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Sample records for draco dwarf spheroidal

  1. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Dhuga, K.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of X - ray sources in Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy recently observed by XMM-Newton. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with AGN, few of them possess characteristics of LMXBs and CVs. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of a central IMBH in Draco.

  2. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with LX > 3 × 1033 erg s‑1 in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  3. The Chemical Evolution of the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Huang, Wenjin

    2009-08-01

    We present an abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of eight stars selected to span the full range in metallicity in the Draco dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. We find that [Fe/H] for the sample stars ranges from -1.5 to -3.0 dex. Combining our sample with previously published work for a total of 14 luminous Draco giants, we show that the abundance ratios [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], and [Si/Fe] for the Draco giants overlap those of Galactic halo giants at the lowest [Fe/H] probed, but are significantly lower for the higher Fe-metallicity Draco stars. For the explosive α-elements Ca and Ti, the abundance ratios for Draco giants with [Fe/H] > - 2.4 dex are approximately constant and slightly subsolar, well below values characteristic of Galactic halo stars. The s-process contribution to the production of heavy elements begins at significantly lower Fe metallicity than in the Galactic halo. Using a toy model we compare the behavior of the abundance ratios within the sample of Draco giants with those from the literature of Galactic globular clusters, and the Carina and Sgr dSph galaxies. The differences appear to be related to the timescale for buildup of the heavy elements, with Draco having the slowest rate. We note the presence of a Draco giant with [Fe/H] <-3.0 dex in our sample, and reaffirm that the inner Galactic halo could have been formed by early accretion of Galactic satellite galaxies and dissolution of young globular clusters, while the outer halo could have formed from those satellite galaxies accreted later. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. THE CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE DRACO DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Huang Wenjin E-mail: hwenjin@astro.washington.edu

    2009-08-20

    We present an abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of eight stars selected to span the full range in metallicity in the Draco dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. We find that [Fe/H] for the sample stars ranges from -1.5 to -3.0 dex. Combining our sample with previously published work for a total of 14 luminous Draco giants, we show that the abundance ratios [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], and [Si/Fe] for the Draco giants overlap those of Galactic halo giants at the lowest [Fe/H] probed, but are significantly lower for the higher Fe-metallicity Draco stars. For the explosive {alpha}-elements Ca and Ti, the abundance ratios for Draco giants with [Fe/H] > - 2.4 dex are approximately constant and slightly subsolar, well below values characteristic of Galactic halo stars. The s-process contribution to the production of heavy elements begins at significantly lower Fe metallicity than in the Galactic halo. Using a toy model we compare the behavior of the abundance ratios within the sample of Draco giants with those from the literature of Galactic globular clusters, and the Carina and Sgr dSph galaxies. The differences appear to be related to the timescale for buildup of the heavy elements, with Draco having the slowest rate. We note the presence of a Draco giant with [Fe/H] <-3.0 dex in our sample, and reaffirm that the inner Galactic halo could have been formed by early accretion of Galactic satellite galaxies and dissolution of young globular clusters, while the outer halo could have formed from those satellite galaxies accreted later.

  5. XMM-Newton study of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, Sara; Sasaki, Manami; Ducci, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We present the results of the analysis of five XMM-Newton observations of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). The aim of the work is the study of the X-ray population in the field of the Draco dSph. Methods: We classified the sources on the basis of spectral analysis, hardness ratios, X-ray-to-optical flux ratio, X-ray variability, and cross-correlation with available catalogues in X-ray, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths. Results: We detected 70 X-ray sources in the field of the Draco dSph in the energy range of 0.2 - 12 keV and classified 18 AGNs, 9 galaxies and galaxy candidates, 6 sources as foreground stars, 4 low-mass X-ray binary candidates, 1 symbiotic star, and 2 binary system candidates. We also identified 9 sources as hard X-ray sources in the field of the galaxy. We derived the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray sources in the Draco dSph in the 2 - 10 keV and 0.5 - 2 keV energy bands. Using the X-ray luminosity function in the energy range of 0.5 - 2 keV, we estimate that ~10 X-ray sources are objects in the Draco dSph. We have also estimated the dark matter halo mass that would be needed to keep the low-mass X-ray binaries gravitationally bound to the galaxy. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  6. Spectroscopy of Six Red Giants in the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme H.; Siegel, Michael H.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Winnick, Rebeccah

    2006-10-01

    Keck Observatory LRIS-B (Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) spectra are reported for six red giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy and several comparison giants in the globular cluster M13. Indexes that quantify the strengths of the Ca II H and K lines, the λ3883 and λ4215 CN bands, and the λ4300 G band have been measured. These data confirm evidence of metallicity inhomogeneity within Draco obtained by previous authors. The four brightest giants in the sample have absolute magnitudes in the range -2.6Draco tip giants and that some giants have higher [C/Fe] ratios than is typical of giants in the globular clusters M13 and M92. Several suggestions are made as to why some Draco stars may have higher [C/Fe] ratios than globular cluster red giants: deep mixing might be inhibited in these Draco stars, they may formerly have been mass-transfer binaries that acquired carbon from a more massive companion, or the Draco dwarf galaxy may have experienced relatively slow chemical evolution over a period of several billion years, allowing carbon-enhanced ejecta from intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to enrich the interstellar medium while star formation was still occurring. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, M. N.; Tsujimoto, T.; Shigeyama, T.; Aoki, W.

    2016-08-01

    A dominant astrophysical site for r-process, which is responsible for producing heavy neutron-capture elements, is unknown. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way halo provide ideal laboratories to investigate the origin and evolution of r-process elements. We carried out high-resolution spectroscopic observations of three giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy to estimate their europium abundances. We found that the upper-limits of [Eu/H] are very low in the range [Fe/H] < -2, while this ratio is nearly constant at higher metallicities. This trend is not well reproduced with models which assume that Eu is produced together with Fe by SNe, and may suggest the contribution from other objects such as neutron-star mergers.

  8. Searching for decaying dark matter in deep XMM-Newton observation of the Draco dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Boyarsky, Alexey; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro; Bulbul, Esra; Eckert, Dominique; Franse, Jeroen; Malyshev, Denys; Markevitch, Maxim; Neronov, Andrii

    2016-08-01

    We present results of a search for the 3.5 keV emission line in our recent very long (˜ 1.4 Ms) XMM-Newton observation of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The astrophysical X-ray emission from such dark matter-dominated galaxies is faint, thus they provide a test for the dark matter origin of the 3.5 keV line previously detected in other massive, but X-ray bright objects, such as galaxies and galaxy clusters. We do not detect a statistically significant emission line from Draco; this constrains the lifetime of a decaying dark matter particle to τ > (7-9) × 1027 s at 95 per cent CL (combining all three XMM-Newton cameras; the interval corresponds to the uncertainty of the dark matter column density in the direction of Draco). The PN camera, which has the highest sensitivity of the three, does show a positive spectral residual (above the carefully modelled continuum) at E = 3.54 ± 0.06 keV with a 2.3σ significance. The two MOS cameras show less-significant or no positive deviations, consistently within 1σ with PN. Our Draco limit on τ is consistent with previous detections in the stacked galaxy clusters, M31 and the Galactic Centre within their 1 - 2σ uncertainties, but is inconsistent with the high signal from the core of the Perseus cluster (which has itself been inconsistent with the rest of the detections). We conclude that this Draco observation does not exclude the dark matter interpretation of the 3.5 keV line in those objects.

  9. Searching for decaying dark matter in deep XMM-Newton observation of the Draco dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Boyarsky, Alexey; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro; Bulbul, Esra; Eckert, Dominique; Franse, Jeroen; Malyshev, Denys; Markevitch, Maxim; Neronov, Andrii

    2016-05-01

    We present results of a search for the 3.5 keV emission line in our recent very long (˜ 1.4 Ms) XMM-Newton observation of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The astrophysical X-ray emission from such dark matter-dominated galaxies is faint, thus they provide a test for the dark matter origin of the 3.5 keV line previously detected in other massive, but X-ray bright objects, such as galaxies and galaxy clusters. We do not detect a statistically significant emission line from Draco; this constrains the lifetime of a decaying dark matter particle to τ > (7 - 9) × 1027 s at 95% CL (combining all three XMM-Newton cameras; the interval corresponds to the uncertainty of the dark matter column density in the direction of Draco). The PN camera, which has the highest sensitivity of the three, does show a positive spectral residual (above the carefully modeled continuum) at E = 3.54 ± 0.06 keV with a 2.3σ significance. The two MOS cameras show less-significant or no positive deviations, consistently within 1σ with PN. Our Draco limit on τ is consistent with previous detections in the stacked galaxy clusters, M31 and the Galactic Center within their 1 - 2σ uncertainties, but is inconsistent with the high signal from the core of the Perseus cluster (which has itself been inconsistent with the rest of the detections). We conclude that this Draco observation does not exclude the dark matter interpretation of the 3.5 keV line in those objects.

  10. MEASURING DARK MATTER PROFILES NON-PARAMETRICALLY IN DWARF SPHEROIDALS: AN APPLICATION TO DRACO

    SciTech Connect

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl; Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Williams, Michael J.; Drory, Niv

    2013-02-15

    We introduce a novel implementation of orbit-based (or Schwarzschild) modeling that allows dark matter density profiles to be calculated non-parametrically in nearby galaxies. Our models require no assumptions to be made about velocity anisotropy or the dark matter profile. The technique can be applied to any dispersion-supported stellar system, and we demonstrate its use by studying the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Draco. We use existing kinematic data at larger radii and also present 12 new radial velocities within the central 13 pc obtained with the VIRUS-W integral field spectrograph on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Our non-parametric Schwarzschild models find strong evidence that the dark matter profile in Draco is cuspy for 20 {<=} r {<=} 700 pc. The profile for r {>=} 20 pc is well fit by a power law with slope {alpha} = -1.0 {+-} 0.2, consistent with predictions from cold dark matter simulations. Our models confirm that, despite its low baryon content relative to other dSphs, Draco lives in a massive halo.

  11. Chemical feature of Eu abundance in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Aoki, Wako

    2015-06-01

    The chemical abundance of r-process elements in nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies is a powerful tool to probe the site of r-process since their small-mass scale can assess the potential rarity of events associated with the r-process production. A merger of binary neutron stars is a promising candidate for such a site. In faint, or less-massive, dSph galaxies such as the Draco, a few binary neutron star mergers are expected to have occurred at most over the whole past. We have measured the chemical abundance, including Eu and Ba, of three red giants in the Draco dSph by Subaru High-Dispersion Spectrograph observation. The Eu detection for one star with [Fe/H] = -1.45 confirms a broadly constant [Eu/H] of ˜ -1.3 for stars with [Fe/H] ≳-2. This feature is shared by other dSphs with similar masses, i.e., the Sculptor and the Carina, and suggests that a neutron star merger is the origin of r-process elements in terms of the rarity of this event. In addition, two very metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] = -2.12 and -2.51 are found to exhibit very low Eu abundances, such as [Eu/H] < -2, with the suggestion of a sudden increase of Eu abundance by more than 0.7 dex at [Fe/H] ≈ -2.2 in the Draco dSph. The detection of Ba abundances for these stars suggests that the r-process enrichment began no later than the time when only a few percent of stars in the present-day Draco dSph were formed. Though identifying the origin of an early Eu production inside the Draco dSph should be left until more abundant data of stars with [Fe/H] ≲ -2 in Draco, as well as other faint dSphs, become available, the implied early emergence of an Eu production event might be reconciled with the presence of extremely metal-poor stars enriched by r-process elements in the Galactic halo.

  12. Spectroscopy of Carbon Stars in the Draco and Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.

    2008-07-01

    With the ISIS spectrograph on the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained intermediate-resolution optical spectra in three and five carbon stars belonging to the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies Draco and Ursa Minor, respectively. The metallicity, carbon isotopic ratios, and high-mass s-element abundances were determined by spectral synthesis in LTE using appropriate spherically symmetric, carbon-rich atmosphere models. The infrared colors and derived luminosities suggest that these stars are equivalent to the classical CH-type stars found in the halo of the Milky Way, although the evidence of luminosity variations in the stars Draco 461 and Draco 20733 may be compatible with these being carbon-rich low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived overall metallicity in the stellar sample ([M/H] ~-2.0) agrees with the average metallicity of the main stellar component in these dSphs obtained by previous studies. The C/O and 12C/13C ratios, and the average large heavy-element (Ba, La, Nd, Sm) enhancements derived ([hs/M] >=1) are also similar to the values found in galactic CH-type stars at the same stellar metallicity. Although this average excess in heavy elements can be explained by standard s-process nucleosynthesis models, in two stars of Ursa Minor there is a suggestion that their heavy-element abundance pattern bears a closer resemblance to the scaled solar system r-process than the s-process abundance curve. If this is confirmed, these stars would represent an extragalactic example of the s + r carbon-rich (binary) stars found in the galactic halo. This r-process like abundance pattern has been found previously in other red giant stars belonging to Ursa Minor, suggesting a peculiar chemical evolution history in this dSph galaxy.

  13. The Nature of the Red Giant Branches in the Ursa Minor and Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetrone, Matthew D.; Côté, Patrick; Stetson, Peter B.

    2001-09-01

    Spectra for stars located redward of the fiducial red giant branches (RGBs) of the Ursa Minor and Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxies have been obtained with the Hobby-Eberly telescope and the Marcario Low Resolution Spectrometer. From a comparison of our radial velocities with those reported in previous medium-resolution studies, we find an average difference of 10 km s-1 with a standard deviation of 11 km s-1. On the basis of these radial velocities, we confirm the membership of five stars in Ursa Minor and find two others to be nonmembers. One of the confirmed members is a known carbon star that lies redward of the RGB; three others are previously unidentified carbon stars. The fifth star is a red giant that was found previously by Shetrone and coworkers to have [Fe/H]=-1.68+/-0.11 dex. In Draco, we find eight nonmembers, confirm the membership of one known carbon star, and find two new members. One of these stars is a carbon star, while the other shows no evidence for C2 bands or strong atomic bands, although the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum is low. Thus, we find no evidence for a population of stars more metal-rich than [Fe/H]~=-1.45 dex in either of these galaxies. Indeed, our spectroscopic survey suggests that every candidate suspected of having a metallicity in excess of this value based on its position in the color-magnitude diagram is, in actuality, a carbon star. Based on the census of 13 known carbon stars in these two galaxies, we estimate the carbon star specific frequency to be ɛdSph~=2.4×10-5 L-1V,solar, 25-100 times higher than that of Galactic globular clusters. This work is based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximillians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  14. Bayesian analysis of resolved stellar spectra: application to MMT/Hectochelle observations of the Draco dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Mateo, Mario

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a Bayesian method for fitting faint, resolved stellar spectra in order to obtain simultaneous estimates of redshift and stellar-atmospheric parameters. We apply the method to thousands of spectra - covering 5160-5280 Å at resolution R˜ 20 000 - that we have acquired with the MMT/Hectochelle fibre spectrograph for red giant and horizontal branch candidates along the line of sight to the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal satellite in Draco. The observed stars subtend an area of ˜4 deg2, extending ˜3 times beyond Draco's nominal `tidal' radius. For each spectrum, we tabulate the first four moments - central value, variance, skewness and kurtosis - of posterior probability distribution functions representing estimates of the following physical parameters: line-of-sight velocity (vlos), effective temperature (Teff), surface gravity (log g) and metallicity ([Fe/H]). After rejecting low-quality measurements, we retain a new sample consisting of 2813 independent observations of 1565 unique stars, including 1879 observations for 631 stars with (as many as 13) repeat observations. Parameter estimates have median random errors of σ _{v_{los}} = 0.88 km s-1, σ _{T_{eff}} = 162 K, σlog g = 0.37 dex and σ[Fe/H] = 0.20 dex. Our estimates of physical parameters distinguish ˜470 likely Draco members from interlopers in the Galactic foreground.

  15. Proper Motion of the Draco Dwarf Galaxy from Subaru Suprime-Cam Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the absolute proper motion of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy using Subaru Suprime-Cam images taken at three epochs, with time baselines of 4.4 and 7 years. The magnitude limit of the proper-motion study is i = 25, thus allowing for thousands of background galaxies and Draco stars to be used to perform extensive astrometric tests and to derive the correction to an inertial reference frame. The derived proper motion is (μα, μδ) = ( - 0.284 ± 0.047, -0.289 ± 0.041) mas yr-1. This motion implies an orbit that takes Draco to a pericenter of ˜20 kpc; a somewhat disruptive orbit suggesting that tides might account for the rising velocity-dispersion profile of Draco seen in line-of-sight velocity studies. The orbit is only marginally consistent with Draco's membership to the vast polar structure of Galactic satellites, in contrast to a recent HST proper-motion measurement that finds alignment very likely. Our study is a test case to demonstrate that deep imaging with mosaic cameras of appropriate resolution can be used for high-accuracy, ground-based proper-motion measurement. As a useful by-product of the study, we also identify two faint brown-dwarf candidates in the foreground field.

  16. Proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy from Subaru Suprime-Cam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured the absolute proper motion of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy using Subaru Suprime-Cam images taken at three epochs, with time baselines of 4.4 and 7 yr. The magnitude limit of the proper-motion study is i = 25, thus allowing for thousands of background galaxies and Draco stars to be used to perform extensive astrometric tests and to derive the correction to an inertial reference frame. The derived proper motion is (μα, μδ) = (-0.284 ± 0.047, -0.289 ± 0.041) mas yr-1. This motion implies an orbit that takes Draco to a pericentre of ˜20 kpc; a somewhat disruptive orbit suggesting that tides might account for the rising velocity-dispersion profile of Draco seen in line-of-sight velocity studies. The orbit is only marginally consistent with Draco's membership to the vast polar structure of Galactic satellites, in contrast to a recent Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurement that finds alignment very likely. Our study is a test case to demonstrate that deep imaging with mosaic cameras of appropriate resolution can be used for high-accuracy, ground-based proper-motion measurement. As a useful by-product of the study, we also identify two faint brown-dwarf candidates in the foreground field.

  17. Detecting dark matter WIMPs in the Draco dwarf: A multiwavelength perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; Ullio, Piero

    2007-01-15

    We explore the possible signatures of dark matter pair annihilations in the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco. After investigating the mass models for Draco in the light of available observational data, we carefully model the dark matter density profile, taking advantage of numerical simulations of hierarchical structure formation. We then analyze the gamma-ray and electron/positron yield expected for weakly interacting dark matter particle (WIMP) models, including an accurate treatment of the propagation of the charged particle species. We show that unlike in larger dark matter structures - such as galaxy clusters - spatial diffusion plays here an important role. While Draco would appear as a pointlike gamma-ray source, synchrotron emission from electrons and positrons produced by WIMP annihilations features a spatially extended structure. Depending upon the cosmic ray propagation setup and the size of the magnetic fields, the search for a diffuse radio emission from Draco can be a more sensitive indirect dark matter search probe than gamma rays. Finally, we show that available data are consistent with the presence of a black hole at the center of Draco: if this is indeed the case, very significant enhancements of the rates for gamma rays and other emissions related to dark matter annihilations are expected.

  18. Studies of local group dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleyna, Jan Thomas

    We present several research topics concerning the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies around the Milky Way. In Chapter 1, we briefly review the qualities of the dSphs; in Chapter 2, we use extant scanned photographic plate survey data to place limits on the population of undiscovered dSphs; in Chapter 3, we describe the first complete CCD survey of a dSph (Ursa Minor), and we analyze the asymmetry and bimodality of its light distribution; in Chapter 4, we present CCD survey data for the UMi and Draco dSphs; in Chapter 5, we compute the constraints that can be placed on the dSph velocity dispersion and dark matter distribution using additional velocity measurements near the tidal radius; and in Chapter 6, we present a deeper survey of Ursa Minor (V ~ 24.5), and develop an objective maximum likelihood technique for fitting theoretical isochrones to its color magnitude diagram.

  19. Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Dragon; abbrev. Dra, gen. Draconis; area 1083 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Ursa Major and Cepheus, and encloses Ursa Minor on three sides. The center of the constellation culminates at midnight in May, though part of it is on the meridian from mid-February to late July. Draco represents the dragon Ladon in Greek mythology, which guarded the golden apple tree that was...

  20. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and resonant orbital coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Miller, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The structural properties of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way may be strongly affected by their time-dependent interactions with the 'tidal' field of the Milky Way. A low Q resonance of the tidal driving force with collective oscillation modes of the dwarf system can produce many of the observed properties of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including large velocity dispersions that would normally be interpreted as indicating large dynamical masses.

  1. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  2. The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Andromeda I

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, J.; Kristian, J. Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    Images of Andromeda I in the visual and near-infrared show a giant branch characteristic of galactic globular clusters of intermediate metallicity. The distance of the galaxy is estimated from the tip of the giant branch to be 790 + or - 60 kpc. The physical dimensions and luminosity are similar to those of the dwarf spheroidal in Sculptor. There is no evidence for an intermediate age population in Andromeda I, and appropriate upper limits are specified. There is marginal evidence for a color gradient in the galaxy, a phenomenon not previously noted in a dwarf spheroidal. 21 refs.

  3. Mass Modelling of dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentowski, Jarosław; Łokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the origin and properties of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N-body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. We create mock kinematic data sets by observing the dwarf in different directions. When the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails. However, most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert. We model the velocity dispersion profiles of the cleaned-up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation. We show that even for such a strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25%.

  4. ANDROMEDA XXIX: A NEW DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY 200 kpc FROM ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Eric F.; Slater, Colin T.; Martin, Nicolas F.

    2011-11-20

    We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Andromeda XXIX (And XXIX), using data from the recently released Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8, and confirmed by Gemini North telescope Multi-Object Spectrograph imaging data. And XXIX appears to be a dwarf spheroidal galaxy, separated on the sky by a little more than 15 Degree-Sign from M31, with a distance inferred from the tip of the red giant branch of 730 {+-} 75 kpc, corresponding to a three-dimensional separation from M31 of 207{sup +20}{sub -2} kpc (close to M31's virial radius). Its absolute magnitude, as determined by comparison to the red giant branch luminosity function of the Draco dwarf spheroidal, is M{sub V} = -8.3 {+-} 0.4. And XXIX's stellar populations appear very similar to Draco's; consequently, we estimate a metallicity for And XXIX of [Fe/H] {approx}-1.8. The half-light radius of And XXIX is 360 {+-} 60 pc and its ellipticity is 0.35 {+-} 0.06, typical of dwarf satellites of the Milky Way and M31 at this absolute magnitude range.

  5. A XMM-Newton observation of a sample of four close dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manni, L.; Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Testa, V.; Ingrosso, G.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of the analysis of deep archival XMM-Newton observations towards the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Leo I, Ursa Major II (UMa II) and Ursa Minor (UMi) in the Milky Way neighbourhood. The X-ray source population is characterized and cross-correlated with available databases to infer their nature. We also investigate if intermediate-mass black holes are hosted in the centre of these galaxies. For Draco, we detect 96 high-energy sources, two of them possibly being local stars, while no evidence for any X-ray emitting central compact object is found. Towards the Leo I and UMa II fields of view, we reveal 116 and 49 X-ray sources, respectively. None of them correlates with the putative central black holes and only one is likely associated with a UMa II local source. The study of the UMi dwarf galaxy found 54 high-energy sources and a possible association with a source at the dwarf spheroidal galaxy centre. We put an upper limit on the luminosity of the central compact object of 4.02 × 1033 erg s-1. Furthermore, via the correlation with a radio source near the galactic centre, the putative black hole should have a mass of (2.76^{+32.00}_{-2.54})× 10^6 M_{{{⊙}}} and be radiatively inefficient. This confirms a previous result obtained using Chandra data alone.

  6. THE DEARTH OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN GALACTIC DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spekkens, Kristine; Urbancic, Natasha; Mason, Brian S.; Willman, Beth; Aguirre, James E.

    2014-11-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (H I) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey data. All of the limits M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon constraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity L{sub V} and dynamical mass M {sub dyn}, we find M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/L{sub V}∼10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}/L{sub ⊙} and M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/M{sub dyn}∼5×10{sup −5}, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative H I contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our H I upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the H I content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of H I in these systems, then orbits in a relatively massive Milky Way are favored for the outer halo dSph Leo I, while Leo II and Canes Venatici I have had a pericentric passage in the past. For Draco and Ursa Minor, the interstellar medium mass that should accumulate through stellar mass loss in between pericentric passages exceeds M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} by a factor of ∼30. In Ursa Minor, this implies that either this material is not in the atomic phase, or that another mechanism clears the recycled gas on shorter timescales.

  7. Is Draco II one of the faintest dwarf galaxies? First study from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Geha, Marla; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Bell, Eric F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We present the first spectroscopic analysis of the faint and compact stellar system Draco II (Dra II, MV = -2.9 ± 0.8, r_h=19^{+8}_{-6} pc), recently discovered in the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 3π survey. The observations, conducted with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope, establish some of its basic characteristics: the velocity data reveal a narrow peak with nine member stars at a systemic heliocentric velocity < v_rrangle =-347.6^{+1.7}_{-1.8} km s^{-1}, thereby confirming Dra II is a satellite of the Milky Way; we infer a velocity dispersion with σvr = 2.9 ± 2.1 km s-1 (<8.4 km s-1 at the 95 per cent confidence level), which implies log _{10}(M_{1/2})=5.5^{+0.4}_{-0.6} and log _{10}(({M/L})_{1/2})=2.7^{+0.5}_{-0.8}, in Solar units; furthermore, very weak calcium triplet lines in the spectra of the high signal-to-noise member stars imply [Fe/H] < -2.1, whilst variations in the line strengths of two stars with similar colours and magnitudes suggest a metallicity spread in Dra II. These new data cannot clearly discriminate whether Draco II is a star cluster or amongst the faintest, most compact, and closest dwarf galaxies. However, the sum of the three - individually inconclusive - pieces of evidence presented here seems to favour the dwarf galaxy interpretation.

  8. FORMATION OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES VIA MERGERS OF DISKY DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Mayer, Lucio; Knebe, Alexander

    2011-10-10

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate whether binary mergers between rotationally supported dwarfs can lead to the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. We select merger events from a Constrained Local Universe simulation of the Local Group (LG) and record the properties of the interacting dwarf-sized halos. This information is subsequently used to seed controlled experiments of binary encounters between dwarf galaxies consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. These simulations are designed to reproduce eight cosmological merger events, with initial masses of the interacting systems in the range {approx}(5-60) x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, occurring quite early in the history of the LG, more than 10 Gyr ago. We compute the properties of the merger remnants as a distant observer would and demonstrate that at least three of the simulated encounters produce systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the LG. Tracing the history of the remnants in the cosmological simulation to z = 0, we find that two dSph-like objects remain isolated at distances {approx}> 800 kpc from either the Milky Way or M31. These systems constitute plausible counterparts of the remote dSphs Cetus and Tucana which reside in the LG outskirts, far from the tidal influence of the primary galaxies. We conclude that merging of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of dSphs in the LG and similar environments.

  9. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  10. Mass and Substructure in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.

    2006-12-01

    I present results from a large spectroscopic survey of individual stars in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, conducted using the Michigan/MIKE Fiber System (MMFS) at the Magellan Telescopes. dSph galaxies have come under intense scrutiny because they represent the lower extreme of the galaxy mass function, and thereby provide important constraints on models of structure formation. The proximity of the Milky Way's (MW's) dSph satellites allows us to study the resolved stellar populations of these systems in detail. Toward this end I have acquired MMFS spectra (5140-5180 Angstroms at resolution 20000) for more than 5000 stars in the MW dSphs Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans. The spectra yield measurements of both radial velocity (median precision ± 1.8 km/s) and [Fe/H] metallicity (± 0.2 dex). I present radial velocity dispersion profiles for each dSph, as well as halo mass profiles derived using a variety of models and nonparametric estimation techniques. In some cases, the bulk stellar component is separable into populations following distinct distributions in position, kinematics, and chemistry, indicating a surprising level of complexity in these diminutive galaxies. Taking advantage of the fine spatial sampling of the MMFS data, I identify regions showing tentative evidence of localized chemo-dynamical substructure. This work is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the University of Michigan.

  11. Testing Modified Gravity with Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, Hosein; Amiri, Vahid

    2016-08-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light (M★/L) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units, that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis (SPS) models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σ _ph {los}) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the Modified Gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant M★/L ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters α and μ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of the THINGS catalog of galaxies. We find that the derived M★/L ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the dSph with reasonable M★/L values we must vary α and μ on a case by case basis. A common pair of values cannot be found for all dSphs. Comparing with the values found from rotation curve fitting, it appears that μ correlates strongly with galaxy luminosity, shedding doubt on it as a universal constant.

  12. Dwarf spheroidal satellite formation in a reionized Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies have emerged a powerful probe of small-scale dark matter clustering and of cosmic reionization. They exhibit structural and chemical continuity with dwarf irregular galaxies in the field and with spheroidal galaxies in high-density environments. By combining empirical constraints derived for star formation at low gas column densities and metallicities in the local Universe with a model for dark matter and baryonic mass assembly, we provide an analytical description of how the dwarf spheroidals acquired their stellar content. Their progenitors formed stars until the gas content, initially reduced from the cosmic average by the thermal pressure of the reionized intergalactic medium, was finally ram pressure stripped during the progenitors' accretion on to the host galaxy. Dwarf spheroidal satellites of differing luminosities seem to share very similar most massive progenitor histories that reach thresholds for gas cooling by atomic line emission at epochs at which the Lagrangian volume of the Local Group should have been reionized. We hypothesize that dwarf spheroidals formed the bulk of their stars in partially rotationally supported H I discs in a reionized universe. This model provides an explanation for the `common mass scale' relation and reproduces the empirical luminosity-size and luminosity-metallicity relations. Explosive feedback phenomena, such as outflows driven by the concerted action of supernovae, need not have been significant in the dwarf spheroidals' formation. We further speculate that the true pre-reionization fossils should exhibit a structure distinct from that of the dwarf spheroidals, e.g. in the form of dense isolated or nuclear star clusters.

  13. Numerical Simulations of the Metallicity Distribution in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-12-12

    Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf galaxies in order to verify whether this result can be reproduced with ''standard'' assumptions. The answer is likely to be negative, unless some selection bias against very low metallicity stars is present in the observations.

  14. Mergers and the outside-in formation of dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Llambay, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Abadi, M. G.; Gottlöber, S.; Yepes, G.; Hoffman, Y.; Steinmetz, M.

    2016-02-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group to explore the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We find that a number of simulated dwarfs form `outside-in', with an old, metal-poor population that surrounds a younger, more concentrated metal-rich component, reminiscent of dwarf spheroidals like Sculptor or Sextans. We focus on a few examples where stars form in two populations distinct in age in order to elucidate the origin of these gradients. The spatial distributions of the two components reflect their diverse origin; the old stellar component is assembled through mergers, but the young population forms largely in situ. The older component results from a first episode of star formation that begins early but is quickly shut off by the combined effects of stellar feedback and reionization. The younger component forms when a late accretion event adds gas and reignites star formation. The effect of mergers is to disperse the old stellar population, increasing their radius and decreasing their central density relative to the young population. We argue that dwarf-dwarf mergers offer a plausible scenario for the formation of systems with multiple distinct populations and, more generally, for the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidals.

  15. Proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy based on Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Carlton; Piatek, Slawomir; Olszewski, Edward W. E-mail: piatek@physics.rutgers.edu

    2015-02-01

    We have measured the proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy using images at two epochs with a time baseline of about two years taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. Wide Field Channels 1 and 2 provide two adjacent fields, each containing a known QSO. The zero point for the proper motion is determined using both background galaxies and the QSOs and the two methods produce consistent measurements within each field. Averaging the results from the two fields gives a proper motion in the equatorial coordinate system of (μ{sub α},μ{sub δ})=(17.7±6.3,−22.1±6.3) mas century{sup −1} and in the Galactic coordinate system of (μ{sub ℓ},μ{sub b})=(−23.1±6.3,−16.3±6.3) mas century{sup −1}. Removing the contributions of the motion of the Sun and of the LSR to the measured proper motion yields a Galactic rest-frame proper motion of (μ{sub α}{sup Grf},μ{sub δ}{sup Grf})=(51.4±6.3,−18.7±6.3) mas century{sup −1} and (μ{sub ℓ}{sup Grf},μ{sub b}{sup Grf})=(−21.8±6.3,−50.1±6.3) mas century{sup −1}. The implied space velocity with respect to the Galactic center is (Π,Θ,Z)=(27±14,89±25,−212±20) km s{sup −1}. This velocity implies that the orbital inclination is 70{sup ∘}, with a 95% confidence interval of (59{sup ∘},80{sup ∘}), and that the plane of the orbit is consistent with that of the vast polar structure (VPOS) of Galactic satellite galaxies.

  16. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    We constrain the parameters of a self-interacting massive dark matter scalar particle in a condensate using the kinematics of the eight brightest dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way. For the case of a repulsive self-interaction, the condensate develops a mass density profile with a characteristic scale radius that is closely related to the fundamental parameters of the theory. We find that the velocity dispersion of dwarf spheroidal galaxies suggests a scale radius of the order of 1 kpc, in tension with previous results found using the rotational curve of low-surface-brightness and dwarf galaxies. The new value is however favored marginally by the constraints coming from the number of relativistic species at big bang nucleosynthesis. We discuss the implications of our findings for the particle dark matter model and argue that while a single classical coherent state can correctly describe the dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, it cannot play, in general, a relevant role for the description of dark matter in bigger objects.

  17. Chemical Analysis of Fornax dwarf spheroidal with VLT/FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letarte, B.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.

    The Fornax dSph is a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy with five globular clusters and a complex star formation history. It is one of the most massive dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. Using the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT, we have obtained high resolution (R˜20 000) spectra for 80 Red Giant Branch stars in the central 25' of the Fornax dSph. We present abundance ratios for some of the elements we have in our analysis, including alpha (Mg and Ca), iron-peak (Fe and Ni) and heavy (Y, Ba, Eu) elements. We compare our results with the Milky Way (MW) and our recent VLT/UVES abundance determinations of nine individual stars in Fornax globular clusters.

  18. VERITAS SEARCH FOR VHE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Furniss, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G.

    2010-09-10

    Indirect dark matter searches with ground-based gamma-ray observatories provide an alternative for identifying the particle nature of dark matter that is complementary to that of direct search or accelerator production experiments. We present the results of observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Ursa Minor, Booetes 1, and Willman 1 conducted by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). These galaxies are nearby dark matter dominated objects located at a typical distance of several tens of kiloparsecs for which there are good measurements of the dark matter density profile from stellar velocity measurements. Since the conventional astrophysical background of very high energy gamma rays from these objects appears to be negligible, they are good targets to search for the secondary gamma-ray photons produced by interacting or decaying dark matter particles. No significant gamma-ray flux above 200 GeV was detected from these four dwarf galaxies for a typical exposure of {approx}20 hr. The 95% confidence upper limits on the integral gamma-ray flux are in the range (0.4-2.2) x 10{sup -12}photonscm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We interpret this limiting flux in the context of pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and derive constraints on the thermally averaged product of the total self-annihilation cross section and the relative velocity of the WIMPs (({sigma}v) {approx}< 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for m {sub {chi} {approx}}> 300 GeV c {sup -2}). This limit is obtained under conservative assumptions regarding the dark matter distribution in dwarf galaxies and is approximately 3 orders of magnitude above the generic theoretical prediction for WIMPs in the minimal supersymmetric standard model framework. However, significant uncertainty exists in the dark matter distribution as well as the neutralino cross sections which under favorable assumptions could further lower this limit.

  19. WFPC2 Observations of the URSA Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Burke, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    We present our analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations in F555W (approximately V) and F814W (approximately I) of the central region of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The V versus V - I color-magnitude diagram features a sparsely populated blue horizontal branch, a steep thin red giant branch, and a narrow subgiant branch. The main sequence reaches approximately 2 magnitudes below the main-sequence turnoff (V(sup UMi, sub TO) approximately equals 23.27 +/- 0.11 mag) of the median stellar population. We compare the fiducial sequence of the Galactic globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). The excellent match between Ursa Minor and M92 confirms that the median stellar population of the UMi dSph galaxy is metal poor ([Fe/H](sub UMi) approximately equals [Fe/H](sub M92) approximately equals -2.2 dex) and ancient (age(sub UMi)approximately equalsage(sub M92) approximately equals 14 Gyr). The B - V reddening and the absorption in V are estimated to be E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.01 mag and A(sup UMi, sub V) = 0.09 +/- 0.03 mag. A new estimate of the distance modulus of Ursa Minor, (m - M)(sup UMi, sub 0) = 19.18 +/- 0.12 mag, has been derived based on fiducial-sequence fitting M92 [DELTA.V(sub UMi - M92) = 4.60 +/- 0.03 mag and DELTA(V - I)(sub UMi - M92) = 0.010 +/- 0.005 mag] and the adoption of the apparent V distance modulus for M92 of (m - M)(sup M92, sub V) = 14.67 +/- 0.08 mag (Pont et al. 1998, A&A, 329, 87). The Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is then at a distance of 69 +/- 4 kpc from the Sun. These HST observations indicate that Ursa Minor has had a very simple star formation history consisting mainly of a single major burst of star formation about 14 Gyr ago which lasted approximately < 2 Gyr. While we may have missed minor younger stellar populations due to the small field-of-view of the WFPC2 instrument, these observations clearly show that most of the stars in the central region Ursa Minor dwarf

  20. Seeking Chemical and Kinematic Correlations within the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevils, G. K.; Koger, D. K.; James, C. R.; Monelli, M.

    2004-12-01

    We explore the possibility that the old and intermediate-age, populations within the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy exhibit distinct kinematic and chemical signatures. Preliminary results from medium-resolution data indeed indicate that such differences do exist. We report on the magnitude of these differences and their uncertainties. This research was funded in part by an Enhancement Grant for Research from Sam Houston State University, as well as by a Women's International Science Collaboration Travel Grant from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. The dark matter content of Local Group dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle; PAndAS Team

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most dark matter dominated objects we have observed in the Universe. By measuring the dynamics of their stellar populations, we can hope to map out the shapes of their central density profiles, and compare these to expectations from simulations. In this poster, we will present the central kinematics of a range of dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way and Andromeda, taken as part of the PAndAS Keck II DEIMOS survey. We will highlight a number of unusual objects, which have either very high mass to light ratios - indicating they may be promising candidates for indirect detection experiments - or those with exceptionally low central densities, whose kinematic profiles suggest that these systems are out of dynamical equilibrium.

  2. Absolute Proper Motions of Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, Edward

    1997-07-01

    We propose to measure precise absolute proper motions for four dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way using spectroscopically-confirmed background QSOs to define a zero- velocity reference frame. Two epochs separated by 2 yrs will yield systemic tangential velocities of UMi, Car, Scl, {and For} to +/- 78 kms {+/- 130 kms}. These are worst-case velocity precisions and they are likely to be 2-4* smaller. Our long-term goal is to reduce them by an additional factor of several by obtaining data over the lifetime of WFPC2. With 2-3 QSOs per galaxy, we will still be confident of our motions with only 2 epochs. We will test whether the halo contains a small number of massive streams containing several dwarf galaxies, or whether the individual halo dwarfs are traveling along independent orbits. HST is essential to achieving the high precisions needed to conclusively compare the projected orbital motions of the individual galaxies; even with our conservative uncertainties, we are competitive with the best ground-based efforts with only a 2 year baseline. We will also use our results to improve our estimate of the mass of the Galaxy interior to 100 kpc. We believe that our project will show that astrometry has been a much ignored resource and power of HST. If HST performs as well as we suspect it can, it will be possible to measure the internal motions of stars in the dwarf spheroidals and the proper motions of all of the Local Group members over a timespan of 5 - 10 years.

  3. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-04-01

    We present wide-field g and i band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82' (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the over-densities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7% confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the over-densities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2' ± 7.1' (2.08±0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  4. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  5. Dark matter annihilation and decay in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: the classical and ultrafaint dSphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnivard, V.; Combet, C.; Daniel, M.; Funk, S.; Geringer-Sameth, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Maurin, D.; Read, J. I.; Sarkar, S.; Walker, M. G.; Wilkinson, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are prime targets for present and future γ-ray telescopes hunting for indirect signals of particle dark matter. The interpretation of the data requires careful assessment of their dark matter content in order to derive robust constraints on candidate relic particles. Here, we use an optimized spherical Jeans analysis to reconstruct the `astrophysical factor' for both annihilating and decaying dark matter in 21 known dSphs. Improvements with respect to previous works are: (i) the use of more flexible luminosity and anisotropy profiles to minimize biases, (ii) the use of weak priors tailored on extensive sets of contamination-free mock data to improve the confidence intervals, (iii) systematic cross-checks of binned and unbinned analyses on mock and real data, and (iv) the use of mock data including stellar contamination to test the impact on reconstructed signals. Our analysis provides updated values for the dark matter content of 8 `classical' and 13 `ultrafaint' dSphs, with the quoted uncertainties directly linked to the sample size; the more flexible parametrization we use results in changes compared to previous calculations. This translates into our ranking of potentially-brightest and most robust targets - namely Ursa Minor, Draco, Sculptor - and of the more promising, but uncertain targets - namely Ursa Major 2, Coma - for annihilating dark matter. Our analysis of Segue 1 is extremely sensitive to whether we include or exclude a few marginal member stars, making this target one of the most uncertain. Our analysis illustrates challenges that will need to be addressed when inferring the dark matter content of new `ultrafaint' satellites that are beginning to be discovered in southern sky surveys.

  6. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Zolotov, Adi E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il

    2014-05-10

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  7. UVES Abundances of Stars in Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim; Shetrone, Matt; Primas, Francesca; Hill, Vanessa; Kaufer, Andreas; Szeifert, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of control and is capable of wrecking the galaxy which hosts it. Of course the majority of galaxies seem to amble along somewhere between these two extremes, and the mean properties tend to favour a quiescent self-regulated evolutionary scenario. But there area variety of observations which require us to invoke transitory ‘bursts’ of star-formation at one time or another in most galaxy types. Several nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies have clearly determined star-formation histories with apparent periods of zero star formation followed by periods of fairly active star formation. If we are able to understand what separated these bursts we would understand several important phenomena in galaxy evolution. Were these galaxies able to clear out their gas reservoir in a burst of star formation? How did this gas return? or did it? Have these galaxies receieved gas from the IGM instead? Could stars from these types of galaxy contribute significantly to the halo population in our Galaxy? To answer these questions we need to combine accurate stellar photometry and Colour-Magnitude Diagram interpretation with detailed metal abundances to combine a star-formation rate versus time with a range of element abundances with time. Different elements trace different evolutionary process (e.g., relative contributions of type I and II supernovae). We often aren't even sure of the abundance spread in these galaxies. We have collected detailed high resolution UVES spectra of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I & Carina) to begin to answer these questions. This is a precursor study to a more complete study with FLAMES. We presented at this meeting the initial results for

  8. Dark matter profiles and annihilation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: prospectives for present and future γ-ray observatories - I. The classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, A.; Combet, C.; Daniel, M.; Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.; Maurin, D.; Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Sarkar, S.; Walker, M. G.; Wilkinson, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Due to their large dynamical mass-to-light ratios, dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter (DM) in γ-rays. We examine their detectability by present and future γ-ray observatories. The key innovative features of our analysis are as follows: (i) we take into account the angular size of the dSphs; while nearby objects have higher γ-ray flux, their larger angular extent can make them less attractive targets for background-dominated instruments; (ii) we derive DM profiles and the astrophysical J-factor (which parametrizes the expected γ-ray flux, independently of the choice of DM particle model) for the classical dSphs directly from photometric and kinematic data. We assume very little about the DM profile, modelling this as a smooth split-power-law distribution, with and without subclumps; (iii) we use a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique to marginalize over unknown parameters and determine the sensitivity of our derived J-factors to both model and measurement uncertainties; and (iv) we use simulated DM profiles to demonstrate that our J-factor determinations recover the correct solution within our quoted uncertainties. Our key findings are as follows: (i) subclumps in the dSphs do not usefully boost the signal; (ii) the sensitivity of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to dSphs within ˜20 kpc with cored haloes can be up to ˜50 times worse than when estimated assuming them to be point-like. Even for the satellite-borne Fermi-Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT), the sensitivity is significantly degraded on the relevant angular scales for long exposures; hence, it is vital to consider the angular extent of the dSphs when selecting targets; (iii) no DM profile has been ruled out by current data, but using a prior on the inner DM cusp slope 0 ≤γprior≤ 1 provides J-factor estimates accurate to a factor of a few if an appropriate angular scale is chosen; (iv) the J-factor is best constrained at a critical

  9. The Origin of the Diversity of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Yves; Jablonka, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    We present a large sample of 166 fully self-consistent hydrodynamical N-body/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies [1]. It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. Using the recent data of the ESO Large Programme DART, we have constrained the star formation history of four Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. Global relations of dSph are successfully reproduced. Our study shows that the total initial mass of these systems is the main driver of their evolution and explains the diversity in luminosity and metallicity observed in the Local Group dSphs.

  10. The Abundance Spread in the Booetes I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Gilmore, Gerard; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. Wyn; Zucker, Daniel B.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2008-12-20

    We present medium-resolution spectra of 16 radial velocity red-giant members of the low-luminosity Booetes I dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy that have sufficient S/N for abundance determination, based on the strength of the Ca II K line. Assuming [Ca/Fe] {approx} 0.3, the abundance range in the sample is {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.7 dex, with one star having [Fe/H] = -3.4. The dispersion is {sigma}([Fe/H]) = 0.45 {+-} 0.08-similar to those of the Galaxy's more luminous dSph systems and {omega} Centauri. This suggests that the large mass ({approx}>10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) normally assumed to foster self-enrichment and the production of chemical abundance spreads was provided by the nonbaryonic material in Booetes I.

  11. A novel multi-scale analysis to determine red giant branch metallicities of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Christopher Thomas

    , (U--R)0 color-magnitude diagram plane as a way to roughly calculate metallicities of red giant branches in old, metal poor, complex stellar populations. For MI = 0, -1, and -2, I produce histograms in a discrete multi-scale method to uncover blended sub-populations within the red giant branches. I use the massive globular cluster, o Centauri, as a test population to show the soundness of the method. Then the method is used to uncover a second possible sub-population in both the Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies for the first time.

  12. Dark matter and gamma-rays from Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, Lars; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma-rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma-rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to non-thermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco's dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be inconsistent with the lack of events seen by EGRET.

  13. Dark matter and gamma rays from Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstroem, Lars; Hooper, Dan

    2006-03-15

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to nonthermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco's dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be inconsistent with the lack of events seen by EGRET.

  14. Search for Dark Matter Annihilations in Draco with CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Chertok, M.; Afonso, P.; Lizarazo, J.; Marleau, P.; Maruyama, S.; Stilley, J.; Tripathi, S. M.

    2006-07-11

    CACTUS is a ground-based Air Cherenkov Telescope (ACT) at the Solar 2 facility located near Barstow, California, and operated by UC Davis. It uses an array of 160 large solar tracking mirrors (heliostats) and a camera with 80 photomultiplier tubes, which, in a multiplexed fashion provides an effective camera with about 300 channels. By incorporating novel techniques of time projection imaging and triggering, CACTUS improves upon the first generation sampling arrays of its kind. We have recently completed observations of Draco, a dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is known to be rich in dark matter content. Supersymmetry-inspired models for dark matter predict observable annihilation rates producing gamma rays. We present the first results from our Draco campaign.

  15. A spectroscopic binary in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Hansen, Terese; Feltzing, Sofia; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    We present the radial velocity curve of a single-lined spectroscopic binary in the faint Hercules dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, based on 34 individual spectra covering more than 2 yr of observations. This is the first time that orbital elements could be derived for a binary in a dSph. The system consists of a metal-poor red giant and a low-mass companion, possibly a white dwarf, with a 135 day period in a moderately eccentric (e = 0.18) orbit. Its period and eccentricity are fully consistent with metal-poor binaries in the Galactic halo, while the projected semimajor axis is small, at a{sub p} sin i = 38 R {sub ☉}. In fact, a very close orbit could inhibit the production of heavier elements through s-process nucleosynthesis, leading to the very low abundances of neutron-capture elements that are found in this star. We discuss the further implications for the chemical enrichment history of the Hercules dSph, but find no compelling binary scenario that could reasonably explain the full, peculiar abundance pattern of the Hercules dSph galaxy.

  16. STELLAR KINEMATICS OF THE ANDROMEDA II DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Nhung; Geha, M.; Tollerud, E.; Munoz, R. R.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gilbert, K. M.; Bullock, J.; Beaton, R. L.; Majewski, S. R. E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu

    2012-10-20

    We present kinematical profiles and metallicity for the M31 dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxy Andromeda II (And II) based on Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy of 531 red giant branch stars. Our kinematical sample is among the largest for any M31 satellite and extends out to two effective radii (r {sub eff} = 5.'3 = 1.1 kpc). We find a mean systemic velocity of -192.4 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1} and an average velocity dispersion of {sigma} {sub v} = 7.8 {+-} 1.1 km s{sup -1}. While the rotation velocity along the major axis of And II is nearly zero (<1 km s{sup -1}), the rotation along the minor axis is significant with a maximum rotational velocity of v {sub max} = 8.6 {+-} 1.8 km s{sup -1}. We find a kinematical major axis, with a maximum rotational velocity of v {sub max} = 10.9 {+-} 2.4 km s{sup -1}, misaligned by 67 Degree-Sign to the isophotal major axis. And II is thus the first dwarf galaxy with evidence for nearly prolate rotation with a v {sub max}/{sigma} {sub v} = 1.1, although given its ellipticity of {epsilon} = 0.10, this object may be triaxial. We measured metallicities for a subsample of our data, finding a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.39 {+-} 0.03 dex and an internal metallicity dispersion of 0.72 {+-} 0.03 dex. We find a radial metallicity gradient with metal-rich stars more centrally concentrated, but do not observe a significant difference in the dynamics of the two metallicity populations. And II is the only known dwarf galaxy to show minor axis rotation, making it a unique system whose existence offers important clues on the processes responsible for the formation of dSphs.

  17. TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES: ENHANCED TRANSFORMATION INTO DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Mayer, Lucio

    2013-02-20

    According to the tidal stirring model, late type, rotationally supported dwarfs resembling present day dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies can transform into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) via interactions with Milky-Way-sized hosts. We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate for the first time how tidal stirring depends on the dark matter (DM) density distribution in the central stellar region of the progenitor disky dwarf. Specifically, we explore various asymptotic inner slopes {gamma} of the dwarf DM density profiles ({rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}). For a given orbit inside the primary galaxy, rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in DM halos with core-like distributions ({gamma} = 0.2) and mild density cusps ({gamma} = 0.6) demonstrate a substantially enhanced likelihood and efficiency of transformation into dSphs compared to their counterparts with steeper DM density profiles ({gamma} = 1). Such shallow DM distributions are akin to those of observed dIrrs highlighting tidal stirring as a plausible model for the Local Group (LG) morphology-density relation. When {gamma} < 1, a single pericentric passage can induce dSph formation and disky dwarfs on low-eccentricity or large-pericenter orbits are able to transform; these new results allow tidal stirring to explain virtually all known dSphs across a wide range of distances from their hosts. A subset of disky dwarfs initially embedded in DM halos with shallow density profiles are eventually disrupted by the primary; those that survive as dSphs are generally on orbits with lower eccentricities and/or larger pericenters compared to those of typical cold dark matter satellites. The latter could explain the peculiar orbits of several LG dSphs such as Fornax, Leo I, Tucana, and Cetus.

