Scientist and Co-Founder of the NCL, Receives the 2010 ASTM International President’s Leadership Award SAIC/NCI-Frederick’s Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) is pleased to announce that Dr. Martin Fritts

122

Compact groups of galaxies in SDSS DR7 (Mendel+, 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Paper III (Cat. J/MNRAS/395/255) we describe the photometric selection of CGs from the SDSS Data Release 6 (Adelman-McCarthy et al., 2008, Cat. II/282/), which included imaging of the entire SDSS-II Legacy Survey area. Since that paper, SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) has provided an additional ~1200deg2 of spectroscopic data, completing spectroscopic observations of the SDSS-II Legacy Survey footprint. In what follows we use galaxy catalogues drawn from SDSS DR7 and, where available, supplement the CG samples in Paper III with updated spectroscopic information. (2 data files).

Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Simard, L.; Patton, D. R.; McConnachie, A. W.

2012-07-01

123

Dr. Irmfried Eberl (1910-1948): mass murdering MD.  

PubMed

There are isolated cases of physicians who murdered their patients. However, never had a single physician personally supervised the mass murder of hundreds of thousands of individuals, until Dr. Irmfried Eberl. Commander of the Nazi death camp Treblinka, he killed both the ill and those he considered "a disease to his nation." At age 32 Dr. Eberl established Treblinka, where he was responsible for the killing of approximately 280,000 individuals within a few weeks. The position of camp commandant was earned following his success as head of two psychiatric hospitals in Germany where he coordinated the murder of thousands of mentally ill Jews and non-Jews within the context of the euthanasia program. However, few in medicine have heard of him or the harm he caused to the ethical practice of the profession and to human rights. PMID:19603594

Strous, Rael D

2009-04-01

124

[Dr Erwin Treu--the first permanent ophthalmologist in Split].  

PubMed

Dr. Erwin Treu (Kotor, 1875-Skopje, 1937) was the first permanent ophthalmologist in Split, Croatia. He finished his ophthalmological specialization at the Eye Clinic in Prague in 1900 at W.P. Czermak. He originates from Tirol. Dr. Treu led and organized ophthalmological service in Split and worked from 1902 to 1921 in the Split Hospital, and had a private practice until 1923. From 1904 to 1910 he temporarily worked outside Split, in Sibenik, Zadar, Dubrovnik, Kotor and Cetinje. During the First World War he was a military doctor in Split and Trogir. He performed ophthalmological operations, cataracts, glaucomas (iridectomy), strabismus (tenotomies), ocular adnexa, injuries, trachoma etc. In 1923 he left for Skopje where he at first worked as a medical major in Military Hospital, and after that as a primarius in Civil Hospital at the Department of Ophthalmology till the end of his life. PMID:19769288

Ivanisevi?, Milan; Boji?, Lovro; Bu?an, Kajo; Kovaci?, Zeljko

125

4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 106 east face through antenna and partial view of satcom communication dome (attached to radar transmitter building 102) in left side of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

126

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1993-05-01

127

Of Brain and Bone: The Unusual Case of Dr. A  

PubMed Central

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick’s disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A’s abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A’s genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can dissociate from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the neural basis of social cognition and suggests a possible genetic link between bone disease and FTD.

Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, ML; Slavotinek, A; DeArmond, SJ; Cha, YH; Miller, BL; Rankin, K.P

2009-01-01

128

Early growth response-1 is a regulator of DR5-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background: Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces tumour cell apoptosis by binding to death receptor 4 (DR4) and DR5. DR4 and DR5 activation however can also induce inflammatory and pro-survival signalling. It is not known how these different cellular responses are regulated and what the individual role of DR4 vs DR5 is in these processes. Methods: DNA microarray study was carried out to identify genes differentially expressed after DR4 and DR5 activation. RT–PCR and western blotting was used to examine the expression of early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) and the proteins of the TRAIL signalling pathway. The function of Egr-1 was studied by siRNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of a dominant-negative version of Egr-1. Results: We show that the immediate early gene, Egr-1, regulates TRAIL sensitivity. Egr-1 is constitutively expressed in colon cancer cells and further induced upon activation of DR4 or DR5. Our results also show that DR4 mediates a type II, mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic pathway, whereas DR5 induces a mitochondrion-independent, type I apoptosis in HCT15 colon carcinoma cells. Egr-1 drives c-FLIP expression and the short splice variant of c-FLIP (c-FLIPS) specifically inhibits DR5 activation. Conclusion: Selective knockdown of c-FLIPS sensitises cells to DR5-induced but not DR4-induced apoptosis and Egr-1 exerts an effect as an inhibitor of the DR5-induced apoptotic pathway, possibly by regulating the expression of c-FLIPS.

Mahalingam, D; Natoni, A; Keane, M; Samali, A; Szegezdi, E

2010-01-01

129

Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.  

PubMed

On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place. PMID:15666497

Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

2004-11-01

130

Monomeric DR2\\/MOG35–55 recombinant TCR ligand treats relapses of experimental encephalomyelitis in DR2 transgenic mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of human autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) will likely require agents that can prevent or reverse the inflammatory process that results in clinical relapses and disease progression. We evaluated the ability of a newly designed monomeric recombinant TCR ligand (RTL342M) containing HLA-DR2 peptide-binding domains covalently linked to MOG-35–55 peptide to prevent and treat both the initial episode

Jason M. Link; Cathleen M. Rich; Maya Korat; Gregory G. Burrows; Halina Offner; Arthur A. Vandenbark

2007-01-01

131

High-Resolution Far-Infrared Observations of DR 21  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present new, high angular resolution two-color maps of the compact H II region DR 21 at 50 ?m and 100 ?m made with the 0.91 m telescope of NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). From the maps we estimate the total fluxes of DR 21 at 50 ?m and 100 ?m to be 1.5 × 104 Jy and 3.8 × 104 Jy, respectively. 1. A homogeneous plane-parallel slab model (Model I) is assumed in order to derive dust temperatures and optical depths. This model implies that the dust in DR 21 has relatively small optical depths at 100 ?m (?100 ˜ 0.1) and its temperature ranges from less than 20 K to ˜55 K. 2. A second model is also presented (Model II): a spherically symmetric dust cloud surrounding an O6 star. We used the radiation transfer code developed by Egan, Leung, & Spagna (1988). Our selection criteria for the best fit were based on the best match for both the energy distribution in the 50-1300 ?m range and the 100 ?m source profile. Assuming the dust properties reported by Mathis, Mezger, & Panagia (1983), and using a mixture of graphite (50% by number) and silicate (50% by number), the best fit to the observations in our modeling with this approach is a spherical dust cloud described by an outer radius of 2.0 pc, an inner radius of 0.1 pc, and a constant dust density distribution. Although this model provides a reasonable fit to the 50-1300 ?m flux densities and a marginal fit to the 100 ?m profile, the predicted FWHM profiles at 800 and 1100 We present new, high angular resolution two-color maps of the compact H II region DR 21 at 50 ?m and 100 ?m made with the 0.91 m telescope of NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). From the maps we estimate the total fluxes of DR 21 at 50 ?m and 100 ?m to be 1.5 × 104 Jy and 3.8 × 104 Jy, respectively. 1. A homogenous plane-parallel slab model (Model I) is assumed in order to derive dust temperatures and optical depths. This model implies that the dust in DR 21 has relatively small optical depths at 100 ?m (?100 ˜ 0.1) and its temperature ranges from less than 20 K to ˜55 K. 2. A second model is also presented (Model II): a spherically symmetric dust cloud surrounding an O6 star. We used the radiation transfer code developed by Egan, Leung, & Spagna (1988). Our selection criteria for the best fit were based on the best match for both the energy distribution in the 50-1300 ?m range and the 100 ?m source profile. Assuming the dust properties reported by Mathis, Mezger, & Panagia (1983), and using a mixture of graphite (50% by number) and silicate (50% by number), the best fit to the observations in our modeling with this approach is a spherical dust cloud described by an outer radius of 2.0 pc, an inner radius of 0.1 pc, and a constant dust density distribution. Although this model provides a reasonable fit to the 50-1300 ?m flux densities and a marginal fit to the 100 ?m profile, the predicted FWHM profiles at 800 and 1100 jim are much broader than those observed with high angular resolution (15" and 19" beams, respectively) as reported in the available literature. Subject headings: dust, extinction H ii regions infrared: ISM: continuum ISM: individual (DR 21) ISM: jets and outflows ?m are much broader than those observed with high angular resolution (15" and 19" beams, respectively) as reported in the available literature.

Colome, Cecilia; Harvey, Paul M.; Lester, Daniel F.; Campbell, Murray F.; Butner, Harold M.

1995-07-01

132

Dr. Basil Bibby: early fluoride investigator and intellectual provocateur.  

PubMed

Dr. Basil Bibby assumed many roles during his productive career as a researcher, teacher, and administrator. Although best known for his research on oral microbiology and on foodstuff as it relates to dental caries, and for fostering the careers of many distinguished researchers, he played an important generative role in determining the local cariostatic effects of fluoride. His seminal work in this area has not received its due because of the mixed success of his initial clinical studies. We hope that a review of his contributions in this area will bring those contributions into focus and illustrate his open personality and multi-dimensional approach to research. PMID:9326893

Handelman, S; Zero, D T

1997-10-01

133

Genocide in Bosnia: the case of Dr. Radovan Karadzic.  

PubMed

From 1992 to 1995 the Republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina experienced a war of genocidal proportions between the Bosnian Serbs, the Bosnian Croats, and the Bosnian Muslims. The international Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia has indicted Dr. Radovan Karadzic--former President of the Bosnian Serb Republic, psychiatrist, and poet--as a suspected war criminal for his role in war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. Karadzic remains enigmatic and poorly understood. Psychological profiling highlights in Karadzic's case the complex coalescence of the psychology of a genocide perpetrator with that of a charismatic narcissistic political leader. Such a profile may possess usefulness in forensic psychiatric investigations and legal proceedings. PMID:9460036

Dekleva, K B; Post, J M

1997-01-01

134

[The SS dentist Dr. Willy Frank. A biography].  

PubMed

In his role as leading SS dentist in the concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau Dr. Willy Frank was involved in the worst crimes of World War II: In the early summer of 1944 the so called "Hungarian Action" commenced. It planned the extermination of around 450 000 Hungarian Jews within only a few months. Some twenty years later he was sentenced during the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trials to seven years of imprisonment on grounds of his participation in the selection and gassing of the Jews. Before that he had been able to resume his professional worksince 1947 unchecked. PMID:20509438

Huber, Barbara

2009-01-01

135

Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature. Reply to Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek  

SciTech Connect

This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} responds to the comments by Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek regarding the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations. The survival time of the patient may depend on the detection of mosicism; the discussion of the existence of full trisomy 22 remains controversial. 2 refs.

Bacino, C.A.; Graham, J.M. Jr. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1996-03-01

136

The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

James, Michael

2009-01-01

137

Existence and completeness of the Möller wave operators for radial potentials satisfying ?01 r||v(r)||dr+?1?||v(r)||dr< ?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We give an elementary proof of the existence of the (three-dimensional) Möller wave operators and the unitarity of the S operator (weak asymptotic completeness) for radial Kato potentials v(r) satisfying F01 r||v(r)||dr+F1?||v(r)||dr<@qL ?.

Dollard, J. D.; Friedman, C. N.

1980-06-01

138

The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

James, Michael

2009-01-01

139

Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR- CAFTA): Understanding the Reasons Why the Dominican Republic (DR) Joined the CAFTA Negotiations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2004, the Dominican Republic (DR) joined the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) negotiations, which had been started between the nations of Central America and the United States. For the DR, this was a major step towards permanently opening u...

D. J. Garcia-Rojas

2009-01-01

140

The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love' administration encompassed the years 1980 through 1985. The individual administrative approaches used by both

Michael James

2009-01-01

141

2009 AMCA Memorial Lecture Honoree: Dr. Chester Lamar Meek.  

PubMed

Chester Lamar Meek (1944-2000), 2009 AMCA Memorial Lecture Honoree, was husband to Sharon Kay Meek, father of Bradley Lamar and Jody Keith, and a member of the faculty of Louisiana State University for 25 years when he passed away on June 27, 2000, while conducting field research on mosquitoes in Cleveland, Mississippi. Dr. Meek was born in Monticello, Arkansas, and attended Ouachita Baptist University, University of Arkansas, and Texas A&M University, where he took his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., respectively. He was an expert in the biology and control of rice-field mosquitoes and in forensic entomology. He served in the medical service corps of the US Army, authored or co-authored over 65 scientific publications, and was mentor to graduate students in medical and forensic entomology. Dr. Meek was a member of the Louisiana Mosquito Control Association, the Texas Mosquito Control Association, the American Mosquito Control Association, the Entomological Society of America, the American Registry of Professional Entomologists, and the Society for Vector Ecology. He received the American Mosquito Control Association's awards for Meritorious Service (1986) and the Memorial Lectureship Award (1991) and was recognized for his service by the Louisiana Mosquito Control Association with the 1989 Hathaway-Ritter Distinguished Achievement award. PMID:19852210

Connelly, C Roxanne

2009-09-01

142

Ibuprofen enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through DR5 upregulation.  

PubMed

Numerous human chemoprevention studies have demonstrated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) possess chemopreventive effects against a variety of malignant tumors. However, there have been many clinical studies on aspirin, but not ibuprofen, even though ibuprofen is one of the most clinically and safely used NSAIDs showing potent anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, we reported that many chemopreventive agents enhance the apoptosis-inducing effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), which is known to be crucial for cancer prevention. We, therefore, investigated whether ibuprofen enhances the cytocidal effect of TRAIL and found that ibuprofen markedly stimulated the apoptosis-inducing efficacy of TRAIL against human colon cancer HCT116 cells. As detected by western blot analysis and real-time RT-PCR, ibuprofen upregulated the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a TRAIL receptor. TRAIL-induced apoptosis enhanced by ibuprofen was effectively decreased by a caspase inhibitor and dominant-negative DR5. Noteworthy, co-treatment of ibuprofen with TRAIL did not enhance apoptosis in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). These results demonstrated that ibuprofen and TRAIL synergistically induced apoptosis in human colon cancer HCT116 cells but not in normal PBMCs, raising the possibility that ibuprofen may be promising as a safe chemopreventive agent against colon cancer. PMID:24002210

Todo, Momoko; Horinaka, Mano; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Ikawa, Haruna; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Hideki; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo; Sakai, Toshiyuki

2013-08-30

143

HLA-DR4 and salivary immunoglobulin A reactions to oral streptococci.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe and compare salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody reactions to extracts of strains of three oral streptococci in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4-positive and -DR4-negative subjects. Whole paraffin-stimulated saliva samples were collected from 27 apparently healthy subjects. Previous HLA typing showed that 20 subjects were DR4 positive and 7 were DR4 negative. HLA-DRB1*04 subtyping was performed among the DR4-positive subjects. Whole-cell antigen extracts from Streptococcus mutans (KPSK 2), Streptococcus sobrinus (OMZ 65) and Streptococcus parasanguis (Nt 62) were separated in SDS-PAGE. The antigens were immunoblotted with diluted saliva (Western blot), scanned and analyzed in a computer system. All immunoblot bands were recorded in DR4-positive and DR4-negative saliva pools, and bands with an optical density >or=0.1 were selected for analysis in individual salivas. The DR4-negative subjects in general had more immunoblot bands and more distinct bands than did the DR4-positive subjects. A higher concentration of total IgA in saliva was correlated with more bands, especially to antigens separated from S. mutans. When the number of bands was calculated per IgA unit, significant differences were observed between DR4-positive and DR4-negative salivas. This was particularly seen for S. mutans and S. parasanguis. As the number of bands was analyzed in relation to DR4 subgroups, DRB1*04, there was a lower salivary IgA activity to S. mutans in the DRB1*0401 and *0404. The variable level of correlation previously demonstrated for S. mutans colonisation and serologically defined DR4 positive subjects might be explained by the heterogeneity in this group, and the relation should be sought on a subgroup level. PMID:11169139

Wallengren, M L; Ericson, D; Hamberg, K; Johnson, U

2001-02-01

144

An HLA-DR typing protocol using group-specific PCR-amplification followed by restriction enzyme digests.  

PubMed

A simple PCR-based protocol for HLA-DR typing suitable for a routine practice is described. The method involves, first, a PCR amplification with seven different, group-specific (DR1, DR2, DR4, DR7, DR9, DR10, and DR3+5+6+8) primer-pairs, and second, typing of HLA-DR allele more exactly in DR1, DR2, DR4, and DR3+5+6+8 groups by digestion of PCR products with restriction enzymes distinguishing different HLA-DR types within each of the groups. Altogether 24 HLA-DR alleles, or any combination of these, can be typed. The whole procedure, starting from a blood sample, can be carried out during a single working-day. The method was tested by typing a set of homozygous cell lines, as well as a local panel previously typed by PCR/oligotyping. Also, 227 patients waiting for transplantation were typed to test the method in a routine setting. The results suggest that this kind of approach gives reliable HLA-DR types and works well in the routine use. PMID:8388248

Westman, P; Kuismin, T; Partanen, J; Koskimies, S

1993-04-01

145

Peptide binding to soluble HLA-DR4 molecules produced by insect cells.  

PubMed

HLA-DR4Dw4 molecules were expressed in insect Sf9 cells. The transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the DR4 alpha- and beta-chains were replaced by the carboxy terminal sequence of decay accelerating factor, leading to a phosphatidyl inositol glycan membrane anchor. This structure contains a cleavage site for phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C, allowing efficient solubilization of the rDR4 molecules. We present evidence that infected insect cells express properly associated surface heterodimers and are able to present antigenic peptides to DR4Dw4-restricted T cell clones. Phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase-cleaved recombinant molecules exhibited in vitro binding characteristics similar to DR4 molecules purified from lymphoblastoid cells. In terms of peptide specificity, pH optimum, kinetics, and affinity they were indistinguishable within the limits of our assay system. However, the peptide binding capacity of the recombinant molecules was higher than that of native DR4 molecules. PMID:1387668

Scheirle, A; Takacs, B; Kremer, L; Marin, F; Sinigaglia, F

1992-09-15

146

Invariant Chain Peptides in Most HLA-DR Molecules of an Antigen-Processing Mutant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Class II major histocompatibility complexes bind peptides in an endosome-like compartment. When the class II null cell line 721.174 was transfected with class II DR3 genes, DR molecules were produced in normal amounts. However, the DR molecules were abnormally conformed and unstable because deletion of an antigen-processing gene had impaired intracellular formation of most class II-peptide complexes. Yet, 70 percent

Alessandro Sette; Stephanie Ceman; Ralph T. Kubo; Kazuyasu Sakaguchi; Ettore Appella; Donald F. Hunt; Theresa A. Davis; Hanspeter Michel; Jeffrey Shabanowitz; Richard Rudersdorf; Howard M. Grey; Robert Demars

1992-01-01

147

105DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of

Knaus

1995-01-01

148

Catalytic antibodies: balancing between Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.  

PubMed

The immunoglobulin molecule is a perfect template for the de novo generation of biocatalytic functions. Catalytic antibodies, or abzymes, obtained by the structural mimicking of enzyme active sites have been shown to catalyze numerous chemical reactions. Natural enzyme analogs for some of these reactions have not yet been found or possibly do not exist at all. Nowadays, the dramatic breakthrough in antibody engineering and expression technologies has promoted a considerable expansion of immunoglobulin's medical applications and is offering abzymes a unique chance to become a promising source of high-precision "catalytic vaccines." At the same time, the discovery of natural abzymes on the background of autoimmune disease revealed their beneficial and pathogenic roles in the disease progression. Thus, the conflicting Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde protective and destructive essences of catalytic antibodies should be carefully considered in the development of therapeutic abzyme applications. PMID:19795406

Belogurov, Alexey; Kozyr, Arina; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Gabibov, Alexander

2009-11-01

149

Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle and the case of congenital syphilis.  

PubMed

In 1894, Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "The Third Generation," a short story involving the transmission of congenital syphilis from generation to generation. Analysts of his writings have interpreted the pathogenetic mechanism involved in modern terms: infection of mother by father and then transplacental infection of the fetus. However, a review of the contemporary literature and the history of the concepts of congenital and "hereditary" syphilis demonstrates that the late 19th-century understanding of the process involved a Lamarckian transmission of paternal infection, via the sperm at the moment of conception. It was undoubtedly this concept that Doyle learned in medical school in the late 1870s and that provided the background to his story. PMID:16702705

Silverstein, Arthur M; Ruggere, Christine

2006-01-01

150

XCS-DR1 Cluster Catalogue (Mehrtens+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 256 are new to the literature and 357 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 463 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06

Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Hilton, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Hosmer, M.; Hoyle, B.; Collins, C. A.; Liddle, A. R.; Viana, P. T. P.; Nichol, R. C.; Stott, J. P.; Dubois, E. N.; Kay, S. T.; Sahlen, M.; Young, O.; Short, C. J.; Christodoulou, L.; Watson, W. A.; Davidson, M.; Harrison, C. D.; Baruah, L.; Smith, M.; Burke, C.; Mayers, J. A.; Deadman, P.-J.; Rooney, P. J.; Edmondson, E. M.; West, M.; Campbell, H. C.; Edge, A. C.; Mann, R. G.; Sabirli, K.; Wake, D.; Benoist, C.; da Costa, L.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R.

2013-04-01

151

Abnormal urothelial HLA-DR expression in interstitial cystitis.  

PubMed Central

Interstitial cystitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the urinary bladder that predominantly afflicts middle-age women. The end stage of the disease is ulceration of the urothelium, the so-called Hunner's ulcer. The aetiology of interstitial cystitis remains obscure. We have studied bladder biopsies from 22 cases of interstitial cystitis and control groups consisting of six cases of bacterial cystitis and eight healthy women. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed on the biopsies using murine MoAbs to human HLA class I molecules, and class II molecules, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. In interstitial cystitis, bacterial cystitis and normal controls most cells expressed HLA class I products. In six cases of interstitial cystitis and one case of bacterial cystitis there was evidence of HLA class I hyperexpression. In normal bladder and bacterial cystitis HLA class II expression was restricted to submucosal dendritic cells, Langerhans cells macrophages, vascular endothelial cells and activated lymphocytes. All but two cases of interstitial cystitis showed surface expression of HLA-DR (but not HLA-DP or DQ). In all cases of interstitial cystitis there was an increase in the numbers of macrophages, activated lymphocytes and vascular endothelial cells expressing HLA class II molecules within the submucosa. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of inappropriate HLA molecule expression in a disease suspected of having an autoimmune pathogenesis and where cellular autoimmune mechanisms play a decisive role in the destruction of the target cells--the bladder urothelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5

Christmas, T J; Bottazzo, G F

1992-01-01

152

Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

Mercado, M.S.

1996-03-09

153

Immunogenicity of HLA-DR1 Restricted Peptides Derived from Leishmania major gp63 Using FVB/N-DR1 Transgenic Mouse Model  

PubMed Central

Background Leishmaniasis is a worldwide disease prevalent in tropical and sub-tropical countries. In the present study the immunogenicity of three human HLA-DR1 restricted peptides derived from L. major gp63 protein was evaluated using FVB/N-DR1 transgenic mouse model. Methods The immunity generated by three MHC class II – restricted peptides with the sequence of AARLVRLAAAGAAVT (AAR), AAPLVRLAAAGAAVT (AAP) and SRYDQLVTRVVTHE (ASR) derived from L. major gp63 protein were predicted using a web-based software (SYFPEITHI) and tested in FVB/N-DR1 transgenic mice. Results Immunization of FVB/N-DR1 transgenic mice with one of the three predicted peptides (AAR) resulted in high levels of Th1-type immune response as well as significant levels of IFN-? detected by Proliferation assay and ELISA. Conclusion The results indicate a high level of immunogenicity for AAR, which can be a potent candidate for peptide vaccine in Leishmania infections.

Rezvan, H

2013-01-01

154

In vitro adherence properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus DR20 and Bifidobacterium lactis DR10 strains and their antagonistic activity against an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adhesion and colonisation properties of three probiotic strains namely, Lactobacillus rhamnosus DR20, L. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis DR10, were determined in vitro using the differentiated human intestinal cell-lines including HT-29, Caco-2, and HT29-MTX, and compared with properties of L. acidophilus LA-1 and L. rhamnosus GG (two commercial probiotic strains). Two independent methods were employed to quantitate the “adhesiveness” of

Pramod K Gopal; Jaya Prasad; John Smart; Harsharanjit S Gill

2001-01-01

155

DR3 signaling protects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity mediated by tumor necrosis factor.  

PubMed

The expression of death receptor 3 (DR3), a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, is up-regulated in human tubular epithelial cells (TECs) during renal injury, but its function in this setting remains unknown. We used cisplatin to induce renal injury in wild-type (DR3(+/+)) or congenitally deficient DR3(-/-) mice to examine the in vivo role of DR3. Cisplatin induced the expression of DR3, its ligand, TNF-like ligand 1A (TL1A), and TNF in TECs, as observed in human renal injury. Cisplatin increased apoptotic death of DR3(-/-) TECs by twofold compared with DR3(+/+) TECs, whereas it reduced the number of tubules expressing phospho-NF-?Bp65(Ser276) by 50% at 72 hours. Similar degrees of induction of DR3, TL1A, and TNF, and changes in apoptosis and phospho-NF-?Bp65(Ser276), were obtained in mouse kidney organ cultures treated with cisplatin for 3 hours, suggesting a direct effect on TECs. TNF was implicated in mediating cisplatin-induced tubular damage given that the in vivo co-administration of GM6001, an inhibitor of TNF maturation and release, significantly reduced TNF production and tubular damage. Moreover, TNF exacerbated, whereas TL1A reduced, cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the DR3(+/+) mouse proximal tubule cell line, TKPTS. Our data demonstrate that cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is mitigated by DR3 signaling, suggesting that this occurs by antagonizing pro-apoptotic signals induced by TNF. Therefore, activating DR3 may be beneficial in reducing acute kidney injury. PMID:22330679

Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Lu, WanHua; Finlay, Sarah; Twohig, Jason P; Wang, Eddie C Y; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Bradley, John R

2012-02-11

156

Association of HLA-DR1 with the allergic response to the major mugwort pollen allergen: molecular background  

PubMed Central

Background Mugwort pollen allergens represent the main cause of pollinosis in late summer. The major allergen, Art v 1, contains only one single immunodominant, solely HLA-DR-restricted T cell epitope (Art v 125-36). The frequency of HLA-DRB1*01 is highly increased in mugwort-allergic individuals and HLA-DR1 serves as restriction element for Art v 125-36. However, Art v 125-36 also binds to HLA-DR4 with high affinity and DR1-restricted Art v 125-36 -specific T cell receptors can be activated by HLA-DR4 molecules. To understand the predominance of HLA-DR1 in mugwort allergy in spite of the degeneracy in HLA/peptide-binding and TCR-recognition, we investigated the molecular background of Art v 125-36 /MHC/TCR interactions in the context of HLA-DR1 compared to -DR4. Results The majority of Art v 125-36 -specific T cell lines and clones from HLA-DR1 carrying, mugwort pollen-allergic donors reacted to synthetic and naturally processed Art v 1–peptides when presented by HLA-DR1 or HLA-DR4 expressing antigen presenting cells. However, at limiting peptide concentrations DR1 was more effective in T cell stimulation. In addition, the minimal epitope for 50% of Art v 125-36 -specific T cells was shorter for DR1 than for DR4. In vitro binding assays of Art v 125-36 mutant peptides to isolated DR1- and DR4-molecules indicated similar binding capacities and use of the same register. In silico simulation of Art v 125-36 binding to HLA-DR1 and -DR4 suggested similar binding of the central part of the peptide to either molecule, but a higher flexibility of the N- and C-terminal amino acids and detachment at the C-terminus in HLA-DR1. Conclusions The predominance of HLA-DR1 in the response to Art v 125-36 may be explained by subtle conformation changes of the peptide bound to DR1 compared to DR4. Computer simulation supported our experimental data by demonstrating differences in peptide mobility within the HLA-DR complex that may influence TCR-binding. We suggest that the minor differences observed in vitro may be more relevant in the microenvironment in vivo, so that only presentation by HLA-DR1, but not -DR4 permits successful T cell activation.

2012-01-01

157

The Scholarship of Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III: Implications for Black Principal Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For over 40 years the scholarship of Dr. Asa G. Hilliard has impacted the fields of educational psychology, testing and measurement, teacher education, and African and African American history. Dr. Hilliard was also concerned about school leadership, and much of his work is closely aligned with current discussions about school reform and…

Tillman, Linda C.

2008-01-01

158

Palindromic rheumatism in two non-identical brothers with identical HLA including DR4  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two brothers, aged 52 and 44, who suffered from palindromic rheumatism (PR) for 12 and 15 years were studied. The disease remained palindromic in the older brother, while chronic deformities developed early in the course of the disease in the younger. Their identical HLA locus was A9,Aw19(29); B12,Bw22; Cw1; DR1, DR4.

P Hannonen; M Hakola; M Oka

1985-01-01

159

Palindromic rheumatism in two non-identical brothers with identical HLA including DR4.  

PubMed

Two brothers, aged 52 and 44, who suffered from palindromic rheumatism (PR) for 12 and 15 years were studied. The disease remained palindromic in the older brother, while chronic deformities developed early in the course of the disease in the younger. Their identical HLA locus was A9,Aw19(29); B12,Bw22; Cw1; DR1, DR4. PMID:3872102

Hannonen, P; Hakola, M; Oka, M

1985-03-01

160

Dr William Saunders Hallaran and psychiatric practice in nineteenth-century Ireland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Dr William Saunders Hallaran wrote the first Irish textbook of psychiatry in 1810. Aims To explore the relevance of Dr Hallaran’s textbook: An Enquiry into the Causes producing the Extraordinary Addition to the Number of Insane together with Extended Observations on the Cure of Insanity with Hints as to the Better Management of Public Asylums for Insane Persons. Methods

B. D. Kelly

2008-01-01

161

Evolution and current status of demand response (DR) in electricity markets: Insights from PJM and NYISO  

Microsoft Academic Search

In electricity markets, traditional demand side management programs are slowly getting replaced with demand response (DR) programs. These programs have evolved since the early pilot programs launched in late 1990s. With the changes in market rules the opportunities have generally increased for DR for participating in emergency, economic and ancillary service programs. In recent times, various regulators have suggested that

Rahul Walawalkar; Stephen Fernands; Netra Thakur; Konda Reddy Chevva

2010-01-01

162

An Analysis of Dr. Anna M. Ortiz's Research: Developing a Foundation in Ethnic Identity Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dr. Anna Ortiz is a scholar who explores the ethnic identity development of college students and the experiences of underrepresented college students in a context in which white culture represents the norm in higher education. This paper explored the background and research of Dr. Ortiz. Her research has been influenced by her cultural and…

Hubbard, Steven M.

163

A DR6/p75NTR complex is responsible for ?-amyloid-induced cortical neuron death  

PubMed Central

The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a known mediator of ?-amyloid (A?)-induced neurotoxicity implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we demonstrate that death receptor 6 (DR6) binds to p75NTR and is a component of the p75NTR signaling complex responsible for A?-induced cortical neuron death. Cortical neurons isolated from either DR6 or p75NTR null mice are resistant to A?-induced neurotoxicity. Blocking DR6 function in cortical neurons by anti-DR6 antibodies that block the binding of DR6 to p75NTR receptor complex or by a dominant negative DR6 construct lacking the cytoplasmic signaling death domain attenuates A?-induced caspase 3 activation and cell death. DR6 expression is upregulated in AD cortex and correlates with elevated neuronal death. Targeting the disruption of the DR6/p75NTR complex to prevent A? cytotoxicity represents a new approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as AD.

Hu, Y; Lee, X; Shao, Z; Apicco, D; Huang, G; Gong, B J; Pepinsky, R B; Mi, S

2013-01-01

164

Web Conference with Dr. Hans Keirstead: Stem Cells and Human Disease  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a 2009 web conference between Dr. Has Keirstead at UCI and an undergraduate class of Dr. Michael Barresi at Smith College. The primary literature discussed is listed on the web site. There are some audio problems with the conference, but the impact of the material is significant so we have submitted it in spite of this.

PhD Michael JF Barresi (Smith College Biological Sciences)

2009-11-30

165

Laboratory Evaluation of the Hach DR-EL Direct Reading, Portable Engineers' Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hach DR-EL colorimeter has been observed in a number of wastewater treatment plant laboratories about the state where they are presumably being used for routine laboratory analyses. The Hach DR-EL, will be an excellent contribution to wastewater treat...

W. S. Midkiff F. Cadena-Cepeda E. T. Davidson P. E. McGinnis

1972-01-01

166

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan  

SciTech Connect

This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The LSFF was established to investigate fire fighting and safety associated with alkali metal fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities. The decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan identifies the decontamination procedures, sampling locations, any special handling requirements, quality control samples, required chemical analysis, and data validation needed to meet the requirements of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Knaus, Z.C.

1995-06-12

167

Interferon-gamma induces HLA-DR expression by thyroid epithelium.  

PubMed Central

We recently showed that human thyroid epithelial cells, which are normally negative for HLA-DR molecules, express HLA-DR in thyroid autoimmunity. Furthermore, induction of HLA-DR on normal thyroid cells can be achieved by culture with plant lectins. We have now found that recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) induces expression of HLA-DR molecules on cultured human thyroid cells, whereas Namalva IFN-alpha, recombinant IFN-beta or recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) do not. All three IFN, but not IL-2, enhanced thyroid cell HLA-A,B,C expression. The results strongly implicate T cells (which are the source of IFN-gamma) in the aberrant induction of DR on thyroid epithelial cells which is proposed to be a central feature of the immunopathological processes leading to autoimmunity. Images Fig. 1 p269-a

Todd, I; Pujol-Borrell, R; Hammond, L J; Bottazzo, G F; Feldmann, M

1985-01-01

168

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. Nadine Foreman, M.D., August 19, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Nadine Foreman was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Foreman was selected for interview because of the position she held at the University of California, San Francisco. Following a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Foreman describes her work with Dr. Mayo Soley using I-131 in treatment of hyperthyroidism, selection criteria for patients in the radioiodine project, work with Dr. Earl Miller, work at Highland Hospital, radioiodine treatment of diffuse toxic goiter (myxedema), the radiophosphorus and radioiodine programs with Dr. Bert Low-Beer, and treatment of polycythemia vera.

NONE

1995-07-01

169

Inhibitory effect of upregulated DR-nm23 expression on invasion and metastasis in colorectal cancer.  

PubMed

To explore the role of DR-nm23 in the regulation of colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry assay and in-situ nucleic acid hybridization were carried out to analyze the protein and mRNA expression of DR-nm23 in patient samples. The molecular cloning technique was applied to construct the recombinant lentiviral expression vector pGC-FU-DR-nm23-GFP. Lentiviral infection was used to introduce overexpression of exogenous DR-nm23 in SW620 colorectal cancer cells. Both in-vitro cell experiments and an in-vivo xenograft tumor model assay were carried out to determine the role of DR-nm23 in the regulation of colorectal cancer proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Our data here showed that the expression level of DR-nm23 in colorectal cancer tissue was significantly lower than that in adenoma and normal tissue. The expression level of DR-nm23 was also found to be negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis and positively correlated with the degree of tumor differentiation. Besides, introduced overexpression of DR-nm23 in SW620 cells through lentiviral infection resulted in significant inhibition of its proliferation rate in vitro and growth rate in vivo. The cell migration ability in vitro and metastatic potential in vivo were also impaired at the same time. Our current study suggested that DR-nm23 may participate in the regulation of differentiation of colorectal cancer cells. Its downregulated expression is closely related to the invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer. Thus, expression status of DR-nm23 may act as a potential prognostic factor in patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:23765094

Qu, Lijuan; Liang, Li; Su, Juanjuan; Yang, Zhi

2013-11-01

170

Groups in the Millennium Simulation and in SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Millennium N-body simulation and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey seventh data release (SDSS DR7) galaxy and galaxy group catalogues are compared to study the properties of galaxy groups and the distribution of galaxies in groups. We construct mock galaxy group catalogues for a Millennium semi-analytical galaxy catalogue by using the same friends-of-friends method, which was used by Tago et al to analyse the SDSS data. We analyse in detail the group luminosities, group richnesses, virial radii, sizes of groups and their rms velocities for four volume-limited samples from observations and simulations. Our results show that the spatial densities of groups agree within one order of magnitude in all samples with a rather good agreement between the mock catalogues and observations. All group property distributions have similar shapes and amplitudes for richer groups. For galaxy pairs and small groups, the group properties for observations and simulations are clearly different. In addition, the spatial distribution of galaxies in small groups is different: at the outskirts of the groups the galaxy number distributions do not agree, although the agreement is relatively good in the inner regions. Differences in the distributions are mainly due to the observational limitations in the SDSS sample and to the problems in the semi-analytical methods that produce too compact and luminous groups.

Nurmi, P.; Heinämäki, P.; Sepp, T.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Gramann, M.; Einasto, M.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, J.