  18. A DEEP SEARCH FOR EXTENDED RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR PARTICLE DARK MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Spekkens, Kristine; Mason, Brian S.; Aguirre, James E.; Nhan, Bang

    2013-08-10

    We present deep radio observations of four nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, designed to detect extended synchrotron emission resulting from weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter annihilations in their halos. Models by Colafrancesco et al. (CPU07) predict the existence of angularly large, smoothly distributed radio halos in such systems, which stem from electron and positron annihilation products spiraling in a turbulent magnetic field. We map a total of 40.5 deg{sup 2} around the Draco, Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, and Willman 1 dSphs with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4 GHz to detect this annihilation signature, greatly reducing discrete-source confusion using the NVSS catalog. We achieve a sensitivity of {sigma}{sub sub} {approx}< 7 mJy beam{sup -1} in our discrete source-subtracted maps, implying that the NVSS is highly effective at removing background sources from GBT maps. For Draco we obtained approximately concurrent Very Large Array observations to quantify the variability of the discrete source background, and find it to have a negligible effect on our results. We construct radial surface brightness profiles from each of the subtracted maps, and jackknife the data to quantify the significance of the features therein. At the {approx}10' resolution of our observations, foregrounds contribute a standard deviation of 1.8 mJy beam{sup -1} {<=} {sigma}{sub ast} {<=} 5.7 mJy beam{sup -1} to our high-latitude maps, with the emission in Draco and Coma dominated by foregrounds. On the other hand, we find no significant emission in the Ursa Major II and Willman 1 fields, and explore the implications of non-detections in these fields for particle dark matter using the fiducial models of CPU07. For a WIMP mass M{sub {chi}} = 100 GeV annihilating into b b-bar final states and B = 1 {mu}G, upper limits on the annihilation cross-section for Ursa Major II and Willman I are log (({sigma}v){sub {chi}}, cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}) {approx}< -25 for

  19. A Deep Search for Extended Radio Continuum Emission from Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies: Implications for Particle Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Mason, Brian S.; Aguirre, James E.; Nhan, Bang

    2013-08-01

    We present deep radio observations of four nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, designed to detect extended synchrotron emission resulting from weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter annihilations in their halos. Models by Colafrancesco et al. (CPU07) predict the existence of angularly large, smoothly distributed radio halos in such systems, which stem from electron and positron annihilation products spiraling in a turbulent magnetic field. We map a total of 40.5 deg2 around the Draco, Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, and Willman 1 dSphs with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4 GHz to detect this annihilation signature, greatly reducing discrete-source confusion using the NVSS catalog. We achieve a sensitivity of σsub <~ 7 mJy beam-1 in our discrete source-subtracted maps, implying that the NVSS is highly effective at removing background sources from GBT maps. For Draco we obtained approximately concurrent Very Large Array observations to quantify the variability of the discrete source background, and find it to have a negligible effect on our results. We construct radial surface brightness profiles from each of the subtracted maps, and jackknife the data to quantify the significance of the features therein. At the ~10' resolution of our observations, foregrounds contribute a standard deviation of 1.8 mJy beam-1 <= σast <= 5.7 mJy beam-1 to our high-latitude maps, with the emission in Draco and Coma dominated by foregrounds. On the other hand, we find no significant emission in the Ursa Major II and Willman 1 fields, and explore the implications of non-detections in these fields for particle dark matter using the fiducial models of CPU07. For a WIMP mass M χ = 100 GeV annihilating into b\\bar{b} final states and B = 1 μG, upper limits on the annihilation cross-section for Ursa Major II and Willman I are log (langσvrangχ, cm3 s-1) <~ -25 for the preferred set of charged particle propagation parameters adopted by CPU07; this is comparable to

  20. Metals Removed by Outflows from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Martin, Crystal L.; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-12-01

    The stars in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are significantly more metal-poor than would be expected from a closed box model of chemical evolution. Gas outflows likely carried away most of the metals produced by the dSphs. Based on previous Keck/DEIMOS observations and models, we calculate the mass in Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe expelled from each of eight dSphs. Essentially, these masses are the differences between the observed amount of metals present in the dSphs' stars today and the inferred amount of metals produced by supernovae. We conclude that the dSphs lost 96% to >99% of the metals their stars manufactured. We apply the observed mass function of Milky Way dSphs to the ejected mass function to determine that a single large dSph, like Fornax, lost more metals over 10 Gyr than all smaller dSphs combined. Therefore, small galaxies like dSphs are not significant contributors to the metal content of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we compare our ejected mass function to previous X-ray measurements of the metal content of the winds from the post-starburst dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569. Remarkably, the most recent starburst in that galaxy falls exactly on the ejected-mass-stellar-mass relation defined by the Milky Way dSphs. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  1. The dynamical and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Y.; Jablonka, P.; Sawala, T.; Hill, V.; Letarte, B.; Irwin, M.; Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Shetrone, M. D.; Tolstoy, E.; Venn, K. A.

    2009-07-01

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial total mass (gas + dark matter) of these galaxies is the main driver of their evolution. Star formation (SF) occurs in series of short bursts. In massive systems, the very short intervals between the SF peaks mimic a continuous star formation rate, while less massive systems exhibit well separated SF bursts, as identified observationally. The delay between the SF events is controlled by the gas cooling time dependence on galaxy mass. The observed global scaling relations, luminosity-mass and luminosity-metallicity, are reproduced with low scatter. We take advantage of the unprecedentedly large sample size and data homogeneity of the ESO Large Programme DART, and add to it a few independent studies, to constrain the star formation history of five Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, LeoII, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. We find that the diversity in dSph properties may well result from intrinsic evolution. We note, however, that the presence of gas in the final state of our simulations, of the order of what is observed in dwarf irregulars, calls for removal by external processes. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Mass Stripping in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies and ω Cen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, T.; Shigeyama, T.

    2004-06-01

    The stellar abundance pattern of neutron-capture elements such as Ba is used as a powerful tool to infer how star formation proceeded in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. It is found that the abundance correlation of Ba with Fe in stars belonging to dSph galaxies have a feature similar to the Ba-Fe correlation in Galactic metal-poor stars. The common feature of these two correlations implies that dSph stars formed from gas with a velocity dispersion of ˜26 km s-1. This velocity dispersion together with the stellar luminosities strongly suggests that dark matter dominated dSph galaxies. The tidal force of the Milky Way links this velocity dispersion with the currently observed value ≤ 10 km s-1 by stripping the dark matter in dSph galaxies. We also investigate the ram pressure exerted on the gas in ω Cen. It is found that the ram pressure is not strong enough to strip the gas but is expected to induce a bulk motion of the gas during the star formation epoch which is compatible with the recent observed finding and then the remaining gas after the star formation is likely to be stripped due to the gradual increase in the gas density in the forming Galactic disk.

  3. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass m{sub f}. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to m{sub f}. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that m{sub f}≅ 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  4. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Jing, Yi Peng

    2016-02-01

    Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH) has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe) as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  5. On the r-process Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r-process elements compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r-process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS–NS or NS–black hole (BH) mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r-process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter (DM) density implode after accumulating a BH-forming mass of DM. We find that r-process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single NS implodes into a BH, can occur at a rate matching the r-process abundance of both Reticulum II and the Milky Way. Remarkably, DM models which collapse a single NS in observed UFDs also solve the missing pulsar problem in the Milky Way Galactic Center. We propose tests specific to DM r-process production which may uncover or rule out this model.

  6. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass mf. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to mf. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that mfsimeq 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  7. An inefficient dwarf: chemical abundances and the evolution of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ural, Uğur; Cescutti, Gabriele; Koch, Andreas; Kleyna, Jan; Feltzing, Sofia; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2015-05-01

    We present detailed chemical element abundance ratios of 17 elements with eight ≤ Z ≤ 60 in three metal-poor stars in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, which we combine with extant data from the literature to assess the predictions of a novel suite of galaxy chemical evolution models. The spectroscopic data were obtained with the Keck/High-Resolution Echelle Spectrograph instrument and revealed low metallicities of [Fe/H] = -2.12, -2.13 and -2.67 dex. While the most metal-poor star in our sample shows an overabundance of [Mn/Fe] and other Fe-peak elements, our overall findings are in agreement with previous studies of this galaxy: elevated values of the [α/Fe] ratios that are similar to, or only slightly lower than, the halo values but with SN Ia enrichment at very low metallicity, as well as an enhancement of the ratio of first to second peak neutron capture elements [Y/Ba] with decreasing metallicity. The chemical evolution models which were tailored to reproduce the metallicity distribution function of the dwarf spheroidal, indicate that Ursa Minor had an extended star formation which lasted nearly 5 Gyr with low efficiency and are able to explain the [Y/Ba] enhancement at low metallicity for the first time. In particular, we show that the present-day lack of gas is probably due to continuous loss of gas from the system, which we model as winds.

  8. Exploring the Extended Structure of the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, K. B.; Ostheimer, J. C.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Patterson, R. J.; Majewski, S. R.; Kunkel, W. E.

    2000-12-01

    We have undertaken a large area (>3 deg2) survey of the Sculptor dSph using the 1-m Swope telescope. The region surveyed includes roughly 1 deg2 centered on the Sculptor core, with the remaining survey area extending to the east and stretching to almost twice the tidal radius (rt=76.5m) to the northeast and southeast. We have imaged in the Washington M,T2 and DDO51 filters, a combination that allows us to discriminate dwarf and giant stars based on the gravity sensitivity of DDO51. The extended structure of Sculptor can be mapped via those stars selected both as giant stars and as having a combination of M and M-T2 consistent with the red giant branch of Sculptor. We also make use of the areal distribution of blue horizontal branch stars, which delineate the extended structure of Sculptor relatively well in this field at high Galactic latitude. Using the HYDRA spectrograph on the Blanco 4-m, we have obtained more than a dozen radial velocities for candidate Sculptor stars that we have identified well outside (1) the core radius, and (2) the radii explored by previous surveys. A preliminary conclusion from our work so far is that Sculptor does not show as extensive a population of extratidal stars as we have identified in similar work we have conducted around the Carina (Majewski et al. 2000, AJ, 119, 760) and Ursa Minor (Palma et al. 2000, BAAS) dwarf galaxies. Indeed, if a lack of significant extended material around Sculptor is borne out by further study over more area and other position angles, then an interesting correlation begins to emerge: Among four galaxies we have surveyed in this way (Car, UMi, Leo II, and Scl), the relative fraction of the dSph's found outside the nominal tidal radius appears to correlate with the published values of M/L. This may suggest that the derived masses for the dwarf spheroidals may be systematically overestimated to a degree set by the amount of dynamical non-equilibrium in the system. This work was supported by NSF, NASA, the

  9. Carbon in Red Giants in Globular Clusters and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guo, Michelle; Zhang, Andrew J.; Deng, Michelle; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Lee, Young Sun; Rizzi, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We present carbon abundances of red giants in Milky Way (MW) globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our sample includes measurements of carbon abundances for 154 giants in the clusters NGC 2419, M68, and M15 and 398 giants in the dSphs Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Draco. This sample doubles the number of dSph stars with measurements of [C/Fe]. The [C/Fe] ratio in the clusters decreases with increasing luminosity above log (L/{{L}})≃ 1.6, which can be explained by deep mixing in evolved giants. The same decrease is observed in dSphs, but the initial [C/Fe] of the dSph giants is not uniform. Stars in dSphs at lower metallicities have larger [C/Fe] ratios. We hypothesize that [C/Fe] (corrected to the initial carbon abundance) declines with increasing [Fe/H] due to the metallicity dependence of the carbon yield of asymptotic giant branch stars and due to the increasing importance of SNe Ia at higher metallicities. We also identified 11 very carbon-rich giants (eight previously known) in three dSphs. However, our selection biases preclude a detailed comparison to the carbon-enhanced fraction of the MW stellar halo. Nonetheless, the stars with [C/Fe]\\lt +1 in dSphs follow a different [C/Fe] track with [Fe/H] than the halo stars. Specifically, [C/Fe] in dSphs begins to decline at lower [Fe/H] than in the halo. The difference in the metallicity of the [C/Fe] “knee” adds to the evidence from [α/Fe] distributions that the progenitors of the halo had a shorter timescale for chemical enrichment than the surviving dSphs. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Sulphur in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Including NLTE corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skúladóttir, Á.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Salvadori, S.; Korotin, S. A.; Pettini, M.

    2015-08-01

    In Galactic halo stars, sulphur has been shown to behave like other α-elements, but until now, no comprehensive studies have been done on this element in stars of other galaxies. Here, we use high-resolution ESO VLT/FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra to determine sulphur abundances for 85 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, covering the metallicity range -2.5 ≤ [ Fe / H ] ≤ -0.8. The abundances are derived from the S I triplet at 9213, 9228, and 9238 Å. These lines have been shown to be sensitive to departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. NLTE effects. Therefore, we present new NLTE corrections for a grid of stellar parameters covering those of the target stars. The NLTE-corrected sulphur abundances in Sculptor show the same behaviour as other α-elements in that galaxy (such as Mg, Si, and Ca). At lower metallicities ([ Fe / H ] ≲ -2) the abundances are consistent with a plateau at [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.16, similar to what is observed in the Galactic halo, [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.2. With increasing [Fe/H], the [S/Fe] ratio declines, reaching negative values at [ Fe / H ] ≳ -1.5. The sample also shows an increase in [S/Mg] with [Fe/H], most probably because of enrichment from Type Ia supernovae. Based on observations made with ESO/VLT/FLAMES at the La Silla Paranal observatory under program ID 089.B-0304(B).Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Variable Stars in the Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario; Fischer, Philippe; Krzeminski, Wojtek

    1995-11-01

    We describe a survey for variable stars in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy based on the analysis of 113 B and 48 V CCD images of four fields covering a total area of 18' x 18'. We have identified 44 variables: 36 RR Lyr star, 6 anomalous Cepheids, one long-period red variable, all probable members of Sextans, and one foreground contact binary. We have used the pulsating stars to derive a true distance modulus of 19.67 +/- 0.15 for Sextans (or D = 86 +/-6 kpc), where the error is primarily due to uncertainties in the luminosity-metallicity relation for RR Lyr stars. Based on our new data we conclude that [Fe/H]_Sex_ = -1.6 +/- 0.2, somewhat higher than the value from Suntzeff et al. (ApJ, 418,208(1993)] obtained from the analysis of fiber spectroscopy of the near-IR Calcium triplet. We present a new deep color- magnitude diagram for Sextans which reveals the presence of a metal-poor population containing stars as young as 2-4 Gyr, consistent with the presence of anomalous Cepheids in the galaxy. This young population may represent as much as 25% of the total stellar content of Sextans. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the frequency of anomalous Cepheids in dSph galaxies and galaxian luminosity and speculate on the possible origin of this strange effect. The RR Lyr stars in Sextans do not exhibit the Oosterhoff dichotomy observed in globular clusters and in the Galactic halo field.

  12. A KINEMATIC STUDY OF THE ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. Michael; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Penarrubia, Jorge; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2013-05-10

    We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I/LRIS and Keck II/DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g - i colors (taken with the CFHT/MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses, and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii ({approx}> 700 pc) and low velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} < 5 km s{sup -1}). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]{sub half}=10.3{sup +7.0}{sub -6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1{sigma} uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.

  13. The Origin of Prolate Rotation in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies Formed by Mergers of Disky Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrová, Ivana; Łokas, Ewa L.

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the discovery of prolate rotation of stars in Andromeda II (And II), a dwarf spheroidal companion of M31, we study its origin via mergers of disky dwarf galaxies. We simulate merger events between two identical dwarfs changing the initial inclination of their disks with respect to the orbit and the amount of orbital angular momentum. On radial orbits, the amount of prolate rotation in the merger remnants correlates strongly with the inclination of the disks and is well understood as due to the conservation of the angular momentum component of the disks along the merger axis. For non-radial orbits, prolate rotation may still be produced if the orbital angular momentum is initially not much larger than the intrinsic angular momentum of the disks. The orbital structure of the remnants with significant rotation is dominated by box orbits in the center and long-axis tubes in the outer parts. The frequency analysis of stellar orbits in the plane perpendicular to the major axis reveals the presence of two families roughly corresponding to inner and outer long-axis tubes. The fraction of inner tubes is largest in the remnant forming from disks that are initially oriented most vertically, and is responsible for the boxy shape of the galaxy. We conclude that prolate rotation results from mergers with a variety of initial conditions and no fine tuning is necessary to reproduce this feature. We compare the properties of our merger remnants to those of dwarfs resulting from the tidal stirring scenario and the data for And II.

  14. Stable State Simulations of Andromeda Dwarf Spheroidal Satellite Galaxies Using MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walentosky, Matthew; Blankartz, Benjamin; Alexander, Stephen; Messinger, Justin; Staron, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations of the stable state condition of several dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting the Andromeda galaxy. Using Modified Newtonian Dynamics, we calculate the motion of ten thousand stars in a spherically symmetric Hernquist potential to obtain both the line of sight bulk velocity dispersion and the dispersion profile, i.e. the velocity dispersion as a function of distance from the galactic center. Our results for the bulk dispersion show excellent agreement with observed values and previously published theoretical results and provide reliable estimates of the mass to luminosity ratio. We predict relatively flat radial dispersion profiles for several of the Andromeda dwarf spheroidal galaxies that are similar to those measured for the Milky Way dwarf spheroidals .

  15. A Universal Mass Profile for Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Wyn Evans, N.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2009-10-01

    We apply the Jeans equation to estimate masses for eight of the brightest dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. For Fornax, the dSph with the largest kinematic data set, we obtain a model-independent constraint on the maximum circular velocity, V max = 20+4 -3 km s-1. Although we obtain only lower limits of V max >~ 10 km s-1 for the remaining dSphs, we find that in all cases the enclosed mass at the projected half-light radius is well constrained and robust to a wide range of halo models and velocity anisotropies. We derive a simple analytic formula that estimates M(r half) accurately with respect to results from the full Jeans analysis. Applying this formula to the entire population of Local Group dSphs with published kinematic data, we demonstrate a correlation such that M(r half) vprop r 1.4±0.4 half, or in terms of the mean density interior to the half-light radius, langρrang vprop r -1.6±0.4 half. This relation is driven by the fact that the dSph data exhibit a correlation between global velocity dispersion and half-light radius. We argue that tidal forces are unlikely to have introduced this relation, but tides may have increased the scatter and/or altered the slope. While the data are well described by mass profiles ranging over a factor of lsim2 in normalization (V max ~ 10-20 km s-1), we consider the hypothesis that all dSphs are embedded within a "universal" dark matter halo. We show that in addition to the power law M vprop r 1.4, viable candidates include a cuspy "Navarro-Frenk-White" halo with V max ~ 15 km s-1 and scale radius r 0 ~ 800 pc, as well as a cored halo with V max ~ 13 km s-1 and r 0 ~ 150 pc. Finally, assuming that their measured velocity dispersions accurately reflect their masses, the smallest dSphs now allow us to resolve dSph densities at radii as small as a few tens of pc. At these small scales, we find mean densities as large as langρrang <~ 5 M sun pc-3 (lsim200 GeV cm-3). This paper presents data gathered with the Magellan

  16. Stellar Populations in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Filippina; Cassisi, Santi; Castellani, Marco; Marconi, Gianni; Santolamazza, Patrizia

    1999-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo I, based on archival Hubble Space Telescope data. Our photometric analysis, confirming previous results on the brighter portion of the CMD, also allow us to obtain an accurate sampling of the stellar populations at the faint magnitudes corresponding to the main sequence. By adopting a homogeneous and consistent theoretical scenario for both hydrogen and central helium-burning evolutionary phases, the various features observed in the CMD are interpreted and reliable estimates for both the distance modulus and the age(s) of the main stellar components of Leo I are derived. In more detail, from the upper luminosity of the red giant branch and the lower luminosity of the subgiant branch we simultaneously constrain the galaxy distance and the age of the oldest stellar population in Leo I. In this way we obtain a distance modulus (m-M)_V=22.00+/-0.15 mag and an age of 10-15 Gyr or 9-13 Gyr, adopting a metallicity of Z=0.0001 or 0.0004, respectively. The reliability of this distance modulus has been tested by comparing the observed distribution of the Leo I anomalous Cepheids in the period-magnitude diagram with the predicted boundaries of the instability strip as given by convective pulsating models. A detailed investigation of the age(s) of the Leo I stellar populations is then performed by comparing the CMD with a suitable set of theoretical isochrones and central helium-burning models. By taking into account all the various features, including the lack of RR Lyrae variables, we conclude that the star formation process in Leo I started ~10 Gyr (with Z=0.0001) or ~13 Gyr (with Z=0.0004) ago, and stopped about 1 Gyr ago. Some evidence is reported supporting the mild metal deficiency (Z=0.0004), whereas no clear indication has been found supporting a star formation history characterized by episodic bursts. The adoption of updated physics, including the inward diffusion of

  17. A Model for Gas Dynamics and Chemical Evolution of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen

    We present an empirical model for the halo evolution, global gas dynamics and chemical evolution of Fornax, the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). Assuming a global star formation rate psi(t) = lambda*(t)[Mg( t)/M[solar masses

  18. Abundance ratios of red giants in low-mass ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, P.; Monaco, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Moni Bidin, C.; Geisler, D.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. Aims: We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to five different ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) that is based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Methods: Medium-resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Results: Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low-mass galaxies, we found that the [α/Fe] ratios vs.s [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to that which is found for the population of stars that belong to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [α/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We report for the first time the abundance of strontium in CVn II. The star we analyzed in this galaxy has a very high [Sr/Fe] and a very low upper limit of barium which makes it a star with an exceptionally high [Sr/Ba] ratio.

  19. THE STELLAR STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES FORMED BY TIDAL STIRRING

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio; Callegari, Simone E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.ed

    2010-01-10

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we study the stellar properties of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies resulting from the tidally induced morphological transformation of disky dwarfs on a cosmologically motivated eccentric orbit around the Milky Way. The dwarf galaxy models initially consist of an exponential stellar disk embedded in an extended spherical dark matter halo. Depending on the initial orientation of the disk with respect to the orbital plane, different final configurations are obtained. The least evolved dwarf is triaxial and retains a significant amount of rotation. The more evolved dwarfs are prolate spheroids with little rotation. We show that in this scenario the final density distribution of stars can be approximated by a simple modification of the Plummer law. The kinematics of the dwarfs is significantly different depending on the line of sight which has important implications for mapping the observed stellar velocity dispersions of dwarfs to subhalo circular velocities. When the dwarfs are observed along the long axis, the measured velocity dispersion is higher and decreases faster with radius. In the case where rotation is significant, when viewed perpendicular to the long axis, the effect of minor axis rotation is detected, as expected for triaxial systems. We model the velocity dispersion profiles and rotation curves of the dwarfs under the assumption of constant mass-to-light ratio by solving the Jeans equations for spherical and axisymmetric systems and adjusting different sets of free parameters, including the total mass. We find that the mass is typically overestimated when the dwarf is seen along the long axis and underestimated when the observation is along the short or intermediate axis. For the studied cases, the effect of non-sphericity cannot, however, bias the inferred mass by more than 60% in either direction, even for the most strongly stripped dwarf which is close to disruption.

  20. Dark Matter Searches with the Fermi-LAT in the Direction of Dwarf Spheroidals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Matthew; Anderson, Brandon; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Conrad, Jan

    2015-07-13

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are some of the most dark-matter-dominated objects known. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are widely considered to be among the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies based on 6 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass 8 reconstruction and event-level analysis. None of the dwarf galaxies are significantly detected in gamma rays, and we present upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of the 15 most promising dwarf galaxies. The constraints derived are among the strongest to date using gamma rays, and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for WIMPs of mass ≲ 100GeV annihilating via the bb-bar and τ⁺τ⁻ channels.

  1. Dark matter annihilation in Draco: New considerations of the expected gamma flux

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M. A.; Prada, F.; Moles, M.; Lokas, E. L.; Wojtak, R.; Gomez, M. E.

    2007-12-15

    A new revision of the gamma flux that we expect to detect in imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes from neutralino annihilation in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy is presented in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard models compatible with the present phenomenological and cosmological constraints, and using the dark matter density profiles compatible with the latest observations. This revision also takes into account the important effect of the point spread function of the telescope, and is valid not only for Draco but also for any other dark matter target. We show that this effect is crucial in the way we will observe and interpret a possible signal detection. Finally, we discuss the prospects to detect a possible gamma signal from Draco for current or planned gamma-ray experiments, i.e., MAGIC, GLAST, and GAW. Even with the large astrophysical and particle physics uncertainties we find that the chances to detect a neutralino annihilation signal in Draco seem to be very scarce for current experiments. However, the prospects for future imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes with upgraded performances (especially lower threshold energies and higher sensitivities) such as those offered by the Cherenkov Telescope Array project, might be substantially better.

  2. Photometric Calibration of DECam Images of the Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Brittany; Vivas, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study on the variable star population of the Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy, we present here details on the photometric calibration of the data, which were obtained with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at the Blanco 4mTelescope at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory. Since DECam is a relatively new instrument, we tested different calibration strategies including calibrating each chip individually and all together. Our results indicate that the color terms and zero points are constant across the camera, at least in the g, r and i bands. We present preliminary results on the location of variable stars in the Sextans dwarf galaxy.

  3. Small-scale hero: Massive-star enrichment in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Matteucci, Francesca; Feltzing, Sofia

    2012-09-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are often conjectured to be the sites of the first stars. The best current contenders for finding the chemical imprints from the enrichment by those massive objects are the ``ultrafaint dwarfs'' (UFDs). Here we present evidence for remarkably low heavy element abundances in the metal poor Hercules UFD. Combined with other peculiar abundance patterns this indicates that Hercules was likely only influenced by very few, massive explosive events - thus bearing the traces of an early, localized chemical enrichment with only very little other contributions from other sources at later times.

  4. Leo I - The youngest Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Myung G.; Freedman, Wendy; Mateo, Mario; Thompson, Ian; Roth, Miguel; Ruiz, Maria-Teresa

    1993-01-01

    Deep CCD photometry of about 16,000 stars in the Milky Way's Leo I spheroidal galaxy satellite is reported. An account is given of the features observed in the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) derived therefrom. A very blue and well-defined red giant branch (RGB) is noted. The CMDs of Leo I shows about 50 anomalous Cepheid candidates; there are another 50 or so asymptotic giant branch stars above the tip of the RGB, including 15 known carbon stars. The mean color of the RGB is estimated at M sub I = -3.5 mag.

  5. INTERNAL DYNAMICS AND DYNAMICAL FRICTION EFFECTS IN THE DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY IN FORNAX

    SciTech Connect

    Cowsik, Ramanath; Wagoner, Kasey; Sircar, Amit; Berti, Emanuele

    2009-07-10

    In the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy the globular clusters are distributed widely, without any significant central concentration. Oh et al. pointed out that such a distribution is paradoxical: dynamical friction effects estimated using single-component King models would have forced the globular clusters to spiral down to the center of the galaxy well within a Hubble time. This paper is devoted to a discussion of this paradox. We describe a model in which the stars of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy are embedded in a cloud of dark matter, and each of these components is specified by its own phase-space distribution function. This model allows us to fit self-consistently the observed luminosity profile and the spatial variation of the velocity dispersion of the stars. This fitting yields two basic parameters, related to the central density and velocity dispersion, that characterize the phase-space distribution of dark matter. The dynamical friction effects calculated on the basis of this self-consistent model are small enough that the observed spatial distribution of the globular clusters poses no difficulty, and the apparent paradox is resolved. Thus, we have at hand a model for Fornax that reproduces the main observed features of this dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  6. Searching for Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with DES and the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; DES Collaboration, Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The population of Milky Way satellite galaxies includes the least luminous, least chemically evolved, and most dark matter dominated galaxies in the known universe. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Prior to 2015, roughly two dozen dwarf spheroidal galaxies were known to surround the Milky Way. From combined observations of these objects, the dark matter annihilation cross section has been constrained to be less than the generic thermal relic cross section for dark matter particles with mass < 100 GeV. Since the beginning of 2015, new optical imaging surveys have discovered over twenty new dwarf galaxy candidates, potentially doubling the population of Milky Way satellite galaxies in a single year. I will discuss recent optical searches for dwarf galaxies, focusing specifically on results from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the implications for gamma-ray searches for dark matter annihilation with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  7. Searching for Tidal Tails in Galactic Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David; Aparicio, A.; Gomez-Flechoso, Maria A.

    The formation of the Galactic halo is currently best explained by the combination of two scenarios which previously were regarded as competing models. Based on the kinematics of metal-poor halo field stars, Eggen, Lynden-Bell & Sandage (ELS, 1962) proposed that the halo formed during a rapid, smooth collapse from a homogeneous primordial medium. Searle & Zinn (SZ, 1978) argued a halo formation via the gradual merging of many sub-galactic fragments. The SZ scenario has been strengthened by the observational evidence accumulated during the past decade. The discovery of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Ibata, Gilmore & Irwin 1994), in a process of dissolving into the Galactic halo, argued in favour that accretion events can take place in the Milky Way. The possibility that accretion events may leave observable fossil records in the halo is also supported by theoretical models of tidally disrupted dSph satellites (Johnston, Spergel & Hernquist 1995; Oh, Lin & Aarseth 1995; Piatek & Pryor 1995). We present our preliminary results of a long-term project to investigate the process of accretion and tidal disruption of dSph satellites in the Galactic halo and, in particular, to search for new tidal tails in a sample of nearby dSph satellites of the Milky Way. The presence of a possible tidal debris in Ursa Minor and Sculptor dSphs and the results of our survey for a tidal extension along the NW semimajor axis of Saggitarius is discussed.

  8. Improving the sensitivity of gamma-ray telescopes to dark matter annihilation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Eric; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2015-03-01

    The Fermi-LAT Collaboration has studied the gamma-ray emission from a stacked population of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and used this information to set constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. Interestingly, their analysis uncovered an excess with a test statistic (TS) of 8.7. If interpreted naively, this constitutes a 2.95 σ local excess (p -value=0.003 ), relative to the expectations of their background model. In order to further test this interpretation, the Fermi-LAT team studied a large number of blank sky locations and found TS >8.7 excesses to be more common than predicted by their background model, decreasing the significance of their dwarf excess to 2.2 σ (p -value=0.027 ) . We argue that these TS >8.7 blank sky locations are largely the result of unresolved blazars, radio galaxies, and star-forming galaxies, and show that multiwavelength information can be used to reduce the degree to which such sources contaminate the otherwise blank sky. In particular, we show that masking regions of the sky that lie within 1° of sources contained in the BZCAT or CRATES catalogs reduce the fraction of blank sky locations with TS >8.7 by more than a factor of 2. Taking such multiwavelength information into account can enable experiments such as Fermi to better characterize their backgrounds and increase their sensitivity to dark matter in dwarf galaxies, the most important of which remain largely uncontaminated by unresolved point sources. We also note that for the range of dark matter masses and annihilation cross sections currently being tested by studies of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, simulations predict that Fermi should be able to detect a significant number of dark matter subhalos. These subhalos constitute a population of subthreshold gamma-ray point sources and represent an irreducible background for searches for dark matter annihilation in dwarf galaxies.

  9. Gas Dynamics in Dwarf-Spheroidal Galaxies: Explaining Carina's Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, P.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1993-12-01

    Computer models of gas dynamics are used to explain the complex star- formation history of the Carina dwarf-spheroidal galaxy, which comprises a small old ( ~ 15 Gyr) population and a much larger intermediate-age ( ~ 7 Gyr) population. The model indicates that the first generation of stars quickly photoionized the gas throughout the galaxy, preventing further star formation. Supernova explosions then set the gas in motion away from the center of the galaxy, with much of it accumulating in a dense shell behind the ensuing shock front. The presence of both significant amounts of dark matter in Carina and an inward-directed pressure from the material in the galactic halo prove to crucial in retaining the shell of gas, which oscillates near the boundary of the galaxy on the order of billions of years before cooling sufficiently to recollapse and set off a second wave of star formation. While only Carina's parameters have been explored with this model, the mechanism can be extended to the other dwarf spheroidals, which display similarly complex star-formation histories.

  10. Confirmation of Flickering Red Giants in the Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, M. L.; Mighell, K. J.

    2005-12-01

    Confirmation of Flickering Red Giants in the Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy M.L. Franz (NOAO/U. Florida), K.J. Mighell (NOAO) The discovery by Mighell & Roederer last year of flickering red giants (FRGs) in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy has been confirmed through the analysis of four archival HST WFPC2 observations in that galaxy. Many new FRG candidates were found that exhibit low-amplitude brightness fluctuations (at the few percent level) over timescales ranging from minutes to hours. We describe the conservative non-constancy statistical test used to detect these new variable stars and present many detailed light curves which have a much better time resolution than the observations analyzed by Mighell & Roederer. M.L.F, was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation through Scientific Program Order No. 3 (AST-0243875) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF. K.J.M was supported by a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Interagency Order No. NNG05EB61I, which was awarded by the Applied Information Systems Research (AISR) Program of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  11. Chemical composition of extremely metal-poor stars in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, W.; Arimoto, N.; Sadakane, K.; Tolstoy, E.; Battaglia, G.; Jablonka, P.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Irwin, M.; Hill, V.; Francois, P.; Venn, K.; Primas, F.; Helmi, A.; Kaufer, A.; Tafelmeyer, M.; Szeifert, T.; Babusiaux, C.

    2009-08-01

    Context: Individual stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way Galaxy have been studied both photometrically and spectroscopically. Extremely metal-poor stars among them are very valuable because they should record the early enrichment in the Local Group. However, our understanding of these stars is very limited because detailed chemical abundance measurements are needed from high resolution spectroscopy. Aims: To constrain the formation and chemical evolution of dwarf galaxies, metallicity and chemical composition of extremely metal-poor stars are investigated. Methods: Chemical abundances of six extremely metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.5) stars in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy are determined based on high resolution spectroscopy (R=40 000) with the Subaru Telescope High Dispersion Spectrograph. Results: (1) The Fe abundances derived from the high resolution spectra are in good agreement with the metallicity estimated from the Ca triplet lines in low resolution spectra. The lack of stars with [Fe/H] ⪉ -3 in Sextans, found by previous estimates from the Ca triplet, is confirmed by our measurements, although we note that high resolution spectroscopy for a larger sample of stars will be necessary to estimate the true fraction of stars with such low metallicity. (2) While one object shows an overabundance of Mg (similar to Galactic halo stars), the Mg/Fe ratios of the remaining five stars are similar to the solar value. This is the first time that low Mg/Fe ratios at such low metallicities have been found in a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. No evidence for over-abundances of Ca and Ti are found in these five stars, though the measurements for these elements are less certain. Possible mechanisms to produce low Mg/Fe ratios, with respect to that of Galactic halo stars, are discussed. (3) Ba is under-abundant in four objects, while the remaining two stars exhibit large and moderate excesses of this element. The abundance distribution of Ba in this galaxy is

  12. Effect of black holes in local dwarf spheroidal galaxies on gamma-ray constraints on dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2014-11-01

    Recent discoveries of optical signatures of black holes in dwarf galaxies indicates that low-mass galaxies can indeed host intermediate massive black holes. This motivates the assessment of the resulting effect on the host dark matter density profile, and the consequences for the constraints on the plane of the dark matter annihilation cross section versus mass, stemming from the nonobservation of gamma rays from local dwarf spheroidals with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We compute the density profile using three different prescriptions for the black hole mass associated with a given spheroidal galaxy, and taking into account the cutoff to the density from dark matter pair-annihilation. We find that the limits on the dark matter annihilation rate from observations of individual dwarfs are enhanced by factors of a few up to 1 06 , depending on the specific galaxy, on the black hole mass prescription, and on the dark matter particle mass. We estimate limits from combined observations of a sample of 15 dwarfs, for a variety of assumptions on the dwarf black hole mass and on the dark matter density profile prior to adiabatic contraction. We find that if black holes are indeed present in local dwarf spheroidals, then, independent of assumptions, (i) the dark matter interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess would be conclusively ruled out, (ii) wino dark matter would be excluded up to masses of about 3 TeV, and (iii) vanilla thermal relic weakly interacting massive particles must be heavier than 100 GeV.

  13. Evidence for dwarf stars at D of about 100 kiloparsecs near the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Richstone, Douglas; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for detecting individual, metal-poor, dwarf stars at distances less than about 150 kpc - a method specifically designed to filter out stars from among the much more numerous faint background field galaxies on the basis of broad-band colors. This technique is applied to two fields at high Galactic latitude, for which there are deep CCD data in four bands ranging from 3600 to 9000 A. The field in Sextans probably contains more than about five dwarf stars with BJ not greater than 25.5. These are consistent with being at a common distance about 100 kpc and lie about 1.7 deg from the newly discovered dwarf galaxy in Sextans whose distance is about 85 +/- 10 kpc. The stars lie near the major axis of the galaxy and are near or beyond the tidal radius. The second field, toward the south Galactic pole, may contain up to about five extra-Galactic stars, but these show no evidence for being at a common distance. Possible applications of this type technique are discussed, and it is shown that even very low surface brightness star clusters or dwarf galaxies may be detected at distances less than about 1 Mpc.

  14. WEAK GALACTIC HALO-DWARF SPHEROIDAL CONNECTION FROM RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, Giuliana; Bono, Giuseppe; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Martínez-Vásquez, Clara E.; Tolstoy, Eline; Salaris, Maurizio; Bernard, Edouard J.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role that dwarf galaxies may have played in the formation of the Galactic halo (Halo) using RR Lyrae stars (RRL) as tracers of their ancient stellar component. The comparison is performed using two observables (periods, luminosity amplitudes) that are reddening and distance independent. Fundamental mode RRL in 6 dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and 11 ultra faint dwarf galaxies (∼1300) show a Gaussian period distribution well peaked around a mean period of (Pab) = 0.610 ± 0.001 days (σ = 0.03). The Halo RRL (∼15,000) are characterized by a broader period distribution. The fundamental mode RRL in all the dSphs apart from Sagittarius are completely lacking in High Amplitude Short Period (HASP) variables, defined as those having P ≲ 0.48 days and A{sub V} ≥ 0.75 mag. Such variables are not uncommon in the Halo and among the globular clusters and massive dwarf irregulars. To further interpret this evidence, we considered 18 globulars covering a broad range in metallicity (–2.3 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ –1.1) and hosting more than 35 RRL each. The metallicity turns out to be the main parameter, since only globulars more metal-rich than [Fe/H] ∼ –1.5 host RRL in the HASP region. This finding suggests that dSphs similar to the surviving ones do not appear to be the major building-blocks of the Halo. Leading physical arguments suggest an extreme upper limit of ∼50% to their contribution. On the other hand, massive dwarfs hosting an old population with a broad metallicity distribution (Large Magellanic Cloud, Sagittarius) may have played a primary role in the formation of the Halo.

  15. INTERGALACTIC GAS IN GROUPS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL FORMATION AND THE MISSING BARYONS PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Freeland, E.; Wilcots, E. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-09-10

    Radio galaxies with bent jets are predominantly located in groups and clusters of galaxies. We use bent-double radio sources, under the assumption that their jets are bent by ram pressure, to probe intragroup medium (IGM) gas densities in galaxy groups. This method provides a direct measurement of the intergalactic gas density and allows us to probe intergalactic gas at large radii and in systems whose IGM is too cool to be detected by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. We find gas with densities of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} at group radii from 15 to 700 kpc. A rough estimate of the total baryonic mass in intergalactic gas is consistent with the missing baryons being located in the IGM of galaxy groups. The neutral gas will be easily stripped from dwarf galaxies with total masses of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} in the groups studied here. Indications are that intragroup gas densities in less-massive systems like the Local Group should be high enough to strip gas from dwarfs like Leo T and, in combination with tides, produce dwarf spheroidals.

  16. The DART Imaging And CaT Survey of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M.J.; Letarte, B.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Venn, K.A.; Shetrone, M.D.; Arimoto, N.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Francois, P.; Szeifert, T.; Abel, T.; Sadakane, K.; /Osaka Kyoiku U.

    2006-08-28

    As part of the DART project we have used the ESO/2.2m Wide Field Imager in conjunction with the VLT/FLAMES* GIRAFFE spectrograph to study the detailed properties of the resolved stellar population of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy out to and beyond its tidal radius. Fornax dSph has had a complicated evolution and contains significant numbers of young, intermediate age and old stars. We investigate the relation between these different components by studying their photometric, kinematic and abundance distributions. We re-derived the structural parameters of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal using our wide field imaging covering the galaxy out to its tidal radius, and analyzed the spatial distribution of the Fornax stars of different ages as selected from Colour-Magnitude Diagram analysis. We have obtained accurate velocities and metallicities from spectra in the Ca II triplet wavelength region for 562 Red Giant Branch stars which have velocities consistent with membership in Fornax dwarf spheroidal. We have found evidence for the presence of at least three distinct stellar components: a young population (few 100 Myr old) concentrated in the center of the galaxy, visible as a Main Sequence in the Colour-Magnitude Diagram; an intermediate age population (2-8 Gyr old); and an ancient population (> 10Gyr), which are distinguishable from each other kinematically, from the metallicity distribution and in the spatial distribution of stars found in the Colour-Magnitude Diagram. From our spectroscopic analysis we find that the ''metal rich'' stars ([Fe/H] > -1.3) show a less extended and more concentrated spatial distribution, and display a colder kinematics than the ''metal poor'' stars ([Fe/H] < -1.3). There is tentative evidence that the ancient stellar population in the center of Fornax does not exhibit equilibrium kinematics. This could be a sign of a relatively recent accretion of external material, such as the merger of another galaxy or other means of gas accretion at

  17. VLT/FLAMES spectroscopy of red giant branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; François, P.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Szeifert, T.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Fornax is one of the most massive dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. The Fornax field star population is dominated by intermediate age stars but star formation was going on over almost its entire history. It has been proposed that Fornax experienced a minor merger event. Aims: Despite recent progress, only the high metallicity end of Fornax field stars ([Fe/H] > -1.2 dex) has been sampled in larger number via high resolution spectroscopy. We want to better understand the full chemical evolution of this galaxy by better sampling the whole metallicity range, including more metal poor stars. Methods: We use the VLT-FLAMES multi-fibre spectrograph in high-resolution mode to determine the abundances of several α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements in a sample of 47 individual red giant branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We combine these abundances with accurate age estimates derived from the age probability distribution from the colour-magnitude diagram of Fornax. Results: Similar to other dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the old, metal-poor stars of Fornax are typically α-rich while the young metal-rich stars are α-poor. In the classical scenario of the time delay between Type II (SNe II) and Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), we confirm that SNe Ia started to contribute to the chemical enrichment at [Fe/H] between -2.0 and -1.8 dex. We find that the onset of SNe Ia took place between 12-10 Gyr ago. The high values of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] reflect the influence of SNe Ia and AGB stars in the abundance pattern of the younger stellar population of Fornax. Conclusions: Our findings of low [α/Fe] and enhanced [Eu/Mg] are compatible with an initial mass function that lacks the most massive stars and with star formation that kept going on throughout the whole history of Fornax. We find that massive stars kept enriching the interstellar medium in α-elements, although they were not the main contributor to the iron enrichment. Based on FLAMES

  18. Search for dark matter annihilation signatures in H.E.S.S. observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goudelis, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadsch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Serpico, P.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spieß, F.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group are close satellites of the Milky Way characterized by a large mass-to-light ratio and are not expected to be the site of nonthermal high-energy gamma-ray emission or intense star formation. Therefore they are among the most promising candidates for indirect dark matter searches. During the last years the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes observed five of these dwarf galaxies for more than 140 hours in total, searching for TeV gamma-ray emission from annihilation of dark matter particles. The new results of the deep exposure of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the first observations of the Coma Berenices and Fornax dwarves and the reanalysis of two more dwarf spheroidal galaxies already published by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Carina and Sculptor, are presented. In the absence of a significant signal new constraints on the annihilation cross section applicable to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are derived by combining the observations of the five dwarf galaxies. The combined exclusion limit depends on the WIMP mass and the best constraint is reached at 1-2 TeV masses with a cross-section upper bound of ˜ 3.9 ×10-24 cm3 s-1 at a 95% confidence level.

  19. Scaling Laws for Dark Matter Halos in Late-Type and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Freeman, K. C.

    2015-04-01

    Dark matter (DM) halos of Sc-Im galaxies satisfy structural scaling laws analogous to the fundamental plane relations for elliptical galaxies. Halos in less luminous galaxies have smaller core radii rc , higher central densities ρ^, and smaller central velocity dispersions σ. If dwarf spheroidal (dSph) and dwarf Magellanic irregular (dIm) galaxies lie on the extrapolations of these correlations, then we can estimate their baryon loss relative to that of Sc-Im galaxies. We find that, if there had been no enhanced baryon loss relative to Sc-Im galaxies, typical dSph and dIm galaxies would be brighter by ΔMB ~= -4.0 mag and ΔMB ~= -3.5 mag, respectively. Instead, the galaxies lost or retained as gas (in dIm galaxies) baryons that could have formed stars. Also, dSph and dIm galaxies have DM halos that are more massive than we thought, with σ ~ 30 km s-1 or circular-orbit rotation velocities V circ ~ 42 km s-1. Comparison of DM and visible matter parameter correlations confirms that, at MV >~ -18, dSph and dIm galaxies form a sequence of decreasing baryon-to-DM mass ratios in smaller dwarfs. We show explicitly that galaxy baryon content goes to (almost) zero at V circ <~ 42 +/- 4 km s-1, in agreement with V circ as found from our estimate of baryon depletion. Our results suggest that there may be a large population of DM halos that are dark and undiscovered. This helps to solve the problem that the initial fluctuation spectrum of cold dark matter predicts more dwarf galaxies than we observe.

  20. Dark matter annihilation factors in the Milky Way’s dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnivard, V.; Combet, C.; Maurin, D.; Walker, M. G.; Geringer-Sameth, A.

    2016-05-01

    The Milky Way’s dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are among the best targets for the indirect detection of dark matter (DM) with γ-rays. The expected gamma-ray flux depends on the so-called ‘J-factor’, the integral of the squared DM density along the line-of-sight. Using a large number of simulated dSphs, we have defined an optimized Jeans analysis setup for the reconstruction of the DM density with stellar-kinematic data. Employing this setup, we provide here estimates of astrophysical J-factors for twenty-two Galactic dSphs, including the newly discovered Reticulum II. We finally identify several criteria that may indicate a contamination of a kinematic dataset by interlopers, leading to unreliable J-factors. We find that the kinematic sample of Segue I, one of the closest dSph, might be affected by this issue.

  1. Confronting Galactic center and dwarf spheroidal gamma-ray observations with cascade annihilation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu; Ghosh, Tathagata; Strigari, Louis E.

    2015-10-01

    Many particle dark matter models predict that the dark matter undergoes cascade annihilations, i.e. the annihilation products are 4-body final states. In the context of model-independent cascade annihilation processes, we study the compatibility of the dark matter interpretation of the Fermi-LAT Galactic center gamma-ray emission with null detections from dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For canonical values of the Milky Way density profile and the local dark matter density, we find that the dark matter interpretation to the Galactic center emission is strongly constrained. However, uncertainties in the dark matter distribution weaken the constraints and leave open dark matter interpretations over a wide range of mass scales.

  2. Chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies based on model calculations incorporating observed star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, H.; Murayama, T.

    We investigate the chemical evolution model explaining the chemical composition and the star formation histories (SFHs) simultaneously for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Recently, wide imaging photometry and multi-object spectroscopy give us a large number of data. Therefore, we start to develop the chemical evolution model based on an SFH given by photometric observations and estimates a metallicity distribution function (MDF) comparing with spectroscopic observations. With this new model we calculate the chemical evolution for 4 dSphs (Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, Sextans), and then we found that the model of 0.1 Gyr for the delay time of type Ia SNe is too short to explain the observed [alpha /Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams.

  3. Faint and soft X-ray binaries in three dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina

    2007-10-01

    We propose to observe three nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) companions of the Milky Way. These galaxies host old populations with little or no contamination of recent star formation, and appear to have a huge dark matter content. They are the ideal Rosetta stones to probe theories of X-ray binary formation, type Ia progenitors evolution, and dark matter halos.Recent observations of four other dSph with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revealed a large number of X-ray sources in the fields, effected by small column density of neutral hydrogen N(H).Using deep optical and UV images, archival HST and GALEX exposures, and later spectroscopic follow-up, we will be able to determine the nature of the sources and whether they belong to the galactic populations.

  4. Observations of MilkyWay Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi-LAT detector and

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Pisa /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /IASF, Milan /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard

    2010-05-26

    We report on the observations of 14 dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope taken during the first 11 months of survey mode operations. The Fermi telescope, which is conducting an all-sky {gamma}-ray survey in the 20 MeV to >300 GeV energy range, provides a new opportunity to test particle dark matter models through the expected {gamma}-ray emission produced by pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the largest galactic substructures predicted by the cold dark matter scenario, are attractive targets for such indirect searches for dark matter because they are nearby and among the most extreme dark matter dominated environments. No significant {gamma}-ray emission was detected above 100 MeV from the candidate dwarf galaxies. We determine upper limits to the {gamma}-ray flux assuming both power-law spectra and representative spectra from WIMP annihilation. The resulting integral flux above 100 MeV is constrained to be at a level below around 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Using recent stellar kinematic data, the {gamma}-ray flux limits are combined with improved determinations of the dark matter density profile in 8 of the 14 candidate dwarfs to place limits on the pair annihilation cross-section ofWIMPs in several widely studied extensions of the standard model, including its supersymmetric extension and other models that received recent attention. With the present data, we are able to rule out large parts of the parameter space where the thermal relic density is below the observed cosmological dark matter density and WIMPs (neutralinos here) are dominantly produced non-thermally, e.g. in models where supersymmetry breaking occurs via anomaly mediation. The {gamma}-ray limits presented here also constrain some WIMP models proposed to explain the Fermi and PAMELA e{sup +}e{sup -} data, including low-mass wino-like neutralinos and models with TeV masses pair

  5. Discovery of true, likely and possible symbiotic stars in the dwarf spheroidal NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Denise R.; Magrini, Laura; de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; Akras, Stavros

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the photometric and spectroscopic observations of newly discovered (symbiotic) systems in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy NGC 205. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on-off band [O III] 5007 Å emission imaging highlighted several [O III] line emitters, for which optical spectra were then obtained. The detailed study of the spectra of three objects allows us to identify them as true, likely and possible symbiotic systems (SySts), the first ones discovered in this galaxy. SySt-1 is unambiguously classified as a symbiotic star, because of the presence of unique emission lines which belong only to symbiotic spectra, the well-known O VI Raman-scattered lines. SySt-2 is only possibly a SySt because the Ne VII Raman-scattered line at 4881 Å, recently identified in a well-studied Galactic symbiotic as another very conspicuous property of symbiotic, could as well be identified as N III or [Fe III]. Finally, SySt-3 is likely a symbiotic binary because in the red part of the spectrum it shows the continuum of a late giant, and forbidden lines of moderate to high ionization, like [Fe V] 4180 Å. The main source for scepticism on the symbiotic nature of the latter systems is their location in the planetary nebula region in the [O III]4363/Hγ versus [O III]5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram. It is worth mentioning that at least another two confirmed symbiotics, one of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal IC 10 and the other of the Galaxy, are also misplaced in this diagram.

  6. The interstellar medium in Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal galaxies - I. Content and origin of the interstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Fritz, Jacopo; Boquien, Médéric; Cormier, Diane; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Young, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are among the most numerous galaxy population in the Universe, but their main formation and evolution channels are still not well understood. The three dwarf spheroidal satellites (NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205) of the Andromeda galaxy are characterized by very different interstellar medium properties, which might suggest them being at different galaxy evolutionary stages. While the dust content of NGC 205 has been studied in detail in an earlier work, we present new Herschel dust continuum observations of NGC 147 and NGC 185. The non-detection of NGC 147 in Herschel SPIRE maps puts a strong constraint on its dust mass (≤128^{+124}_{-68} M⊙). For NGC 185, we derive a total dust mass Md = 5.1±1.0 × 103 M⊙, which is a factor of ˜2-3 higher than that derived from ISO and Spitzer observations and confirms the need for longer wavelength observations to trace more massive cold dust reservoirs. We, furthermore, estimate the dust production by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and supernovae (SNe). For NGC 147, the upper limit on the dust mass is consistent with expectations of the material injected by the evolved stellar population. In NGC 185 and NGC 205, the observed dust content is one order of magnitude higher compared to the estimated dust production by AGBs and SNe. Efficient grain growth, and potentially longer dust survival times (3-6 Gyr) are required to account for their current dust content. Our study confirms the importance of grain growth in the gas phase to account for the current dust reservoir in galaxies.

  7. The interstellar medium in Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal galaxies: I. Content and origin of the interstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Fritz, Jacopo; Boquien, Médéric; Cormier, Diane; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Young, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are among the most numerous galaxy population in the Universe, but their main formation and evolution channels are still not well understood. The three dwarf spheroidal satellites (NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205) of the Andromeda galaxy are characterised by very different interstellar medium (ISM) properties, which might suggest them being at different galaxy evolutionary stages. While the dust content of NGC 205 has been studied in detail by De Looze et al. (2012), we present new Herschel dust continuum observations of NGC 147 and NGC 185. The non-detection of NGC 147 in Herschel SPIRE maps puts a strong constraint on its dust mass (≤ 128^{+124}_{-68} M⊙). For NGC 185, we derive a total dust mass Md = 5.1±1.0 × 103 M⊙, which is a factor of ˜ 2-3 higher than that derived from ISO and Spitzer observations and confirms the need for longer wavelength observations to trace more massive cold dust reservoirs. We, furthermore, estimate the dust production by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and supernovae (SNe). For NGC 147, the upper limit on the dust mass is consistent with expectations of the material injected by the evolved stellar population. In NGC 185 and NGC 205, the observed dust content is one order of magnitude higher compared to the estimated dust production by AGBs and SNe. Efficient grain growth, and potentially longer dust survival times (3-6 Gyr) are required to account for their current dust content. Our study confirms the importance of grain growth in the gas phase to account for the current dust reservoir in galaxies.

  8. A unique isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxy at D = 1.9 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitry; Makarova, Lidia; Sharina, Margarita; Uklein, Roman; Tikhonov, Anton; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan; Terekhova, Natalya

    2012-09-01

    We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of the unique isolated nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy KKR 25. The galaxy was resolved into stars with Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 including old red giant branch and red clump. We have constructed a model of the resolved stellar populations and measured the star formation rate and metallicity as a function of time. The main star formation activity period occurred about 12.6-13.7 Gyr ago. These stars are mostly metal poor, with a mean metallicity [Fe/H] ˜ -1 to -1.6 dex. About 60 per cent of the total stellar mass was formed during this event. There are indications of intermediate-age star formation in KKR 25 between 1 and 4 Gyr with no significant signs of metal enrichment for these stars. Long-slit spectroscopy was carried out using the Russian 6-m telescope of the integrated starlight and bright individual objects in the galaxy. We have discovered a planetary nebula (PN) in KKR 25. This is the first known PN in a dSph galaxy outside the Local Group. We have measured its oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H) = 7.60 ± 0.07 dex and a radial velocity Vh = -79 km s-1. We have analysed the stellar density distribution in the galaxy body. The galaxy has an exponential surface brightness profile with a central light depression. We discuss the evolutionary status of KKR 25, which belongs to a rare class of very isolated dwarf galaxies with spheroidal morphology.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen abundances of individual stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Battaglia, G.; Pancino, E.; Romano, D.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Starkenburg, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Tosi, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] abundance ratios and CH(λ4300) and S(λ3883) index measurements for 94 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy from VLT/VIMOS MOS observations at a resolving power R = 1150 at 4020 Å. This is the first time that [N/Fe] abundances are derived for a large number of stars in a dwarf spheroidal. We found a trend for the [C/Fe] abundance to decrease with increasing luminosity on the RGB across the whole metallicity range, a phenomenon observed in both field and globular cluster giants, which can be interpreted in the framework of evolutionary mixing of partially processed CNO material. Both our measurements of [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for stars at similar luminosity and metallicity. We detected a dispersion in the carbon abundance at a given [Fe/H], which cannot be ascribed to measurement uncertainties alone. We interpret this observational evidence as the result of the contribution of different nucleosynthesis sources over time to a not well-mixed interstellar medium. We report the discovery of two new carbon-enhanced, metal-poor stars. These are likely the result of pollution from material enriched by asymptotic giant branch stars, as indicated by our estimates of [Ba/Fe] >+1. We also attempted a search for dissolved globular clusters in the field of the galaxy by looking for the distinctive C-N pattern of second population globular clusters stars in a previously detected, very metal-poor, chemodynamical substructure. We do not detect chemical anomalies among this group of stars. However, small number statistics and limited spatial coverage do not allow us to exclude the hypotheses that this substructure forms part of a tidally shredded globular cluster. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 091.D-0089

  10. Satellite accretion in action: a tidally disrupting dwarf spheroidal around the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Martin, Nicolas F.; Morales, Gustavo; Jennings, Zachary G.; GaBany, R. Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Grebel, Eva K.; Schedler, Johannes; Sidonio, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of NGC 253-dw2, a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy candidate undergoing tidal disruption around a nearby spiral galaxy, NGC 253 in the Sculptor group: the first such event identified beyond the Local Group. The dwarf was found using small-aperture amateur telescopes, and followed up with Suprime-Cam on the 8 m Subaru Telescope in order to resolve its brightest stars. Using g- and Rc-band photometry, we detect a red giant branch consistent with an old, metal-poor stellar population at a distance of ˜3.5 Mpc. From the distribution of likely member stars, we infer a highly elongated shape with a semimajor axis half-light radius of (2 ± 0.4) kpc. Star counts also yield a luminosity estimate of ˜2 × 106 L⊙,V (MV ˜ -10.7). The morphological properties of NGC 253-dw2 mark it as distinct from normal dSphs and imply ongoing disruption at a projected distance of ˜50 kpc from the main galaxy. Our observations support the hierarchical paradigm wherein massive galaxies continuously accrete less massive ones, and provide a new case study for dSph infall and dissolution dynamics. We also note the continued efficacy of small telescopes for making big discoveries.