2013-09-01

171

Groups in the Millennium Simulation and in SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Millennium N-body simulation and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey seventh data release (SDSS DR7) galaxy and galaxy group catalogues are compared to study the properties of galaxy groups and the distribution of galaxies in groups. We construct mock galaxy group catalogues for a Millennium semi-analytical galaxy catalogue by using the same friends-of-friends method, which was used by Tago et al to analyse the SDSS data. We analyse in detail the group luminosities, group richnesses, virial radii, sizes of groups and their rms velocities for four volume-limited samples from observations and simulations. Our results show that the spatial densities of groups agree within one order of magnitude in all samples with a rather good agreement between the mock catalogues and observations. All group property distributions have similar shapes and amplitudes for richer groups. For galaxy pairs and small groups, the group properties for observations and simulations are clearly different. In addition, the spatial distribution of galaxies in small groups is different: at the outskirts of the groups the galaxy number distributions do not agree, although the agreement is relatively good in the inner regions. Differences in the distributions are mainly due to the observational limitations in the SDSS sample and to the problems in the semi-analytical methods that produce too compact and luminous groups.

Nurmi, P.; Heinämäki, P.; Sepp, T.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Gramann, M.; Einasto, M.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, J.

2013-11-01

172

2011 AMCA Memorial Lecture honoree: Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr.  

PubMed

Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr. (1866-1929) was an early-20th-century expert in taxonomy and biology of culicid Diptera. At an early age, Dyar became interested in the biology, life history, and taxonomy of Lepidoptera, which he continued throughout his entire career. Dyar pursued his passion for entomology, and during his formative years, professionals sent Lepidoptera specimens to him for identification. As his prominence was well known to Leland Howard, then the honorary curator of the US National Museum of Natural History, he was asked and accepted the position as honorary custodian of Lepidoptera in 1897, which later included periods of service with the US Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and the US Army Officers' Reserve Corps. This position went without stipend and it was Dyar's personal wealth that allowed him to continue his love of entomology. However, the museum did provide limited staff and funds for illustrators, supplies, and travel. In the early 1900s, his interests expanded to include mosquitoes where he concentrated on their life histories and taxonomy. Throughout his career, Dyar often criticized colleagues, both personally and in publications, often with interludes of peace to coauthor articles and books. His legacy of original scientific work is of lasting significance to public health and entomology communities, in recognition of which he was selected as the 2011 AMCA memorial lecture honoree. PMID:22017104

Carpenter, Terry L; Klein, Terry A

2011-09-01

173

[Life and work of Dr. Jovan Jovanovi? Zmaj].  

PubMed

The year of 2004 was the 100th anniversary of death of the poet and physician Dr. Jovan Jovanovi? Zmaj. Jovan Jovanovi? Zmaj was born in 1833 in Novi Sad, and died in 1904 in Sremska Kamenica J.J. Zmaj himself studied law and worked in the Novi Sad magistrate court. It was not until he turned 30 that he began practicing medicine. He developed as a poet as early as during his studies. He remained loyal to the vocations of physician and poet throughout his life. He wrote over 5000 poems, ranging from those for children through those for adults and those with which he addressed the rulers satirically. He was a founder of a number of magazines (Javor, Neven, Komarac, Danica). At that time of Romanticism, the work of J.J. Zmaj also had a national character. However, he succeeded in achieving something more: he introduced a literary genre till then unknown in Serb literature--literature for children. Through his genre he promoted not only Serbian language but also hygiene, by which he played a significant health care role, similar to that played by his friend Milan Jovanovi? Batut, only from a different aspect. He also used to draw, and his drawing of the emblem of the Serbian Literary Association has remained on the cover of every book published by it until these days. PMID:18172968

Lesi?, Aleksandar; Bumbasirevi?, Marko; Zizi?-Borjanovi?, Slavica

2006-10-01

174

Galaxy clusters in the SDSS-DR5 (Yoon+, 2008)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent large-scale galaxy spectroscopic surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), enable us to execute a systematic, relatively unbiased search for galaxy clusters. Such surveys make it possible to measure the 3D distribution of galaxies but are hampered by the incompleteness problem due to fiber collisions. In this study we aim to develop a density-measuring technique that alleviates the problem and derives densities more accurately by adding additional cluster member galaxies that follow optical color-magnitude relations for the given redshift. The new density measured with both spectroscopic and photometric data shows a good agreement with apparent information on cluster images and is supported by follow-up observations. By adopting this new method, a total of 924 robust galaxy clusters are found from the SDSS DR5 database in the redshift range 0.05

Yoon, J. H.; Schawinski, K.; Sheen, Y.-K.; Ree, C. H.; Yi, S. K.

2009-07-01

175

Spectro-Astrometry of Molecular Emission in DR Tauri  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To understand how life originated on Earth, we must investigate how the necessary water and other prebiotic molecules were distributed through the protoplanetary disk from which the solar system formed. To infer this, we study analogs to the early solar system: T Tauri stars. These objects are low-mass, pre-main sequence stars surrounded by circumstellar disks of material from which planets are believed to form. How water is distributed through a protoplanetary disk is of particular interest. We present high-resolution, near-infrared spectro-astrometric data for the T Tauri star DR Tau using NIRSPEC at the Keck II telescope. Spectro-astrometry obtains sub-seeing spatial information from emission lines originating in a non-point source object, such as a circumstellar disk. We report the first detection of water spectro-astrometric signatures in a protoplanetary disk. Three water features near 3 ?m were averaged together to produce the total signal analyzed. Using a disk model, we constrained the position angle of the disk (~140o), the inclination of the disk (~13o), and the emitting region of the water emission lines (~0.056 - 0.38 AU). Further more, we attempted to constrain the emitting region for observed OH emission.

Brown, Logan; Troutman, Matthew; Gibb, Erika

2013-07-01

176

Radial metallicity gradient from RAVE DR3 (Coskunoglu+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate radial metallicity gradients for a sample of dwarf stars from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) Data Release 3 (DR3, Cat. III/265). We select a total of approximately 17000 F-type and G-type dwarfs, using a selection of colour, log g and uncertainty in the derived space motion, and calculate for each star a probabilistic (kinematic) population assignment to a thick or thin disc using space motion and additionally another (dynamical) assignment using stellar vertical orbital eccentricity. We additionally subsample by colour, to provide samples biased toward young thin-disc and older thin-disc stars. We derive a metallicity gradient as a function of Galactocentric radial distance, i.e. d[M/H]/dRm=-0.051+/-0.005dex/kpc, for the youngest sample, F-type stars with vertical orbital eccentricities ev<=0.04. Samples biased toward older thin-disc stars show systematically shallower abundance gradients. (1 data file).

Coskunoglu, B.; Ak, S.; Bilir, S.; Karaali, S.; Onal, O.; Yaz, E.; Gilmore, G.; Seabroke, G. M.

2012-07-01

177

The life-work of Prof. MUDr. Zdenek Lojda, Dr.Sc., Dr. Med. et Iur. h.c.  

PubMed

Professor Zdenek Lojda, MD., Dr.Sc., Dr. Med.h.c., Dr. Jur. h.c., vice-rector emeritus of the Charles University and director emeritus of the Institute of Histology and Embryology of the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague died on the 24th April 2004. Born in Trebíc (in a local maternal hospital on the 7th December 1927) he grew up in Moravské Budejovice where he graduated from a primary and secondary school (he passed out each class as well as the leaving exam at the local gymnasium in 1946 cum laude). He was growing up in an inspiring atmosphere of a family of a professor at gymnasium that helped him to form his fundamental moral attitude and to gain high knowledge of an almost Renaissance comprehension. He was a gifted linguist (he spoke fluently several languages including Latin) and musician (he did community singing among others) and he was interested in natural sciences. In 1946 he enrolled for the medical faculty and coincidentally he was grouped among students that completed histology and embryology at the Institute of Embryology headed by professor Zdenek Frankenberger, MD., who had recognised his interest in this field of study. The young student gave himself and his free time to the work of an unqualified lab-worker and only later he became assistant conducting practical tutorials. He took his degree cum laude in 1952 and he received certificate of competence because of his excellent results. He showed his preoccupation with histology (strongly influenced by the personality of professor Frankenberger) after the graduation when he entered the job of the assistant professor at the Institute of Embryology and he stayed there until 1961. When he was about to decide which problems he should target, professor Frankenberger drew his attention to a very interesting part of histology that was just in advance and that was the use of diazonic salts for formation of colour reaction product demonstrating enzyme activity in tissues. In 1962 professor Frankenberger retired and Lojda left the Institute of Embryology for the 4th internal clinic to work in the Laboratory of Angiology housed at the 1st (Hlava) Institute of Pathologic Anatomy. This step influenced Lojda's professional occupations: in the Laboratory of Angiology he studied enzymes of blood vessel wall; the problems in gastroenterology solved at the 4th internal clinic and teaching hospital brought him to issues connected with enzyme garniture of the intestinal mucosal epithelium; his engagement at the Hlava Institute where he worked as well as house officer and later as pathology teacher caused that he subordinated his interest in enzyme garniture of various tissues to study and explanation of pathological processes using functional morphology. In years 1966 to 1975 he earned his master degree in pathology, he habilitated in pathology and was promoted to a professorship in pathology. PMID:19548603

Hach, P

2008-01-01

178

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. Nadine Foreman, M.D., August 19, 1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dr. Nadine Foreman was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Foreman was selected for interview because of the position she held at the University of California, San Francisco. Following a brief bio...

1995-01-01

179

Genetic and biochemical characteristics of the histone-like protein DR0199 in Deinococcus radiodurans.  

PubMed

Bacterial histone-like proteins are important for nucleoid structure, cell growth, DNA replication, recombination and gene regulation. In this study, we focused on the role of DR0199 (the EbfC orthologue), a newly identified member of the nucleoid-associated protein family in Deinococcus radiodurans. The survival fraction of DR0199-null mutant decreased by tenfold after treatment with 50 mM H(2)O(2), nearly sixfold at a 10 kGy dose of gamma ray and nearly eightfold at a UV exposure of 1000 J m(-2) compared with wild-type cells. The results of fluorescence labelling assays indicated that DR0199 protein localized in the nucleoid area of cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that D. radiodurans DR0199 is a DNA-binding protein. Furthermore, DNA protection assays suggested that DR0199 shields DNA from hydroxyl radical- and DNase I-mediated cleavage. The supercoiling of relaxed plasmid DNA in the presence of topoisomerase I revealed that DR0199 constrains DNA supercoils in vitro. Collectively, these findings suggest that DR0199 is a protein with DNA-protective properties and histone-like features that are involved in protecting D. radiodurans DNA from damage. PMID:22282513

Wang, Hu; Wang, Fei; Hua, Xiaoting; Ma, Tingting; Chen, Jianhui; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

2012-01-27

180

Regulation of HLA-DR peptide occupancy by histone deacetylase inhibitors.  

PubMed

Numerous molecular effects have been attributed to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI's), including the induction of major histocompatibility (MHC) genes. Here we report that one FDA approved HDACI, Vorinostat, and a second HDACI currently in clinical trials, Entinostat, reduce the ratio of class II associated invariant peptide (CLIP) to the MHC class II molecule, HLA-DR, indicating an increase in the non-CLIP peptides bound to HLA-DR. The HDACI effects are apparent with immortalized B-cells, HLA-DR constitutive melanoma cells and with melanoma cells expressing HLA-DR due to transformation with an expression vector for the HLA-DR gene co-activator, CIITA. Entinostat treatment leads to upregulation of Cathepsin L1, and the HLA-DR peptidome of the Entinostat treated cells is consistent with increased Cathepsin L1 mediated proteolysis. These results indicate that HDACI treatments may alter the HLA-DR peptidome of cells in patients and provide a way to identify novel immunogens for vaccinations and the study of autoantigens. PMID:23328677

Cronin, Kevin; Escobar, Hernando; Szekeres, Karoly; Reyes-Vargas, Eduardo; Rockwood, Alan L; Lloyd, Mark C; Delgado, Julio C; Blanck, George

2013-01-17

181

N-APP binds DR6 to cause axon pruning and neuron death via distinct caspases  

PubMed Central

Naturally-occurring axonal pruning and neuronal cell death help sculpt neuronal connections during development, but their mechanistic basis remains poorly understood. We report that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and Death Receptor 6 (DR6) activate a widespread caspase-dependent self-destruction program. DR6 is broadly expressed by developing neurons, and is required for normal cell body death and axonal pruning both in vivo and after trophic factor deprivation in vitro. Unlike neuronal cell body apoptosis, which requires caspase-3, we show that axonal degeneration requires caspase-6, which is activated in a punctate pattern that parallels the pattern of axonal fragmentation. DR6 is activated locally by an inactive surface ligand(s) that is released in active form upon trophic factor deprivation, and we identify APP as a DR6 ligand. Trophic factor deprivation triggers shedding of surface APP in a beta-secretase (BACE)-dependent manner. Loss- and gain-of-function studies support a model in which a cleaved amino-terminal fragment of APP (N-APP) binds DR6 and triggers degeneration. Genetic support is provided by a common neuromuscular junction phenotype in mutant mice. Our results indicate that APP and DR6 are components of a neuronal self-destruction pathway, and suggest that an extracellular fragment of APP, acting via DR6 and caspase-6, contributes to Alzheimer’s disease.

Nikolaev, Anatoly; McLaughlin, Todd; O'Leary, Dennis; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

2009-01-01

182

[Dr Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis- the "Leopard" from Vis].  

PubMed

Dr Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis (1845-1927) was a descendant of a respectful aristocratic family from Vis. His father was Peter Dojmi di Delupis (1809-1886), an attorney, a moderate pro-Italian autonomist, and a mayor of Vis, and his mother was Margherita Siminati. As soon as he graduated from the Medical University of Graz in 1870, he joined the Ottoman army as a physician for a two-year journey in which he reached as far as Baghdad and Basra. He left notes about this dramatic, juvenile adventure in his diaries. In 1878, he married a Viennese girl Maria Neidl and brought her home to Vis, where he got a position of municipal doctor. He had an extraordinary diagnosing acuity, great sympathy for patients, and was always willing to help, which is why he was adored by all the people of Vis, whether they agreed with his autonomist ideas or not, and soon became "the father of Vis". He was the first to warn of leprosy in Dalmatia, when he diagnosed two cases in Vis. Beside medicine and politics, he was also a passionate botanist. He was the first to seed palms in Vis and to grow a palm nursery with his agronomist son Peter Dojmi, for the whole of Dalmatia. He also tried breeding ostriches and growing Mexican coffee. He funded a small meteorological station in Vis, and planned to open a health resort with professor Schröter from Vienna. Even though Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis held the great Italian culture very dear, his vocation as a physician and humanist inclination never let him burn with the fervour of a political extremist. Thanks to his psychophysical stability, he overcame numerous difficulties in life and retained faith in people. All these traits evoke Prince Salina, the leading character of the renowned novel Il gattopardo (The Leopard) by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, which is why the author has so entitled this article "The Gattopardo of Vis". PMID:22292541

Jamnicki Dojmi, Mirko

2011-01-01

183

Structural and functional analysis of the interaction between the agonistic monoclonal antibody Apomab and the proapoptotic receptor DR5  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activation of the proapoptotic receptor death receptor5 (DR5) in various cancer cells triggers programmed cell death through the extrinsic pathway. We have generated a fully human monoclonal antibody (Apomab) that induces tumor cell apoptosis through DR5 and investigated the structural features of its interaction with DR5. Biochemical studies showed that Apomab binds DR5 tightly and selectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis of

C Adams; K Totpal; D Lawrence; S Marsters; R Pitti; S Yee; S Ross; L Deforge; H Koeppen; M Sagolla; D Compaan; H Lowman; S Hymowitz; A Ashkenazi

2008-01-01

184

Characterization of a Novel Anti-DR5 Monoclonal Antibody WD1 with the Potential to Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a TNF family member capable of inducing apoptosis. Death receptor 5 (DR 5) is a key receptor of TRAIL and plays an important role in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DR5, cDNA encoding soluble DR5 (sDR5) was firstly amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers, and then inserted into

Jing Wang; Zhou Lin; Chunxia Qiao; Ming Lv; Ming Yu; He Xiao; Qingyang Wang; Liyan Wang; Jiannan Feng; Beifen Shen; Yangfang Ma; Yan Li; Yuanfang Ma

2008-01-01

185

Developmental patterns of DR6 in normal human hippocampus and in Down syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background Death receptor 6 (DR6) is highly expressed in the human brain: it has been shown to induce axon pruning and neuron death via distinct caspases and to mediate axonal degeneration through binding to N-terminal ? amyloid precursor protein (N-APP). Methods We investigated the expression of DR6 during prenatal and postnatal development in human hippocampus and temporal cortex by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis (118 normal human brain specimens; 9 to 41 gestational weeks; 1 day to 7 months postnatally; 3 to 91 years). To investigate the role of N-APP/DR6/caspase 6 pathway in the development of hippocampal Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated pathology, we examined DR6 immunoreactivity (IR) in the developing hippocampus from patients with Down syndrome (DS; 48 brain specimens; 14 to 41 gestational weeks; 7 days to 8 months postnatally; 15 to 64 years) and in adults with DS and AD. Results DR6 was highly expressed in human adult hippocampus and temporal cortex: we observed consistent similar temporal and spatial expression in both control and DS brain. Western blot analysis of total homogenates of temporal cortex and hippocampus showed developmental regulation of DR6. In the hippocampus, DR6 IR was first apparent in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare at 16 weeks of gestation, followed by stratum oriens, radiatum, pyramidale (CA1 to CA4) and molecular layer of the dentate gyrus between 21 and 23 gestational weeks, reaching a pattern similar to adult hippocampus around birth. Increased DR6 expression in dystrophic neurites was detected focally in a 15-year-old DS patient. Abnormal DR6 expression pattern, with increased expression within dystrophic neurites in and around amyloid plaques was observed in adult DS patients with widespread AD-associated neurodegeneration and was similar to the pattern observed in AD hippocampus. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated the colocalization, in dystrophic neurites, of DR6 with APP. We also observed colocalization with hyper-phosphorylated Tau and with caspase 6 (increased in hippocampus with AD pathology) in plaque-associated dystrophic neurites and within the white matter. Conclusions These findings demonstrate a developmental regulation of DR6 in human hippocampus and suggest an abnormal activation of the N-APP/DR6/caspase 6 pathway, which can contribute to initiation or progression of hippocampal AD-associated pathology.

2013-01-01

186

Dr. John Frederick May and the identification of John Wilkes Booth's body.  

PubMed

Shortly after President Abraham Lincoln's assassin was killed on April 26, 1865, a formal inquest was held to positively identify the body. Dr. John Frederick May, a leading surgeon in the District of Columbia, was summoned to examine the remains. Two years earlier, Dr. May had removed a fibroid tumor from the back of the assassin's neck and an identifiable large ugly scar resulted when the wound inadvertently opened and healed by granulation. Based upon the recognition of the scar made by his scalpel, Dr. May made a positive identification. PMID:9793835

Spiegel, A D

1998-10-01

187

Differential expression of four protocadherin alpha and gamma clusters in the developing and adult zebrafish: DrPcdh2? but not DrPcdh1? is expressed in neuronal precursor cells, ependymal cells and non-neural epithelia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protocadherins are cadherin-like molecules with adhesive and signaling functions, in particular, during neuronal development.\\u000a Large protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters are present in the genome of vertebrates. In the zebrafish, two Pcdh clusters are\\u000a found on chromosomes 10 (DrPcdh1) and 14 (DrPcdh2), each divided into subclusters of DrPcdh? and DrPcdh? family genes. In\\u000a total, about 100 different DrPcdh molecules are predicted.

Thilo Bass; Matthias Ebert; Matthias Hammerschmidt; Marcus Frank

2007-01-01

188

The SN host galaxies in SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The wide interest of the scientific community on SNe has triggered new, deep SN searches which, in a few years have enormously increased the number of SN discoveries. Unfortunately in a lot of cases, especially in deep SN searches, identification of host galaxies and their physical properties are incorrect or even absent. To solve this problem we cross-matched Asiago Supernovae Catalogue (ASC) with the SDSS DR7 in term to directly identify SN host galaxies and create a homogeneous database with the hosts integral properties. We provide accurate coordinates, morphological type, spectral and activity classes, SDSS magnitudes, apparent diameters, axial ratios, and position angles of galaxies. All SN type classifications taken from the ASC were checked through a complete search of the literature, IAU circulars and Sternberg Astronomical Institute SNe Catalogue. Our sample consists of 3072 SNe in 2918 hosts which are located in SDSS area. For 2808 SNe (in 2654 hosts) we directly identified host galaxies, which is about 91% of our sample. From this 91% 1600 host galaxies in ASC are marked as anonymous. Identifications of most of them have been done for first time. 1038 hosts (with 1107 SNe) have nuclear SDSS spectra. Photometrical information is available for the local position of 663 SNe. Spectra from direct positions of 83 SNe are also available. Detailed morphological classification has done for 1585 hosts. We found that approximately 10% of our sample galaxies have SDSS morphological classification which is dramatically different from the ASC (mainly from RC3) and HyperLeda database. In most cases, the morphological bias can be due to the over-exposure of the high surface brightness galaxies. The creation of this homogeneous database will help to understand how the different type SNe events and their spatial distribution are correlated with the properties of the nuclei (activity class, chemistry, stellar population etc.) and global physical parameters (morphology, size, absolute magnitudes etc.) of the host galaxies and also how they interact with close and far environments properties of these galaxies, as well as minimize possible selection effects and errors which often arise when information for studied objects is selected from different sources and catalogues.

Hakobyan, A. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Petrosian, A. R.; Aramyan, L. S.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Turatto, M.

2010-06-01

189

[Dr Alexander M. Kellas and the first Mount Everest expedition].  

PubMed

In 1921 the government of Tibet gave permission for a British party to attempt Mount Everest from the northern Tibetan side. Little was known about the physiological and medical problems associated with ascents to extreme altitudes. The person who knew most about these topics was Dr. Alexander Kellas, lecturer in medical chemistry at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School. He had made a number of expeditions to the Sikkim Himal and the Tibetan border before the first world war, and had become increasingly interested in the problems caused by altitude. He was invited to join the Everest expedition but died on the approach march at Kampa Dzong on the Tibetan plateau, within sight of the mountain. Before he went on the expedition Kellas wrote an article entitled A consideration of the possibility of ascending Mt. Everest. This paper was never published, but the manuscript exists in the archives of the Royal Geographical Society and the Alpine Club in London. As Kellas saw it, the main issue was whether sufficient adaptation could occur to allow a climber to ascend from a camp at about 7,700 m to the summit (8,848 m) in one day without supplementary oxygen. His conclusion was that this was possible and, in fact, the first such ascent by Habeler and Messner in 1978 started from a camp at 7,900 m. Kellas calculated the pressure on the summit to be 251 mmHg, a more accurate figure than estimates based on the "Standard Atmosphere" Kellas estimated maximum oxygen uptake at the summit to be 970 ml/min, and the current value is thought to be about 1,070 ml/min. His estimates of the climbing rate near the summit closely parallels the rate of Habeler and Messner. Kellas had a talent for asking the right questions. He applied his considerable knowledge of physiology to the topic of high altitude, and his suggestions and recommendations were of consistently high quality. He deserves to be better known, both for his geographical surveys and for his pioneer work on high altitude medicine and acclimatisation. The 1921 expedition, after many failed attempts, discovered a possible route to the top of Mount Everest, which was used on all the summit attempts between the two world wars. The route went from Kharta, over the pass Lhakpa La, across East Rongbuk glacier and up via the north col. PMID:9148480

Hauge, A

1997-03-20

190

Letter from FDA to The Dr. Oz Show Regarding Apple Juice ...  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... The Dr. Oz Show choose to suggest that apple juice is unsafe because of the amounts of total arsenic found by EMSL Analytical, Inc.'s testing, the ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/recallsoutbreaksemergencies/safetyalertsadvisories

191

Ask Dr. Sue--Updates: Infectious Diseases, SIDS, HIV/AIDS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes new concerns about infectious diseases in childcare settings (tuberculosis, gastrointestinal infections, and lice); sleep position and SIDS; HIV/AIDS issues; and the use of sterilized sand in sand boxes. (DR)|

Aronson, Susan S.

1995-01-01

192

Description of work for 100-DR-2 Operable Unit Vadose Drilling/test pits  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the scope of work for the boreholes/test pits of the 100-DR-2 Operable Unit. Sampling and field activities include: Soil screening; geologic sampling; soil sampling (physical property); analytical sampling and depths; and geophysical logging.

Naiknimbalkar, N.

1993-08-01

193

High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / ... heavier and older, what does recent research on cholesterol and heart health tell us that Americans need ...

194

HLA-DR antigens on human macrophages from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.  

PubMed Central

The expression of HLA-DR (Ia-like) antigens on human macrophages was investigated by analyses of cells from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from 12 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, six patients with extrinsic allergic alveolitis, nine patients with cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, 11 normal non-smokers, and 12 normal smokers. The HLA-DR antigen was demonstrated by the mouse monoclonal antibody OKIa by a peroxidase-antiperoxidase method performed on glass slides. No differences were found in the percentage of alveolar macrophages that expressed DR antigens between the five study groups. OKIa positivity was observed on more than 90% of macrophages in all cases. These observations suggest that the previously reported enhanced antigen presentation by alveolar macrophages in sarcoidosis is not linked with an increase in the percentage of DR+ macrophages in the lung. Images

Costabel, U; Bross, K J; Andreesen, R; Matthys, H

1986-01-01

195

Cancer Bulletin Profile: In Their Own Words: TCGA Investigator Dr. Raju Kucherlapati  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Raju Kucherlapati, the Paul C. Cabot Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, speaks about cancer genetics and genomics, specifically the Cancer Genome Atlas project and the tools that personalized medicine may provide to detect, treat, and prevent cancer.

196

HLA-DR antigen expression on melanoma metastases and the course of the disease.  

PubMed

Melanoma cells freshly isolated from regional lymph node metastases of 59 stage II malignant melanoma patients were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence staining with monoclonal antibody TAL 1B5, detecting the HLA-DR alpha chain. The expression of HLA-A,B,C antigens, using antibody W6/32, was also investigated in 45 of these cases. There were no substantial differences in the course of the disease with respect to the percentage of positive cells. In 13 malignant melanoma patients two to four simultaneous and/or successive metastases (both locoregional and distant-subcutaneous) were analysed for HLA-DR. With simultaneous metastases (7 cases) the percentage of HLA-DR-positive cells was mostly very similar, and in no case was there more than 25% variation. As to successive metastases (9 cases) the percentage of HLA-DR-positive cells remained practically unchanged or decreased during the course of the disease. PMID:2598188

Munzarová, M; Zemanová, D; Rejthar, A; Mechl, Z; Kolcová, V

1989-01-01

197

[Life and work of Dr. Bozo Perici? (1865-1947), genius of our medicine].  

PubMed

The paper describes the life and work of on of our most distinguished physicians--Dr Bozo Perici?. Togheter with another young physician Dr Nikola Lali? the Sibenik hospital became a sort of Meca for medical people. Dr Perici? succeded to clarify an unknown disease--so called "Skrljevo disease", paved the path of to the knowledge about achinococcus etc. He published also number of valuable medical articles and books and avarded a number af aknowledgements. One of the biggest was his nomination for membership of the Supreme Haelth Council in Wienna. He contributed e lot to the medical journals, especially to the "Physician's Journal". As person of wide culture, famous linguist and polyglot Dr Perici? published the "Medical dictionary of Croatian and German Language". He lay foundation of the craniology, quite a new branch of arheology at the time. His accounts of travels, reviews on famous writers, translation of Hamlet, etc--are valuable literary works. PMID:15918326

Perovi?, Slavko; Sirovica, Stjepan

198

Mb-346: Honeywell DR4500A Truline Series HTST, STLR and ...  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... Included in the Truline DR 4500AP Series ERC for use as a Flow Recorder/Controller, is the Loss (Low Flow) of Signal and High Flow Alarm ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/guidancedocumentsregulatoryinformation

199

For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key  

MedlinePLUS

... Issues Feature: Senior Living For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key Past Issues / ... home. "Watching my children grow closer to my parents has been a blessing, and having us nearby ...

200

New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research That Benefits Everyone's Health  

MedlinePLUS

... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research ... Our goal is to advance biomedical research in new, innovative ways that will benefit everyone's health." — NIH ...

201

Cytomegalovirus and HLA-A, B, and DR locus interactions: Impact on renal transplant graft survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graft failur rates for renal transplantations performed between 1989 and 1994 and recorded in the US Renal Data System database were retrospectively evaluated for interactions between cytomegalovirus and HLA-A, B, and DR loci. Twelve significant interactions were observed. There were significantly greater risks of graft failure for the total effect of cytomegalovirus and donor or matched HLA-DR9, recipient or matched

Mark A. Schnitzler; Robert S. Woodward; Daniel C. Brennan; Donna L. Phelan; Edward L. Spitznagel; Stuart B. Boxerman; William L. Phelan; William C. Dunagan; Thomas C. Bailey

1997-01-01

202

Nitrosylcobalamin Promotes Cell Death via S Nitrosylation of Apo2L/TRAIL Receptor DR4  

PubMed Central

We have previously demonstrated that nitrosylcobalamin (NO-Cbl), an analogue of vitamin B12 that delivers nitric oxide (NO), had potent antiproliferative activity against several human cancer cell lines. NO-Cbl induced apoptosis via a death receptor/caspase-8 pathway. In this study, we demonstrate that a functional Apo2L/TRAIL receptor was necessary for the induction of cell death by NO-Cbl. Furthermore, the Apo2L/TRAIL death receptor DR4 (TRAIL R1) was S nitrosylated following NO-Cbl treatment. Human melanoma (A375), renal carcinoma (ACHN), and ovarian carcinoma (NIH-OVCAR-3) cells were treated with NO-Cbl and subjected to the biotin switch assay; S-nitrosylated DR4 was detected in all three cell lines. NO-Cbl treatment did not cause S nitrosylation of DR5. The seven cysteine residues located in the cytoplasmic domain of DR4 were individually point mutated to alanines. NIH-OVCAR-3 cells expressing the DR4 C336A mutation lacked S nitrosylation following NO-Cbl treatment. Overexpression of wild-type DR4 sensitized cells to growth inhibition by NO-Cbl. Cells expressing the DR4 C336A mutant were more resistant to NO-Cbl and Apo2L/TRAIL than were the other six C-A mutations or wild-type cells. The C336A mutant also displayed blunted caspase-8 enzymatic activity following NO-Cbl treatment compared to the other mutants. Thus, DR4 residue C336 becomes S nitrosylated and promotes apoptosis following NO-Cbl treatment.

Tang, Zhuo; Bauer, Joseph A.; Morrison, Bei; Lindner, Daniel J.

2006-01-01

203

Different HLA DR-DQ associations in subgroups of idiopathic myasthenia gravis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have investigated theHLA-DRB and -DQB gene polymorphism in 131 myasthenia gravis (MG) patients. TheHLA genotypes in these patients were assigned by means of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-definedDR-DQ haplotypes, correlating to serologic HLA class II typing. Using this technique we could, among randomly selected non-thymomatous (NT)-MG patients, confirm the strong association to DR3, and 70% of the patients were

Björn Carlsson; Johan Wallin; Ritva Pirskanen; Georg Matell; C. I. Edvard Smith

1990-01-01

204

Fully human, HLA-DR-specific monoclonal antibodies efficiently induce programmed death of malignant lymphoid cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Human Combinatorial Antibody Library (HuCAL) was screened for antibodies specific to human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) that induce programmed death of lymphoma\\/leukemia cells expressing the target antigen. The active Fab fragments were affinity-matured, and engineered to IgG4 antibodies of sub-nanomolar affinity. The antibodies exhibited potent in vitro tumoricidal activity on several lymphoma and leukemia cell lines and on chronic lymphocytic

Bernd Hubner; Corinna Löhning; Robert Rauchenberger; Silke Reiffert; Elisabeth Thomassen-Wolf; Stefan Zahn; Sigmar Leyer; Eva M. Schier; Angelika Zahradnik; Christoph Brunner; Kurt Lobenwein; Benno Rattel; Michael Stanglmaier; Michael Hallek; Mark Wing; Steve Anderson; Matt Dunn; Titus Kretzschmar; Michael Tesar; Zoltan A. Nagy

2002-01-01

205

Oral efficacy of Vero cell attenuated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus DR13 strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Vero cell attenuated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) strain, DR13, was distinguished from wild-type PEDV using restric- tion enzyme fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Cell attenuated DR13 was orally or intramuscularly (IM) administered to late-term pregnant sows, and mortality resulting from the highly virulent PEDV challenge was investigated in passively immunized suckling piglets of the two different groups. The mortality

D. S. Song; J. S. Oh; B. K. Kang; J. S. Yang; H. J. Moon; H. S. Yoo; Y. S. Jang; B. K. Park

2006-01-01

206

Oral efficacy of Vero cell attenuated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus DR13 strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Vero cell attenuated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) strain, DR13, was distinguished from wild-type PEDV using restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Cell attenuated DR13 was orally or intramuscularly (IM) administered to late-term pregnant sows, and mortality resulting from the highly virulent PEDV challenge was investigated in passively immunized suckling piglets of the two different groups. The mortality rate

D. S. Song; J. S. Oh; B. K. Kang; J. S. Yang; H. J. Moon; H. S. Yoo; Y. S. Jang; B. K. Park

2007-01-01

207

The Dr-nanos gene is essential for germ cell specification in the planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis.  

PubMed

Homologs of nanos are required for the formation and maintenance of germline stem cell (GSC) systems and for gametogenesis in many metazoans. Planarians can change their reproductive mode seasonally, alternating between asexual and sexual reproduction; they develop and maintain their somatic stem cells (SSCs) and GCSs from pluripotent stem cells known as neoblasts. We isolated a nanos homolog, Dr-nanos, from the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of the sexualized form of Dugesia ryukyuensis. We examined the expression of Dr-nanos in asexual and sexualized planarians by in situ hybridization and analyzed its function using RNA interference (RNAi) together with a planarian sexualization assay. A nanos homolog, Dr-nanos, was identified in the planarian D. ryukyuensis. Dr-nanos expression was observed in the ovarian primordial cells of the asexual worms. This expression increased in proportion to sexualization and was localized in the early germline cells of the ovaries and testes. In X-ray-irradiated worms, the expression of Dr-nanos decreased to a large extent, indicating that Dr-nanos is expressed in some subpopulations of stem cells, especially in GSCs. During the sexualization process, worms in which Dr-nanos was knocked down by RNAi exhibited decreased numbers of oogonia in the ovaries and failed to develop testes, whereas the somatic sexual organs were not affected. We conclude that Dr-nanos is essential for the development of germ cells in the ovaries and testes and may have a function in the early stages of germ cell specification, but not in the development of somatic sexual organs. PMID:22451004

Nakagawa, Haruka; Ishizu, Hirotsugu; Chinone, Ayako; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Midori

2012-01-01

208

[Dr. Torafumi Okuyama, naval medical officer and the author of the dictionaries of medical terms].  

PubMed

Dr. Genryo Torafumi Okuyama, the second son of Dr. Genchu Okuyama of the Kaminoyama clan, was born on Dec. 4th, 1847. His elder brother Dr. Toraakira Okuyama was promoted to Dai Ikan (Senior Captain), the highest rank of medical officer in the Japanese Navy, and rendered distinguished services in the establishment of the naval medical systematization in the early Meiji era. Dr. Trafumi Okuyama, who was appointed as medical officer of the Yokohama army Hospital and transferred to Daibyoin in Edo, was engaged in medical treatment of injured soldiers during the Boshin-war in 1868. He went to Kagoshima with William Willis and as one of the founders of the Kagoshima Medical school, gave students education there. He resigned his naval position in 1874, when he was Dai Gun I (Senior Leutenant) and died at the age of 41 in April 16th 1887. Dr. Torafumi Okuyama compiled A medical vocabulary in English and Japanese ("Igo Ruizyu") and Deutsch-Japanisches Hand-Wörterbuch für Medizin ("Dokuwa Igaku Ziten) and published "Koen Hikki", the translation of the lectures by Dr. Edwin Wheeler. PMID:11618875

Fukase, Y

1996-03-01

209

The structure of HLA-DR52c: Comparison to other HLA-DRB3 alleles  

SciTech Connect

Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules present antigens to CD4{sup +} T cells. In addition to the most commonly studied human MHCII isotype, HLA-DR, whose {beta} chain is encoded by the HLA-DRB1 locus, several other isotypes that use the same {alpha} chain but have {beta} chains encoded by other genes. These other DR molecules also are expressed in antigen-presenting cells and are known to participate in peptide presentation to T cells and to be recognized as alloantigens by other T cells. Like some of the HLA-DRB1 alleles, several of these alternate DR molecules have been associated with specific autoimmune diseases and T cell hypersensitivity. Here we present the structure of an HLA-DR molecule (DR52c) containing one of these alternate {beta} chains (HLA-DRB3*0301) bound to a self-peptide derived from the Tu elongation factor. The molecule shares structurally conserved elements with other MHC class II molecules but has some unique features in the peptide-binding groove. Comparison of the three major HLA-DBR3 alleles (DR52a, b, and c) suggests that they were derived from one another by recombination events that scrambled the four major peptide-binding pockets at peptide positions 1, 4, 6, and 9 but left virtually no polymorphisms elsewhere in the molecules.

Dai, Shaodong; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W. (HHMI)

2008-09-05

210

The life and contribution of Dr. Ronald Gitelman: a pioneer of modern chiropractic science  

PubMed Central

Objective: The life and contribution to chiropractic science of Dr. Ronald Gitelman is reviewed. Methods: Sources for this article included review of the notes prepared by Dr. Joseph Keating in his “biography” of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); review of the important articles published by Dr. Gitelman; review of the important projects undertaken by him along with various colleagues; notes from reminiscences obtained from many of these colleagues and discussions with his family. Discussion: Dr. Gitelman’s academic career spanned from 1963 to the late 1980’s. During that time, he made foundational contributions to the development of chiropractic science including: developing the Archives (1974), the first collection of scientific articles supporting chiropractic science (which was subsequently published as the Chiropractic Archives Research Collection (CRAC)); delivering one of the few chiropractic papers at the seminal NINCDS conference (1975) and, developing the collaboration between CMCC and Dr. Kirkaldy-Willis at the University of Saskatoon (1976). He practiced in Toronto from 1961 to 2007. Summary: Dr. Gitelman was a pioneer in the development of chiropractic science. He died on October 7, 2012.

Vernon, Howard

2013-01-01

211

Measurement of iron L-shell dielectronic recombination (DR) rates for X-ray photoionized nebulae: Fe XVIII and Fe XIX Delta n=0 DR  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an X-ray photoionized nebula (XPN) the ionization structure is driven by photoionization balanced by radiative recombination (RR) and DR; and the electron temperature at which an ion is formed is far below the temperature at which the ion would exist in coronal equilibrium. (Kallman et al.), Astrophys. J. 465, 994 (1996). (Arnaud, M. and Raymond, J., Astrophys. J. 398),

D. W. Savin; S. M. Kahn; J. Linkemann; A. A. Saghiri; M. Schmitt; A. Wolf; T. Bartsch; A. Müller; S. Schippers; M. H. Chen

1997-01-01

212

Redundancy in Antigen-Presenting Function of the HLA-DR and -DQ Molecules in the Multiple Sclerosis-Associated HLA-DR2 Haplotype1  

PubMed Central

The three HLA class II alleles of the DR2 haplotype, DRB1*1501, DRB5*0101, and DQB1*0602, are in strong linkage disequilibrium and confer most of the genetic risk to multiple sclerosis. Functional redundancy in Ag presentation by these class II molecules would allow recognition by a single TCR of identical peptides with the different restriction elements, facilitating T cell activation and providing one explanation how a disease-associated HLA haplotype could be linked to a CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Using combinatorial peptide libraries and B cell lines expressing single HLA-DR/DQ molecules, we show that two of five in vivo-expanded and likely disease-relevant, cross-reactive cerebrospinal fluid-infiltrating T cell clones use multiple disease-associated HLA class II molecules as restriction elements. One of these T cell clones recognizes >30 identical foreign and human peptides using all DR and DQ molecules of the multiple sclerosis-associated DR2 haplotype. A T cell signaling machinery tuned for efficient responses to weak ligands together with structural features of the TCR-HLA/peptide complex result in this promiscuous HLA class II restriction.

Sospedra, Mireia; Muraro, Paolo A.; Stefanova, Irena; Zhao, Yingdong; Chung, Katherine; Li, Yili; Giulianotti, Marc; Simon, Richard; Mariuzza, Roy; Pinilla, Clemencia; Martin, Roland

2009-01-01

213

The effect of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor beta-1 on HLA-DR expression in colonic epithelial cells.  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to assess whether interleukin-10 (IL-10) and/or transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta1) downregulate HLA-DR expression using the HT29 cell line as a model of colonic epithelial cells. HLA-DR expression was induced in HT29 cells with gamma-interferon. The effects of IL-10 alone, TGFbeta1 alone, and IL-10 and TGFbeta1 in combination were studied. HLA-DR expression was assessed using flow cytometric analysis. Gamma-interferon induced HLA-DR expression in a dose-dependent fashion. In the absence of gamma-interferon, neither IL-10 nor TGFbeta1 induced HLA-DR expression. In isolation, neither IL-10 nor TGFbeta1 downregulated HLA-DR expression. When IL-10 and TGFbeta1 were added in combination, small (6-30%) statistically significant reductions in HLA-DR expression were seen. The biological significance is unclear.

Zimmerman, M J; Radford-Smith, G R; Jewell, D P

1998-01-01

214

Potentiation by thyroid hormone of human IFN-gamma-induced HLA-DR expression.  

PubMed

We have investigated the mechanism by which thyroid hormone potentiates IFN-gamma-induced HLA-DR expression. IFN-gamma-induced HLA-DR expression requires activation of STAT1alpha and induction of the Class II trans-activator, CIITA. HeLa and CV-1 cells treated only with L-thyroxine (T4) demonstrated increased tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (= activation) of STAT1alpha; this hormone effect on signal transduction, and T4 potentiation of IFN-gamma-induced HLA-DR expression, were blocked by the inhibitors CGP 41251 (PKC) and genistein (tyrosine kinase). Treatment of cells with T4-agarose also caused activation of STAT1alpha. In the presence of IFN-gamma, T4 enhanced cytokine-induced STAT1alpha activation. Potentiation by T4 of IFN-gamma action was associated with increased mRNA for both CIITA and HLA-DR, with peak enhancement at 16 h (CIITA), and 2 d (HLA-DR). T4 increased IFN-gamma-induced HLA-DR protein 2.2-fold and HLA-DR mRNA fourfold after 2 d. Treatment with actinomycin D after induction of HLA-DR mRNA with IFN-gamma, with or without T4, showed that thyroid hormone decreased the t(1/2) of mRNA from 2.4 to 1.1 h. HeLa and CV-1 cells lack functional nuclear thyroid hormone receptor. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and 3,5,3'-triiodo-thyroacetic acid (triac) blocked T4 potentiation of IFN-gamma-induced HLA-DR expression and T4 activation of STAT1alpha. These studies define an early hormone recognition step at the cell surface that is novel, distinct from nuclear thyroid hormone receptor, and blocked by tetrac and triac. Thus, thyroid hormone potentiation of IFN-gamma-induced HLA-DR transcription is mediated by a cell membrane hormone binding site, enhanced activation of STAT1alpha, and increased CIITA induction. PMID:9670962

Lin, H Y; Martino, L J; Wilcox, B D; Davis, F B; Gordinier, J K; Davis, P J

1998-07-15

215

Cutting Edge: Responder T Cells Regulate Human DR+ Effector Regulatory T Cell Activity via Granzyme1  

PubMed Central

MHC class II expression identifies an effector subset of human CD4+CD25highFoxP3high natural regulatory T cells (DR+ Tregs) that induces more rapid suppression and exhibits higher FoxP3 expression than the remaining Treg population. Although Tregs are known to be highly sensitive to apoptosis, in this study we demonstrate that this sensitivity is primarily a feature of DR+ Tregs. Granzyme B (GzmB) is strongly expressed by nonregulatory responder CD4 T cells, whereas effector DR+ Tregs express little GzmB. Strong TCR stimulation markedly increases the expression of GzmB in all dividing responder CD4 T cells and mitigates the suppression by DR+ Tregs. DR+ Treg suppressive activity reemerges if GzmB is neutralized. We show that responder cells actively kill effector Tregs by producing GzmB in response to strong TCR stimulation. Thus, the production of GzmB by strongly activated CD4 T cells represents a mechanism by which CD4 T cells resist Treg suppression.

Ashley, Charles W.; Baecher-Allan, Clare

2010-01-01

216

Langerhans cells in prurigo nodularis investigated by HLA-DR and S-100 immunofluorescence double staining.  

PubMed

The Langerhans cell is one of the antigen-presenting cells in the immune system. To study the presence of cutaneous Langerhans cells in prurigo nodularis, age- and sex-matched prurigo nodularis patients and healthy volunteer skin biopsies were investigated by an HLA-DR and S-100 immunohistochemical double staining method. The results showed that the HLA-DR- and S-100-immunoreactive (IR) Langerhans cells were altered in prurigo nodularis epidermis and dermis. The number of epidermal Langerhans cells in the prurigo nodularis patients was decreased in five and increased in two cases. In the dermis, the HLA-DR- and S-100-IR cells were apparently more numerous than in the controls. In the involved skin there were also more S-100-IR coarse nerve fibres in the dermis as compared to controls. The results indicate that dermal Langerhans cells (HLA-DR and S-100 double-labeled) as well as other dermal HLA-DR- and S-100-IR dendritic cells, but most likely not epidermal Langerhans cells, may be critically involved in the development or persistence of prurigo nodularis. PMID:9651825

Johansson, O; Liang, Y; Heilborn, J D; Marcusson, J A

1998-05-01

217

Dr. Walter C. McCrone--his contributions to environmental microscopy.  

PubMed

This paper briefly highlights Dr. McCrone's contributions to the recently emerging field of forensic environmental microscopy. Few, if any, criminalists are not familiar with Dr. Walter C. McCrone's voluminous contributions to the field of forensic microscopy and the analyses of micro and ultra micro transfer (trace) evidence. Dr. McCrone was renowned for his life long efforts in promoting the application of the Polarized Light Microscope (PLM) to problem solving. It is therefore not surprising that Dr. McCrone would also apply his analytical and deductive skills employing the PLM to problems in environmental analysis. He is well known for his many publications dealing with the analysis of asbestos and asbestos like materials by PLM. His philosophy of presenting intense professional training courses stressing the practical applications of the PLM carried over to a series of courses offered to students requiring education in other areas of microscopical analysis. Through McCrone Research Institute, Dr. McCrone can be said to have been responsible for the training of a large majority of microscopists who literally analyzed tens of millions of samples. These analyses were performed utilizing methodologies developed predominately by him and adopted by regulatory agencies in the United States and abroad. The methods he fostered are a major part of the arsenal of microscopical techniques employed by forensic environmental microscopists in their efforts to identify a manufacturer of an insulation product for the purpose of litigation. PMID:15027546

Kubic, Thomas A

2004-03-01

218

50th anniversary of the discovery of ibuprofen: an interview with Dr Stewart Adams.  

PubMed

2011 marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of ibuprofen. This article is a focus on the personal reflections and career of Dr Stewart Adams OBE, the scientist whose research lead to the discovery of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor. When Dr Adams discovered ibuprofen, he was working as a pharmacologist in the Research Department for the Boots Pure Drug Company Ltd. Dr Adams was assigned to work on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chose in 1953 to search for a drug that would be effective in RA but would not be a corticosteroid. He was one of the first workers in this field that later became known as NSAIDs (Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs). In 1961, Dr Adams with John Nicholson, the organic chemist, filed a patent for the compound 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid, later to become one of the most successful NSAIDs in the modern world, ibuprofen. In this article, Dr Adams gives his modest insight into the early stages and initial observations which led to this world-wide success. PMID:22098129

Halford, Gayle M; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Watson, Steve P

2011-11-18

219

Human collagen II peptide 256-271 preferentially binds to HLA-DR molecules associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

The binding ability of 23 overlapping peptides, all derived from the CB11 fragment of CII, was tested on several HLA-DR molecules associated or not with disease susceptibility. These experiments were performed on a variety of cells expressing different HLA-DR molecules, using both indirect and direct binding assays. The CII (256-271) fragment was shown to bind to a restricted population among which the HLA-DR molecules associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. The results also clearly indicate that the binding specificity of CII (256-271), among the DR4 molecules, is controlled by the nature of the HLA-DR molecule beta-chain residues 71 and 74, residues previously shown by X-ray crystallography to be involved in the HLA-DR/peptide interaction. The human CII (256-271) peptide is thus likely to play a role in the disease process. PMID:9811967

Diab, B Y; Lambert, N C; L'Faqihi, F E; Loubet-Lescoulié, P; de Préval, C; Coppin, H

1999-01-01

220

Autopsy radiography: digital radiographs (DR) vs multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in high-velocity gunshot-wound victims.  

PubMed

This study compared full-body digital radiography (DR) with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the postmortem evaluation of gunshot wound (GSW) victims. Thirteen consecutive male GSW victims (mean age, 27 years) had full-body DR and MDCT prior to routine autopsy. DR successfully identified all metallic fragments, but MDCT was superior in its ability to precisely determine location because it provided 3-dimensional anatomic localization. In all cases, MDCT more accurately assessed organ injuries and wound tracks. Both DR and MDCT are limited in classifying multiple wounds and major vessel injury, but MDCT is generally superior to DR. MDCT shows significant advantages over DR in the forensic evaluation of GSW victims. This is particularly advantageous for the pathologist retrieving metallic fragments and for describing fracture detail accurately. Use of MDCT instead of radiographs will require medical examiners to become familiar with reading cross-sectional images. PMID:17325457

Harcke, H Theodore; Levy, Angela D; Abbott, Robert M; Mallak, Craig T; Getz, John M; Champion, Howard R; Pearse, Lisa

2007-03-01

221

HLA-DM Interactions with Intermediates in HLA-DR Maturation and a Role for HLA-DM in Stabilizing Empty HLA-DR Molecules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cell lines which lack HLA-DM ex- pression accumulate class II molecules associated with residual invariant (I) chain fragments (class II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP)). In vitro, HLA-DM catalyzes CLIP dissoci- ation from class II-CLIP complexes, promoting binding of antigenic peptides. Here the physi- cal interaction of HLA-DM with HLA-DR molecules was investigated. HLA-DM

Lisa K. Denzin; Craig Hammond; Peter Cresswell

222

The conviction of Dr. Crippen: new forensic findings in a century-old murder.  

PubMed

Dr. Hawley Crippen was accused and convicted of murdering his wife in London in 1910. Key to the conviction was microscopic analysis of remains found in the Crippen's coal cellar, which were identified as Cora Crippen based on a scar she was said to have. Dr. Crippen was hanged, always proclaiming his innocence. In this study, genealogical research was used to locate maternal relatives of Cora Crippen, and their mitochondrial haplotypes were determined. Next, one of the pathology slides of the scar was obtained, DNA was isolated, and the haplotype was determined. That process was then repeated. Finally, both DNA isolates were assayed for repetitive elements on autosomes and repetitive elements specific to the Y chromosome. Based on the genealogical and mitochondrial DNA research, the tissue on the pathology slide used to convict Dr. Crippen was not that of Cora Crippen. Moreover, that tissue was male in origin. PMID:20735704

Foran, David R; Wills, Beth E; Kiley, Brianne M; Jackson, Carrie B; Trestrail, John H

2010-08-23

223

RELATING BOTTOM QUARK MASS IN DR-BAR AND MS-BAR REGULARIZATION SCHEMES  

SciTech Connect

The value of the bottom quark mass at Q = M{sub Z} in the {ovr DR} scheme is an important input for the analysis of supersymmetric models with a large value of tan {beta}. Conventionally, however, the running bottom quark mass extracted from experimental data is quoted in the {ovr MS} scheme at the scale Q = m{sub b}. We describe a two loop procedure for the conversion of the bottom quark mass from {ovr MS} to {ovr DR} scheme. The Particle Data Group value m{sub b}{sup {ovr MS}} (m{sub b}{sup {ovr MS}}) = 4.2 {+-} 0.2 GeV corresponds to a range of 2.65-3.03 GeV for m{sub b}{sup {ovr DR}} (M{sub Z}).

Melnikov, Kirill

2002-08-08

224

Esculetin enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through DR5 upregulation in human oral cancer SAS cells.  

PubMed

Esculetin has been shown to selectively induce tumor apoptosis in several types of cancers and is regarded as a promising chemotherapeutic agent. In this study, we showed that esculetin significantly suppressed the growth of oral cancer SAS cells in a dose-dependent manner. DNA content flow cytometry and TUNEL assay revealed that esculetin induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Western blotting showed esculetin increased DR5 protein expression and activated caspase-8, which differed from previous studies conducted in other cell types. Furthermore, treatment with esculetin significantly increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in SAS cells and the TRAIL-sensitizing effect was blocked by DR5/Fc chimera protein. Our results indicate that esculetin enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis primarily through upregulation of DR5. Combination of esculetin and TRAIL may be a novel treatment strategy for oral cancers. PMID:19720557

Kok, Sang-Heng; Yeh, Cheng-Chang; Chen, Mei-Ling; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping

2009-08-31

225

Magnetic Field Structure revealed through CO polarization in Massive Star-Forming Region DR21(OH)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present linear polarization detections of CO (3-2) line and the inferred magnetic field structure toward DR21(OH). The data is part of the SMA Legacy Project - "Filament, Magnetic Fields, and Star Formation" which is aiming at imaging dust and CO polarization at 345 GHz for a large sample of massive filaments. Our new results of CO polarizations toward DR21(OH) are in general consistent with previous BIMA results (Lai et al. 2003), but provide more detailed magnetic field structure up to 1" resolution. The CO polarizations are strongly detected and coherent in all outflow features, suggesting that the interplay between magnetic fields and outflows are important in shaping the outflow structure in DR21(OH).

Lai, S.-P.

2013-06-01

226

Who's Who and What's What in the Books of Dr. Seuss  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Theodor Seuss Geisel (better known as Dr. Seuss) was a member of Dartmouth's Class of 1925, so it makes sense that this wonderful digital project on his work and creations is based at that fine institution. In 2000, this compilation of "who's who & what's what" in the books of Dr. Seuss was created by Edward Connery Lathem and recently, the Dartmouth Digital Library Initiatives digitized this unique guide through the world of Dr. Suess. The digital user interface is simple to use and user-friendly. Visitors can select certain pages to share with friends via email, search for certain terms (like "Lorax") and also create a full-screen view for closer scrutiny.

Lathem, Edward C.

227

Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A Induces Small Clusters of HLA-DR1 on B Cells  

PubMed Central

The superantigen SEA causes non-specific hyperactivation of T and B cells at low concentrations. Studies of mutants or soluble proteins suggest SEA is bivalent for its ligand, MHC class II. However, the interaction between these molecules on intact cells is unknown. On primary mouse B cells expressing the MHC class II allele HLA-DR1, measurements of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between HLA-DR1 molecules on SEA-treated cells indicated specific clustering, not observed in untreated or monovalent superantigen treated cells. Tomographic visualization and electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled SEA-treated B cells revealed small clusters of surface HLA-DR1 (?4 gold labels). These results present direct visual evidence of SEA-mediated clustering of MHC class II molecules on treated antigen presenting cells, and provide a new structural approach to addressing problems of this nature.

Narayan, Kedar; Perkins, Edward M.; Murphy, Gavin E.; Dalai, Sarat K.; Edidin, Michael; Subramaniam, Sriram; Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

2009-01-01

228

Raman microscopy based on doubly-resonant four-wave mixing (DR-FWM).  

PubMed

Doubly-resonant four-wave mixing (DR-FWM) is a nondegenerate four-wave mixing process in which four photons interact to coherently probe two distinct Raman resonances. We demonstrate DR-FWM microscopy as a label-free and nondestructive molecular imaging modality with high chemical specificity on the submicron scale by imaging alkyne-substituted oleic acid in both aqueous and lipid-rich environments. DR-FWM microscopy is contrasted to coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and it is shown that the coherent addition of two simultaneously probed Raman resonances leads to a significant increase in signal without increasing the non-resonant background. Thus, this scheme enables the detection of weak Raman signals through amplification by a strong Raman resonance, potentially increasing the overall detection sensitivity beyond what has been demonstrated by either CARS or stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). PMID:19770922

Weeks, Tyler; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Huser, Thomas

2009-09-14

229

Pathogenic human thyroglobulin peptides in HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse model of autoimmune thyroiditis.  

PubMed

To identify pathogenic epitopes on human thyroglobulin (hTg), a homodimer of 660kDa, we have applied a computer-based algorithm to predict potential HLA-DR3-binding peptides and have tested them in DR3-transgenic mice. Of the 39 peptides selected, four stimulated a proliferative response from hTg-primed cells of DR3+ mice, but not DQ8+ mice. Of the four peptides, one, hTg2079, was consistently pathogenic. Thyroiditis was not only produced by adoptive transfer of hTg-primed, hTg2079-activated cells but also by direct immunization with the peptide. These results demonstrate the utility of using this computer-based algorithm with synthetic peptides to help identify pathogenic T cell epitopes on hTg. PMID:15474522

Flynn, Jeffrey C; McCormick, Daniel J; Brusic, Vladimir; Wan, Qiang; Panos, John C; Giraldo, Alvaro A; David, Chella S; Kong, Yi-chi M

2004-06-01

230

The structure of an intermediate in class II MHC maturation: CLIP bound to HLA-DR3  

Microsoft Academic Search

A complex between HLA-DR3 and a fragment of invariant chain called CLIP was isolated from a human cell line defective in antigen presentation and its X-ray crystal structure determined. Previous data indicate that this complex is an intermediate in class II histocompatibility maturation, occurring between invariant chain-DR3 and antigenic peptide-DR3 complexes. The structure shows that the CLIP fragment binds to

Partho Ghosh; Miguel Amaya; Elizabeth Mellins; Don C. Wiley

1995-01-01

231

T-cell activation in HLA-B8,DR3-positive individuals early antigen expression defect in vitro  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HLA-B8,DR3 haplotype is overrepresented in several autoimmune diseases, implying that genes predisposing to these disorders are linked to this haplotype. In the patients affected by these diseases, as well as in healthy HLA-B8,DR3 individuals, various dysfunctions reflecting an impairment of T-cell activation have been found. To better characterize T-cell impairment of HLA-B8,DR3-positive healthy individuals, we analyzed the surface expression

Giuseppina Candore; Diego Cigna; Matilde Todaro; Ruggero De Maria; Giorgio Stassi; Carla Giordano; Calogero Caruso

1995-01-01

232

HLA-DR as a marker for increased risk for systemic inflammation and septic complications after cardiac surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study investigated the predictive value of a decrease in monocyte HLA-DR expression as an early marker for postoperative SIRS and septic complications. We hypothesized that decreased HLA-DR levels in the first 24 h after cardiac surgery is not related to postoperative SIRS\\/sepsis. We also compared HLA-DR levels of patients with postoperative complications to those with an uncomplicated course.Design and settingProspective

Wolfgang Oczenski; Herbert Krenn; Ruth Jilch; Herbert Watzka; Ferdinand Waldenberger; Ursula Köller; Sylvia Schwarz; Robert D. Fitzgerald

2003-01-01

233

Modeling the Ternary Complex TCR-Vbeta\\/CollagenII(261-273)\\/HLA-DR4 Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIt is known that genetic predisposition to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with the MHC class II allele HLA-DR4 and that residues 261–273 of type II collagen (huCollp261) represent an immunodominant T cell epitope restricted by the DR4 molecule. Despite recent advances in characterization of MHC and T cell receptor (TCR) contacts to this epitope, the atomic details of TCR\\/huCollp261\\/HLA-DR4

Maria Cristina de Rosa; Bruno Giardina; Caterina Bianchi; Cristiana Carelli Alinovi; Davide Pirolli; Gianfranco Ferraccioli; Maria de Santis; Gabriele di Sante; Francesco Ria; Anna Kristina Croft

2010-01-01

234

Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production using waste vegetable oil by Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2.  

PubMed

To produce polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from inexpensive substrates by bacteria, vegetable-oil-degrading bacteria were isolated from a rice field using enrichment cultivation. The isolated Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 showed clear orange or red spots of accumulated PHA granules when grown on phosphate and nitrogen limited medium containing vegetable oil as the sole carbon source and stained with Nile blue A. Up to 37.34% (w/w) of intracellular PHA was produced from corn oil, which consisted of three major 3-hydroxyalkanoates; octanoic (C8:0, 37.75% of the total 3-hydroxyalkanoate content of PHA), decanoic (C10:0, 36.74%), and dodecanoic (C12:0, 11.36%). Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated up to 23.52% (w/w) of PHAMCL from waste vegetable oil. The proportion of 3- hydroxyalkanoate of the waste vegetable-oil-derived PHA [hexanoic (5.86%), octanoic (45.67%), decanoic (34.88%), tetradecanoic (8.35%), and hexadecanoic (5.24%)] showed a composition ratio different from that of the corn-oil-derived PHA. Strain DR2 used three major fatty acids in the same ratio, and linoleic acid was the major source of PHA production. Interestingly, the production of PHA in Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 could not occur in either acetate- or butyrate-amended media. Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated a greater amount of PHA than other well-studied strains (Chromobacterium violaceum and Ralstonia eutropha H16) when grown on vegetable oil. The data showed that Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 was capable of producing PHA from waste vegetable oil. PMID:18756101

Song, Jin Hwan; Jeon, Che Ok; Choi, Mun Hwan; Yoon, Sung Chul; Park, Woojun

2008-08-01

235

On the exoneration of Dr. William H. Stewart: debunking an urban legend  

PubMed Central

Background It is one of the most infamous quotes in the history of biomedicine: “It is time to close the book on infectious diseases, and declare the war against pestilence won.” Long attributed to the United States Surgeon General, Dr. William H. Stewart (1965-1969), the statement is frequently used as a foil by scientific and lay authors to underscore the ever-increasing problems of antibiotic-resistant and emerging infections. However, the primary source for the quote has never been identified. Methods We undertook a comprehensive search of multiple databases encompassing medical literature, news articles, and congressional records to attempt to identify sources for the quote. Results No source of the quote was identified. However, a trail of source documents was identified that clearly serves as the basis for subsequent, incorrect attribution of the quote to Dr. Stewart. In multiple source documents, Dr. Stewart made statements to the opposite effect, clearly recognizing that infectious diseases had not been conquered. The urban legend was created by a combination of lack of primary witnesses to the originating speech, misunderstanding of points made by Dr. Stewart in the speech, and increasing societal concern about emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Conclusions Attribution to Dr. Stewart of a belief that it was time to close the book on infectious diseases is an urban legend; he never made any such statement. Numerous other verifiable sources, however, confirm that other people in academia adopted this belief. Dr. Stewart should no longer be cited in this regard, and should be replaced with verifiable sources.

2013-01-01

236

Association between risk for pre-eclampsia and HLA DR4  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Kilpatrick and colleagues report results of a family study showing an association between HLA DR4 and mild and proteinuric pre-eclampsia in a British (Edinburgh) maternal population. Among 76 parous sisters of women with protein uric pre-eclampsia, they found that sisters with pregnancy-induced hypertension (pre-eclampsia with or without proteinuria) had a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen than did normotensive sisters. In addition, they cited unpublished findings in which they found a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen in a large sample of pre-eclamptic women and their babies than in appropriate controls. The authors have completed a study of HLA antigens and pregnancy outcome among a coherent of 715 black (50.9%) and white (49.1%) primigravida who were delivered at a medical center in southern USA. HLA DR typing was done by the one-color fluorescence technique with reagents. On the basis of standard criteria for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, 6.9 of the cohort had mild non-proteinuric pre-eclampsia, 8.8% had pregnancy-induced hypertension, and 9.5% had combined pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Whereas black women had higher rates than white women in all three clinical categories (eg, pregnancy-induced hypertension 10.7% vs 6.8%, respectively), differences were not significant and frequencies of HLA DR4 antigen were higher among normotensives in both races (results not shown). They therefore pooled the two racial groups for analyses.

Not Available

1990-03-17

237

Different HLA DR-DQ associations in subgroups of idiopathic myasthenia gravis.  

PubMed

We have investigated the HLA-DRB and -DQB gene polymorphism in 131 myasthenia gravis (MG) patients. The HLA genotypes in these patients were assigned by means of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-defined DR-DQ haplotypes, correlating to serologic HLA class II typing. Using this technique we could, among randomly selected non-thymomatous (NT)-MG patients, confirm the strong association to DR3, and 70% of the patients were found to carry a specific DR3-positive DR-DQ haplotype, T-3.1. Furthermore, an analysis of T-3.1- NT-MG patients revealed that 59% were T-4.1+ (DR4, DQw8). Thymic hyperplasia was found in approximately 85% of the T-3.1+, as well as of the T-4.1+/3.1- patients. As previously observed, we found a clear dominance of females among the T-3.1+ NT-MG patients. However, among T-4.1+/3.1- patients, males were as common as females. Furthermore, the T-4.1+ patients were significantly older at the onset of disease than those who were T-3.1+. In female MG patients, the DRw15-Dw2-positive haplotype T-2.1 was strongly correlated with the presence of thymoma (T-MG). These data indicate that the HLA associations in early vs late onset of NT-MG are different, and that female patients with and without thymoma differ from each other with regard to HLA markers. Thus, at least three different HLA DR-DQ associations are found in subgroups of idiopathic MG. PMID:1973409

Carlsson, B; Wallin, J; Pirskanen, R; Matell, G; Smith, C I

1990-01-01

238

The medical ethics of the 'father of gynaecology', Dr J Marion Sims.  

PubMed Central

Vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) was a common ailment among American women in the 19th century. Prior to that time, no successful surgery had been developed for the cure of this condition until Dr J Marion Sims perfected a successful surgical technique in 1849. Dr Sims used female slaves as research subjects over a four-year period of experimentation (1845-1849). This paper discusses the controversy surrounding his use of powerless women and whether his actions were acceptable during that historical period.

Ojanuga, D

1993-01-01

239

Coexpression of Aspartic Proteinases and Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR in Human Transplanted Lung  

PubMed Central

Aspartic proteinases have recently been shown to be implicated in antigen processing. We explored the expression of two aspartic proteinases, cathepsins E and D, and of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) molecules in a consecutive series of 80 transbronchial biopsies from transplanted lungs. For controls, we studied five normal donor lungs (not suitable for transplantation on account of thoracic trauma) and macroscopically normal areas of three cancer-affected lungs. Two of the five unsuitable donor lungs showed minimal inflammatory changes. Macroscopically normal samples from the three cancerous lungs showed mild and focal inflammatory infiltrates. In histologically normal lungs, HLA-DR expression was limited to professional antigenpresenting cells. Macroscopically normal lung samples with minimal inflammatory changes from both donor and cancer lungs showed variable HLA-DR expression by alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells and by endothelial cells. All transplanted lung biopsies showed HLA-DR expression by epithelial (alveolar and bronchial) and endothelial cells, with a trend for increased positivity in acute rejection. Cathepsin E was restricted to Clara and to rare bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue-related epithelial cells in histologically normal lung samples, whereas minimal de novo cathepsin E expression by rare alveolar pneumocytes was noted in control lung samples exhibiting minimal inflammatory changes. In all transplanted lung biopsies, cathepsin E was diffusely expressed de novo by hyperplastic alveolar epithelial cells, regardless of the presence or degree of rejection. Cathepsin D was expressed only by alveolar macrophages and by ciliated bronchial cells of normal, minimally inflamed, and transplanted lungs. In transplanted lung, Clara cells and several hyperplastic alveolar pneumocytes coexpressed HLA-DR and cathepsin E, whereas all alveolar macrophages and a few ciliated cells coexpressed cathepsin D and HLA-DR The present investigation suggests that the de novo expression of cathepsin E and HLA-DR by hyperplastic alveolar pneumocytes of transplanted lung may be crucial for antigen processing and presentation to recipient competent T cells, and thus for the triggering of the immune-inflammatory cascade that leads to rejection. ImagesFigure 5Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6

Arbustini, Eloisa; Morbini, Patrizia; Diegoli, Marta; Grasso, Maurizia; Fasani, Roberta; Vitulo, Patrizio; Fiocca, Roberto; Cremaschi, Paolo; Volpato, Gino; Martinelli, Luigi; Vigano, Mario; Samloff, I Michael; Solcia, Enrico

1994-01-01

240

Coexpression of aspartic proteinases and human leukocyte antigen-DR in human transplanted lung.  

PubMed

Aspartic proteinases have recently been shown to be implicated in antigen processing. We explored the expression of two aspartic proteinases, cathepsins E and D, and of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) molecules in a consecutive series of 80 transbronchial biopsies from transplanted lungs. For controls, we studied five normal donor lungs (not suitable for transplantation on account of thoracic trauma) and macroscopically normal areas of three cancer-affected lungs. Two of the five unsuitable donor lungs showed minimal inflammatory changes. Macroscopically normal samples from the three cancerous lungs showed mild and focal inflammatory infiltrates. In histologically normal lungs, HLA-DR expression was limited to professional antigen-presenting cells. Macroscopically normal lung samples with minimal inflammatory changes from both donor and cancer lungs showed variable HLA-DR expression by alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells and by endothelial cells. All transplanted lung biopsies showed HLA-DR expression by epithelial (alveolar and bronchial) and endothelial cells, with a trend for increased positivity in acute rejection. Cathepsin E was restricted to Clara and to rare bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue-related epithelial cells in histologically normal lung samples, whereas minimal de novo cathepsin E expression by rare alveolar pneumocytes was noted in control lung samples exhibiting minimal inflammatory changes. In all transplanted lung biopsies, cathepsin E was diffusely expressed de novo by hyperplastic alveolar epithelial cells, regardless of the presence or degree of rejection. Cathepsin D was expressed only by alveolar macrophages and by ciliated bronchial cells of normal, minimally inflamed, and transplanted lungs. In transplanted lung, Clara cells and several hyperplastic alveolar pneumocytes coexpressed HLA-DR and cathepsin E, whereas all alveolar macrophages and a few ciliated cells coexpressed cathepsin D and HLA-DR. The present investigation suggests that the de novo expression of cathepsin E and HLA-DR by hyperplastic alveolar pneumocytes of transplanted lung may be crucial for antigen processing and presentation to recipient competent T cells, and thus for the triggering of the immune-inflammatory cascade that leads to rejection. PMID:8053491

Arbustini, E; Morbini, P; Diegoli, M; Grasso, M; Fasani, R; Vitulo, P; Fiocca, R; Cremaschi, P; Volpato, G; Martinelli, L

1994-08-01

241

Fetal growth is increased by maternal type 1 diabetes and HLA DR4-related gene interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims\\/hypothesis  Intrauterine growth in non-diabetic pregnancies is reported to be influenced by type 1 diabetes susceptibility genes. In particular,\\u000a the high-risk HLA DR4_DQB1*0302 haplotype is associated with increased birthweight. The aim of this study was to determine whether HLA DR4 was associated\\u000a with increased birthweight in a maternal diabetes environment and whether effects persisted during early childhood.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Subjects and methods  Birthweight and

M. Hummel; S. Marienfeld; M. Huppmann; A. Knopff; M. Voigt; E. Bonifacio; A.-G. Ziegler

2007-01-01

242

Association of HLA-DR, DQ genotype with different beta-cell functions at IDDM diagnosis in Japanese children.  

PubMed

Japanese IDDM patients have been demonstrated to have unique and different HLA associations from white patients. To elucidate the effect of HLA-associated genetic factors on the clinical heterogeneity of IDDM in Japanese people, HLA-DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 genotypes in 88 childhood-onset Japanese IDDM patients were examined by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) or sequence-specific primers (SSP). Of the 88 IDDM patients, 26 (29.5%) had DRB1*0405-DQA1*0302-DQB1*0401/X (DR4-DQ4/X), 38 (43.2%) had DRB1*0901-DQA1*0302-DQB1*0303/X (DR9-DQ9/X), and 9 (10.2%) were DR4/9-DQ4/9 heterozygous in the present study (X does not contain protective alleles). Clinical heterogeneity such as age distribution at onset, prevalence and serum level of anti-GAD antibodies (GADAb), and residual pancreatic beta-cell function after diagnosis were compared between patients with HLA-DR4-DQ4 and DR9-DQ9. The frequency of DR9-DQ9 genotype was significantly higher in the younger (0-10 years) than in the older (11-16 years) age-group of onset, but the frequency of DR4-DQ4 was higher in the older (11-16 years) age-group. Although no association of DR-DQ genotypes with the prevalence and serum level of GADAb was found among newly diagnosed patients, long-standing DR9-DQ9 patients had significantly higher levels of GADAb than those with DR4-DQ4. While no difference in time course of serum C-peptide (CPR) levels was detected between GADAb+ and GADAb- patients, a remarkable difference was demonstrated between DR9-DQ9 and DR4-DQ4 patients. The residual pancreatic beta-cell function was retained more in patients with DR4-DQ4 than in those with DR9-DQ9 at diagnosis through 12-18 months after diagnosis. These results suggest that the DR9-DQ9 genotype may induce stronger autoimmune destructive response (T-helper 1 function) against target beta-cells than the DR4-DQ4 genotype does. Our findings may warrant further studies on the association of diabetogenic autoimmune response with HLA class II molecules and contribute to a clarification of interracial differences in HLA-encoded susceptibility to IDDM. PMID:9356042

Sugihara, S; Sakamaki, T; Konda, S; Murata, A; Wataki, K; Kobayashi, Y; Minamitani, K; Miyamoto, S; Sasaki, N; Niimi, H

1997-11-01

243

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dr. George Voelz was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). This oral history covers Dr. Voelz`s research on Manhattan Engineering District plutonium workers, the acute and long term effects of radiation, his inhalation studies, and his activities at the 1961 INL reactor accident (SL-1 Reactor). After a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Voelz his remembrances on tissue studies of plutonium workers, the plutonium injection studies of 1945-1946, the controlled environmental radioiodine tests of 1963-1968, and tracer studies with human volunteers at Los Alamos. Dr. Voelz states his opinions concerning misconceptions about the Los Alamos Human Radiation Experiments.