  11. A COMPREHENSIVE, WIDE-FIELD STUDY OF PULSATING STARS IN THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Vivas, A. Katherina; Mateo, Mario E-mail: mmateo@umich.edu

    2013-12-01

    We report the detection of 388 pulsating variable stars (and some additional miscellaneous variables) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy over an area covering the full visible extent of the galaxy and extending a few times beyond its photometric (King) tidal radius along the direction of its major axis. Included in this total are 340 newly discovered dwarf Cepheids (DCs), which are mostly located ∼2.5 mag below the horizontal branch and have very short periods (<0.1 days), typical of their class and consistent with their location on the upper part of the extended main sequence of the younger populations of the galaxy. Several extra-tidal DCs were found in our survey up to a distance of ∼1° from the center of Carina. Our sample also includes RR Lyrae stars and anomalous Cepheids, some of which were found outside the galaxy's tidal radius as well. This supports past works that suggest that Carina is undergoing tidal disruption. We use the period-luminosity relationship for DCs to estimate a distance modulus of μ{sub 0} = 20.17 ± 0.10 mag, in very good agreement with the estimate from RR Lyrae stars. We find some important differences in the properties of the DCs of Carina and those in Fornax and the LMC, the only extragalactic samples of DCs currently known. These differences may reflect a metallicity spread, depth along the line of sight, and/or different evolutionary paths of the DC stars.

  12. A FAST RADIO BURST IN THE DIRECTION OF THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, V.; Shannon, R. M.; Jameson, A.

    2015-01-20

    We report the real-time discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB 131104) with the Parkes radio telescope in a targeted observation of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The dispersion measure of the burst is 779 cm{sup –3} pc, exceeding predictions for the maximum line-of-sight Galactic contribution by a factor of 11. The temporal structure of the burst is characterized by an exponential scattering tail with a timescale of 2.0{sub −0.5}{sup +0.8} ms at 1582 MHz that scales as frequency to the power –4.4{sub −1.8}{sup +1.6} (all uncertainties represent 95% confidence intervals). We bound the intrinsic pulse width to be <0.64 ms due to dispersion smearing across a single spectrometer channel. Searches in 78 hr of follow-up observations with the Parkes telescope reveal no additional sporadic emission and no evidence for associated periodic radio emission. We hypothesize that the burst is associated with the Carina dwarf galaxy. Follow-up observations at other wavelengths are necessary to test this hypothesis.

  13. OGLE Study of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy and its M54 Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamanowicz, A.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Udalski, A.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pawlak, M.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2016-06-01

    We use the fundamental-mode RR Lyr-type variable stars (RRab) from OGLE-IV survey to draw a 3D picture of the central part of the tidally disrupted Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal (Sgr dSph) galaxy. We estimate the line-of-sight thickness of the Sgr dSph stream to be FWHMcen=2.42 kpc. Based on OGLE-IV observations collected in seasons 2011-2014 we conduct a comprehensive study of stellar variability in the field of the globular cluster M54 (NGC 6715) residing in the core of this dwarf galaxy. Among the total number of 268 detected variable stars we report the identification of 174 RR Lyr stars, four Type II Cepheids, 51 semi-regular variable red giants, three SX Phe-type stars, 18 eclipsing binary systems. Eighty-three variable stars are new discoveries. The distance to the cluster determined from RRab stars is dM54=26.7±0.03stat±1.3sys kpc. From the location of RRab stars in the period-amplitude (Bailey) diagram we confirm the presence of two old populations, both in the cluster and the Sgr dSph stream.

  14. A Chemical Confirmation of the Faint Boötes II Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-01

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = -2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of -2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  15. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  16. The Star Formation & Chemical Evolution Timescales of Two Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Thomas; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Saha, A.; Olsen, K.; Starkenburg, E.; Irwin, M.; Battaglia, G.

    2012-01-01

    We present wide-field photometry of resolved stars in the nearby Sculptor and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies, going down to the oldest Main Sequence Turn-Off. The accurately flux calibrated wide-field Colour-Magnitude Diagrams are used directly in combination with spectroscopic metallicities of individual RGB stars to constrain the ages of different stellar populations, and derive the Star Formation History with particular accuracy. The Sculptor dSph contains a predominantly ancient stellar population (>10 Gyr old), which can easily be resolved into individual stars. A galaxy dominated by an old population provides a clear view of ancient processes of galaxy formation unimpeded by overlying younger populations. The Fornax dSph is dominated by stellar populations of intermediate and young ages, which can be used to study the processes of galaxy formation in a more complex mix of stellar populations We find that the known metallicity gradients are well matched to an age gradient. This is the first time that this link with age has been directly quantified. The detailed Star Formation History shows the distribution of age with regards to the metallicity for different radii out from the centre of the galaxy. By linking the obtained SFH to observed spectroscopic abundances (alpha-elements, r- and s-process elements) of RGB stars it is possible to put ages on the chemical evolution patterns observed in this galaxy. In this way we can study the timescale of chemical evolution in these two dwarf galaxies. By comparing both dwarfs we determine whether the chemical abundance patterns seen in galaxies with recent episodes of star formation are a direct continuation of those with only old populations.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF THE PUZZLING ABUNDANCE PATTERN IN THE STARS OF THE FORNAX DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongjie; Cui Wenyuan; Zhang Bo

    2013-09-20

    Many works have found unusual characteristics of elemental abundances in nearby dwarf galaxies. This implies that there is a key factor of galactic evolution that is different from that of the Milky Way (MW). The chemical abundances of the stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Fornax dSph) provide excellent information for setting constraints on the models of galactic chemical evolution. In this work, adopting the five-component approach, we fit the abundances of the Fornax dSph stars, including {alpha} elements, iron group elements, and neutron-capture elements. For most sample stars, the relative contributions from the various processes to the elemental abundances are not usually in the MW proportions. We find that the contributions from massive stars to the primary {alpha} elements and iron group elements increase monotonically with increasing [Fe/H]. This means that the effect of the galactic wind is not strong enough to halt star formation and the contributions from the massive stars to {alpha} elements did not halt for [Fe/H] {approx}< -0.5. The average contribution ratios of various processes between the dSph stars and the MW stars monotonically decrease with increasing progenitor mass. This is important evidence of a bottom-heavy initial mass function (IMF) for the Fornax dSph, compared to the MW. Considering a bottom-heavy IMF for the dSph, the observed relations of [{alpha}/Fe] versus [Fe/H], [iron group/Fe] versus [Fe/H], and [neutron-capture/Fe] versus [Fe/H] for the dSph stars can be explained.

  18. THE SPLASH SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPY OF 15 M31 DWARF SPHEROIDAL SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Bullock, James S.; Yniguez, Basilio; Cooper, Michael C. E-mail: bullock@uci.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu; and others

    2012-06-10

    We present a resolved star spectroscopic survey of 15 dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). We filter foreground contamination from Milky Way (MW) stars, noting that MW substructure is evident in this contaminant sample. We also filter M31 halo field giant stars and identify the remainder as probable dSph members. We then use these members to determine the kinematical properties of the dSphs. For the first time, we confirm that And XVIII, XXI, and XXII show kinematics consistent with bound, dark-matter-dominated galaxies. From the velocity dispersions for the full sample of dSphs we determine masses, which we combine with the size and luminosity of the galaxies to produce mass-size-luminosity scaling relations. With these scalings we determine that the M31 dSphs are fully consistent with the MW dSphs, suggesting that the well-studied MW satellite population provides a fair sample for broader conclusions. We also estimate dark matter halo masses of the satellites and find that there is no sign that the luminosity of these galaxies depends on their dark halo mass, a result consistent with what is seen for MW dwarfs. Two of the M31 dSphs (And XV, XVI) have estimated maximum circular velocities smaller than 12 km s{sup -1} (to 1{sigma}), which likely places them within the lowest-mass dark matter halos known to host stars (along with Booetes I of the MW). Finally, we use the systemic velocities of the M31 satellites to estimate the mass of the M31 halo, obtaining a virial mass consistent with previous results.

  19. Scaling Laws for Dark Matter Halos in Late-type and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Freeman, K. C.

    2016-02-01

    Dark matter (DM) halos of Sc-Im and dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies satisfy scaling laws: halos in lower-luminosity galaxies have smaller core radii, higher central densities, and smaller velocity dispersions. These results are based on maximum-disk rotation curve decompositions for giant galaxies and Jeans equation analysis for dwarfs. (1) We show that spiral, Im, and Sph galaxies with absolute magnitudes MV > -18 form a sequence of decreasing baryon-to-DM surface density with decreasing luminosity. We suggest that this is a sequence of decreasing baryon retention versus supernova-driven losses or decreasing baryon capture after cosmological reionization. (2) The structural differences between S+Im and Sph galaxies are small. Both are affected mostly by the physics that controls baryon depletion. (3) There is a linear correlation between the maximum rotation velocities of baryonic disks and the outer circular velocities Vcirc of test particles in their DM halos. Baryons become unimportant at Vcirc = 42 ± 4 km s-1. Smaller galaxies are dim or dark. (4) We find that, absent baryon “depletion” and with all baryons converted into stars, dSph galaxies would be brighter by ˜4.6 mag and dIm galaxies would be brighter by ˜3.5 mag. Both have DM halos that are massive enough to help to solve the “too big to fail” problem with DM galaxy formation. (5) We suggest that there exist many galaxies that are too dark to be discovered by current techniques, as required by cold DM theory. (6) Central surface densities of DM halos are constant from MB ˜ -5 to -22. This implies a Faber-Jackson law with halo mass M ∝ (halo dispersion)4.

  20. Mass assembly history and infall time of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Strigari, Louis E.; Lovell, Mark R.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2016-04-01

    We use cosmological simulations to identify dark matter subhalo host candidates of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy using the stellar kinematic properties of Fornax. We consider cold dark matter (CDM), warm dark matter (WDM), and decaying dark matter (DDM) simulations for our models of structure formation. The subhalo candidates in CDM typically have smaller mass and higher concentrations at z = 0 than the corresponding candidates in WDM and DDM. We examine the formation histories of the ˜100 Fornax candidate subhaloes identified in CDM simulations and, using approximate luminosity-mass relationships for subhaloes, we find two of these subhaloes that are consistent with both the Fornax luminosity and kinematics. These two subhaloes have a peak mass over 10 times larger than their z = 0 mass. We suggest that in CDM the dark matter halo hosting Fornax must have been severely stripped of mass and that it had an infall time into the Milky Way of ˜9 Gyr ago. In WDM, we find that candidate subhaloes consistent with the properties of Fornax have a similar infall time and a similar degree of mass-loss, while in DDM we find a later infall time of ˜3-4 Gyr ago and significantly less mass-loss. We discuss these results in the context of the Fornax star formation history, and show that these predicted subhalo infall times can be linked to different star formation quenching mechanisms. This emphasizes the links between the properties of the dark matter and the mechanisms that drive galaxy evolution.

  1. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G J

    2012-03-27

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs. PMID:22411827

  2. The masses of local group dwarf spheroidal galaxies: The death of the universal mass profile

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile cannot be found to fit all of the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured solely for the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant with that of the Andromeda dSphs (at just beyond the 1σ level), where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (≳ 600 pc) and low-velocity dispersions (σ {sub v} < 5 km s{sup –1}), are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.

  3. ACCURATE STELLAR KINEMATICS AT FAINT MAGNITUDES: APPLICATION TO THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Gilmore, G.; Walker, M. G.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. Wyn; Okamoto, S.; Penarrubia, J.; Fellhauer, M.; Gieren, W.; Geisler, D.; Monaco, L.; Norris, J. E.; Wilkinson, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-08-01

    We develop, implement, and characterize an enhanced data reduction approach which delivers precise, accurate, radial velocities from moderate resolution spectroscopy with the fiber-fed VLT/FLAMES+GIRAFFE facility. This facility, with appropriate care, delivers radial velocities adequate to resolve the intrinsic velocity dispersions of the very faint dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. Importantly, repeated measurements let us reliably calibrate our individual velocity errors (0.2 kms{sup -1} {<=} {delta}{sub V} {<=} 5 km s{sup -1}) and directly detect stars with variable radial velocities. We show, by application to the Booetes I dSph, that the intrinsic velocity dispersion of this system is significantly below 6.5 km s{sup -1} reported by previous studies. Our data favor a two-population model of Booetes I, consisting of a majority 'cold' stellar component, with velocity dispersion 2.4{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5} km s{sup -1}, and a minority 'hot' stellar component, with velocity dispersion {approx}9 km s{sup -1}, although we cannot completely rule out a single component distribution with velocity dispersion 4.6{sup 0.8}{sub -0.6} km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this complex velocity distribution actually reflects the distribution of velocity anisotropy in Booetes I, which is a measure of its formation processes.

  4. A new estimation of manganese distribution for local dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Men-Quan; Wang, Zhong-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of abundance for iron-peak elements in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is important for galaxy evolution and supernova (SN) nucleosynthesis. Nowadays, manganese (Mn) is one of the most observed iron-peak elements in local dSphs. Studies of its distributions allow us to derive and understand the evolution history of these dSphs. We improve a phenomenological model by a two-curve model including a new initial condition, that includes detailed calculations of SN explosion rates and yields. We compare the results with the observed Mn distribution data for three dSphs: Fornax, Sculpture and Sextans. We find that the model can describe the observed Fe and Mn distributions well simultaneously for the three dSphs. The results also indicate that the initial conditions should be determined by the low metallicity samples in the beginning time of the galaxies and the previous assumption of metellicity-dependant Mn yield of SNIa is not needed when a wide mass range of core-collapse SNe is included. Our method is applicable to the chemical evolution of other iron-peak elements in dSphs and can be modified to provide more detailed processes for the evolution of dSphs.

  5. DISCOVERY OF MIRA VARIABLE STARS IN THE METAL-POOR SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2012-12-10

    We report the discovery of two Mira variable stars (Miras) toward the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). We performed optical long-term monitoring observations for two red stars in the Sextans dSph. The light curves of both stars in the I{sub c} band show large-amplitude (3.7 and 0.9 mag) and long-period (326 {+-} 15 and 122 {+-} 5 days) variations, suggesting that they are Miras. We combine our own infrared data with previously published data to estimate the mean infrared magnitudes. The distances obtained from the period-luminosity relation of the Miras (75.3{sup +12.8}{sub -10.9} and 79.8{sup +11.5}{sub -9.9} kpc, respectively), together with the radial velocities available, support memberships of the Sextans dSph (90.0 {+-} 10.0 kpc). These are the first Miras found in a stellar system with a metallicity as low as [Fe/H] {approx} -1.9 than any other known system with Miras.

  6. A NEW CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES BASED ON OBSERVED LONG STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, Hidetomo; Murayama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-02-01

    We present a new chemical evolution model for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the local universe. Our main aim is to explain both their observed star formation histories and metallicity distribution functions simultaneously. Applying our new model for the four local dSphs, that is, Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, and Sextans, we find that our new model reproduces the observed chemical properties of the dSphs consistently. Our results show that the dSphs have evolved with both a low star formation efficiency and a large gas outflow efficiency compared with the Milky Way, as suggested by previous works. Comparing the observed [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation of the dSphs with the model predictions, we find that our model favors a longer onset time of Type Ia supernovae (i.e., 0.5 Gyr) than that suggested in previous studies (i.e., 0.1 Gyr). We discuss the origin of this discrepancy in detail.

  7. The Star Formation History of the Leo I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Marsteller, B.; Cole, A.; Bullock, J.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on results of new deep imaging obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) that show the Leo I dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy has a much larger population of ancient (>10 Gyr old) stars than previously determined with shallower WFPC2 imaging (Gallart et al. 1999, Dolphin 2003), as well as the previously identified component of intermediate-aged stars. Our new imaging is much deeper, which allows us to unambiguously identify the main sequence turnoffs of the ancient population and constrain the star formation rate at the epoch of the formation of the "first stars” in this galaxy. We will determine the galaxy's star formation rate as a function of time from the observed density of stars in the color-magnitude diagram by comparing with Padova stellar evolutionary models (Girardi et al. 2000). We compare and contrast the star formation histories of the Leo I dSph, which is currently devoid of any gas, with that of the gas-rich Leo A dIrr galaxy. The two are very different in that the dSph formed most of its stars early and the dIrr formed most of its stars later, however both have been actively forming stars over most of the age of the universe.

  8. Proper Motions of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope Imaging. 3; Measurement for URSA Minor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piatek, Slawomir; Pryor, Carlton; Bristow, Paul; Olszewski, Edward W.; Harris, Hugh C.; Mateo, Mario; Minniti, Dante; Tinney, Christopher G.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a measurement of the proper motion of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy determined from images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in two distinct fields. Each field contains a quasi-stellar object that serves as the "reference point". Integrating the motion of Ursa Minor in a realistic potential for the Milky Way produces orbital elements. The perigalacticon and apogalacticon are 40 (10, 76) and 89 (78, 160) kpc, respectively, where the values in the parentheses represent the 95% confidence intervals derived from Monte Carlo experiments. The eccentricity of the orbit is 0.39 (0.09, 0.79), and the orbital period is 1.5 (1.1, 2.7) Gyr. The orbit is retrograde and inclined by 124 degrees (94 deg, 36 deg ) to the Galactic plane. Ursa Minor is not a likely member of a proposed stream of galaxies on similar orbits around the Milky Way, nor is the plane of its orbit coincident with a recently proposed planar alignment of galaxies around the Milky Way. Comparing the orbits of Ursa Minor and Carina shows no reason for the different star formation histories of these two galaxies. Ursa Minor must contain dark matter to have a high probability of having survived disruption by the Galactic tidal force until the present.

  9. Constraints on the pMSSM from LAT Observations of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Murgia, S.; Bloom, E.D.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2012-03-15

    We examine the ability for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) to constrain Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) dark matter through a combined analysis of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We examine the Lightest Supersymmetric Particles (LSPs) for a set of {approx}71k experimentally valid supersymmetric models derived from the phenomenological-MSSM (pMSSM). We find that none of these models can be excluded at 95% confidence by the current analysis; nevertheless, many lie within the predicted reach of future LAT analyses. With two years of data, we find that the LAT is currently most sensitive to light LSPs (mLSP < 50 GeV) annihilating into {tau}-pairs and heavier LSPs annihilating into b{bar b}. Additionally, we find that future LAT analyses will be able to probe some LSPs that form a sub-dominant component of dark matter. We directly compare the LAT results to direct detection experiments and show the complementarity of these search methods.

  10. New limits on the dark matter lifetime from dwarf spheroidal galaxies using Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Ghosh, Tathagata; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Sinha, Kuver

    2016-05-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter through gamma-ray emission due to their proximity, lack of astrophysical backgrounds and high dark matter density. They are often used to place restrictive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section. In this paper, we analyze six years of Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data from 19 dSphs that are satellites of the Milky Way, and derive from a stacked analysis of 15 dSphs, robust 95% confidence level lower limits on the dark matter lifetime for several decay channels and dark matter masses between ˜1 GeV and 10 TeV. Our findings are based on a bin-by-bin maximum likelihood analysis treating the J -factor as a nuisance parameter using the Pass 8 event class. Our constraints from this ensemble are among the most stringent and solid in the literature, and competitive with existing ones coming from the extragalactic gamma-ray background, galaxy clusters, AMS-02 cosmic ray data, Super-K and ICECUBE neutrino data, while rather insensitive to systematic uncertainties. In particular, among gamma-ray searches, we improve existing limits for dark matter decaying into b ¯b (μ+μ-) for dark matter masses below ˜30 (200 ) GeV , demonstrating that dSphs are compelling targets for constraining dark matter decay lifetimes.

  11. HOW TO MAKE AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY: TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-05-20

    In recent years the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has unraveled a new population of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) whose origin remains a puzzle in the vicinity of the Milky Way (MW). Using a suite of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the formation of UFDs in the context of the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group (LG). Our simulations are designed to reproduce the tidal interactions between MW-sized host galaxies and rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter (DM) halos. We explore a variety of inner density slopes {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -{alpha}} for the dwarf DM halos, ranging from core-like ({alpha} = 0.2) to cuspy ({alpha} = 1), and different dwarf orbital configurations. Our experiments demonstrate that UFDs can be produced via tidal stirring of disky dwarfs on relatively tight orbits, consistent with a redshift of accretion by the host galaxy of z {approx} 1, and with intermediate values for the halo inner density slopes ({rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -0.6}). The inferred slopes are in excellent agreement with those resulting from both the modeling of the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies and recent cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxy formation. Comparing the properties of observed UFDs with those of their simulated counterparts, we find remarkable similarities in terms of basic observational parameters. We conclude that tidal stirring of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of UFDs in the LG environment.

  12. ON THE EFFICIENCY OF THE TIDAL STIRRING MECHANISM FOR THE ORIGIN OF DWARF SPHEROIDALS: DEPENDENCE ON THE ORBITAL AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF THE PROGENITOR DISKY DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Moustakas, Leonidas A. E-mail: lokas@camk.edu.pl E-mail: lucio@phys.ethz.ch

    2011-01-10

    The tidal stirring model posits the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) via the tidal interactions between late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs and Milky-Way-sized host galaxies. Using a comprehensive set of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the efficiency of the tidal stirring mechanism for the origin of dSphs. In particular, we examine the degree to which the tidal field of the primary galaxy affects the sizes, masses, shapes, and kinematics of the disky dwarfs for a range of dwarf orbital and structural parameters. Our study is the first to employ self-consistent, equilibrium models for the progenitor dwarf galaxies constructed from a composite distribution function and consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in massive, cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. Exploring a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures, we demonstrate that in the majority of cases the disky dwarfs experience significant mass loss and their stellar distributions undergo a dramatic morphological, as well as dynamical, transformation. Specifically, the stellar components evolve from disks to bars and finally to pressure-supported, spheroidal systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the Local Group (LG) and similar environments. The self-consistency of the adopted dwarf models is crucial for confirming this complex transformation process via tidally induced dynamical instabilities and impulsive tidal heating of the stellar distribution. Our results suggest that such tidal transformations should be common occurrences within the currently favored cosmological paradigm and highlight the key factor responsible for an effective metamorphosis to be the strength of the tidal shocks at the pericenters of the orbit. We also demonstrate that the combination of short orbital times and small pericentric distances, characteristic of dwarfs being accreted by their hosts at high redshift

  13. On the Efficiency of the Tidal Stirring Mechanism for the Origin of Dwarf Spheroidals: Dependence on the Orbital and Structural Parameters of the Progenitor Disky Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Łokas, Ewa L.; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2011-01-01

    The tidal stirring model posits the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) via the tidal interactions between late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs and Milky-Way-sized host galaxies. Using a comprehensive set of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the efficiency of the tidal stirring mechanism for the origin of dSphs. In particular, we examine the degree to which the tidal field of the primary galaxy affects the sizes, masses, shapes, and kinematics of the disky dwarfs for a range of dwarf orbital and structural parameters. Our study is the first to employ self-consistent, equilibrium models for the progenitor dwarf galaxies constructed from a composite distribution function and consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in massive, cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. Exploring a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures, we demonstrate that in the majority of cases the disky dwarfs experience significant mass loss and their stellar distributions undergo a dramatic morphological, as well as dynamical, transformation. Specifically, the stellar components evolve from disks to bars and finally to pressure-supported, spheroidal systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the Local Group (LG) and similar environments. The self-consistency of the adopted dwarf models is crucial for confirming this complex transformation process via tidally induced dynamical instabilities and impulsive tidal heating of the stellar distribution. Our results suggest that such tidal transformations should be common occurrences within the currently favored cosmological paradigm and highlight the key factor responsible for an effective metamorphosis to be the strength of the tidal shocks at the pericenters of the orbit. We also demonstrate that the combination of short orbital times and small pericentric distances, characteristic of dwarfs being accreted by their hosts at high redshift

  14. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. I. THE SCULPTOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bolte, Michael; Geha, Marla C.

    2009-11-01

    We present measurements of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 388 radial velocity member stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph), a satellite of the Milky Way (MW). This is the largest sample of individual alpha element (Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti) abundance measurements in any single dSph. The measurements are made from Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrometer medium-resolution spectra (6400-9000 A, R approx 6500). Based on comparisons to published high-resolution (R approx> 20,000) spectroscopic measurements, our measurements have uncertainties of sigma[Fe/H] = 0.14 and sigma[alpha/Fe] = 0.13. The Sculptor [Fe/H] distribution has a mean ([Fe/H]) = -1.58 and is asymmetric with a long, metal-poor tail, indicative of a history of extended star formation. Sculptor has a larger fraction of stars with [Fe/H] < -2 than the MW halo. We have discovered one star with [Fe/H] = -3.80 +- 0.28, which is the most metal-poor star known anywhere except the MW halo, but high-resolution spectroscopy is needed to measure this star's detailed abundances. As has been previously reported based on high-resolution spectroscopy, [alpha/Fe] in Sculptor falls as [Fe/H] increases. The metal-rich stars ([Fe/H] approx -1.5) have lower [alpha/Fe] than Galactic halo field stars of comparable metallicity. This indicates that star formation proceeded more gradually in Sculptor than in the Galactic halo. We also observe radial abundance gradients of -0.030 +- 0.003 dex arcmin{sup -1} in [Fe/H] and +0.013 +- 0.003 dex arcmin{sup -1} in [alpha/Fe] out to 11 arcmin (275 pc). Together, these measurements cast Sculptor and possibly other surviving dSphs as representative of the dwarf galaxies from which the metal-poor tail of the Galactic halo formed.

  15. The dynamical and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies with GEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Y.; Jablonka, P.

    2012-02-01

    We present the fully parallel chemo-dynamical Tree/SPH code GEAR, which allows us to perform high resolution simulations with detailed chemical diagnostics. Starting from the public version of Gadget-2, we included the complex treatment of the baryon physics: gas cooling, star formation law, chemical evolution, and supernova feedback. We qualified the performances of GEAR in the case of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) galaxies. Our code GEAR conserves the total energy budget of the systems to better than 5% over 14 Gyr and provides an excellent convergence of the results with numerical resolution. We showed that models of dSphs in a static Euclidean space, where the expansion of the universe is neglected are valid. In addition, we tackled some existing open questions in the field, such as the stellar mass fraction of dSphs and its link to the predicted dark matter halo mass function, the effect of supernova feedback, the spatial distribution of the stellar populations, and the origin of the diversity in star formation histories and chemical abundance patterns. Strong supernova-driven winds seem incompatible with the observed metallicities and luminosities. Despite newly formed stars being preferentially found in the galaxy central parts, turbulent motions in the gas can quickly erase any metallicity gradient. The diversity in properties of dSph are related to a range of total masses, as well as a range of dispersion in the central densities, which is also seen in the halos emerging from a ΛCDM cosmogony. Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Internal Kinematics of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies: Fornax, Carina, Sculptor, and Sextans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. G.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E. W.; Wang, X.; Woodroofe, M.

    2005-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are the smallest stellar systems for which Newtonian gravity implies the presence of a dark matter component. This makes dSphs objects of fundamental importance within the prevalent framework of Λ CDM structure formation. The dSphs are thought to be embedded within dark matter halos that happened to survive the merger assembly of larger systems, and thus represent the most pristine nearby relics from earlier epochs of cosmological structure. The proximity of the Milky Way's ˜ 10 known dSph satellites provides the unique opportunity to measure the radial velocities of individual dSph stars, enabling detailed kinematic studies. Velocity samples containing precision measurements for tens of stars established that the internal kinematics of at least some dSphs are dominated by dark matter. More recent work based on samples of ˜ 200 stellar velocities has begun to address the details of mass distribution, the degree of velocity anisotropy, and the influence of external tidal forces imposed on dSphs by the Milky Way. Here we present large new samples of dSph velocities obtained using the Michigan-MIKE Fiber System at the Magellan telescopes. We have measured precise (± 3 km s-1) line-of-sight velocities for 330 members of the Carina dSph, 325 members of the Fornax dSph, 285 members of the Sextans dSph, and 675 members of the Sculptor dSph. We discuss various analysis methods and apply a new nonparametric technique we have developed in order to estimate mass distributions from samples containing large numbers of discrete velocities. We find strikingly similar mass profiles over the radial region common to each sample. This work is supported by generous grants from the National Science Foundation and the University of Michigan's Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.

  17. Structural parameters and blue stragglers in Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Jílková, Lucie; Carraro, Giovanni; Catelan, Márcio; Amigo, Pía.

    2012-04-01

    We present BV photometry of four Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters: Arp 2, NGC 5634, Palomar 12 and Terzan 8, obtained with the Danish Telescope at ESO La Silla. We measure the structural parameters of the clusters using a King profile fitting, obtaining the first reliable measurements of the tidal radius of Arp 2 and Terzan 8. These two clusters are remarkably extended and with low concentrations; with a concentration of only c= 0.41 ± 0.02, Terzan 8 is less concentrated than any cluster in our Galaxy. Blue stragglers are identified in the four clusters, and their spatial distribution is compared to those of horizontal branch and red giant branch stars. The blue straggler properties do not provide evidence of mass segregation in Terzan 8, while Arp 2 probably shares the same status, although with less confidence. In the case of NGC 5634 and Palomar 12, blue stragglers are significantly less populous, and their analysis suggests that the two clusters have probably undergone mass segregation. References: (1) Peterson (1976); (2) Kron, Hewitt & Wasserman (1984); (3) Chernoff & Djorgovski (1989); (4) Trager, Djorgovski & King (1993); (5) Trager et al. (1995); (6) Rosenberg et al. (1998); (7) Mackey & Gilmore (2003b); (8) McLaughlin & van der Marel (2005) and (9) Carballo-Bello et al. (2012).

  18. Probing the Dark Matter Content of Local Group Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark I.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Gilmore, Gerard F.; Evans, N. Wyn; Koch, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Harbeck, Daniel R.

    2006-06-01

    We present preliminary kinematic results from our VLT programme of spectroscopic observations in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy using the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph. These new data suggest that the dark matter halo of this galaxy has a uniform density core. The implications for our understanding of the nature of the dark matter are discussed. Z% Aaronson M. 1983, ApJ 266, L11 Belokurov V. et al. 2006, ApJL, submitted, astro-ph/0604355 Goerdt T. et al. 2006, MNNRAS 368, 1073 Harbeck D. et al. 2001, AJ 122, 3092 Kleyna J. T. et al. 2001, ApJ 564, L115 Kleyna J. T. et al. 2003, ApJ 588, L21 Koch A. et al. 2006a, The Messenger 123, 38 Koch A. et al. 2006b, AJ 131, 895 Majewski S. R. et al. 2005, AJ 130, 2677 Martin N. et al. 2006, MNRAS 367, L69 Mateo M. et al. 1993, AJ 105, 510 Mateo M. 1997, ASP Conf. Ser. 116, 259 Mateo M. et al. 1998, AJ 116, 2315 Monelli M. et al. 2003, AJ 126, 218 Munoz R. R. et al. 2005, ApJ 631, L137 Shetrone M. D. et al. 2001, ApJ 548, 592 Tolstoy E. et al. 2006, The Messenger 123, 33 Wilkinson M. I. et al. 2002, MNRAS 330, 778 Wilkinson M. I. et al. 2004, MNRAS 611, L21 Wilkinson M. I. et al. 2006, in proceedings of XXIst IAP meeting, EDP sciences, astro-ph/0602186 Willman B. et al. 2005, ApJ 626, L85 Wyse R. F. G. et al. 2006, ApJ 639, L13 Zucker D. B. et al. 2006, ApJ 643, L103

  19. Dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31. I. Variable stars and stellar populations in Andromeda XIX

    SciTech Connect

    Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Garofalo, Alessia; Federici, Luciana E-mail: gisella.clementini@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: alessia.garofalo@studio.unibo.it; and others

    2013-12-10

    We present B, V time-series photometry of Andromeda XIX (And XIX), the most extended (half-light radius of 6.'2) of Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal companions, which we observed with the Large Binocular Cameras at the Large Binocular Telescope. We surveyed a 23' × 23' area centered on And XIX and present the deepest color-magnitude diagram (CMD) ever obtained for this galaxy, reaching, at V ∼ 26.3 mag, about one magnitude below the horizontal branch (HB). The CMD shows a prominent and slightly widened red giant branch, along with a predominantly red HB, which extends to the blue to significantly populate the classical instability strip. We have identified 39 pulsating variable stars, of which 31 are of RR Lyrae type and 8 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs). Twelve of the RR Lyrae variables and three of the ACs are located within And XIX's half light radius. The average period of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars ((P {sub ab}) = 0.62 days, σ = 0.03 days) and the period-amplitude diagram qualify And XIX as an Oosterhoff-Intermediate system. From the average luminosity of the RR Lyrae stars ((V(RR)) = 25.34 mag, σ = 0.10 mag), we determine a distance modulus of (m – M){sub 0} = 24.52 ± 0.23 mag in a scale where the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is 18.5 ± 0.1 mag. The ACs follow a well-defined Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation that appears to be in very good agreement with the PW relationship defined by the ACs in the LMC.

  20. The star formation and chemical evolution history of the sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxyâ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Saha, A.; Olsen, K.; Starkenburg, E.; Lemasle, B.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.

    2012-03-01

    We have combined deep photometry in the B, V and I bands from CTIO/MOSAIC of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, going down to the oldest main sequence turn-offs, with spectroscopic metallicity distributions of red giant branch stars. This allows us to obtain the most detailed and complete star formation history to date, as well as an accurate timescale for chemical enrichment. The star formation history shows that Sculptor is dominated by old (>10 Gyr), metal-poor stars, but that younger, more metal-rich populations are also present. Using star formation histories determined at different radii from the centre we show that Sculptor formed stars with an increasing central concentration with time. The old, metal-poor populations are present at all radii, while more metal-rich, younger stars are more centrally concentrated. We find that within an elliptical radius of 1 degree, or 1.5 kpc from the centre, a total mass in stars of 7.8 × 10^6 M

  1. Mass modelling of dwarf spheroidal galaxies: the effect of unbound stars from tidal tails and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentowski, Jarosław; Łokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.

    2007-06-01

    We study the origin and properties of the population of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high-resolution N-body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. In agreement with the tidal stirring scenario of Mayer et al., the dwarf is placed on a highly eccentric orbit, its initial stellar component is in the form of an exponential disc and it has a NFW-like dark matter (DM) halo. After 10 Gyr of evolution the dwarf produces a spheroidal stellar component and is strongly tidally stripped so that mass follows light and the stars are on almost isotropic orbits. From this final state, we create mock kinematic data sets for 200 stars by observing the dwarf in different directions. We find that when the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails. We also study another source of possible contamination by adding stars from the Milky Way. We demonstrate that most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert and recently tested on simulated DM haloes. We model the cleaned-up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation with constant mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and velocity anisotropy parameter. We show that even for such a strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and M/L of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25 per cent and almost exactly in the case when the line of sight is perpendicular to the tidal tails. The analysis was applied to the new data for the Fornax dSph galaxy. We show that after careful removal of interlopers the velocity dispersion profile of Fornax can be reproduced by a model in which mass traces light with a M/L of 11 solar units and isotropic orbits. We demonstrate that most of the contamination in the kinematic sample of

  2. Mass Modelling of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies: the Effect of Unbound Stars From Tidal Tails And the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys. /Meudon Observ.

    2006-11-14

    We study the origin and properties of the population of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N- body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. In agreement with the tidal stirring scenario of Mayer et al., the dwarf is placed on a highly eccentric orbit, its initial stellar component is in the form of an exponential disk and it has a NFW-like dark matter halo. After 10 Gyrs of evolution the dwarf produces a spheroidal stellar component and is strongly tidally stripped so that mass follows light and the stars are on almost isotropic orbits. From this final state, we create mock kinematic data sets for 200 stars by observing the dwarf in different directions.We find that when the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails.We also study another source of possible contamination by adding stars from the Milky Way. We demonstrate that most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert and recently tested on simulated dark matter haloes. We model the cleaned up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation with constant mass-to-light ratio and velocity anisotropy parameter. We show that even for such strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25 percent and almost exactly in the case when the line of sight is perpendicular to the tidal tails. The analysis was applied to the new data for the Fornax dSph galaxy for which we find a mass-to-light ratio of 11 solar units and isotropic orbits. We demonstrate that most of the contamination in the kinematic sample of Fornax probably originates from the Milky Way.

  3. High resolution spectroscopy of Red Giant Branch stars and the chemical evolution of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Francois, P.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Szeifert, T.

    2014-12-01

    From VLT-FLAMES high-resolution spectra, we determine the abundances of several α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements in 47 Red Giant Branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We confirm that SNe Ia started to contribute to the chemical enrichment of Fornax at [Fe/H] between --2.0 and --1.8 dex. Combining these abundances with accurate age estimates, we date the onset of SNe Ia to ≈ 12--10 Gyrs ago. Our results are compatible with an initial mass function that lacks the most massive stars and with a star formation going on throughout the whole history of Fornax.

  4. The Metal-poor Knee in the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Koch, Andreas; Lanfranchi, Gustavo A.; Boeche, Corrado; Walker, Matthew; Johnson, Christian I.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gilmore, Gerard

    2014-04-01

    We present α-element abundances of Mg, Si, and Ti for a large sample of field stars in two outer fields of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, obtained with Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE (R ~ 16, 000). Due to the large fraction of metal-poor (MP) stars in our sample, we are able to follow the α-element evolution from [Fe/H] ≈ -2.5 continuously to [Fe/H] ≈ -0.7. For the first time we are able to resolve the turnover from the Type II supernovae (SNe) dominated, α-enhanced plateau down to subsolar [α/Fe] values, due to the onset of SNe Ia, and thus to trace the chemical enrichment efficiency of the galaxy. Our data support the general concept of an α-enhanced plateau at early epochs, followed by a well-defined "knee" caused by the onset of SNe Ia, and finally a second plateau with sub-solar [α/Fe] values. We find the position of this knee to be at [Fe/H] ≈ -1.9 and therefore significantly more MP than expected from comparison with other dSphs and standard evolutionary models. Surprisingly, this value is rather comparable to the knee in Sculptor, a dSph ~10 times less luminous than Fornax. Using chemical evolution models, we find that the position of the knee and the subsequent plateau at the sub-solar level can hardly be explained unless the galaxy experienced several discrete star formation (SF) events with a drastic variation in SF efficiency, while a uniform SF can be ruled out. One possible evolutionary scenario is that Fornax experienced one or several major accretion events from gas-rich systems in the past, so that its current stellar mass is not indicative of the chemical evolution environment at ancient times. If Fornax is the product of several smaller buildings blocks, this may also have implications for the understanding of the formation process of dSphs in general. This article is based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under program 082.B-0940(A).

  5. The metal-poor knee in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Koch, Andreas; Lanfranchi, Gustavo A.; Boeche, Corrado; Walker, Matthew; Johnson, Christian I.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gilmore, Gerard

    2014-04-20

    We present α-element abundances of Mg, Si, and Ti for a large sample of field stars in two outer fields of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, obtained with Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE (R ∼ 16, 000). Due to the large fraction of metal-poor (MP) stars in our sample, we are able to follow the α-element evolution from [Fe/H] ≈ –2.5 continuously to [Fe/H] ≈ –0.7. For the first time we are able to resolve the turnover from the Type II supernovae (SNe) dominated, α-enhanced plateau down to subsolar [α/Fe] values, due to the onset of SNe Ia, and thus to trace the chemical enrichment efficiency of the galaxy. Our data support the general concept of an α-enhanced plateau at early epochs, followed by a well-defined 'knee' caused by the onset of SNe Ia, and finally a second plateau with sub-solar [α/Fe] values. We find the position of this knee to be at [Fe/H] ≈ –1.9 and therefore significantly more MP than expected from comparison with other dSphs and standard evolutionary models. Surprisingly, this value is rather comparable to the knee in Sculptor, a dSph ∼10 times less luminous than Fornax. Using chemical evolution models, we find that the position of the knee and the subsequent plateau at the sub-solar level can hardly be explained unless the galaxy experienced several discrete star formation (SF) events with a drastic variation in SF efficiency, while a uniform SF can be ruled out. One possible evolutionary scenario is that Fornax experienced one or several major accretion events from gas-rich systems in the past, so that its current stellar mass is not indicative of the chemical evolution environment at ancient times. If Fornax is the product of several smaller buildings blocks, this may also have implications for the understanding of the formation process of dSphs in general.

  6. A FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE PROPER MOTION OF THE LEO II DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, Sebastien; Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael; Kuijken, Konrad

    2011-11-10

    We use 14 year baseline images obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to derive a proper motion for one of the Milky Way's most distant dwarf spheroidal companions, Leo II, relative to an extragalactic background reference frame. Astrometric measurements are performed in the effective point-spread function formalism using our own developed code. An astrometric reference grid is defined using 3224 stars that are members of Leo II and brighter than a magnitude of 25 in the F814W band. We identify 17 compact extragalactic sources, for which we measure a systemic proper motion relative to this stellar reference grid. We derive a proper motion [{mu}{sub {alpha},{mu}{delta}}] = [+104 {+-}113,-33 {+-} 151] {mu}as yr{sup -1} for Leo II in the heliocentric reference frame. Though marginally detected, the proper motion yields constraints on the orbit of Leo II. Given a distance of d {approx_equal} 230 kpc and a heliocentric radial velocity v{sub r} = +79 km s{sup -1}, and after subtraction of the solar motion, our measurement indicates a total orbital motion v{sub G} = 266.1 {+-} 128.7 km s{sup -1} in the Galactocentric reference frame, with a radial component v{sub r{sub G}}=21.5{+-}4.3 km s{sup -1} and tangential component v{sub t{sub G}} = 265.2 {+-} 129.4 km s{sup -1}. The small radial component indicates that Leo II either has a low-eccentricity orbit or is currently close to perigalacticon or apogalacticon distance. We see evidence for systematic errors in the astrometry of the extragalactic sources which, while close to being point sources, are slightly resolved in the HST images. We argue that more extensive observations at later epochs will be necessary to better constrain the proper motion of Leo II. We provide a detailed catalog of the stellar and extragalactic sources identified in the HST data which should provide a solid early-epoch reference for future astrometric measurements.

  7. The star formation and chemical evolution history of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Saha, A.; Olszewski, E. W.; Mateo, M.; Starkenburg, E.; Battaglia, G.; Walker, M. G.

    2012-08-01

    We present deep photometry in the B, V and I filters from CTIO/MOSAIC for about 270 000 stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, out to a radius of rell ≈ 0.8 degrees. By combining the accurately calibrated photometry with the spectroscopic metallicity distributions of individual red giant branch stars we obtain the detailed star formation and chemical evolution history of Fornax. Fornax is dominated by intermediate age (1-10 Gyr) stellar populations, but also includes ancient (10-14 Gyr), and young (≤1 Gyr) stars. We show that Fornax displays a radial age gradient, with younger, more metal-rich populations dominating the central region. This confirms results from previous works. Within an elliptical radius of 0.8 degrees, or 1.9 kpc from the centre, a total mass in stars of 4.3 × 107 M⊙ was formed, from the earliest times until 250 Myr ago. Using the detailed star formation history, age estimates are determined for individual stars on the upper RGB, for which spectroscopic abundances are available, giving an age-metallicity relation of the Fornax dSph from individual stars. This shows that the average metallicity of Fornax went up rapidly from [Fe/H] ≤ -2.5 dex to [Fe/H] = -1.5 dex between 8-12 Gyr ago, after which a more gradual enrichment resulted in a narrow, well-defined sequence which reaches [Fe/H] ≈ -0.8 dex, ≈3 Gyr ago. These ages also allow us to measure the build-up of chemical elements as a function of time, and thus determine detailed timescales for the evolution of individual chemical elements. A rapid decrease in [Mg/Fe] is seen for the stars with [Fe/H] ≥ -1.5 dex, with a clear trend in age. Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/544/A73

  8. Complexity on Small Scales. II. Metallicities and Ages in the Leo II Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Harbeck, Daniel R.; Gilmore, Gerard F.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Evans, N. Wyn

    2007-01-01

    We present metallicities and ages for 52 red giants in the remote Galactic dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Leo II. These stars cover the entire surface area of Leo II and are radial velocity members. We obtained medium-resolution multifiber spectroscopy with FLAMES as part of a Large Program with the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. The metallicities were determined based on the well-established near-infrared Ca II triplet technique. This allowed us to achieve a mean random error of 0.16 dex on the metallicities, while other systematic effects, such as unknown variations in the dSph's [Ca/Fe] ratio, may introduce a further source of uncertainty of the order of 0.1 dex. The resulting metallicity distribution is asymmetric and peaks at [Fe/H]=-1.74 dex on the Carretta & Gratton scale. The full range in metallicities extends from -2.4 to -1.08 dex. As in other dSph galaxies, no extremely metal-poor red giants were found. We compare Leo II's observed metallicity distribution with model predictions for several other Galactic dSphs from the literature. Leo II clearly exhibits a lack of more metal-poor stars, analogous to the classical G dwarf problem, which may indicate a comparable ``K giant problem.'' Moreover, its evolution appears to have been affected by galactic winds. We use our inferred metallicities as an input parameter for isochrone fits to Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry of our target stars and derive approximate ages. The resulting age-metallicity distribution covers the full age range from 2 to about 15 Gyr on our adopted isochrone scale. During the first ~7 Gyr relative to the oldest stars, the metallicity of Leo II appears to have remained almost constant, centering on the mean metallicity of this galaxy. The almost constant metallicity at higher ages and a slight drop by about 0.3 dex thereafter may be indicative of rejuvenation by low-metallicity gas. Overall, the age-metallicity relation appears to support the

  9. THE CHEMICAL SIGNATURE OF A RELIC STAR CLUSTER IN THE SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY-IMPLICATIONS FOR NEAR-FIELD COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Torgny; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Freeman, Ken C.; Silk, Joe

    2012-11-10

    We present tentative evidence for the existence of a dissolved star cluster at [Fe/H] = -2.7 in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use the technique of chemical tagging to identify stars that are highly clustered in a multi-dimensional chemical abundance space (C-space). In a sample of six stars, three, possibly four, stars are identified as potential cluster stars. The initial stellar mass of the parent cluster is estimated from two independent observations to be M{sub *,init}=1.9{sup +1.5}{sub -0.9}(1.6{sup +1.2}{sub -0.8}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, assuming a Salpeter (Kroupa) initial mass function. If corroborated by follow-up spectroscopy, this star cluster is the most metal-poor system identified to date. Chemical signatures of remnant clusters in dwarf galaxies like Sextans provide us with a very powerful probe to the high-redshift universe. From available observational data, we argue that the average star cluster mass in the majority of the newly discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies was notably lower than it is in the Galaxy today and possibly lower than in the more luminous, classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Furthermore, the mean cumulative metallicity function of the dwarf spheroidals falls below that of the ultra-faints, which increases with increasing metallicity as predicted from our stochastic chemical evolution model. These two findings, together with a possible difference in the ([Mg/Fe]) ratio suggest that the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy population, or a significant fraction thereof, and the dwarf spheroidal population were formed in different environments and would thus be distinct in origin.

  10. Chemical analysis of carbon stars in the Local Group. II. The Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.; de Laverny, P.; Wahlin, R.

    2008-04-01

    Aims:We present new results of our ongoing chemical study of carbon stars in Local Group galaxies to test the critical dependence of s-process nucleosynthesis on the stellar metallicity. Methods: We collected optical spectra with the VLT/UVES instrument of two carbon stars found in the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, namely ALW-C6 and ALW-C7. We performed a full chemical analysis using the new generation of hydrostatic, spherically symmetric carbon-rich model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis method in LTE. Results: The luminosities, atmosphere parameters and chemical composition of ALW-C6 and ALW-C7 are compatible with these stars being in the TP-AGB phase undergoing third dredge-up episodes, although their extrinsic nature (external pollution in a binary stellar system) cannot be definitively excluded. Our chemical analysis shows that the metallicity of both stars agree with the average metallicity ([Fe/H] -1.8 dex) previously derived for this satellite galaxy from the analysis of both low resolution spectra of RGB stars and the observed colour magnitude diagrams. ALW-C6 and ALW-C7 present strong s-element enhancements, [ s/Fe] = +1.6, +1.5, respectively. These enhancements and the derived s-process indexes [ ls/Fe] , [ hs/Fe] and [ hs/ls] are compatible with theoretical s-process nucleosynthesis predictions in low mass AGB stars ( 1.5 M_⊙) on the basis that the 13C(α,n)16O is the main source of neutrons. Furthermore, the analysis of C2 and CN bands reveals a large carbon enhancement (C/O 7 and 5, respectively), much larger than the values typically found in galactic AGB carbon stars (C/O 1{-}2). This is also in agreement with the theoretical prediction that AGB carbon stars are formed more easily through third dredge-up episodes as the initial stellar metallicity drops. However, theoretical low-mass AGB models apparently fail to simultaneously fit the observed s-element and carbon enhancements. On the other hand, Zr is found to be less enhanced in

  11. Complexity on Small Scales. III. Iron and α Element Abundances in the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Gilmore, Gerard F.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Harbeck, Daniel R.; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Wyn Evans, N.

    2008-04-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectroscopy of ten red giants in the Carina dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy with the ultraviolet and visual echelle spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope in order to study the detailed chemical evolution of this Galactic satellite. Here we present the abundances of O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Fe. By comparison of the derived iron abundances [Fe/H] with metallicities based on the well-established calcium triplet (CaT) calibration, [Fe/H]CaT, we show that the empirical CaT technique yields good agreement with the high-resolution data for [Fe/H] gsim 2 dex, but tends to deviate from these data at lower metallicities. With [Fe/H] ~ 1.7 dex the mean iron abundance of our targets is fully consistent with the peak metallicity of Carina as derived from medium-resolution spectroscopy and previous photometric studies, all calibrated onto iron via Galactic globular cluster scales. We identify two metal-poor stars with iron abundances of 2.72 and 2.50 dex. These stars are found to have enhanced [α/Fe] ratios similar to the elemental ratios of stars in the Milky Way halo. In this context, it is conceivable that the moderately metal-poor halo stars may originate from an early dSph accretion event. The bulk of the Carina red giants exhibit a depletion in the [α/Fe] abundance ratios with respect to the Galactic halo at a given metallicity. One of our targets with a moderately low [Fe/H] of 1.5 dex is considerably depleted in almost all of the α-elements by ~0.5 dex compared to the solar values. Such low values of the ratio of α-elements to iron can be produced by stochastical fluctuations in terms of an incomplete mixing of single type Ia and type II supernova (SN) events into the interstellar medium. Moreover, the system's slow star-formation (SF) rate grants sufficient time for SNe I to occur. Our derived chemical element ratios are consistent with the episodic and extended SF in Carina previously derived from

  12. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with Six Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Albert, A; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Essig, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Malyshev, D; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Meyer, M; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sehgal, N; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strigari, L; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. These constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100  GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels. PMID:26684107

  13. Hubble space telescope absolute proper motions of NGC 6681 (M70) and the sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Massari, D.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.

    2013-12-10

    We have measured absolute proper motions for the three populations intercepted in the direction of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6681: the cluster itself, the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, and the field. For this, we used Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS optical imaging data separated by a temporal baseline of 5.464 yr. Five background galaxies were used to determine the zero point of the absolute-motion reference frame. The resulting absolute proper motion of NGC 6681 is (μ{sub α}cos δ, μ{sub δ}) = (1.58 ± 0.18, –4.57 ± 0.16) mas yr{sup –1}. This is the first estimate ever made for this cluster. For the Sgr dSph we obtain (μ{sub α}cos δ, μ{sub δ}) = –2.54 ± 0.18, –1.19 ± 0.16) mas yr{sup –1}, consistent with previous measurements and with the values predicted by theoretical models. The absolute proper motion of the Galaxy population in our field of view is (μ{sub α}cos δ, μ{sub δ}) = (– 1.21 ± 0.27, –4.39 ± 0.26) mas yr{sup –1}. In this study we also use background Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal stars to determine the rotation of the globular cluster in the plane of the sky and find that NGC 6681 is not rotating significantly: v {sub rot} = 0.82 ± 1.02 km s{sup –1} at a distance of 1' from the cluster center.