NONE

1995-05-01

244

The DR1 and DR6 First Exons of Human Herpesvirus 6A Are Not Required for Virus Replication in Culture and Are Deleted in Virus Stocks That Replicate Well in T-Cell Lines ? †  

PubMed Central

Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B are lymphotropic viruses which replicate in cultured activated cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) and in T-cell lines. Viral genomes are composed of 143-kb unique (U) sequences flanked by ?8- to 10-kb left and right direct repeats, DRL and DRR. We have recently cloned HHV-6A (U1102) into bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors, employing DNA replicative intermediates. Surprisingly, HHV-6A BACs and their parental DNAs were found to contain short ?2.7-kb DRs. To test whether DR shortening occurred during passaging in CBMCs or in the SupT1 T-cell line, we compared packaged DNAs from various passages. Restriction enzymes, PCR, and sequencing analyses have shown the following. (i) Early (1992) viral preparations from CBMCs contained ?8-kb DRs. (ii) Viruses currently propagated in SupT1 cells contained ?2.7-kb DRs. (iii) The deletion spans positions 60 to 5545 in DRL, including genes encoded by DR1 through the first exon of DR6. The pac-2-pac-1 packaging signals, the DR7 open reading frame (ORF), and the DR6 second exon were not deleted. (iv) The DRR sequence was similarly shortened by 5.4 kb. (v) The DR1 through DR6 first exon sequences were deleted from the entire HHV-6A BACs, revealing that they were not translocated into other genome locations. (vi) When virus initially cultured in CBMCs was passaged in SupT1 cells no DR shortening occurred. (vii) Viral stocks possessing short DRs replicated efficiently, revealing the plasticity of herpesvirus genomes. We conclude that the DR deletion occurred once, producing virus with advantageous growth “conquering” the population. The DR1 gene and the first DR6 exon are not required for propagation in culture.

Borenstein, Ronen; Zeigerman, Haim; Frenkel, Niza

2010-01-01

245

HLA-DR associations in black type I diabetics in Nigeria. Further support for models of inheritance.  

PubMed

The distributions of HLA-A, -B, -(Bw4/Bw6), -C, -DR, -(DRw52/DRw53), and -DQ genes in 19 type I diabetics, 37 type II diabetics, and 13 nondiabetics of the Yoruba tribe in southwestern Nigeria were studied. Because no associations between type II diabetes and HLA were detected in the current study and such associations are not known to exist in most ethnoracial groups, type II diabetics plus nondiabetics were used as a group of controls for the group of type I diabetics. Trends toward associations between increased DR3 (53 versus 30% of controls) and decreased DR2 (21 versus 46% of controls) and type I diabetes were found (0.1 greater than P greater than 0.05). The strongest HLA association with type I diabetes in Caucasians is usually with DR4. The percent of DR4-positive type I diabetes (11%) was not significantly greater that that in the controls (4%). Because the strong HLA associations with type I diabetes in American Blacks are the same as in Caucasians (i.e., increased DR3 and DR4 and decreased DR2), the genetic contribution (i.e., the lack of an association with DR4) to susceptibility to type I diabetes in most Nigerian Blacks may be different from that in most Caucasians and American Blacks. Onset of diabetes in most of the type I subjects was after age 20, and type I diabetics were difficult to recruit for the study, in keeping with reports on the rarity of type I diabetes among Blacks in western Africa and reports of DR4, but not DR3, being correlated with an early age of onset in Caucasians.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3456943

MacDonald, M J; Famuyiwa, O O; Nwabuebo, I A; Bella, A F; Junaid, T A; Marrari, M; Duquesnoy, R J

1986-05-01

246

It Really Is All about the Child: An Interview with Dr. Edward Hallowell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a decade when brain research has helped people understand learning difficulties in children, and people have seen increased media attention on the use of medications to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults, Dr. Edward (Ned) Hallowell has worked tirelessly to educate the medical profession, parents,…

Peters, Dane L.

2012-01-01

247

Respuesta al artículo UNA FUNCIÓN IGNORADA: LA PRODUCCIÓN DE TURISMO Del Dr. Muñoz Escalona  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ante todo quiero agradecer al Dr. Escalona por su lectura crítica de mi trabajo Algunas Indefiniciones pero por la abundante descarga recibida creo que al menos el Sr. Escalona debería haber citado mi trabajo en las referencias bibliográficas, cosa que no ha hecho, tal vez por su apasionada crítica, lo cual de por sí ya habla de un grado de

Maximiliano Korstanje

2010-01-01

248

Debate on the Chernobyl disaster: response to Dr. Sergei V. Jargin.  

PubMed

The author responds, point by point, to Dr. Jargin's critique in this Journal issue of A. V. Yablokov, V. B. Nesterenko, and A. B. Nesterenko, Chernobyl: consequences of the catastrophe for people and the environment, published in 2009 by the New York Academy of Sciences. PMID:22403907

Yablokov, Alexey

2012-01-01

249

Dr. Martin Jaffee Engages with the Question: What Can You Say About the “Problem of Evil?”  

Microsoft Academic Search

What can you say about the “Problem of Evil?”\\u000aDr. Martin Jaffee discusses the problem of the existence of God even though there is suffering in the world. Jaffee remarks that the problem of evil is “not a problem” for religion, but is only one for theology and philosophers that have created an omnipotent and all good God.

Martin Jaffee; Alfred Benney

1999-01-01

250

Strategies for dose reduction in ordinary radiographic examinations using CR and DR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uncoupling of display from acquisition in computed radiography (CR) and digital radiography (DR) introduces the potential for systematic overexposure without necessarily compromising image quality. Although the magnitude of radiation doses in general radiography is low compared to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, the dose to the patient is more critical in pediatric examinations than in adults, because of the greater radiosensitivity

Charles E. Willis; Edward B Singleton

2004-01-01

251

Multiband photometric follow-up of ASASSN-13aw (SN 2013dr)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the result of an extensive photometric follow-up of ASASSN-13aw (ATEL#5183) aka SN 2013dr, classified as type Ia supernova (Tomasella et al., CBAT TOCP for PSN J17193026+4742046). The telescopes involved in the follow-up operated in the preparatory mode for the forthcoming Gaia Science Ale$ follow-up network.

Wyrzykowski, L.; Campbell, H. C.; Koposov, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Damljanovic, G.; Vince, O.; Pavlovic, R.; Cvetkovic, Z.; Stojanovic, M.; Kolb, U.; Bochinski, J.; Burwitz, V.; Haswell, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Harding, J.; Busuttil, R.

2013-08-01

252

The structural basis of the response regulator DrRRA from Deinococcus radiodurans.  

PubMed

DrRRA, a vital and recently discovered gene product of Deinococcus radiodurans, is a member of the OmpR/PhoB family of response regulators that couple with the cognate histidine kinase (HK) to form a typical two component system (TCS). It is known that the DrRRA is responsible for the transcriptional levels of numerous genes mostly relating to the stress response and DNA repair. In this paper, the crystal structures of the effector domain and full-length protein of DrRRA with resolutions of 1.6 and 2.3Å, respectively, are determined. These crystal structures depicted that DrRRA has the structural features of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily and were also confirmed by SAXS investigation of the protein in solution. Our data suggest that the receiver domain blocks the binding of DNA to the DNA recognition helix of effector domain; while the interdomain interface would be unwrapped, via the phosphorylation of receiver domain and/or the inducement of DNA, in order to provide DNA binding. PMID:22227191

Liu, Ying; Gao, Zeng-Qiang; She, Zhun; Qu, Kun; Wang, Wen-Jia; Shtykova, Eleonora V; Xu, Jian-Hua; Ji, Chao-Neng; Dong, Yu-Hui

2011-12-29

253

Dr. Val Stephen, a ‘Gentleman Amateur’ in Australian Electronic Music Experiment of the 1960s  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article uses the example of Dr. Val Stephen, a Melbourne anaesthetist believed to be the first Australia-based composer to have a record of electronic music released overseas, to discuss an unexplored category woven into the tapestry of Australian electronic music experiment of the 1960s; namely, that of the ‘hobby experimentalist’. The article shows that while Stephen might be conveniently

John Whiteoak; Clinton Green

2010-01-01

254

Dr. Moore has Problems: A Case Study to Consider Legal and Ethical Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. Moore Has Problems” is a case study written primarily to help students consider both legal and ethical issues. Two teachers from the same campus have husbands running for office against one another. One of the teachers is pushy and corners staff to persuade them to vote for her husband. The staff becomes divided. Later, the same teacher appears with

Marion Czaja; Jerry Lowe

2000-01-01

255

Dr. Andrew Huvos (1934-2006) retrospective: a tribute to the pathologist and the man.  

PubMed

Andrew G. Huvos was born in communist Budapest, Hungary, in March of 1934. At twenty-four he immigrated to New York City, working as a cytotechnologist at Delafield Hospital. Dr. Huvos attended the University of Gottingen Medical School in Germany, where he was awarded his MD degree. He completed a 1-year internship at New York Hospital, going on to Residency at Delafield Hospital and Fellowship at Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Huvos ascended through the ranks to Attending Pathologist and Member at Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied diseases, at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. Concurrently, he was appointed to Weill Medical College of Cornell University, where he was Professor of Pathology for over two decades. Dr. Huvos was an editorial referee for over half a dozen highly esteemed publications, including the New England Journal of Medicine and Cancer. He trained over a thousand oncological surgical pathology fellows, head and neck fellows, and surgeons. Dr. Huvos spent nearly 40 years at MSKCC and his career was accompanied by his authorship of 388 peer-reviewed publications and eighteen book chapters. His legacy leaves behind a generation of pathologists who have greatly benefited from his tutelage. PMID:23459837

Carlson, Diane L

2013-03-05

256

Dr Anders Sparrman: Travelling with the Labouring Poor in the Late Eighteenth-Century Cape  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines an account by Dr Anders Sparrman, who visited the Cape of Good Hope in the 1770s, with the view of utilising travel accounts as historical evidence. Late eighteenth-century travel accounts of the Cape have attracted the attention of geographers and literary scholars, who focus on the emergence of naturalist history. Drawing on Edward Said, Mary Louise Pratt

Nicole Ulrich

2009-01-01

257

It Really Is All about the Child: An Interview with Dr. Edward Hallowell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a decade when brain research has helped people understand learning difficulties in children, and people have seen increased media attention on the use of medications to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults, Dr. Edward (Ned) Hallowell has worked tirelessly to educate the medical profession, parents,…

Peters, Dane L.

2012-01-01

258

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune: A Life Devoted to Service  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the leadership traits of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, an African-American woman of history, using the servant leadership theory developed by Robert K. Greenberg and the ten characteristics of servant leadership as conceived by Larry C. Spears. This exploration seeks to identify the significant…

Long, Kim Cliett

2011-01-01

259

HLA-DR Predicts the Prognosis in Scandinavian Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although most patients with sarcoidosis have a good prognosis, a significant proportion runs a more severe and prolonged disease course. There is no marker to distinguish these subpopulations of pa- tients, however. To investigate the relationship between HLA haplotype and clinical course, 122 Scan- dinavian patients with sarcoidosis were genomically typed for HLA-DR, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification

MARY BERLIN; ANNA FOGDELL-HAHN; OLLE OLERUP; ANDERS EKLUND; JOHAN GRUNEWALD

260

Commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this is a short collection of suggested activities to teach black awareness in the elementary and secondary grades through King's philosophy. An introductory biographical sketch of King and an article about his accomplishments are provided. Activities are divided into grade-level ranges for the…

Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

261

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1990-09-01

262

Replicating a Successful Authentic Science Research Program: An Interview with Dr. Robert Pavlica  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this interview, Dr. Robert Pavlica discusses the Byram Hills High School Authentic Science Program, which he founded and directs. This program has been replicated in school districts throughout the country, and the expense to start and maintain it is minimal. Students are self-selected into the program based on their desire to study and…

Robinson, George

2005-01-01

263

Replicating a Successful Authentic Science Research Program: An Interview with Dr. Robert Pavlica  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this interview, Dr. Robert Pavlica discusses the Byram Hills High School Authentic Science Program, which he founded and directs. This program has been replicated in school districts throughout the country, and the expense to start and maintain it is minimal. Students are self-selected into the program based on their desire to study and succeed, not on their grade-point average.

George Robinson

2004-01-01

264

Commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Developed in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this is a short collection of suggested activities to teach black awareness in the elementary and secondary grades through King's philosophy. An introductory biographical sketch of King and an article about his accomplishments are provided. Activities are divided into grade-level ranges for the…

Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

265

An Atomic Resolution Model for Assembly, Architecture, and Function of the Dr Adhesins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathogenic bacteria possess adhesion protein complexes that play essential roles in targeting host cells and in propagating infection. Although each family of adhesion proteins is generally associated with a specific human disease, the Dr family from Escherichia coli is a notable exception, as its members are associated with both diarrheal and urinary tract infections. These proteins are reported to form

Kirstine L. Anderson; Jason Billington; David Pettigrew; Ernesto Cota; Peter Simpson; Pietro Roversi; Ho An Chen; Petri Urvil; Laurence du Merle; Paul N. Barlow; M. Edward Medof; Richard A. G. Smith; Bogdan Nowicki; Chantal Le Bouguénec; Susan M. Lea; Stephen Matthews

2004-01-01

266

Analysis of the parameter identifiability of the in situ diffusion and retention (DR) experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

In situ diffusion experiments are performed at underground research laboratories to overcome the limitations of laboratory diffusion experiments. The diffusion and retention (DR) experiments are long-term, natural-scale, in situ experiments performed in the anisotropic Opalinus Clay Formation at Mont Terri, Switzerland. Dilution data are monitored at the injection interval and overcoring data will be measured at samples around the injection

Javier Samper; Shuping Yi; Acacia Naves

2010-01-01

267

African American Women Scholars and International Research: Dr. Anna Julia Cooper's Legacy of Study Abroad  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

EIn this article, the author presents a little-known but detailed history of Black women's tradition of study abroad. Specifically, she situates Dr. Anna Julia Cooper within the landscape of historic African American students who studied in Japan, Germany, Jamaica, England, Italy, Haiti, India, West Africa, and Thailand, in addition to France. The…

Evans, Stephanie Y.

2009-01-01

268

Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, 1858-1964: Teacher, Scholar, and Timeless Womanist  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examines the various accomplishments and achievements of Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, a social activist-educator, scholar and an early model for African-American feminist theory. Cooper was a great public intellectual and teacher, as she highly attacked the prevalence of racism, sexism and poverty through her writings and by working with…

Giles, Mark S.

2006-01-01

269

The 2008 Benjamin Franklin medal for physics is presented to Dr. Deborah Jin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Benjamin Franklin Medal for Physics is awarded to Dr. Deborah Jin (JILA, NIST and the University of Colorado) “in recognition of her pioneering investigations into the quantum properties of an ultra-cold gas of fermionic atoms and, in particular, for her creation of the first degenerate Fermi gas of atoms”.

Elias Burstein

2011-01-01

270

Putting Functional Behavioral Assessment into Practice: A Conversation with Dr. Richard Van Acker.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this interview, Dr. Richard Van Acker discusses federal requirements for functional behavioral assessments (FBAs) and the teamwork involved in conducting an FBA. Various components of FBAs and the approximate time required are outlined and examples are provided of structured data collection for use in the FBA. (CR)|

Bullock, Lyndal M.; Gable, Robert A.

1999-01-01

271

Fighting the higher battle: The life and times of Dr. Henry Hitt Crane  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. Henry Hitt Crane was one of the most influential American Methodist ministers of the twentieth century. A gifted speaker, he became one of the most popular preachers in university chapels from the early 1920s to the early 1960s. Although he frequently preached on the Social Gospel, his special contribution was his fervent advocacy of pacifism. With other Methodist pacifists,

William Lawrence Elster

1998-01-01

272

Dr. Clarke vs. the "Ladies": Coeducation and Women's Roles in the 1870's.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Negative reaction to the theories forwarded in Dr. Edward H. Clarke's 1873 treatise against coeducation, "Sex in Education or A Fair Chance for the Girls," has been largely neglected. The book appeared at a time when conspicuous numbers of women were extending their activities by campaigning for suffrage; working in factories, schools, and…

Seller, Maxine S.

273

Framing an Alleged Terrorist: How Four Australian News Media Organizations Framed the Dr. Mohamed Haneef Case  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stories about alleged terrorism and terrorist activities typically conflate Islam and terrorism, but there are few examples of cases where the news frames used to present these types of stories change over time. This article explores how four key Australian media outlets framed Australia's biggest and to date most costly terrorism investigation, the Dr. Mohamed Haneef case. It tracks the

Jacqui Ewart

2012-01-01

274

Dr. Bowdler's Legacy: A History of Expurgated Books in England and America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This history of expurgation of English and American literature from 1724 until the 1960's focuses on the influence of changing taste upon literature, especially the changing standards of what constitutes decency. Discussed are (1) expurgations of literary works in the 18th century and the causes of bowdlerism; (2) Dr. Bowdler, his sister (the…

Perrin, Noel

275

Effect of HLA DR epitope de-immunization of Factor VIII in vitro and in vivo  

PubMed Central

T cell-dependent development of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies that neutralize FVIII activity is a major obstacle to replacement therapy in hemophilia A. To create a less immunogenic therapeutic protein, recombinant FVIII can be modified to reduce HLA binding of epitopes based on predicted anchoring residues. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify C2 domain HLA DR epitopes and predict site-specific mutations that reduce immunogenicity. Epitope peptides corresponding to original and modified sequences were validated in HLA binding assays and in immunizations of hemophilic E16 mice, DR3 and DR4 mice and DR3xE16 mice. Consistent with immunoinformatics predictions, original epitopes are immunogenic. Immunization with selected modified sequences lowered immunogenicity for particular peptides and revealed residual immunogenicity of incompletely de-immunized modified peptides. The stepwise approach to reduce protein immunogenicity by epitope modification illustrated here is being used to design and produce a functional full-length modified FVIII for clinical use.

Moise, Leonard; Song, Chang; Martin, William D.; Tassone, Ryan; De Groot, Anne S.; Scott, David W.

2011-01-01

276

Dr. Robert W. Saunders, Sr oral history interview by Canter Brown, January 14, 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. Robert W. Saunders, Sr., former field secretary of the Florida National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, describes the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. This interview focuses on the NAACP in Florida, discussing desegregation, the Tallahassee bus boycott, Florida politics, and other subjects. Numerous civil rights leaders are discussed in detail, including Harry T. Moore,

Robert W. Saunders; Canter Brown

2002-01-01

277

In Defense of Disparate Impact Analysis Under Title VII: A Reply to Dr. Cohn  

Microsoft Academic Search

The preceding article by Dr. Richard M. Cohn' concerning the use of statistics in Title VII employment discrimination cases makes three basic points. First, Cohn rejects the methods used to assess disproportionate differences between groups on tests, such as ability tests. He finds fault both with the approach of the Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures and with the method

Elaine W. Shoben

1980-01-01

278

Bisexuality in the Kinsey–Klein Continuum: An Interview with Kinsey Institute Scholar Dr. John Bancroft  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this interview for the 60th anniversary commemoration of the Kinsey Male report, Kinsey Institute director emeritus Dr. John Bancroft answers questions about Alfred C. Kinsey's research on bisexuality, compares the Kinsey Scale and Klein Grid and considers Kinsey's continued legacy in terms of conservative backlash against him for his influence in initiating sexual liberation movements of the late 20th

Jonathan Alexander; Ron Jackson Suresha

2008-01-01

279

Keratinocyte-Specific Retinoid Regulation of Human Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein-II (hCRABPII) Gene Promoter Requires an Evolutionarily Conserved DR1 Retinoic Acid-Responsive Element  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transcription of the hCRABPII gene is retinoid inducible in human skin keratinocytes (KC) but, surprisingly, not in cultured cells. The promoter for the gene harbors three putative nuclear receptor binding sites: DR5, upstream of the transcription start site; DR1 (DR1d), distal to the site; and DR1 (DR1p), a proximal variant. DR1d, but not DR1p, is conserved between human and mouse.

Wen Di; Xiao-Yan Li; Subhash Datta; Anders Åström; Gary J. Fisher; Pierre Chambon; John J. Voorhees; Jia-Hao Xiao

1998-01-01

280

Description of Work for Drilling at the 183-DR Site in Support of the In situ Gaseous Reduction Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document describes field activities associated with installation of boreholes to verify the presence of hexavalent chromium in the vadose zone at the former location of the 183-DR facility, a water treatment plant, in the 100 D/DR Area of the U.S. De...

E. D. Thornton K. B. Olsen R. Schalla

2000-01-01

281

Detection of HLA-DR associated with monocytotropic, primary, and plasma isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.  

PubMed Central

This study determined whether HLA-DR was incorporated into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 produced in vivo or by primary cultured cells. HLA-DR was associated with virions from primary isolates, macrophage cultures, and blood plasma. These results represent the first demonstration of major histocompatibility complex molecules associated with an in vivo source of virus.

Saarloos, M N; Sullivan, B L; Czerniewski, M A; Parameswar, K D; Spear, G T

1997-01-01

282

Designed tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand variants initiating apoptosis exclusively via the DR5 receptor  

PubMed Central

Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potential anticancer drug that selectively induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells by interacting with death receptors DR4 and DR5. TRAIL can also bind to decoy receptors (DcR1, DcR2, and osteoprotegerin receptor) that cannot induce apoptosis. The occurrence of DR5-responsive tumor cells indicates that a DR5 receptor-specific TRAIL variant will permit tumor-selective therapies. By using the automatic design algorithm FOLD-X, we successfully generated DR5-selective TRAIL variants. These variants do not induce apoptosis in DR4-responsive cell lines but show a large increase in biological activity in DR5-responsive cancer cell lines. Even wild-type TRAIL-insensitive ovarian cancer cell lines could be brought into apoptosis. In addition, our results demonstrate that there is no requirement for antibody-mediated cross-linking or membrane-bound TRAIL to induce apoptosis through DR5.

van der Sloot, Almer M.; Tur, Vicente; Szegezdi, Eva; Mullally, Margaret M.; Cool, Robbert H.; Samali, Afshin; Serrano, Luis; Quax, Wim J.

2006-01-01

283

HLA-DR and T Helper Cells in the Blood of Hansen's Disease Patients. (Reannouncement with New Availability Information).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The peripheral blood of twenty-two Hansen's disease (HD) patients was investigated by Leishman's stain for white blood count and by cytofluorograph for the HLA-DR+ cells and T helper cells. The high frequency of HLA-DR+ cells was associated with increased...

L. Ashamalla N. El Ghorab M. Michel

1988-01-01

284

Epithelial Invasion by Escherichia coli Bearing Dr Fimbriae Is Controlled by Nitric Oxide-Regulated Expression of CD55  

PubMed Central

We previously reported that inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) increases the rate of bacteremia and maternal mortality in pregnant rats with uterine infection by Escherichia coli expressing the Dr fimbria (Dr+). Epithelial binding and invasion by Dr+ E. coli has also been shown to be dependent upon the expression level of the cellular receptor decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). Here, we hypothesize that NO-related severity of infection could be mediated by changes in DAF expression and in the rate of epithelial invasion. The cellular basis of NO effects on epithelial invasion with Dr+ E. coli was studied using Ishikawa endometrial carcinoma cells as an in vitro model of the human endometrial epithelium. Initially, we show that Ishikawa cells produce NO and express both NO synthase enzymes, NOS II and NOS III, and DAF protein. We next tested the abilities of both Dr+ E. coli and a Dr? E. coli mutant to invade Ishikawa cells, and invasion was seen only with Dr+ E. coli. Invasion by Dr+ E. coli was decreased by elevated NO production and increased by NO inhibition. Elevated NO production significantly decreased DAF protein and mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Here, we propose that in vitro invasion of an epithelial cell line is directly related to NO-regulated expression of DAF. The significance of NO-regulated receptor-ligand invasion is that it may represent a novel unrecognized phenomenon of epithelial defense against infection.

Fang, Li; Nowicki, Bogdan J.; Urvil, Petri; Goluszko, Pawel; Nowicki, Stella; Young, Steven L.; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

2004-01-01

285

HLA DR phenotypic frequencies and genetic risk of Type 1 diabetes in west region of Algeria, Tlemcen  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The main genomic region controlling the predisposition to type 1 diabetes is the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) class II of the major histocompatibility complex. Association with different HLA types depends also on the studied populations. In our investigation, we tried to measure the phenotypic HLA class II association frequencies of DR3 and\\/or DR4 antigens, using a serologic method called

Mourad Aribi; Soraya Moulessehoul; Ahmed-Bakir Benabadji; Mohammed Kendoucitani

2004-01-01

286

B-cell-specific and interferon-gamma-inducible regulation of the HLA-DR alpha gene.  

PubMed Central

We investigated the cis-acting sequences that function in the B-cell-specific and interferon-gamma-inducible expression of the HLA-DR alpha gene, a human class II major histocompatibility complex gene. The effects of 5' deletions on the activity of the DR alpha promoter and the influence of upstream DR alpha promoter elements on the activity of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter were examined by a transient transfection assay in human B-, T-, and fibroblast cell lines. We show that the DR alpha gene is regulated by positive and negative cis-acting sequences between positions -1300 and +31 from the site of initiation of transcription. We also demonstrate that the DR alpha promoter sequences from positions -116 to -92 and from -136 to -80 are the minimal sequences required for conferring B-cell specificity and interferon-gamma inducibility upon the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter, respectively.

Tsang, S Y; Nakanishi, M; Peterlin, B M

1988-01-01

287

A tribute to Dr. Robert C. Allen, an inspirational teacher, humanitarian, and friend (Nov. 18, 1950-Mar. 24, 2005).  

PubMed

Dr. Robert C. Allen was a gifted educator, as well as experienced ophthalmologist, who was a close personal friend of Dr. Edlich at the University of Virginia Health System. While serving on the faculty at the University of Virginia Health System, Dr. Allen proved to be a compassionate physician, who developed close personal relationships with the residents, faculty, and his patients. Dr. Allen was invited by Dr Edlich to be a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants. When Dr. Allen told Dr. Edlich that he had ocular melanoma in 2000, this news was a wake-up call to Dr. Edlich on the need to prevent skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Empowered by this news, Dr. Edlich was honored to co-author four articles on skin cancer prevention, as well as the latest article focusing on prevention of ocular melanoma. The Ocular Melanoma Foundation (Richmond, VA (USA)) was founded in 2003 by Dr. Robert C. Allen to increase awareness, enhance education, and provide advocacy among both patients and health care professionals regarding this rare, but potentially lethal cancer. It has a website that provides patient information, up-to-date information and enables communication/ discourse between and among patients and practitioners (admin@ocularmelanoma.org). Dr. Allen died on March 24, 2005, at his home surrounded by family and loved ones. When surgeons are faced with challenging healthcare diseases, Dr. Edlich's mentor, Dr. Owen Wangensteen, advised Dr. Edlich that he should seek the advice and guidance of skilled basic scientists, who are familiar with the problem. Dr. Wangensteen is recognized as the greatest surgical teacher during the 20th century. Consequently, Dr. Edlich enlisted the advice and guidance from the two co-authors of the next article regarding the scientific basis for the selection of sunglasses to prevent the development of cataracts, pterygia, skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Dr. Reichow is a Professor of Optometry at Pacific University College of Optometry (Forest Grove, OR (USA)). Dr. Citek is Associate Professor of Optometry at Pacific University College of Optometry (Forest Grove (USA)). In their comprehensive evaluation of sunglasses, they found some disturbing results. Despite being endorsed by The Skin Cancer Foundation, the Walgreens eyewear samples offer only partial protection to the potential hazards of sunlight exposure. Those individuals who spend considerable time outdoors should seek sun filter eyewear with impact resistant polycarbonate lenses that provide 100% ultraviolet filtration, high levels of blue light filtration, and full visual field lens/frame coverage as provided by high wrap eyewear. There are several brands that offer products with such protective characteristics. Performance sun eyewear by Nike Vision (Nike Inc., Portland OR [USA]), available in both corrective and plano (nonprescription) forms, is one such brand incorporating these protective features, as well as patented optical and tint designs. Numerous Nike styles offer interchangeable lens options to meet the changing environmental conditions encountered outdoors. These technologies are incorporated into performance-driven frame designs inspired by feedback from some of the world's best athletes. Nonprescription Nike eyewear are available on-line at http://www.nike.com/nikevision, as well as at various well-known retail outlets. Nonprescription and prescription Nike eyewear are also available at the offices of many eye care professionals. Even though our latest report did not include soft contact lens, it is important to emphasize that Dr. Reichow and Dr. Citek have played a leadership role in coordinating the development of the Nike MAXSIGHT, an innovative fully tinted soft contact lens. This contact lens provides distortion-free optics, whether or not you wear prescription contacts. They filter out more than 90% of harmful blue light and 95% of UVA and UVB. For the contact lens, you should go to the website for more information http://www.nike.com/nikevision/content.html

Edlich, Richard F; Greene, Jill A; Long, William B

2006-01-01

288

Proto-PC Inventor, and inspiration for Microsoft, Dr. Henry Edward (Ed) Roberts passes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Remembering Ed Robertshttp://www.thegatesnotes.com/Thinking/article.aspx?ID=126New operator found for iconic Harvard Square newsstandhttp://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2009/01/new_operator_fo.htmlMITS and Altair historyhttp://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/d_altair.htmlNew Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science: StartUp Galleryhttp://www.startupgallery.org/40 Years Later, Looking Back At the Internet's Birthhttp://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=114376728Dr. Henry Edward Roberts is best known for inventing the Altair 8800, a personal computer that would spark the home computer era. Dr. Roberts died yesterday after complications from pneumonia. Dr. Roberts founded Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS), which was originally started to sell electronics kits to model rocket hobbyists. The firm began to struggle in the mid-1970s, and Dr. Roberts began developing a computer kit for hobbyists. The result was the Altair 8800 with an Intel 8080 microprocessor. The kit was available for $395 and was featured on the cover of Popular Electronics in 1975. This cover inspired Paul Allen and Bill Gates to contact Roberts with an offer to write software code that would help people program the machine. Allen and Gates eventually moved to Albuquerque (home to MITS) and founded Micro-Soft to develop their software. Dr. Roberts eventually sold his company and retired to Georgia where he eventually fulfilled a life long dream of earning a medical degree and became a small-town doctor. Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak was saddened to learn of Robert's death stating in an email, "He [Roberts] took a critically important step that led to everything we have today."The first link leads to a story from the New York Times about the passing of Dr. Roberts. The second link will take visitors to a tribute remembering Ed Roberts from Bill Gates and Paul Allen. The third link leads to a story on the saving of the newsstand that sold Paul Allen the famous Popular Electronics magazine that started it all. The fourth link will take visitors to a history of MITS and Altair 8800. The fifth link leads to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science StartUp Gallery. This is a permanent exhibition dedicated to the personal computer revolution and the many breakthroughs that happened in Albuquerque. If all this talk has you thinking about how far computers have come, the last link should suit you, as it leads to a piece (audio or transcript) from NPR's All Things Considered which takes a look at the 40 years since the birth of the Internet.

Halderman, Chanda

2010-04-02

289

[The anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp: The beginning of a medical utopia].  

PubMed

The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp was painted by Rembrandt Harmen-szoon van Rijn at the early age of 26 years. In the XVII century these paintings were very popular in the Netherlands, and in this country the cities flourished as cultural centers searching the anatomy knowledge. Nicolaes Tulp was one of the persons in the center of Amsterdam's scene during XVII century. In 1632 Tulp was 39 years old, and he was an anatomist and a surgeon. Rembrandt masterly shows an autopsy performed by Dr. Tulp. This picture is the description of the beginning of a medical intellectual utopia: the absolute visibility of the disease. Unfortunately this utopia is blind to the complete visibility of the psycho-socio-cultural dimensions of the ill. PMID:21879195

Rosler, Roberto; Young, Pablo

2011-08-25

290

Dr. Smith Goes to Washington: A Physicist Wanders the Halls of Congress  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Tannenbaum was the 2002-2003 APS Congressional Science Fellow. He worked in the office of U.S. Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) on nuclear nonproliferation issues. His work in Congressman Markey's office focused on issues including missile defense, the nuclear program in Iran, prevention of the transfer of U.S. nuclear technology to North Korea, and the security of nuclear sites in Iraq. Dr. Tannenbaum will discuss this experience and observations concerning 'underinformed and uninformed' decision-making in Congress. He will also briefly discuss goals of the Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Finally, he will discuss ways in which physicists can get more involved in the political process.

Tannenbaum, Benn (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Center for Science, Technology, and Security Policy)

2005-03-23

291

Structural studies of the nudix hydrolase DR1025 from deinococcus radiodurans and its ligand complexes  

SciTech Connect

We have determined the crystal structure, at 1.4, of the Nudix hydrolase DR1025 from the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The protein forms an intertwined homodimer by exchanging N-terminal segments between chains. We have identified additional conserved elements of the Nudix fold, including the metal-binding motif, a kinked b-strand characterized by a proline two positions upstream of the Nudix consensus sequence, and participation of the N-terminal extension in the formation of the substrate-binding pocket. Crystal structures were also solved of DR1025 crystallized in the presence of magnesium and either a GTP analog or Ap4A (both at 1.6 resolution). In the Ap4Aco-crystal, the electron density indicated that the product of asymmetric hydrolysis, ATP, was bound to the enzyme. The GTP analog bound structure showed that GTP was bound almost identically as ATP. Neither nucleoside triphosphate was further cleaved.

Ranatunga, Wasantha; Hill, Emma E.; Mooster, Jana L.; Holbrook, Elizabeth L.; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Xu, WenLian; Bessman, Maurice J.; Brenner, Steve n E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

2004-01-29

292

HLA DR and DQ polymorphism in Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Jews: comparison with other Mediterraneans.  

PubMed

HLA-DR and DQ alleles have been detected by DNA typing in Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Jews from Israel. Allele frequencies, characteristic DR/DQ linkage disequilibria, population distances and their corresponding dendrogram by using the Neighbor-Joining method were used to study relatedness between Jewish and other Mediterranean and non Mediterranean populations. Closest relatedness is observed between Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Jews, and, in decreasing order, also with Algerians, Spaniards (including Spanish-Basques), French and Italians. Also, particular characteristic Central European alleles are observed in Ashkenazi Jews and Mediterranean/African alleles in non-Ashkenazi Jews. This is consistent with historical data, Jews being an ancient Mediterranean population, who have had a certain degree of admixture with their 2000-3000 years old neighbors in spite of cultural and religious traditions which have preserved identity outside Israel. PMID:8929714

Martinez-Laso, J; Gazit, E; Gomez-Casado, E; Morales, P; Martinez-Quiles, N; Alvarez, M; Martin-Villa, J M; Fernandez, V; Arnaiz-Villena, A

1996-01-01

293

Phenotypic and physiological changes in Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 with exogenous plasmid.  

PubMed

The genus Acinetobacter has been recognized to take up exogenous DNA from the environment. In this study, we conducted natural transformation with a novel diesel-degrading Acinetobacter sp. strain, designated strain DR1, using the broad host range plasmid pRK415. Many factors, including temperature, quantities of DNA, and aeration have proven critically important for efficient natural transformation. Interestingly, the Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 (pRK415) differed both phenotypically and physiologically from the wild-type strain in several regards, including motility, biofilm formation ability, and responses to oxidative stress: the transformed cells were rendered more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide, and their motilities and biofilm formation activity were also attenuated. Our data demonstrated that caution should be exercised when conducting genetic manipulation with plasmids, due to the possibility that phenotypic and physiological changes in the host might occur along with the uptake of plasmids. PMID:20607540

Park, Jungsoon; Park, Woojun

2010-07-07

294

Dr Karel Fleischmann: the story of an artist and physician in Ghetto Terezin.  

PubMed

Dr Karel Fleischmann (1897-1944) was a Jewish dermatologist and noted Czech artist. During World War II, Fleischmann was confined by the Nazis in Ghetto Terezin (Theresienstadt), which was located in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia. While at Terezin, Fleischmann became a leader of the ghetto's health care system and administered programs that helped to dramatically reduce the high mortality rate of the Jewish population from disease. In his spare time, Fleischmann drew works of art that portrayed the daily life and suffering of the Jews in Ghetto Terezin. Although Fleischmann perished in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, his artwork survived the war. This article pays tribute to Dr Karel Fleischmann by telling the story of his life and by citing selections from his art, poetry and prose. PMID:15125504

Hoenig, Leonard J; Spenser, Tomas; Tarsi, Anita

2004-02-01

295

Dr. Max King: the sad life and early death of Mackenzie King's physician brother  

PubMed Central

While researching her best-selling biography, Mrs. King: The Life and Times of Isabel Mackenzie King, CMAJ contributing editor Charlotte Gray discovered a wealth of information about Dr. Dougal Macdougall (Max) King. Although he never became as famous as his older brother Mackenzie, Gray presents a convincing argument that Dr. Max King's life and early death speak volumes about medicine and the medical profession at the turn of the century. She also argues that Mackenzie King's own life would have been much different had his brother not died at the too young age of 42. Gray's book was nominated for the Viacom Award, which honours the best nonfiction book published annually in Canada.

Gray, C

1998-01-01

296

Dr. Yvonne Pendleton: A Prestigious Role Model of the 21st Century  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This project embodies the progression of Dr. Yvonne Pendleton through the beginnings of her fascination with science, her achievements in astrophysics, and contributions to scientific communities as a whole. As a woman of authority in a male-dominated field of study, Dr. Yvonne Pendleton has challenged the misconception that society attains of women in physics. As Senior Advisor for Research and Analysis for NASA, she recently investigated the organic component of the interstellar medium and the incorporation of that material into the early solar nebula. Through various obstacles, she continues to devote much of her free time to the encouragement of students at the high school, collegiate, graduate, and post-graduate levels.

Flores, Gustavo; Prado, Hilary

2009-10-01

297

Dr. PH  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text VersionPage 1. CURRICULUM VITAE 26 February 2013 Name: Walter Churchill Willett Home Address: Office Address: Department ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

298

Dear Dr  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text Version... equipment, have (including household members) been medically screened for contraindications based on completed health assessment forms ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/emergencypreparedness

299

Structural mechanisms of DIAP1 auto-inhibition and DIAP1-mediated inhibition of drICE.  

PubMed

The Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis protein DIAP1 exists in an auto-inhibited conformation, unable to suppress the effector caspase drICE. Auto-inhibition is disabled by caspase-mediated cleavage of DIAP1 after Asp20. The cleaved DIAP1 binds to mature drICE, inhibits its protease activity, and, presumably, also targets drICE for ubiquitylation. DIAP1-mediated suppression of drICE is effectively antagonized by the pro-apoptotic proteins Reaper, Hid, and Grim (RHG). Despite rigorous effort, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are enigmatic. Here we report a 2.4 Å crystal structure of uncleaved DIAP1-BIR1, which reveals how the amino-terminal sequences recognize a conserved surface groove in BIR1 to achieve auto-inhibition, and a 3.5 Å crystal structure of active drICE bound to cleaved DIAP1-BIR1, which provides a structural explanation to DIAP1-mediated inhibition of drICE. These structures and associated biochemical analyses, together with published reports, define the molecular determinants that govern the interplay among DIAP1, drICE and the RHG proteins. PMID:21811237

Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Shi, Yigong

2011-08-02

300

There is no Significant Association Between Death Receptor 4 (DR4) Gene Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer in Turkish Population.  

PubMed

Death receptor 4 (DR4) gene is a candidate tumor supressor gene that has a role in apoptotic pathway. It was reported in literature that polymorphisms in DR4 gene lead to susceptibility to many cancers. In accordance with this information, we aimed to investigate the association between G422A, C626G, A683C and A1322G polymorphisms in DR4 gene and lung cancer. We selected 60 patients with lung cancer (LC) and 30 healthy, sex and age matched volunteers randomly. Four polymorhisms, G422A, C626G, A683C and A1322G, in DR4 gene were analyzed with Polymerase Change Reaction (PCR) - Restriction Fragment Lenght Polymorphism (RFLP) and Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) techniques in both groups. Our results showed that there are no statistically significances between the patients and controls in terms of the G422A, C626G, A683C and A1322G polymorphisms in DR4 gene (p?>?0,05). Our findings showed no role of DR4 gene polymorhisms in susceptibility to LC and provide a plausible explanation for DR4 genetic heterogeneity in LC susceptibility. PMID:23661154

Ta?temir-Korkmaz, Deniz; Demirhan, Osman; Kuleci, Sedat; Hastürk, Serap

2013-05-10

301

On DR\\/BEM for eigenvalue analysis of 2-D acoustics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the efficiency of several DR\\/BEM formulations and other boundary techniques for the eigenvalue extraction of two-dimensional acoustic cavities. First, the paper shows that the well-known conical radial basis functions lead to extremely ill conditioning results in cases that the height of the cone is not properly chosen. Moreover, the accuracy of other known high-degree basis functions is

C. G. Provatidis

2004-01-01

302

Axonal neuropathy associated with interferon-? treatment for hepatitis C: HLA-DR immunoreactivity in Schwann cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 44-year-old man developed a peripheral neuropathy during treatment with interferon-? for chronic hepatitis C. The onset\\u000a was insidious, beginning symmetrically in the hands with paresthesia. Neurophysiological investigation revealed a predominantly\\u000a sensory axonal neuropathy. A sural nerve biopsy confirmed primary axonal damage. Immunofluorescence studies showed increased\\u000a expression of HLA-DR molecules prevalently on Schwann cells of non-myelin-forming type.

Angelo Quattrini; Giancarlo Comi; Raffaello Nemni; Vittorio Martinelli; Antonello Villa; Marco Caimi; Lawrence Wrabetz; Nicola Canal

1997-01-01

303

Evaluation of the pDR1200 Real-Time Aerosol Monitor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to characterize the ability of the pDR-1200 real-time aerosol monitor to measure aerosols of varying size, composition, and origin. Particle aspiration and transmission efficiency was characterized at airflow rates of 2 L\\/min, 5 L\\/min, and 10 L\\/min in a wind tunnel in both static and orientation-averaged configurations. At 10 L\\/min, the particle cut point

Kaila Benton-Vitz; John Volckens

2008-01-01

304

U-GPF Information Fusion Algorithm for GPS\\/DR Integrated Positioning System  

Microsoft Academic Search

U-GPF is proposed for GPS\\/DR integrated positioning system to improve its performance. It is based on the Gaussian particle filter (GPF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF). UKF is used to calculate the estimate parameters value and covariance matrix in the observation update, and the distribution function is sampled as the importance density function for GPF. Simulation results show that U-GPF

Dong-Kai Yang; Xin-Li Zhou; Xu Liu; Qi-Shan Zhang

2007-01-01

305

An Apologetic to the Neo-Pagans as Represented by Dr. Gus DiZerega  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current trend of multi-religious observance can be traced to various root sources. In particular, the advocacy of Christianity and another religious tradition is particularly strong within Neo-Pagan circles. Through historical investigation, as well as response to the writings of Dr. Gus DiZerega, a prominent Neo-Pagan proponent, these connection will be made. It will be posited that the core of

William Tennison Smitherman II

2009-01-01

306

Dr. Smith Goes to Washington: A Physicist Wanders the Halls of Congress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. Tannenbaum was the 2002-2003 APS Congressional Science Fellow. He worked in the office of U.S. Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) on nuclear nonproliferation issues. His work in Congressman Markey's office focused on issues including missile defense, the nuclear program in Iran, prevention of the transfer of U.S. nuclear technology to North Korea, and the security of nuclear sites in Iraq.

Tannenbaum; Benn

2005-01-01

307

PinDr0p: using single-ended audio features to determine call provenance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent diversification of telephony infrastructure allows users to communicate through landlines, mobile phones and VoIP phones. However, call metadata such as Caller-ID is either not transferred or transferred without verification across these networks, allowing attackers to maliciously alter it. In this paper, we develop PinDr0p, a mechanism to assist users in determining call provenance - the source and the

Vijay A. Balasubramaniyan; Aamir Poonawalla; Mustaque Ahamad; Michael T. Hunter; Patrick Traynor

2010-01-01

308

Data-driven insights into deletions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex chromosomal DR region using spoligoforests.  

PubMed

Biomarkers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) mutate over time. Among the biomarkers of MTBC, spacer oligonucleotide type (spoligotype) and Mycobacterium Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU) patterns are commonly used to genotype clinical MTBC strains. In this study, we present an evolution model of spoligotype rearrangements using MIRU patterns to disambiguate the ancestors of spoligotypes, in a large patient dataset from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Based on the contiguous deletion assumption and rare observation of convergent evolution, we first generate the most parsimonious forest of spoligotypes, called a spoligoforest, using three genetic distance measures. An analysis of topological attributes of the spoligoforest and number of variations at the direct repeat (DR) locus of each strain reveals interesting properties of deletions in the DR region. First, we compare our mutation model to existing mutation models of spoligotypes and find that our mutation model produces as many within-lineage mutation events as other models, with slightly higher segregation accuracy. Second, based on our mutation model, the number of descendant spoligotypes follows a power law distribution. Third, contrary to prior studies, the power law distribution does not plausibly fit to the mutation length frequency. Finally, the total number of mutation events at consecutive DR loci follows a bimodal distribution, which results in accumulation of shorter deletions in the DR region. The two modes are spacers 13 and 40, which are hotspots for chromosomal rearrangements. The change point in the bimodal distribution is spacer 34, which is absent in most MTBC strains. This bimodal separation results in accumulation of shorter deletions, which explains why a power law distribution is not a plausible fit to the mutation length frequency. PMID:22343484

Ozcaglar, Cagri; Shabbeer, Amina; Kurepina, Natalia; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

2011-01-01

309

CRCHD Principal Investigator: Amelie G. Ramirez, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.  

Cancer.gov

Amelie G. Ramirez, Dr.P.H., is a Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatics and Director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA). She is also the Dielmann Chair in Health Disparities Research and Community Outreach at UTHSCSA and Director of Outreach and Health Care Disparities at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center.

310

Lack of the HLA-DR2 specificity in multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of the HLA-B7 and HLA-DR2 specificities in 17 unrelated patients with multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis, 11 with and six without subretinal neovascularisation, was evaluated and compared with those of two different groups. The first group was 17 patients with subretinal neovascularisation associated with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, and the second was a group of 105 eye patients with

R F Spaide; J E Skerry; L A Yannuzzi; J T DeRosa

1990-01-01

311

Interview with Dr. George H. Hoemann Assistant Dean, Chair of Commission for LGBT People  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. George H. Hoemann is Assistant Dean for Distance Education and holds the Ph.D. in American Constitutional-Legal History from Rice University (1982) and the M.S.L.S. from the University of Tennessee (1995). His publications include What God Hath Wrought: the Embodiment of Freedom in the Thirteenth Amendment as well as assistant or associate editor on numerous volumes of the Papers of

Donna Marie Braquet; James Roger Weaver

2008-01-01

312

[The Nobel Prize for nitric oxide. The unjust exclusion of Dr. Salvador Moncada].  

PubMed

The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded jointly to North-American scientists, Dr Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro and Ferid Murad, for their discoveries in relation to "nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system". This has raised an important polemic because of the exclusion the South-American scientist, now nationalized British, Dr. Salvador Moncada. This short historical review examines some of the fundamental contributions to the knowledge in this field. It shows the sequence of the discoveries and the communication of them to the scientific community by the rewarded scientists and by Dr. Moncada. It is based on some fundamental publications in order to better understand this story, which does not coincide with the writing in 1996 by the Lasker Prize Committee, and which in 1998 was re-written again by the Nobel Committee of the Swedish Academy. More than 90 universities, academies and societies have acknowledged Dr. Moncada up to now with priority in the discovery of the fact that nitric oxide is released by endothelial cells, and the revealing of its metabolic way. More than 20,000 citations of their fundamental papers endorse in the scientific community his primacy in this field. Even Robert Furchgott, author of the brilliant discovery of the endothelium derived relaxing factor, that opened this field to the science, declared about the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize: "I feel that the Nobel Prize Committee could have made an exception this year and chosen a fourth person, Salvador Moncada (to share the prize)". PMID:10217961

de Berrazueta, J R

1999-04-01

313

Induction of Tumor-specific T Cell Immunity by Anti-DR5 Antibody Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in tumor cells and plays a critical role in tumor surveillance, its receptor is an attractive target for antibody-mediated tumor therapy. Here we report that a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse TRAIL receptor, DR5, exhibited potent antitumor effects against TRAIL-sensitive tumor cells in vivo by recruiting Fc receptor-expressing innate

Kazuyoshi Takeda; Noriko Yamaguchi; Hisaya Akiba; Yuko Kojima; Yoshihiro Hayakawa; Jane E. Tanner; Thomas J. Sayers; Naoko Seki; Ko Okumura; Hideo Yagita; Mark J. Smyth

2004-01-01

314

A study in dualism: The strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde  

PubMed Central

R. L. Stevenson's novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a prominent example of Victorian fiction. The names Jekyll and Hyde have become synonymous with multiple personality disorder. This article seeks to examine the novel from the view point of dualism as a system of philosophy and as a religious framework and also from the view point of Freud's structural theory of the mind.

Singh, Shubh M.; Chakrabarti, Subho

2008-01-01

315

HLA-DR antigen expression on melanoma metastases and the course of the disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Melanoma cells freshly isolated from regional lymph node metastases of 59 stage II malignant melanoma patients were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence staining with monoclonal antibody TAL 1B5, detecting the HLA-DR a chain. The expression of HLA-A,B,C antigens, using antibody W6\\/32, was also investigated in 45 of these cases. There were no substantial differences in the course of the disease

Marta Munzarová; Daniela Zemanová; Aleš Rejthar; Zdenek Mechl; V?ra Kolcová

1989-01-01

316

Dr Mary Louisa Gordon (1861–1941): A Feminist Approach in Prison  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons\\u000a in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922\\u000a book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her

Deborah Cheney

2010-01-01

317

A study in dualism: The strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.  

PubMed

R. L. Stevenson's novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a prominent example of Victorian fiction. The names Jekyll and Hyde have become synonymous with multiple personality disorder. This article seeks to examine the novel from the view point of dualism as a system of philosophy and as a religious framework and also from the view point of Freud's structural theory of the mind. PMID:19742237

Singh, Shubh M; Chakrabarti, Subho

2008-07-01

318

With stroke of pen, FERC puts DR on par with supply side options  

SciTech Connect

In mid October 2008, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) finalized new rules intended to strengthen the operation and improve the competitiveness of organized U.S. wholesale electric markets. FERC intends to increase the use of demand response (DR), encourage long-term power contracts, strengthen the role of market monitors, and enhance the responsiveness of regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system operators (ISOs). The FERC order applies to existing U.S. organized wholesale markets.

NONE

2009-01-15

319

Herschel-SPIRE spectroscopy of the DR21 molecular cloud core  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present far-infrared spectra and maps of the DR21 molecular cloud core between 196 and 671 mum, using the Herschel-SPIRE spectrometer. Nineteen molecular lines originating from CO, 13CO, HCO+ and H2O, plus lines of [N ii] and [CI] were recorded, including several transitions not previously detected. The CO lines are excited in warm gas with Tkin 125 K and n{H_2}

G. J. White; A. Abergel; L. Spencer; N. Schneider; D. A. Naylor; L. D. Anderson; C. Joblin; P. Ade; P. André; H. Arab; J.-P. Baluteau; J.-P. Bernard; K. Blagrave; S. Bontemps; F. Boulanger; M. Cohen; M. Compiegne; P. Cox; E. Dartois; G. Davis; R. Emery; T. Fulton; B. Gom; M. Griffin; C. Gry; E. Habart; M. Huang; S. Jones; J. M. Kirk; G. Lagache; S. Leeks; T. Lim; S. Madden; G. Makiwa; P. Martin; M.-A. Miville-Deschênes; S. Molinari; H. Moseley; F. Motte; K. Okumura; D. Pinheiro Gonçalves; E. Polehampton; T. Rodet; J. A. Rodón; D. Russeil; P. Saraceno; S. Sidher; B. M. Swinyard; D. Ward-Thompson; A. Zavagno

2010-01-01

320

Cosmological constraints from the clustering of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 luminous red galaxies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field derived from a sample of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release (DR7). The halo power spectrum has a direct connection to the underlying dark matter power for k <= 0.2hMpc-1, well into the quasi-linear regime. This enables us to use a

Beth A. Reid; Will J. Percival; Daniel J. Eisenstein; Licia Verde; David N. Spergel; Ramin A. Skibba; Neta A. Bahcall; Tamas Budavari; Masataka Fukugita; J. Richard Gott; James E. Gunn; Zeljko Ivezic; Gillian R. Knapp; Richard G. Kron; Robert H. Lupton; Timothy A. McKay; Robert C. Nichol; Adrian C. Pope; David J. Schlegel; Chris Stoughton; Michael A. Strauss; Alexander S. Szalay; Max Tegmark; Michael S. Vogeley; David H. Weinberg; Donald G. York; Idit Zehavi

2010-01-01

321

CHOP is involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by enhancing DR5 expression in human carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

It has been shown that excess stress to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers apoptosis, but the mechanisms underlying these processes remain unclear. We and others have reported previously that DR5 expression is up-regulated in thapsigargin (THG)-treated human cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence that CHOP is involved in THG up-regulation of DR5, which is a critical step for ER stress-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells. In human colon cancer HCT116 cells, knockdown of DR5 by siRNA blocked THG-induced Bax conformational change along with caspase-3 activation and cell death. Moreover, inhibition of CHOP expression attenuated DR5 up-regulation and apoptosis induced by THG, whereas ectopic expression of DR5 restored the sensitivity of CHOP siRNA-transfected cells to THG-induced apoptosis. In addition to HCT116 cells, inhibition of CHOP or DR5 induction also attenuated THG-induced cell death in other cancer cell lines including LNCaP, A2780S, and DU145, indicating that CHOP and DR5 are critical for ER stress-mediated apoptosis in human carcinoma cells. Furthermore, we identified a potential CHOP-binding site in the 5'-flanking region of the DR5 gene. Mutation of this site abrogated the enhanced reporter activity in response to THG treatment. Together, our findings suggest that CHOP regulates ER stress-induced apoptosis, at least in part, through enhancing DR5 expression in some types of human cancer cells. PMID:15322075

Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Wang, Hong-Gang

2004-08-18

322

The presence of host-derived HLA-DR1 on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 increases viral infectivity.  

PubMed Central

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) incorporates several host cell components when budding out of the infected cell. One of the most abundant host-derived molecules acquired by HIV-1 is the HLA-DR determinant of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules. The fact that CD4 is the natural ligand of MHC-II prompted us to determine if such virally embedded cellular components can affect the biology of the virus. Herein, we report for the first time that the incorporation of cellular HLA-DR1 within HIV-1 enhances its infectivity. This observation was made possible with virions bearing or not bearing on their surfaces host-derived HLA-DR1 glycoproteins. Such virus stocks were prepared by a transient-expression system based on transfection of 293T cells with a recombinant luciferase-encoding HIV-1 molecular clone along with plasmids encoding the alpha and beta chains of HLA-DR1. Cell-free virions recovered from transfected cells were shown to have efficiently incorporated host-derived HLA-DR1 glycoproteins. Infectivity was increased by a factor of 1.6 to 2.3 for virions bearing on their surfaces host-derived HLA-DR1. The observed enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity was independent of the virus stocks used and was seen in several T-lymphoid cell lines, in a premonocytoid cell line, and in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Finally, we determined that the presence of virion-bound cellular HLA-DR1 is associated with faster kinetics of virus infection. Taken together, these results suggest that HLA-DR-1-bearing HIV-1 particles had a greater infectivity per picogram of viral p24 protein than HLA-DR1-free virions.

Cantin, R; Fortin, J F; Lamontagne, G; Tremblay, M

1997-01-01

323

Structure-Function Analysis of Decay-Accelerating Factor: Identification of Residues Important for Binding of the Escherichia coli Dr Adhesin and Complement Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a complement regulatory protein, also serves as a receptor for Dr adhesin- bearing Escherichia coli. The repeat three of DAF was shown to be important in Dr adhesin binding and complement regulation. However, Dr adhesins do not bind to red blood cells with the rare polymorphism of DAF, designated Dr(a); these cells contain a point mutation (Ser165-Leu)

Rafia J. Hasan; Edyta Pawelczyk; Petri T. Urvil; Mathura S. Venkatarajan; Pawel Goluszko; Jozef Kur; Rangaraj Selvarangan; Stella Nowicki; Werner A. Braun; Bogdan J. Nowicki

2002-01-01

324

Human Skin Cells Synthesize HLA-DR Molecules of the Same Charge and Molecular Weight as those Synthesized by Autologous Lymphocytes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 5 and 14% of human skin cells, separated by trypsinization, express HLA-DR antigen as detected by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-DR antibody. To determine the source and structure of these DR molecules, skin cell suspensions were biosynthetically labeled with 35S-methionine and the radiolabeled DR molecules were analyzed by the method of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results indicated the

Vera B. Morhenn; Dominique J. Charron; Edgar G. Engleman

1982-01-01

325

A further biochemical characterization of DrPLL the thermophilic lactonase from Deinococcus radiodurans.  

PubMed

Recently, the cloning of the ORF Dr0930 from Deinococcus radiodurans displaying, as primary activity, a lactonase activity and a promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity was reported. The crystal structure of the resulting recombinant enzyme has been solved, and many mutants have been generated in order to increase the phosphotriesterase activity, with the aim to reach the level of activity of the related pPTE from Pseudomonas diminuta. In this paper we report an additional biochemical characterization of DrPLL and show that this enzyme has an optimal temperature for catalysis of 85 °C and possesses promiscuous carboxylesterase, phophodiesterase and thioesterase activities which were not previously described. A metal analysis was performed on the purified protein by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS ELAN DRC-e), which confirmed the presence of Ni(2+) as a main metal in the recombinant protein. Surprisingly, the specificity constants (s=k(cat)/K(M)) for the pNP-decanoate and pNP-dodecanoate esters were only one order of magnitude lower than that for the lactone substrate thio-buthyl-?-butyric-lactone (TBBL), and the K(M) value for TBBL was more than ten-fold higher than those for the esters. We named this enzyme DrPLL, based on its structural and biochemical features it belongs to the Phosphotriesterase Like Lactonase group, a small protein family belonging to the amidohydrolase superfamily. PMID:22789107

Mandrich, Luigi; Di Gennaro, Spartaco; Palma, Achille; Manco, Giuseppe

2013-01-01

326

Solution Structure of Hypothetical Nudix Hydrolase DR0079 from Extremely Radiation-Resistant Deinococcus radiodurans Bacterium  

SciTech Connect

Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based methods including residual dipolar coupling restraints, we have determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 (171 residues, MW= 19.3 kDa). The protein contains eight b-strands and three a-helices organized into three subdomains; an N-terminal b-sheet (1-34), a central Nudix core (35-140), and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (141-171). The Nudix core and C-terminal helix-turn-helix form the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed b-sheet sandwiched between a-helices. The residues that compose the signature Nudix sequence, GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U= I, L, or V and X= any amino acid), are contained in a turn-helix-turn motif on the face of the mixed b-sheet. Chemical shift mapping experiments suggest that DR0079 binds Mg2+, but, precipitates out of solution in the presence of excess Mn2+. Experiments designed to determine the biological function of the protein indicate th at it is not a type I isopentenyl-diphosphate d-isomerase and it does not bind a,b-methyleneadenosine 5-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and guanosine 5-[b,g-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP). The structure of DR0079 is compared to other known Nudix protein structures, a potential substrate binding surface is proposed, and its possible biological function discussed.

Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Kennedy, Michael A.

2004-07-01

327

Solution structure of hypothetical nudix hydrolase dr0079 from extremely radiation-resistant deinococcus radiodurans bacterium  

SciTech Connect

Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based methods, including residual dipolar coupling restraints, we have determined the solution structure of the hypothetical Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix protein DR0079 (171 residues, MW 19.3 kDa). The protein contains eight-strands and three-helices organized into three subdomains: an N-terminal-sheet (1 34), a central Nudix core (35 140), and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (141 171). The Nudix core and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix form the fundamental fold common to the Nudix family, a large mixed-sheet sandwiched between-helices. The residues that compose the signature Nudix sequence, GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where UI, L, or V and X any amino acid), are contained in a turn-helix-turn motif on the face of the mixed-sheet. Chemical shift mapping experiments suggest that DR0079 binds Mg2. Experiments designed to determine the biological function of the protein indicate that it is not a type I isopentenyl-diphosphate-isomerase and that it does not bind, -methyleneadenosine 5-triphosphate (AMPCPP) or guanosine 5-[ ,-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP). In this article, the structure of DR0079 is compared to other known Nudix protein structures, a potential substrate-binding surface is proposed, and its possible biological function is discussed.

Buchko, G.W.; Ni, S.; Holbrook, S.R.; Kennedy, M.A.

2003-12-01

328

Isolation of HLA-DR1.(staphylococcal enterotoxin A)2 trimers in solution.  

PubMed Central

Mutational studies indicate that the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) has two separate binding sites for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Direct evidence is provided here for the formation of SEA-MHC class II trimers in solution. Isoelectric focusing separated SEA-HLA-DR1 complexes into both dimers and HLA-DR1.SEA2 trimers. The molar ratio of components was determined by dual isotope labeling. The SEA mutant SEA-F47S, L48S, Y92A, which is deficient in MHC class II alpha-chain binding, formed only dimers with HLA-DR1, whereas a second SEA mutant, SEA-H225A, which lacks high-affinity MHC class II beta-chain binding was incapable of forming any complexes. Thus SEA binding to its MHC receptor is a two-step process involving initial beta-chain binding followed by cooperative binding of a second SEA molecule to the class II alpha chain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3

Tiedemann, R E; Urban, R J; Strominger, J L; Fraser, J D

1995-01-01

329

Neurobiology of nAChRs and cognition: A mini review of Dr. Jerry J. Buccafusco's contributions over a 25 year career  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review highlights some of the many contributions of the late Dr. Jerry J. Buccafusco to the neurobiology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and cognition over a 25 year period. The article is written by two of Dr. Buccafusco's professional colleagues, one from academia and one from the pharmaceutical industry. While Dr. Buccafusco's expertise in the cholinergic field was extensive,

Alvin V. Terry; Michael W. Decker

2011-01-01

330

Distribution of drb Genes Coding for Dr Binding Adhesins among Uropathogenic and Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates and Identification of New Subtypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dr family of related adherence structures, some fimbriated and others afimbriated, bind to decay- accelerating factor molecules on human cells. Dr is associated with recurring urinary tract infection (UTI), but the distribution of Dr subtypes among uropathogenic Escherichia coli causing UTI among otherwise healthy women has yet to be described. A total of 787 UTI and fecal E. coli

LIXIN ZHANG; BETSY FOXMAN; PAT TALLMAN; EDUARDO CLADERA; CHANTAL LE BOUGUENEC; CARL F. MARRS

1997-01-01

331

Notch inhibition restores TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via AP1-dependent upregulation of DR4 and DR5 TRAIL receptors in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.  

PubMed

Notch is a family of transmembrane receptors whose activation through proteolytic cleavage by ?-secretase targets genes which participate in cell development, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Notch signaling is constitutively activated in various cancers, including breast cancer and its upregulation is usually related with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore, targeting Notch signaling with ?-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) is considered a promising strategy for cancer treatment. We report that the ?-secretase inhibitor-I (GSI-I) sensitizes human breast cancer cells to apoptosis mediated by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). The antiproliferative GSI-I/TRAIL synergism was stronger in ER-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared with ER-positive MCF-7 cells. In MDA-MB-231 cells, GSI-I treatment induced upregulation of DR4 and DR5 TRAIL receptors. This effect seemed to be related to the activation of the transcription factor AP1 that was a consequence of Notch inhibition, as demonstrated by Notch-1 silencing experiments. Combined treatment induced loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and activation of caspases. GSI-I alone and/or GSI-I/TRAIL combination also induced a significant decrease in the levels of some survival factors (survivin, c-IAP-2, Bcl-xL, BimEL and pAKT) and upregulation of pro-apoptotic factors BimL, BimS and Noxa, enhancing the cytotoxic potential of the two drugs. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that GSI-I/TRAIL combination could represent a novel and potentially effective tool for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23686163

Portanova, Patrizia; Notaro, Antonietta; Pellerito, Ornella; Sabella, Selenia; Giuliano, Michela; Calvaruso, Giuseppe

2013-05-17

332

T cell response to myelin basic protein in the context of the multiple sclerosis-associated HLA-DR15 haplotype: peptide binding, immunodominance and effector functions of T cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we evaluated the role of the two functional HLA-DR heterodimers, DR2a (DR? paired with the ? chain encoded by DRB5*0101) and DR2b (DR? paired with the ? chain encoded by DRB1*1501), that are coexpressed in the multiple sclerosis (MS)-associated haplotype HLA-DR15 Dw2, in presenting myelin basic protein (MBP) peptides to MBP-specific T cell lines (TCL). Our results

M Vergelli; M Kalbus; S. C Rojo; B Hemmer; H Kalbacher; L Tranquill; H Beck; H. F McFarland; R De Mars; E. O Long; R Martin

1997-01-01

333

C4 Chido 3 and 6 distinguish two diabetogenic haplotypes: HLA-B49, SC01,DR4,DQw8 and B8,SC01,DR3,DQw2.  

PubMed

The combination of the HLA complement allotypes BFS, C2C, C4AQ0 (deleted gene) and C4B1, termed SC01 complotype, usually present in the HLA-B8,DR3,DQw2 diabetogenic haplotype, has also been found in a novel "low frequency" HLA-B49,DR4,DQw8 haplotype associated with Spanish insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Family studies of C4 antigenic determinants Rodgers/Chido and their specific C4d nucleotide sequences confirm that this novel haplotype bearing Chido -3, -6 is not due to a recent recombination from the common HLA-B8,DR3 haplotype bearing Chido 3,6; moreover, Chido analysis at the serological or DNA level is presently the only way to distinguish both SC01 complotypes, since BF, C2, steroid 21-hydroxylase and C4 genes do not reveal other differences by restriction fragment analysis. On the other hand, HLA-B49,SC01,DR4 is the first DR4-bearing IDDM-susceptible haplotype with a deleted C4 gene described so far and the only DR4-bearing haplotype found in the Spanish population. This report further supports the fact that extended haplotypes with deleted (or "not duplicated") genes in the class III region contain IDDM-susceptibility more often than non-deleted (or "duplicated") haplotypes in the Spanish and other Mediterranean populations. PMID:1682241

Segurado, O G; Giles, C M; Iglesias-Casarrubios, P; Corell, A; Martinez-Laso, J; Vicario, J L; Arnaiz-Villena, A

1991-09-01

334

Polymorphism of the HLA-D Region in American Blacks. A DR3 Haplotype Generated by Recombination,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The polymorphism of HLA class II molecules in man is particularly evident when comparisons between population groups are made. This study describes a DR3 haplotype commonly present in the American black population. Unlike the Northern European population ...

C. K. Hurley P. Gregersen N. Steiner J. Bell R. Hartzman

1988-01-01

335

Sequence of a new DR12 allele with two silent mutations that affect PCR-SSP typing.  

PubMed

A new HLA-DR12 allele has been identified in a European Caucasoid bone marrow donor. The DRB1*12012 allele differs from DRB1*12011 by two silent substitutions at codons 72 and 78, two polymorphic positions used for DNA subtyping of the DR12 serotype. The co-occurence of the two nucleotide changes is unique to the DR12 group and results in a new PCR-SSP typing pattern. The complete HLA type of the donor is A24, A68; B55, B61; Cw*01, Cw*0304; DRB1*12012, DRB1*1402; DRB3*0101, DRB3*0202; DQB1*0301. HLA-DRB1*12012 is a rare allele as it occurs in < 0.2% of DR12 donors. PMID:12028552

Zanone, R; Bettens, F; Tiercy, J-M

2002-02-01

336

Statement by Dr. Rita R. Colwell, Director, National Science Foundation, On Award of the Nobel Prize in Economics  

NSF Publications Database

... by Dr. Rita R. Colwell, Director, National Science Foundation, On Award of the Nobel Prize in ... 2003 Nobel Prize for Economics. The National Science Foundation has supported the research of both ...

337

Statement by Dr. Rita R. Colwell, Director, National Science Foundation, On Award of the Nobel Prize in Physics  

NSF Publications Database

... by Dr. Rita R. Colwell, Director, National Science Foundation, On Award of the Nobel Prize in ... of atoms in superfluids. The National Science Foundation is proud to have supported his research ...

338

Modeling the Ternary Complex TCR-V?/CollagenII(261-273)/HLA-DR4 Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Background It is known that genetic predisposition to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with the MHC class II allele HLA-DR4 and that residues 261–273 of type II collagen (huCollp261) represent an immunodominant T cell epitope restricted by the DR4 molecule. Despite recent advances in characterization of MHC and T cell receptor (TCR) contacts to this epitope, the atomic details of TCR/huCollp261/HLA-DR4 ternary complex are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have used computational modeling to get insight into this interaction. A three-dimensional model of the TCR V? domain from a DR4+ patient affected by RA has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the TCR V? domain in complex with huCollp261/HLA-DR4 was obtained from a docking approach in conjunction with a filtering procedure based on biochemical information. The best complex from the docking experiments was then refined by 20 ns of molecular dynamics simulation in explicit water. The predicted model is consistent with available experimental data. Our results indicate that residues 97–101 of CDR3? are critical for recognition of huCollp261/HLA-DR4 by TCR. We also show that TCR contacts on p/MHC surface affect the conformation of the shared epitope expressed by DR alleles associated with RA susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance This work presents a three-dimensional model for the ternary complex TCR-V?/collagenII(261–273)/HLA-DR4 associated with rheumatoid arthritis that can provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of self reactivity.

De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Giardina, Bruno; Bianchi, Caterina; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Pirolli, Davide; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; De Santis, Maria; Di Sante, Gabriele; Ria, Francesco

2010-01-01

339

RRR-?-tocopherol induces human breast cancer cells to undergo apoptosis via death receptor 5 (DR5)-mediated apoptotic signaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goal of this study was to investigate the pro-apoptotic properties of RRR-?-tocopherol (?T) in human breast cancer cells. ?T was shown to induce cancer cells but not normal cells to undergo apoptosis, sensitize cancer cells to Tumor necrosis factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis, and increase death receptor 5 (DR5) mRNA, protein and cell surface expression. Knockdown of DR5 attenuated ?T-induced

Weiping Yu; Sook-Kyung Park; Li Jia; Richa Tiwary; Wenjun W. Scott; Jing Li; Pei Wang; Marla Simmons-Menchaca; Bob G. Sanders; Kimberly Kline

2008-01-01

340

Widespread Alu repeat-driven expansion of consensus DR2 retinoic acid response elements during primate evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Nuclear receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors whose signaling controls numerous aspects of development and physiology. Many receptors recognize DNA hormone response elements formed by direct repeats of RGKTCA motifs separated by 1 to 5 bp (DR1-DR5). Although many known such response elements are conserved in the mouse and human genomes, it is unclear to which extent transcriptional regulation by

David Laperriere; Tian-Tian Wang; John H White; Sylvie Mader

2007-01-01

341

Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a high-affinity zinc importer (DrZIP1) from zebrafish (Danio rerio)  

PubMed Central

Zinc is a vital micronutrient to all organisms and a potential toxicant to aquatic animals. It is therefore of importance to understand the mechanism of zinc regulation. In the present study, we molecularly cloned and functionally characterized a zinc transporter of the SLC39A family [commonly referred to as the ZIP (Zrt- and Irt-related protein) family] from the gill of zebrafish (Danio rerio) (DrZIP1). DrZIP1 protein was found to localize at the plasma membrane and to function as a zinc uptake transporter when being expressed in either chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) embryonic 214 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes. In comparison with pufferfish transporter proteins (FrZIP2 and FrECaC) that are known to facilitate cellular zinc uptake, DrZIP1 appears to have high affinity to bind and transport zinc, suggesting that it may be a high-affinity zinc uptake transporter (Km<0.5 ?M) in fish. Orthologues of DrZIP1 were also identified in both freshwater and seawater pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes), indicating that these proteins may be functionally conserved among different fish species. DrZIP1 mRNA is expressed in all the tissues examined in the present study and thus DrZIP1 may be a constitutive zinc uptake transporter in many cell types of zebrafish.

2005-01-01

342

Effects of gold sodium thiomalate on interferon stimulation of C2 synthesis and HLA-DR expression by human monocytes.  

PubMed

Gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN) is a T cell-derived lymphokine that has potent macrophage-activating properties. It increases Fc receptor density, increases the formation and release of reactive oxygen intermediates, increases the synthesis and release of complement cascade proteins, especially C2 and factor B, and increases class II (HLA-DR) antigen expression. These effects may play a role in the potentiation of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. We examined the possibility that gold sodium thiomalate (GST), an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, would inhibit gamma-IFN-mediated stimulation of monocyte/macrophages. GST in concentrations attainable in vivo was shown to inhibit both spontaneous and gamma-IFN-stimulated C2 production up to 50%. GST inhibition could be only partially overcome with increasing concentrations of gamma-IFN. In addition, GST inhibited gamma-IFN-stimulated HLA-DR expression at the highest concentrations tested (20-50 micrograms/ml). GST alone in low concentrations (0.1-5 micrograms/ml) was found to increase HLA-DR antigen expression as quantitated by several methods, including flow cytometry, cell surface enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting. This GST-stimulated increase in HLA-DR antigen expression paralleled an increased ability of monocytes to present antigen. The mechanism by which low concentrations of GST stimulate HLA-DR antigen expression is unclear, but was shown by 35S-methionine cell labeling not to involve increased HLA-DR protein synthesis. PMID:3117066

Sanders, K M; Carlson, P L; Littman, B H

1987-09-01

343

Probing the Gas Phase Folding Kinetics of Peptide Ions by IR Activated DR-ECD  

PubMed Central

The effect of infrared (IR) irradiation on the electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation pattern of peptide ions was investigated. IR heating increases the internal energy of the precursor ion, which often amplifies secondary fragmentation, resulting in the formation of w-type ions as well as other secondary fragments. Improved sequence coverage was observed with IR irradiation before ECD, likely due to the increased conformational heterogeneity upon IR heating, rather than faster breakdown of the initially formed product ion complex, as IR heating after ECD did not have similar effect. Although the ECD fragment ion yield of peptide ions does not typically increase with IR heating, in double resonance (DR) ECD experiments, fragment ion yield may be reduced by fast resonant ejection of the charge reduced molecular species, and becomes dependent on the folding state of the precursor ion. In this work, the fragment ion yield was monitored as a function of the delay between IR irradiation and the DR-ECD event to study the gas phase folding kinetics of the peptide ions. Furthermore, the degree of intra-complex hydrogen transfer of the ECD fragment ion pair was used to probe the folding state of the precursor ion. Both methods gave similar refolding time constants of ~1.5 s?1, revealing that gaseous peptide ions often refold in less than a second, much faster than their protein counterparts. It was also found from the IR-DR-ECD study that the intra-molecular H• transfer rate can be an order of magnitude higher than that of the separation of the long-lived c/z product ion complexes, explaining the common observation of c• and z type ions in ECD experiments.