  14. Deep XMM observations of Draco rule out at the 99 per cent confidence level a dark matter decay origin for the 3.5 keV line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeltema, Tesla; Profumo, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We searched for an X-ray line at energies around 3.5 keV in deep, ˜1.6 Ms XMM-Newton observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco. No line was found in either the Metal Oxide Semi-conductor (MOS) or the p-type/n-type semiconductor (PN) detectors. The data in this energy range are completely consistent with a single, unfolded power-law modelling the particle background, which dominates at these energies, plus instrumental lines; the addition of a ˜3.5 keV line feature gives no improvement to the fit. The corresponding upper limit on the line flux rules out a dark matter decay origin for the 3.5 keV line found in observations of clusters of galaxies and in the Galactic Centre at greater than 99 per cent confidence level.

  15. ASSESSING THE MILKY WAY SATELLITES ASSOCIATED WITH THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Law, David R.; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed

    2010-08-01

    Numerical models of the tidal disruption of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy have recently been developed that for the first time simultaneously satisfy most observational constraints on the angular position, distance, and radial velocity trends of both leading and trailing tidal streams emanating from the dwarf. We use these dynamical models in combination with extant three-dimensional position and velocity data for Galactic globular clusters and dSph galaxies to identify those Milky Way satellites that are likely to have originally formed in the gravitational potential well of the Sgr dwarf, and have been stripped from Sgr during its extended interaction with the Milky Way. We conclude that the globular clusters Arp 2, M 54, NGC 5634, Terzan 8, and Whiting 1 are almost certainly associated with the Sgr dwarf, and that Berkeley 29, NGC 5053, Pal 12, and Terzan 7 are likely to be as well (albeit at lower confidence). The initial Sgr system therefore may have contained five to nine globular clusters, corresponding to a specific frequency S{sub N} = 5-9 for an initial Sgr luminosity M{sub V} = -15.0. Our result is consistent with the 8 {+-} 2 genuine Sgr globular clusters expected on the basis of statistical modeling of the Galactic globular cluster distribution and the corresponding false-association rate due to chance alignments with the Sgr streams. The globular clusters identified as most likely to be associated with Sgr are consistent with previous reconstructions of the Sgr age-metallicity relation, and show no evidence for a second-parameter effect shaping their horizontal branch morphologies. We find no statistically significant evidence to suggest that any of the recently discovered population of ultrafaint dwarf galaxies are associated with the Sgr tidal streams, but are unable to rule out this possibility conclusively for all systems.

  16. Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites in the Common Surface-density Dark Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Yusuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the growth histories of dark matter halos associated with dwarf satellites in Local Group galaxies and the resultant evolution of the baryonic component. Our model is based on the recently proposed property that the mean surface density of a dark halo inside a radius at maximum circular velocity {V}{{\\max }} is universal over a large range of {V}{{\\max }}. Given that a surface density of 20 M ⊙ pc‑2 well explains dwarf satellites in the Milky Way and Andromeda, we find that the evolution of the dark halo in this common surface-density scale is characterized by the rapid increase of the halo mass assembled by the redshift {z}{{TT}} of the tidal truncation by its host halo, at early epochs of {z}{{TT}}≳ 6 or {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s‑1. This mass growth of the halo is slow at lower {z}{{TT}} or larger {V}{{\\max }}. Taking into account the baryon content in this dark halo evolution, under the influence of the ionizing background radiation, we find that the dwarf satellites are divided into roughly two families: those with {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s‑1 having high star formation efficiency and those with larger {V}{{\\max }} having less efficient star formation. This semianalytical model is in agreement with the high-resolution numerical simulation for galaxy formation and with the observed star formation histories for Fornax and Leo II. This suggests that the evolution of a dark halo may play a key role in understanding star formation histories in dwarf satellites.

  17. Study of the X-ray Source Population and the Dark Matter Halo in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxiess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Manami; Saeedi, Sara; Ducci, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The Local Group of galaxies consists of the large spiral galaxies Milky Way, M31, and M33, and a large number of dwarf galaxies. Most of the galaxies are dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, which are the least luminous galaxies with the largest mass-to-light ratios. In general, dSphs show no recent star formation, which means that they are ideal laboratories to study the old, pristine stellar populations formed in the earliest epochs of chemical enrichment of the Universe. Observations with today's X-ray telescopes have revealed X-ray sources in the fields of the dSphs that are satellites of our Milky Way. The study of X-ray source population in these galaxies and their X-ray luminosity function will help us to understand the source population in galaxies at the early stages of galaxy evolution. Moreover, the existence of X-ray binaries in these galaxies, if confirmed, would indicate that these galaxies are able to retain their compact objects, which are believed to obtain high kick-velocities at their birth in asymmetric supernova explosions. Therefore, the search for and the study of X-ray sources in dSph galaxies in the Local Group will enable us to constrain the mass of dark matter in these galaxies and test different models of the formation and growth of galaxies out of primordial dark-matter halos.I will discuss, how, owing to the large effective area, large field of view and high spatial and time resolution, Athena and its WFI will make it possible to obtain unprecedented observational data of the stellar populations in primordial galaxies and dark-matter halo distribution in our Local Group through the study of high-energy sources.

  18. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Supernovae-driven Gas Loss in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Ursa Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caproni, A.; Lanfranchi, G. A.; da Silva, A. Luiz; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2015-06-01

    As is usual in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, today the Local Group galaxy Ursa Minor is depleted of its gas content. How this galaxy lost its gas is still a matter of debate. To study the history of gas loss in Ursa Minor, we conducted the first three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of this object, assuming that the gas loss was driven by galactic winds powered only by type II supernovae (SNe II). The initial gas setup and supernova (SN) rates used in our simulations are mainly constrained by the inferred star formation history and the observed velocity dispersion of Ursa Minor. After 3 Gyr of evolution, we found that the gas removal efficiency is higher when the SN rate is increased, and also when the initial mean gas density is lowered. The derived mass-loss rates are systematically higher in the central regions (\\lt 300 pc), even though such a relationship has not been strictly linear in time and in terms of the galactic radius. The filamentary structures induced by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the concentric shells related to the acoustic waves driven by SNe can account for the inferred mass losses from the simulations. Our results suggest that SNe II are able to transfer most of the gas from the central region outward to the galactic halo. However, other physical mechanisms must be considered in order to completely remove the gas at larger radii.

  19. Search for Gamma-Ray Emission from DES Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Candidates with Fermi-LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drlica-Wagner, A.; Albert, A.; Bechtol, K.; Wood, M.; Strigari, L.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Baldini, L.; Essig, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Anderson, B.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E. D.; Caputo, R.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; de Angelis, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Kuss, M.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Morselli, A.; Ohsugi, T.; Orlando, E.; Persic, M.; Rainò, S.; Sehgal, N.; Spada, F.; Suson, D. J.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Balbinot, E.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Castander, F. J.; Covarrubias, R.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Cunha, C. E.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D.; Jeltema, T.; Kent, S.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Luque, E.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J.; Martini, P.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Peoples, J.; Petravick, D.; Pieres, A.; Plazas, A. A.; Queiroz, A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wester, W.; Williams, P.; Yanny, B.; Zuntz, J.; DES Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Due to their proximity, high dark-matter (DM) content, and apparent absence of non-thermal processes, Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) are excellent targets for the indirect detection of DM. Recently, eight new dSph candidates were discovered using the first year of data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We searched for gamma-ray emission coincident with the positions of these new objects in six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data. We found no significant excesses of gamma-ray emission. Under the assumption that the DES candidates are dSphs with DM halo properties similar to the known dSphs, we computed individual and combined limits on the velocity-averaged DM annihilation cross section for these new targets. If the estimated DM content of these dSph candidates is confirmed, they will constrain the annihilation cross section to lie below the thermal relic cross section for DM particles with masses ≲ 20 {GeV} annihilating via the b\\bar{b} or τ+τ- channels.

  20. Search for Gamma-Ray Emission from DES Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Candidates with Fermi-LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, A.; et al.

    2015-08-04

    Due to their proximity, high dark-matter (DM) content, and apparent absence of non-thermal processes, Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) are excellent targets for the indirect detection of DM. Recently, eight new dSph candidates were discovered using the first year of data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We searched for gamma-ray emission coincident with the positions of these new objects in six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data. We found no significant excesses of gamma-ray emission. Under the assumption that the DES candidates are dSphs with DM halo properties similar to the known dSphs, we computed individual and combined limits on the velocity-averaged DM annihilation cross section for these new targets. If the estimated DM content of these dSph candidates is confirmed, they will constrain the annihilation cross section to lie below the thermal relic cross section for DM particles with masses $\\lesssim 20\\,\\mathrm{GeV}$ annihilating via the $b\\bar{b}$ or τ(+)τ(-) channels.

  1. Life and death of a hero - lessons learned from modelling the dwarf spheroidal Hercules: an incorrect orbit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaña, M.; Fellhauer, M.; Smith, R.; Candlish, G. N.; Cohen, R.; Farias, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Hercules is a dwarf spheroidal satellite of the Milky Way, found at a distance of ≈138 kpc, and showing evidence of tidal disruption. It is very elongated and exhibits a velocity gradient of 16 ± 3 km s-1 kpc-1. Using these data a possible orbit of Hercules has previously been deduced in the literature. In this study, we make use of a novel approach to find a best-fitting model that follows the published orbit. Instead of using trial and error, we use a systematic approach in order to find a model that fits multiple observables simultaneously. As such, we investigate a much wider parameter range of initial conditions and ensure we have found the best match possible. Using a dark matter free progenitor that undergoes tidal disruption, our best-fitting model can simultaneously match the observed luminosity, central surface brightness, effective radius, velocity dispersion, and velocity gradient of Hercules. However, we find it is impossible to reproduce the observed elongation and the position angle of Hercules at the same time in our models. This failure persists even when we vary the duration of the simulation significantly, and consider a more cuspy density distribution for the progenitor. We discuss how this suggests that the published orbit of Hercules is very likely to be incorrect.

  2. Scl-1013644: a CEMP-s star in the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, C.; Da Costa, G. S.; Yong, D.; Norris, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of the Milky Way and its satellites have paid special attention to the importance of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars due to their involvement in Galactic formation history and their possible connection with the chemical elements originating in the first stellar generation. In an ongoing study of red giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy we have discovered a star with extremely strong CN and CH molecular bands. This star, Scl-1013644, has previously been identified by Geisler et al. (2005) as a star with an enrichment in the heavy elements. Spectrum synthesis has been used to derive the carbon, nitrogen and barium abundances for Scl-1013644. Our findings are [C/Fe] = +0.8, [N/Fe] = -0.3 and [Ba/Fe] = +2.1 with the latter result consistent with the value found by Geisler et al. (2005). These results reveal Scl-1013644 as a CEMP-s star, the third such star discovered in this dwarf galaxy.

  3. DRACO Flowpath Performance and Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, D. R.; McDonald, Jon

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Space Transportation (AST) project office has challenged NASA to design, manufacture, ground-test and flight-test an axisymmetric, hydrocarbon-fueled, flight-weight, ejector-ramjet engine system testbed no later than 2005. To accomplish this, a multi-center NASA team has been assembled. The goal of this team, led by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is to develop propulsion technologies that demonstrate rocket and airbreathing combined-cycle operation (DRACO). Current technical activities include flowpath conceptual design, engine systems conceptual design, and feasibility studies investigating the integration and operation of the DRACO engine with a Lockheed D-21B drone. This paper focuses on the activities of the Flowpath Systems Product Development Team (PDT), led by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC) and supported by NASA-MSFC and TechLand Research, Inc. The objective of the Flowpath PDT at the start of the DRACO program was to establish a conceptual design of the flowpath aerodynamic lines, determine the preliminary performance, define the internal environments, and support the DRACO testbed concept feasibility studies. To accomplish these tasks, the PDT convened to establish a baseline flowpath concept. With the conceptual lines defined, cycle analysis tasks were planned and the flowpath performance and internal environments were defined. Additionally, sensitivity studies investigating the effects of inlet reference area, combustion performance, and combustor/nozzle materials selection were performed to support the Flowpath PDT design process. Results of these tasks are the emphasis of this paper and are intended to verify the feasibility of the DRACO flowpath and engine system as well as identify the primary technical challenges inherent in the flight-weight design of an advanced propulsion technology demonstration engine. Preliminary cycle performance decks were developed to support the testbed concept feasibility studies but are not

  4. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  5. Estimating the evolution of gas in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy from its star formation history: an illustrative example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Qian, Y.-Z.; Jing, Y. P.

    2016-03-01

    We propose that detailed data on the star formation history of a dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) may be used to estimate the evolution of the total mass Mg(t) for cold gas in its star-forming disc. Using Fornax as an illustrative example, we estimate its Mg(t) and the corresponding net gas flow rate ΔF(t) assuming a global star formation rate ψ(t) = λ*(t)[Mg(t)/M⊙]α consistent with observations of nearby galaxies. We identify the onset of the transition in ΔF(t) from a net inflow to a net outflow as the time tsat at which the Fornax halo became a Milky Way satellite and estimate the evolution of its total mass Mh(t) at t < tsat using the median halo growth history in the current cosmology and its present mass within the half-light radius derived from observations. We examine three different cases of α = 1, 1.5, and 2, and justify the corresponding λ*(t) by comparing the gas mass fraction fg(t) = Mg(t)/Mh(t) at t < tsat with results from simulations of gas accretion by haloes in a reionized universe. We find that the Fornax halo grew to Mh(tsat) ˜ 2 × 109 M⊙ at tsat ˜ 5 or 8 Gyr, in broad agreement with previous studies using data on its stellar kinematics and its orbital motion. We describe qualitatively the evolution of Fornax as a satellite and discuss potential extension of our approach to other dSphs.

  6. A discrete chemo-dynamical model of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor: mass profile, velocity anisotropy and internal rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; van de Ven, Glenn; Watkins, Laura L.; Posti, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    We present a new discrete chemo-dynamical axisymmetric modeling technique, which we apply to the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor. The major improvement over previous Jeans models is that realistic chemical distributions are included directly in the dynamical modelling of the discrete data. This avoids loss of information due to spatial binning and eliminates the need for hard cuts to remove contaminants and to separate stars based on their chemical properties. Using a combined likelihood in position, metallicity and kinematics, we find that our models naturally separate Sculptor stars into a metal-rich and a metal-poor population. Allowing for non-spherical symmetry, our approach provides a central slope of the dark matter density of γ = 0.5 ± 0.3. The metal-rich population is nearly isotropic (with β _r^{red} = 0.0± 0.1) while the metal-poor population is tangentially anisotropic (with β _r^{blue} = -0.2± 0.1) around the half light radius of 0.26 kpc. A weak internal rotation of the metal-rich population is revealed with vmax/σ0 = 0.15 ± 0.15. We run tests using mock data to show that a discrete dataset with ˜6000 stars is required to distinguish between a core (γ = 0) and cusp (γ = 1), and to constrain the possible internal rotation to better than 1 σ confidence with our model. We conclude that our discrete chemo-dynamical modelling technique provides a flexible and powerful tool to robustly constrain the internal dynamics of multiple populations, and the total mass distribution in a stellar system.

  7. Searching for dwarf spheroidal galaxies and other galactic dark matter substructures with the Fermi large area telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex

    2013-08-01

    Over the past century, it has become clear that about a quarter of the known universe is composed of an invisible, massive component termed ''dark matter''. Some of the most popular theories of physics beyond the Standard Model suggest that dark matter may be a new fundamental particle that could self-annihilate to produce γ rays. Nearby over-densities in the dark matter halo of our Milky Way present some of the most promising targets for detecting the annihilation of dark matter. We used the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for γ rays produced by dark matter annihilation in Galactic dark matter substructures. We searched for γ-ray emission coincident with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies, which trace the most massive Galactic dark matter substructures. We also sought to identify nearby dark matter substructures that lack all astrophysical tracers and would be detectable only through γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation. We found no conclusive evidence for γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and we set stringent and robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. While γ-ray searches for dark matter substructure are currently the most sensitive and robust probes of dark matter annihilation, they are just beginning to intersect the theoretically preferred region of dark matter parameter space. Thus, we consider future prospects for increasing the sensitivity of γ-ray searches through improvements to the LAT instrument performance and through upcoming wide- field optical surveys.

  8. Discovery of Super-Li-rich Red Giants in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Deng, Licai

    2012-06-01

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the 7Li(p, α)4He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants—14 of which are new discoveries—among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] <~ -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li)NLTE = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. Magellan/M2FS Spectroscopy of the Reticulum 2 Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Bailey, John I., III; Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-08-01

    We present results from spectroscopic observations with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) of 182 stellar targets along the line of sight (LOS) to the newly discovered “ultrafaint” object Reticulum 2 (Ret 2). For 37 of these targets, the spectra are sufficient to provide simultaneous estimates of LOS velocity ({v}{los}, median random error {δ }{v{los}}=1.4 km s‑1), effective temperature ({T}{eff}, {δ }{T{eff}}=478 K), surface gravity ({log}g, {δ }{logg}=0.63 dex), and iron abundance ([{Fe}/{{H}}], {δ }[{Fe/{{H}}]}=0.47 dex). We use these results to confirm 17 stars as members of Ret 2. From the member sample we estimate a velocity dispersion of {σ }{v{los}}= {3.6}-0.7+1.0 km s‑1 about a mean of < {v}{los}> = {64.3}-1.2+1.2 km s‑1 in the solar rest frame (∼ -90.9 km s‑1 in the Galactic rest frame), and a metallicity dispersion of {σ }[{Fe/{{H}}]} = {0.49}-0.14+0.19 dex about a mean of < [{Fe}/{{H}}]> = -{2.58}-0.33+0.34. These estimates marginalize over possible velocity and metallicity gradients, which are consistent with zero. Our results place Ret 2 on chemodynamical scaling relations followed by the Milky Way’s dwarf-galactic satellites. Under assumptions of dynamic equilibrium and negligible contamination from binary stars—both of which must be checked with deeper imaging and repeat spectroscopic observations—the estimated velocity dispersion suggests a dynamical mass of M({R}{{h}})≈ 5{R}{{h}}{σ }{v{los}}{}2/(2G) = {2.4}-0.8+1.4× {10}5 {M}ȯ enclosed within projected halflight radius {R}{{h}}∼ 32 pc, with mass-to-light ratio ≈ 2M({R}{{h}})/{L}V = {467}-168+286 in solar units. This paper presents data gathered with the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  10. A photometric study of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Leo IV and Bootes II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haw

    A photometric study of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies Leo IV and Bootes II in the V and IC filters is here presented. The age of Leo IV relative to M92 were derived by fitting of Dartmouth isochrones, by a "standard" VHBTO method, and by the V HBTO method of VandenBerg et al. 2013. The age of Bootes II relative to M92 was derived by fitting of Dartmouth isochrones. Leo IV is found to be between 2 to 2.5 Gyr younger than M92 by these three methods. It is found to be predominantly old and metal poor and is well fit by isochrones of [Fe/H] = ---2.46 and [alpha/Fe] = 0.2 and 0.4. An age spread with a plausible value of ˜ 2 Gyr cannot be ruled out. A 10 Gyr old synthetic horizontal branch with [Fe/H] = ---1.70 and [alpha/Fe] of 0.2 is fit to Leo IV's red horizontal branch (RHB). The good fit of this model and its matching isochrone to Leo IV's CMD suggests that the RHB is real and not an observational artifact as proposed by Okamoto et al. 2012. Two RRab Lyraes previously observed by Moretti et al. 2009 were observed in Leo IV. One of the stars, V1, is observed to exhibit the Blazhko effect. No further RR Lyraes were uncovered in Leo IV. Comparison of the horizontal branch's observed V magnitude to the absolute magnitudes of the RR Lyraes yields a distance modulus of (m---M)0 = 21.01 +/- 0.07, in good agreement with previous studies. Leo IV's possible population of blue stragglers is found to show no signs of central concentration, though this study's sample and spatial coverage are too small for any detailed spatial distribution study. Bootes II's CMD is found to be consistent with that of a single age, mono-metallicity system. It is well fit by isochrones of [Fe/H] = ---1.79 and [alpha/Fe] = 0.2 and 0.4. Bootes II is found to be between 0.5 to 1.5 Gyr younger than M92. Distance was left as a free parameter in the fits. Bootes II is found to have distance modulus (m---M)0 lying between 18.02 to 18.15, in good agreement with previous studies. A single RRab Lyrae

  11. VARIABLE STARS IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY URSA MAJOR I

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Alessia; Moretti, Maria Ida; Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Coppola, Giuseppina; Musella, Ilaria; Marconi, Marcella E-mail: fcusano@na.astro.it E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it E-mail: imoretti@na.astro.it E-mail: ilaria@na.astro.it

    2013-04-10

    We have performed the first study of the variable star population of Ursa Major I (UMa I), an ultra-faint dwarf satellite recently discovered around the Milky Way (MW) by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Combining time series observations in the B and V bands from four different telescopes, we have identified seven RR Lyrae stars in UMa I, of which five are fundamental-mode (RRab) and two are first-overtone pulsators (RRc). Our V, B - V color-magnitude diagram of UMa I reaches V {approx} 23 mag (at a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}6) and shows features typical of a single old stellar population. The mean pulsation period of the RRab stars (P{sub ab}) = 0.628, {sigma} = 0.071 days (or (P{sub ab}) = 0.599, {sigma} = 0.032 days, if V4, the longest period and brightest variable, is discarded) and the position on the period-amplitude diagram suggest an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the galaxy. The RR Lyrae stars trace the galaxy horizontal branch (HB) at an average apparent magnitude of (V(RR)) = 20.43 {+-} 0.02 mag (average on six stars and discarding V4), giving in turn a distance modulus for UMa I of (m - M){sub 0} = 19.94 {+-} 0.13 mag, distance d = 97.3{sup +6.0}{sub -5.7} kpc, in the scale where the distance modulus of the Large Magellanic Cloud is 18.5 {+-} 0.1 mag. Isodensity contours of UMa I red giants and HB stars (including the RR Lyrae stars identified in this study) show that the galaxy has an S-shaped structure, which is likely caused by the tidal interaction with the MW. Photometric metallicities were derived for six of the UMa I RR Lyrae stars from the parameters of the Fourier decomposition of the V-band light curves, leading to an average metal abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.29 dex ({sigma} = 0.06 dex, average on six stars) on the Carretta et al. metallicity scale.

  12. Magellan/M2FS Spectroscopy of the Reticulum 2 Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Bailey, John I., III; Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-08-01

    We present results from spectroscopic observations with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) of 182 stellar targets along the line of sight (LOS) to the newly discovered “ultrafaint” object Reticulum 2 (Ret 2). For 37 of these targets, the spectra are sufficient to provide simultaneous estimates of LOS velocity ({v}{los}, median random error {δ }{v{los}}=1.4 km s-1), effective temperature ({T}{eff}, {δ }{T{eff}}=478 K), surface gravity ({log}g, {δ }{logg}=0.63 dex), and iron abundance ([{Fe}/{{H}}], {δ }[{Fe/{{H}}]}=0.47 dex). We use these results to confirm 17 stars as members of Ret 2. From the member sample we estimate a velocity dispersion of {σ }{v{los}}= {3.6}-0.7+1.0 km s-1 about a mean of < {v}{los}> = {64.3}-1.2+1.2 km s-1 in the solar rest frame (˜ -90.9 km s-1 in the Galactic rest frame), and a metallicity dispersion of {σ }[{Fe/{{H}}]} = {0.49}-0.14+0.19 dex about a mean of < [{Fe}/{{H}}]> = -{2.58}-0.33+0.34. These estimates marginalize over possible velocity and metallicity gradients, which are consistent with zero. Our results place Ret 2 on chemodynamical scaling relations followed by the Milky Way’s dwarf-galactic satellites. Under assumptions of dynamic equilibrium and negligible contamination from binary stars—both of which must be checked with deeper imaging and repeat spectroscopic observations—the estimated velocity dispersion suggests a dynamical mass of M({R}{{h}})≈ 5{R}{{h}}{σ }{v{los}}{}2/(2G) = {2.4}-0.8+1.4× {10}5 {M}⊙ enclosed within projected halflight radius {R}{{h}}˜ 32 pc, with mass-to-light ratio ≈ 2M({R}{{h}})/{L}V = {467}-168+286 in solar units. This paper presents data gathered with the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Clean Kinematic Samples in Dwarf Spheroidals: An Algorithm for Evaluating Membership and Estimating Distribution Parameters When Contamination is Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sen, Bodhisattva; Woodroofe, Michael

    2009-02-01

    We develop an algorithm for estimating parameters of a distribution sampled with contamination. We employ a statistical technique known as "expectation maximization" (EM). Given models for both member and contaminant populations, the EM algorithm iteratively evaluates the membership probability of each discrete data point, then uses those probabilities to update parameter estimates for member and contaminant distributions. The EM approach has wide applicability to the analysis of astronomical data. Here we tailor an EM algorithm to operate on spectroscopic samples obtained with the Michigan-MIKE Fiber System (MMFS) as part of our Magellan survey of stellar radial velocities in nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. These samples, to be presented in a companion paper, contain discrete measurements of line-of-sight velocity, projected position, and pseudo-equivalent width of the Mg-triplet feature, for ~1000-2500 stars per dSph, including some fraction of contamination by foreground Milky Way stars. The EM algorithm uses all of the available data to quantify dSph and contaminant distributions. For distributions (e.g., velocity and Mg-index of dSph stars) assumed to be Gaussian, the EM algorithm returns maximum-likelihood estimates of the mean and variance, as well as the probability that each star is a dSph member. These probabilities can serve as weights in subsequent analyses. Applied to our MMFS data, the EM algorithm identifies more than 5000 stars as probable dSph members. We test the performance of the EM algorithm on simulated data sets that represent a range of sample size, level of contamination, and amount of overlap between dSph and contaminant velocity distributions. The simulations establish that for samples ranging from large (N ~ 3000, characteristic of the MMFS samples) to small (N ~ 30), resembling new samples for extremely faint dSphs), the EM algorithm distinguishes members from contaminants and returns accurate parameter estimates much more

  14. BOO-1137-AN EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STAR IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY BOOeTES I

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2010-03-01

    We present high-resolution (R {approx} 40,000), high-signal-to-noise ratio (20-90) spectra of an extremely metal-poor giant star Boo-1137 in the 'ultra-faint' dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Booetes I, absolute magnitude M{sub V} {approx} -6.3. We derive an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.7, making this the most metal-poor star as yet identified in an ultra-faint dSph. Our derived effective temperature and gravity are consistent with its identification as a red giant in Booetes I. Abundances for a further 15 elements have also been determined. Comparison of the relative abundances, [X/Fe], with those of the extremely metal-poor red giants of the Galactic halo shows that Boo-1137 is 'normal' with respect to C and N, the odd-Z elements Na and Al, the iron-peak elements, and the neutron-capture elements Sr and Ba, in comparison with the bulk of the Milky Way halo population having [Fe/H] {approx}<-3.0. The alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti are all higher by DELTA[X/Fe] {approx} 0.2 than the average halo values. Monte Carlo analysis indicates that DELTA[alpha/Fe] values this large are expected with a probability {approx}0.02. The elemental abundance pattern in Boo-1137 suggests inhomogeneous chemical evolution, consistent with the wide internal spread in iron abundances we previously reported. The similarity of most of the Boo-1137 relative abundances with respect to halo values, and the fact that the alpha-elements are all offset by a similar small amount from the halo averages, points to the same underlying galaxy-scale stellar initial mass function, but that Boo-1137 likely originated in a star-forming region where the abundances reflect either poor mixing of supernova (SN) ejecta, or poor sampling of the SN progenitor mass range, or both.

  15. Insights from the outskirts: Chemical and dynamical properties in the outer parts of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Koch, Andreas; Walker, Matthew; Johnson, Christian I.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gilmore, Gerard

    2014-12-01

    We present radial velocities and [Fe/H] abundances for 340 stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal from R ~ 16 000 spectra. The targets were obtained in the outer parts of the galaxy, a region that has been poorly studied. Our sample shows a wide range in [Fe/H], between -0.5 and -3.0 dex, in which we detect three subgroups. Removal of stars belonging to the most metal-rich population produces a truncated metallicity distribution function that is identical to Sculptor, indicating that these systems shared a similar early evolution, except that Fornax experienced a late, intense period of star formation (SF). The derived age-metallicity relation shows a fast increase in [Fe/H] at early ages, after which the enrichment flattens significantly for stars younger than ~ 8 Gyr. Additionally, the data indicate a strong population of stars around 4 Gyr, followed by a second rapid enrichment in [Fe/H]. A leaky-box chemical enrichment model generally matches the observed relation but predicts neither a significant population of young stars nor strong enrichment at late times. The young population in Fornax may therefore stem from an externally triggered SF event. Our dynamical analysis reveals an increasing velocity dispersion with decreasing [Fe/H] from σsys ≈ 7.5 km s-1 to ≥ 14 km s-1. The large velocity dispersion at low metallicities is possibly the result of a non-Gaussian velocity distribution among stars older than ~ 8 Gyr. Our sample also includes members from the Fornax globular clusters H2 and H5. In agreement with past studies we find [Fe/H] = -2.04 ± 0.04 and a mean radial velocity RV = 59.36 ± 0.31 km s-1 for H2 and [Fe/H] = -2.02 ± 0.11 and RV = 59.39 ± 0.44 km s-1 for H5. Finally, we test different calibrations of the calcium triplet over more than 2 dex in [Fe/H] and find best agreement with the calibration equations provided by Carrera et al. (2013, MNRAS, 434, 1681). Overall, we find high complexity in the chemical and dynamical properties, with

  16. Searching for Dark Matter signatures in dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the ASTRI mini-array in the framework of Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammaria, P.; Lombardi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Brocato, E.; Bigongiari, C.; Di Pierro, F.; Stamerra, A.; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium, the

    2016-07-01

    The nature of Dark Matter (DM) is an open issue of modern physics. Cosmological considerations and observational evidences indicate a behaviour beyond the Standard Model for feasible DM particle candidates. Non-baryonic DM is compatible with cold and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) expected to have a mass in the range between ∼10 GeV and ∼100 TeV. Indirect DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes may play a crucial role in constraining the nature of the DM particle(s) through the study of their annihilation in very high energy (VHE) gamma rays from promising targets, such as the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way. Here, we focus on indirect DM searches in dSphs, presenting the preliminary prospects of this research beyond the TeV mass region achievable with the ASTRI mini-array, proposed to be installed at the Cherenkov Telescope Array southern site.

  17. Searching for dark matter annihilation from Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies with six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.

    2015-11-30

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. As a result, these constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100 GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels.

  18. Searching for dark matter annihilation from Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies with six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ackermann, M.

    2015-11-30

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. As a result, these constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DMmore » of mass ≲100 GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels.« less

  19. A New View of the Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites of the Milky Way From VLT/FLAMES: Where are the Very Metal Poor Stars?

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, Amina; Irwin, M.J.; Tolstoy, E.; Battaglia, G.; Hill, V.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Arimoto, N.; Abel, T.; Francois, P.; Kaufer, A.; Primas, F.; Sadakane, K.; Szeifert, T.; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. /Meudon Observ. /LASTRO Observ. /Victoria U. /Texas U., McDonald Observ. /Tokyo, Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /European Southern Obs., Chile /European Southern Observ. /Osaka Kyoiku U.

    2006-11-20

    As part of the Dwarf galaxies Abundances and Radial-velocities Team (DART) Programme, we have measured the metallicities of a large sample of stars in four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph): Sculptor, Sextans, Fornax and Carina. The low mean metal abundances and the presence of very old stellar populations in these galaxies have supported the view that they are fossils from the early Universe. However, contrary to naive expectations, we find a significant lack of stars with metallicities below [Fe/H] {approx} -3 dex in all four systems. This suggests that the gas that made up the stars in these systems had been uniformly enriched prior to their formation. Furthermore, the metal-poor tail of the dSph metallicity distribution is significantly different from that of the Galactic halo. These findings show that the progenitors of nearby dSph appear to have been fundamentally different from the building blocks of the Milky Way, even at the earliest epochs.

  20. Chemical compositions of six metal-poor stars in the ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxy Boötes I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, M. N.; Aoki, W.; Arimoto, N.; Okamoto, S.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies recently discovered around the Milky Way (MW) contain extremely metal-poor stars, and might represent the building blocks of low-metallicity components of the MW. Among them, the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy is of particular interest because of its exclusively old stellar population. Detailed chemical compositions of individual stars in this galaxy are a key to understanding formation and chemical evolution in the oldest galaxies in the Universe and their roles in building up the MW halo. Aims: Previous studies of the chemical abundances of Boötes I show discrepancies in elemental abundances between different authors, and thus a consistent picture of its chemical enrichment history has not yet been established. In the present work, we independently determine chemical compositions of six red giant stars in Boötes I, some of which overlap with those analyzed in the previous studies. Based on the derived abundances, we re-examine trends and scatters in elemental abundances and make comparisons with MW field halo stars and other dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the MW. Methods: High-resolution spectra of a sample of stars were obtained with the High Dispersion Spectrograph mounted on the Subaru Telescope. Abundances of 12 elements, including C, Na, α, Fe-peak, and neutron capture elements, were determined for the sample stars. The abundance results were compared to those in field MW halo stars previously obtained using an abundance analysis technique similar to the present study. Results: We confirm the low metallicity of Boo-094 ([Fe/H] = -3.4). Except for this star, the abundance ratios ([X/Fe]) of elements lighter than zinc are generally homogeneous with small scatter around the mean values in the metallicities spanned by the other five stars (-2.7 < [Fe/H] < -1.8). Specifically, all of the sample stars with [Fe/H] > -2.7 show no significant enhancement of carbon. The [Mg/Fe] and [Ca/Fe] ratios are almost constant with a

  1. LAMOST 1: A Disrupted Satellite in the Constellation Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, John J.; Smith, Martin C.; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Using Large Sky Area Multi-object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectroscopic data, we find a strong signal of a comoving group of stars in the constellation of Draco. The group, observed near the apocenter of its orbit, is 2.6 kpc from the Sun with a metallicity of -0.64 dex. The system is observed as a streaming population of unknown provenance with mass of about 2.1+/- 0.4\\cdot {10}4 {M}⊙ and brightness of about {M}V˜ -3.6. Its high metallicity, diffuse physical structure, and eccentric orbit may indicate that the progenitor satellite was a globular cluster rather than a dwarf galaxy or an open cluster.

  2. The Metamorphosis of Tidally Stirred Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio; Governato, Fabio; Colpi, Monica; Moore, Ben; Quinn, Thomas; Wadsley, James; Stadel, Joachim; Lake, George

    2001-10-01

    We present results from high-resolution N-body/SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamic) simulations of rotationally supported dwarf irregular galaxies moving on bound orbits in the massive dark matter halo of the Milky Way. The dwarf models span a range in disk surface density and the masses and sizes of their dark halos are consistent with the predictions of cold dark matter cosmogonies. We show that the strong tidal field of the Milky Way determines severe mass loss in their halos and disks and induces bar and bending instabilities that transform low surface brightness dwarfs (LSBs) into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and high surface brightness dwarfs (HSBs) into dwarf ellipticals (dEs) in less than 10 Gyr. The final central velocity dispersions of the remnants are in the range 8-30 km s-1 and their final v/σ falls to values less than 0.5, matching well the kinematics of early-type dwarfs. The transformation requires the orbital time of the dwarf to be <~3-4 Gyr, which implies a halo as massive and extended as predicted by hierarchical models of galaxy formation to explain the origin of even the farthest dSph satellites of the Milky Way, Leo I, and Leo II. We show that only dwarfs with central dark matter densities as high as those of Draco and Ursa Minor can survive for 10 Gyr in the proximity of the Milky Way. A correlation between the central density and the distance of the dwarfs from the primary galaxy is indeed expected in hierarchical models, in which the densest objects should have small orbital times because of their early formation epochs. Part of the gas is stripped and part is funneled to the center because of the bar, generating one strong burst of star formation in HSBs and smaller, multiple bursts in LSBs. Therefore, the large variety of star formation histories observed in Local Group dSphs arises because different types of dIrr progenitors respond differently to the external perturbation of the Milky Way. Our evolutionary model naturally explains the

  3. Sagittarius II, Draco II and Laevens 3: Three New Milky Way Satellites Discovered in the Pan-STARRS 1 3 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Slater, Colin T.; Sweeney, William E.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Huxor, Avon P.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Hodapp, Klaus A.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    We present the discovery of three new Milky Way satellites from our search for compact stellar overdensities in the photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1, or PS1) 3π survey. The first satellite, Laevens 3, is located at a heliocentric distance of d = 67 ± 3 kpc. With a total magnitude of MV = ‑4.4 ± 0.3 and a half-light radius of rh = 7 ± 2 pc, its properties resemble those of outer halo globular clusters. The second system, Draco II/Laevens 4, is a closer and fainter satellite (d ∼ 20 kpc, MV = ‑2.9 ± 0.8), whose uncertain size ({r}h={19}-6+8 {pc}) renders its classification difficult without kinematic information; it could either be a faint and extended globular cluster or a faint and compact dwarf galaxy. The third satellite, Sagittarius II/Laevens 5 (Sgr II), has an ambiguous nature, as it is either the most compact dwarf galaxy or the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range ({r}h={37}-8+9 {pc} and MV = ‑5.2 ± 0.4). At a heliocentric distance of 67 ± 5 kpc, this satellite lies intriguingly close to the expected location of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream behind the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph). If confirmed through spectroscopic follow up, this connection would locate this part of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream that has so far gone undetected. It would further suggest that Sgr II was brought into the Milky Way halo as a satellite of the Sgr dSph.

  4. Measuring Detailed Chemical Abundances from Co-added Medium-resolution Spectra. I. Tests Using Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies and Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Cheng, Lucy

    2013-05-01

    The ability to measure metallicities and α-element abundances in individual red giant branch (RGB) stars using medium-resolution spectra (R ≈ 6000) is a valuable tool for deciphering the nature of Milky Way dwarf satellites and the history of the Galactic halo. Extending such studies to more distant systems like Andromeda is beyond the ability of the current generation of telescopes, but by co-adding the spectra of similar stars, we can attain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to make detailed abundance measurements. In this paper, we present a method to determine metallicities and α-element abundances using the co-addition of medium-resolution spectra. We test the method of spectral co-addition using high-S/N spectra of more than 1300 RGB stars from Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies obtained with the Keck II telescope/DEIMOS spectrograph. We group similar stars using photometric criteria and compare the weighted ensemble average abundances ([Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) of individual stars in each group with the measurements made on the corresponding co-added spectrum. We find a high level of agreement between the two methods, which permits us to apply this co-added spectra technique to more distant RGB stars, like stars in the M31 satellite galaxies. This paper outlines our spectral co-addition and abundance measurement methodology and describes the potential biases in making these measurements. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. MEASURING DETAILED CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES FROM CO-ADDED MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. I. TESTS USING MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Lei; Peng, Eric W.; Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2013-05-01

    The ability to measure metallicities and {alpha}-element abundances in individual red giant branch (RGB) stars using medium-resolution spectra (R Almost-Equal-To 6000) is a valuable tool for deciphering the nature of Milky Way dwarf satellites and the history of the Galactic halo. Extending such studies to more distant systems like Andromeda is beyond the ability of the current generation of telescopes, but by co-adding the spectra of similar stars, we can attain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to make detailed abundance measurements. In this paper, we present a method to determine metallicities and {alpha}-element abundances using the co-addition of medium-resolution spectra. We test the method of spectral co-addition using high-S/N spectra of more than 1300 RGB stars from Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies obtained with the Keck II telescope/DEIMOS spectrograph. We group similar stars using photometric criteria and compare the weighted ensemble average abundances ([Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) of individual stars in each group with the measurements made on the corresponding co-added spectrum. We find a high level of agreement between the two methods, which permits us to apply this co-added spectra technique to more distant RGB stars, like stars in the M31 satellite galaxies. This paper outlines our spectral co-addition and abundance measurement methodology and describes the potential biases in making these measurements.

  6. THE [Fe/H], [C/Fe], AND [{alpha}/Fe] DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, David K.; Bolte, Michael; Rockosi, Constance M.; Lucatello, Sara; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Sivarani, Thirupathi E-mail: bolte@ucolick.org E-mail: lee@pa.msu.edu E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: sivarani@iiap.res.in

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of a low-resolution spectral abundance study of 25 stars in the Booetes I dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. The data were obtained with the low resolution imaging spectrometer instrument at Keck Observatory and allow us to measure [Fe/H], [C/Fe], and [{alpha}/Fe] for each star. We find both a large spread in metallicity (2.1 dex in [Fe/H]) as well as a low average metallicity in this system, ([Fe/H]) = -2.59, matching previous estimates. This sample includes a newly discovered extremely metal-poor star, with [Fe/H] = -3.8, that is one of the most metal-poor stars yet found in a dSph. We compare the metallicity distribution function of Booetes I to analytic chemical evolution models. While the metallicity distribution function of Booetes I is best fit by an Extra Gas chemical evolution model, leaky-box models also provide reasonable fits. We also find that the [{alpha}/Fe] distribution and the carbon-enhanced metal-poor fraction of our sample (12%) are reasonable matches to Galactic halo star samples in the same metallicity range, indicating that at these low metallicities, systems like the Booetes I ultra-faint dSph could have been contributors to the Galactic halo.

  7. Search for gamma-ray emission from eight dwarf spheroidal galaxy candidates discovered in year two of Dark Energy Survey with Fermi-LAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shang; Liang, Yun-Feng; Duan, Kai-Kai; Shen, Zhao-Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Li, Xiang; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Liao, Neng-Hui; Feng, Lei; Chang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    Very recently the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Collaboration has released their second group of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy candidates. With the publicly available Pass 8 data of Fermi-LAT we search for γ -ray emissions from the directions of these eight newly discovered dSph galaxy candidates. No statistically significant γ -ray signal has been found in the combined analysis of these sources. With the empirically estimated J-factors of these sources, the constraint on the annihilation channel of χ χ →τ+τ- is comparable to the bound set by the joint analysis of fifteen previously known dSphs with kinematically constrained J-factors for the dark matter mass mχ>250 GeV . In the direction of Tucana III (DES J2356-5935), one of the nearest dSph galaxy candidates that is ˜25 kpc away, there is a weak γ -ray signal and its peak test statistic (TS) value for the dark matter annihilation channel χ χ →τ+τ-1 is ≈6.7 at mχ˜15 GeV . The significance of the possible signal likely increases with time. More data is highly needed to pin down the physical origin of such a GeV excess.

  8. THE ACS SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. XI. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL ORIENTATION OF THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY AND ITS GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Majewski, Steven R.; Law, David R.; and others

    2011-12-10

    We use observations from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) study of Galactic globular clusters to investigate the spatial distribution of the inner regions of the disrupting Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr). We combine previously published analyses of four Sgr member clusters located near or in the Sgr core (M54, Arp 2, Terzan 7, and Terzan 8) with a new analysis of diffuse Sgr material identified in the background of five low-latitude Galactic bulge clusters (NGC 6624, 6637, 6652, 6681, and 6809) observed as part of the ACS survey. By comparing the bulge cluster color-magnitude diagrams to our previous analysis of the M54/Sgr core, we estimate distances to these background features. The combined data from four Sgr member clusters and five Sgr background features provide nine independent measures of the Sgr distance and, as a group, provide uniformly measured and calibrated probes of different parts of the inner regions of Sgr spanning 20 Degree-Sign over the face of the disrupting dwarf. This allows us, for the first time, to constrain the three-dimensional orientation of Sgr's disrupting core and globular cluster system and compare that orientation to the predictions of an N-body model of tidal disruption. The density and distance of Sgr debris are consistent with models that favor a relatively high Sgr core mass and a slightly greater distance (28-30 kpc, with a mean of 29.4 kpc). Our analysis also suggests that M54 is in the foreground of Sgr by {approx}2 kpc, projected on the center of the Sgr dSph. While this would imply a remarkable alignment of the cluster and the Sgr nucleus along the line of sight, we cannot identify any systematic effect in our analysis that would falsely create the measured 2 kpc separation. Finally, we find that the cluster Terzan 7 has the most discrepant distance (25 kpc) among the four Sgr core clusters, which may suggest a different dynamical history than the other Sgr core clusters.

  9. Binary populations in Milky Way satellite galaxies: Constraints from multi-epoch data in the Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Quinn E.

    2013-12-20

    We introduce a likelihood analysis of multi-epoch stellar line-of-sight velocities to constrain the binary fractions and binary period distributions of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This method is applied to multi-epoch data from the Magellan/MMFS survey of the Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSph galaxies, after applying a model for the measurement errors that accounts for binary orbital motion. We find that the Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSphs are consistent with having binary populations similar to that of Milky Way field binaries to within 68% confidence limits, whereas the Carina dSph is remarkably deficient in binaries with periods less than ∼10 yr. If Carina is assumed to have a period distribution identical to that of the Milky Way field, its best-fit binary fraction is 0.14{sub −0.05}{sup +0.28}, and is constrained to be less than 0.5 at the 90% confidence level; thus it is unlikely to host a binary population identical to that of the Milky Way field. By contrast, the best-fit binary fraction of the combined sample of all four galaxies is 0.46{sub −0.09}{sup +0.13}, consistent with that of Milky Way field binaries. More generally, we infer probability distributions in binary fraction, mean orbital period, and dispersion of periods for each galaxy in the sample. Looking ahead to future surveys, we show that the allowed parameter space of binary fraction and period distribution parameters in dSphs will be narrowed significantly by a large multi-epoch survey. However, there is a degeneracy between the parameters that is unlikely to be broken unless the measurement error is of order ∼0.1 km s{sup –1} or smaller, presently attainable only by a high-resolution spectrograph.

  10. Dark subhalo accretion onto dwarf galaxies in CDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Chervin Fabien Pierre; Penarrubia, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Baryonic feedback at high redshifts has been proposed to explain the inference of dark matter (DM) cores in low-surface brightness and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. However, in the currently favoured cosmological model, structure grows hierarchically and CDM predicts a myriad of small substructures orbiting dwarf galaxies, some luminous (which habe been observationally identified in recent years), some dark. If such dark subhalos get close enough to the centre of cored dwarfs, they could potentially lead to cusp regrowth.In this talk, I will present the evolution of the DM profiles of dwarf galaxies driven by the accretion of DM substructures through controlled N-body experiments. The initial conditions assume that supernova feedback erases the primordial DM cusps at high redshift of halos with final masses $10^{9}-10^{10} \\rm{M_{\\odot}}$ by z=0. The orbits and masses of the infalling substructures are borrowed from the {\\it Aquarius} cosmological simulations. I will show that some halos that undergo 1:3 down to 1:30 mergers are susceptible to reform a DM cusp by $z\\approx 0$ and how this depends on the internal structure of the infalling substructures. I will show that within CDM a non-negligible level of scatter in the mass profiles of dwarfs is to be expected given their stochastic mass accretion histories and their diverse (observed) star formation histories and that this effect could possibly explain the existence of dense dwarfs like Draco, Ursa Minor or Tucana. I will argue how this process is unique to CDM and may be falsifiable. If time allows, I will show preliminary results from suites of cosmological N-body simulations designed to address the statistics of this effect.

  11. Limits on the significant mass-loss scenario based on the globular clusters of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaj, P.; Baumgardt, H.

    2016-03-01

    Many of the scenarios proposed to explain the origin of chemically peculiar stars in globular clusters (GCs) require significant mass loss (≥95 per cent) to explain the observed fraction of such stars. In the GCs of the Fornax dwarf galaxy, significant mass loss could be a problem. Larsen et al. showed that there is a large ratio of GCs to metal-poor field stars in Fornax and about 20-25 per cent of all the stars with [Fe/H] < -2 belong to the four metal-poor GCs. This imposes an upper limit of ˜80 per cent mass loss that could have happened in Fornax GCs. In this paper, we propose a solution to this problem by suggesting that stars can leave the Fornax galaxy. We use a series of N-body simulations to determine the limit of mass loss from Fornax as a function of the initial orbital radii of GCs and the speed with which stars leave Fornax GCs. We consider a set of cored and cuspy density profiles for Fornax. Our results show that with a cuspy model for Fornax, the fraction of stars that leave the galaxy can be as high as ˜90 per cent, when the initial orbital radii of GCs are R = 2-3 kpc and the initial speed of stars is v > 20 km s-1. We show that such large velocities can be achieved by mass loss induced by gas expulsion but not mass loss induced by stellar evolution. Our results imply that one cannot interpret the metallicity distribution of Fornax field stars as evidence against significant mass loss in Fornax GCs, if mass loss is due to gas expulsion.

  12. Phytochemical and anti-staphylococcal biofilm assessment of Dracaena draco L. Spp. draco resin

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, V. Di; Pitonzo, R.; Schillaci, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dracaena draco L. ssp. draco is known as the “dragon's blood tree” and it is endemic from the Canary Islands and Morocco. Objective: Carry out phytochemical investigation of acetonic extracts of red resin obtained from the trunk of D. draco, to obtain to the isolation of the most abundant resin constituents, belonging to the class of flavonoids: flavans, along with homoisoflavans and homoisoflavanones. Materials and Methods: The structures of the isolated compounds were established by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry data and comparison with literature data. The acetonic extract was evaluated for its anti-staphylococcal properties against two reference strains. Results: The acetonic extracts resulted inactive at the maximum tested concentration of 1000 μg/ml against free living forms of tested staphylococci, but they showed a very interesting activity in the prevention of a biofilm formation at a concentration equal to 200 μg/ml against S. aureus ATCC 25923. PMID:24991124

  13. THE SPLASH SURVEY: INTERNAL KINEMATICS, CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES, AND MASSES OF THE ANDROMEDA I, II, III, VII, X, AND XIV DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Geha, Marla C.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan N.

    2010-03-10

    We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of hundreds of individual stars along the sightline to the first three of the Andromeda (M31) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies to be discovered, And I, II, and III, and combine them with recent spectroscopic studies by our team of three additional M31 dSphs, And VII, X, and XIV, as a part of the SPLASH Survey (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo). Member stars of each dSph are isolated from foreground Milky Way dwarf stars and M31 field contamination using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic diagnostics. Our final spectroscopic sample of member stars in each dSph, for which we measure accurate radial velocities with a median uncertainty (random plus systematic errors) of 4-5 km s{sup -1}, includes 80 red giants in And I, 95 in And II, 43 in And III, 18 in And VII, 22 in And X, and 38 in And XIV. The sample of confirmed members in the six dSphs is used to derive each system's mean radial velocity, intrinsic central velocity dispersion, mean abundance, abundance spread, and dynamical mass. This combined data set presents us with a unique opportunity to perform the first systematic comparison of the global properties (e.g., metallicities, sizes, and dark matter masses) of one-third of Andromeda's total known dSph population with Milky Way counterparts of the same luminosity. Our overall comparisons indicate that the family of dSphs in these two hosts have both similarities and differences. For example, we find that the luminosity-metallicity relation is very similar between L {approx} 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} L{sub sun}, suggesting that the chemical evolution histories of each group of dSphs are similar. The lowest luminosity M31 dSphs appear to deviate from the relation, possibly suggesting tidal stripping. Previous observations have noted that the sizes of M31's brightest dSphs are systematically larger than Milky Way satellites of similar luminosity. At lower luminosities

  14. DRACO development for 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, Milad; Moses, Gregory

    2006-10-01

    The DRACO (r-z) lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics laser fusion simulation code is being extended to model 3D hydrodynamics in (x-y-z) coordinates with hexahedral cells on a structured grid. The equation of motion is solved with a lagrangian update with optional rezoning. The fluid equations are solved using an explicit scheme based on (Schulz, 1964) while the SALE-3D algorithm (Amsden, 1981) is used as a template for computing cell volumes and other quantities. A second order rezoner has been added which uses linear interpolation of the underlying continuous functions to preserve accuracy (Van Leer, 1976). Artificial restoring force terms and smoothing algorithms are used to avoid grid distortion in high aspect ratio cells. These include alternate node couplers along with a rotational restoring force based on the Tensor Code (Maenchen, 1964). Electron and ion thermal conduction is modeled using an extension of Kershaw's method (Kershaw, 1981) to 3D geometry. Test problem simulations will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of this new version of DRACO to the study of fluid instabilities in three dimensions.

  15. Three new flavans in dragon's blood from Daemonorops draco.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qian; Saito, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Yosuke; Li, Hai-Zhou; Takashi, Tanaka

    2015-01-01

    Three new flavans were isolated from chloroform extracts of dragon's blood from Daemonorops draco, together with eight known compounds. The structures of the new flavans were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. These compounds are the first examples of 2-methoxyflavans from D. draco and regarded as derivatives of biogenetic intermediates from flavans to chalcones, which are characteristic of the dragon's blood. PMID:25601087

  16. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT IN THE FAINTEST GALAXIES: THE CARBON AND IRON ABUNDANCE SPREADS IN THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY AND THE SEGUE 1 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard; Belokurov, V.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Frebel, Anna; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2010-11-10

    We present an AAOmega spectroscopic study of red giants in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Booetes I (M{sub V} {approx} -6) and the Segue 1 system (M{sub V} {approx} -1.5), either an extremely low luminosity dwarf galaxy or an unusually extended globular cluster. Both Booetes I and Segue 1 have significant abundance dispersions in iron and carbon. Booetes I has a mean abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.55 {+-} 0.11 with an [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.37 {+-} 0.08, and abundance spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.7 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.5. Segue 1 has a mean of [Fe/H] = -2.7 {+-} 0.4 with [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.7 {+-} 0.3, and abundances spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.6 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.2. Moreover, Segue 1 has a radial-velocity member at four half-light radii that is extremely metal-poor and carbon-rich, with [Fe/H] = -3.5, and [C/Fe] = +2.3. Modulo an unlikely non-member contamination, the [Fe/H] abundance dispersion confirms Segue 1 as the least-luminous ultra-faint dwarf galaxy known. For [Fe/H] < -3.0, stars in the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites exhibit a dependence of [C/Fe] on [Fe/H] similar to that in Galactic field halo stars. Thus, chemical evolution proceeded similarly in the formation sites of the Galaxy's extremely metal-poor halo stars and in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm the correlation between (decreasing) luminosity and both (decreasing) mean metallicity and (increasing) abundance dispersion in the Milky Way dwarf galaxies at least as faint as M{sub V} = -5. The very low mean iron abundances and the high carbon and iron abundance dispersions in Segue 1 and Booetes I are consistent with highly inhomogeneous chemical evolution starting in near zero-abundance gas. These ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are apparently surviving examples of the very first bound systems.

  17. Chemical substructure and inhomogeneous mixing in Local Group dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, K. A.

    Evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in the Carina, Draco, and Sculptor dwarf galaxies is examined from chemical abundance patterns. Inhomogeneous mixing at early times is indicated in the classical dwarf galaxies, though cannot be ascertained in ultra faint dwarfs. Mixing efficiencies can affect the early metallicity distribution function, the pre-enrichment levels in globular clusters, and also have an impact on the structure of dwarf systems at early times. Numerical models that include chemical evolution explicitly do a better job in reproducing the observations, and make interesting predictions for the nature of dwarf galaxies and their first stars at the earliest times.

  18. Dark matter annihilation and decay from non-spherical dark halos in galactic dwarf satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kohei; Ichikawa, Koji; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Sugai, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the Milky Way are the primary targets in the indirect searches for particle dark matter. To set robust constraints on candidate dark matter particles, understanding the dark halo structure of these systems is of substantial importance. In this paper, we first evaluate the astrophysical factors for dark matter annihilation and decay for 24 dSphs, taking into account a non-spherical dark halo, using generalized axisymmetric mass models based on axisymmetric Jeans equations. First, from a fitting analysis of the most recent kinematic data available, our axisymmetric mass models are a much better fit than previous spherical ones, thus, our work should be the most realistic and reliable estimator for astrophysical factors. Secondly, we find that among analysed dSphs, the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Triangulum II and Ursa Major II are the most promising but large uncertain targets for dark matter annihilation while the classical dSph Draco is the most robust and detectable target for dark matter decay. It is also found that the non-sphericity of luminous and dark components influences the estimate of astrophysical factors, even though these factors largely depend on the sample size, the prior range of parameters and the spatial extent of the dark halo. Moreover, owing to these effects, the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross-section are more conservative than those of previous spherical works. These results are important for optimizing and designing dark matter searches in current and future multi-messenger observations by space and ground-based telescopes.

  19. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhi, Jayashri; Duorah, H. L.; Barua, A. G.; Duorah, K.

    2016-09-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are thought to be good candidates for dark matter search due to their high mass-to-light (M/L) ratio. One of the most favored dark matter candidates is the lightest neutralino (neutral χ particle) as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). In this study, we model the gamma ray emission from dark matter annihilation coming from the nearby dSph galaxies Draco, Segue 1, Ursa Minor and Willman 1, taking into account the contribution from prompt photons and photons produced from inverse Compton scattering off starlight and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons by the energetic electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation. We also compute the energy spectra of electrons and positrons from the decay of dark matter annihilation products. Gamma ray spectra and fluxes for both prompt and inverse Compton emission have been calculated for neutralino annihilation over a range of masses and found to be in agreement with the observed data. It has been found that the ultra faint dSph galaxy Segue 1 gives the largest gamma ray flux limits while the lowest gamma ray flux limits has been obtained from Ursa Minor. It is seen that for larger M/L ratio of dwarf galaxies the intensity pattern originating from e + e - pairs scattering off CMB photons is separated by larger amount from that off the starlight photons for the same neutralino mass. As the e + e - energy spectra have an exponential cut off at high energies, this may allow to discriminate some dark matter scenarios from other astrophysical sources. Finally, some more detailed study about the effect of inverse Compton scattering may help constrain the dark matter signature in the dSph galaxies.

  20. Stellar kinematics and dark matter in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina

    2016-08-01

    In this review I will discuss the current status on determinations of the dark matter content and distribution in Milky Way dwarf spheroidals, for which the available data-sets allow the application of sophisticated mass modeling techniques.

  1. Abundance Patterns and the Chemical Enrichment of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, V.; DART Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    I review here the chemical abundances of individual stars in the nearest classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, that have become available in increasing numbers (sample size and galaxies probed) in the last decade.

  2. Light Scattering by Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ming; Ji, Xia

    Nowadays, with the development of technology, particles with size at nanoscale have been synthesized in experiments. It is noticed that anisotropy is an unavoidable problem in the production of nanospheres. Besides, nonspherical nanoparticles have also been extensively used in experiments. Comparing with spherical model, spheroidal model can give a better description for the characteristics of nonspherical particles. Thus the study of analytical solution for light scattering by spheroidal particles has practical implications. By expanding incident, scattered, and transmitted electromagnetic fields in terms of appropriate vector spheroidal wave functions, an analytic solution is obtained to the problem of light scattering by spheroids. Unknown field expansion coefficients can be determined with the combination of boundary conditions and rotational-translational addition theorems for vector spheroidal wave functions. Based on the theoretical derivation, a Fortran code has been developed to calculate the extinction cross section and field distribution, whose results agree well with those obtain by FDTD simulation. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 91230203.

  3. GALEX OBSERVATIONS OF DIFFUSE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM DRACO

    SciTech Connect

    Sujatha, N. V.; Murthy, Jayant; Suresh, Rahul; Henry, Richard Conn; Bianchi, Luciana E-mail: murthy@iiap.res.i E-mail: rch@pha.jhu.ed

    2010-11-10

    We have studied small-scale (2') spatial variation of the diffuse ultraviolet (UV) radiation using a set of 11 Galaxy Evolution Explorer deep observations in the constellation of Draco. We find a good correlation between the observed UV background and the infrared (IR) 100 {mu}m flux, indicating that the dominant contributor of the diffuse background in the field is scattered starlight from the interstellar dust grains. We also find strong evidence of additional emission in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) band which is absent in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band. This is most likely due to Lyman band emission from molecular hydrogen in a ridge of dust running through the field and to line emissions from species such as C IV (1550 A) and Si II (1533 A) in the rest of the field. A strong correlation exists between the FUV/NUV ratio and the FUV intensity in the excess emission regions in the FUV band irrespective of the optical depth of the region. The optical depth increases more rapidly in the UV than the IR and we find that the UV/IR ratio drops off exponentially with increasing IR due to saturation effects in the UV. Using the positional details of Spitzer extragalactic objects, we find that the contribution of extragalactic light in the diffuse NUV background is 49 {+-} 13 photons cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} s{sup -1} A{sup -1} and is 30 {+-} 10 photons cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} s{sup -1} A{sup -1} in the FUV band.

  4. The Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies are the most numerous galaxies in the Universe, yet the driving forces in their evolution remain elusive. The proposed evolutionary link between dwarf irregular and dwarf elliptical/spheroidal galaxies is investigated using broad-band UBVR photometry obtained for a sample of 29 dwarf galaxies. The galaxies span a range of absolute B-band magnitude from -13.67 to -19.86 mag. Broad-band colors and Sérsic surface brightness profile fits are compared for the two morphological types. All optical parameters are statistically different between the two subsamples, as evidenced by the significance level of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic.Others have noted that dwarf ellipticals might have looked much like the currently observed dwarf irregulars in the past based on optical colors. An overlap between in the range of colors observed is noted for these targets, implying the possibility of an evolutionary link. A difference is noted between the two samples in the value of n (the power-law exponent determined from the Sérsic profile fitting), suggesting that the two main types of dwarf galaxy are structurally distinct. The differences in the structure of the stellar components would imply that dwarf irregulars do not evolve to become dwarf ellipticals in isolation, meaning that some sort of external interaction is required if the transformation is to occur. However, when the brightest dwarf elliptical targets are eliminated from the comparison, the two dwarf samples are much more similar in their values and range for the power-law exponent, which again suggests a possible evolutionary link. The environments of the galaxies are initially classified as either field or group/cluster, though no definitive environmental comparison is presented here.

  5. Interaction between the IGM and a dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, V.; Raga, A. C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2015-04-01

    Dwarf Galaxies are the most common objects in the Universe and are believed to contain large amounts of dark matter. There are mainly three morphologic types of dwarf galaxies: dwarf ellipticals, dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars. Dwarf irregular galaxies are particularly interesting in dwarf galaxy evolution, since dwarf spheroidal predecessors could have been very similar to them. Therefore, a mechanism linked to gas-loss in dwarf irregulars should be observed, i.e. ram pressure stripping. In this paper, we study the interaction between the ISM of a dwarf galaxy and a flowing IGM. We derive the weak-shock, plasmon solution corresponding to the balance between the post-bow shock pressure and the pressure of the stratified ISM (which we assume follows the fixed stratification of a gravitationally dominant dark matter halo). We compare our model with previously published numerical simulations and with the observed shape of the HI cloud around the Ho II and Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxies. We show that such a comparison provides a straightforward way for estimating the Mach number of the impinging flow.

  6. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  7. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-01

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  8. The size and structure of the spheroid of IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, P.; Demers, S.; Artigau, É.

    2007-05-01

    Context: Nearby galaxies, spirals as well as irregulars, have been found to be much larger than previously believed. The structure of the huge spheroid surrounding dwarf galaxies could give clues to their past gravitational history. Thanks to wide field imagers, nearby galaxies with diameter of dozens of arcmin can be effectively surveyed. Aims: We obtain, from the CFHT archives, a series of i' and g' MegaCam images of IC 1613 in order to determine the stellar surface density of the field and determine the shape of its spheroid. Methods: From the colour magnitude diagram we select some 36 000 stars, in the first three magnitudes of the red giant branch. The spatial distribution of these stars is used to establish the structure of the spheroid. Results: The position angle of the major axis of the stellar spheroid is found to be ≈90°, some 30° from the major axis of the HI cloud surrounding IC 1613. The surface density profile of the spheroid is not exponential over all the length of the major axis. A King profile, with a core radius of 4.5' and a tidal radius of 24' fits the data. The tidal truncation of the spheroid suggests that IC 1613 is indeed a satellite of M 31. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XMM spectral analysis of Draco dSph (Sonbas+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-06-01

    The 87ks image of Draco (Figure 1; RA=17:20:12.4 and DEC=+57:54:55.3 (J2000)) was obtained by the European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton (XMM-Newton) between 2009 August 4 and 28 (PI: K. Dhuga). We used the 3XMM-DR54 (3XMM) catalog (Rosen et al. 2015, IX/46) for the automated multiwavelength (MW) classification described in Section 3.1. The parameters obtained from the 3XMM catalog are the source coordinates and X-ray fluxes in four different energy bands. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) partly observed Draco with the WFPC2, ACS/WFC, and WFC3/UVIS cameras between 2001 Aug 18 and 2013 Oct 14. (1 data file).

  10. Sequencing and analysis of complete mitochondrial genome of Apodemus draco (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).

    PubMed

    Wei, Haixue; Jia, Qiang; Li, Fengjun; Liu, Yongcheng; Chen, Shunde; Yong, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The genus Apodemus are the most common small rodents in fields. They are also one of the best species for biogeographic study and understanding the environmental changes. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Apodemus draco is determined. The mitogenome is 16 220 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a control region, with a base composition of 35.1% A, 29.0% T, 23.8% C and 12.1% G. The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of Apodemus draco and other 23 rodents were used for mitochondrial genome phylogenetic analyses. The monophyly of the genus Apodemus was well supported with sister to the genus Mus. Bayesian analysis also suggested that Apodemus draco was a sister to Apodemus latronum. The present study may facilitate further investigation of the molecular evolution and biogeographic study of the genus Apodemus. PMID:27158789

  11. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  12. Dark Matter in Draco: new considerations of the expected gamma flux in IACTs

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Prada, Francisco; Lokas, Ewa L.

    2006-11-28

    A new revision of the gamma flux that we expect to detect in Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) from SUSY dark matter annihilation in the Draco dSph is presented using the dark matter density profiles compatible with the latest observations. This revision takes also into account the important effect of the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the Cherenkov telescope. We show that this effect is crucial in the way we will observe and interpret a possible signal profile in the telescope. Given these new considerations, some light can be shed oe recent signal excess reported by the CACTUS experiment.

  13. Axisymmetric scattering of scalar waves by spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lekner, John; Boyack, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    A phase shift formulation of scattering by oblate and prolate spheroids is presented, in parallel with the partial-wave theory of scattering by spherical obstacles. The crucial step is application of a finite Legendre transform to the Helmholtz equation in spheroidal coordinates. In the long-wavelength limit the spheroidal analog of the spherical scattering length immediately gives the cross section. Analytical results are readily obtained for scattering of Schrödinger particle waves by impenetrable spheroids, and for scattering of sound waves by acoustically soft spheroidal objects. The method is restricted to scattering by spheroids whose symmetry axis is coincident with the direction of the incident plane wave. PMID:21682372

  14. The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission. Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO): Understanding the Global Dynamics of the Structured Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetospheric Constellation Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO) is the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) designed to understand the nonlinear dynamics, responses, and connections within the Earth's structured magnetotail, using a constellation of approximately 50 to 100 distributed vector measurement spacecraft. DRACO will reveal magnetotail processes operating within a domain extending 20 Earth radii (R(sub E)) across the tail and 40 R(sub E)down the tail, on spatial and time scales accessible to global circulation models, i.e., approximately 2 R(sub E) and 10 seconds.

  15. Integrated Two-Dimensional DRACO Simulations of Cryogenic DT Target Performance on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated simulations of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have been performed using the radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO. Taking into account the known nonuniformities of target and laser irradiation, 2-D simulations examine the target performance of a variety of ignition-relevant implosions. The effects of cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal heat transport are mimicked by a time-dependent flux limiter. DRACO simulations show good agreement with experiments in ρR , neutron yield, Ti, neutron rate, and x-ray images for the mid-adiabat (α ~ 4 ) implosions. For low-adiabat (α ~ 2) and high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR > 24) implosions, the integrated simulations with the known nonuniformity sources cannot fully explain the reduction in target performance. Examinations of other possible nonuniformity sources and the thermal conductivity model will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Dwarf novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    Dwarf novae are defined on grounds of their semi-regular brightness variations of some two to five magnitudes on time scales of typically 10 to 100 days. Historically several different classification schemes have been used. Today, dwarf novae are divided into three sub-classes: the U Geminorum stars, the SU Ursae Majoris stars, and the Z Camelopardalis stars. Outbursts of dwarf novae occur at semi-periodic intervals of time, typically every 10 to 100 days; amplitudes range from typically 2 to 5 mag. Within certain limits values are characteristic for each object. Relations between the outburst amplitude, or the total energy released during outburst, and the recurrence time have been found, as well as relations between the orbital period and the outburst decay time, the absolute magnitude during outburst maximum, and the widths of long and short outbursts, respectively. Some dwarf novae are known to have suspended their normal outburst activity altogether for a while. They later resumed it without having undergone any observable changes. The optical colors of dwarf novae all are quite similar during outburst, considerably bluer than during the quiescent state. During the outburst cycle, characteristic loops in the two color diagram are performed. At a time resolution on the order of minutes, strictly periodic photometric changes due to orbital motion become visible in the light curves of dwarf novae. These are characteristic for each system. Remarkably little is known about orbital variations during the course of an outburst. On time-scales of minutes and seconds, further more or less periodic types of variability are seen in dwarf novae. Appreciable flux is emitted by dwarf novae at all wavelengths from the X-rays to the longest IR wavelengths, and in some cases even in the radio. Most dwarf novae exhibit strong emission line spectra in the optical and UV during quiescence, although some have only very weak emissions in the optical and/or weak absorptions at UV

  17. Light scattering by randomly oriented spheroidal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asano, S.; Sato, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the light scattering properties of randomly oriented, identical spheroidal particles is presented. A computation method was developed to integrate the Asano and Yamomoto solution (1975) for scattering from a homogeneous spheroid over all particle orientations; the extinction and scattering cross-sections, the asymmetry factor, and scattering matrix elements are calculated for randomly oriented prolate and oblate spheroids and compared with the calculations for spheres and laboratory measurements. The angular scattering behavior of spheroids is found to be different from that of the spheres for side scattering to backscattering directions, and prolate and oblate spheroids of the same shape parameter have similar angular scattering patterns.

  18. EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TIDALLY STIRRED DISKY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2011-09-20

    Using collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the tidal evolution of late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs inside Milky Way sized host galaxies. Our study focuses on a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures. During the evolution, the disky dwarfs undergo strong mass loss, the stellar disks are transformed into spheroids, and rotation is replaced by random motions of the stars. Thus, the late-type progenitors are transformed into early-type dwarfs as envisioned by the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Local Group. We determine the photometric properties of the dwarfs, including the total visual magnitude, the half-light radius, and the central surface brightness as they would be measured by an observer near the galactic center. Special emphasis is also placed on studying their kinematics and shapes. We demonstrate that the measured values are biased by a number of observational effects including the increasing angle of the observation cone near the orbital pericenter, the fact that away from the pericenter the tidal tails are typically oriented along the line of sight, and the fact that for most of the evolution the stellar components of the dwarfs are triaxial ellipsoids whose major axis tumbles with respect to the line of sight. Finally, we compare the measured properties of the simulated dwarfs to those of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The evolutionary tracks of the dwarfs in different parameter planes and the correlations between their different properties, especially the total magnitude and the surface brightness, strongly suggest that present-day dSph galaxies may have indeed formed from late-type progenitors as proposed by the tidal stirring scenario.

  19. Advanced Technology Inlet Design, NRA 8-21 Cycle II: DRACO Flowpath Hypersonic Inlet Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    1999-01-01

    The report outlines work performed in support of the flowpath development for the DRACO engine program. The design process initiated to develop a hypersonic axisymmetric inlet for a Mach 6 rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine is discussed. Various design parametrics were investigated, including design shock-on-lip Mach number, cone angle, throat Mach number, throat angle. length of distributed compression, and subsonic diffuser contours. Conceptual mechanical designs consistent with installation into the D-21 vehicle were developed. Additionally, program planning for an intensive inlet development program to support a Critical Design Review in three years was performed. This development program included both analytical and experimental elements and support for a flight-capable inlet mechanical design.

  20. Dwarf galaxies in multistate scalar field dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Robles, V. H.; Matos, T.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the velocity dispersion for eight of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellites in the context of finite temperature scalar field dark matter. In this model the finite temperature allows the scalar field to be in configurations that possess excited states, a feature that has proved to be necessary in order to explain the asymptotic rotational velocities found in low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. In this work we show that excited states are not only important in large galaxies but also have visible effects in dwarf spheroidals. Additionally, we stress that contrary to previous works where the scalar field dark matter halos are consider to be purely Bose-Einstein condensates, the inclusion of excited states in these halo configurations provides a consistent framework capable of describing LSB and dwarf galaxies of different sizes without arriving to contradictions within the scalar field dark matter model. Using this new framework we find that the addition of excited states accounts very well for the raise in the velocity dispersion in Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies improving the fit compared to the one obtained assuming all the dark matter to be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  1. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  2. Populations of Dwarfs in Clusters of Galaxies: Environmental Connections (Oral Contribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S.; Conselice, C. J.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    Despite their apparent fragile appearance, dwarf spheroidals are the most common galaxy type in clusters. In this paper we consider some of the issues associated with two major models for the origin of these dwarfs: primeval galaxies which formed with the cluster and the modification of accreted systems. We argue that the present observational evidence, derived from the Virgo and Perseus clusters, points to infall as the origin of many of these objects.

  3. DARK SATELLITES AND THE MORPHOLOGY OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, Amina; Starkenburg, E.; Starkenburg, T. K.; Vera-Ciro, C. A.; Sales, L. V.; De Lucia, G.; Li, Y.-S.

    2012-10-10

    One of the strongest predictions of the {Lambda}CDM cosmological model is the presence of dark satellites orbiting all types of galaxies. We focus here on the dynamical effects of such satellites on disky dwarf galaxies, and demonstrate that these encounters can be dramatic. Although mergers with M{sub sat} > M{sub d} are not very common, because of the lower baryonic content they occur much more frequently on the dwarf scale than for L{sub *} galaxies. As an example, we present a numerical simulation of a 20% (virial) mass ratio merger between a dark satellite and a disky dwarf (akin to the Fornax dwarf galaxy in luminosity) that shows that the merger remnant has a spheroidal morphology. Perturbations by dark satellites thus provide a plausible path for the formation of dSph systems. The transition from disky to the often amorphous, irregular, or spheroidal morphologies of dwarfs could be a natural consequence of the dynamical heating of hitherto unobservable dark satellites.

  4. [Persistent skin reaction and Raynaud phenomenon after a sting by Echiichthys draco (great weever fish)].

    PubMed

    Mayser, P; Dreyer, F; Repp, H

    2003-07-01

    A 54-year-old recreational angler was stung in his right forefinger by Echiichthys draco. Within a few seconds he developed severe swelling with extreme pain sensation at the sting site, accompanied by dizziness and chill. Even under morphine therapy the pain symptoms were only slightly reduced. During the subsequent weeks, an erythema with marginate medium-sized scaling developed at the sting site and the patient experienced a approximately 50% reduced bending capacity of the forefinger and permanent numbness in this region. After 4 months, Raynaud phenomenon developed limited to the right forefinger. Great weever fishes (Echiichthys spp.) are the most venomous fishes in European waters. In humans, life-threatening sting reactions occur only in exceptional cases. As a commercial antiserum is not available, the therapy is mainly empiric (General measures of first aid and emergency medicine, the wound should be thoroughly washed). Patients should be informed that reduced motion ability, swelling or Raynaud's phenomenon can persist for several months. PMID:12835865

  5. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  6. GIANT GALAXIES, DWARFS, AND DEBRIS SURVEY. I. DWARF GALAXIES AND TIDAL FEATURES AROUND NGC 7331

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, Johannes; Pasquali, Anna; Grebel, Eva K.; Gallagher, John S. III

    2012-12-01

    The Giant GAlaxies, Dwarfs, and Debris Survey (GGADDS) concentrates on the nearby universe to study how galaxies have interacted in groups of different morphology, density, and richness. In these groups, we select the dominant spiral galaxy and search its surroundings for dwarf galaxies and tidal interactions. This paper presents the first results from deep wide-field imaging of NGC 7331, where we detect only four low-luminosity candidate dwarf companions and a stellar stream that may be evidence of a past tidal interaction. The dwarf galaxy candidates have surface brightnesses of {mu}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 23-25 mag arcsec{sup -2} with (g - r){sub 0} colors of 0.57-0.75 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey filter system, consistent with their being dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. A faint stellar stream structure on the western edge of NGC 7331 has {mu}{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 27 mag arcsec{sup -2} and a relatively blue color of (g - r){sub 0} = 0.15 mag. If it is tidal debris, then this stream could have formed from a rare type of interaction between NGC 7331 and a dwarf irregular or transition-type dwarf galaxy. We compare the structure and local environments of NGC 7331 to those of other nearby giant spirals in small galaxy groups. NGC 7331 has a much lower ({approx}2%) stellar mass in the form of early-type satellites than found for M31 and lacks the presence of nearby companions like luminous dwarf elliptical galaxies or the Magellanic Clouds. However, our detection of a few dSph candidates suggests that it is not deficient in low-luminosity satellites.

  7. Dwarf Galaxies in the Leo I Group: the Group Luminosity Function beyond the Local Group (Oral Contribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, K.; Bolte, M.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    We present first results of a survey of the Leo I group at 10 Mpc for M_R < -10 dwarf galaxies. This is part of a larger program to measure the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in nearby poor groups. Our method is optimized to find Local-Group-like dwarfs down to dwarf spheroidal surface brightnesses, but we also find very large LSB dwarfs in Leo I with no Local Group counterpart. A preliminary measurement of the luminosity function yields a slope consistent with that measured in the Local Group.

  8. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems. PMID:26708088

  9. HOT GAS IN THE GALACTIC THICK DISK AND HALO NEAR THE DRACO CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, R. L.; Henley, D. B.; Dixon, W. V. E-mail: dbh@physast.uga.ed

    2010-10-10

    This paper examines the ultraviolet and X-ray photons generated by hot gas in the Galactic thick disk or halo in the Draco region of the northern hemisphere. Our analysis uses the intensities from four ions, C IV, O VI, O VII, and O VIII, sampling temperatures of {approx}10{sup 5} to {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} K. We measured the O VI, O VII, and O VIII intensities from FUSE and XMM-Newton data and subtracted off the local contributions in order to deduce the thick disk/halo contributions. These were supplemented with published C IV intensity and O VI column density measurements. Our estimate of the thermal pressure in the O VI-rich thick disk/halo gas, p{sub th}/k = 6500{sup +2500}{sub -2600} K cm{sup -3}, suggests that the thick disk/halo is more highly pressurized than would be expected from theoretical analyses. The ratios of C IV to O VI to O VII to O VIII intensities were compared with those predicted by theoretical models. Gas which was heated to 3 x 10{sup 6} K then allowed to cool radiatively cannot produce enough C IV or O VI-generated photons per O VII or O VIII-generated photon. Producing enough C IV and O VI emission requires heating additional gas to 10{sup 5} K < T < 10{sup 6} K. However, shock heating, which provides heating across this temperature range, overproduces O VI relative to the others. Obtaining the observed mix may require a combination of several processes, including some amount of shock heating, heat conduction, and mixing, as well as radiative cooling of very hot gas.

  10. Chemodynamic subpopulations of the Carina dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, G.; Amorisco, N. C.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Koposov, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    We study the chemodynamical properties of the Carina dwarf spheroidal by combining an intermediate spectroscopic resolution data set of more than 900 red giant and red clump stars, with high-precision photometry to derive the atmospheric parameters, metallicities and age estimates for our targets. Within the red giant branch population, we find evidence for the presence of three distinct stellar subpopulations with different metallicities, spatial distributions, kinematics and ages. As in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals, the subpopulation with the lowest average metallicity is more extended and kinematically hotter than all other populations. However, we identify an inversion in the parallel ordering of metallicity, kinematics and characteristic length-scale in the two most metal-rich subpopulations, which therefore do not contribute to a global negative chemical gradient. Contrary to common trends in the chemical properties with radius, the metal richest population is more extended and mildly kinematically hotter than the main component of intermediate metallicity. More investigations are required to ascertain the nature of this inversion, but we comment on the mechanisms that might have caused it.

  11. Naming Disney's Dwarfs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses Disney's version of the folkloric dwarfs in his production of "Snow White" and weighs the Disney rendition of the dwarf figure against the corpus of traits and behaviors pertaining to dwarfs in traditional folklore. Concludes that Disney's dwarfs are "anthropologically true." (HOD)

  12. The Hunt for Missing Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    galaxies that resemble the UDGs found in Virgo and Coma clusters, verifying that such objects exist in environments beyond only massive clusters.And at the faint end of the sample, the authors find additional extremely low-surface-brightness dwarfs that are several orders of magnitude fainter even than classical UDGs.The authors describe the properties of these galaxies and compare them to systems like classical UDGs and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in our own Local Cluster. The next step is to determine which of the differences between the sample of NGFS dwarfs and previously known systems are explained by the environmental factors of their host cluster, and which are simply due to sample biases.With much more data from the NGFS still to come, it seems likely that we will soon be able to examine an even larger sample of no-longer-missing dwarfs!CitationRoberto P. Muoz et al 2015 ApJ 813 L15. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/813/1/L15

  13. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  14. Approximating spheroid inductive responses using spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank

    2003-12-12

    The response of high permeability ({mu}{sub r} {ge} 50) conductive spheroids of moderate aspect ratios (0.25 to 4) to excitation by uniform magnetic fields in the axial or transverse directions is approximated by the response of spheres of appropriate diameters, of the same conductivity and permeability, with magnitude rescaled based on the differing volumes, D.C. magnetizations, and high frequency limit responses of the spheres and modeled spheroids.

  15. Ontogenetic growth of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, C. A.; Menchón, S. A.

    2006-11-01

    In ontogenetic growth models, the basal metabolic rate is usually assumed to depend on the individual mass following a power law. Here it is shown that, in the case of multicellular tumor spheroids, the emergence of a necrotic core invalidates this assumption. The implications of this result for spheroid growth are discussed, and a procedure to determine the growth parameters using macroscopic measurements is proposed.

  16. Spheroid-Based In Vitro Angiogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Larissa; Korff, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In vitro models mimicking capillary sprouting are important tools to investigate the tumor angiogenesis, developmental blood vessel formation, and pathophysiological remodeling processes of the capillary system in the adult. With this focus, in 1998 Korff et al. introduced endothelial cell (EC) spheroids as a three-dimensional in vitro model resembling angiogenic responses and sprouting behavior [1]. As such, EC spheroids are capable of giving rise to capillary-like sprouts which are relatively close to the physiologically and genetically programmed arrangement of endothelial cells in vessels. Co-culture spheroids consisting of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells form a spheroidal core composed of smooth muscle cells and an outer monolayer of endothelial cells, similar to the physiological architecture of larger blood vessels. In practise, a defined number of endothelial cells are cultured in a round-bottom well plate or in "hanging drops" to allow the formation and arrangement of the spheroidal three-dimensional structure. Subsequently, they are harvested and embedded in a collagen gel to allow outgrowth of endothelial cell sprouts originating from each spheroid. To evaluate the pro- or antiangiogenic impact of a cytokine or compound, the number and length of sprouts is determined. PMID:27172953

  17. The mass dependence of dwarf satellite galaxy quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2014-09-10

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M {sub *} ≲ 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  18. Evaluation of bioreductive drugs in multicell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Durand, R E; Olive, P L

    1992-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of a variety of bioreductive agents, including misonidazole, RSU-1069, NFVO, mitomycin C, porfiromycin, and SR-4233 was evaluated using Chinese hamster V79 multicell spheroids in vitro. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting techniques were used to selectively recover cells from various depths within the spheroids to measure the differential cytotoxicity in the cells near the hypoxic core of the spheroid relative to the well oxygenated peripheral cells. At the high cell density found in spheroids (as in tissues in vivo) the differential toxicity observed was typically much less than expected, based on data from single cell systems. In some cases, this was due to lack of sufficient hypoxia in the spheroids; in other cases, drug treatment itself produced reoxygenation through metabolic or toxic effects during treatment. An unexpected observation of considerable concern was rapid bioreduction of the more active agents; this sometimes occurred at rates that exceeded drug delivery, resulting in considerably less efficacy when large hypoxic fractions were present (e.g. mitomycin C, NFVO, and SR-4233). This suggests that induction of hypoxia prior to bioreductive agent therapy may not be the most productive approach. Though none of the agents showed "ideal" properties, porfiromycin was judged to give the best combination of differential toxicity, longevity in situ, and ability to reach the entire hypoxic cell subpopulation. PMID:1544838

  19. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs. PMID:21908797

  20. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, J.; Theuwissen, K.; Laffont, L.; Véron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions.

  1. Electrostatic disruption of a charged conducting spheroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. R.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic disruption of elongated parent grains following sudden charging to high electrostatic potentials is proposed as a specific mechanism for the appearance of striae or pseudosynchronic bands which have been observed in several comets. The polar and equatorial electrostatic tension for axis ratios between 0.01 and 1000 are calculated, and the polar pressure is found to be larger than the equatorial pressure for prolate spheroids. The electrostatic polar pressure profile along the polar axis for prolate spheroids is calculated, and the pressure is found to increase monotonically from a minimum at the center to a maxima at the ends. This indicates that as a prolate spheroid of uniform tensile strength is charged up, it will continue to chip off at the ends when the electrostatic pressure there exceeds the uniform tensile strength of the grain. The result can be a prolate grain or a grain which continues chipping until it explodes.

  2. Prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    As a modification of the oblate spheroidal case, a recursive method is developed to compute the point value and a few low-order derivatives of the prolate spheroidal harmonics of the second kind, Q{sub nm} (y), namely the unnormalized associated Legendre function (ALF) of the second kind with its argument in the domain, 1 < y < ∞. They are required in evaluating the prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of the gravitational field in addition to the point value and the low-order derivatives of P-bar {sub nm}(t), the 4π fully normalized ALF of the first kind with its argument in the domain, |t| ≤ 1. The new method will be useful in the gravitational field computation of elongated celestial objects.

  3. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  4. How effective is harassment on infalling late-type dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Davies, J. I.; Nelson, A. H.

    2010-07-01

    A new harassment model is presented that models the complex and dynamical tidal field of a Virgo-like galaxy cluster. The model is applied to small, late-type dwarf disc galaxies (of substantially lower mass than in previous harassment simulations) as they infall into the cluster from the outskirts. These dwarf galaxies are only mildly affected by high-speed tidal encounters with little or no observable consequences; typical stellar losses are <10per cent, producing very low surface brightness streams (magarcsec-2) and a factor of 2 drop in dynamical mass-to-light ratio. Final stellar discs remain disc like, and dominated by rotation although often with tidally induced spiral structure. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, the statistically likely influences of harassment on infalling dwarf galaxies are determined. The effects of harassment are found to be highly dependent on the orbit of the galaxy within the cluster, such that newly accreted dwarf galaxies typically suffer only mild harassment. Strong tidal encounters, that can morphologically transform discs into spheroidals, are rare occurring in <15per cent of dwarf galaxy infalls for typical orbits of substructure within cold dark matter cluster mass haloes. For orbits with small apocentric distances (<250kpc), harassment is significantly stronger resulting is in complete disruption or heavy mass loss (>90per cent dark matter and >50per cent stellar), however, such orbits are expected to be highly improbable for newly infalling galaxies due to the deep potential well of the cluster.

  5. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral Rose

    2016-06-01

    The high dark matter content and the shallow potential wells of low mass galaxies (10^3 Msun < Mstar < 10^9.5 Msun) make them excellent testbeds for differing theories of galaxy formation. Additionally, the recent up-tick in the number and detail of Local Group dwarf galaxy observations provides a rich dataset for comparison to simulations that attempt to answer important questions in near field cosmology: why are there so few observed dwarfs compared to the number predicted by simulations? What shuts down star formation in ultra-faint galaxies? Why do dwarfs have inverted age gradients and what does it take to convert a dwarf irregular (dIrrs) into a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy?We to attempt to answer these questions by running ultra-high resolution cosmological FIRE simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies. We predict that many ultra-faint dwarfs should exist as satellites of more massive isolated Local Group dwarfs. The ultra-faints (Mstar < 10^4 Msun) formed in these simulations have uniformly ancient stellar populations (> 10 Gyr), having had their star formation shut down by reionization. Additionally, we show that the kinematics and ellipticities of isolated simulated dwarf centrals are consistent with observed dSphs satellites without the need for harassment from a massive host. We further show that most (but not all) observed *isolated* dIrrs in the Local Volume also have dispersion-supported stellar populations, contradicting the previous view that these objects are rotating. Finally, we investigate the stellar age gradients in dwarfs — showing that early mergers and strong feedback can create an inverted gradient, with the older stars occupying larger galactocentric radii.These results offer an interesting direction in testing models that attempt to solve dark matter problems via explosive feedback episodes. Can the same models that create large cores in simulated dwarfs preserve the mild stellar rotation that is seen in a minority of isolated d

  6. How chameleons core dwarfs with cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    The presence of a scalar field that couples nonminimally and universally to matter can enhance gravitational forces on cosmological scales while restoring general relativity in the Solar neighborhood. In the intermediate regime, kinematically inferred masses experience an additional radial dependence with respect to the underlying distribution of matter, which is caused by the increment of gravitational forces with increasing distance from the Milky Way center. The same effect can influence the internal kinematics of subhalos and cause cuspy matter distributions to appear core-like. Specializing to the chameleon model as a worked example, we demonstrate this effect by tracing the scalar field from the outskirts of the Milky Way halo to its interior, simultaneously fitting observed velocity dispersions of chemo-dynamically discriminated red giant populations in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. Whereas in standard gravity these observations suggest that the matter distribution of the dwarfs is cored, we find that in the presence of a chameleon field the assumption of a cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White profile becomes perfectly compatible with the data. Importantly, chameleon models also predict the existence of slopes between two stellar subcomponents that in Newtonian gravity would be interpreted as a decline of matter density toward the dwarf center. Hence, an observation of such an apparently pathological scenario may serve as a smoking gun for the presence of a chameleon field or a similar modification of gravity, independent of baryonic feedback effects. In general, measuring the dynamic mass profiles of the Milky Way dwarfs provides stronger constraints than those inferred from the screening scale of the Solar System since these are located at greater distances from the halo center.

  7. Evaluation of Consistency in Spheroid Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids embedded in a matrix represent invaluable tools to analyze cell invasion. Spheroid sizes and invasiveness are the main observables easily measurable to evaluate effects of biological or pharmaceutical manipulations on invasion. They largely account for these 3-D platforms variability, leading to flaws in data interpretation. No method has been established yet that characterizes this variability and guarantees a reliable use of 3-D platforms. Spheroid initial/end sizes and invasiveness were systematically analyzed and compared in spheroids of U87MG cells generated by three different methods and embedded at different times in a collagen matrix. A normality test was used to characterize size distribution. We introduced the linearity-over-yield analysis as a novel mathematical tool to assess end sizes and invasion reproducibility. We further provide a proof of concept by applying these tools to the analysis of a treatment known to be effective beforehand. We demonstrate that implementation of these statistical and mathematical tools warranted a confident quantification and interpretation of in 3-D conducted assays. We propose these tools could be incorporated in a guideline for generation and use of 3-D platforms. PMID:27334575

  8. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  9. ANDROMEDA XXVIII: A DWARF GALAXY MORE THAN 350 kpc FROM ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Martin, Nicolas F.

    2011-11-20

    We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Andromeda XXVIII, using data from the recently released Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. The galaxy is a likely satellite of Andromeda, and, at a separation of 365{sup +17}{sub -1} kpc, would be one of the most distant of Andromeda's satellites. Its heliocentric distance is 650{sup +150}{sub -80} kpc, and analysis of its structure and luminosity shows that it has an absolute magnitude of M{sub V} = -8.5{sup +0.4}{sub -1.0} and half-light radius of r{sub h} = 210{sup +60}{sub -50} pc, similar to many other faint Local Group dwarfs. With presently available imaging we are unable to determine whether there is ongoing or recent star formation, which prevents us from classifying it as a dwarf spheroidal or a dwarf irregular.

  10. Predicting the Velocity Dispersions of the Dwarf Satellite Galaxies of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.

    2016-05-01

    Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group are the faintest and most diffuse stellar systems known. They exhibit large mass discrepancies, making them popular laboratories for studying the missing mass problem. The PANDAS survey of M31 revealed dozens of new examples of such dwarfs. As these systems were discovered, it was possible to use the observed photometric properties to predict their stellar velocity dispersions with the modified gravity theory MOND. These predictions, made in advance of the observations, have since been largely confirmed. A unique feature of MOND is that a structurally identical dwarf will behave differently when it is or is not subject to the external field of a massive host like Andromeda. The role of this "external field effect" is critical in correctly predicting the velocity dispersions of dwarfs that deviate from empirical scaling relations. With continued improvement in the observational data, these systems could provide a test of the strong equivalence principle.

  11. Impact of NLTE on research of early chemical enrichment of the dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Jablonka, Pascale; North, Pierre; Sitnova, Tatyana

    2016-08-01

    Based on high-resolution observed spectra, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation, and precise stellar atmosphere parameters, we present the first complete sample of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with accurate chemical abundances in the very metal-poor (VMP) regime. The obtained stellar elemental ratios are compared with chemical enrichment models, and we show that NLTE is a major step forward for studies of the dSph and the Milky Way (MW) chemical evolution.

  12. Dielectric and phase behavior of dipolar spheroids.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Benight, Stephanie J; Barnes, Robin; Robinson, Bruce H

    2015-04-23

    The Stockmayer fluid, composed of dipolar spheres, has a well-known isotropic-ferroelectric phase transition at high dipole densities. However, there has been little investigation of the ferroelectric transition in nearly spherical fluids at dipole densities corresponding to those found in many polar solvents and in guest-host organic electro-optic materials. In this work, we examine the transition to ordered phases of low-aspect-ratio spheroids under both unperturbed and poled conditions, characterizing both the static dielectric response and thermodynamic properties of spheroidal systems. Spontaneous ferroelectric ordering was confined to a small region of aspect ratios about unity, indicating that subtle changes in sterics can have substantial influence on the behavior of coarse-grained liquid models. Our results demonstrate the importance of molecular shape in obtaining even qualitatively correct dielectric responses and provide an explanation for the success of the Onsager model as a phenomenological representation for the dielectric behavior of polar organic liquids. PMID:25821921

  13. Long waves induced motions to rigid spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2015-05-01

    Responses of unconstrained and rigid spheroidal bodies subjected to long sound waves are analyzed by means of approaching hydrodynamic method. It is shown that in the low-frequency approximation the amplitude of translational velocity is completely determined by the density as well as the acoustic added mass which is equal to hydrodynamic one associated with the body. The inconformity of responses to sound waves in virtue of geometric asymmetry is also presented. In addition, rotational movement engendered by acoustic oblique incidence is discussed, and it represents as the modulated angular oscillation similar to the beat-frequency vibration. All these analyses on acoustically induced motions provide a theoretical evidence for developing spheroidal inertial vector receivers.

  14. Phase behavior of shape-changing spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. I. C.; Masters, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a simple model for a biaxial nematic liquid crystal. This consists of hard spheroids that can switch shape between prolate (rodlike) and oblate (platelike) subject to an energy penalty Δ ɛ . The spheroids are approximated as hard Gaussian overlap particles and are treated at the level of Onsager's second-virial description. We use both bifurcation analysis and a numerical minimization of the free energy to show that, for additive particle shapes, (i) there is no stable biaxial phase even for Δ ɛ =0 (although there is a metastable biaxial phase in the same density range as the stable uniaxial phase) and (ii) the isotropic-to-nematic transition is into either one of two degenerate uniaxial phases, rod rich or plate rich. We confirm that even a small amount of shape nonadditivity may stabilize the biaxial nematic phase.

  15. Dipolophoresis of dielectric spheroids under asymmetric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Itzchak; Yossifon, Gilad; Miloh, Touvia

    2012-01-01

    Non-spherical particles are common in colloidal science. Spheroidal shapes are particularly convenient for the analysis of the pertinent electrostatic and hydrodynamic problems and are thus widely used to model the manipulation of biological cells as well as deformed drops and bubbles. We study the rotary motion of a dielectric spheroidal micro-particle which is freely suspended in an unbounded electrolyte solution in the presence of a uniform applied electric field, assuming a thin Debye layer. For the common case of a uniform distribution of the native surface-charge density, the rotary motion of the particle is generated by the contributions of the induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) slip and the dielectrophoresis associated with the distribution of the Maxwell stress, respectively. Series solutions are obtained by using spheroidal (prolate or oblate) coordinates. Explicit results are presented for the angular velocity of particles spanning the entire spectrum from rod-like to disk-like shapes. These results demonstrate the non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the eccentricity of particle shape and the singularity of the multiple limits corresponding to conducting (ideally polarizable) particles of extreme eccentricity (e ≈ 1). The non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the particle dielectric permittivity is related to the induced-charge contribution. We apply these results to describe the motion of particles subject to a uniform field rotating in the plane. For a sufficiently slow rotation rate, prolate particles eventually become "locked" to the external field with their stationary relative orientation in the plane of rotation being determined by the particle eccentricity and dielectric constant. This effect may be of potential use in the manipulation of poly-disperse suspensions of dielectric non-spherical particles. Oblate spheroids invariably approach a uniform orientation with their symmetry axes directed normal to the external

  16. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    PubMed

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids. PMID:21217688

  17. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brogan, Crystal L.

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first `seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  18. WISE and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; WISE Team

    2009-05-01

    The search for the nearest and coolest brown dwarfs will use WISE's two short-wavelength channels (W1 and W2), which are optimized for brown dwarf detection. W1 samples the methane fundamental absorption band at 3.3 microns, and W2 measures the relatively opacity-free portion of the brown dwarf atmosphere near 4.7 microns. Cool brown dwarfs will thus have very red [W1]-[W2] colors, maximizing our chances of identifying them. Extrapolating preferred mass functions to very low masses and assuming that the star formation rate has been constant over the last 10 Gyr, we can predict the number of brown dwarfs WISE is expected to image. At spectral types later than T7 (Teff > 850K), WISE is expected to find 500 brown dwarfs, which makes WISE uniquely suited among future surveys to measure the low-mass limit of star formation for the first time. This sample will also show whether a new spectral class beyond T, dubbed "Y", is needed at the lowest temperatures. Although the primary six-month WISE mission will cover the entire sky once, WISE should have sufficient cryogen to perform a second, complete pass of the sky. In this case, the identification of nearby brown dwarfs need not rely solely on color selection. Kinematics (proper motion) and geometry (parallax) can also be used to distinguish our closest brown dwarf neighbors, one of which may lie less distant than Proxima Centauri or even fall within our own Oort Cloud.

  19. Astrophysics: Illuminating brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.

    2016-05-01

    Objects known as brown dwarfs are midway between stars and planets in mass. Observations of a hot brown dwarf irradiated by a nearby star will help to fill a gap in our knowledge of the atmospheres of fluid planetary objects. See Letter p.366

  20. Using dwarf satellite proper motions to determine their origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, G. W.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Kroupa, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    The highly organized distribution of satellite galaxies surrounding the Milky Way is a serious challenge to the concordance cosmological model. Perhaps the only remaining solution, in this framework, is that the dwarf satellite galaxies fall into the Milky Way's potential along one or two filaments, which may or may not plausibly reproduce the observed distribution. Here we test this scenario by making use of the proper motions of the Fornax, Sculptor, Ursa Minor and Carina dwarf spheroidals, and trace their orbits back through several variations of the Milky Way's potential and account for dynamical friction. The key parameters are the proper motions and total masses of the dwarf galaxies. Using a simple model, we find no tenable set of parameters that can allow Fornax to be consistent with filamentary infall, mainly because the 1σ error on its proper motion is relatively small. The other three must walk a tightrope between requiring a small pericentre (less than 20 kpc) to lose enough orbital energy to dynamical friction and avoiding being tidally disrupted. We then employed a more realistic model with host halo mass accretion and found that the four dwarf galaxies must have fallen in at least 5 Gyr ago. This time-interval is longer than organized distribution is expected to last before being erased by the randomization of the satellite orbits.

  1. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Spheroid Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, C; Gabriel, C; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Spheroid cell culture emerges as powerful in vitro tool for experimental tumour research. In this study, we established a scaffold-free three-dimensional spheroid system built from canine osteosarcoma (OS) cells (D17). Spheroids (7, 14 and 19 days of cultivation) and monolayer cultures (2 and 7 days of cultivation) were evaluated and compared on light and electron microscopy. Monolayer and spheroid cultures were tested for vimentin, cytokeratin, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen I by means of immunohistochemistry. The spheroid cell culture exhibited a distinct network of collagen I in particular after 19-day cultivation, whereas in monolayer cultures, collagen I was arranged as a lamellar basal structure. Necrotic centres of large spheroids, as observed in 14- and 19-day cultures, were characterized by significant amounts of osteocalcin. Proliferative activity as determined by Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed an even distribution in two-dimensional cultures. In spheroids, proliferation was predominating in the peripheral areas. Metastasis-associated markers ezrin and S100A4 were shown to be continuously expressed in monolayer and spheroid cultures. We conclude that the scaffold-free spheroid system from canine OS cells has the ability to mimic the architecture of the in vivo tumour, in particular cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26287450

  2. Blue compact dwarfs - Extreme dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinh X.

    1987-01-01

    Observational data on the most extreme members of the irregular dwarf (dI) galaxy class, the blue compact dwarfs (BCDs), are characterized, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The properties of the young stellar population, the ionized gas, the older star population, and the gas and dust of BCDs are contrasted with those of other dIs; BCD morphology is illustrated with sample images; and the value of BCDs (as nearby 'young' chemically unevolved galaxies) for studies of galaxy formation, galactic evolution, and starburst triggering mechanisms is indicated.

  3. Revisiting the luminosity function of single halo white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Ruxandra; Torres, Santiago; Althaus, Leandro G.; Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Context. White dwarfs are the fossils left by the evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, and have very long evolutionary timescales. This allows us to use them to explore the properties of old populations, like the Galactic halo. Aims: We present a population synthesis study of the luminosity function of halo white dwarfs, aimed at investigating which information can be derived from the currently available observed data. Methods: We employ an up-to-date population synthesis code based on Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporates the most recent and reliable cooling sequences for metal-poor progenitors as well as an accurate modeling of the observational biases. Results: We find that because the observed sample of halo white dwarfs is restricted to the brightest stars, only the hot branch of the white dwarf luminosity function can be used for these purposes, and that its shape function is almost insensitive to the most relevant inputs, such as the adopted cooling sequences, the initial mass function, the density profile of the stellar spheroid, or the adopted fraction of unresolved binaries. Moreover, since the cutoff of the observed luminosity has not yet been determined only the lower limits to the age of the halo population can be placed. Conclusions: We conclude that the current observed sample of the halo white dwarf population is still too small to obtain definite conclusions about the properties of the stellar halo, and the recently computed white dwarf cooling sequences, which incorporate residual hydrogen burning, should be assessed using metal-poor globular clusters.

  4. Abundance patterns and the chemical enrichment of nearby dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Vanessa

    2010-03-01

    As the least massive galaxies we know, dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) allow to probe chemical enrichement on the smallest scales, and perhaps in its simplest expression. Particularly interesting are the issues concerning the efficency with which metals are retained or lost in these shallow potential wells (supernovae feedback), and the effect of this on star formation itself. Another fundamental issue concerns the earliest epochs of star formation: are first stars formed in similar ways and proportions in all halos ? Finally, as the smallest galaxies know, dSph have been suggested to be the surviving cousins of galaxy building blocs that (in λ-CDM) assemble to make larger galaxies. This parenthood would not necessarily hold at all late times, when survivors have lived their own differentiated life, but is expected at least at the earliest epochs. I review here the chemical abundances of individual stars in the nearest dwarf spheroidal galaxies, that have become available in increasing numbers (sample size and galaxies probed) in the last decade. Special emphasis is given to: a) recent results obtain with FLAMES on VLT, highlighting the power of detailed chemical abundance patterns of large samples of stars to unravel the various evolutionnary paths followed by dSph; b) the oldest and most metal-poor populations in dSph.

  5. Digital microfluidics for spheroid-based invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Bender, Brian F; Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2016-04-21

    Cell invasion is a key process in tissue growth, wound healing, and tumor progression. Most invasion assays examine cells cultured in adherent monolayers, which fail to recapitulate the three-dimensional nuances of the tissue microenvironment. Multicellular cell spheroids have a three-dimensional (3D) morphology and mimic the intercellular interactions found in tissues in vivo, thus providing a more physiologically relevant model for studying the tissue microenvironment and processes such as cell invasion. Spheroid-based invasion assays often require tedious, manually intensive handling protocols or the use of robotic liquid handling systems, which can be expensive to acquire, operate, and maintain. Here we describe a digital microfluidic (DμF) platform that enables formation of spheroids by the hanging drop method, encapsulation of the spheroids in collagen, and the exposure of spheroids to migration-modulating agents. Collagen sol-gel solutions up to 4 mg mL(-1), which form gels with elastic moduli up to ∼50 kPa, can be manipulated on the device. In situ spheroid migration assays show that cells from human fibroblast spheroids exhibit invasion into collagen gels, which can be either enhanced or inhibited by the delivery of exogenous migration modulating agents. Exposing fibroblast spheroids to spheroid secretions from colon cancer spheroids resulted in a >100% increase in fibroblast invasion into the collagen gel, consistent with the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. These data show that DμF can be used to automate the liquid handling protocols for spheroid-based invasion assays and create a cell invasion model that mimics the tissue microenvironment more closely than two-dimensional culturing techniques do. A DμF platform that facilitates the creation and assaying of 3D in vitro tissue models has the potential to make automated 3D cell-based assays more accessible to researchers in the life sciences. PMID:27020962

  6. Janus magnetic cellular spheroids for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon M.; Olsen, Timothy R.; Casco, Megan; Reese, Laura; Poole, John T.; Zhang, Jing; Visconti, Richard P.; Simionescu, Agneta; Simionescu, Dan T.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Cell aggregates, or spheroids, have been used as building blocks to fabricate scaffold-free tissues that can closely mimic the native three-dimensional in vivo environment for broad applications including regenerative medicine and high throughput testing of drugs. The incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into spheroids permits the manipulation of spheroids into desired shapes, patterns, and tissues using magnetic forces. Current strategies incorporating MNPs often involve cellular uptake, and should therefore be avoided because it induces adverse effects on cell activity, viability, and phenotype. Here, we report a Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCS) with spatial control of MNPs to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. This separation of cells and MNPs within magnetic cellular spheroids was successfully incorporated into cellular spheroids with various cellular and extracellular compositions and contents. The amount of cells that internalized MNPs was quantified and showed that JMCSs resulted in significantly lower internalization (35%) compared to uptake spheroids (83%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, the addition of MNPs to cellular spheroids using the Janus method has no adverse effects on cellular viability up to seven weeks, with spheroids maintaining at least 82% viability over 7 weeks when compared to control spheroids without MNPs. By safely incorporating MNPs into cellular spheroids, results demonstrated that JMCSs were capable of magnetic manipulation, and that magnetic forces used during magnetic force assembly mediate fusion into controlled patterns and complex tissues. Finally, JMCSs were assembled and fused into a vascular tissue construct 5 mm in diameter using magnetic force assembly. PMID:24183699

  7. On The gamma-ray emission from Reticulum II and other dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2015-09-01

    The recent discovery of ten new dwarf galaxy candidates by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) could increase the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope's sensitivity to annihilating dark matter particles, potentially enabling a definitive test of the dark matter interpretation of the long-standing Galactic Center gamma-ray excess. In this paper, we compare the previous analyses of Fermi data from the directions of the new dwarf candidates (including the relatively nearby Reticulum II) and perform our own analysis, with the goal of establishing the statistical significance of any gamma-ray signal from these sources. We confirm the presence of an excess from Reticulum II, with a spectral shape that is compatible with the Galactic Center signal. The significance of this emission is greater than that observed from 99.84% of randomly chosen high-latitude blank-sky locations, corresponding to a local detection significance of 3.2σ. We caution that any dark matter interpretation of this excess must be validated through observations of additional dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and improved calculations of the relative J-factor of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We improve upon the standard blank-sky calibration approach through the use of multi-wavelength catalogs, which allow us to avoid regions that are likely to contain unresolved gamma-ray sources.