Lin, Cheng; Cournoyer, Jason J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

2011-01-01

344

Shut out of medicine in Canada, Dr. Leonora Howard King blazed a trail in China.  

PubMed Central

After being denied the opportunity to study medicine and work at home, Dr. Leonora Howard King became Canada's first female medical missionary to China. Although she attempted to wear both the religious and secular hats handed her by the Women's Foreign Missionary Society, Howard King found that she was too busy meeting the medical needs of destitute women and children to proselytize. She won the favour of Chinese royalty, and after treating hundreds of wounded soldiers during the 1894-95 war with Japan became the first Western woman to become a mandarin, an honour bestowed by her adopted country. Images p1742-a

Negodaeff-Tomsik, M

1996-01-01

345

Automatic unsupervised classification of all SDSS\\/DR7 galaxy spectra  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the 'k-means' cluster analysis algorithm, we carry out an unsupervised\\u000aclassification of all galaxy spectra in the seventh and final Sloan Digital Sky\\u000aSurvey data release (SDSS\\/DR7). Except for the shift to restframe wavelengths,\\u000aand the normalization to the g-band flux, no manipulation is applied to the\\u000aoriginal spectra. The algorithm guarantees that galaxies with similar spectra\\u000abelong to

J. Sanchez Almeida; J. A. L. Aguerri; C. Munoz-Tunon; A. de Vicente

2010-01-01

346

Memorial tribute to astrobiology pioneers Dr. David S. Mckay and academician Georgy A. Zavarzin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the past two years, the world has lost two great pioneers of the field of Astrobiology-Dr. David Stewart McKay who worked at the NASA-Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, USA and Academician Georgy Alexandrovich Zavarzin of the Institute of Microbiology of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Professor of the Moscow State University in Moscow, Russia. The Volume of the Proceedings of the 2013 SPIE Instruments, Methods, and Missions for Astrobiology XVI is dedicated to the memory of these great scientists. We remember our dear friends and review some of their many important contributions to Planetary Science, Geology, Meteoritics, Microbiology and Astrobiology.

Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Rozhnov, Sergei V.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

2013-09-01

347

Prediction of desmoglein-3 peptides reveals multiple shared T-cell epitopes in HLA DR4- and DR6- associated Pemphigus vulgaris  

PubMed Central

Background Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a severe autoimmune blistering skin disorder that is strongly associated with major histocompatibility complex class II alleles DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503. The target antigen of PV, desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), is crucial for initiating T-cell response in early disease. Although a number of T-cell specificities within Dsg3 have been reported, the number is limited and the role of T-cells in the pathogenesis of PV remains poorly understood. We report here a structure-based model for the prediction of peptide binding to DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503. The scoring functions were rigorously trained, tested and validated using experimentally verified peptide sequences. Results High predictivity is obtained for both DRB1*0402 (r2 = 0.90, s = 1.20 kJ/mol, q2 = 0.82, spress = 1.61 kJ/mol) and DQB1*0503 (r2 = 0.95, s = 1.20 kJ/mol, q2 = 0.75, spress = 2.15 kJ/mol) models, compared to experimental data. We investigated the binding patterns of Dsg3 peptides and illustrate the existence of multiple immunodominant epitopes that may be responsible for both disease initiation and propagation in PV. Further analysis reveals that DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503 may share similar specificities by binding peptides at different binding registers, thus providing a molecular mechanism for the dual HLA association observed in PV. Conclusion Collectively, the results of this study provide interesting new insights into the pathology of PV. This is the first report illustrating high-level of cross-reactivity between both PV-implicated alleles, DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503, as well as the existence of a potentially large number of T-cell epitopes throughout the entire Dsg3 extracellular domain (ECD) and transmembrane region. Our results reveal that DR4 and DR6 PV may initiate in the ECD and transmembrane region respectively, with implications for immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of this autoimmune disease.

Tong, Joo Chuan; Tan, Tin Wee; Sinha, Animesh A; Ranganathan, Shoba

2006-01-01

348

HLA-DR4-Ala74 beta is associated with risk and poor outcome of severe aplastic anemia.  

PubMed

Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a heterogeneous hematological disorder with a high mortality. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play a role in a considerable proportion of SAA cases. For instance, the human lymphocyte antigen HLA-DR2 has been repeatedly demonstrated to be over-represented in SAA patients. In this paper, we expand on the evidence for the contribution of HLA polymorphism in the susceptibility to SAA, which was obtained using the "high-resolution" technique of HLA-DRB1 subtyping. The DRB1*1501 allele appeared to be responsible for the predominance of DR2 specificity in SAA patients and was the most significant risk factor for this disease. It was observed in 23/44 (52.3%) patients versus 22/100 (22.0%) donors [odds ratio (OR) = 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8-8.3; P = 0.0005, corrected P (Pc) < 0.05]. In addition, DRB1*04 alleles also displayed non-random distribution in the SAA group. In particular, DRB1*04 variants coding for alanine at position 74 of the DR beta 1 chain (HLA-DR4-Ala74 beta subtype) were detected in all 13 DR4-positive SAA patients but only in 15/24 (62.5%) controls (OR = 16.6; 95% CI: 0.9-312.0; P = 0.015). Multiple comparison analysis confirmed that the HLA-DR4-Ala74 beta subtype confers susceptibility to SAA independently from the DRB1*1501 allele. Finally, examination of the clinical records has shown that the HLA-DR4-Ala74 beta subtype is associated with poor outcome of SAA. PMID:11261326

Kapustin, S I; Popova, T I; Lyshchov, A A; Imyanitov, E N; Blinov, M N; Abdulkadyrov, K M

2001-02-01

349

Structural analysis of the N-linked oligosaccharides on HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules from normal lymphocytes  

SciTech Connect

To determine if the glycosylation pattern of class II molecules was similar for normal cells and B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, they have used serial lectin affinity chromatography to analyze the structure of the N-linked oligosaccharides on HLA-DR and DQ molecules derived from normal tonsil cells. Tonsil cells were labeled with /sup 3/H-mannose and chased so that only mature molecules would be analyzed. Invariant chain was dissociated from ..cap alpha beta.. complexes. HLA-DQ molecules migrated as single ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. chains; the DR molecules migrated as two ..cap alpha.. chains (..cap alpha../sub 1/ and ..cap alpha../sub 2/) and two ..beta.. chains (..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/). Pronase released glycopeptides were analyzed by serial lectin affinity chromatography. The DQ ..cap alpha.. chain bore one high mannose oligosaccharide and one complex tri- or tetra-antennary oligosaccharide which was fucosylated 50% of the time. The majority of the DQ ..beta.. chains bore one complex fucosylated tri- or tetra-antennary oligosaccharide. The glycosylation patterns of the DR ..cap alpha../sub 1/ and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ chains and DR ..beta../sub 1/ chains were similar to that of the DQ ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. chains, respectively. However, the DR ..beta../sub 2/ chain bore predominantly a high-mannose oligosaccharide. These data suggest that the glycosylation patterns of DQ molecules are similar to those of DR molecules, and that the glycosylation patterns of DR molecules are similar for normal and lymphoblastoid cells.

Zacheis, M.; Schwartz, B.D.

1986-03-05

350

Optical absorption and SHG in PMMA:DR1 thin films as function of poling time  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amorphous, PMMA: DR1: surfactant and PMMA:DR1:TEOS thin films were prepared by dip-coating. All films were calcined at 70 °C for 3 hours. For nanostructured thin films two ionic surfactants were used, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to obtain two different nanostructures of the PMMA matrix: lamellar, and hexagonal, respectively. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to determine the long-order structure tailored in the films. The measurements of the optical absorption and the second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity were carried out at different orientation arrangements of the chromophores embedded in the films. The chromophore orientation distributions were obtained by means of the corona technique. These distributions depend on the corona poling time. We physically modeled the optical absorption and the second harmonic generation experimental results as function of the corona poling time, employing only one fitting parameter related to the matrix-chromophore interactions. The physical model and the experimental results were in an excellent agreement. The experimental results fitted by the model are shown in plots of order parameter against corona poling time and SHG intensity against corona poling time. The amorphous films provide a larger SHG intensity values than those obtained from the nanostructured films. Thin films with lamellar structure have a SHG intensity bigger than those from hexagonal and PMMA:TEOS thin films.

García-Macedo, Jorge A.; Franco, Alfredo; Valverde-Aguilar, Guadalupe; Aguilar-Gutiérrez, Carlos

2007-10-01

351

The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.  

PubMed Central

In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

Brunicardi, F. Charles; Cotton, Ronald T.; Cole, George W.; Martinez, George

2007-01-01

352

Rheumatic fever in Ireland: the role of Dr Monica Lea Wilson (1889-1971).  

PubMed

In 1869 William Stokes pointed out that the severity of rheumatic fever in Dublin had declined over recent decades. Similar worldwide decline led to the closure of many internationally famous rheumatic fever centres. The discovery by Robert Collis that rheumatic fever was a sequel to haemolytic streptococcal infection and the subsequent discovery of penicillin accelerated the decline. St Gabriel's Hospital in Dublin opened in 1951 under the clinical direction of Dr Monica Lea Wilson. Contrary to contemporary medical opinion a regimen of very prolonged bed rest was enforced. From 1961 the family doctors became concerned at the adverse psychological effects of the unnecessarily prolonged hospital stay. Twenty-seven of the 56 inpatients were re-assessed. None of them showed any evidence of active rheumatic fever and their parents took them home. The hospital closed in 1968. Dr Lea Wilson distanced herself from mainstream medicine and she is best remembered for having presented an unrecognized Caravaggio painting to the Jesuit Order in recognition of their pastoral support at the time of the controversial assassination in 1920 of her husband Percival, an Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary. PMID:23610223

Ward, O Conor

2013-02-01

353

Effect of dabrafenib on melanoma cell lines harbouring the BRAFV600D/R mutations  

PubMed Central

Background Conventional therapeutic agents are largely unsatisfactory into the treatment of malignant melanoma. Recently, an innovative approach based on inhibitors of the mutated BRAF gene (which represents the most prevalent alteration in melanoma patients) appears very promising from the clinical point of view. On this regard, a new compound, dabrafenib (GSK2118436), has been demonstrated to be effective in patients carrying the BRAFV600E/K mutations. We here tested dabrafenib for its capability to inhibit cell growth on primary melanoma cell lines, established from patients' tumour tissues and carrying the BRAFV600D/R mutations. Methods Three melanoma cell lines were tested: M257 wild-type BRAF, LCP BRAFV600R and WM266 BRAFV600D. The MTT assays were performed using standardized approaches. To evaluate the inhibition of MAPK pathway and the consequent inhibition of cellular proliferation, the phosphorylation of ERK was examined by Western Blot analysis performed on total protein extracts from cell lines after treatment with dabrafenib. Results Our experiments demonstrated an effective action of Dabrafenib (GSK2118436) and the inhibition of MAPK pathway in melanoma cell lines carrying BRAFV600D/R mutations. Conclusion These results could be helpful to enlarge the number of melanoma patients who may benefit of a more effective targeted treatment.

2013-01-01

354

A software tool for quality assurance of computed/digital radiography (CR/DR) systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recommended methods to test the performance of computed radiography (CR) systems have been established by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Report No. 93, "Acceptance Testing and Quality Control of Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Imaging Systems". The quality assurance tests are categorized by how frequently they need to be performed. Quality assurance of CR systems is the responsibility of the facility that performs the exam and is governed by the state in which the facility is located. For Example, the New York State Department of Health has established a guide which lists the tests that a CR facility must perform for quality assurance. This study aims at educating the reader about the new quality assurance requirements defined by the state. It further demonstrates an easy to use software tool, henceforth referred to as the Digital Physicist, developed to aid a radiologic facility in conforming with state guidelines and monitoring quality assurance of CR/DR imaging systems. The Digital Physicist provides a vendor independent procedure for quality assurance of CR/DR systems. Further it, generates a PDF report with a brief description of these tests and the obtained results.

Desai, Nikunj; Valentino, Daniel J.

2011-03-01

355

Molecular and atomic emission-line images of DR 21 and GGD 37  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Molecular and atomic emission-line images of DR 21 and GGD 37 PI: J.R. Houck Technical contact: Dan Watson DR 21 and GGD 37 (Cep A West) are two of the best-resolved examples of bipolar outflows and shocks from massive young stellar objects. In this program we will use the high-spectral-resolution modules of the IRS to obtained detailed images of emission by molecular hydrogen (three pure rotational lines), water (13 pure rotational lines) , and several low-excitation ions and atoms (e.g. [Si II], [Fe II], [S I] and [Ne II]). The structure of the shocks will be resolved in the images; in particular the dual cloud-shock/jet-shock structures will be cleanly separated in the many nearly-edge-on shock rims in these objects. This provides a unique opportunity -- not possible from suborbital platformas -- for study of the interaction of a YSO outflow and its surrounding cloud, using probes that trace the bulk of the material (H2) as well as the bulk of the radiated energy (H2O) in the shocked gas, and will provide strong constraints on models of the interaction and on the influence of outflows and shocks on ongoing star formation.

Houck, James R.; Watson, Dan

2004-09-01

356

[Optimization of exposure conditions for amorphous selenium direct conversion DR-based mammography system].  

PubMed

A new direct-conversion detector for DR mammography has improved the detectability of microcalcifications and masses. Each optimized exposure condition (target/filter combination and tube voltage) was defined through comparison of physical values and visual evaluation on breast specimens using the innovative DR mammography. The contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) of PMMA phantoms of various thicknesses were obtained under a variety of exposure conditions whose average glandular doses (AGDs) were made consistent. Fifty breast specimens were irradiated under these combinations. Visual evaluation was conducted on the images, whose histograms were controlled for consistency. In the phantoms with thicknesses of 20 mm or more, tungsten/rhodium had the highest CNRs of the targets/filters such as molybdenum/molybdenum and molybdenum/rhodium. For visualizing microcalcifications and masses on breast specimens of thicknesses of 35 mm and below, molybdenum/molybdenum was the best. Nevertheless, to obtain better image quality, molybdenum/rhodium was superior for 35-55 mm thickness, and tungsten/rhodium was superior for 55 mm and above under the same AGD, enabling accurate and efficient diagnosis. The study showed that the exposure conditions differ for obtaining the highest CNR using phantoms and those under which breast specimen images allow the most accurate and efficient diagnosis. In addition, image evaluations of the breast specimens allowed optimization of exposure conditions that are closer to those of the actual diagnosis using mammography. PMID:21937839

Endo, Tokiko; Shiraiwa, Misaki; Oiwa, Mikinao; Nishida, Chikako; Morita, Takako; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Sato, Yasuyuki; Hayashi, Takako; Ichihara, Shu; Moritani, Suzuko; Hirofuji, Yoshiaki; Wakayama, Takuya

2011-01-01

357

Precious Metals In SDSS QSOs: The Hunt For Intergalactic CIV In DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CIV doublet has proven to be an important tracer of the IGM and its evolution from z = 6 to 0. These transitions have been well-studied at high redshifts because: they are strong transitions of common metals; they are observable outside the Ly-alpha forest, where they become easier to identify; they redshift into optical passbands for 1.5 < z < 4.5; and they are resonant doublets, which give them distinctive characteristics and enable the survey to be largely automated. However, the 1.5 < z < 4.5 results can be vastly improved by surveying the thousands of SDSS DR7 QSOs. Having done this, we now present early results on the over 15,000 CIV systems that we identified. We are constructing a uniform 0 < z < 6 dataset by combining the SDSS survey with the z < 1 HST results (Cooksey et al. 2010) and the new z > 5 FIRE results (Simcoe et al. 2011). Thus, we can compare apples-to-apples: the absorber line density over time and the CIV mass density evolution. This is the first in a series on our surveys for various metal-line absorption systems in SDSS DR7 QSOs.

Cooksey, Kathy; Kao, M.; Simcoe, R.; O'Meara, J.; Prochaska, J.; Seyffert, E.

2012-01-01

358

Presence of the Dr receptor in normal human tissues and its possible role in the pathogenesis of ascending urinary tract infection.  

PubMed Central

The Dr hemagglutinin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli recognizes the Dra blood group antigen, a component of the IFC or Cromer-related blood group complex. The present report used the Dr hemagglutinin to demonstrate location of the Dr receptor in selected human tissues and to evaluate the possible use of this lectin as a tissue marker recognizing sites sensitive for bacterial colonization. It was found that the Dr receptor was expressed in different parts of the digestive, urinary, genital, and respiratory tracts, and skin. Intense staining by Dr hemagglutinin was shown in colonic, bronchial, and endometrial glands, and skin eccrine sweat glands. Structures of the urinary tract showing strong fluorescence were renal tubular basement membrane, Bowmans' capsule, and transitional epithelium. The role of Dra antigen as receptor for adhesion for Dr-positive E. coli in ascending colonization of urinary tract and the possible importance of Dra in human pathology is discussed. Images Figure 1

Nowicki, B.; Truong, L.; Moulds, J.; Hull, R.

1988-01-01

359

Presence of the Dr receptor in normal human tissues and its possible role in the pathogenesis of ascending urinary tract infection.  

PubMed

The Dr hemagglutinin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli recognizes the Dra blood group antigen, a component of the IFC or Cromer-related blood group complex. The present report used the Dr hemagglutinin to demonstrate location of the Dr receptor in selected human tissues and to evaluate the possible use of this lectin as a tissue marker recognizing sites sensitive for bacterial colonization. It was found that the Dr receptor was expressed in different parts of the digestive, urinary, genital, and respiratory tracts, and skin. Intense staining by Dr hemagglutinin was shown in colonic, bronchial, and endometrial glands, and skin eccrine sweat glands. Structures of the urinary tract showing strong fluorescence were renal tubular basement membrane, Bowmans' capsule, and transitional epithelium. The role of Dra antigen as receptor for adhesion for Dr-positive E. coli in ascending colonization of urinary tract and the possible importance of Dra in human pathology is discussed. PMID:3052090

Nowicki, B; Truong, L; Moulds, J; Hull, R

1988-10-01

360

HLA-DR4 subtype frequencies in rheumatoid arthritis indicate that DRB1 is the major susceptibility locus within the HLA class II region  

SciTech Connect

Susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be due to the presence of shared functional epitopes common the HLA-DR {beta} chains of several RA-associated haplotypes. The authors have obtained direct evidence for this hypothesis by using the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing the DRB1 and DQB1 genes from RA patients. A highly conserved epitope present on DR {beta} chains of DR4 and DR1 haplotypes was found in 83% of 149 patients with classical or definite RA but was found in only 46% of 100 control individuals. Two Dw subtypes of DR4 (Dw4 and Dw14) were associated with disease susceptibility but two other subtypes (Dw10 and Dw13) were not. Sequence differences between these subtypes implicate those residues around the putative antigen binding site of the DR {beta} molecule in the pathogenesis of RA. These data provide a basis for understanding host susceptibility to RA at a molecular level.

Wordsworth, B.P.; Bell, J.I. (Univ. of Oxford (England)); Lanchbury, J.S.S.; Sakkas, L.I.; Welsh, K.I.; Panayi, G.S. (Guy's Hospital, London (England))

1989-12-01

361

Impaired fc-mediated mononuclear phagocyte system clearance in HLA-DR2 and MT1-positive healthy young adults.  

PubMed

Normal individuals with an HLA haplotype containing either DR2, MT1, or B8/DR3 are more likely to have abnormally prolonged Fc receptor-mediated mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) clearance of IgG-sensitized autologous erythrocytes than their normal counterparts without such haplotypes. Although measurement of Fc receptor binding by rosette formation and saturable IgG aggregate binding revealed no differences among groups, Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-sensitized bovine erythrocytes by monocytes was decreased in the DR2-positive and MT1-positive individuals. The basal in vivo MPS clearance in normal individuals may be immunogenetically determined and may reflect differences in phagocytic rates. PMID:6222132

Kimberly, R P; Gibofsky, A; Salmon, J E; Fotino, M

1983-05-01

362

Immune response to Amb a VI (Ra6) is associated with HLA-DR5 in allergic humans  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-pure short ragweed pollen allergen Amb a VI (Ra6), mol. wt. 11,500 daltons, was used to explore the relationship between HLA-DR and specific immune responsiveness in 115 Caucasian subjects who were skin-test positive to short ragweed or 5 other common inhalant allergens. Immune responsiveness to Amb a VI was assessed by measuring IgE and IgG antibodies (Abs) by double Ab radioimmunoassay. A striking and significant association was found between IgEAb responsiveness to Amb a VI and the possession of HLA-DR5: 13/16 (81%) of responders vs. 12/99 (12%) of non-responders were DR5+ (p = 8 x 10/sup -8/). The association with IgGAb responsiveness was less striking (p = 0.003). These results add to the growing body of evidence that studies using ultra-pure allergens provide valuable insight into the genetic basis of human immune responsiveness.

Marsh, D.G.; Freidhoff, L.R.; Bias, W.B.; Roebber, M.

1986-03-01

363

Increased Rate of Apoptosis and Diminished Phagocytic Ability of Human Neutrophils Infected with Afa\\/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

The proinflammatory effect of Afa\\/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa\\/Dr DAEC) strains have been recently demonstrated in vitro by showing that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transepithelial migration is induced after bacterial colonization of apical intestinal monolayers. The effect of Afa\\/Dr DAEC-PMN interaction on PMN behavior has been not investigated. Because of the putative virulence mechanism of PMN apoptosis during infectious diseases

Patrick Brest; Frederic Betis; Nicolas Cuburu; Eric Selva; Magali Herrant; Alain Servin; Patrick Auberger; Paul Hofman

2004-01-01

364

Starburst-AGN Connections: Clues from Poststarburst Broad Line AGN in the SDSS DR2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sample of 74 poststarburst broad line AGN are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 (SDSS DR2). Because in these so-called "Q+A"s, we can catch with a smoking gun the change of the recent star formation in the host galaxies, and in the meantime, view the nuclear activity directly, the present sample suits to address the important yet long debated issue concerning the physical link between starburst and AGN phenomena. We find that more than half of the Q+As can be classified as Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) and the mass accretion rate of the sample is significantly higher than that of optically-selected quasars. If these engorging objects, especially the NLS1s are indeed AGN in their early evolution stage, this result strongly suggests that the nuclear activity be driven by starburst with a time delay of ˜ a few hundred Myr.

Zhou, H.; Wang, T.; Dong, X.; Wang, J.; Lu, H.

365

Enhanced dissociation of HLA-DR-bound peptides in the presence of HLA-DM.  

PubMed

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM is a critical participant in antigen presentation that catalyzes the release of class II-associated invariant chain-derived peptides (CLIP) from newly synthesized class II histocompatibility molecules, freeing the peptide-binding site for acquisition of antigenic peptides. The mechanism for the selective release of CLIP but not other peptides is unknown. DM was found to enhance the rate of peptide dissociation to an extent directly proportional to the intrinsic rate of peptide dissociation from HLA-DR, regardless of peptide sequence. Thus, CLIP is rapidly released in the presence of DM, because its intrinsic rate of dissociation is relatively high. In antigen presentation, DM has the potential to markedly enhance the rate of peptide exchange, favoring the presentation of peptides with slower intrinsic rates of dissociation. PMID:8849454

Weber, D A; Evavold, B D; Jensen, P E

1996-10-25

366

In silico methods for predicting T-cell epitopes: Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde?  

PubMed

In silico tools offer an attractive alternative strategy to the cumbersome experimental approaches to identify T-cell epitopes. These computational tools have metamorphosed over the years into complex algorithms that attempt to efficiently predict the binding of a plethora of peptides to HLA alleles. In recent years, the scientific community has embraced these techniques to reduce the burden of wet-laboratory experimentation. Although there are some splendid examples of the utility of these methods, there are also evidences where they fall short and remain inconsistent. Hence, are these computational tools 'Dr Jekyll' or 'Mr Hyde' to the researcher, who wishes to utilize them intrepidly? This article reviews the progress and pitfalls of the in silico tools that identify T-cell epitopes. PMID:19811074

Gowthaman, Uthaman; Agrewala, Javed N

2009-10-01

367

Superestructuras en el universo: caracterización e identificación en el catálgo SDSS-DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Superclusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the Universe. These structures are not presently virialized, so the application of theoreti- cal arguments in their identification is not straightforward. Luparello et al., (2011) present an identification method and establish the values of the pa- rameters in order to ensure that superstructures in the present Universe will evolve into virialized structures. In this work we define and characterize the largest structures in the Universe, in the framework of the cosmological model CDM. We briefly describe the Future Virialized Structures (FVS) identification method applied to the seventh data release of the Sloan Dig- ital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7, Abazajian et al., 2009) in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.12 and present the main properties of the FVS catalogue. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

Luparello, H. E.; Lares, M.; García Lambas, D.; Padilla, N.

368

Dr. Henry Head and lessons learned from his self-experiment on radial nerve transection.  

PubMed

In this paper the authors aim to review Dr. Henry Head's famous and dramatic nerve sectioning experiment. They discuss the implications of his experimental approach as well as the effect his experiment had on the field of neurology. Henry Head was a prominent British neurologist who contributed greatly to the understanding of the sensory examination through an experiment in which he had his own radial nerve transected. Head carefully documented the sensory changes following the sectioning. He hypothesized the existence of two separate sensory systems: protopathic and epicritic. Head was one of the first scientists to speculate on sensory dissociation, and his writings generated both enthusiasm and controversy. Although the ethical issue of self-experimentation was raised by his bold experiment and many aspects of his investigations and conclusions have been criticized, Head undoubtedly contributed important clinical lessons to neurology. Arguably, Henry Head's greatest contribution was the realization that the neurological portion of the sensory examination was anything but straightforward. PMID:20932092

Lenfest, Stephen M; Vaduva-Nemes, Andreea; Okun, Michael S

2010-10-08

369

Red bulgeless galaxies in SDSS DR7. Are there any AGN hosts?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the main goal of finding bulgeless galaxies harbouring supermassive black holes and showing, at most, just residual star formation activity, we have selected a sample of massive bulgeless red sequence galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), based on the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue. Multiwavelength data were retrieved using European Virtual Observatory (EURO-VO) tools, and the objects are characterized in terms of degree of star formation and the presence of an AGN. We have found seven objects that are quenched massive galaxies, have no prominent bulge and show signs of extra activity in their nuclei, five of them being central in their halo. These objects are rather robust candidates for rare systems that, though devoid of a significant bulge, harbour a supermassive black hole with an activity level likely capable of having halted the star formation through feedback.

Coelho, B.; Antón, S.; Lobo, C.; Ribeiro, B.

2013-10-01

370

Thermal regime database of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant cooler--Lake Dr?ksiai.  

PubMed

The hydrothermal regime of the Lake Dr?ksiai has changed when it became a cooler for the Ignalina NPP. For 18 years, 1981-1998, the hydrologists from Lithuanian Energy Institute have been investigating thermal state of the lake. The water temperature data owned by the laboratory is unique as it has been collected sequentially during 18 yr under wide range of different weather and INPP capacity conditions. Gathered information consists of lake surface temperature, related meteorological data and INPP operating capacity data. This information enables not only to state that the relationship between hydrological and meteorological/INPP capacity data exists (that is already known) but also to analyze its character. The aim of this study was to build computer database for data analysis and management as well as to create digital maps for further modelling and forecasting. ArcView software package was used for data set management and visualization. PMID:12381019

Sarauskiene, Diana

2002-10-01

371

Dr. Haakon Sæthre: a norwegian neuroscientist and his resistance against Nazi Germany.  

PubMed

Dr. Haakon Sæthre was a leader of Norwegian neurology and psychiatry. He was resourceful, compassionate and had immense pride in his independent homeland. He described Sæthre-Chotzen syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type III). When Nazi Germany occupied Norway during World War II, Sæthre fearlessly and actively resisted, from revoking his medical association membership, to hiding persecuted Jews as patients in his psychiatric ward and aiding in their escape to Sweden, to managing the largest "illegal" food warehouse in Oslo with Danish humanitarian aid. As a prominent and noticeable citizen, he was arrested and executed by the Nazis in reprisal for the resistance's assassination of a hated Norwegian Nazi. His legacy lives on in Norway, where he was honored by a scholarship fund, a portrait and multiple plaques at Ullevål Hospital, and a street and memorial statue in his hometown. He was a hero and should be remembered by all who practice neurology. PMID:23586544

Zeidman, Lawrence A

2013-01-01

372

Studies on the interaction between TWEAK and the death receptor WSL-1/TRAMP (DR3).  

PubMed

WSL-1/TRAMP (DR3) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily which exhibits effects on NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis. TWEAK, a novel TNF-related molecule, has been proposed as the ligand for this receptor. Utilising both human and murine TWEAK ligand, it is shown that TWEAK and WSL-1/TRAMP do not interact in an in vitro binding assay and that TWEAK binds strongly to cells that do not express WSL-1/TRAMP on the cell surface. Biological activity of TWEAK is also observed in these cells. Finally, cells isolated from WSL-1/TRAMP knockout mice are shown to retain their ability to interact with TWEAK. These results suggest that WSL-1/TRAMP is not the major receptor for TWEAK PMID:11094155

Kaptein, A; Jansen, M; Dilaver, G; Kitson, J; Dash, L; Wang, E; Owen, M J; Bodmer, J L; Tschopp, J; Farrow, S N

2000-11-24

373

A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7  

SciTech Connect

We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara /LBL, Berkeley; Rozo, Eduardo; /Chicago U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Siegel, Seth R.; /Michigan U.; Becker, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Busha, Michael; /SLAC; Gerdes, David; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Fermilab; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

2011-08-22

374

Synthesis and nonlinear optical properties of a peripherally functionalized hyperbranched polymer by DR1 chromophores.  

PubMed

The first peripheral postfunctionalization of a hyperbranched polyimide by nonlinear optic chromophores (DR1 derivative) was achieved using two different routes. The first one consists in the esterification of the terminal carboxylic acid groups, whereas the second is based on copper-catalyzed Huisgen reaction of the terminal propargylic ester groups. The resulting polymers display good solubility in classical organic solvents and good filmability because thick films can be prepared (up to 2.7 mum). The second-order nonlinear optical properties were measured by SHG at 1064 nm and we show that these hyperbranched polymers exhibit good poling efficiency and good thermal stability since the electro-optic activity remains stable up to 130 degrees C. These results illustrate the potential of hyperbranched polymers to host second-order nonlinear optical chromophores to replace dendrimers or classical linear polymers generally used in this area. PMID:20355797

Scarpaci, Annabelle; Blart, Errol; Montembault, Véronique; Fontaine, Laurent; Rodriguez, Vincent; Odobel, Fabrice

2009-08-01

375

'The anatomy lesson of Dr. Frederik Ruysch' of 1683, a milestone in knowledge about obstetrics.  

PubMed

'The anatomy lesson of Dr. Frederik Ruysch' (1683) belongs to the famous collection of group portraits of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons. In this painting, Ruysch is portrayed with a dissected corpse of a newborn, which was still attached to its placenta. Several guild officials as well as his son, who is holding a skeleton of an infant, are surrounding him. Dissection of a child instead of an executed criminal was very uncommon at that time. We therefore investigated the medical background of the painting, with the question why Ruysch was depicted with these obstetrical subjects. To this end, the contents of Ruysch's original works and his over 300-year-old anatomical specimens in the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera) in St. Petersburg were studied and described in the context of the painting. Major contributions to anatomical knowledge and to human development should be attributed to Ruysch, and these provided the essentials of the composition depicted in this painting. PMID:23845171

Ijpma, Frank F A; Radziun, Anna; van Gulik, Thomas M

2013-07-08

376

Micro-Macro Analysis of Viscoelastic Unidirectional Laminated Composite Plates Using DR Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dynamic Relaxation (DR) technique together with finite difference discritization is used to study the bending behavior of Mindlin composite plate including geometric nonlinearity. The overall behavior of the unidirectional composite is obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) micromechanical model, in any combination of normal and shear loading conditions, based on the assumptions of Simplified Unit Cell Method (SUCM). The composite system consists of nonlinear viscoelastic matrix reinforced by transversely isotropic elastic fibers. A recursive formulation for the hereditary integral of the Schapery viscoelastic constitutive equation in multiaxial stress state is used to model the nonlinear viscoelastic matrix material in the material level. The creep tests data is used for verification of the predicted response of the current approach. Under uniform lateral pressure, the laminated plate deformation with clamped and hinged edged constraints is predicted for various time steps.

Falahatgar, Seyed Reza; Salehi, Manouchehr; Aghdam, Mohammad Mohammadi

2010-10-01

377

Differential expression of Class II (DR & DQ) antigens by human gingival Langerhans' cells and keratinocytes in vitro.  

PubMed

The expression of the Class II products DR and DQ on human gingival epithelium was examined using immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase staining. Differential expression of Class II antigens was seen in chronic gingivitis in adults, with T6(+) DR(+) cells being more numerous than T6(+) DQ(+) cells. The periodontopathic organism Fusobacterium nucleatum (FN) induced DQ expression on Langerhans' cells (LC) during in vitro explant culture of gingival tissue. This effect was mimicked by endotoxin (LPS) from F. nucleatum and by E. coli LPS. These results indicate that differential expression of Class II products, a feature of chronic gingival inflammation, may result from the action of LPS on gingival LC. PMID:2435875

Walsh, L J; Seymour, G J; Powell, R N

1987-01-01

378

Structure and nucleotide sequence of the heavy chain gene of HLA-DR.  

PubMed Central

We have used a 175-nucleotide-long primer extension product corresponding to the 5' end of HLA-DR alpha-chain mRNA to isolate a genomic clone from a human DNA library. The entire HLA-DR alpha gene is contained in two contiguous EcoRI fragments spanning about 7.5 kilobases (kb); most of the sequence has been determined. The 5' end of the gene is contained in a 4.4-kb fragment, and the coding segments and the 3' untranslated region are contained in a 3.1-kb fragment. The gene is split into five exons. The 5' untranslated region, the leader peptide, and the first two NH2-terminal amino acids are fused into the first exon. Exons 2 and 3 represent two extracellular coding domains of mature p34. The transmembrane domain, cytoplasmic domain, and part of the 3' untranslated region are merged into a fourth exon. The rest of the 3' untranslated region is in exon 5. The predicted amino acid sequence of mature p34, as deduced from its gene structure, has 229 residues and reveals a single potential disulfide loop (between cysteine residues 107 and 163) as well as a 22-amino acid residue membrane integrated segment (residues 193-214). Fifteen amino acids (residues 215-229) reside on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane. There is considerable amino acid sequence homology between the second external domains of p34 and p29, as well as the immunoglobulin-like third domain of HLA-B7, and beta 2-microglobulin and the homologous constant region domains of the light and heavy chains of immunoglobulins. Images

Das, H K; Lawrance, S K; Weissman, S M

1983-01-01

379

THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wachter, Stefanie [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)

2011-12-01

380

Inferred spoligoforest topology unravels spatially bimodal distribution of mutations in the DR region.  

PubMed

Biomarkers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) mutate over time. Among the biomarkers of MTBC, spacer oligonucleotide type (spoligotype) and mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) patterns are commonly used to genotype clinical MTBC strains. In this study, we present an evolution model of spoligotype rearrangements using MIRU patterns to disambiguate the ancestors of spoligotypes. We use a large patient dataset from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to generate this model. Based on the contiguous deletion assumption and rare observation of convergent evolution, we first generate the most parsimonious forest of spoligotypes, called a spoligoforest, using three genetic distance measures. An analysis of topological attributes of the spoligoforest and number of variations at the direct repeat (DR) locus of each strain reveals interesting properties of deletions in the DR region. First, we compare our mutation model to existing mutation models of spoligotypes and find that our mutation model produces as many within-lineage mutation events as other models, with slightly higher segregation accuracy. Second, based on our mutation model, the number of descendant spoligotypes follows a power law distribution. Third, contrary to prior studies, the power law distribution does not plausibly fit to the mutation length frequency. Moreover, we find that the total number of mutation events at consecutive spacers follows a spatially bimodal distribution. The two modes are spacers 13 and 40, which are hotspots for chromosomal rearrangements, and the change point is spacer 34, which is absent in most MTBC strains. Based on this observation, we built two alternative models for mutation length frequency: the Starting Point Model (SPM) and the Longest Block Model (LBM). Both models are plausibly good fits to the mutation length frequency distribution, as verified by the goodness-of-fit test. We also apply SPM and LBM to a dataset from Institut Pasteur de Guadeloupe and verify that these models hold for different strain datasets. PMID:22987125

Ozcaglar, Cagri; Shabbeer, Amina; Kurepina, Natalia; Rastogi, Nalin; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

2012-09-01

381

Associations of HLA DR and DQ molecules with Lyme borreliosis in Latvian patients  

PubMed Central

Background Many autoimmune diseases are associated with variants of HLA genes such as those encoding the MHC complex. This correlation is not absolute, but may help in understanding of the molecular mechanism of disease. The purpose of this study was to determine HLA-DR,-DQ alleles in Latvian patients with Lyme borreliosis and control (healthy) persons. Case patients and control subjects were similar in age, gender and ethnic heritage and differed only as regards the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. The study included 25 patients with clinical stage – erythema migrans and 30 control (healthy) persons. HLA genotyping was performed by PCR with sequence-specific primers. Results The results show difference in HLA-DRB1 alleles distribution between patients and control subjects. The frequencies of HLA-DRB1 *04 (OR 11.24; p?DR alleles also have a significant influence, and, may have implications in our understanding of pathogenesis of this disease. In particular, HLA-DRB1*04 and DRB1 *17 (03) may contribute to the Lyme borreliosis development in Latvian population

2012-01-01

382

Association of the HLA-DR15\\/HLA-DQ6 haplotype with development of choroidal neovascular lesions in presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations of human leukocyte antigen DR2 (HLA-DR2) and HLA-B7 with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS) in the United States has been previously described. However, these associations were determined by means of low-resolution, complement-dependent cytotoxicity assays for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DR molecules. To determine whether POHS is associated with other HLA alleles within the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ loci, we

Humeyra Dabil; Henry J Kaplan; Brian F Duffy; Donna L Phelan; T Mohanakumar; Andrés Jaramillo

2003-01-01

383

Expression of the human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR3 transgene reduces the severity of demyelination in a murine model of multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed Central

The role of various MHC genes in determining the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains controversial. The HLA-DR3 gene has been associated with benign relapsing MS in some genetic epidemiologic studies, but with disease progression in others. We induced demyelination in highly susceptible B10.M and B10.Q mice expressing the DR3 (HLA-DRB1*0301) transgene to determine directly the effects of a human transgene by infecting them with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). DR3+ mice experienced a dramatic reduction in the extent and severity of demyelination compared with DR3- littermate controls, whereas anti-TMEV antibody titers, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and levels of infectious virus, virus antigen, and virus RNA were similar in both groups. To address a possible mechanism of how the human transgene is reducing virus-induced demyelination, we analyzed cytokine expression in the lesions and also determined whether B10.M mice can respond to peptides derived from the DR3 molecule. Intense staining for IFN-gamma and IL-4, T helper (TH) 1 and TH2 cytokines, respectively, was found in the lesions of TMEV-infected DR3- mice but not in the DR3+ transgenic mice at day 21 after infection. DR3 peptides elicited strong proliferative responses in B10.M mice but not in B10.M (DR3+) mice. These experiments are the first to demonstrate that a human class II DR gene can alter the severity of demyelination in an animal model of MS without influencing viral load. These experiments are consistent with a mechanism by which DR3 reduces demyelination by altering the cytokine expression in the lesions, possibly by deleting T cells involved in virus-induced pathology.

Drescher, K M; Nguyen, L T; Taneja, V; Coenen, M J; Leibowitz, J L; Strauss, G; Hammerling, G J; David, C S; Rodriguez, M

1998-01-01

384

Celebration of DOE's 35th Anniversary and the Secretary of Energy's Honor Awards, Keynote Address: Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu  

ScienceCinema

Dr. Steven Chu gives a keynote address marking the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Department of Energy (DOE). He highlights outstanding achievements of the Department and its scientists. Several of the Department's many Nobel Prize winners over the years are mentioned.

385

An Application of Bion's Theory of Thinking and Transformations in Hallucinosis. An Experience of Supervision with Dr Donald Meltzer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|I hope in this paper to show how Bion's theory of thinking and his later theory of transformations in hallucinosis, enabled psychotherapy in a special school setting many years ago to be undertaken with a psychotic child who was constantly hallucinating. The work was carried out under the expert supervision of Dr Donald Meltzer who managed…

Emanuel, Ricky

2012-01-01

386

Comparative Analysis and Research in Religious Education: A Response to Professors English, D'Souza, and Dr. Chartrand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this article is to respond to Professor English, Professor D'Souza, and Dr. Chartrand's comparative review of research in the British Journal of Religious Education and Religious Education over the ten-year period from 1992?2002. Their analysis is for the most part extended and complemented, although critical questions are also raised…

Barnes, L.

2005-01-01

387

Selection of Benign Primitive Hematopoietic Progenitors in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia on the Basis of HLA-DR Antigen Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a lethal malignancy of the human hematopoietic stem cell. Here we report that coexistent benign, primitive hematopoietic progenitors can be distinguished from their malignant counterparts in CML bone marrow by differences in cell surface antigen expres- sion. Selection of bone marrow cells expressing the CD34 antigen but lacking the HLA-DR antigen results in recovery of

Catherine M. Verfaillie; Wesley J. Miller; Kristin Boylan; Philip B. McGlave

1992-01-01

388

The Stars Belong to Everyone: The rhetorical practices of astronomer and science writer Dr. Helen Sawyer Hogg (1905--1993)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Astronomer and science writer Dr. Helen Sawyer Hogg (University of Toronto) reached a variety of audiences through different rhetorical forms. She communicated to her colleagues through her scholarly writings; she reached out to students and the public through her Toronto Star newspaper column entitled \\

Maria J. Cahill

2009-01-01

389

77 FR 66600 - DR6275 LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments, Protests, and/or Motions...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DI13-1-000] DR6275 LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments...inspection: a. Application Type: Declaration of Intention. b. Docket No: DI13-1-000...used in a local cabin. When a Declaration of Intention is filed with the...

2012-11-06

390

Family study of the major histocompatibility complex in HLA DR3 negative patients with systemic lupus erythematosus  

PubMed Central

Susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is known to be governed by genes in the HLA region of the 6th chromosome. From previous studies it has not been possible to distinguish between the effects of null genes for the complement component C4 and HLA-DR3, because of the marked linkage disequilibrium between DR3 and a null allele of C4A (C4A*QO) in caucasoid populations. We report here an immunogenetic study of 44 cases of SLE, selected because they were DR3 negative. Eighteen of the 30 Caucasoid cases (60%) had extended HLA haplotypes with a C4 null allele, compared with 22 of 60 (37%) of a control panel of 60 DR3 negative normal Caucasoid subjects. This difference is significant (?2=4·41; 0·05>P>0·01). Of 14 non-caucasoid patients analysed, 10 had a C4 null allele. It is concluded that the null alleles of the C4 A and B genes are themselves directly responsible for conferring susceptibility to SLE.

Batchelor, J. R.; Fielder, A. H. L.; Walport, M. J.; David, J.; Lord, D. K.; Davey, N.; Dodi, I. A.; Malasit, P.; Wanachiwanawin, W.; Bernstein, R.; Mackworth-Young, C.; Isenberg, D.

1987-01-01

391

Oh, What Dr. Seuss Can Induce: Using Intentionality to Connect Families with Classrooms through Science and Children's Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In the following article, Dr. Seuss's children's books are creatively integrated with science activities through the creation of take-home activity kits. The kits provide families an opportunity to read at home while connecting the enjoyable experience to science content and skill development through associated activities. The kits should be…

Thomas, Jeff A.; Raisor, Jill M.; Goebel, Vella

2013-01-01

392

Building an Institution Second to None: Dr. Inabel Burns Lindsay—A Social Work Leader in the Academy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes Dr. Inabel Burns Lindsay's leadership as the founding dean at Howard University School of Social Work during her 30 years of service from 1937 to 1967. It chronicles her efforts to build the School as well as her efforts to highlight social injustices of the time. Her lifelong efforts promoted the inclusion of African American social workers

Ruby M. Gourdine; Sandra Edmonds Crewe; Annie W. Brown

2008-01-01

393

Dr. Richard J. Whelan: Seeing the Field of Emotional and Behavior Disorders through the Lens of a Pioneer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dr. Richard J. Whelan is a distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Kansas. His earliest professional experiences were at the Children's Hospital (Southard School) of the Menninger Clinic, where he served as a recreational therapist, teacher, and director of education. During his career at the University of Kansas and the KU Medical…

Kaff, Marilyn S.; Teagarden, Jim; Zabel, Robert H.

2011-01-01

394

DISEÑO DE UN ARTE CON LATAS PARA INCREMENTAR EL RECICLAJE EN LA UNIVERSIDAD DR. JOSE GREGORIO HERNANDEZ (UJGH)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project had as purpose to increase the reciclaje process in the University Dr. José Gregorio Hernández (UJGH), by means of the design of an art with cans and to contribute this way to modify the behavior of the students keeping in mind that they will be in a professional future and they stood out in different areas of the

José Gregorio Hernández

395

An Addendum to Leading Change in Gifted Education: The Festschrift of Dr. Joyce VanTassel-Baska  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|On March 13, 2009, Dr. Joyce VanTassel-Baska, an eminent leader in gifted education, was presented with a Festschrift, a volume of articles submitted by colleagues as well as former and current graduate students to celebrate her life's work and influence on the field. This volume is a free supplement from The College of William and Mary's Center…

Lord, E. Wayne; Swanson, Julie Dingle; Breard, Nan; Drain, Denise; Thomas, Kianga R.; Thomas, Steve; Dolph, Katie A.; Price, R. Douglas

2009-01-01

396

[An Enemy of the People--about Dr Harald Engelsen and work-related lead poisoning in Horten].  

PubMed

Little attention was paid to lead poisoning in Norway before 1930. In 1931-33, however, Dr Harald Engelsen, a naval surgeon, reported to the National Insurance Administration more than 40 cases among shipyard workers. The first worker in which he diagnosed lead poisoning had consulted other doctors, but only got a symptomatic diagnosis. Dr Engelsen was then consulted by several others with similar symptoms. At the outset his diagnosis was doubted and a considerable disagreement ensued with colleagues and yard representatives; he was compared with Dr Stockmann in Henrik Ibsen's play An Enemy of the People. The controversy escalated. A commission appointed by the government to examine the matter concluded that there had been cases of lead poisoning in the shipyard, that mandatory requirements had not been strictly complied with, and that monitoring of working conditions had been fragmentary. Most of the workers were granted compensation and pensions. For a publication on lead poisoning, Dr Engelsen was awarded the University of Oslo's gold medal, and for his work for improving seamen's health and welfare he was awarded the St. Olav Order. In 1938 he was appointed head of medical services in the Royal Norwegian Navy. PMID:15608777

Sommerfelt-Pettersen, Jan; Ongre, Aksel

2004-12-16

397

Numerical model of a long-term in situ diffusion and retention (DR) experiment in Opalinus Clay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Determining diffusion parameters under real conditions is necessary for the performance assessment of a deep geological repository. Here we present a numerical model for the interpretation of a long-term in situ diffusion and retention (DR) experiment performed on Opalinus clay (OPA) at Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in Switzerland using a comprehensive set of tracers which includes neutral (HTO, HDO),

Q. C. Yang; X. Zhang; Z. P. Yang; J. Liang

2010-01-01

398

Sudden and unexpected death in early life: proceedings of a symposium in honor of Dr. Henry F. Krous.  

PubMed

Reported here are the proceedings of a symposium given in honor of Dr. Henry F. Krous upon his retirement as Clinical Professor of Pathology and Pediatrics at the University of California Schools of Medicine, and as Director of the San Diego SIDS/SUDC Research Project. Dr. Krous' distinguished 37-year-career was dedicated to research into sudden unexpected death in infancy and childhood, notably the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC). The presentations were given at the International Conference on Stillbirth, SIDS, and infant survival on October 5, 2012, in Baltimore, MD, USA. Eight colleagues of Dr. Krous whose own professional careers were touched by his efforts discussed forensic issues related to SIDS, tissue banking, animal models in SIDS, brainstem studies in SIDS, genetic studies in SIDS, establishment of a SUDC registry, neuropathologic research in SUDC, and potential shared mechanisms underlying sudden and unexpected death in early life. The wide scope of the presentations crossed the disciplines of forensic pathology, pediatric pathology, neuropathology, neuroscience, physiology, genetics, and bereavement, and attest to Dr. Krous' far-reaching influence upon SIDS and SUDC research. PMID:22941540

Kinney, Hannah C; Rognum, Torleiv O; Nattie, Eugene E; Haddad, Gabriel G; Hyma, Bruce; McEntire, Betty; Paterson, David S; Crandall, Laura; Byard, Roger W

2012-09-01

399

Free Trade and Social CitizenshipProspects and Possibilities of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article takes as its starting point the proliferation of regional free trade agreements, and the question is posed: whether increased economic integration in Central America may `spill over' in enhanced social citizenship rights? The question is triggered by the signing in 2004 of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). The article explores the arguments concerning the development of

Peter Abrahamson

2007-01-01

400

TRAIL and DR5 promote thyroid follicular cell apoptosis in iodine excess-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice.  

PubMed

Death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been implicated in target organ destruction in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Several apoptosis signaling pathways, such as Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), have been shown to be active in thyroid cells and may be involved in destructive thyroiditis. Thyroid toxicity of iodide excess has been demonstrated in animals fed with an iodide-rich diet, but its pathogenic role remains unclear. The effects of excessive iodine on TRAIL and its death receptor expression in thyroid were investigated. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was induced by excessive iodine and thyroglobulin (Tg) in non-obese diabetic mice. The expression of TRAIL and its death receptor DR5 was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Following administration of excessive iodine alone, Tg, and excessive iodine combined with Tg, TRAIL-positive cells appear not only in follicular cells but also in lymphocytes infiltrated in the thyroid, whereas DR5-positive cells appear only in follicular cells. Large numbers of CD3-positive cells and a few CD22-positive cells were detected in thyroid. A great amount of follicular cells were labeled specifically by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxynucleotide triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. Taken together, our results suggest that excessive iodine could induce TRAIL and DR5 abnormal expression in thyroid. TRAIL band with DR5 to promote follicular cells apoptosis thus mediate thyroid destruction in EAT. PMID:21225479

Yu, Xiujie; Li, Lanying; Li, Qingxin; Zang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Zebing

2011-01-12

401

Dr. Charles Alexander Eastman, Sioux Physician-Author, 1858-1939. With Teacher's Guide. Native Americans of the Twentieth Century.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A biography for elementary school students of a 19th century American Indian physician and author, Charles Alexander Eastman (Sioux), includes photographs of Dr. Eastman and his wife. A teacher's guide following the bibliography contains information on the Sioux Uprising of 1862 and the Wounded Knee Massacre, learning objectives and directions for…

Minneapolis Public Schools, MN.

402

Characterization Activities Conducted at the 183-DR Site in Support of an In Situ Gaseous Reduction Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. This document presents information associated with characterization activities conducted at the 183-DR site at Hanford, which is associated with a significant groundwater contaminant plume and was formerly a water treatment facility that utilized chromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Geotechnical and chemical data were collected during the excavation of trenches and the drilling of two vadose zone boreholes to support a possible ISGR demonstration at 183-DR. Although elevated total chromium and trace levels of hexavalent chromium were identified from one of the trenches and one of the boreholes, it appears that the boreholes missed the vadose zone contaminant source responsible for the chromium groundwater plume located downgradient of the 183-DR site. Recommendations are provided, however, for future work at 183-DR that may serve to identify the source for the groundwater plume and possibly provide an opportunity for an ISGR demonstration.

Thornton, Edward C.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2001-03-30

403

76 FR 62494 - Designation of Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri, Also Known as Dr. Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Notice 7638] Designation of Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri, Also Known as Dr. Ibrahim `Awwad Ibrahim `Ali al-Badri, Also Known as Ibrahim `Awad Ibrahim al-Badri al-Samarrai, Also Known as Ibrahim Awwad Ibrahim...

2011-10-07

404

Then & Now: Research Pays Off for All Americans / Dr. Virginia Apgar: Keeping Score at Baby's First Cry | NIH ...  

MedlinePLUS

... of the division of congenital defects at the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (now the March of Dimes) and received many honors and awards for her work. To Find Out More Learn more about Dr. Apgar through the Profiles in Science program of the National Library of Medicine and ...

405

The Life and Death of Dr Abu Baker ‘Hurley’ Asvat, 23 February 1943 to 27 January 1989  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the time of his murder in 1989, Dr Abu Baker ‘Hurley’ Asvat was widely revered as ‘the people's doctor’ based on almost two decades of medical work in Soweto and health projects initiated across the Transvaal as Azapo's secretary of health. Despite his close relationship with leading African National Congress (ANC) figures and his major role in anti-apartheid medical

Jon Soske

2011-01-01

406

Judgement and Decision-Making in the Controversial Dr Haneef CounterTerrorism Operation: A Simulation Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental-simulation approach was utilised in order to examine decisions made by investigators in the controversial Australian counter-terrorism operation concerning Dr Mohamed Haneef. The police were criticised by the media and contemporary commentators in regards to their handling of this operation due to the perception that they had made poor decisions and thus demonstrated bias against an innocent individual. To

Lauren Katherina Vogel; Mark Rhys Kebbell

2011-01-01

407

VERY LARGE ARRAY H I ZEEMAN OBSERVATIONS OF THE CYGNUS X REGION: DR 22 AND ON 2  

SciTech Connect

We have used the Very Large Array to study the Zeeman effect in 21 cm H I absorption lines from two star-forming regions in the Cygnus X complex, DR 22 and ON 2. We measure the line-of-sight magnetic field toward these regions, finding B{sub los} = -84 {+-} 11 {mu}G toward the DR 22 H II region and B{sub los} < 50 {mu}G toward each of the two H II regions in ON 2. We interpret these results in terms of two different models. In one model, we assume that the H I Zeeman effect is a measure of magnetic fields in the associated molecular clouds. If so, then the DR 22 molecular cloud is magnetically subcritical, that is, magnetically dominated. The ON 2 molecular clouds are magnetically supercritical. In a second model, we assume that the H I Zeeman effect is a measure of magnetic fields in photon-dominated regions where the gas has been compressed (and the field amplified) by absorption of stellar radiation. We find that this second model, where the measured field strength has been affected by star formation, accounts well for the DR 22 H I Zeeman effect. This same model, however, overpredicts the magnetic field in ON 2. ON 2 may be a region where the magnetic field is energetically insignificant or where the field happens to lie nearly in the plane of the sky.

Mayo, E. A. [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC 29117-0001 (United States); Troland, T. H., E-mail: emayo@scsu.edu, E-mail: troland@pa.uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY40506-0055 (United States)

2012-02-15

408

Celebration of DOE's 35th Anniversary and the Secretary of Energy's Honor Awards, Keynote Address: Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Steven Chu gives a keynote address marking the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Department of Energy (DOE). He highlights outstanding achievements of the Department and its scientists. Several of the Department's many Nobel Prize winners over the years are mentioned.

Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

2012-10-04

409

Pregnancy Prevention among Latina Adolescents--The Role of Social Capital and Cultural Norms: An Interview with Dr. Claire Brindis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Recently, Dr. Brindis and her colleagues compared four communities with high poverty and lower than average birth rates among Latina adolescents, with four communities which also had high poverty but had higher than average birth rates among Latina adolescents. Their goal was to examine the social capital and cultural norms within these…

Prevention Researcher, 2004

2004-01-01

410

Epitope recognition in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice immunized to TSH-R protein or peptides.  

PubMed

Development of Graves' disease is related to HLA-DR3. The extracellular domain (ECD) of human TSH receptor (hTSH-R) is a crucial antigen in Graves' disease. hTSH-R peptide 37 (amino acids 78-94) is an important immunogenic peptide in DR3 transgenic mice immunized to hTSH-R. This study examined the epitope recognition in DR3 transgenic mice immunized to hTSH-R protein and evaluated the ability of a mutant hTSH-R peptide to attenuate the immunogenicity of hTSH-R peptide 37. DR3 transgenic mice were immunized to recombinant hTSH-R-ECD protein or peptides. A mutant hTSH-R 37 peptide (ISRIYVSIDATLSQLES: 37 m), in which DR3 binding motif position 5 was mutated V>A, and position 8 Q>S, was synthesized. 37 m should bind to HLA-DR3 but not bind T cell receptors. DR3 transgenic mice were immunized to hTSH-R 37 and 37 m. Mice immunized to hTSH-R-ECD protein developed strong anti-hTSH-R antibody, and antisera reacted strongly with hTSH-R peptides 1-5 (20-94), 21 (258-277), 41 (283-297), 36 (376-389), and 31 (399-418). Strikingly, antisera raised to hTSH-R peptide 37 bound to hTSH-R peptides 1-7 (20-112), 10 (132-50), 33 (137-150), 41, 23 (286-305), 24 (301-320), 36, and 31 as well as to hTSH-R-ECD protein. Both antibody titers to hTSH-R 37 and reaction of splenocytes to hTSH-R 37 were significantly reduced in mice immunized to hTSH-R 37 plus 37 m, compared with mice immunized to hTSH-R 37 alone. The ability of immunization to a single peptide to induce antibodies that bind hTSH-R-ECD protein, and multiple unrelated peptides, is a unique observation. Immunogenic reaction to hTSH-R peptide 37 was partially suppressed by 37 m, and this may contribute to immunotherapy of autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:23592747

Inaba, Hidefumi; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S; Desrosiers, Joe; Tassone, Ryan; Buchman, George; Akamizu, Takashi; De Groot, Leslie J

2013-04-16

411

¿Los consumidores colombianos de combustibles reciben subsidios o, en neto, pagan impuestos?  

Microsoft Academic Search

El objetivo del documento es analizar los subsidios e impuestos al consumo de combustibles en Colombia y verificar si los primeros han sido mayores que los segundos. El marco conceptual es un modelo simple de equilibrio parcial donde existen sólo dos agentes: el sector público (paga subsidios y cobra impuestos) y el consumidor de combustibles (recibe subsidios y paga impuestos).

Hernán Rincón

2008-01-01

412

Dr(a-) polymorphism of decay accelerating factor. Biochemical, functional, and molecular characterization and production of allele-specific transfectants.  

PubMed Central

The Dra antigen belongs to the Cromer-related blood group system, a series of antigens on decay accelerating factor (DAF), a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein that protects host cells from complement-mediated damage. We studied the rare inherited Dr(a-) phenotype to ascertain the associated biochemical and functional changes in DAF and to characterize the basis for this polymorphism. Radioimmunoassay assay and flow cytometric analysis of Dr(a-) erythrocytes demonstrated 40% of normal surface expression of DAF but normal levels of several other glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, distinguishing this phenotype from that of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Western blots confirmed this reduced DAF expression and indicated a slightly faster mobility of the molecule on SDS-PAGE. Despite the reduced DAF expression, Dr(a-) erythrocytes functioned normally in the complement lysis sensitivity assay. Utilization of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify mononuclear cell genomic DNA from three unrelated Dr(a-) individuals demonstrated that a point mutation underlies the Dr(a-) phenotype: a C to T change in nucleotide 649 resulting in a serine165 to leucine change. This defines the Drb allele of DAF, which can be distinguished from Dra by a Taq I restriction fragment length polymorphism. We created transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing either the Dra or the Drb allelic form of DAF. These allele-specific transfectants were tested by inhibition of hemagglutination or flow cytometry and confirmed the specificity of anti-Dra alloantisera. The allele-specific transfectants could form the basis of a new serological approach to immunohematology. Images

Lublin, D M; Thompson, E S; Green, A M; Levene, C; Telen, M J

1991-01-01

413

A multistage-polyepitope vaccine protects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is responsible for almost 2 million deaths annually. BCG, currently the only TB vaccine, induces variable protection and does not protect against reactivation of latent TB. Thus, efficient vaccines to supplement BCG are required urgently. Since Mtb's proteome differs qualitatively and quantitatively during bacterial replication stages from that expressed during dormancy, improved TB vaccines should drive immune responses to Mtb antigens expressed during multiple stages of infection. Consequently, such "multistage" vaccines should be composed of (immunodominant) antigens expressed during different phases of Mtb infection. As a concept multistage vaccine, we constructed a polyepitope by fusing five HLA-DR3-restricted T-cell epitopes derived from different Mtb proteins either expressed highly by replicating bacteria (Ag85B, hsp65, 19 kDa lipoprotein), or abundantly expressed by dormant bacilli and recognized preferentially by TST(+) individuals (hsp16, Rv1733c). PBMC of HLA-DR3(+) but not HLA-DR3(-) cured TB patients and TST(+) individuals responded well to the multistage-polyepitope in vitro. The in vivo immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the multistage-polyepitope were analyzed using HLA-DR3 transgenic mice lacking endogenous murine class II as a model. Immunization with the multistage-polyepitope adjuvanted with CpG generated high IgG levels as well as polyfunctional CD4(+) T-cells producing IFN-?, TNF and IL-2, specific for these HLA-DR3-restricted epitopes. Importantly, multistage-polyepitope immunization reduced the number of bacilli in the lungs after Mtb challenge when administered as prophylactic vaccine. Given the extensive repertoire of potential Mtb antigens available for immune recognition, the data of our model demonstrate the potential of multistage-polyepitope vaccines to protect against TB. PMID:23103299

Geluk, Annemieke; van den Eeden, Susan J F; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Dijkman, Karin; Franken, Kees L M C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

2012-10-24

414

Mutations within DR2 independently reduce the amount of both minus- and plus-strand DNA synthesized during duck hepatitis B virus replication.  

PubMed Central

The initial aim of this study was to examine the role of complementarity between the plus-strand primer and the minus-strand DNA template for translocation of the plus-strand primer in hepadnaviral replication. We show that when a 5-nucleotide substitution was placed in either DR1 or DR2, translocation of the primer at a detectable level did not occur. Placing the mutation in both DR1 and DR2 did not restore primer translocation, which indicates that complementarity is not the sole determinant for primer translocation. These mutants, in which primer translocation has been inhibited, have been additionally informative. The mutation in DR1 led to efficient synthesis of plus-strand DNA, albeit primed in situ. In contrast, the mutation in DR2 resulted in a reduction in the amount of plus-strand DNA synthesized per unit of minus-strand DNA. These findings were interpreted as indicating that a mutation at DR2, the primer acceptor site, can inhibit both primer translocation and in situ priming. Lastly, we show that mutations within DR2 can result in a reduction in the synthesis of minus-strand DNA and that this reduction is occurring at an early phase of the process. We speculate that this reduction in the amount of minus-strand DNA synthesized could be due to an inhibition of the template switch during minus-strand DNA synthesis.

Loeb, D D; Tian, R; Gulya, K J

1996-01-01

415

Anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody-mediated DTIC-loaded nanoparticles combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy for malignant melanoma: target formulation development and in vitro anticancer activity  

PubMed Central

Background The increased incidence of malignant melanoma in recent decades, along with its high mortality rate and pronounced resistance to therapy pose an enormous challenge. Novel therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapy and targeted therapy, are urgently needed for melanoma. In this study, a new active targeting drug delivery system was constructed to combine chemotherapy and active specific immunotherapy. Methods The chemotherapeutic drug, dacarbazine (DTIC), that induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway which typically responds to severe DNA damage, was used as a model drug to prepare DTIC-loaded polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles (DTIC-NPs), which were covalently conjugated to a highly specific targeting functional TRAIL-receptor 2 (DR5) monoclonal antibody (mAb) that can contribute directly to cancer cell apoptosis or growth inhibition through the extrinsic pathway. Results Our in vitro experiments demonstrated that DTIC-PLA-DR5 mAb nanoparticles (DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb) are an active targeting drug delivery system which can specifically target DR5-overexpressing malignant melanoma cells and become efficiently internalized. Most strikingly, compared with conventional DTIC-NPs, DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb showed significantly enhanced cytotoxicity and increased cell apoptosis in DR5-positive malignant melanoma cells. Conclusion The DTIC-NPs-DR5 mAb described in this paper might be a potential formulation for targeting chemotherapy and immunotherapy to DR5-overexpressing metastatic melanoma.

Ding, Baoyue; Wu, Xin; Fan, Wei; Wu, Zhaoyong; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Lulu; Xiang, Wang; Zhu, Quangang; Liu, Jiyong; Ding, Xueying; Gao, Shen

2011-01-01

416

Conferencias a la Memoria de la Dra. Lydia J. Roberts 1967, 1969-1973 (Conferences in Memory of Dr. Lydia J. Roberts 1967, 1969-1973).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication includes eleven lectures presented as part of a conference given honoring Dr. Lydia J. Roberts. Seven of the papers are written in the English language and four in Spanish. Most of the papers relate to the topic of nutrition, but a few pay tribute to Dr. Roberts in recognition of her distinguished leadership and teacher of human…

Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras.

417

HLA DR15 Antigen Status Does Not Impact Graft-versus-Host Disease or Survival in HLA-Matched Sibling Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies  

PubMed Central

The HLA class II DRB1 antigen DR15 is an important prognostic marker in immune-mediated marrow failure states. DR15 has also been associated with favorable outcomes (reduced acute graft-versus-host disease [aGVHD] and relapse) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. To elucidate the impact of DR15 on transplantation outcomes, we conducted a retrospective study of 2891 recipients of first allogeneic stem cell transplant from HLA-matched sibling donors for the treatment of acute leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) between 1990 and 2007. All patients received conventional myeloablative conditioning, T-replete grafts, and cyclosporine plus methotrexate-based GVHD prophylaxis. DNA-based HLA typing allowed categorization of 732 patients (25.3%) as positive and 2159 patients (74.7%) as negative for DRB1*15:01 or *15:02 (DR15). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the HLA DR15 positive and negative groups. In univariate analysis, HLA-DR15 status had no impact on neutrophil engraftment, aGVHD, chronic GVHD (cGVHD), treatment-related mortality, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, DR15 status showed no significant difference in aGVHD, cGVHD, OS, or relapse. In conclusion, DR15 status had no impact on major HLA-matched sibling donor hematopoietic cell transplant outcomes in this large and homogenous cohort of patients with leukemia and MDS.

Battiwalla, Minoo; Ellis, Kristin; Li, Peigang; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Akpek, Gorgun; Hematti, Peiman; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Savani, Bipin N.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Drobyski, William R.; George, Biju; Hahn, Theresa; Khera, Nandita; Litzow, Mark R.; Loren, Alison W.; Saber, Wael; Arora, Mukta; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Cutler, Corey; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Spellman, Stephen R.

2013-01-01

418

Antibiotic Prescribing in DR Congo: A Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Survey among Medical Doctors and Students  

PubMed Central

Objectives Antibiotic resistance (ABR) particularly hits resource poor countries, and is fuelled by irrational antibiotic (AB) prescribing. We surveyed knowledge, attitudes and practices of AB prescribing among medical students and doctors in Kisangani, DR Congo. Methods Self-administered questionnaires. Results A total of 184 questionnaires were completed (response rate 94.4%). Knowledge about AB was low (mean score 4.9/8 points), as was the estimation of local resistance rates of S. Typhi and Klebsiella spp.(correct by 42.5% and 6.9% of respondents respectively). ABR was recognized as a problem though less in their own practice (67.4%) than nation- or worldwide (92.9% and 85.5%, p<.0001). Confidence in AB prescribing was high (88.6%) and students consulted more frequently colleagues than medical doctors when prescribing (25.4% versus 11.6%, p ?=?0.19). Sources of AB prescribing included pharmaceutical companies (73.9%), antibiotic guidelines (66.3%), university courses (63.6%), internet-sites (45.7%) and WHO guidelines (26.6%). Only 30.4% and 16.3% respondents perceived AB procured through the central procurement and local pharmacies as of good quality. Local AB guidelines and courses about AB prescribing are welcomed (73.4% and 98.8% respectively). Conclusions This data shows the need for interventions that support rational AB prescribing.

Thriemer, Kamala; Katuala, Yves; Batoko, Bibi; Alworonga, Jean-Pierre; Devlieger, Hugo; Van Geet, Christel; Ngbonda, Dauly; Jacobs, Jan

2013-01-01

419

Radial Velocity and Abundance Properties of Five Open Clusters Based on SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present metallicities and radial velocities for five old open clusters (NGC 6791, NGC 2420, NGC 2682, NGC 2158, NGC 7789) using data from the SDSS DR7. The radial velocities are used to calculate cluster membership probabilities for stars in each cluster region. NGC 6791, NGC 2420, NGC 2682, NGC 2158 and NGC 7789 are found to have a mean metallicity [Fe/H]= +0.08±0.09, -0.38±0.11, -0.08±0.04, -0.41±0.14 and -0.18±0.13 dex(s.d.), respectively. The mean radial velocities for these clusters are Vr = -45.9 ±0.2, +76.1±0.2, +35.0±0.2, +26.9±0.2 and -48.2±0.2 km s-1, respectively. We have compared our results with the values from literatures, found that our metallicity of NGC 6791 is significantly underestimated (by about 0.3 dex) and our radial velocities of the open clusters agree well with the values derived based on high-resolution spectroscopy.

Chen, L.; Gao, X. H.

2011-12-01

420

Pioneers of anti-venomous serotherapy: Dr Vital Brazil (1865-1950).  

PubMed

Dr Vital Brazil was a great humanitarian and pioneer of medical science. His main work arose from his concern with poisonous snakebite accidents to labourers working the land. Vital Brazil estimated that, at the beginning of this century, deaths due to crotaline snakebites in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were nearly 3000 per year, representing a mortality rate of about 25%, the majority being due to bothropic envenomation. After reading a report of Calmette's anti-Naja serum, Vital Brazil raised monovalent serum against the venom of Bothrops jararaca and the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus. In 1989 this led to the first demonstration of the specificity of anti-venomous serum and later, the first production of polyvalent serum for therapeutic use. As Director of the newly founded Institute Butantan in São Paulo, Vital Brazil was actively engaged in every aspect of serotherapeutic treatment. This included organizing a unique system of exchanging anti-ophidic serum for snakes as well as a wide-ranging teaching programme. His many outstanding contributions to the fields of immunology, public health, toxinology and herpetology required not only a very high level of observational, deductive and practical ability but also an unswerving vision and sense of duty; this was allied to great administrative skill and exceptional energy. PMID:1519249

Hawgood, B J

421

Quantifying the coherent outflows of galaxies around voids in the SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the detection, with a high level of confidence, of coherent outflows around voids found in the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7). In particular, we developed a robust ?|cos ?|? statistical test to quantify the strength of redshift-space distortions (RSD) associated with extended coherent velocity fields. We consistently find that the vector that joins void centers with galaxies that lie in shells around them is more likely to be perpendicular to the line-of-sight than parallel to it. This effect is clear evidence for the existence of outflows in the vicinity of voids. We show that the RSD exist for a wide range of void radius and shell thickness, but they are more evident in the largest voids in our sample. For instance, we find that the ?|cos ?|? for galaxies located in shells within 2 h-1Mpc from the edge of voids larger than 15 h-1Mpc deviates 3.81? from uniformity. The measurements presented in this work provide useful information to constrain cosmological parameters, in particular ?m and ?8.

Patiri, S. G.; Betancort-Rijo, J.; Prada, F.

2012-05-01

422

The medical ethics of Dr J Marion Sims: a fresh look at the historical record  

PubMed Central

Vesicovaginal fistula was a catastrophic complication of childbirth among 19th century American women. The first consistently successful operation for this condition was developed by Dr J Marion Sims, an Alabama surgeon who carried out a series of experimental operations on black slave women between 1845 and 1849. Numerous modern authors have attacked Sims's medical ethics, arguing that he manipulated the institution of slavery to perform ethically unacceptable human experiments on powerless, unconsenting women. This article reviews these allegations using primary historical source material and concludes that the charges that have been made against Sims are largely without merit. Sims's modern critics have discounted the enormous suffering experienced by fistula victims, have ignored the controversies that surrounded the introduction of anaesthesia into surgical practice in the middle of the 19th century, and have consistently misrepresented the historical record in their attacks on Sims. Although enslaved African American women certainly represented a “vulnerable population” in the 19th century American South, the evidence suggests that Sims's original patients were willing participants in his surgical attempts to cure their affliction—a condition for which no other viable therapy existed at that time.

Wall, L L

2006-01-01

423

Father and son. The origins of Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.  

PubMed

In Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson created, out of one of his own dreams, the most famous pre-Freudian case study of the divided self. The present essay explores the roots of that work in Stevenson's lifelong difficulty in separating from his moody, conflicted, and passionately possessive father. Out of a matrix of religious guilt and social conformity, Stevenson struggled to create and define his own identity as a writer, a struggle that ran counter to many of his beloved father's deepest needs and led to sharp clashes, accompanied by periods of severe depressive and physical illness in both. Stevenson's creative block during his father's final depression and dementia was broken only by the nightmare that became Jekyll and Hyde, which enabled him to give enduring literary expression to the disavowed rage, guilt, and sense of deformity and fractured identity endemic to their internalized relationship. It may also have functioned as an act of exorcism and expiation that helped him recover rapidly from his father's death and exploit more productively the few years that were left to him. PMID:12102020

Beattie, H J

2001-01-01

424

A reconstructive surgeon's taste in art: Dr Peter Parker and the Lam Qua oil paintings.  

PubMed

Hidden within the basement archives of Yale University's Historical Medical Library lie the original oil painting collection and personal papers of the first American surgeon to practice in China. The Reverend Dr Peter Parker, a graduate of Yale, established the first American hospital in Guangzhou (formerly Canton) in 1835 and successfully introduced Western surgical techniques including amputation, anesthesia, and reconstructive surgery. In addition to this distinguished career of medical missionary service, Parker commissioned the Chinese artist Lam Qua to paint a fascinating series of portraits depicting patients with extreme tumor growths. In this article, Parker's own journals are examined to reveal both his missionary zeal and his frustrations working in China. Selected examples of the Lam Qua paintings are presented along with Parker's corresponding patient descriptions. These detailed patient reports give insight into the extent of surgical pathology as well as the relative brutality of surgical techniques in the early to mid-1800s. The historical significance of the Peter Parker-Lam Qua collaboration within the context of the Western transformation of Chinese art and medicine is also discussed. PMID:8342936

Chang, J

1993-05-01

425

Some comments on Dr Iglesias's paper, 'In vitro fertilisation: the major issues'.  