  8. M dwarfs: Theoretical work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, Dermott J.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical work on the atmospheres of M dwarfs has progressed along lines parallel to those followed in the study of other classes of stars. Such models have become increasingly sophisticated as improvements in opacities, in the equation of state, and in the treatment of convection were incorporated during the last 15 to 20 years. As a result, spectrophotometric data on M dwarfs can now be fitted rather well by current models. The various attempts at modeling M dwarf photospheres in purely thermal terms are summarized. Some extensions of these models to include the effects of microturbulence and magnetic inhomogeneities are presented.

  9. When White Dwarfs Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Wendy Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    3D models of white dwarf collisions are used to assess the likelihood of double-degenerate mergers as progenitors for Type Ia supernovae (henceforth SNIa) and to identify observational signatures of double-degenerate collisions. Observations of individual SNIa, SNIa rates in different galaxy types, and double white dwarf binary systems suggest that mergers or collisions between two white dwarfs play a role in the overall SNIa population. Given the possibility of two progenitor systems (single-degenerate and double-degenerate), the sample of SNIa used in cosmological calcula- tions needs to be carefully examined. To improve calculations of cosmological parameters, the development of calibrated diagnostics for double-degenerate progenitor SNIa is essential. Head-on white dwarf collision simulations are used to provide an upper limit on the 56Ni production in white dwarf collisions. In chapter II, I explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs using the Eulerian grid code FLASH. The initial 1D white dwarf profiles are created assuming hydrostatic equilibrium and a uniform composition of 50% 12C and 50% 16O. The masses range from 0.64 to 0.81 solar masses and have an isothermal temperature of 107 K. I map these 1D models onto a 3D grid, where the dimensions of the grid are each eight times the white dwarf radius, and the dwarfs are initially placed four white dwarf radii apart (center to center). To provide insight into a larger range of physical possibilities, I also model non-zero impact parameter white dwarf collisions (Chapter III). Although head-on white dwarf collisions provide an upper limit on 56Ni production, non-zero impact parameter collisions provide insight into a wider range of physical scenarios. The initial conditions (box size, initial separation, composition, and initial temperature) are identical to those used for the head-on collisions (Chapter II) for the same range of masses. For each mass pair- ing, collision simulations are carried

  10. Global Landslides on Rapidly Spinning Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, Daniel J.; Sanchez, P.

    2013-10-01

    The angle of repose and conditions for global landslides on the surfaces of small, rapidly spinning, spheroidal asteroids are studied. Applying techniques of soil mechanics, we develop a theory for, and examples of, how regolith will fail and flow in this microgravity environment. Our motivation is to develop an understanding of the "top-shaped" class of asteroids based on analytical soil mechanics. Our analysis transforms the entire asteroid surface into a local frame where we can model it as a conventional granular pile with a surface slope, acceleration and height variations as a function of the body's spin rate, shape and density. A general finding is that the lowest point on a rapidly spinning spheroid is at the equator with the effective height of surface material monotonically increasing towards the polar regions, where the height can be larger than the physical radius of the body. We study the failure conditions of both cohesionless and cohesive regolith, and develop specific predictions of the surface profile as a function of the regolith angle of friction and the maximum spin rate experienced by the body. The theory also provides simple guidelines on what the shape may look like, although we do not analyze gravitationally self-consistent evolution of the body shape. The theory is tested with soft-sphere discrete element method granular mechanics simulations to better understand the dynamical aspects of global asteroid landslides. We find significant differences between failure conditions for cohesive and cohesionless regolith. In the case of cohesive regolith, we show that extremely small values of strength (much less than that found in lunar regolith) can stabilize a surface even at very rapid spin rates. Cohesionless surfaces, as expected, fail whenever their surface slopes exceed the angle of friction. Based on our analysis we propose that global landslides and the flow of material towards the equator on spheroidal bodies are precipitated by exogenous

  11. [Structural and functional polarity of porcine hepatocyte cultured spheroids].

    PubMed

    Lorenti, Alicia S; Hidalgo, Alejandra M; Barbich, Mariana R; Torres, José; Batalle, Juan; Izaguirre, María F; Fiorucci, María Paula; Casco, Víctor; Gadano, Adrián; Argibay, Pablo F

    2006-06-01

    Hepatocytes are epithelial cells that show a complex polarity in vivo. However, hepatocytes isolated and cultured in vitro normally lose both their differentiated properties and polarity. Culturing hepatocyte spheroids seems to be the accurate approach to maintain tissue level of organization. The structural and functionalpolarities of pig liver spheroids were analyzed in this work. Swine liver cells were isolated and cultured as spheroids. Their metabolic activity was proved through the metabolism of diazepam, ammonium and synthesis of albumin. Several structural features show the presence of polarity in the cells inside the spheroids. Reticular and collagen fibers, as well as Ck19(+) cells forming duct-like structures were found. _eta and _-catenins and pancadherins were positive in different regions of the spheroids, mainly in the outer cell layers, which have cuboidal epithelia features. The scanning electron microscopy showed a tightly compacted architecture, with smooth surface. The transmission electron microscopy analysis showed bile canaliculi with microvilli, tight junctions, zonula adherens and desmosome-like junctions. Well-maintained cellular organelles, as mitochondria, nucleus, nucleolus, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, were seen in the spheroids. A complex inner bile canaliculi network was shown by using a fluorescent bile acid analogue incorporated and excreted by the spheroids. Furthermore, excretion of a normal pattern of bile acids was demonstrated. The morphology and functionality of the spheroids may provide an appropriate model for applications where the maintenance of liver-specific functions is crucial, as a bioartificial liver device. PMID:16859079

  12. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. PMID:25510471

  13. Bounds on Cross-sections and Lifetimes for Dark Matter Annihilation and Decay into Charged Leptons from Gamma-ray Observations of Dwarf Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2009-06-19

    We provide conservative bounds on the dark matter cross-section and lifetime from final state radiation produced by annihilation or decay into charged leptons, either directly or via an intermediate particle {phi}. Our analysis utilizes the experimental gamma-ray flux upper limits from four Milky Way dwarf satellites: HESS observations of Sagittarius and VERITAS observations of Draco, Ursa Minor, and Willman 1. Using 90% confidence level lower limits on the integrals over the dark matter distributions, we find that these constraints are largely unable to rule out dark matter annihilations or decays as an explanation of the PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS excesses. However, if there is an additional Sommerfeld enhancement in dwarfs, which have a velocity dispersion {approx} 10 to 20 times lower than that of the local Galactic halo, then the cross-sections for dark matter annihilating through {phi}'s required to explain the excesses are very close to the cross-section upper bounds from Willman 1. Dark matter annihilation directly into {tau}'s is also marginally ruled out by Willman 1 as an explanation of the excesses, and the required cross-section is only a factor of a few below the upper bound from Draco. Finally, we make predictions for the gamma-ray flux expected from the dwarf galaxy Segue 1 for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We find that for a sizeable fraction of the parameter space in which dark matter annihilation into charged leptons explains the PAMELA excess, Fermi has good prospects for detecting a gamma-ray signal from Segue 1 after one year of observation.

  14. Cool White Dwarfs from the SuperCOSMOS and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambly, N. C.; Digby, A. P.; Oppenheimer, B. R.

    2005-07-01

    We have used datamining techniques in the SuperCOSMOS Science Archive (http://surveys.roe.ac.uk/ssa) to obtain a large, well defined proper motion and magnitude selected sample of cool white dwarfs. Using accurate 5-colour photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR1 and SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey photometry and astrometry, we demonstrate the power of reduced proper motion in obtaining a sample of >700 white dwarfs. We examine the characteristics of these objects in various two-colour diagrams in conjunction with new model atmosphere predictions recently computed in the SDSS photometric system. Ultimately, we intend to analyse these data with techniques similar to those already used to examine the subdwarf luminosity function (Digby et al. 2003). In this way, we aim to decompose the contribution of thin disk, thick disk and spheroid white dwarfs in the sample to enable computation of accurate luminosity functions for those respective populations.

  15. Method to measure the radio and chemosensitivity of human spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, J.; Nederman, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method based on the spontaneous outgrowth of cells from spheroids was tested. Different outgrowth patterns were seen depending on the types of spheroids and on the radiation or drug doses. The method allowed dose-effect relations to be determined. Spheroid survival was defined as when the outgrowing monolayers contained at least thousand cells within five weeks. The method was used as an alternative to cloning of isolated single cells. The glioma and osteosarcoma spheroids could not be disintegrated to single cell suspensions since they resisted enzymatic and mechanical treatments for cell separation. Detection of differences in radio and chemosensitivity between different types of spheroids of human origin might be valuable for the understanding of the large variations in therapeutical response often seen between different types of tumors.

  16. Dwarfs in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Chahira

    2006-02-15

    Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced and productive civilizations in antiquity, spanning 3000 years before the "Christian" era. Ancient Egyptians built colossal temples and magnificent tombs to honor their gods and religious leaders. Their hieroglyphic language, system of organization, and recording of events give contemporary researchers insights into their daily activities. Based on the record left by their art, the ancient Egyptians documented the presence of dwarfs in almost every facet of life. Due to the hot dry climate and natural and artificial mummification, Egypt is a major source of information on achondroplasia in the old world. The remains of dwarfs are abundant and include complete and partial skeletons. Dwarfs were employed as personal attendants, animal tenders, jewelers, and entertainers. Several high-ranking dwarfs especially from the Old Kingdom (2700-2190 BCE) achieved important status and had lavish burial places close to the pyramids. Their costly tombs in the royal cemeteries and the inscriptions on their statutes indicate their high-ranking position in Egyptian society and their close relation to the king. Some of them were Seneb, Pereniankh, Khnumhotpe, and Djeder. There were at least two dwarf gods, Ptah and Bes. The god Ptah was associated with regeneration and rejuvenation. The god Bes was a protector of sexuality, childbirth, women, and children. He was a favored deity particularly during the Greco-Roman period. His temple was recently excavated in the Baharia oasis in the middle of Egypt. The burial sites and artistic sources provide glimpses of the positions of dwarfs in daily life in ancient Egypt. Dwarfs were accepted in ancient Egypt; their recorded daily activities suggest assimilation into daily life, and their disorder was not shown as a physical handicap. Wisdom writings and moral teachings in ancient Egypt commanded respect for dwarfs and other individuals with disabilities. PMID:16380966

  17. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  18. Electron Microscopy of Chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, K. D.

    1965-01-01

    Gibson, K. D. (St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, London, England). Electron microscopy of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. J. Bacteriol. 90:1059–1072. 1965.—Fixed and stained chromatophores and whole cells of anaerobically grown Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were examined in thin sections in the electron microscope. Both purified chromatophores and intracellular membrane-bound vesicles had exactly the same appearance, namely that of spheres or ellipsoids with a thin electron-dense shell surrounding an electron-lucent interior. The distribution of diameters in the two types of structure was also found to be the same, and was compatible with a normal distribution, with a mean of 570 A and a standard deviation 40 A. Negatively stained chromatophores appeared like discs or collapsed spheres. The presence of invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane in this species was confirmed, and a new structure resembling a twin chromatophore was observed. The bearing of these results on theories of the origin of chromatophores is discussed, and it is concluded that they offer some support for each one of the three main theories about the origin of particulate organelles. Images PMID:5847796

  19. On Convergence Aspects of Spheroidal Monogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, S.; Morais, J.

    2011-09-01

    Orthogonal polynomials have found wide applications in mathematical physics, numerical analysis, and other fields. Accordingly there is an enormous amount of variety of such polynomials and relations that describe their properties. The paper's main results are the discussion of approximation properties for monogenic functions over prolate spheroids in R3 in terms of orthogonal monogenic polynomials and their interdependences. Certain results are stated without proof for now. The motivation for the present study stems from the fact that these polynomials play an important role in the calculation of the Bergman kernel and Green's monogenic functions in a spheroid. Once these functions are known, it is possible to solve both basic boundary value and conformal mapping problems. Interestingly, most of the used methods have a n-dimensional counterpart and can be extended to arbitrary ellipsoids. But such a procedure would make the further study of the underlying ellipsoidal monogenics somewhat laborious, and for this reason we shall not discuss these general cases here. To the best of our knowledge, this does not appear to have been done in literature before.

  20. GEMS: The destiny of Blue Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häußler, Boris; Bell, Eric F.; Barden, Marco; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Borch, Andrea; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Caldwell, John A. R.; Heymans, Catherine; Jahnke, Knud; Jogee, Shardha; Koposov, Sergey E.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Peng, Chien Y.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Wolf, Christian

    2007-05-01

    One of the key predictions of hierarchical galaxy formation models is that a significant fraction of elliptical galaxies form in late merging events. One of the most important observations of such an assembly is the existence of blue spheroidal galaxies, which have spheroid-dominated morphologies and blue colors indicating recent star formation, as an intermediate step in the evolution of elliptical galaxies. We present results from the GEMS survey showing the properties of these galaxies derived from 2-D galaxy fitting of the ˜8000 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the 28'x28' HST mosaic. For the first time we were able to divide the observed population of blue elliptical galaxies into sub-populations of different stellar masses. We found that massive blue ellipticals are likely to be the progenitors of red elliptical galaxies while low-mass blue ellipticals have half-light radii considerably in excess of those measured for low-mass present day elliptical galaxies and instead have larger sizes similar to present-day disk-dominated systems with substantial bulges (see Figure)

  1. Ultra-light dark matter in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass m ˜ 10-22 eV, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the centre of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a Wave Dark Matter model having a DM particle with m ˜ 3.7-5.6 × 10-22 eV. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer to observations of cored central density in dwarf galaxies.

  2. Ultra-light dark matter in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass $m\\sim10^{-22}{\\rm eV}$, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the center of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a wave dark matter model having a DM particle with $m\\sim 3.7-5.6\\times 10^{-22}{\\rm eV}$. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer to observations of cored central density in dwarf galaxies.

  3. Scalable production of controllable dermal papilla spheroids on PVA surfaces and the effects of spheroid size on hair follicle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ching; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Ting; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Tsai, Ren-Yeu; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Chan, Jung-Yi; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Organ size and numbers are vital issues in bioengineering for hair follicle (HF) regeneration. Murine HF dermal papilla (DP) cells are able to induce HF neogenesis when transplanted as aggregates. However, how the preparation of murine and human DP aggregates affects HF inductivity and the size of regenerated HF is yet to be determined. Here we report a scalable method for production of controllable human and rat DP spheroids in general labs for reproducible experiments. Compared with more hydrophobic polyethylene and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), DP cells are poorly adhesive to hydrophilic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Seeded in PVA-coated 96-welled commercial PCR tube arrays, DP cells quickly aggregate into single spheroids with progressive compaction. Varying seeded cell numbers and culture periods enables us to control the size and cell number of the spheroids. The spheroids obtained have high viability and preserve DP characters. A proof of principle experiment was conducted to examine the size effect on the efficiency and efficacy of HF regeneration. We found that both human and rat DP spheroids are able to induce HF neogenesis and larger DP spheroids exhibit higher HF inductivity. However, the average diameter of regenerated hair fiber did not significantly change with the increasing size of transplanted DP spheroids. The result suggests that an appropriate size of DP spheroid is essential for HF inductivity, but its size cannot be directly translated to a thicker regenerated hair. Our results also have implications on the efficiency and efficacy in the regeneration of other epithelial organs. PMID:23092862

  4. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup —}dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup –1} in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  5. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Peng, Eric W.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range 0.7 ≲ reff/kpc ≲ 1.5 with luminosities of -11.65 ≲ MU ≲ -9.42 and -12.79 ≲ MI ≲ -10.58 mag, corresponding to a color range of (U - I)0 ≃ 1.1 - 2.2 mag and surface brightness levels of μU ≃ 28.1 mag/arcsec2 and μI ≃ 27.4 mag/arcsec2. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z⊙ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range M_*|_{Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{odot } and M_*|_{0.02 Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{6.3-8} M_{odot }. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than ˜2 Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with ˜2 kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of reff ≃ 46 - 63 pc and magnitude MU, 0 = -7.42 mag and (U - I)0 = 1.51 mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range 104.9 - 6.5 M⊙.

  6. The HST Snapshot Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. III. Resolved Dwarf Galaxies In and Beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Seitzer, P.; Dolphin, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Sarajedini, A.; Sharina, M. E.

    1999-12-01

    We present results for several nearby, resolved dwarf galaxies imaged with WFPC2 in the framework of our HST snapshot survey of nearby dwarf galaxy candidates (Seitzer et al., paper I in this series). All data presented here were analyzed with the automated photometry package HSTPHOT (Dolphin et al., paper IV in this series). Our closest target is the recently discovered Cassiopeia dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy (Karachentsev & Karachentseva 1999, A&A, 341, 355), a new Local Group member and companion of M31 (Grebel & Guhathakurta 1999, ApJ, 511, 101). Our WFPC2 snapshot data reveal a pronounced red horizontal branch in Cas dSph. IC 5152 is a dwarf irregular (dIrr) just beyond the Local Group. Our data show a significant intermediate-age population with a strongly tilted asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a substantial young population, and a wide giant branch. Other nearby galaxies to be discussed include NGC 1560, ESO 471-G006, ESO 470-G018, and KK 035. Most of these galaxies are being resolved into stars for the first time. We describe their properties in detail and derive distances for all dwarfs with a well-defined tip of the red giant branch. Membership of these galaxies in nearby groups is discussed. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant GO-08192.97A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. EKG acknowledges support by NASA through grant HF-01108.01-98A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. EKG and IDK are supported by the Henri Chrétien International Research Grant administered by the American Astronomical Society. PG is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  7. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.

    2015-06-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%-50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is

  8. Multi-element Abundance Measurements from Medium-resolution Spectra. II. Catalog of Stars in Milky Way Dwarf Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Simon, Joshua D.; Geha, Marla C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Sneden, Christopher; Cohen, Judith G.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Majewski, Steven R.; Siegel, Michael

    2010-12-01

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 stars in eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy (MRS) combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters (GCs). We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, a sample of 132 stars with published high-resolution spectroscopy in GCs, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies has been observed with MRS. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and lang[α/Fe]rang (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. II. CATALOG OF STARS IN MILKY WAY DWARF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; Geha, Marla C.; Sneden, Christopher; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Majewski, Steven R.; Siegel, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 stars in eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy (MRS) combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters (GCs). We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, a sample of 132 stars with published high-resolution spectroscopy in GCs, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies has been observed with MRS. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and ([{alpha}/Fe]) (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass.

  10. Emulsion technologies for multicellular tumour spheroid radiation assays.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; McCluskey, Anthony G; Sorensen, Annette; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-01-01

    A major limitation with current in vitro technologies for testing anti-cancer therapies at the pre-clinical level is the use of 2D cell culture models which provide a poor reflection of the tumour physiology in vivo. Three dimensional cell culture models, such as the multicellular spheroid, provide instead a more accurate representation. However, existing spheroid-based assessment methods are generally labour-intensive and low-throughput. Emulsion based technologies offer enhanced mechanical stability during multicellular tumour spheroid formation and culture and are scalable to enable higher-throughput assays. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of emulsion-based techniques for the formation and long term culture of multicellular UVW glioma cancer spheroids and apply these findings to assess the cytotoxic effect of radiation on spheroids. Our results showed that spheroids formed within emulsions had similar morphological and growth characteristics to those formed using traditional methods. Furthermore, we have identified the effects produced on the proliferative state of the spheroids due to the compartmentalised nature of the emulsions and applied this for mimicking tumour growth and tumour quiescence. Finally, proof of concept results are shown to demonstrate the scalability potential of the technology for developing high-throughput screening assays. PMID:26456100

  11. THE SPLASH SURVEY: KINEMATICS OF ANDROMEDA's INNER SPHEROID

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Claire E.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; and others

    2012-06-20

    The combination of large size, high stellar density, high metallicity, and Sersic surface brightness profile of the spheroidal component of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) within R{sub proj} {approx} 20 kpc suggests that it is unlike any subcomponent of the Milky Way. In this work we capitalize on our proximity to and external view of M31 to probe the kinematical properties of this 'inner spheroid'. We employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of resolved stellar kinematics from Keck/DEIMOS spectra of 5651 red giant branch stars to disentangle M31's inner spheroid from its stellar disk. We measure the mean velocity and dispersion of the spheroid in each of five spatial bins after accounting for a locally cold stellar disk as well as the Giant Southern Stream and associated tidal debris. For the first time, we detect significant spheroid rotation (v{sub rot} {approx} 50 km s{sup -1}) beyond R{sub proj} {approx} 5 kpc. The velocity dispersion decreases from about 140 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 7 kpc to 120 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 14 kpc, consistent to 2{sigma} with existing measurements and models. We calculate the probability that a given star is a member of the spheroid and find that the spheroid has a significant presence throughout the spatial extent of our sample. Lastly, we show that the flattening of the spheroid is due to velocity anisotropy in addition to rotation. Though this suggests that the inner spheroid of M31 more closely resembles an elliptical galaxy than a typical spiral galaxy bulge, it should be cautioned that our measurements are much farther out (2-14r{sub eff}) than for the comparison samples.

  12. Anisotropic star on pseudo-spheroidal spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanpal, B. S.; Thomas, V. O.; Pandya, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    A new class of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations representing anisotropic distribution of matter on pseudo-spheroidal spacetime is obtained. The parameters appearing in the model are restricted through physical requirements of the model. It is found that the models given in the present work is compatible with observational data of a wide variety of compact objects like 4U 1820-30, PSR J1903+327, 4U 1608-52, Vela X-1, PSR J1614-2230, SMC X-4, Cen X-3. A particular model of pulsar PSR J1614-2230 is studied in detail and found that it satisfies all physical requirements needed for physically acceptable model.

  13. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  14. Dark influences II. Gas and star formation in minor mergers of dwarf galaxies with dark satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, T. K.; Helmi, A.; Sales, L. V.

    2016-03-01

    Context. It has been proposed that mergers induce starbursts and lead to important morphological changes in galaxies. Most studies so far have focused on large galaxies, but dwarfs might also experience such events, since the halo mass function is scale-free in the concordance cosmological model. Notably, because of their low mass, most of their interactions will be with dark satellites. Aims: In this paper we follow the evolution of gas-rich disky dwarf galaxies as they experience a minor merger with a dark satellite. We aim to characterize the effects of such an interaction on the dwarf's star formation, morphology, and kinematical properties. Methods: We performed a suite of carefully set-up hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxies that include dark matter, gas, and stars merging with a satellite consisting solely of dark matter. For the host system we vary the gas fraction, disk size and thickness, halo mass, and concentration, while we explore different masses, concentrations, and orbits for the satellite. Results: We find that the interactions cause strong starbursts of both short and long duration in the dwarfs. Their star formation rates increase by factors of a few to 10 or more. They are strongest for systems with extended gas disks and high gas fractions merging with a high-concentration satellite on a planar, radial orbit. In contrast to analogous simulations of Milky Way-mass galaxies, many of the systems experience strong morphological changes and become spheroidal even in the presence of significant amounts of gas. Conclusions: The simulated systems compare remarkably well with the observational properties of a large selection of irregular dwarf galaxies and blue compact dwarfs. This implies that mergers with dark satellites might well be happening but not be fully evident, and may thus play a role in the diversity of the dwarf galaxy population.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGB stars in Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Whitelock+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelock, P. A.; Menzies, J. W.; Feast, M. W.; Matsunaga, N.; Tanabe, T.; Ita, Y.

    2009-10-01

    Observations were made with the SIRIUS camera on the Japanese-SAAO Infrared Survey Facility (IRSF) at Sutherland. Observations were made at about 15 epochs spread over 3yr in the central 4x4 grid (3 data files).

  16. Non-parametric star formation histories for four dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.; Gilmore, Gerard; Valls-Gabaud, David

    2000-10-01

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar populations of a sample of local dSph galaxies (Carina, Leo I, Leo II and Ursa Minor) to infer the star formation histories of these systems, SFR(t). Applying a new variational calculus maximum likelihood method, which includes a full Bayesian analysis and allows a non-parametric estimate of the function one is solving for, we infer the star formation histories of the systems studied. This method has the advantage of yielding an objective answer, as one need not assume a priori the form of the function one is trying to recover. The results are checked independently using Saha's W statistic. The total luminosities of the systems are used to normalize the results into physical units and derive SN type II rates. We derive the luminosity-weighted mean star formation history of this sample of galaxies.

  17. Cleaning spectroscopic samples of stars in nearby dwarf galaxies. The use of the nIR Mg I line to weed out Milky Way contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.

    2012-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies provide insight into the processes of star formation and chemical enrichment at the low end of the galaxy mass function, as well as into the clustering of dark matter on small scales. In studies of Local Group dwarf galaxies, spectroscopic samples of individual stars are used to derive the internal kinematics and abundance properties of these galaxies. It is therefore important to clean these samples from Milky Way stars, which are not related to the dwarf galaxy, since they can contaminate analysis of the properties of these objects. Here we introduce a new diagnostic for separating Milky Way contaminant stars, which mainly consist of dwarf stars, and red giant branch stars targeted in dwarf galaxies. As discriminator we use the trends in the equivalent width of the nIR Mg I line at 8806.8 Å as a function of the equivalent width of Ca II triplet lines. This method is particularly useful for works dealing with multi-object, intermediate-resolution spectroscopy focusing in the region of the nIR Ca II triplet. We use synthetic spectra to explore how the equivalent width of these lines changes for stars with different properties (gravity, effective temperature, metallicity) and find that a distinction among giants above the horizontal branch and dwarfs can be made with this method at [Fe/H] > -2 dex. For -2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -1, this method is also valid for distinguishing dwarfs and giants down to approximately one magnitude below the horizontal branch. Using a foreground model we make predictions on the use of this new discrimination method for nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including the ultra-faints. We subsequently use VLT/FLAMES data for the Sextans, Sculptor, and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies to verify the predicted theoretical trends. Based on FLAMES observations collected at the ESO, proposals 171.B-0588, 076.B-0391, 079.B-0435.

  18. Effects of photodynamic therapy on human glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Chu, Eugene A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1999-07-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with malignant brain neoplasm has led to a search for better treatment modalities. Although gliomas are considered to be disseminated tumors in the brain, most recur at the site of the previous tumor resection. Improved local control would thus be of clear benefit. The utility of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of brain neoplasms is investigated using a human glioma spheroid model. Specifically, the effects of PDT on human glioma spheroids are investigated using PhotofrinTM and 56-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The effects of various irradiation schemes were monitored using a simple growth assay. A growth delay was observed at an optical fluence of approximately 35 J cm-2 for spheroids incubated in Photofrin. Spheroids incubated in ALA were unaffected by the PDT treatment regimens examined in this study. This was most likely a result of inadequate photosensitizer concentration.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Carbon in red giants in GCs and dSph galaxies (Kirby+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, E. N.; Guo, M.; Zhang, A. J.; Deng, M.; Cohen, J. G.; Guhathakurta, P.; Shetrone, M. D.; Lee, Y. S.; Rizzi, L.

    2015-07-01

    We obtained Keck/DEIMOS spectra of the carbon G band in red giants in Milky Way (MW) globular clusters (GCs) and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) between 2011 Jul 29 and 2012 Mar 19. The GCs are NGC 2419, NGC 4590 (M68), and NGC 7078 (M15). The dSphs are Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Draco. See table 1. (3 data files).

  20. Cusp diffraction catastrophe from spheroids: generalized rainbows and inverse scattering.

    PubMed

    Marston, P L

    1985-12-01

    The angular location of the recently discovered cusp pattern in the far-field scattering from an oblate spheroid is calculated as a function of the aspect ratio D/H. The calculation assumes the diameter D > lambda and is limited to illumination perpendicular to the short axis of the spheroid. It agrees with observations for water drops in the range 1.22 < D/H < 1.37 with D ~ 1 mm. PMID:19730494

  1. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-03-01

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this ‘r-process galaxy’ is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers.

  2. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Alexander P; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D

    2016-03-31

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this 'r-process galaxy' is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers. PMID

  3. Age and metallicity gradients in early-type galaxies: a dwarf-to-giant sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, Mina; Prugniel, Philippe; de Rijcke, Sven; Zeilinger, Werner W.

    2011-11-01

    We studied the stellar populations of 40 early-type galaxies using medium-resolution long-slit spectroscopy along their major axes (and along the minor axis for two of them). The sample, including elliptical and lenticular galaxies as well as dwarf galaxies, is combined with other previously published data in order to discuss the systematics of the radial gradients of age and metallicity over a large mass range, from 107 M⊙ to 1012 M⊙ (-9.2 > MB > -22.4 mag). The well-known mass-metallicity relation is continuous throughout the whole mass range, in the sense that more massive galaxies are more metal-rich. The age-mass relation is consistent with the idea of downsizing: smaller galaxies have more extended star formation histories than more massive ones. The transition-type dwarfs (intermediate between dwarf irregular and dwarf elliptical galaxies) deviate from this relation having younger mean age, and the low-mass dwarf spheroidals have older ages, marking a discontinuity in the relation, possibly due to selection effects. In all mass regimes, the mean metallicity gradients are approximately -0.2 and the mean age gradients +0.1 dex per decade of radius. The individual gradients are widely spread: -0.1 < ∇Age < 0.4 and -0.54 < ∇[Fe/H] < +0.2. We do not find evidence for a correlation between the metallicity gradient and luminosity, velocity dispersion, central age or age gradient. Likewise, we do not find a correlation between the age gradient and any other parameter in bright early-type galaxies. In faint early-types with MB≳-17 mag, on the other hand, we find a strong correlation between the age gradient and luminosity: the age gradient becomes more positive for fainter galaxies. Together with the observed downsizing phenomenon this indicates that, as time passes, star formation persists in dwarf galaxies and becomes more centrally concentrated. However, this prolonged central star formation is not reflected in the metallicity profiles of the dwarfs in

  4. Biological magnetic cellular spheroids as building blocks for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon; Olsen, Timothy R.; Gu, Yu; Casco, Megan; Herbst, Austin; Simionescu, Dan T.; Visconti, Richard P.; Kornev, Konstantin G.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), primarily iron oxide nanoparticles, have been incorporated into cellular spheroids to allow for magnetic manipulation into desired shapes, patterns and 3-D tissue constructs using magnetic forces. However, the direct and long-term interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with cells and biological systems can induce adverse effects on cell viability, phenotype and function, and remain a critical concern. Here we report the preparation of biological magnetic cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin, a biological MNP, capable of serving as a biological alternative to iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids as tissue engineered building blocks. Magnetoferritin NPs were incorporated into 3-D cellular spheroids with no adverse effects on cell viability up to 1 week. Additionally, cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin NPs were magnetically patterned and fused into a tissue ring to demonstrate its potential for tissue engineering applications. These results present a biological approach that can serve as an alternative to the commonly used iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids, which often require complex surface modifications of iron oxide NPs to reduce the adverse effects on cells. PMID:24176725

  5. Biological magnetic cellular spheroids as building blocks for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mattix, Brandon; Olsen, Timothy R; Gu, Yu; Casco, Megan; Herbst, Austin; Simionescu, Dan T; Visconti, Richard P; Kornev, Konstantin G; Alexis, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), primarily iron oxide nanoparticles, have been incorporated into cellular spheroids to allow for magnetic manipulation into desired shapes, patterns and 3-D tissue constructs using magnetic forces. However, the direct and long-term interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with cells and biological systems can induce adverse effects on cell viability, phenotype and function, and remain a critical concern. Here we report the preparation of biological magnetic cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin, a biological MNP, capable of serving as a biological alternative to iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids as tissue engineered building blocks. Magnetoferritin NPs were incorporated into 3-D cellular spheroids with no adverse effects on cell viability up to 1 week. Additionally, cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin NPs were magnetically patterned and fused into a tissue ring to demonstrate its potential for tissue engineering applications. These results present a biological approach that can serve as an alternative to the commonly used iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids, which often require complex surface modifications of iron oxide NPs to reduce the adverse effects on cells. PMID:24176725

  6. Radiation torque exerted on a spheroid: Analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Lock, James A.; Gouesbet, Gérard; Tropea, Cameron

    2008-07-01

    As a companion work to our previous study [F. Xu, , Phys. Rev. E. 75, 026613 (2007)] on radiation force prediction for a homogeneous spheroid, we provide in this paper the analytical solution to the radiation torque exerted by an arbitrarily shaped beam on a spheroid, which can be prolate or oblate, transparent or absorbing. Calculations based upon this theoretical development are performed for both linearly and circularly polarized incident beams, and the results are compared to those of a sphere. Stable orientations of spheroids inside a linearly and a circularly polarized Gaussian beam are predicted. We analyze two physical mechanisms, the polarization torque and the reaction force torque, which do not exist or have no contribution to the torque on a sphere but cause rotation of a spheroid. As verification, the dipole method is also developed for the torque calculation for spheroids of size much less than the wavelength, and geometrical optics is developed to qualitatively analyze the torque exerted on spheroids of large size.

  7. The oblate spheroidal harmonics under coordinate system rotation and translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panou, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Several recent studies in geodesy and related sciences make use of oblate spheroidal harmonics. For instance, the Earth's external gravitational potential can be mathematically expanded in an oblate spheroidal harmonic series which converges outside any spheroid enclosing all the masses. In this presentation, we develop the exact relations between the solid oblate spheroidal harmonics in two coordinate systems, related to each other by an arbitrary rotation or translation. We start with the relations which exist between the spherical harmonics in the two coordinate systems. This problem has received considerable attention in the past and equivalent results have been independently derived by several investigators. Then, combining the previous results with the expressions which relate the solid spherical harmonics and the solid spheroidal harmonics, we obtain the relations under consideration. For simplicity, complex notation has been adopted throughout the work. This approach is also suitable and easy to use in the zonal harmonic expansions. The spherical harmonics under coordinate system rotation and translation are obtained as a degenerate case. The above theory can be used in any spheroidal harmonic model. Finally, some simple examples are given, in order to illuminate the mathematical derivations.

  8. Suites of dwarfs around Nearby giant galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Makarov, Dmitry I. E-mail: kei@sao.ru

    2014-01-01

    The Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog (UNGC) contains the most comprehensive summary of distances, radial velocities, and luminosities for 800 galaxies located within 11 Mpc from us. The high density of observables in the UNGC makes this sample indispensable for checking results of N-body simulations of cosmic structures on a ∼1 Mpc scale. The environment of each galaxy in the UNGC was characterized by a tidal index Θ{sub 1}, depending on the separation and mass of the galaxy's main disturber (MD). We grouped UNGC galaxies with a common MD in suites, and ranked suite members according to their Θ{sub 1}. All suite members with positive Θ{sub 1} are assumed to be physical companions of the MD. About 58% of the sample are members of physical groups. The distribution of suites by the number of members, n, follows a relation N(n) ∼ n {sup –2}. The 20 most populated suites contain 468 galaxies, i.e., 59% of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M{sub B} = –18{sup m}. We discuss various properties of MDs, as well as galaxies belonging to their suites. The suite abundance practically does not depend on the morphological type, linear diameter, or hydrogen mass of the MD, the tightest correlation being with the MD dynamical mass. Dwarf galaxies around MDs exhibit well-known segregation effects: the population of the outskirts has later morphological types, richer H I contents, and higher rates of star formation activity. Nevertheless, there are some intriguing cases where dwarf spheroidal galaxies occur at the far periphery of the suites, as well as some late-type dwarfs residing close to MDs. Comparing simulation results with galaxy groups, most studies assume the Local Group is fairly typical. However, we recognize that the nearby groups significantly differ from each other and there is considerable variation in their properties. The suites of companions around the Milky Way and M31, consisting of the

  9. Suites of Dwarfs around nearby Giant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Makarov, Dmitry I.

    2014-01-01

    The Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog (UNGC) contains the most comprehensive summary of distances, radial velocities, and luminosities for 800 galaxies located within 11 Mpc from us. The high density of observables in the UNGC makes this sample indispensable for checking results of N-body simulations of cosmic structures on a ~1 Mpc scale. The environment of each galaxy in the UNGC was characterized by a tidal index Θ1, depending on the separation and mass of the galaxy's main disturber (MD). We grouped UNGC galaxies with a common MD in suites, and ranked suite members according to their Θ1. All suite members with positive Θ1 are assumed to be physical companions of the MD. About 58% of the sample are members of physical groups. The distribution of suites by the number of members, n, follows a relation N(n) ~ n -2. The 20 most populated suites contain 468 galaxies, i.e., 59% of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at MB = -18m. We discuss various properties of MDs, as well as galaxies belonging to their suites. The suite abundance practically does not depend on the morphological type, linear diameter, or hydrogen mass of the MD, the tightest correlation being with the MD dynamical mass. Dwarf galaxies around MDs exhibit well-known segregation effects: the population of the outskirts has later morphological types, richer H I contents, and higher rates of star formation activity. Nevertheless, there are some intriguing cases where dwarf spheroidal galaxies occur at the far periphery of the suites, as well as some late-type dwarfs residing close to MDs. Comparing simulation results with galaxy groups, most studies assume the Local Group is fairly typical. However, we recognize that the nearby groups significantly differ from each other and there is considerable variation in their properties. The suites of companions around the Milky Way and M31, consisting of the Local Group, do not quite seem to be a typical

  10. Barley Yellow Dwarf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow dwarf is the most economically important virus disease affecting most cereal crops world wide. This manuscript summarizes the current knowledge of the disease etiology, epidemiology and management. This information is incorporated into the latest revision of the American Phytopathologi...

  11. Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow dwarf (BYD) is the most widespread and economically important virus disease of cereals. The viruses causing BYD were initially grouped based on common biological properties, including persistent and often strain-specific transmission by aphids and induction of yellowing symptoms. The...

  12. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  13. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in

  14. Phylogeography of the South China Field Mouse (Apodemus draco) on the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau Reveals High Genetic Diversity and Glacial Refugia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liao, Lihuan; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2012-01-01

    The southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (SEMTP) is a particularly interesting region due to its topographic complexity and unique geologic history, but phylogeographic studies that focus on this region are rare. In this study, we investigated the phylogeography of the South China field mouse, Apodemus draco, in order to assess the role of geologic and climatic events on the Tibetan Plateau in shaping its genetic structure. We sequenced mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences in 103 individuals from 47 sampling sites. In addition, 23 cyt b sequences were collected from GenBank for analyses. Phylogenetic, demographic and landscape genetic methods were conducted. Seventy-six cyt b haplotypes were found and the genetic diversity was extremely high (π = 0.0368; h = 0.989). Five major evolutionary clades, based on geographic locations, were identified. Demographic analyses implied subclade 1A and subclade 1B experienced population expansions at about 0.052-0.013 Mya and 0.014-0.004 Mya, respectively. The divergence time analysis showed that the split between clade 1 and clade 2 occurred 0.26 Mya, which fell into the extensive glacial period (EGP, 0.5-0.17 Mya). The divergence times of other main clades (2.20-0.55 Mya) were congruent with the periods of the Qingzang Movement (3.6-1.7 Mya) and the Kun-Huang Movement (1.2-0.6 Mya), which were known as the most intense uplift events in the Tibetan Plateau. Our study supported the hypothesis that the SEMTP was a large late Pleistocene refugium, and further inferred that the Gongga Mountain Region and Hongya County were glacial refugia for A. draco in clade 1. We hypothesize that the evolutionary history of A. draco in the SEMTP primarily occurred in two stages. First, an initial divergence would have been shaped by uplift events of the Tibetan Plateau. Then, major glaciations in the Pleistocene added complexity to its demographic history and genetic structure. PMID:22666478

  15. The distribution of alpha elements in Andromeda dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla C.; Tollerud, Erik J.

    2014-07-20

    We present alpha to iron abundance ratios for 226 individual red giant branch stars in nine dwarf galaxies of the Andromeda (M31) satellite system. The abundances are measured from the combined signal of Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti lines in Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectra. This constitutes the first large sample of alpha abundance ratios measured in the M31 satellite system. The dwarf galaxies in our sample exhibit a variety of alpha abundance ratios, with the average values in each galaxy ranging from approximately solar ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.0) to alpha-enhanced ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.5). These variations do not show a correlation with internal kinematics, environment, or stellar density. We confirm radial gradients in the iron abundance of two galaxies out of the five with sufficient data (NGC 185 and And II). There is only tentative evidence for an alpha abundance radial gradient in NGC 185. We homogeneously compare our results to the Milky Way classical dwarf spheroidals, finding evidence for wider variation in average alpha abundance. In the absence of chemical abundances for the M31 stellar halo, we compare to the Milky Way stellar halo. A stellar halo comprised of disrupted M31 satellites is too metal-rich and inconsistent with the Milky Way halo alpha abundance distribution even if considering only satellites with predominantly old stellar populations. The M31 satellite population provides a second system in which to study chemical abundances of dwarf galaxies and reveals a wider variety of abundance patterns than the Milky Way.

  16. The Main-Sequence Stars of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, G. G.; Mandushev, G.; Richer, H. B.; Thompson, I. B.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.

    1996-03-01

    The Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (SDG) is visible in the background field of the globular cluster M55. We present a deep VI color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of M55, which shows a prominent sequence of stars some 3.5 mag below the cluster main sequence. Through a comparison with a similar CMD for the globular cluster M4, we show that the M55 background field is not the Galactic bulge or spheroid. The SDG main sequence is almost as blue as that of M55 and thus, if it is metal rich, it must be younger than M55, a typical old Galactic globular cluster. The results from isochrone fitting indicate that the age of the SDG is 10--14 Gyr, similar to the ages inferred for the two associated globular clusters Ter 7 and Arp 2.

  17. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by spheroidal particles: a novel approach exploiting the scr(T) matrix computed in spheroidal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, F. Michael; Stamnes, Knut Stamnes, Jakob A.

    1998-11-01

    A method other than the extended-boundary-condition method (EBCM) to compute the {ital T} matrix for electromagnetic scattering is presented. The separation-of-variables method (SVM) is used to solve the electromagnetic scattering problem for a spheroidal particle and to derive its scr(T) matrix in spheroidal coordinates. A transformation is developed for transforming the scr(T) matrix in spheroidal coordinates into the corresponding T matrix in spherical coordinates. The T matrix so obtained can be used for analytical calculation of the optical properties of ensembles of randomly oriented spheroids of arbitrary shape by use of an existing method to average over orientational angles. The optical properties obtained with the SVM and the EBCM are compared for different test cases. For mildly aspherical particles the two methods yield indistinguishable results. Small differences appear for highly aspherical particles. The new approach can be used to compute optical properties for arbitrary values of the aspect ratio. To test the accuracy of the expansion coefficients of the spheroidal functions for arbitrary arguments, a new testing method based on the completeness relation of the spheroidal functions is developed. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  18. M dwarfs, microlensing, and the mass budget of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Flynn, Chris; Gould, Andrew; Kirhakos, Sofia

    1994-01-01

    We show that faint red stars do not contribute significantly to the mass budget of the Galaxy or to microlensing statistics. Our results are obtained by analyzing two long exposures of a high-latitude field taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the newly repaired Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Stars are easily distinguished from galaxies essentially to the limiting magnitudes of the images. We find five stars with 2.0 less than V - I less than 3.0 and I less than 25.3 and no stars with V - I greater than 3.0. Therefore, main-sequence stars with M(sub I) greater than 10 that are above the hydrogen-burning limit in the dark halo or the spheroid contribute less than 6% of the unseen matter. Faint red disk stars, M-dwarfs, contribute at most 15% to the mass of the disk. We parameterize the faint end of the cumulative distribution of stars, Phi, as a function of luminosity L(sub V), d Phi/d ln L(sub V) proportional to L(sub V exp -gamma). For spheroid stars, gamma less than 0.32 over the range 6 less than M(sub V) less than 17, with 98% confidence. The disk luminosity function falls, gamma less than 0, for 15 approximately less than M(sub V) approximately less than 19. Faint red stars in the disk or thick disk, and stars with M(sub V) less than 16 in the spheroid contribute tau less than 10(exp -8) to the optical depth to microlensing toward the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  19. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Donato; Gregoletto, Luca; Reano, Simone; Pietronave, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Talmon, Maria; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Nicoletti, Carmine; Musarò, Antonio; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Follenzi, Antonia; Prat, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol. PMID:26375957

  20. Calibrating brown dwarf ages using white dwarfs in wide binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, S.

    Even though age is a critical parameter for all objects, it can also be one of the most difficult to measure, in particular for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Brown dwarf models suffer from degeneracy and are not useful to infer ages without well constrained atmospheric parameters \\citep{pin06}. However, there is a way to overcome this problem by studying brown dwarfs for which some external constraints are available, for example brown dwarfs in wide binary systems. Wide binary members share proper motion and are supposed to have been born simultaneously and with the same chemical composition. Since they are well separated (⪆ 1000 AU) we can assume that no interaction has occurred between them in the past and they have evolved as isolated objects. If the companion of the brown dwarfs is a white dwarf, we can use it to calibrate the age of the system. White dwarf evolution can be described as a cooling process which is relatively well understood \\citep[e.g.][]{sal00}. Thus, they yield robust age constraints from the use of cooling sequences \\citep{gar11}. White dwarf cooling ages will uniformally give age lower limits (despite some uncertainty on progenitor life-time), and in some cases yield ages to better than 10% accuracy. Hence, wide binary systems containing a white dwarf can have system age constraints inferred from the white dwarf component. There are not many white dwarf-brown dwarf systems known so far, but with the combination of optical and IR surveys, SDSS+UKIDSS and Gaia + UKIDSS/VHS, new systems will be detected.

  1. METALLICITY EVOLUTION OF THE SIX MOST LUMINOUS M31 DWARF SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Nhung; Geha, Marla; Tollerud, Erik J.; Zinn, Robert; Vargas, Luis C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu

    2015-01-10

    We present global metallicity properties, metallicity distribution functions (MDFs), and radial metallicity profiles for the six most luminous M31 dwarf galaxy satellites: M32, NGC 205, NGC 185, NGC 147, Andromeda VII, and Andromeda II. The results presented are the first spectroscopic MDFs for dwarf systems surrounding a host galaxy other than the Milky Way (MW). Our sample consists of individual metallicity measurements for 1243 red giant branch member stars spread across these six systems. We determine metallicities based on the strength of the Ca II triplet lines using the empirical calibration of Carrera et al., which is calibrated over the metallicity range –4 < [Fe/H] <+0.5. We find that these M31 satellites lie on the same luminosity-metallicity relationship as the MW dwarf satellites. We do not find a trend between the internal metallicity spread and galaxy luminosity, contrary to previous studies. The MDF widths of And II and And VII are similar to the MW dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of comparable luminosity; however, our four brightest M31 dwarf satellites are more luminous than any of the MW dSphs and have broader MDFs. The MDFs of our six M31 dwarf satellites are consistent with the leaky box model of chemical evolution, although our metallicity errors allow a wide range of evolution models. We find a significant radial gradient in metallicity in only two of our six systems, NGC 185 and Andromeda II, and flat radial metallicity gradients in the rest of our sample with no observed correlation between rotational support and radial metallicity gradients. Although the average properties and radial trends of the M31 dwarf galaxies agree with their MW counterparts at similar luminosity, the detailed MDFs are different, particularly at the metal-rich end.

  2. Metallicity Evolution of the Six Most Luminous M31 Dwarf Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Nhung; Geha, Marla; Tollerud, Erik J.; Zinn, Robert; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Vargas, Luis C.

    2015-01-01

    We present global metallicity properties, metallicity distribution functions (MDFs), and radial metallicity profiles for the six most luminous M31 dwarf galaxy satellites: M32, NGC 205, NGC 185, NGC 147, Andromeda VII, and Andromeda II. The results presented are the first spectroscopic MDFs for dwarf systems surrounding a host galaxy other than the Milky Way (MW). Our sample consists of individual metallicity measurements for 1243 red giant branch member stars spread across these six systems. We determine metallicities based on the strength of the Ca II triplet lines using the empirical calibration of Carrera et al., which is calibrated over the metallicity range -4 < [Fe/H] <+0.5. We find that these M31 satellites lie on the same luminosity-metallicity relationship as the MW dwarf satellites. We do not find a trend between the internal metallicity spread and galaxy luminosity, contrary to previous studies. The MDF widths of And II and And VII are similar to the MW dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of comparable luminosity; however, our four brightest M31 dwarf satellites are more luminous than any of the MW dSphs and have broader MDFs. The MDFs of our six M31 dwarf satellites are consistent with the leaky box model of chemical evolution, although our metallicity errors allow a wide range of evolution models. We find a significant radial gradient in metallicity in only two of our six systems, NGC 185 and Andromeda II, and flat radial metallicity gradients in the rest of our sample with no observed correlation between rotational support and radial metallicity gradients. Although the average properties and radial trends of the M31 dwarf galaxies agree with their MW counterparts at similar luminosity, the detailed MDFs are different, particularly at the metal-rich end.

  3. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gómez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  4. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gomez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  5. Solidification of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1982-01-01

    The internal structure of white dwarfs is discussed. Highly correlated plasmas are reviewed. Implications for phase separation in the core of cooling white dwarfs are considered. The consequences for evolution of white dwarfs are addressed.

  6. Development and testing of spheroidal inorganic sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Anderson, K.K.

    1998-01-29

    The general objectives of this task are to develop, prepare, and test spheroidal inorganic ion exchangers made by the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine) internal gelation process to remove radionuclides and heavy metals from waste streams occurring at the various DOE sites. Inorganic ion-exchange materials, such as sodium silicotitanate, sodium titanate, ammonium molybdeophosphate, phosphotungstic acid, hexacyanoferrates, titanium monohydrogen phosphate, hydrous titanium oxide, polyantimonic acid, magnesium oxide, etc. have high selectivities and efficiencies for separating and removing radionuclides (e.g., cesium, strontium, technetium, iodine, europium, cerium, ruthenium, and zirconium), actinides, and other elements (such as lead, mercury, silver, nickel, zinc, chromium, and fluoride) from aqueous waste streams. The development of cesium specific spherical sorbents for treatment of acidic, high-salt waste solutions was initiated in FY 1998. Acid-side treatment is important at INEEL and could become important if acidic sludge washing were to become a treatment option at Hanford, Savannah River, or Oak Ridge. Zirconium monohydrogen phosphates (ZrHP) embedded with ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) was the cesium selective inorganic sorbent chosen for making microspheres. AMP is known to be a very effective sorbent for removing cesium from waste streams over a wide range of acidity and salinity, and it has very rapid loading kinetics. The cesium can also be eluted from AMP with ammonium salt solutions. AMP cannot be used as a sorbent at pHs above 7 because it decomposes. In the pH range of 1 to 7, ZrHP is also a very effective sorbent for removing Cs, Sr, Th, U(VI), Pu(IV), AM(III), Hg, and Pb from streams of lower ionic concentrations.

  7. The transitional wake behind an inclined prolate spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fengjian; Gallardo, José P.; Andersson, Helge I.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-09-01

    The wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence has been studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNSs). The Reynolds number based on the minor axis of the spheroid was 3000 as compared to 1000 in our preceding study [Jiang et al., "The laminar wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence angle," Phys. Fluids 26, 113602 (2014)]. The resulting wake is no longer laminar and the transitional wake is fundamentally unsteady and highly asymmetric from the very beginning. A substantial side force resulted from the asymmetric pressure field. No signs of vortex shedding could be observed. The forces and the flow field around the spheroid exhibited a dominant periodicity with a surprisingly low Strouhal number of 0.0733. One part of the counter-rotating vortex pair which dominated the near-wake broke down into small-scale vortices as soon as the vortex left the shadow behind the spheroid. The other part appeared as a helical vortex inside which the mechanical energy was conserved over a substantial length. The axial flow within this vortex tube experienced a sudden change from having maximum to minimum at the vortex center while maintaining the sign of the circulation. The severe asymmetry of the wake is ascribed to a global instability and may impact on submarine maneuverability.

  8. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  9. Distances to WISE Y dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichman; A., C.; Gelino; R., C.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    The WISE satellite has detected some of the coldest, lowest mass objects in the solar neighborhood. These late T and early Y dwarfs have effective temperatures in the range 250-800 K and inferred masses in the range 5-25 MJup. A critical piece of information for determining the physical properties of a brown dwarf is its distance, which greatly improves the comparison with evolutionary models. We discuss the importance of Y dwarfs in the context of star and planet formation. We also update our recent paper on Y dwarf parallaxes with improved values for four objects based on recent observations.

  10. COMPLEXITY ON DWARF GALAXY SCALES: A BIMODAL DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION IN SCULPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Breddels, Maarten A.; Helmi, Amina

    2014-08-10

    In our previous work, we presented Schwarzschild models of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy demonstrating that this system could be embedded in dark matter halos that are either cusped or cored. Here, we show that the non-parametric distribution function recovered through Schwarzschild's method is bimodal in energy and angular momentum space for all of the best-fitting mass models explored. We demonstrate that this bimodality is directly related to the two components known to be present in Sculptor through stellar population analysis, although our method is purely dynamical in nature and does not use this prior information. It therefore constitutes independent confirmation of the existence of two physically distinct dynamical components in Sculptor and suggests a rather complex assembly history for this dwarf galaxy.