PubMed Central

In an article in an earlier edition of the Journal of Medical Ethics (1) Dr Iglesias bases her analysis upon the mediaeval interpretation of Platonic metaphysics and Aristotelian logic as given by Aquinas. Propositional forms are applied to the analysis of experience. This results in a very abstract analysis. The essential connection of events and their changing temporal relationships are ignored. The dichotomy between body and soul is a central concept. The unchanging elements in experience are assumed to be more real than the actual world of experienced process. Such a view makes the analysis of the temporal factors in experience impossible. Its abstractness is quite unsuitable for the analysis of the ontological structure and development of the neonate from fertilisation to birth. A N Whitehead made the notion of organism central to his philosophy. He refused to place human experience outside nature, or admit dualism. His philosophy of organism is an attempt to uncover the essential elements connecting human experience with the physical and biological sciences. Time, change and process are, in his view, more real than the static abstractions obtainable by the use of the fallacy of misplaced concreteness. Use of the latter negates the essential connectedness of events and the importance of temporarily and change (2). In this paper I argue that the embryo, being an organism, is not analysable in terms of thinghood. It is a process. To apply Aristotelian logical concepts to it is to distort the real nature of the datum.

Mill, J M

1986-01-01

426

Sudden Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with HLA A1-B8-DR3 Haplotype  

PubMed Central

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be present as a symptom in systemic autoimmune diseases or may occur as a primary disorder without another organ involvement (autoimmune inner ear disease). The diagnosis of autoimmune inner ear disease is still predicated on clinical features, and to date specific diagnostic tests are not available. We report a case of bilateral sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, intense rotatory vertigo, and nausea in a female patient in which the clinical manifestations, in addition to raised levels of circulating immune complexes, antithyroglobulin antibodies, and the presence of the HLA A1-B8-DR3 haplotype, allowed us to hypothesize an autoimmune inner ear disease. Cyclosporine-A immunosuppressive treatment in addition to steroids helped in hearing recovery that occurred progressively with normalization of the hearing function after a five-month treatment. Cyclosporine-A could be proposed as a therapeutic option in case of autoimmune inner ear disease allowing the suspension of corticosteroids that, at high dose, expose patients to potentially serious adverse events.

Psillas, G.; Daniilidis, M.; Gerofotis, A.; Veros, K.; Vasilaki, A.; Vital, I.; Markou, K.

2013-01-01

427

Hypochondria as withdrawal and comedy as cure in Dr. Willibald's Der Hypochondrist (1824).  

PubMed

Balthasar von Ammann's comedy Der Hypochondrist, published in 1824 under the pseudonym Dr. Willibald, foregrounds the social, sexual, and political implications of hypochondria. The play engages with early nineteenth-century medical and popular conceptions of hypochondria to co-opt potentially subversive elements and to promote a specific social, sexual, and political agenda. The text promotes literature — specifically comedic drama — as a cure for hypochondria. Hypochondria functions as a code for withdrawal. The hypochondriac withdraws medically from healthy society, gaining exceptional status. He withdraws sexually from society by remaining a bachelor, possibly engaged in non-normative sexual behaviour. Furthermore, the politically disenfranchised protagonist voices his political frustrations via a coded medical metaphor. The hypochondriac poses a threefold challenge to the social, sexual, and political order, and the play engages with contemporary conceptions of the disease to provide the solution: comedy. The text, presented as a cure for hypochondria, replaces the coded questioning of the social order via hypochondria with the less threatening code of heraldry. A comedy-within-the-comedy uses the hypochondriac's love of heraldry to cure him, resulting in the elimination of his medical problems and exceptional status, in the purification of his bachelorhood from non-normative elements, and in the pre-emption of political frustrations. PMID:22375296

Potter, Edward T

2012-01-01

428

Purification and biochemical characterization of an acidophilic amylase from a newly isolated Bacillus sp. DR90.  

PubMed

An acidophilic and Ca(2+)-independent amylase was purified from a newly isolated Bacillus sp. DR90 by ion-exchange chromatography, and exhibited a molecular weight of 68.9 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were found to be 4.0 and 45 °C, respectively. The enzyme activity was increased by Ba(2+), Fe(2+) and Mg(2+), and decreased by Hg(2+) and Zn(2+), while it was not affected by Na(+), K(+), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and ?-mercaptoethanol. Ca(2+) and EDTA did not have significant effect on the enzyme activity and thermal stability. The values of K m and V max for starch as substrate were 4.5 ± 0.13 mg/ml and 307 ± 12 ?M/min/mg, respectively. N,N-dialkylimidazolium-based ionic liquids such as 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [HMIM][Br] have inhibitory effect on the enzyme activity. Thin layer chromatography analyses displayed that maltose and glucose are the main products of the enzyme reaction on starch. Regarding the features of the enzyme, it may be utilized as a novel candidate for industrial applications. PMID:23430382

Asoodeh, Ahmad; Alemi, Ashraf; Heydari, Akbar; Akbari, Jafar

2013-02-21

429

A humanized model for multiple sclerosis using HLA-DR2 and a human T-cell receptor.  

PubMed

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex chronic neurologic disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. Although there is evidence that the development of MS is determined by both environmental influences and genes, these factors are largely undefined, except for major histocompatibility (MHC) genes. Linkage analyses and association studies have shown that susceptibility to MS is associated with genes in the human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA) class II region, but the contribution of these genes to MS disease development less compared with their contribution to disorders such as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Due to the strong linkage disequilibrium in the MHC class II region, it has not been possible to determine which gene(s) is responsible for the genetic predisposition. In transgenic mice, we have expressed three human components involved in T-cell recognition of an MS-relevant autoantigen presented by the HLA-DR2 molecule: DRA*0101/DRB1*1501 (HLA-DR2), an MHC class II candidate MS susceptibility genes found in individuals of European descent; a T-cell receptor (TCR) from an MS-patient-derived T-cell clone specific for the HLA-DR2 bound immunodominant myelin basic protein (MBP) 4102 peptide; and the human CD4 coreceptor. The amino acid sequence of the MBP 84-102 peptide is the same in both human and mouse MBP. Following administration of the MBP peptide, together with adjuvant and pertussis toxin, transgenic mice developed focal CNS inflammation and demyelination that led to clinical manifestations and disease courses resembling those seen in MS. Spontaneous disease was observed in 4% of mice. When DR2 and TCR double-transgenic mice were backcrossed twice to Rag2 (for recombination-activating gene 2)-deficient mice, the incidence of spontaneous disease increased, demonstrating that T cells specific for the HLA-DR2 bound MBP peptide are sufficient and necessary for development of disease. Our study provides evidence that HLA-DR2 can mediate both induced and spontaneous disease resembling MS by presenting an MBP self-peptide to T cells. PMID:10610182

Madsen, L S; Andersson, E C; Jansson, L; krogsgaard, M; Andersen, C B; Engberg, J; Strominger, J L; Svejgaard, A; Hjorth, J P; Holmdahl, R; Wucherpfennig, K W; Fugger, L

1999-11-01

430

Haplotype Analysis Discriminates Genetic Risk for DR3-Associated Endocrine Autoimmunity and Helps Define Extreme Risk for Addison's Disease  

PubMed Central

Context: Multiple autoimmune disorders (e.g. Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease) are associated with HLA-DR3, but it is likely that alleles of additional genes in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 contribute to disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize major histocompatability complex (MHC) haplotypes conferring extreme risk for autoimmune Addison’s disease (AD). Design, Setting, and Participants: Eighty-six 21-hydroxylase autoantibody-positive, nonautoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1, Caucasian individuals collected from 1992 to 2009 with clinical AD from 68 families (12 multiplex and 56 simplex) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1, MICA, HLA-B, and HLA-A as well as high density MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis for 34. Main Outcome Measures: AD and genotype were measured. Result: Ninety-seven percent of the multiplex individuals had both HLA-DR3 and HLA-B8 vs. 60% of simplex AD patients (P = 9.72 × 10?4) and 13% of general population controls (P = 3.00 × 10?19). The genotype DR3/DR4 with B8 was present in 85% of AD multiplex patients, 24% of simplex patients, and 1.5% of control individuals (P = 4.92 × 10?191). The DR3-B8 haplotype of AD patients had HLA-A1 less often (47%) than controls (81%, P = 7.00 × 10?5) and type 1 diabetes patients (73%, P = 1.93 × 10?3). Analysis of 1228 SNPs across the MHC for individuals with AD revealed a shorter conserved haplotype (3.8) with the loss of the extended conserved 3.8.1 haplotype approximately halfway between HLA-B and HLA-A. Conclusion: Extreme risk for AD, especially in multiplex families, is associated with haplotypic DR3 variants, in particular a portion (3.8) but not all of the conserved 3.8.1 haplotype.

Baker, Peter R.; Baschal, Erin E.; Fain, Pam R.; Triolo, Taylor M.; Nanduri, Priyaanka; Siebert, Janet C.; Armstrong, Taylor K.; Babu, Sunanda R.; Rewers, Marian J.; Gottlieb, Peter A.; Barker, Jennifer M.; Eisenbarth, George S.

2010-01-01

431

Upregulation of DR3 expression in CD4+ T cells promotes secretion of IL-17 in experimental autoimmune uveitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study investigated the role of death receptor 3 (DR3) in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Methods EAU was induced in B10.RIII mice by subcutaneous injection of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) 161–180 emulsified with complete Freund’s adjuvant and evaluated with clinical and histopathologic observation. Total protein of draining lymph nodes (DLNs) was extracted from the control, EAU, or recovery phase mice. CD4+ T cells were separated from lymphocytes with magnetic-assisted cell sorting. At the same time, some of the CD4+ T cells were cultured with or without recombinant TL1A (rTL1A, the DR3 ligand) for three days, and the supernatants were collected for the interleukin-17 (IL-17) test. DR3 mRNA and protein levels in CD4+ T cells and the endogenous concentration of TL1A in mice DLNs were assessed with real-time PCR or western blotting. Levels of IL-17 in the supernatants were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Histopathological and clinical data revealed severe intraocular inflammation in the immunized mice. The inflammation reached its peak on day 14 in EAU and had resolved in the recovery phase (weeks 4–5 or more after IRBP immunization). CD4+ T cells obtained from EAU (day 7 or 14) had higher levels of DR3 mRNA and protein expression compared with the control group treated with complete Freund’s adjuvant alone and the recovery group. However, the DR3 mRNA and protein levels on day 21 in EAU were similar to those observed in the control and recovery groups. The endogenous levels of TL1A were upregulated in EAU, and decreased in the recovery phase mice. Adding rTL1A increased the production of IL-17 by CD4+ T cells isolated from mice DLNs. Moreover, the increased IL-17 levels in the culture supernatant of CD4+ T cells from EAU were much higher than those from the control and recovery phase mice. However, the effects on promoting IL-17 production in TL1A-stimulated CD4+ T cells were similar between the controland recovery groups. Conclusions Our data suggest that DR3 expression is induced during EAU and may be involved in the development of this disease, possibly by promoting IL-17 secretion.

2011-01-01

432

Description of Work for Drilling at the 183-DR Site in Support of the In Situ Gaseous Reduction Test  

SciTech Connect

In Situ Gaseous Reduction is a technology currently being developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. Prior work suggests that a candidate for application of this approach is the 183-DR site at Hanford. However, deep vadose zone drilling is needed to verify the presence of a hexavalent chromium source and to determine the concentration levels and spatial distribution of contamination. This document presents the requirements associated with drilling one to two vadose zone boreholes at the 183-DR site to obtain this information. If hexavalent chromium is determined to be present at levels of at least 10 ppm in the vadose zone in one of the initial boreholes, this hole will be completed for gas injection and six additional gas extraction boreholes will be drilled and completed. This network will be used as a flowcell for performing a gas treatment test at the site.

Thornton, Edward C.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald

2000-06-26

433

Parliamentarians translate knowledge into action. Dr. Nafis Sadik's call at the 6th General Assembly of AFPPD.  

PubMed

The speech by Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of UNFPA, during the 6th General Assembly of Asian Forum of Parliamentarians for Population and Development (AFPPD) focuses on three main issues: women's empowerment, strong actions needed to meet International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) goals, and a reflection on the 6 billion population. Along with the discussion, she made mention of the important role that the parliamentarians played in addressing these issues. She recalled that the parliamentarians reaffirmed their commitment to the ICPD Program of Action during the International Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development in The Hague in February 1999. On her last note, Dr. Sadik appeals to the parliamentarians to redouble their efforts and determination to translate their knowledge into action and pledge to mobilize the available resources they have in order to materialize such endeavor. PMID:12295499

434

Interferometric CO-18 observations of DR 21(OH) and L1551 IRS 5 at lambda = 1. 4 millimeters  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution (3 arcsec) aperture synthesis maps in the J = 2 to 1 transition of CO-18 have been obtained for the star formation regions DR 21(OH) and L1551 IRS 5. Two compact sources, separated by 7 arcsec, have been discovered at the centers of H2O maser activity associated with DR 21(OH). Mass estimates from the 1.4 mm continuum and CO-18 line emission are similar to the 110 solar masses required for a bound system with the observed 4 km/s radial velocity difference, suggesting that a massive multiple star system is forming. The CO-18 emission from L1551 IRS 5 is extended in an elongated structure of radius 700 AU and mass of 0.1 solar masses. 17 refs.

Padin, S.; Sargent, A. I.; Mundy, L. G.; Scoville, N. Z.; Woody, D. P.

1989-02-01

435

Regulation of MntH by a dual Mn(II)- and Fe(II)-dependent transcriptional repressor (DR2539) in Deinococcus radiodurans.  

PubMed

The high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio observed within the bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans may contribute to its remarkable resistance to environmental stresses. We isolated DR2539, a novel regulator of intracellular Mn/Fe homeostasis in D. radiodurans. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed that DR2539 binds specifically to the promoter of the manganese acquisition transporter (MntH) gene, and that DR0865, the only Fur homologue in D. radiodurans, cannot bind to the promoter of mntH, but it can bind to the promoter of another manganese acquisition transporter, MntABC. ?-galactosidase expression analysis indicated that DR2539 acts as a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor. Further sequence alignment analysis revealed that DR2539 has evolved some special characteristics. Site-directed mutagenesis suggested that His98 plays an important role in the activities of DR2539, and further protein-DNA binding activity assays showed that the activity of H98Y mutants decreased dramatically relative to wild type DR2539. Our study suggests that D. radiodurans has evolved a very efficient manganese regulation mechanism that involves its high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio and permits resistance to extreme conditions. PMID:22523570

Sun, Hongxing; Li, Mingfeng; Xu, Guangzhi; Chen, Huan; Jiao, Jiandong; Tian, Bing; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

2012-04-16

436

HLA-matched Sibling Transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia: Impact of HLA DR15 Antigen Status on Engraftment, Graft vs. Host Disease and Overall Survival  

PubMed Central

The HLA class II DRB1 antigen DR15 (common alleles *1501, *1502) is an important marker in the pathobiology of severe aplastic anemia (SAA). We studied 1204 recipients of HLA-matched sibling bone marrow transplantation for SAA to determine whether HLA-DR15 status (as determined by allele-level typing) affected hematopoietic recovery, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) or overall survival. In multivariate analysis, secondary graft failure rate at 2-years was lower in patients who are HLA-DR15+ (hazard ratio 0.46, p=0.01). However, neutrophil recovery at day-28, platelet recovery at day-100, acute GvHD, chronic GvHD and overall mortality were independent of DR15 status. The 5-year probabilities of overall survival, after adjusting for age, race, performance score, transplant-conditioning regimen and year of transplantation, were 78% and 81% for patients who are HLA-DR15+ and HLA-DR15-, respectively (p=0.35). In conclusion, DR15 status is associated with secondary graft failure after HLA-matched sibling bone marrow transplantation for SAA but has no significant impact on survival.

Battiwalla, Minoo; Wang, Tao; Carreras, Jeanette; Deeg, H. Joachim; Ayas, Mouhab; Bajwa, Rajinder PS; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Pasquini, Ricardo; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Passweg, Jakob R.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Eapen, Mary

2012-01-01

437

Regulation of MntH by a Dual Mn(II)- and Fe(II)-Dependent Transcriptional Repressor (DR2539) in Deinococcus radiodurans  

PubMed Central

The high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio observed within the bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans may contribute to its remarkable resistance to environmental stresses. We isolated DR2539, a novel regulator of intracellular Mn/Fe homeostasis in D. radiodurans. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed that DR2539 binds specifically to the promoter of the manganese acquisition transporter (MntH) gene, and that DR0865, the only Fur homologue in D. radiodurans, cannot bind to the promoter of mntH, but it can bind to the promoter of another manganese acquisition transporter, MntABC. ?-galactosidase expression analysis indicated that DR2539 acts as a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor. Further sequence alignment analysis revealed that DR2539 has evolved some special characteristics. Site-directed mutagenesis suggested that His98 plays an important role in the activities of DR2539, and further protein-DNA binding activity assays showed that the activity of H98Y mutants decreased dramatically relative to wild type DR2539. Our study suggests that D. radiodurans has evolved a very efficient manganese regulation mechanism that involves its high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio and permits resistance to extreme conditions.

Xu, Guangzhi; Chen, Huan; Jiao, Jiandong; Tian, Bing; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

2012-01-01

438

Diabetes and intermediate hyperglycaemia in Kisantu, DR Congo: a cross-sectional prevalence study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To study the prevalence and risk markers of diabetes mellitus and intermediate hyperglycaemia (IH) in Kisantu, a semirural town in Bas-Congo province, The Democratic Republic of Congo. Design A cross-sectional population-based survey. Settings A modified WHO STEPwise strategy was used. Capillary glycaemia was measured for fasting plasma glucose and 2-h-postload glucose. Both WHO/IDF (International Diabetes Federation) 2006 and American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2003 diagnostic criteria for diabetes and IH were used. Participants 1898 subjects aged ? 20?years. Results Response rate was 93.7%. Complete data were available for 1759 subjects (86.9%). Crude and standardised (for Doll and UN population) prevalence of diabetes were 4.8% and 4.0–4.2%. Crude IH prevalence was 5.8% (WHO/IDF) and 14.2% (ADA). Independent risk markers for diabetes (p<0.01) were male (OR 2.5), age 50–69?years (OR 2.6), family history (OR 3.5), waist (OR 4.1) and alcohol consumption (OR 0.36). In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, prediction of diabetes was slightly better by waist than body mass index (BMI). IH defined according to WHO/IDF was associated with BMI (OR 2.6, p<0.001). IH defined according to ADA was associated (p<0.05) with waist (OR 1.4), education level (OR 1.6), BMI (OR 2.4) and physical activity (OR 0.7). Conclusions Current prevalence of diabetes in DR Congo exceeds IDF projections for 2030. The lower glucose threshold used by ADA almost triples impaired fasting glucose prevalence compared to WHO/IDF criteria. The high proportion of disorders of glycaemia made up by IH suggests the early stages of a diabetes epidemic.

Muyer, Muel Telo; Muls, Erik; Mapatano, Mala Ali; Makulo, Jean-Robert; Mvitu, Moise; Kimenyembo, Wivine; Mandja, Bien-Aime; Kimbondo, Pierre; Bieleli, Chris Bonketo; Kaimbo wa Kaimbo, Dieudonne; Buntinx, Frank

2012-01-01

439

[Dr. Elizabeth Ross: heroine and victim of the World War I in Serbia].  

PubMed

At the beginning of 1915, several months after the World War I started, Serbia was in an extremely difficult situation.The country was war-ravaged, full of sick and wounded soldiers, there was a desperate shortage of doctors, nurses and other medical personnel, and the epidemic of typhus fever exploded and violently attacked the entire country. At that time, however, a number of both foreign allied medical missions and individual volunteers, from various countries, mostly from Great Britain, came to Serbia to help. Among them mostly were women, and they were of enormous support to Serbia in that grave situation. It is estimated that there were more than 600 foreign women volunteers in Serbia at that time and that 22 of them died there. Dr. Elizabeth Ross was one of those brave volunteers who came to Serbia early in 1915. That noble Scottish lady doctor was born in 1878 and finished her medical studies at the University of Glasgow in 1901. After graduation she worked in various places in Great Britain until 1909, when she went to Persia (Iran), where she worked until the beginning of the so called Great War. When she heard of the urgent need in Serbia she left Persia as soon as she could and volunteered to serve in Serbia. She came to Kragujevac at the beginning of January 1915, where she worked at the First Military Reserve Hospital, which at that time was actually a typhus hospital. Working there intensively and devotedly for several weeks under shocking conditions she contracted typhus herself and died there on her 37th birthday on February 14th, 1915. She was buried in Kragujevac, next to two British ladies who also died in Serbia of typhus. Her grave was restored in 1980 when the town of Kragujevac started holding commemorations at the graveside every February 14th at noon to honor her and all other brave and noble women who lost their lives helping Serbia at that unfortunate time. PMID:23092045

Miki?, Želimir; Leši?, Aleksandar

440

Convergent Flows and Low-velocity Shocks in DR21(OH)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

DR21(OH) is a pc-scale massive, ~7000 M sun clump hosting three massive dense cores (MDCs) at an early stage of their evolution. We present a high angular resolution mosaic, covering ~70'' × 100'', with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 3 mm to trace the dust continuum emission and the N2H+ (J = 1-0) and CH3CN (J = 5-4) molecular emission. The cold, dense gas traced by the compact emission in N2H+ is associated with the three MDCs and shows several velocity components toward each MDC. These velocity components reveal local shears in the velocity fields which are best interpreted as convergent flows. Moreover, we report the detection of weak extended emission from CH3CN at the position of the N2H+ velocity shears. We propose that this extended CH3CN emission is tracing warm gas associated with the low-velocity shocks expected at the location of convergence of the flows where velocity shears are observed. This is the first detection of low-velocity shocks associated with small (subparsec) scale convergent flows which are proposed to be at the origin of the densest structures and of the formation of (high-mass) stars. In addition, we propose that MDCs may be active sites of star formation for more than a crossing time as they continuously receive material from larger scale flows as suggested by the global picture of dynamical, gravity-driven evolution of massive clumps which is favored by the present observations.

Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Motte, F.; Gueth, F.; Hora, J. L.

2011-10-01

441

Multimodality of rich clusters from the SDSS DR8 within the supercluster-void network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. The study of the properties of galaxy clusters and their environment gives us information about the formation and evolution of galaxies, groups and clusters, and larger structures - superclusters of galaxies and the whole cosmic web. Aims: We study the relations between the multimodality of galaxy clusters drawn from the SDSS DR8 and the environment where they reside. As cluster environment we consider the global luminosity density field, supercluster membership, and supercluster morphology. Methods: We use 3D normal mixture modelling, the Dressler-Shectman test, and the peculiar velocity of cluster main galaxies as signatures of multimodality of clusters. We calculate the luminosity density field to study the environmental densities around clusters, and to find superclusters where clusters reside. We determine the morphology of superclusters with the Minkowski functionals and compare the properties of clusters in superclusters of different morphology. We apply principal component analysis to study the relations between the multimodality parameters of clusters and their environment simultaneously. Results: Multimodal clusters reside in higher density environment than unimodal clusters. Clusters in superclusters have higher probability to have substructure than isolated clusters. The superclusters can be divided into two main morphological types, spiders and filaments. Clusters in superclusters of spider morphology have higher probabilities to have substructure and larger peculiar velocities of their main galaxies than clusters in superclusters of filament morphology. The most luminous clusters are located in the high-density cores of rich superclusters. Five of seven most luminous clusters, and five of seven most multimodal clusters reside in spider-type superclusters; four of seven most unimodal clusters reside in filament-type superclusters. Conclusions: Our study shows the importance of the role of superclusters as high density environment, which affects the properties of galaxy systems in them. Tables 5, 6, and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

Einasto, M.; Liivamägi, L. J.; Tempel, E.; Saar, E.; Vennik, J.; Nurmi, P.; Gramann, M.; Einasto, J.; Tago, E.; Heinämäki, P.; Ahvensalmi, A.; Martínez, V. J.

2012-06-01

442

MILLIMETER MULTIPLICITY IN DR21(OH): OUTFLOWS, MOLECULAR CORES, AND ENVELOPES  

SciTech Connect

We present sensitive high angular resolution ({approx}1'') millimeter continuum and line observations from the massive star-forming region DR21(OH) located in the Cygnus X molecular cloud. Within the well-known dusty MM1-2 molecular cores, we report the detection of a new cluster of about 10 compact continuum millimeter sources with masses between 5 and 24 M{sub Sun }, and sizes of a few thousands of astronomical units. These objects are likely to be large dusty envelopes surrounding massive protostars, some of them most probably driving several of the outflows that emanate from this region. Additionally, we report the detection of strong millimeter emission of formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) near 218 GHz as well as compact emission from the typical outflow tracers carbon monoxide and silicon monoxide (CO and SiO) toward this massive star-forming region. The H{sub 2}CO and CH{sub 3}OH emission is luminous ({approx}10{sup -4} L{sub Sun }), well resolved, and found along the collimated methanol maser outflow first identified at centimeter wavelengths and in the sources SMA6 and SMA7. Our observations suggest that this maser outflow might be energized by a millimeter source called SMA4 located in the MM2 dusty core. The CO and SiO emission traces some other collimated outflows that emanate from MM1-2 cores, and are not related with the low-velocity maser outflow.

Zapata, Luis A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Galvan-Madrid, R. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Su, Y.-N. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Patel, Nimesh [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-01-10

443

Exploring Our World with Dr. Ryan: an adventure-science video series  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science is embedded in all that we do and experience. It brings perspective to the simplest and most complex systems: A rocket breaking free of the Earth's gravitational field to single stream recycling of waste. Everything! To many of us, these concepts are acknowledged as a part of our lives, but remain at arm's length because we don't understand the fundamental principles that make them all possible. However individuals, armed with information, make wise decisions about their lives and the world that we share. The adults of tomorrow are quickly growing up, which makes effective science outreach to youth all the more important, even urgent. In this presentation we shall describe the infrastructure behind the exciting Exploring Our World with Dr. Ryan series. These stirring, web-based videos (~4 min) are designed to educate audiences (with a target age of 8-12 years old) about various aspects of the world in which we live. Currently we are working on a Climate Change sub-series. The well-produced films are designed to be placed into the hands of educators but are appealing to youth outside of the classroom. The short vignettes are concise descriptions of fascinating and timely scientific topics, making them ideal multimodal teaching tools, introductions to topics of discussion and alternative perspectives to textbook-based curriculum. The series leverages enthusiastic hosting, otherwise inaccessible scientific expertise and authentic illustrations of experimentation. Additionally, each episode is strengthened by a carefully conceived work-flow that not only emphasizes the desired content but encourages critical thinking, models scientific methodology, humanizes scientists and celebrates collaborations that lead to clearer understandings of the Big Picture. Robust social networking is the capsicum to the series successful outreach. Example episode: http://vimeo.com/22397380

vachon, R. W.; Kramer, N.

2011-12-01

444

The Origin of DIRT (Detrital Input and Removal Treatments): the Legacy of Dr. Francis D. Hole  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil organic matter (SOM) plays a key role in the cycling and retention of nitrogen and carbon within soil. Both above and belowground detrital inputs determine the nature and quantity of SOM. Studies on detrital impacts on SOM dynamics are underway at several LTER, ILTER and LTER-affiliated sites using a common experimental design, Detrital Input and Removal Treatments (DIRT). The concept for DIRT was originally based on experimental plots established at the University of Wisconsin Arboretum by Dr. Francis D. Hole in 1956 to study the effects of detrital inputs on pedogenesis. These plots are located on two forested sites and two prairie sites within the arboretum. Manipulations of the forested sites include double litter, no litter and removal of the O and A horizons. Manipulations of the prairie sites include harvest, mulch, bare and burn. These original treatments have largely been maintained since 1956. After 40 years of maintenance, there were significant differences in soil carbon between the double and no litter plots. The double litter plots had increased by nearly 30% while the no litter plots had decreased over 50%. The original DIRT plots are now 50 years old and have been re-sampled, where possible, for total carbon and nitrogen, labile and recalcitrant carbon fractions, net and gross nitrogen mineralization rates, and SOM bioavailability through CO2 respiration. The soils were fractionated by density to examine the role of carbon in each density fraction. The mean age of carbon in each fraction was determined by radiocarbon dating. This sampling and analysis is of special significance because it provides a glimpse into the future SOM trajectories for the new DIRT sites: Harvard Forest (MA), Bousson (PA), Andrews Experimental Forest (OR) and Sikfokut (Hungary).

Townsend, K. L.; Lajtha, K.; Caldwell, B.; Sollins, P.

2007-12-01

445

Photometric Redshift Probability Distributions for Galaxies in the SDSS DR8  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present redshift probability distributions for galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 imaging data. We used the nearest-neighbor weighting algorithm to derive the ensemble redshift distribution N(z), and individual redshift probability distributions P(z) for galaxies with r < 21.8 and u < 29.0. As part of this technique, we calculated weights for a set of training galaxies with known redshifts such that their density distribution in five-dimensional color-magnitude space was proportional to that of the photometry-only sample, producing a nearly fair sample in that space. We estimated the ensemble N(z) of the photometric sample by constructing a weighted histogram of the training-set redshifts. We derived P(z)'s for individual objects by using training-set objects from the local color-magnitude space around each photometric object. Using the P(z) for each galaxy can reduce the statistical error in measurements that depend on the redshifts of individual galaxies. The spectroscopic training sample is substantially larger than that used for the DR7 release. The newly added PRIMUS catalog is now the most important training set used in this analysis by a wide margin. We expect the primary sources of error in the N(z) reconstruction to be sample variance and spectroscopic failures: The training sets are drawn from relatively small volumes of space, and some samples have large incompleteness. Using simulations we estimated the uncertainty in N(z) due to sample variance at a given redshift to be ~10%-15%. The uncertainty on calculations incorporating N(z) or P(z) depends on how they are used; we discuss the case of weak lensing measurements. The P(z) catalog is publicly available from the SDSS Web site.

Sheldon, Erin S.; Cunha, Carlos E.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Brinkmann, J.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

2012-08-01

446

DR_SEQAN: a PC\\/Windows-based software to evaluate drug resistance using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Genotypic assays based on DNA sequencing of part or the whole reverse transcriptase (RT)- and protease (PR)-coding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome have become part of the routine clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to complex interactions between mutations found in viral genes. RESULTS: DR_SEQAN is a

César Garriga; Luis Menéndez-Arias

2006-01-01

447

Dr. Schubert Ogden Engages with the Question: What is of Greatest Concern for You in Your Work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

What is of greatest concern for you in your work?\\u000aDr. Schubert Ogden discusses his hope that his work would affect the significant work of many to advance the discussion of Christianity. He suggests that this is the greatest reason to publish any work. He says that doing theology is reflecting on what it means to bear witness to faith.

Schubert Ogden; Alfred Benney

2000-01-01

448

HLA-DR4Ala74? is associated with risk and poor outcome of severe aplastic anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a heterogeneous hematological disorder with a high mortality. Genetic predisposition has\\u000a been shown to play a role in a considerable proportion of SAA cases. For instance, the human lymphocyte antigen HLA-DR2 has\\u000a been repeatedly demonstrated to be over-represented in SAA patients. In this paper, we expand on the evidence for the contribution\\u000a of HLA polymorphism

S. I. Kapustin; T. I. Popova; A. A. Lyshchov; E. N. Imyanitov; M. N. Blinov; K. M. Abdulkadyrov

2001-01-01

449

Changes in Fish Biomass under Impact of a Thermal Effluent and Eutrophication in Lake Dr?kšiai  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the period 1993–1999, discharged thermal effluent and intensive anthropogenic eutrophication impact on the fish biomass were studied in Lake Dr?kšiai, the cooler of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP). Since 1950, the total biomass of fish has increased 50% and, in addition, great changes have occurred in the biomass of different fish species. In comparison to the period 1950–1975, the

Egidijus Bernotas

2002-01-01

450

COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION: A RESPONSE TO PROFESSORS ENGLISH, D'SOUZA, AND DR. CHARTRAND  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this article is to respond to Professor English, Professor D'Souza, and Dr. Chartrand's comparative review of research in the British Journal of Religious Education and Religious Education over the ten-year period from 1992–2002. Their analysis is for the most part extended and complemented, although critical questions are also raised and pursued. The article concludes with the identification

L. Philip Barnes

2005-01-01

451

A Lung Rezisztencia Protein (LRP) expressziójának vizsgálata hererákokban Dr. Sugár János professzor 80. születésnapjára készített elôadás alapján  

Microsoft Academic Search

A germinalis sejtes hererákok kemoterápiával jól gyógyíthatók, mert kb. 80%-os remisszió érhetô el. Ennek ellenére a daganat kemorezisztenciája (DR) miatt a betegek 15-20%-a meghal. A multidrug- rezisztencia (MDR) fenotípus számos mechanizmusa ismert, amelybe az MDR\\/P-glycoprotein (P-gp), továbbá az ún. multidrug-rezisztencia protein (MRP) tartozik. A Lung Rezisztencia Protein (LRP) ATP- hez kötött kazetta (ABC) transzporter fehérje, amely az MDR-hez kapcsolódik. Jelen

Mándoky László; Géczi Lajos; Doleschall Zoltán; Csuka Orsolya; Bodrogi István; Bak Mihály

2002-01-01

452

HLA-DR expression, natural killer cells and IgE containing cells in the jejunal mucosa of coeliac children.  

PubMed Central

The expression of HLA-DR by surface and crypt epithelium and the numbers of cells of natural killer (NK) phenotype and of IgE containing cells were studied with monoclonal antisera using the peroxidase technique. We examined 48 jejunal biopsy specimens taken from 35 coeliac children before treatment (11), during gluten free diet (20) and after gluten challenge (17), and 13 control specimens. The luminal surface of the epithelial cells stained with HLA-DR antiserum in all specimens, but the cytoplasm of the surface epithelial cells took up the stain more frequently in the specimens from the controls (5/13) than those from the coeliacs (2/48) (p less than 0.01). In 21/28 specimens taken from coeliacs when on a gluten containing diet the crypt epithelium showed strong HLA-DR expression, while only 4/20 (p less than 0.01) specimens of coeliacs on a gluten free diet and 1/13 specimens of controls had similar staining. Among the intraepithelial lymphocytes no cells of NK phenotype were found in specimens from patients or controls. As compared with control specimens biopsy specimens from untreated coeliac patients showed smaller numbers of NK cells in the lamina propria. No difference was found in the numbers of IgE containing cells between the patients and controls. The strong expression of HLA-DR by the crypt epithelial cells in coeliac children on a normal diet suggest that these cells are involved in the presentation of the antigen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3

Arato, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M; Verkasalo, M; Klemola, T

1987-01-01

453

Neuroprotective Effects of Recombinant T-cell Receptor Ligand in Autoimmune Optic Neuritis in HLA-DR2 Mice  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Optic neuritis (ON) is a condition involving primary inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury in the optic nerve and leads to apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, which contributes to the persistence of visual loss. Currently, ON has no effective treatment. The goal was to determine the effectiveness of immunotherapy with recombinant T-cell receptor ligand (RTL) in preventing ON in humanized HLA-DR2 transgenic mice. Methods. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in humanized HLA-DR2 (DR?1*1501) transgenic mice. Five consecutive doses of RTL342M were administrated at the onset of ON. The development of autoimmune ON was assessed by histopathology at different time points. The levels of myelin loss, axonal loss, and RGC damage were examined by immunofluorescence. Results. HLA-DR2 mice developed chronic ON 2 days before EAE characterized by progressive neurodegeneration in both organs. RTL342M significantly suppressed inflammation in the optic nerve and spinal cord and provided protection for at least 30 days. Examination of myelin loss showed a marked suppression of demyelination and an increase in myelin recovery in the optic nerve. Moreover, RTL342M treatment revealed a neuroprotective effect on optic nerve axons and RGCs in retinas at postimmunization (PI) day 62. Conclusions. RTL342M suppressed clinical and histologic signs of EAE/ON by preventing the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the optic nerve and showed neuroprotective effects against ON. However, to achieve full therapeutic benefit, more doses may be needed. These findings suggest a possible clinical application of this novel class of T-cell-tolerizing drugs for patients with optic neuritis.

Brown, Lori; Andrew, Shayne; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.

2012-01-01

454

DR CHIP, EDUC,& COSEHC: a triple public health strategy to reduce mortality in a high cardiovascular risk community  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dan River Region Cardiovascular Health Initiative Program (DR CHIP),a COSEHC Cardiovascular Center of Excellence is dedicated to reducing cardiovascular(cv)mortality in Pittsylvania County, VA, a county among those with the highest incidence of coronary artery disease mortality.Itis also a NHLBI Enhanced Dissemination and Utilization Center(EDUC) and a COSEHC Cardiovascular Center of Excellence. Case managers are utilized to implement and to

Michael A. Moore; Terry Motley; Kathryn Plum; Leslie Smith

2002-01-01

455

Sampling and analysis plan for the 105-F and 105DR Phase III below-grade structures and underlying soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

This sampling and analysis plan presents the rationale and strategy for radiological surveys and the sampling and analysis activities proposed in support of Phase III of the 105-F\\/105-DR Interim Safe Storage Project. The purpose of the proposed surveys and sampling and analysis activities is the characterization of the Phase III below-grade structures and underlying soils to support their verification of

Day

1999-01-01