  11. Chemistry of Stars in the Sculptor Dwarf Galaxy from VLT-FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Hill, V.

    The chemical composition of 91 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is presented as determined from spectra taken with the FLAMES multiobject spectrograph in the Medusa mode. The analysis methods are outlined. The [α/Fe] ratios are shown for Mg, Ca, and Ti, and compared with those of Galactic stars. Heavy element abundance ratios (Y, Ba, and Eu) are also presented. Since the Sculptor dwarf galaxy has had a significantly different star formation history and chemical evolution than the Galaxy, then comparison of Sculptor's metal-poor (old) stars to similar metallicity stars in the Galaxy can be used to discuss galaxy formation scenarios, as well as test some of our fundamental assumptions in stellar nucleosynthesis.

  12. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  13. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell-cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  14. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Jose M; Basheer, Haneen A; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC-19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC-19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  15. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  16. CONCENTRIC MACLAURIN SPHEROID MODELS OF ROTATING LIQUID PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W. B.

    2013-05-01

    I present exact expressions for the interior gravitational potential V of a system of N concentric constant-density (Maclaurin) spheroids. I demonstrate an iteration procedure to find a self-consistent solution for the shapes of the interfaces between spheroids, and for the interior gravitational potential. The external free-space potential, expressed as a multipole expansion, emerges as part of the self-consistent solution. The procedure is both simpler and more precise than perturbation methods. One can choose the distribution and mass densities of the concentric spheroids so as to reproduce a prescribed barotrope to a specified accuracy. I demonstrate the method's efficacy by comparing its results with several published test cases.

  17. A numerical study of separation on a spheroid at incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, M.; Israeli, M.; Wolfshtein, M.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional incompressible, steady and laminar flow field around a prolate spheroid at incidence is considered. The parabolized Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically. The method can handle vortex types as well as bubble type flow separation because the pressure is one of the dependent variables. Here, the distribution of the skin friction is reported for two test cases. The first test case is a prolate spheroid of aspect ratio of 4:1 at 6 degrees incidence and Reynolds number of 1 million (based on half the major axis). The second case is a spheroid with a 6:1 aspect ratio at 10 degrees incidence and Reynolds number of 0.8 x 1 million. The properties of the flow field near the body are discussed on the basis of the pattern of the skin friction lines, and the shape of the separation lines. Favorable agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  18. The gravimetric boundary value problem in spheroidal approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panou, Georgios

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation the linear gravimetric boundary value problem is discussed in spheroidal approximation. The input to the problem is gravity disturbances, using the known Earth's topography as boundary and corresponds to an oblique derivative problem. From the physical viewpoint, it has many advantages and can serve as the basis in establishing a world vertical datum. Adopting the spheroidal approximation in this boundary value problem, an integral equation results which can be solved analytically using successive approximations. However, the mathematical model becomes simpler and can be solved more easily by applying certain permissible approximations: neglecting the Earth's topography, a spheroidal normal derivative (Neumann) problem is obtained. Under the spherical approximation, the result is a normal derivative problem plus suitable corrections. In this case, neglecting the Earth's topography, the solution corresponds to the well-known spherical Hotine integral. Finally, the relative errors in the above approximations and derivations are quantitatively estimated.

  19. Satellite dwarf galaxies in a hierarchical universe: the prevalence of dwarf-dwarf major mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Alis; Wetzel, Andrew; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2014-10-20

    Mergers are a common phenomenon in hierarchical structure formation, especially for massive galaxies and clusters, but their importance for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains poorly understood. We investigate the frequency of major mergers between dwarf galaxies in the Local Group using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of Milky Way- and M31-like host halos. We find that ∼10% of satellite dwarf galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} that are within the host virial radius experienced a major merger of stellar mass ratio closer than 0.1 since z = 1, with a lower fraction for lower mass dwarf galaxies. Recent merger remnants are biased toward larger radial distance and more recent virial infall times, because most recent mergers occurred shortly before crossing within the virial radius of the host halo. Satellite-satellite mergers also occur within the host halo after virial infall, catalyzed by the large fraction of dwarf galaxies that fell in as part of a group. The merger fraction doubles for dwarf galaxies outside of the host virial radius, so the most distant dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are the most likely to have experienced a recent major merger. We discuss the implications of these results on observable dwarf merger remnants, their star formation histories, the gas content of mergers, and massive black holes in dwarf galaxies.

  20. Optical properties of core-mantle spheroidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsikov, Vadim V.; Farafonov, Victor G.

    1994-12-01

    The new solution of the problem of light scattering by coated spheroids was used to calculate the optical properties of prolate and oblate particles. The solution was obtained by the method of separation of variables for confocal spheroids. We consider the silicate core ice mantle particles and present the extinction cross-sections for prolate and oblate spheroids with the refractive indices mcore equals 1.7 + Oi, 1.7 + 0.1i and mmantle equals 1.3, the aspect ratio (a/b)mantle equals 2 and various volume ratios Vcore/Vtotal. The results are plotted for different size parameters xv equals 2(pi) rv/(lambda) , where rv is the radius of equivolume sphere and (lambda) is the wavelength of incident radiation. The main conclusions are: (a) if Vcore/Vtotal equals 0.5, the optical properties of a core-mantle particle are determined mainly by its core: for prolate non-absorbing spheroids when xv spheroids when xv 10, for oblate absorbing and non-absorbing spheroids when xv

  1. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  2. Polarization of cosmic dust simulated with the rough spheroid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Das, Himadri Sekhar; Dubovik, Oleg; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Yang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic dust is a polydisperse mixture of irregular, often aggregated, particles. Previous attempts have tried to simulate polarimetric properties of this dust using aggregate dust models, but it has not been possible to consider particle sizes larger than a couple of microns due to limitations of computer memory and processing power. Attempts have also been made to replace aggregates by polydisperse regular particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders), but those models could not consistently reproduce the observed photopolarimetric characteristics. In this study, we introduce to the astronomical community the software package developed by Dubovik et al. (2006) for modeling light scattering by a polydisperse mixture of randomly oriented smooth and rough spheroids of a variety of aspect ratios. The roughness of spheroids is defined by a normal distribution of the surface slopes, and its degree depends on the standard deviation of the distribution (which is zero for smooth surface and greater than zero for rough surface). The pre-calculated kernels in the software package allow for fast, accurate, and flexible modeling of different size and shape distributions. We present our results of a systematic investigation of polarization obtained with the rough and smooth spheroid models; we study differences in their phase angle dependence and how those differences change with the particle size distribution. We found that the difference between smooth and rough particles increases with increasing effective size parameter and affects mainly the value and position of the maximum polarization. Negative polarization was found to be typical only for silicate-like refractive indexes and only when the particles have size parameters within 2.5-25. As an example of an application of the rough spheroid model, we made computations for rough spheroids that have a size distribution and composition typical for cometary dust. We found that a mixture of porous rough spheroids made of absorbing

  3. DWARFS GOBBLING DWARFS: A STELLAR TIDAL STREAM AROUND NGC 4449 AND HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION ON SMALL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Delgado, David; Rix, Hans-Walter; Maccio, Andrea V.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Annibali, Francesca; Fliri, Juergen; Zibetti, Stefano; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Chonis, Taylor S.; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Gallego-Laborda, J.; Merrifield, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A candidate diffuse stellar substructure was previously reported in the halo of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4449 by Karachentsev et al. We map and analyze this feature using a unique combination of deep integrated-light images from the BlackBird 0.5 m telescope, and high-resolution wide-field images from the 8 m Subaru Telescope, which resolve the nebulosity into a stream of red giant branch stars, and confirm its physical association with NGC 4449. The properties of the stream imply a massive dwarf spheroidal progenitor, which after complete disruption will deposit an amount of stellar mass that is comparable to the existing stellar halo of the main galaxy. The stellar mass ratio between the two galaxies is {approx}1:50, while the indirectly measured dynamical mass ratio, when including dark matter, may be {approx}1:10-1:5. This system may thus represent a 'stealth' merger, where an infalling satellite galaxy is nearly undetectable by conventional means, yet has a substantial dynamical influence on its host galaxy. This singular discovery also suggests that satellite accretion can play a significant role in building up the stellar halos of low-mass galaxies, and possibly in triggering their starbursts.

  4. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  5. Testing gravity using dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    Generic scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict deviations from Newtonian physics inside astrophysical bodies. In this paper, we point out that low mass stellar objects, red and brown dwarf stars, are excellent probes of these theories. We calculate two important and potentially observable quantities: the radius of brown dwarfs and the minimum mass for hydrogen burning in red dwarfs. The brown dwarf radius can differ significantly from the general relativity prediction, and upcoming surveys that probe the mass-radius relation for stars with masses dwarf stars. This places a new and extremely stringent constraint on the parameters that appear in the effective field theory of dark energy and rules out several well-studied dark energy models.

  6. COMPARING THE OBSERVABLE PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES ON AND OFF THE ANDROMEDA PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-20

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  7. Bulgeless dwarf galaxies and dark matter cores from supernova-driven outflows.

    PubMed

    Governato, F; Brook, C; Mayer, L; Brooks, A; Rhee, G; Wadsley, J; Jonsson, P; Willman, B; Stinson, G; Quinn, T; Madau, P

    2010-01-14

    For almost two decades the properties of 'dwarf' galaxies have challenged the cold dark matter (CDM) model of galaxy formation. Most observed dwarf galaxies consist of a rotating stellar disk embedded in a massive dark-matter halo with a near-constant-density core. Models based on the dominance of CDM, however, invariably form galaxies with dense spheroidal stellar bulges and steep central dark-matter profiles, because low-angular-momentum baryons and dark matter sink to the centres of galaxies through accretion and repeated mergers. Processes that decrease the central density of CDM halos have been identified, but have not yet reconciled theory with observations of present-day dwarfs. This failure is potentially catastrophic for the CDM model, possibly requiring a different dark-matter particle candidate. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations (in a framework assuming the presence of CDM and a cosmological constant) in which the inhomogeneous interstellar medium is resolved. Strong outflows from supernovae remove low-angular-momentum gas, which inhibits the formation of bulges and decreases the dark-matter density to less than half of what it would otherwise be within the central kiloparsec. The analogues of dwarf galaxies-bulgeless and with shallow central dark-matter profiles-arise naturally in these simulations. PMID:20075915

  8. Comparing the Observable Properties of Dwarf Galaxies on and off the Andromeda Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-01

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  9. Dwarfs in Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This false-color mosaic of the central region of the Coma cluster combines infrared and visible-light images to reveal thousands of faint objects (green). Follow-up observations showed that many of these objects, which appear here as faint green smudges, are dwarf galaxies belonging to the cluster. Two large elliptical galaxies, NGC 4889 and NGC 4874, dominate the cluster's center. The mosaic combines visible-light data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (color coded blue) with long- and short-wavelength infrared views (red and green, respectively) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  10. Seeing Baby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version

    The unique ultraviolet vision of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveals, for the first time, dwarf galaxies forming out of nothing more than pristine gas likely leftover from the early universe. Dwarf galaxies are relatively small collections of stars that often orbit around larger galaxies like our Milky Way.

    The forming dwarf galaxies shine in the far ultraviolet spectrum, rendered as blue in the call-out on the right hand side of this image. Near ultraviolet light, also obtained by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, is displayed in green, and visible light from the blue part of the spectrum here is represented by red. The clumps (in circles) are distinctively blue, indicating they are primarily detected in far ultraviolet light.

    The faint blue overlay traces the outline of the Leo Ring, a huge cloud of hydrogen and helium that orbits around two massive galaxies in the constellation Leo (left panel). The cloud is thought likely to be a primordial object, an ancient remnant of material that has remained relatively unchanged since the very earliest days of the universe. Identified about 25 years ago by radio waves, the ring cannot be seen in visible light.

    Only a portion of the Leo Ring has been imaged in the ultraviolet, but this section contains the telltale ultraviolet signature of recent massive star formation within this ring of pristine gas. Astronomers have previously only seen dwarf galaxies form out of gas that has already been cycled through a galaxy and enriched with metals elements heavier than helium produced as stars evolve.

    The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md. The

  11. Barley yellow dwarf viruses.

    PubMed

    Miller, W A; Rasochová, L

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf viruses represent one of the most economically important and ubiquitous groups of plant viruses. This review focuses primarily on four research areas in which progress has been most rapid. These include (a) evidence supporting reclassification of BYDVs into two genera; (b) elucidation of gene function and novel mechanisms controlling gene expression; (c) initial forays into understanding the complex interactions between BYDV virions and their aphid vectors; and (d) replication of a BYDV satellite RNA. Economic losses, symptomatology, and means of control of BYD are also discussed. PMID:15012520

  12. A spatial characterization of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal tails

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Matthew; Cole, Nathan; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Willett, Benjamin; Desell, Travis; Magdon-Ismail, Malik; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Varela, Carlos; Yanny, Brian E-mail: heidi@rpi.edu

    2013-06-01

    We measure the spatial density of F turnoff stars in the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, using statistical photometric parallax. We find a set of continuous, consistent parameters that describe the leading Sgr stream's position, direction, and width for 15 stripes in the north Galactic cap, and three stripes in the south Galactic cap. We produce a catalog of stars that has the density characteristics of the dominant leading Sgr tidal stream that can be compared with simulations. We find that the width of the leading (north) tidal tail is consistent with recent triaxial and axisymmetric halo model simulations. The density along the stream is roughly consistent with common disruption models in the north, but possibly not in the south. We explore the possibility that one or more of the dominant Sgr streams has been misidentified, and that one or more of the ''bifurcated'' pieces is the real Sgr tidal tail, but we do not reach definite conclusions. If two dwarf progenitors are assumed, fits to the planes of the dominant and ''bifurcated'' tidal tails favor an association of the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the dominant southern stream and the ''bifurcated'' stream in the north. In the north Galactic cap, the best fit Hernquist density profile for the smooth component of the stellar halo is oblate, with a flattening parameter q = 0.53, and a scale length of r {sub 0} = 6.73. The southern data for both the tidal debris and the smooth component of the stellar halo do not match the model fits to the north, although the stellar halo is still overwhelmingly oblate. Finally, we verify that we can reproduce the parameter fits on the asynchronous MilkyWay@home volunteer computing platform.

  13. A Spatial Characterization of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy Tidal Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Matthew; Cole, Nathan; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Desell, Travis; Magdon-Ismail, Malik; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Varela, Carlos; Willett, Benjamin; Yanny, Brian

    2013-06-01

    We measure the spatial density of F turnoff stars in the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, using statistical photometric parallax. We find a set of continuous, consistent parameters that describe the leading Sgr stream's position, direction, and width for 15 stripes in the north Galactic cap, and three stripes in the south Galactic cap. We produce a catalog of stars that has the density characteristics of the dominant leading Sgr tidal stream that can be compared with simulations. We find that the width of the leading (north) tidal tail is consistent with recent triaxial and axisymmetric halo model simulations. The density along the stream is roughly consistent with common disruption models in the north, but possibly not in the south. We explore the possibility that one or more of the dominant Sgr streams has been misidentified, and that one or more of the "bifurcated" pieces is the real Sgr tidal tail, but we do not reach definite conclusions. If two dwarf progenitors are assumed, fits to the planes of the dominant and "bifurcated" tidal tails favor an association of the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the dominant southern stream and the "bifurcated" stream in the north. In the north Galactic cap, the best fit Hernquist density profile for the smooth component of the stellar halo is oblate, with a flattening parameter q = 0.53, and a scale length of r 0 = 6.73. The southern data for both the tidal debris and the smooth component of the stellar halo do not match the model fits to the north, although the stellar halo is still overwhelmingly oblate. Finally, we verify that we can reproduce the parameter fits on the asynchronous MilkyWay@home volunteer computing platform.

  14. Infrared Properties of Star Forming Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaduvescu, Ovidiu

    2005-11-01

    between the isophotal semimajor axis and the sech magnitude. Also, correlations were found between the central surface brightness and the sech magnitude. Overall, galaxies with more luminous old components are larger, redder, and brighter in the centre. Thus, size, colour, and the extent of the central plateau appear to be determined by the mass of the old component. For both dIs and BCDs, the Tully-Fisher relation shows considerable scatter in K_s, especially at low luminosities. The scatter appears to be tied to variations in surface brightness. A new ''fundamental plane'' was discovered for dIs which relates the sech absolute magnitude, the central surface brightness, and the neutral hydrogen line-width. The residuals are low enough (rms 0.4 mag), that it offers considerable potential as a distance indicator for star-forming dwarfs. BCDs appear to lie on the dI fundamental plane, but the scatter is larger, probably due to uncertitudes in their line widths. We used NIR images for 22 dEs in the Virgo cluster taken from the GOLDMine database, and some additional data for 9 other dwarf spheroidals in the Local Group, to examine how closely dEs fit into the dI fundamental plane. Over a 9 mag interval in absolute magnitude, the dEs fall in the plane defined by the dIs. The outstanding overlap suggests a close evolutionary connection between dIs and dEs. Using oxygen abundances of dIs and BCDs from the literature, we studied correlations between metallicity, stellar mass, gas mass, baryonic mass, and gas fractions. Although there is some scatter, metallicity correlates with all four parameters in the sense that more massive systems contain more metals. The oxygen abundance correlates very well with the luminosity in K_s, for both dIs and BCDs. Nevertheless, the two relations appear to be different, with more luminous BCDs being more metal rich than dIs with similar absolute magnitudes. This shift can be biased by not including gas. After the gas mass is considered, BCDs

  15. Convective diffusion and adsorption in a swarm of spheroidal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coutelieris, F.A.; Burganos, V.N.; Payatakes, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    The problem of mass transfer from a Newtonian fluid to a swarm of spheroidal adsorbers under creeping flow conditions is considered using the spheroid-in-cell model to represent the swarm. The flow field within the fluid envelope for the Kuwabara type of boundary conditions is obtained from the analytical solution of Dassios et al. (1994). The complete convective diffusion equation is used to describe mass transport within the envelope so that moderate and strong diffusion terms can be taken into account. A new set of boundary conditions is used that respects mass flux and concentration continuity across the outer surface of the cell and maximizes the applicability of the spheroid-in-cell model in the convection-to-diffusion transition regime. The resulting elliptic problem in two dimensions is solved numerically. Results for the upstream and downstream concentration profiles reveal that tangential diffusion is very significant and should not be neglected for moderate and low Peclet number values. Also, the classical Levich-type of formulation, which is theoretically valid for very weak diffusional terms only, can in practice be modified to predict with fair accuracy the overall Sherwood number and the adsorption efficiency of prolate and oblate spheroids-in-cell even in moderate Peclet number cases.

  16. Cisplatin and CCNU synergism in spheroid cell subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of two antineoplastic drugs, cisplatin and CCNU, was evaluated in Chinese hamster V79 multicell spheroids using the drugs as single agents or combinations. Cells obtained from different depths within spheroids 550-750 microns in diameter showed different sensitivities to the two agents; the external cells of the spheroids were more sensitive than the internal cells to cisplatin, whereas the internal cells were most effectively killed by CCNU. Combining the two agents produced the expected 'complementary' activity, and in addition, synergism was observed between the drugs at exposure levels practical for clinical use. For the combination treatments, both the net pattern of cell killing through the spheroid and the degree of interaction between the agents (quantified using the combination index method) were a function of the dose ratio of the two drugs, and of overall treatment intensity. BCNU produced patterns of cell killing similar to CCNU, but showed little interaction with cisplatin. Our results suggest significant clinical potential in using CCNU with cisplatin, particularly since CCNU-cisplatin combinations were synergistic even in the cell subpopulations most resistant to each drug as a single agent. PMID:2257225

  17. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  18. Which Way Is Jerusalem? Navigating on a Spheroid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Given two points on a spheroidal planet, what is the direction from the first to the second? The answer depends, of course, on what path you take. This paper compares two paths which suggest themselves, namely, the loxodrome, which is the path in which the direction stays constant, and the geodesic, which is the shortest path. The geodesic does…

  19. Void nucleation in spheroidized steels during tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jr, J R

    1980-04-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of various mechanical and material parameters on void formation at cementite particles in axisymmetric tensile specimens of spheroidized plain carbon steels. Desired microstructures for each of three steel types were obtained. Observations of void morphology with respect to various microstructural features were made using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  20. In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Marley, Garry M.

    1993-01-01

    Cinostatic bioreactor promotes formation of relatively large solid tumor spheroids exhibiting diameters from 750 to 2,100 micrometers. Process useful in studying efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and of interactions between cells not constrained by solid matrices. Two versions have been demonstrated; one for anchorage-independent cells and one for anchorage-dependent cells.

  1. Analytical Equation for Estimating Terminal Velocities of Spheroidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method for estimating the terminal velocities of spheroidal particles in a fluid medium has been derived form a graphical approach proposed by Haider and Levenspiel. Using an analytical equation enables the researcher to calculate the terminal velocities without resorting to graphical interpolations, thereby reducing errors and enabling terminal velocities to be estimated in automated calculations.

  2. Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Spheroidized 1045 Steel by Induction Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwook; Shin, Jung-Ho; Choi, Young; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2016-04-01

    The effects of induction heat treatment on the formation of carbide particles and mechanical properties of spheroidized 1045 steel were investigated by means of microstructural analysis and tensile testing. The induction spheroidization accelerated the formation of spherical cementite particles and effectively softened the steel. The volume fraction of cementite was found to be a key factor that affected the mechanical properties of spheroidized steels. Further tests showed that sequential spheroidization by induction and furnace heat treatments enhanced elongation within a short spheroidization time, resulting in better mechanical properties. This was due to the higher volume fraction of spherical cementite particles that had less diffusion time for particle coarsening.

  3. PAndAS' CUBS: DISCOVERY OF TWO NEW DWARF GALAXIES IN THE SURROUNDINGS OF THE ANDROMEDA AND TRIANGULUM GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Nicolas F.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike; Chapman, Scott; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Dubinski, John; Babul, Arif; Navarro, Julio; Fardal, Mark; Lewis, Geraint F.; Rich, R. Michael

    2009-11-01

    We present the discovery of two new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXI and Andromeda XXII, located in the surroundings of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies (M31 and M33). These discoveries stem from the first year data of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey, a photometric survey of the M31/M33 group conducted with the Megaprime/MegaCam Wide-Field Camera mounted on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Both satellites appear as spatial overdensities of stars which, when plotted in a color-magnitude diagram, follow metal-poor, [Fe/H] = -1.8, red giant branches at the distance of M31/M33. Andromeda XXI is a moderately bright dwarf galaxy (M{sub V} = -9.9 +- 0.6), albeit with low surface brightness, emphasizing again that many relatively luminous M31 satellites still remain to be discovered. It is also a large satellite, with a half-light radius close to 1 kpc, making it the fourth largest Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy after the recently discovered Andromeda XIX, Andromeda II, and Sagittarius around the Milky Way, and supports the trend that M31 satellites are larger than their Milky Way counterparts. Andromeda XXII is much fainter (M{sub V} = -6.5 +- 0.8) and lies a lot closer in projection to M33 than it does to M31 (42 versus 224 kpc), suggesting that it could be the first Triangulum satellite to be discovered. Although this is a very exciting possibility in the context of a past interaction of M33 with M31 and the fate of its satellite system, a confirmation will have to await a good distance estimate to confirm its physical proximity to M33. Along with the dwarf galaxies found in previous surveys of the M31 surroundings, these two new satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 20.

  4. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  5. PROPERTIES OF THE COOLEST DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    SAUMON, DIDIER; LEGGETT, SANDY K.; FREEDMAN, RICHARD S.; GEBALLE, THOMAS R.; GOLIMOWSKI, DAVID A.; LODIEU, NICOLAS; MARLEY, MARK S.; STEPHENS, DENISE; PINFIELD, DAVID J.; WARREN, STEPHEN J.

    2007-01-18

    Eleven years after the discovery of the first T dwarf, we have a population of ultracool L and T dwarfs that is large enough to show a range of atmospheric properties, as well as model atmospheres advanced enough to study these properties in detail. Since the last Cool Stars meeting, there have been observational developments which aid in these studies. they present recent mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope which confirms the prevalence of vertical mixing in the atmospheres of L and T dwarfs. Hence, the 700 K to 2200 K L and t dwarf photspheres require a large number of parameters for successful modeling: effective temperature, gravity, metallicity, grain sedimentation and vertical mixing efficiency. They also describe initial results of a search for ultracool dwarfs in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, and present the latest T dwarf found to date. They conclude with a discussion of the definition of the later-than-T spectral type, the Y dwarf.

  6. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Shreya; Mehta, Pooja; Horst, Eric N; Ward, Maria R; Rowley, Katelyn R; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-03-29

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  7. In situ oxygen consumption rates of cells in V-79 multicellular spheroids during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, J.P.; Tustanoff, E.; Franko, A.J.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The rate of consumption of oxygen by V-79 cells in multicellular spheroids was measeured as a function of the spheroid diameter. In situ consumption was equal to that of exponentially growing cells for spheroids less than 200 ..mu..m in diameter. The rate of oxygen consumption decreased for cells in spheroids between 200 and 400 ..mu..m diameter to a value one-fourth the initial, then remained constant with further spheroid growth. Comparison of consumption rates for spheroid-derived cells before and after dissociation from the spheroid structure indicated that the spheroid microenvironment accounted for only 20% of the change in oxygen consumption rate. Cell-cell contact, cell packing, and cell volume were not critical parameters. Plateau-phase cells had a fivefold lower rate of oxygen consumption than exponential cells, and it is postulated that the spheroid quiescent cell population accounts for a large part of the intrinsic alteration in oxygen consumption of cells in spheroids. Some other mechanism must be involved in the regulation of cellular oxygen consumption in V-79 spheroids to account for the remainder of the reduction obvserved in this system.

  8. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Rowley, Katelyn R.; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  9. Surface acoustic streaming in microfluidic system for rapid multicellular tumor spheroids generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHasan, Layla; Qi, Aisha; Al-Aboodi, Aswan; Rezk, Amged; Shilton, Richie R.; Chan, Peggy P. Y.; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a novel and rapid method to generate in vitro three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. A SAW device with single-phase unidirectional transducer electrodes (SPUTD) on lithium niobate substrate was fabricated using standing UV photolithography and wet-etching techniques. To generate spheroids, the SAW device was loaded with medium containing human breast carcinoma (BT474) cells, an oscillating electrical signal at resonant frequency was supplied to the SPUDT to generate acoustic radiation in the medium. Spheroids with uniform size and shape can be obtained using this method in less than 1 minute, and the size of the spheroids can be controlled through adjusting the seeding density. The resulting spheroids were used for further cultivation and were monitored using an optical microscope in real time. The viability and actin organization of the spheroids were assessed using live/dead viability staining and actin cytoskeleton staining, respectively. Compared to spheroids generated using the liquid overlay method, the SAW generated spheroids exhibited higher circularity and higher viability. The F-actin filaments of spheroids appear to aggregate compared to that of untreated cells, indicating that mature spheroids can be obtained using this method. This spheroid generating method can be useful for a variety of biological studies and clinical applications.

  10. Plasma spheroidization of iron powders in a non-transferred DC thermal plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Selvarajan, V

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, the results of plasma spheroidization of iron powders using a DC non-transferred plasma spray torch are presented. The morphology of the processed powders was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The percentages of spheroidized powders were calculated by the shape factors such as the Irregularity Parameter (IP) and Roundness (RN). A maximum of 83% of spheroidization can be achieved. The spheroidization results are compared with the theoretical estimation and they are found to be in good agreement. The phase composition of the spheroidized powder was analyzed by XRD. The effect of plasma jet temperature and plasma gas flow rate on spheroidization is discussed. At low plasma gas flow rates and at high plasma jet temperatures, the percentage of spheroidization is high.

  11. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  12. ASC Spheroid Geometry and Culture Oxygenation Differentially Impact Induction of Preangiogenic Behaviors in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Hanna, Brandon; Rucker, Lindsay; Tipton, Allison; Brougham-Cook, Aidan; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Blanchette, James O.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based angiogenic therapies offer potential for the repair of ischemic injuries, while avoiding several of the limitations associated with material-based growth factor delivery strategies. Evidence supports that applying MSCs as spheroids rather than dispersed cells can improve retention and enhance therapeutic effect through increased secretion of angiogenic factors due to hypoxia. However, while spheroid culture appears to modulate MSC behavior, there has been little investigation of how major culture parameters that affect cellular oxygen tension, such as external oxygenation and culture size, impact the angiogenic potential of spheroids. We cultured equal numbers of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) as spheroids containing 10,000 (10k) or 60,000 (60k) cells each, in 20% and 2% oxygen. VEGF secretion varied among the sample groups, with 10k, 2% O2 spheroids exhibiting the highest production. Spheroid-conditioned media was applied to HUVEC monolayers, and proliferation was assessed. Spheroids of either size in 2% oxygen induced comparable proliferation compared to a 2 ng/ml VEGF control sample, while spheroids in 20% oxygen induced less proliferation. Spheroids were also applied in coculture with HUVEC monolayers, and induction of migration through a Transwell membrane was evaluated. Sixty thousand, 2% O2 spheroids induced similar levels of migration as VEGF controls, while 10k, 2% O2 spheroids induced significantly more. Ten thousand, 20% spheroids performed no better than VEGF-free controls. We conclude that the therapeutic ability of ASC spheroids to stimulate angiogenesis in endothelial cells is affected by both culture size and oxygenation parameters, suggesting that, while ASC spheroids offer potential in the treatment of injured and ischemic tissues, careful consideration of culture size in respect to in vivo local oxygen tension will be necessary for optimal results. PMID:25197983

  13. PAndAS' PROGENY: EXTENDING THE M31 DWARF GALAXY CABAL

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jenny C.; Irwin, Mike J.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Dotter, Aaron L.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-05-10

    We present the discovery of five new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXIII-XXVII, located in the outer halo of M31. These galaxies were discovered during the second year of data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), a photometric survey of the M31/M33 subgroup conducted with the MegaPrime/MegaCam wide-field camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The current PAndAS survey now provides an almost complete panoramic view of the M31 halo out to an average projected radius of {approx}150 kpc. Here we present for the first time the metal-poor stellar density map for this whole region, not only as an illustration of the discovery space for satellite galaxies, but also as a birds-eye view of the ongoing assembly process of an L{sub *} disk galaxy. Four of the newly discovered satellites appear as well-defined spatial overdensities of stars lying on the expected locus of metal-poor (-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1.3) red giant branch stars at the distance of M31. The fifth overdensity, And XXVII, is embedded in an extensive stream of such stars and is possibly the remnant of a strong tidal disruption event. Based on distance estimates from horizontal branch magnitudes, all five have metallicities typical of dwarf spheroidal galaxies ranging from [Fe/H] =-1.7 {+-} 0.2 to [Fe/H] =-1.9 {+-} 0.2 and absolute magnitudes ranging from M{sub V} = -7.1 {+-} 0.5 to M{sub V} = -10.2 {+-} 0.5. These five additional satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 25 and continue the trend whereby the brighter dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31 generally have much larger half-light radii than their Milky Way counterparts. With an extended sample of M31 satellite galaxies, we also revisit the spatial distribution of this population and in particular we find that, within the current projected limits of the PAndAS survey, the surface density of satellites is essentially constant out to 150 kpc. This corresponds to a radial density distribution of satellites

  14. PAndAS' Progeny: Extending the M31 Dwarf Galaxy Cabal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jenny C.; Irwin, Mike J.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Dotter, Aaron L.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-05-01

    We present the discovery of five new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXIII-XXVII, located in the outer halo of M31. These galaxies were discovered during the second year of data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), a photometric survey of the M31/M33 subgroup conducted with the MegaPrime/MegaCam wide-field camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The current PAndAS survey now provides an almost complete panoramic view of the M31 halo out to an average projected radius of ~150 kpc. Here we present for the first time the metal-poor stellar density map for this whole region, not only as an illustration of the discovery space for satellite galaxies, but also as a birds-eye view of the ongoing assembly process of an L * disk galaxy. Four of the newly discovered satellites appear as well-defined spatial overdensities of stars lying on the expected locus of metal-poor (-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1.3) red giant branch stars at the distance of M31. The fifth overdensity, And XXVII, is embedded in an extensive stream of such stars and is possibly the remnant of a strong tidal disruption event. Based on distance estimates from horizontal branch magnitudes, all five have metallicities typical of dwarf spheroidal galaxies ranging from [Fe/H] =-1.7 ± 0.2 to [Fe/H] =-1.9 ± 0.2 and absolute magnitudes ranging from MV = -7.1 ± 0.5 to MV = -10.2 ± 0.5. These five additional satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 25 and continue the trend whereby the brighter dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31 generally have much larger half-light radii than their Milky Way counterparts. With an extended sample of M31 satellite galaxies, we also revisit the spatial distribution of this population and in particular we find that, within the current projected limits of the PAndAS survey, the surface density of satellites is essentially constant out to 150 kpc. This corresponds to a radial density distribution of satellites varying as r -1, a result

  15. Measuring M Dwarf Winds with DAZ White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, John H.

    2006-11-01

    Hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs with metal lines, so-called DAZs, show evidence for ongoing accretion of material onto their surfaces. Some DAZs are known to have unresolved M dwarf companions, which could account for the observed accretion through a stellar wind. I combine observed Ca abundances of the DAZs with information on the orbital separation of their M dwarf companions to infer the mass-loss rate of the M dwarfs. I find that for three of the six known DAZs with M dwarf companions, a stellar wind can plausibly explain the observed accretion on the white dwarfs assuming Bondi-Hoyle accretion of solar abundance stellar winds on the order of 10-14 to 10-16 Msolar yr-1. The rest of the sample have companions with orbits >~1 AU and require companion mass-loss rates of >10-11 Msolar yr-1. I conclude that there must be an alternative explanation for accretion of material onto DAZs with widely separated companions. The inferred winds for two of the close binaries are orders of magnitude smaller than typically assumed for the angular momentum loss of red dwarf-white dwarf pairs due to magnetic braking from a stellar wind and may seriously affect predictions for the formation rate of CVs with low-mass companions. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 10255.

  16. FIRST DIRECT EVIDENCE THAT BARIUM DWARFS HAVE WHITE DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R. O.; McGahee, C. E.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Corbally, C. J. E-mail: cmcgahe@g.clemson.edu E-mail: corbally@as.arizona.edu

    2011-05-15

    Barium II (Ba) stars are chemically peculiar F-, G-, and K-type objects that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements. Since s-process nucleosynthesis is unlikely to take place in stars prior to the advanced asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage, the prevailing hypothesis is that each present Ba star was contaminated by an AGB companion which is now a white dwarf (WD). Unless the initial mass ratio of such a binary was fairly close to unity, the receiving star is thus at least as likely to be a dwarf as a giant. So although most known Ba stars appear to be giants, the hypothesis requires that Ba dwarfs be comparably plentiful and moreover that they should all have WD companions. However, despite dedicated searches with the IUE satellite, no WD companions have been directly detected to date among the classical Ba dwarfs, even though some 90% of those stars are spectroscopic binaries, so the contamination hypothesis is therefore presently in some jeopardy. In this paper, we analyze recent deep, near-UV and far-UV Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) exposures of four of the brightest of the class (HD 2454, 15360, 26367, and 221531), together with archived GALEX data for two newly recognized Ba dwarfs: HD 34654 and HD 114520 (which also prove to be spectroscopic binaries). The GALEX observations of the Ba dwarfs as a group show a significant far-UV excess compared to a control sample of normal F-type dwarfs. We suggest that this ensemble far-UV excess constitutes the first direct evidence that Ba dwarfs have WD companions.

  17. ROSAT detection of an X-ray shadow in the 1/4-keV diffuse background in the Draco nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Mebold, U.; Hirth, W.; Herbstmeier, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M.

    1991-01-01

    The detection by the Roentgen satellite (ROSAT) X-ray telescope of a shadow in the 1/4-keV (C-band, 0.1 to 0.284 keV) cosmic diffuse background is reported. The location and morphology of the local minimum in X-rays are in clear agreement with a discrete H I cloud. The shadow is very deep with a minimum level at 50 percent of the surrounding emission; therefore, a minimum of 50 percent of the observed off-cloud flux must originate on the far side of the cloud. The analysis of H I velocity components links the cloud with the Draco nebula (distance of about 600 parsecs); it then follows that there is significant 1/4-keV X-ray emission at large distance (more than 400 parsecs) from the galactic plane along this line of sight. The extent of the distant emission region is uncertain, and if it indicates the existence of a hot galactic corona, it must be patchy in nature.

  18. Exclusion of canonical weakly interacting massive particles by joint analysis of Milky Way dwarf galaxies with data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Koushiappas, Savvas M

    2011-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are known to be excellent targets for the detection of annihilating dark matter. We present new limits on the annihilation cross section of weakly interacting massive particles based on the joint analysis of seven Milky Way dwarfs using a frequentist Neyman construction and Pass 7 data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. We exclude generic weakly interacting massive particle candidates annihilating into bb with a mass less than 40 GeV that reproduce the observed relic abundance. To within 95% systematic errors on the dark matter distribution within the dwarfs, the mass lower limit can be as low as 19 GeV or as high as 240 GeV. For annihilation into τ+ τ-, these limits become 19, 13, and 80 GeV, respectively. PMID:22242988

  19. Chemical Signatures in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Hill, Vanessa M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical signatures in dwarf galaxies describe the examination of specific elemental abundance ratios to investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies, particularly when compared with the variety of stellar populations in the Galaxy. Abundance ratios can come from HII region emission lines, planetary nebulae, or supernova remnants, but mostly they come from stars. Since stars can live a very long time, for example, a 0.8 MSun star born at the time of the Big Bang would only now be ascending the red giant branch, and, if, for the most part, its quiescent main sequence lifetime had been uneventful, then it is possible that the surface chemistry of stars actually still resembles their natal chemistry. Detailed abundances of stars in dwarf galaxies can be used to reconstruct their chemical evolution, which we now find to be distinct from any other component of the Galaxy, questioning the assertion that dwarf galaxies like these built up the Galaxy. Potential solutions to reconciling dwarf galaxy abundances and Galaxy formation models include the timescale for significant merging and the possibility for uncovering different stellar populations in the new ultra-faint dwarfs.

  20. Are ancient dwarf satellites the building blocks of the Galactic halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitoni, E.; Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; Romano, D.

    2016-05-01

    According to the current cosmological cold dark matter paradigm, the Galactic halo could have been the result of the assemblage of smaller structures. Here we explore the hypothesis that the classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way have been the building blocks of the Galactic halo by comparing their [α/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] patterns with the ones observed in Galactic halo stars. The α elements deviate substantially from the observed abundances in the Galactic halo stars for [Fe/H] values larger than -2 dex, while they overlap for lower metallicities. On the other hand, for the [Ba/Fe] ratio, the discrepancy is extended at all [Fe/H] values, suggesting that the majority of stars in the halo are likely to have been formed in situ. Therefore, we suggest that [Ba/Fe] ratios are a better diagnostic than [α/Fe] ratios. Moreover, for the first time we consider the effects of an enriched infall of gas with the same chemical abundances as the matter ejected and/or stripped from dwarf satellites of the Milky Way on the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo. We find that the resulting chemical abundances of the halo stars depend on the assumed infall time-scale, and the presence of a threshold in the gas for star formation. In particular, in models with an infall time-scale for the halo around 0.8 Gyr coupled with a threshold in the surface gas density for the star formation (4 M⊙ pc-2), and the enriched infall from dwarf spheroidal satellites, the first halo stars formed show [Fe/H]>-2.4 dex. In this case, to explain [α/Fe] data for stars with [Fe/H]<-2.4 dex, we need stars formed in dSph systems.

  1. Families of ellipsoidal stellar systems adn the formation of dwarf elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kormendy, J.

    1985-08-01

    Core radii and central surface brightnesses of bulges and elliptical galaxies are measured using CCD photometry obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (scale = 0''.22 pixel/sup -1/; seeing = 0''.45--1''.0 FWHM). The correlations between core parameters are derived and compared for ellipticals, bulges, dwarf spheroidal galaxies, dwarf irregular galaxies, and globular clusters. The results are as follows. 1. Ihe data confirm the existence of well-defined correlations between the core parameters of elliptical galaxies. More luminous ellipticals have larger core radii r/sub c/ and lower central surface brightnesses ..mu../sub 0v/. Galaxies with larger core radii have larger central velocity dispersions. The small, bright core of M32 is normal for a galaxy of M/sub B/ = -15.2. Radio ellipticals and brightest cluster galaxies satisfy the correlations. 2. The bulges of disk galaxies are basically similar to elliptical galaxies. Their cores have slightly smaller r/sub c/ and brighter ..mu../sub 0v/ than ellipticals of the same luminosity, because their nonisothermal profiles rise more rapidly toward the center and because they often contain extra nuclei superposed on their cores. 3. There is a large discontinuity between the parameter correlations for bright ellipticals, including M32, and those for dwarf spheroidals. Seven dE's in the Local Group and three in the Virgo Cluster have core parameters which are correlated, but not as in ordinary ellipticals. More luminous dE's have larger r/sub c/ and brighter ..mu../sub 0v/.

  2. THRESHING IN ACTION: THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A DWARF GALAXY BY THE HYDRA I CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Burkert, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael; Black, Christine S.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Hilker, Michael; Benson, Andrew J.

    2012-08-10

    We report on the discovery of strong tidal features around a dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the Hydra I galaxy cluster, indicating its ongoing tidal disruption. This very low surface brightness object, HCC-087, was originally classified as an early-type dwarf in the Hydra Cluster Catalogue (HCC), but our re-analysis of the ESO-VLT/FORS images of the HCC unearthed a clear indication of an S-shaped morphology and a large spatial extent. Its shape, luminosity (M{sub V} = -11.6 mag), and physical size (at a half-light radius of 3.1 kpc and a full length of {approx}5.9 kpc) are comparable to the recently discovered NGC 4449B and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal, all of which are undergoing clear tidal disruption. Aided by N-body simulations we argue that HCC-087 is currently at its first apocenter, at 150 kpc, around the cluster center and that it is being tidally disrupted by the galaxy cluster's potential itself. An interaction with the nearby (50 kpc) S0 cluster galaxy HCC-005, at M{sub *} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} is rather unlikely, as this constellation requires a significant amount of dynamical friction and thus low relative velocities. The S-shaped morphology and large spatial extent of the satellite would, however, also appear if HCC-087 would orbit the cluster center. These features appear to be characteristic properties of satellites that are seen in the process of being tidally disrupted, independent of the environment of the destruction. An important finding of our simulations is an orientation of the tidal tails perpendicular to the orbit.

  3. Is Sextans dwarf galaxy in a scalar field dark matter halo?

    SciTech Connect

    Lora, V.; Magaña, Juan E-mail: juan.magana@uv.cl

    2014-09-01

    The Bose-Einstein condensate/scalar field dark matter model, considers that the dark matter is composed by spinless-ultra-light particles which can be described by a scalar field. This model is an alternative model to the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm, and therefore should be studied at galactic and cosmological scales. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies have been very useful when studying any dark matter theory, because the dark matter dominates their dynamics. In this paper we study the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy, embedded in a scalar field dark matter halo. We explore how the dissolution time-scale of the stellar substructures in Sextans, constrain the mass, and the self-interacting parameter of the scalar field dark matter boson. We find that for masses in the range (0.12< m{sub φ}<8) ×10{sup -22} eV, scalar field dark halos without self-interaction would have cores large enough to explain the longevity of the stellar substructures in Sextans, and small enough mass to be compatible with dynamical limits. If the self-interacting parameter is distinct to zero, then the mass of the boson could be as high as m{sub φ}≈2×10{sup -21} eV, but it would correspond to an unrealistic low mass for the Sextans dark matter halo . Therefore, the Sextans dwarf galaxy could be embedded in a scalar field/BEC dark matter halo with a preferred self-interacting parameter equal to zero.

  4. Heterogeneity in multicell spheroids induced by alterations in the external oxygen and glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Multicell tumor spheroids are currently being used as in vitro models for investigations of tumor therapy, based on the concept that spheroids exhibit many of the growth characteristics and cell subpopulations of tumors in vivo. At present, the factors which regulate cell proliferation, clonogenicity and viability in spheroids are unknown, as are the effects of alterations in these critical factors on therapeutic results. The symmetrical structure of the EMT6/Ro spheroid and the ease of manipulating the external environment are key features of this spheroid system which are used to investigate the role of oxygen and glucose in the control of spheroid growth and the development of cell subpopulations. A technique is developed for selectivity dissociating a spheroid population into fractions of cells originating from known locations in the spheroid structure. Characterization of these cell subpopulations demonstrates that outer cells are similar to an exponential cell population, while inner region cells are not proliferating and have a reduced cell volume and clonogenic capacity. Oxygen and glucose concentrations at critical depths in the spheroid were determined. It is concluded that the oxygen and glucose supply to cells in spheroids is critical in determining the initial onset of central necrosis. 217 references, 32 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

  5. Manipulation of cellular spheroid composition and the effects on vascular tissue fusion.

    PubMed

    Olsen, T R; Mattix, B; Casco, M; Herbst, A; Williams, C; Tarasidis, A; Simionescu, D; Visconti, R P; Alexis, F

    2015-02-01

    Cellular spheroids were investigated as tissue-engineered building blocks that can be fused to form functional tissue constructs. While spheroids can be assembled using passive contacts for the fusion of complex tissues, physical forces can be used to promote active contacts to improve tissue homogeneity and accelerate tissue fusion. Understanding the mechanisms affecting the fusion of spheroids is critical to fabricating tissues. Here, manipulation of the spheroid composition was used to accelerate the fusion process mediated by magnetic forces. The Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids spatially controls iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. Studies were performed to evaluate the influence of extracellular matrix (ECM) content and cell number on the fusion of Janus magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCSs). Results showed that the integration of iron oxide MNPs into spheroids increased the production of collagen over time when compared to spheroids without MNPs. The results also showed that ring tissues composed of JMCSs with high ECM concentrations and high cell numbers fused together, but exhibited less contraction when compared to their lower concentration counterparts. Results from spheroid fusion in capillary tubes showed that low ECM concentrations and high cell numbers experienced more fusion and cellular intermixing over time when compared to their higher counterparts. These findings indicate that cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions play an important role in regulating fusion, and this understanding sets the rationale of spheroid composition to fabricate larger and more complex tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:25463485

  6. Opportunities and Challenges for use of Tumor Spheroids as Models to Test Drug Delivery and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Geeta; Hsiao, Amy Y.; Ingram, Marylou; Luker, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are three dimensional in vitro microscale tissue analogs. The current article examines the suitability of spheroids as an in vitro platform for testing drug delivery systems. Spheroids model critical physiologic parameters present in vivo, including complex multicellular architecture, barriers to mass transport, and extracellular matrix deposition. Relative to two-dimensional cultures, spheroids also provide better target cells for drug testing and are appropriate in vitro model for studies of drug penetration. Key challenges associated with creation of uniformly sized spheroids, spheroids with small number of cells and co-culture spheroids are emphasized in the article. Moreover, the assay techniques required for the characterization of drug delivery and efficacy in spheroids and the challenges associated with such studies are discussed. Examples for the use of spheroids in drug delivery and testing are also emphasized. With these challenges and the possible solutions, multicellular spheroids are becoming an increasingly useful in vitro tool for drug screening and delivery to pathological tissues and organs. PMID:22613880

  7. Adhesive Wear Behavior of Heat Treated Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, M.; Shama, S.; Mozumder, Y. H.; Behera, R. K.; P, Sindhoora L.; Pattanaik, A.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron is one of the most favorable materials in cast iron family due to its wide range of mechanical and tribological properties. In the current research priority is given towards the investigation of wear system response of spheroidal graphite cast iron subjected to various heat treatment conditions. Pearlitic/ferritic and upper bainitic matrix was obtained through normalizing and austempering treatment for an austenitizing temperature of 1000°C. Dry sliding wear test was performed at 10N, 20N, 30N for a sliding distance of 7.54m. With increase in load weight loss was observed for as-cast specimen whereas normalized specimen showed very less weight loss with increasing load. On the other hand the austempered specimen observed to lose weight when operated at 10N, whereas at 20N and 30N drastic gain in weight was observed.

  8. Two step continuous method to synthesize colloidal spheroid gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Doran, J; McCormack, S J

    2015-12-01

    This research investigated a two-step continuous process to synthesize colloidal suspension of spheroid gold nanorods. In the first step; gold precursor was reduced to seed-like particles in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone and ascorbic acid. In continuous second step; silver nitrate and alkaline sodium hydroxide produced various shape and size Au nanoparticles. The shape was manipulated through weight ratio of ascorbic acid to silver nitrate by varying silver nitrate concentration. The specific weight ratio of 1.35-1.75 grew spheroid gold nanorods of aspect ratio ∼1.85 to ∼2.2. Lower weight ratio of 0.5-1.1 formed spherical nanoparticle. The alkaline medium increased the yield of gold nanorods and reduced reaction time at room temperature. The synthesized gold nanorods retained their shape and size in ethanol. The surface plasmon resonance was red shifted by ∼5 nm due to higher refractive index of ethanol than water. PMID:26298283

  9. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method. PMID:27619092

  10. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  11. The Dark Halo - Spheroid Conspiracy Reloaded: Evolution with Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The total density profiles of elliptical galaxies can be fit by a single power law, i.e., ρtot ~ r γ with γ ~ -2. While strong lensing observations show a tendency for the slopes to become flatter with increasing redshift, simulations indicate an opposite trend. To understand this discrepancy, we study a set of simulated spheroids formed within the cosmological framework. From our simulations we find that the steepness of the total density slope correlates with the compactness of the stellar component within the half-mass radius, and that spheroidal galaxies tend to be more compact at high redshifts than their present-day counterparts. While both these results are in agreement with observations, the observed trend of the total density slope with redshift remains in contradiction to the results from simulations.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  13. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ∼50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color–magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ∼12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 \\lt [Fe/H] \\lt -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2–3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.02 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ε =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec‑2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity–luminosity and surface brightness–luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  14. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ˜50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color-magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ˜12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 < [Fe/H] < -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2-3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V< 0.02 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ɛ =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec-2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity-luminosity and surface brightness-luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  15. Sound scattering by rigid oblate spheroids, with implication to pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.; Seiner, J.; Norum, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The frequency limit below which sound scattering by a microphone body is sufficiently small to permit accurate pressure gradient measurements was determined. The sound pressure was measured at various points on the surface of a rigid oblate spheroid illuminated by spherical waves generated by a point source at a large distance from the spheroid, insuring an essentially plane sound field. The measurements were made with small pressure microphones flush mounted from the inside of the spheroid model. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of spheroid shapes, including that of the experimental model. Very good agreement was achieved between the experimental and theoretical results. It was found that scattering effects are insignificant if the ratio of the major circumference of the spheroid to the wavelength of the incident sound is less than about 0.7, this number being dependent upon the shape of the spheroid. This finding can be utilized in the design of pressure gradient microphones.

  16. Magnetic Flattening of Stem-Cell Spheroids Indicates a Size-Dependent Elastocapillary Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuel, Francois; Reffay, Myriam; Du, Vicard; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Rieu, Jean-Paul; Wilhelm, Claire

    2015-03-01

    Cellular aggregates (spheroids) are widely used in biophysics and tissue engineering as model systems for biological tissues. In this Letter we propose novel methods for molding stem-cell spheroids, deforming them, and measuring their interfacial and elastic properties with a single method based on cell tagging with magnetic nanoparticles and application of a magnetic field gradient. Magnetic molding yields spheroids of unprecedented sizes (up to a few mm in diameter) and preserves tissue integrity. On subjecting these spheroids to magnetic flattening (over 150 g ), we observed a size-dependent elastocapillary transition with two modes of deformation: liquid-drop-like behavior for small spheroids, and elastic-sphere-like behavior for larger spheroids, followed by relaxation to a liquidlike drop.

  17. THE INNER STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY AS A PRODUCT OF TIDAL STIRRING

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Majewski, Steven R.; Law, David R.; Mayer, Lucio; Frinchaboy, Peter M. E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.ed E-mail: drlaw@astro.ucla.ed E-mail: p.frinchaboy@tcu.ed

    2010-12-20

    The tidal stirring model envisions the formation of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Local Group and similar environments via the tidal interaction of disky dwarf systems with a larger host galaxy like the Milky Way. These progenitor disks are embedded in extended dark halos and during the evolution both components suffer strong mass loss. In addition, the disks undergo the morphological transformation into spheroids and the transition from ordered to random motion of their stars. Using collisionless N-body simulations, we construct a model for the nearby and highly elongated Sagittarius (Sgr) dSph galaxy within the framework of the tidal stirring scenario. Constrained by the present orbit of the dwarf, which is fairly well known, the model suggests that in order to produce the majority of tidal debris observed as the Sgr stream, but not yet transform the core of the dwarf into a spherical shape, Sgr must have just passed the second pericenter of its current orbit around the Milky Way. In the model, the stellar component of Sgr is still very elongated after the second pericenter and morphologically intermediate between the strong bar formed at the first pericenter and the almost spherical shape existing after the third pericenter. This is thus the first model of the evolution of the Sgr dwarf that accounts for its observed very elliptical shape. At the present time, there is very little intrinsic rotation left and the velocity gradient detected along the major axis is almost entirely of tidal origin. We model the recently measured velocity dispersion profile for Sgr assuming that mass traces light and estimate its current total mass within 5 kpc to be 5.2 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. To have this mass at present, the model requires that the initial virial mass of Sgr must have been as high as 1.6 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, comparable to that of the Large Magellanic Cloud, which may serve as a suitable analog for the pre-interaction, Sgr progenitor.

  18. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    This proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of about 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain. A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s. Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle". A paper reporting this study is now in preparation.

  19. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. III. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF MILKY WAY DWARF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Lanfranchi, Gustavo A.; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2011-02-01

    We present metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) for the central regions of eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way: Fornax, Leo I and II, Sculptor, Sextans, Draco, Canes Venatici I, and Ursa Minor. We use the published catalog of abundance measurements from the previous paper in this series. The measurements are based on spectral synthesis of iron absorption lines. For each MDF, we determine maximum likelihood fits for Leaky Box, Pre-Enriched, and Extra Gas (wherein the gas supply available for star formation increases before it decreases to zero) analytic models of chemical evolution. Although the models are too simplistic to describe any MDF in detail, a Leaky Box starting from zero metallicity gas fits none of the galaxies except Canes Venatici I well. The MDFs of some galaxies, particularly the more luminous ones, strongly prefer the Extra Gas Model to the other models. Only for Canes Venatici I does the Pre-Enriched Model fit significantly better than the Extra Gas Model. The best-fit effective yields of the less luminous half of our galaxy sample do not exceed 0.02 Z{sub sun}, indicating that gas outflow is important in the chemical evolution of the less luminous galaxies. We surmise that the ratio of the importance of gas infall to gas outflow increases with galaxy luminosity. Strong correlations of average [Fe/H] and metallicity spread with luminosity support this hypothesis.

  20. Spheroid-plug model as a tool to study tumor development, angiogenesis, and heterogeneity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Szade, Agata; Collet, Guillaume; Kloska, Damian; Kieda, Claudine; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneous injection of the tumor cell suspension is a simple and commonly used tool for studying tumor development in vivo. However, subcutaneous models poorly resemble tumor complexity due to the fast growth not reflecting the natural course. Here, we describe an application of the new spheroid-plug model to combine the simplicity of subcutaneous injection with improved resemblance to natural tumor progression. Spheroid-plug model relies on in vitro formation of tumor spheroids, followed by injection of single tumor spheroid subcutaneously in Matrigel matrix. In spheroid-plug model, tumors grow slower in comparison to tumors formed by injection of cell suspension as assessed by 3D ultrasonography (USG) and in vivo bioluminescence measurements. The slower tumor growth rate in spheroid-plug model is accompanied by reduced necrosis. The spheroid-plug model ensures increased and more stable vascularization of tumor than classical subcutaneous tumor model as demonstrated by 3D USG Power Doppler examination. Flow cytometry analysis showed that tumors formed from spheroids have enhanced infiltration of endothelial cells as well as hematopoietic and progenitor cells with stem cell phenotype (c-Kit(+) and Sca-1(+)). They also contain more tumor cells expressing cancer stem cell marker CXCR4. Here, we show that spheroid-plug model allows investigating efficiency of anticancer drugs. Treatment of spheroid-plug tumors with known antiangiogenic agent axitinib decreased their size and viability. The antiangiogenic activity of axitinib was higher in spheroid-plug model than in classical model. Our results indicate that spheroid-plug model imitates natural tumor growth and can become a valuable tool for cancer research. PMID:26385771

  1. Spheroidal models of the exterior gravitational field of Asteroids Bennu and Castalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebera, Josef; Bezděk, Aleš; Pešek, Ivan; Henych, Tomáš

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational field of small bodies can be modeled e.g. with mascons, a polyhedral model or in terms of harmonic functions. If the shape of a body is close to the spheroid, it is advantageous to employ the spheroidal basis functions for expressing the gravitational field. Spheroidal harmonic models, similarly to the spherical ones, may be used in navigation and geophysical tasks. We focus on modeling the exterior gravitational field of oblate-like Asteroid (101955) Bennu and prolate-like Asteroid (4769) Castalia with spheroidal harmonics. Using the Gauss-Legendre quadrature and the spheroidal basis functions, we converted the gravitational potential of a particular polyhedral model of a constant density into the spheroidal harmonics. The results consist of (i) spheroidal harmonic coefficients of the exterior gravitational field for the Asteroids Bennu and Castalia, (ii) spherical harmonic coefficients for Bennu, and (iii) the first and second-order Cartesian derivatives in the local spheroidal South-East-Up frame for both bodies. The spheroidal harmonics offer biaxial flexibility (compared with spherical harmonics) and low computational costs that allow high-degree expansions (compared with ellipsoidal harmonics). The obtained spheroidal models for Bennu and Castalia represent the exterior gravitational field valid on and outside the Brillouin spheroid but they can be used even under this surface. For Bennu, 5 m above the surface the agreement with point-wise integration was 1% or less, while it was about 10% for Castalia due to its more irregular shape. As the shape models may produce very high frequencies, it was crucial to use higher maximum degree to reduce the aliasing. We have used the maximum degree 360 to achieve 9-10 common digits (in RMS) when reconstructing the input (the gravitational potential) from the spheroidal coefficients. The physically meaningful maximum degree may be lower (≪ 360) but its particular value depends on the distance and/or on the

  2. Brown dwarfs as close companions to white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, G.S.; Bodenheimer, P.; Black, D.C. Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX )

    1990-02-01

    The influence of the radiation flux emitted by a white dwarf primary on the evolution of a closely orbiting brown dwarf (BD) companion is investigated. Full stellar evolutionary calculations are presented for both isolated and thermal bath cases, including effects of large variations in the atmospheric grain opacities. High grain opacities significantly increase the radii of the BDs, but the thermal bath does not. The major influence of the thermal bath is to increase substantially the surface temperature and luminosity of the BD at a given age. These results are compared with the observational properties of the possible BD companion of the white dwarf G29-38. Inclusion of both physical effects, high grain opacities and thermal bath, increases the mass range (0.034-0.063 solar masses) of viable models significantly, yet the final determination of whether the object is indeed a BD requires improvements in the observations of the system's properties. 37 refs.

  3. Brown dwarfs as close companions to white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bodenheimer, Peter; Black, David C.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the radiation flux emitted by a white dwarf primary on the evolution of a closely orbiting brown dwarf (BD) companion is investigated. Full stellar evolutionary calculations are presented for both isolated and thermal bath cases, including effects of large variations in the atmospheric grain opacities. High grain opacities significantly increase the radii of the BDs, but the thermal bath does not. The major influence of the thermal bath is to increase substantially the surface temperature and luminosity of the BD at a given age. These results are compared with the observational properties of the possible BD companion of the white dwarf G29-38. Inclusion of both physical effects, high grain opacities and thermal bath, increases the mass range (0.034-0.063 solar masses) of viable models significantly, yet the final determination of whether the object is indeed a BD requires improvements in the observations of the system's properties.

  4. The universal stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gallazzi, Anna

    2013-12-20

    We present spectroscopic metallicities of individual stars in seven gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), and we show that dIrrs obey the same mass-metallicity relation as the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of both the Milky Way and M31: Z{sub ∗}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 0.30±0.02}. The uniformity of the relation is in contradiction to previous estimates of metallicity based on photometry. This relationship is roughly continuous with the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for galaxies as massive as M {sub *} = 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. Although the average metallicities of dwarf galaxies depend only on stellar mass, the shapes of their metallicity distributions depend on galaxy type. The metallicity distributions of dIrrs resemble simple, leaky box chemical evolution models, whereas dSphs require an additional parameter, such as gas accretion, to explain the shapes of their metallicity distributions. Furthermore, the metallicity distributions of the more luminous dSphs have sharp, metal-rich cut-offs that are consistent with the sudden truncation of star formation due to ram pressure stripping.

  5. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF SEVEN IRREGULAR AND THREE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN THE M81 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Henry; Miller, Bryan W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Lee, Janice C.; Cote, Stephanie; Kennicutt, Robert C. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.ed E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed E-mail: stephanie.cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.c E-mail: bmiller@gemini.ed

    2009-11-01

    We have derived nebular abundances for 10 dwarf galaxies belonging to the M81 Group, including several galaxies which do not have abundances previously reported in the literature. For each galaxy, multiple H II regions were observed with GMOS-N at the Gemini Observatory in order to determine abundances of several elements (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, neon, and argon). For seven galaxies, at least one H II region had a detection of the temperature sensitive [O III] lambda4363 line, allowing a 'direct' determination of the oxygen abundance. No abundance gradients were detected in the targeted galaxies, and the observed oxygen abundances are typically in agreement with the well-known metallicity-luminosity relation. However, three candidate 'tidal dwarf' galaxies lie well off this relation: UGC 5336, Garland, and KDG 61. The nature of these systems suggests that UGC 5336 and Garland are indeed recently formed systems, whereas KDG 61 is most likely a dwarf spheroidal galaxy which lies along the same line of sight as the M81 tidal debris field. We propose that these H II regions formed from previously enriched gas which was stripped from nearby massive galaxies (e.g., NGC 3077 and M81) during a recent tidal interaction.

  6. The Universal Stellar Mass-Stellar Metallicity Relation for Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Cheng, Lucy; Bullock, James S.; Gallazzi, Anna

    2013-12-01

    We present spectroscopic metallicities of individual stars in seven gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), and we show that dIrrs obey the same mass-metallicity relation as the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of both the Milky Way and M31: Z_* \\propto M_*^{0.30+/- 0.02}. The uniformity of the relation is in contradiction to previous estimates of metallicity based on photometry. This relationship is roughly continuous with the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for galaxies as massive as M * = 1012 M ⊙. Although the average metallicities of dwarf galaxies depend only on stellar mass, the shapes of their metallicity distributions depend on galaxy type. The metallicity distributions of dIrrs resemble simple, leaky box chemical evolution models, whereas dSphs require an additional parameter, such as gas accretion, to explain the shapes of their metallicity distributions. Furthermore, the metallicity distributions of the more luminous dSphs have sharp, metal-rich cut-offs that are consistent with the sudden truncation of star formation due to ram pressure stripping. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Machine Learning Identification of Dwarf Galaxy Satellites around Milky Way Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, Emily; Geha, M. C.; Wechsler, R. H.; Tollerud, E. J.; Marshall, P. J.; Cunha, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Milky Way galaxy (MW) hosts approximately two dozen known dwarf galaxy satellites, ranging from the bright Magellanic Clouds, to the fainter dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including Leo I and Fornax, to ultra-faint dwarfs. Galaxy formation simulations predict that, down to the luminosity of Fornax, roughly three times more satellites should exist than we observe. However, the MW is a small and possibly biased sample. No MW analog satellite populations have yet been studied to these luminosities, because identifying the satellites around a MW analog requires spectroscopic observations of all objects within the virial radius to distinguish the satellites from the significantly more numerous background galaxies. Here, we apply machine learning techniques, specifically the use of an artificial neural network (ANN), to the problem of identifying satellites around MW analogs based on photometric observables, which are more easily obtained than spectroscopy. The ANN is trained on a set of labeled satellites and background galaxies around ~100 MW-like hosts, then applied to a validation data set to evaluate its performance. This work is carried out in parallel with a long-term spectroscopic observing program of several MW analogs, which will increase the training set size and improve the ANN’s performance.

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the unimodal nature of the dwarf galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Smriti; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Driver, S.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Hopkins, A. M.; Baldry, I.; Phillipps, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Loveday, J.; Penny, Samantha J.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we aim to (i) test the number of statistically distinct classes required to classify the local galaxy population and (ii) identify the differences in the physical and star formation properties of visually distinct galaxies. To accomplish this, we analyse the structural parameters - effective radius (Reff), effective surface brightness within Reff (<μ>e), central surface brightness (μ0) and Sérsic index (n) - obtained by fitting the light profile of 432 galaxies (0.002 < z ≤ 0.02; Viking Z band), and their spectral energy distribution using multiband photometry in 18 broad-bands to obtain the stellar mass (M*), the star formation rate (SFR), the specific SFR (sSFR) and the dust mass (Mdust), respectively. We show that visually distinct, star-forming dwarf galaxies (irregulars, blue spheroids and low-surface-brightness galaxies) form a unimodal population in a parameter space mapped by <μ>e, μ0, n, Reff, SFR, sSFR, M*, Mdust and (g - i). The SFR and sSFR distribution of passively evolving (dwarf) ellipticals on the other hand, statistically distinguish them from other galaxies with similar luminosity, while the giant galaxies clearly segregate into star-forming spirals and passive lenticulars. We therefore suggest that the morphology classification scheme(s) used in literature for dwarf galaxies only reflect the observational differences based on luminosity and surface brightness among the apparent distinct classes, rather than any physical differences between them.

  9. Dwarf busting in Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon

    1999-07-01

    We request 24 orbits to obtain a deep mosaic {6 * 4-orbit pointings} of the central region of A868, a rich Abell cluster which we have imaged comprehensively from the ground. The objective is to identify and characterise the morphological nature of the dwarf galaxy population{s} responsible for the steep upturn seen in this cluster's luminosity function. While similar upturns have been reported in many clusters, the specifics of the dwarf population remain unknown as these objects cannot be resolved from the ground. What type of dwarf galaxies are they ? Is there more than one population contributing ? How are they clustered ? By obtaining deep high-resolution HST WFPC2 imaging over a central field roughly 7.5' * 3.75' we will be able to measure morphologies, light- profiles and the clustering properties of the dwarf population{s} down to M_I = -16 mags {H_o=75kms^-1Mpc^-1}. Although we shall primarily concentrate on the dwarf galaxies, we will also recover the cluster's morphological luminosity distributions for elliptical, spirals and irregulars over a broad absolute magnitude range {-24 < M_I < -16 mags} as well as the more quantitative bivariate brightness distribution {- 24 < M_I < -16 mags, 17.0 < mu_e^I < 25 mags per sq arcsec}. Comparing these results to those recently derived for the general field will provide an insight into the environmental influences on morphology and surface brightness.

  10. Physiologically Low Oxygen Enhances Biomolecule Production and Stemness of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shearier, Emily; Xing, Qi; Qian, Zichen; Zhao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spheroids have been demonstrated to be valuable in a variety of applications, including cartilage regeneration, wound healing, and neoangiogenesis. Physiological relevant low oxygen culture can significantly improve in vitro hMSC expansion by preventing cell differentiation. We hypothesize that hypoxia-cultured hMSC spheroids can better maintain the regenerative properties of hMSCs. In this study, hMSC spheroids were fabricated using hanging drop method and cultured under 2% O2 and 20% O2 for up to 96 h. Spheroid diameter and viability were examined, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) components and growth factor levels between the two oxygen tensions at different time points. Stemness was measured among the spheroid culture conditions and compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Spheroid viability and structural integrity were studied using different needle gauges to ensure no damage would occur when implemented in vivo. Spheroid attachment and integration within a tissue substitute were also demonstrated. The results showed that a three-dimensional hMSC spheroid cultured at low oxygen conditions can enhance the production of ECM proteins and growth factors, while maintaining the spheroids' stemness and ability to be injected, attached, and potentially be integrated within a tissue. PMID:26830500

  11. THE EXTENSIVE AGE GRADIENT OF THE CARINA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, G.; Irwin, M.; Tolstoy, E.; De Boer, T.; Mateo, M.

    2012-12-20

    The evolution of small systems such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is likely to have been a balance between external environmental effects and internal processes within their own relatively shallow potential wells. Assessing how strong such environmental interactions may have been is therefore an important element in understanding the baryonic evolution of dSphs and their derived dark matter distribution. Here we present results from a wide-area CTIO/MOSAIC II photometric survey of the Carina dSph, reaching down to about two magnitudes below the oldest main-sequence turnoff (MSTO). This data set enables us to trace the structure of Carina in detail out to very large distances from its center, and as a function of stellar age. We observe the presence of an extended structure made up primarily of ancient MSTO stars, at distances between 25' and 60' from Carina's center, confirming results in the literature that Carina extends well beyond its nominal tidal radius. The large number statistics of our survey reveals features such as isophote twists and tails that were undetected in other previous, shallower surveys. This is the first time that such unambiguous signs of tidal disruption have been found in a Milky Way 'classical' dwarf other than Sagittarius. We also demonstrate the presence of a negative age gradient in Carina directly from its MSTOs, and trace it out to very large distances from the galaxy center. The signs of interaction with the Milky Way make it unclear whether the age gradient was already in place before Carina underwent tidal disruption.

  12. The Origin of Dwarf Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa

    2012-10-01

    Abridge. We have conducted a spectrophotometric study of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in regions of lower density. We have found that these galaxies show many properties in common with late-type galaxies but not with more massive early-types (E/S0). The properties of the dEs in Virgo show gradients within the cluster. dEs in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster are kinematically supported by rotation, while those in the center are supported by the random motions of their stars (i.e. pressure supported). The rotationally supported dEs have disky isophotes and faint underlying spiral/irregular substructures, they also show younger ages than those pressure supported, which have boxy isophotes and are smooth and regular, without any substructure. We compare the position of these dEs with massive early-type galaxies in the Faber-Jackson and Fundamental Plane relations, and we find that, although there is no difference between the position of rotationally and pressure supported dEs, both deviate from the relations of massive early-type galaxies in the direction of dwarf spheroidal systems (dSphs). We have used their offset with respect to the Fundamental Plane of E/S0 galaxies to estimate their dark matter fraction. All the properties studied in this work agree with a ram pressure stripping scenario, where late-type galaxies infall into the cluster, their interaction with the intergalactic medium blows away their gas and, as a result, they are quenched in a small amount of time. However, those dEs in the center of the cluster seem to have been fully transformed leaving no trace of their possible spiral origin, thus, if that is the case, they must have experienced a more violent mechanism in combination with ram pressure stripping.

  13. Ejection of Supernova-enriched Gas from Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragile, P. Chris; Murray, Stephen D.; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2004-12-01

    We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 108 and 109 Msolar with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 Myr-1. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk but distributed over radii of 0%, 30%, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, however, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density ``chimneys'' swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predictions indicates that when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered will efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

  14. Branes constrictions with White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aspeitia, Miguel A.

    2015-11-01

    We consider here a robust study of stellar dynamics for white dwarf stars with polytropic matter in the weak-field approximation using the Lane-Emden equation from the brane-world scenario. We also derive an analytical solution to the nonlocal energy density and show the behavior and sensitivity of these stars to the presence of extra dimensions. Similarly, we analyze stability and compactness, in order to show whether it is possible to agree with the conventional wisdom of white dwarfs dynamics. Our results predict an average value of the brane tension of < λ rangle ≳ 84.818MeV^4, with a standard deviation σ ˜eq 82.021MeV^4, which comes from a sample of dwarf stars, being weaker than other astrophysical observations but remaining higher than cosmological results provided by nucleosynthesis among others.

  15. Pluto: Dwarf planet 134340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, investigations of Pluto with up-to-date astronomical instruments yielded results that have been generally confirmed by the New Horizons mission. In 2006, in Prague, the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reclassified Pluto as a member of the dwarf planet category according to the criteria defined by the IAU for the term "planet". At the same time, interest in studies of Pluto was increasing, while the space investigations of Pluto were delayed. In 2006, the New Horizons Pluto spacecraft started its journey to Pluto. On July 14, 2015, the spacecraft, being in fly-by mode, made its closest approach to Pluto. The heterogeneities and properties of the surface and rarified atmosphere were investigated thoroughly. Due to the extreme remoteness of the spacecraft and the energy limitations, it will take 18 months to transmit the whole data volume. Along with the preliminary results of the New Horizons Pluto mission, this paper reviews the basics on Pluto and its moons acquired from the ground-based observations and with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). There are only a few meteorite craters on the surfaces of Pluto and Charon, which distinctly marks them apart from such satellites of the giant planets as Ganymede and Callisto. The explanation is that the surface of Pluto is young: its age is estimated at less than 100 Myr. Ice glaciers of apparently a nitrogen nature were found. Nitrogen is also the main component of the atmosphere of Pluto. The planet demonstrates the signs of strong geologic activity, though the energy sources of these processes are unknown.

  16. Maximum likelihood fitting of tidal streams with application to the Sagittarius dwarf tidal tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Nathan

    2009-06-01

    = 4.2 value to estimate stellar distances. Fifteen stripes were extracted and used to trace the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy tidal stream. These analyses characterize the Sagittarius tidal stream in both the trailing tidal tail and the leading tidal tail. Comparing these detections with that of the current models for the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy disruption shows that there is considerable disagreement. The positions along the trailing tidal tail correspond well with the model disruption; however, the leading tidal tail positions differ greatly from those seen in the model disruptions indicating that new models need to be created to better fit the observations. A new orbital plane of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy has been calculated, using the fifteen detections of the Sgr stream, with equation -0.207 X + 0.925 Y + 0.319 Z - 1.996 = 0. The leading tidal tail lies along this plane while the Sgr core and the trailing tail do not. A second plane was fit to the three southern detections and the Sagittarius dwarf position and is described by equation 0.024 X + 03990 Y + 0.136 Z - 1.801 = 0. The leading and trailing tails are fit well with these two planes, respectively. There is approximately a 17° difference in orientation of these two planes and may imply a strong precession of the orbit of the Sagittarius dwarf. The separation technique was applied to the analyzed data to successfully create a catalog of stars matching the density profile of the Sagittarius tidal streams; however, these stars do not explicitly represent stars drawn from the Sagittarius tidal stream. The stream was then successfully extracted from the data resulting in a much smoother spheroid. Therefore, through the fitting and extraction of all tidal debris in the data using this method, the smooth component of the spheroid may be recovered for uncontaminated study to determine the true structure of the smooth spheroid. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  17. Age determination for Ultracool Dwarfs .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.

    Brown dwarfs are notoriously difficult to age date as they lack stable hydrogen burning hence main-sequence star age-dating techniques are inapplicable for their masses. However precise and accurate ages for individual sources are required to determine masses and disentangle how secondary parameters such as differing metallicity, cloud structure and gravity impact observables. In this contribution, I review age-dating techniques for brown dwarfs as well as ``piggy-back" techniques that rely on co-moving, higher mass, main-sequence stars for which Gaia may substantially increase the sample.

  18. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  19. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Langan, Laura M; Dodd, Nicholas J F; Owen, Stewart F; Purcell, Wendy M; Jackson, Simon K; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  20. Spheroid formation and enhanced cardiomyogenic potential of adipose-derived stem cells grown on chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-Hsien; Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Min-Hsiung; Chen, David C; Lee, Bo-Hua; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells may differentiate into cardiomyocytes and participate in local tissue repair after heart injury. In the current study, rat adipose-derived adult stem cells (ASCs) grown on chitosan membranes were observed to form cell spheroids after 3 days. The cell seeding density and surface modification of chitosan with Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide had an influence on the sizes of ASC spheroids. In the absence of induction, these spheroids showed an increased level of cardiac marker gene expression (Gata4, Nkx2-5, Myh6, and Tnnt2) more than 20-fold versus cells on the tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) dish. Induction by 5-azacytidine or p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB202190) did not further increase the cardiac marker gene expression of these spheroids. Moreover, the enhanced cardiomyogenic potential of the spheroids was highly associated with the chitosan substrates. When ASC spheroids were plated onto TCPS with either basal or cardiac induction medium for 9 days, the spheroids spread into a monolayer and the positive effect on cardiomyogenic marker gene expression disappeared. The possible role of calcium ion and the up-regulation of adhesion molecule P-selectin and chemokine receptor Cxcr4 were demonstrated in ASC spheroids. Applying these spheroids to the chronic myocardial infarction animal model showed better functional recovery versus single cells after 12 weeks. Taken together, this study suggested that the ASC spheroids on chitosan may form as a result of calcium ion signaling, and the transplantation of these spheroids may offer a simple method to enhance the efficiency of stem cell-based therapy in myocardial infarction. PMID:23514754

  1. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Laura M.; Dodd, Nicholas J. F.; Owen, Stewart F.; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  2. Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Spheroids. I. Disassembling Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks bars rings spiral arms halos extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors.

  3. OVCAR-3 Spheroid-Derived Cells Display Distinct Metabolic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A.; Wang, Lijuan; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells. Methods To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines. Results These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate for the

  4. Aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea in Labrador.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G J

    1981-01-01

    To determine the aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea (Labrador keratopathy), total population surveys were conducted in 5 communities in coastal Labrador and northern Newfoundland. For 4 years records were also kept on all clinic patients aged 40 or more throughout the region. Both methods gave a peak prevalence at latitudes 55 degrees--56 degrees north. The greatest severity and earliest age of onset occurred around the same latitudes. Of the proposed environmental causative agents only ultraviolet radiation, reflected from ice and snow, explains the distribution of the disease. The high cumulative UV dosage is due to the unique geographical and climatic features of the region. Images PMID:7236572

  5. Hyperbolic umbilic diffraction catastrophe and rainbow scattering from spheroidal drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Trinh, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    Short-wavelength scattering from drops whose shapes closely approximate that of an oblate spheroid with a vertical short or symmetry axis have been studied. The drops were illuminated by a horizontally propagating gaussian beam with a wavelength of 633 nm. The drops were observed to scatter in the horizontal rainbow region with patterns like those of hyperbolic-umblic (classification D4(+)) diffraction catastrophes. Visible D4(+) diffraction patterns observed previously include light transmitted by frosted glass surfaces and by liquid lenses clinging to tilted glass plates.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  7. New light on dark stars. Red dwarfs, low-mass stars, brown dwarfs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. N.; Hawley, S. L.

    This book presents a comprehensive discussion of both the astrophysical structure of individual M dwarf and brown dwarf star, and their collective statistical properties as a Galactic stellar population. The first section of the book discusses M dwarfs and brown dwarfs as individual objects - their observational properties, formation, internal structure and atmospheres. The second section deals with M dwarfs from the Galactic perspective - the number of stars, their possible contribution to dark matter and the missing mass and their use as probes of the stellar populations that make up our Galaxy. Contents: (1) Astronomical concepts. (2) Basic observational properties of low-mass dwarfs. (3) The structure, formation and evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. (4) The photosphere. (5) Stellar activity. (6) A Galactic structure primer. (7) The stellar luminosity function. (8) The mass function. (9) Brown dwarfs: new light on dark stars. (10) Extrasolar planets. (11) M dwarfs in the Galactic halo. Appendix: The 8 parsec sample.

  8. Andromeda and the Seven Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, C.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N.

    2011-07-01

    With the new generation of wide-field surveys, our understanding of the Andromeda satellite system has dramatically improved in recent years. Since 2004, 12 new dwarf galaxies have been discovered around Andromeda, doubling the number of previously known companions. What are the properties of these newly discovered dwarfs and what do they tell us about galaxy formation? Are these systems bound? Do they show evidence of multiple star formation epochs? To better understand the stellar populations of the faintest dwarfs around M 31, we have used the Large Binocular Camera (LBT) and Suprime-Cam (Subaru) to obtain photometric observations of And X, And XVII, And XVIII, And XIX, And XX, And XXI and And XXII. Reaching below the horizontal branch, these observations have allowed for accurate distance determinations to be made, together with metallicity estimates based on the red giant branch stars. Our analysis shows our 7 dwarfs to be metal poor and with large spreads in [Fe/H], it strongly suggests multiple generations of stars are present in And X, And XVII, And XVIII, and And XIX, And XXI.

  9. The Physics of White Dwarfs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Hugh M.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the current understanding of the structure and evolution of the white dwarf stars that was gained as a result of the increasingly sensitive and detailed astronomical observations coupled with calculations of the properties of matter under extreme conditions. (Author/GA)

  10. Irregular Dwarf Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the irregular dwarf galaxy IC 1613. Low surface brightness galaxies, such as IC 1613, are more easily detected in the ultraviolet because of the low background levels compared to visual wavelengths.

  11. Pulsating Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith; Montgomery, Michael H.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Shipman, Harry; Nitta, Atsuko; Whole Earth Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars currently on the main sequence as well as those from earlier generations will or have ended their stellar lives as white dwarf stars. White dwarfs are rich forensic laboratories linking the history and future evolution of our Galaxy. Their structure and atmospheric composition provide evidence of how the progenitors lived, how they evolved, and how they died. This information reveals details of processes governing the behavior of contemporary main sequence stars. Combined with their distribution in luminosity/temperature, white dwarfs strongly constrain models of galactic and cosmological evolution.GD358 is among the brightest (mv =13.7) and best studied of the pulsating white dwarfs. This helium atmoshere pulsator (DBV) has an extensive photometric database spanning 30 years, including nine multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns. GD358 exhibits a range of behaviors, from drastic changes in excited pulsation modes to variable multiplet splittings. We use GD358 as a template for an examination of the DBV class, combining photometric results with recent COS spectroscopy. The results present new questions concerning DB formation and evolution.

  12. White Dwarfs in Intermediate Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Kunegunda E.; Sion, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Intermediate polars (IPs), magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) in which the white dwarf (WD) has an intermediate strength magnetic field (B< 5 MG), present an interesting laboratory for the study of the evolution of CVs as they contain elements of both non-magnetic and magnetic systems. Do magnetic CVs and IPs evolve in the same manner as non-magnetic systems? One answer in this puzzle may come from understanding the nature of the white dwarf in a magnetic CV. Standard CV evolution theory predicts a white dwarf temperature for a given CV orbital period and accretion rate. By investigating the temperature of white dwarfs in IPs and comparing the temperatures to those predicted from theory, we can learn where IPs fit into the model of CV evolution. Here we present the results of our continued study of the nature of WDs in IPs. We compare temperatures derived from model fits to UV spectra with temperatures calculated based on the accretion rate and binary orbital period. Our preliminary results indicate that IPs follow the general trend of magnetic CVs containing cooler WDs than non-magnetic CVs.

  13. Stability of self-gravitating homogeneous spheroid with azimuthal magnetic field. I

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, V.A.; Zheleznyak, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of a frozen magnetic field on the stability of a self-gravitating homogeneous spheroid with respect to a deformation that transforms it into a triaxial ellipsoid is investigated. It is shown that an azimuthal magnetic field is a stabilizing factor, allowing the spheroid to be stable at e > e/sub cr/ = 0.95285.

  14. Rapid formation of multicellular spheroids in double-emulsion droplets with controllable microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hon Fai; Zhang, Ying; Ho, Yi-Ping; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Jung, Youngmee; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    An attractive option for tissue engineering is to use of multicellular spheroids as microtissues, particularly with stem cell spheroids. Conventional approaches of fabricating spheroids suffer from low throughput and polydispersity in size, and fail to supplement cues from extracellular matrix (ECM) for enhanced differentiation. In this study, we report the application of microfluidics-generated water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double-emulsion (DE) droplets as pico-liter sized bioreactor for rapid cell assembly and well-controlled microenvironment for spheroid culture. Cells aggregated to form size-controllable (30–80 μm) spheroids in DE droplets within 150 min and could be retrieved via a droplet-releasing agent. Moreover, precursor hydrogel solution can be adopted as the inner phase to produce spheroid-encapsulated microgels after spheroid formation. As an example, the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) spheroids in alginate and alginate-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (-RGD) microgel was demonstrated, with enhanced osteogenic differentiation further exhibited in the latter case. PMID:24322507

  15. The Effects of ROCK Inhibitor Y-27632 on Injectable Spheroids of Bovine Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yonglong; Liu, Qing; Yang, Yan; Guo, Xiaoling; Lian, Ruiling; Li, Shanyi; Wang, Chan; Zhang, Shiqi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The spheroids of 3-dimensional culture and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 have shown many advantages for the promotion of cellular viability and proliferation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Y-27632 on the growth and injectability of bovine corneal endothelial cells (B-CECs) maintained in vitro as spheroid cultures. Immunofluorescence staining showed that Y-27632 did not alter the cell type specificity of B-CECs, but it significantly enhanced B-CEC spherical viability and proliferation by a Live/Dead assay, 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling assay, and Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The uniform B-CEC spheroids could easily form in multiwall agarose micromolds and had a higher stemness potential than single B-CECs. Injectable B-CEC spheroids were able to form monolayer growth, and polygonal B-CECs completely covered culture plates or Descemet's membrane of decellularized corneas under inverted microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). B-CEC spheroids were generated from agarose microwells on day 1 and then adherent culture with Y-27632 for day 5. However, small B-CEC spheroids still existed on culture plates or decellularized corneas when B-CEC spheroids were cultured in the same condition except for absence of Y-27632. Our findings that CEC spheroids with Y-27632 are injectable in vitro have important implications for the favorable treatment of CEC deficiency. PMID:25548902

  16. THREE NEW ECLIPSING WHITE-DWARF-M-DWARF BINARIES DISCOVERED IN A SEARCH FOR TRANSITING PLANETS AROUND M-DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Kraus, Adam L.; Street, Rachel; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Shporer, Avi; Lister, Tim; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Baranec, Christoph; Bui, Khanh; Davis, Jack T. C.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter; and others

    2012-10-01

    We present three new eclipsing white-dwarf/M-dwarf binary systems discovered during a search for transiting planets around M-dwarfs. Unlike most known eclipsing systems of this type, the optical and infrared emission is dominated by the M-dwarf components, and the systems have optical colors and discovery light curves consistent with being Jupiter-radius transiting planets around early M-dwarfs. We detail the PTF/M-dwarf transiting planet survey, part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based box-least-squares search for transits that runs approximately 8 Multiplication-Sign faster than similar algorithms implemented on general purpose systems. For the discovered systems, we decompose low-resolution spectra of the systems into white-dwarf and M-dwarf components, and use radial velocity measurements and cooling models to estimate masses and radii for the white dwarfs. The systems are compact, with periods between 0.35 and 0.45 days and semimajor axes of approximately 2 R{sub Sun} (0.01 AU). The M-dwarfs have masses of approximately 0.35 M{sub Sun }, and the white dwarfs have hydrogen-rich atmospheres with temperatures of around 8000 K and have masses of approximately 0.5 M{sub Sun }. We use the Robo-AO laser guide star adaptive optics system to tentatively identify one of the objects as a triple system. We also use high-cadence photometry to put an upper limit on the white-dwarf radius of 0.025 R{sub Sun} (95% confidence) in one of the systems. Accounting for our detection efficiency and geometric factors, we estimate that 0.08%{sub -0.05%}{sup +0.10%} (90% confidence) of M-dwarfs are in these short-period, post-common-envelope white-dwarf/M-dwarf binaries where the optical light is dominated by the M-dwarf. The lack of detections at shorter periods, despite near-100% detection efficiency for such systems, suggests that binaries including these relatively low-temperature white dwarfs are preferentially found at

  17. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  18. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  19. An mDia2/ROCK Signaling Axis Regulates Invasive Egress from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pettee, Krista M.; Dvorak, Kaitlyn M.; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L.; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-cellular spheroids are enriched in ascites of epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) patients. They represent an invasive and chemoresistant cellular population fundamental to metastatic dissemination. The molecular mechanisms triggering single cell invasive egress from spheroids remain enigmatic. mDia formins are Rho GTPase effectors that are key regulators of F-actin cytoskeletal dynamics. We hypothesized that mDia2-driven F-actin dynamics promote single cell invasive transitions in clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D) OvCa spheroids. The current study is a dissection of the contribution of the F-actin assembly factor mDia2 formin in invasive transitions and using a clinically relevant ovarian cancer spheroid model. We show that RhoA-directed mDia2 activity is required for tight spheroid organization, and enrichment of mDia2 in the invasive cellular protrusions of collagen-embedded OVCA429 spheroids. Depleting mDia2 in ES-2 spheroids enhanced invasive dissemination of single amoeboid-shaped cells. This contrasts with spheroids treated with control siRNA, where a mesenchymal invasion program predominated. Inhibition of another RhoA effector, ROCK, had no impact on ES-2 spheroid formation but dramatically inhibited spheroid invasion through induction of a highly elongated morphology. Concurrent inhibition of ROCK and mDia2 blocked single cell invasion from ES-2 spheroids more effectively than inhibition of either protein alone, indicating that invasive egress of amoeboid cells from mDia2-depleted spheroids is ROCK-dependent. Our findings indicate that multiple GTPase effectors must be suppressed in order to fully block invasive egress from ovarian cancer spheroids. Furthermore, tightly regulated interplay between ROCK and mDia2 signaling pathways dictates the invasive capacities and the type of invasion program utilized by motile spheroid-derived ovarian cancer cells. As loss of the gene encoding mDia2, DRF3, has been linked to cancer progression and

  20. A Deep Study of the Dwarf Satellites Andromeda XXVIII and Andromeda XXIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Ho, Nhung

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of a deep study of the isolated dwarf galaxies Andromeda XXVIII and Andromeda XXIX with Gemini/GMOS and Keck/DEIMOS. Both galaxies are shown to host old, metal-poor stellar populations with no detectable recent star formation, conclusively identifying both of them as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). And XXVIII exhibits a complex horizontal branch morphology, which is suggestive of metallicity enrichment and thus an extended period of star formation in the past. Decomposing the horizontal branch into blue (metal-poor, assumed to be older) and red (relatively more metal-rich, assumed to be younger) populations shows that the metal-rich are also more spatially concentrated in the center of the galaxy. We use spectroscopic measurements of the calcium triplet, combined with the improved precision of the Gemini photometry, to measure the metallicity of the galaxies, confirming the metallicity spread and showing that they both lie on the luminosity-metallicity relation for dwarf satellites. Taken together, the galaxies exhibit largely typical properties for dSphs despite their significant distances from M31. These dwarfs thus place particularly significant constraints on models of dSph formation involving environmental processes such as tidal or ram pressure stripping. Such models must be able to completely transform the two galaxies into dSphs in no more than two pericentric passages around M31, while maintaining a significant stellar population gradient. Reproducing these features is a prime requirement for models of dSph formation to demonstrate not just the plausibility of environmental transformation but the capability of accurately recreating real dSphs.

  1. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  2. Results of two multichord stellar occultations by dwarf planet (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Giacchini, B. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Assafin, M.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Sicardy, B.; Timerson, B.; George, T.; Broughton, J.; Blank, T.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Brooks, J.; Dantowitz, R. F.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J. B.; Ellington, C. K.; Emilio, M.; Herpich, F. R.; Jacques, C.; Maley, P. D.; Mehret, L.; Mello, A. J. T.; Milone, A. C.; Pimentel, E.; Schoenell, W.; Weber, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    We report the results of two multichord stellar occultations by the dwarf planet (1) Ceres that were observed from Brazil on 2010 August 17, and from the USA on 2013 October 25. Four positive detections were obtained for the 2010 occultation, and nine for the 2013 occultation. Elliptical models were adjusted to the observed chords to obtain Ceres' size and shape. Two limb-fitting solutions were studied for each event. The first one is a nominal solution with an indeterminate polar aspect angle. The second one was constrained by the pole coordinates as given by Drummond et al. Assuming a Maclaurin spheroid, we determine an equatorial diameter of 972 ± 6 km and an apparent oblateness of 0.08 ± 0.03 as our best solution. These results are compared to all available size and shape determinations for Ceres made so far, and shall be confirmed by the NASA's Dawn space mission.

  3. DISTANCE TO THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY USING MACHO PROJECT RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, Andrea; Chaboyer, Brian E-mail: brian.chaboyer@dartmouth.edu

    2009-05-15

    We derive the distance to the northern extension of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal galaxy from 203 Sgr RR0 Lyrae stars found in the MACHO database. Their distances are determined differentially with respect to 288 Galactic bulge RR0 Lyrae stars also found in the MACHO data. We find a distance modulus difference of 2.41 mag at l = 5{sup 0} and b = -8{sup 0} and that the extension of the Sgr galaxy toward the galactic plane is inclined toward us. Assuming R {sub GC} = 8 kpc, this implies the distance to these stars is (m - M){sub 0} = 16.97 {+-} 0.07 mag, which corresponds to D = 24.8 {+-} 0.8 kpc. Although this estimate is smaller than previous determinations for this galaxy and agrees with previous suggestions that Sgr's body is truly closer to us, this estimate is larger than studies at comparable galactic latitudes.

  4. Diffusion and binding of monoclonal antibody TNT-1 in multicellular tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.M.; Hansen, E.B.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1991-02-06

    Tumor spheroids of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma and A375 melanoma were established to investigate the uptake and clearance kinetics of TNT-1, a monoclonal antibody that targets necrotic cells of tumors. Our data reveal that there was rapid uptake of TNT-1 and its F(ab')2 fragment in both spheroid models, whereas an antibody of irrelevant specificity, Lym-1, and its F(ab')2 fragment bound poorly to the spheroids. Unlike previously reported monoclonal antibodies to tumor cell-surface antigens, TNT-1 showed (1) a linear uptake that increased over time without saturation in tumor spheroids and (2) an unexpected uptake by a subpopulation of cells in the viable outer rim of the spheroids. These preclinical studies provide important information concerning the therapeutic potential of TNT monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and micrometastases.

  5. Development of controlled release spheroids using natural polysaccharide as release modifier.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Giriraj T; Gowthamarajan, K; Dhobe, Rohan R; Yohanan, Fenni; Suresh, B

    2005-01-01

    A polysaccharide hydrogel was isolated from the seeds of Tamarindus indica (tamarind) and was used as release modifier for the preparation of diclofenac sodium spheroids, using extrusion-spheronization technique. The process was studied for the effect of variables to arrive at spheroids with satisfactory particle shape, size and size-distribution. The prepared spheroids were characterized for surface morphology, qualitative surface porosity, friability, bulk density, and flow properties. The in vitro release studies exhibited a zero-order release kinetics that was confirmed by Higuchi's and Peppas' models. A credible correlation was obtained among swelling index, viscosity, surface roughness of the polysaccharide, and in vitro dissolution profile of the spheroids. In the comparative bioavailability study, we found that the developed spheroids were able to sustain the drug release over 8 hr and could improve the extent of absorption and bioavailability of the drug. PMID:16036714

  6. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS AND THE INHOMOGENEOUS CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE CARINA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Venn, Kim A.; Divell, Mike; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Irwin, Mike J.; Hill, Vanessa; Jablonka, Pascale; Tolstoy, Eline; Lemasle, Bertrand; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Letarte, Bruno; Baldner, Charles; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Primas, Francesca; Kaufer, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    The detailed abundances of 23 chemical elements in nine bright red giant branch stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy are presented based on high-resolution spectra gathered at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and Magellan telescopes. A spherical model atmospheres analysis is applied using standard methods (local thermodynamic equilibrium and plane-parallel radiative transfer) to spectra ranging from 380 to 680 nm. Stellar parameters are found to be consistent between photometric and spectroscopic analyses, both at moderate and high resolution. The stars in this analysis range in metallicity from -2.9 < [Fe/H] <-1.3, and adopting the ages determined by Lemasle et al., we are able to examine the chemical evolution of Carina's old and intermediate-aged populations. One of the main results from this work is the evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in Carina and therefore for a poor statistical sampling of the supernova contributions when forming stars; a large dispersion in [Mg/Fe] indicates poor mixing in the old population, an offset in the [{alpha}/Fe] ratios between the old and intermediate-aged populations (when examined with previously published results) suggests that the second star formation event occurred in {alpha}-enriched gas, and one star, Car-612, seems to have formed in a pocket enhanced in SN Ia/II products. This latter star provides the first direct link between the formation of stars with enhanced SN Ia/II ratios in dwarf galaxies to those found in the outer Galactic halo (Ivans et al.). Another important result is the potential evidence for SN II driven winds. We show that the very metal-poor stars in Carina have not been enhanced in asymptotic giant branch or SN Ia products, and therefore their very low ratios of [Sr/Ba] suggests the loss of contributions from the early SNe II. Low ratios of [Na/Fe], [Mn/Fe], and [Cr/Fe] in two of these stars support this scenario, with additional evidence from the low [Zn/Fe] upper limit for one star. It is

  7. Nucleosynthesis and the Inhomogeneous Chemical Evolution of the Carina Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Irwin, Mike J.; Hill, Vanessa; Jablonka, Pascale; Tolstoy, Eline; Lemasle, Bertrand; Divell, Mike; Starkenburg, Else; Letarte, Bruno; Baldner, Charles; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Helmi, Amina; Kaufer, Andreas; Primas, Francesca

    2012-06-01

    The detailed abundances of 23 chemical elements in nine bright red giant branch stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy are presented based on high-resolution spectra gathered at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and Magellan telescopes. A spherical model atmospheres analysis is applied using standard methods (local thermodynamic equilibrium and plane-parallel radiative transfer) to spectra ranging from 380 to 680 nm. Stellar parameters are found to be consistent between photometric and spectroscopic analyses, both at moderate and high resolution. The stars in this analysis range in metallicity from -2.9 < [Fe/H] <-1.3, and adopting the ages determined by Lemasle et al., we are able to examine the chemical evolution of Carina's old and intermediate-aged populations. One of the main results from this work is the evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in Carina and therefore for a poor statistical sampling of the supernova contributions when forming stars; a large dispersion in [Mg/Fe] indicates poor mixing in the old population, an offset in the [α/Fe] ratios between the old and intermediate-aged populations (when examined with previously published results) suggests that the second star formation event occurred in α-enriched gas, and one star, Car-612, seems to have formed in a pocket enhanced in SN Ia/II products. This latter star provides the first direct link between the formation of stars with enhanced SN Ia/II ratios in dwarf galaxies to those found in the outer Galactic halo (Ivans et al.). Another important result is the potential evidence for SN II driven winds. We show that the very metal-poor stars in Carina have not been enhanced in asymptotic giant branch or SN Ia products, and therefore their very low ratios of [Sr/Ba] suggests the loss of contributions from the early SNe II. Low ratios of [Na/Fe], [Mn/Fe], and [Cr/Fe] in two of these stars support this scenario, with additional evidence from the low [Zn/Fe] upper limit for one star. It is interesting

  8. Explicit Determination of Piezoelectric Eshelby Tensors for a Spheroidal Inclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yozo Mikata

    2001-06-21

    In this paper, by systematically treating the integrals involved in the piezoelectric inclusion problem, explicit results were obtained for the piezoelectric Eshelby tensors for a spheroidal inclusion aligned along the axis of the anisotropy in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric material. This problem was first treated by Dunn and Wienecke (1996) using a Green's function approach, which closely follows Withers' approach (1989) for an ellipsoidal inclusion problem in a transversely isotropic elastic medium. The same problem was recently treated by Michelitsch and Levin (2000) also using a Green's function approach. In this paper, a different method was used to obtain the explicit results for the piezoelectric Eshelby tensors for a spheroidal inclusion. The method is a direct extension of a more unified approach, which has been recently developed by Mikata (2000), which is based on Deeg's results (1980) on a piezoelectric inclusion problem. The main advantage of this method is that it is more straightforward and simpler than Dunn and Wienecke (1996), or Michelitsch and Levin (2000), and the results are a little bit more explicit than their solutions. The key step of this paper is an analytical closed form evaluation of several integrals, which was made possible after a careful treatment of a certain bi-cubic equation.

  9. Study on the effects of nylon-chitosan-blended membranes on the spheroid-forming activity of human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Wen-Chu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Yu, Hsin-Su; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Lai, Juin-Yih; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-10-01

    Though reported limitedly in tissue engineering, modification of cellular functions can be achieved by culturing them into multicellular spheroids. We have shown melanocytes form spheroids on chitosan surface. However, how biomaterials promote spheroid formation has never been systemically investigated. In this work, nylon, which inhibits melanocyte spheroid formation, and chitosan, which promotes melanocyte spheroid formation, are used to prepare nylon/chitosan-blended membranes. Membranes composed of pure nylon, pure chitosan and various ratios of nylon and chitosan are employed to examine their effects on spheroid formation. Melanocytes show better adhesion to nylon membranes than that to chitosan membranes. In blended membranes, as more nylon is incorporated, cell adhesion increases and the trend for spheroid formation decreases. Melanocytes can only form spheroids on membranes with poorer cell adhesion. Examining the surface of the blended membranes shows phase separation of nylon and chitosan. As nylon content increases, the nylon phase on the membrane surface increases and thereby enhances cell adhesion. The opposite trend for cell adhesion and spheroid formation substantiates our hypothesis of spheroid formation on biomaterials: a balance between cell-substrate interaction and cell-cell interaction. The decrease in cell-substrate interaction tilts the balance to a state more favorable for spheroid formation. Our work can serve as a model to investigate the relative strengths of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and also pave way to design blended membranes with desired physical properties while preserving the spheroid-forming activity. PMID:16777216

  10. Discriminating between the physical processes that drive spheroid size evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Bundy, Kevin; Hernquist, Lars; Wuyts, Stijn; Cox, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Observations have shown that massive galaxies at high redshift have much smaller effective radii than galaxies of similar mass today; however, recent work has shown that they have similar central densities. The primary growth of size, therefore, relates to the apparent relative abundance of low-density material at low redshifts. But various models have been proposed to accomplish this, and the exact contribution of these mechanisms, relative to others that would, for example, lower the density of the system uniformly, or relate to possible observational misestimates of the stellar mass distribution, remain uncertain, as does the degree to which this evolution is driven by processes of initial spheroid formation versus subsequent `dry' assembly of spheroids. These different possibilities also yield dramatically different constraints on any possible evolution in the MBH-σ relation. Here, we compile observations of spheroid properties as a function of redshift and use them to test the different proposed models, each of which we have calibrated and studied in a suite of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. We show that the evolution in progenitor disc gas fractions with redshift gives rise to the initial formation of smaller spheroids at high redshift. We then consider how these early-forming systems must evolve to be consistent with the larger sizes of old spheroids today. We consider (1) equal-density `dry' mergers, (2) later major or minor `dry' mergers with less dense galaxies, (3) adiabatic expansion, after significant gas mass loss, (4) gradients in stellar mass-to-light ratios from young nuclear stellar populations (yielding smaller Re at early times, which vanish as the system fades), (5) biases in the stellar mass estimation of high-redshift (young) systems (from e.g. uncertain asymptotic giant branch starlight contributions) and (6) observational effects (possible biases in fitting or missed light from surface brightness dimming, or the effects of

  11. RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF A BROWN DWARF BINARY AT THE T DWARF/Y DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.

    2012-01-20

    We report resolved near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the T8.5 binary WISEP J045853.90+643452.6AB obtained with Keck/NIRC2, Keck/OSIRIS, and the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. These data confirm common proper and radial motion for the two components, and we see the first indications of orbital motion (mostly radial) for this system. H-band spectroscopy identifies both components as very late type brown dwarfs with strong H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} absorption. The spectrum of WISE J0458+6434B also exhibits a compelling signature of NH{sub 3} absorption over 1.52-1.54 {mu}m when compared to the T9 dwarf UGPS J072227.51-054031.2. Comparison to T8-Y0 spectral standards and H-band spectral indices indicate classifications of T8.5 and T9.5 for these two components, approaching the boundary between the T dwarf and Y dwarf spectral classes.

  12. Early gas stripping as the origin of the darkest galaxies in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Mastropietro, C; Wadsley, J

    2007-02-15

    The known galaxies most dominated by dark matter (Draco, Ursa Minor and Andromeda IX) are satellites of the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies. They are members of a class of faint galaxies, devoid of gas, known as dwarf spheroidals, and have by far the highest ratio of dark to luminous matter. None of the models proposed to unravel their origin can simultaneously explain their exceptional dark matter content and their proximity to a much larger galaxy. Here we report simulations showing that the progenitors of these galaxies were probably gas-dominated dwarf galaxies that became satellites of a larger galaxy earlier than the other dwarf spheroidals. We find that a combination of tidal shocks and ram pressure swept away the entire gas content of such progenitors about ten billion years ago because heating by the cosmic ultraviolet background kept the gas loosely bound: a tiny stellar component embedded in a relatively massive dark halo survived until today. All luminous galaxies should be surrounded by a few extremely dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal satellites, and these should have the shortest orbital periods among dwarf spheroidals because they were accreted early. PMID:17301786

  13. Early Gas Stripping as the Origin of the Darkest Galaxies in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Lucio; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mastropietro, Chiara; Wadsley, James; /McMaster U.

    2007-02-28

    The known galaxies most dominated by dark matter (Draco, Ursa Minor and Andromeda IX) are satellites of the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies. They are members of a class of faint galaxies, devoid of gas, known as dwarf spheroidals, and have by far the highest ratio of dark to luminous matter. None of the models proposed to unravel their origin can simultaneously explain their exceptional dark matter content and their proximity to a much larger galaxy. Here we report simulations showing that the progenitors of these galaxies were probably gas-dominated dwarf galaxies that became satellites of a larger galaxy earlier than the other dwarf spheroidals. We find that a combination of tidal shocks and ram pressure swept away the entire gas content of such progenitors about ten billion years ago because heating by the cosmic ultraviolet background kept the gas loosely bound: a tiny stellar component embedded in a relatively massive dark halo survived until today. All luminous galaxies should be surrounded by a few extremely dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal satellites, and these should have the shortest orbital periods among dwarf spheroidals because they were accreted early.

  14. The Pulsating White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a summary of what is currently known about the three distinct families of isolated pulsating white dwarfs. These are the GW Vir stars (He/C/O-atmosphere stars with Teff sime 120,000 K), the V777 Her stars (He-atmosphere, Teff sime 25,000 K), and the ZZ Ceti stars (H-atmosphere, Teff sime 12,000 K), all showing multiperiodic luminosity variations caused by low-order and low-degree g-mode instabilities. We also provide, in an Appendix, a very brief overview of the newly found evidence in favor of the existence of a fourth category of oscillating white dwarfs bearing strong similarities with these families of pulsators. We begin our survey with a short historical introduction, followed by a general discussion of pulsating white dwarfs as compact pulsators. We then discuss the class properties of these objects, including an updated census. We next focus on the instability domains for each family of pulsators in the log g - Teff diagram, and present their time-averaged properties in more detail. This is followed by a section on excitation physics, i.e., the causes of the pulsational instabilities, with emphasis on the common properties of the different types of pulsator. We then discuss the time-dependent properties of the pulsating white dwarfs featuring, among other things, a brief "picture tour" across the ZZ Ceti instability strip. We next review the methods used to infer or constrain the angular geometry of a pulsation mode in a white dwarf. These include multicolor photometry and time-resolved spectroscopy, the exploitation of the nonlinear features in the observed light curves, and rotational splitting. We also consider basic adiabatic asteroseismology starting with a discussion of the reaction of the period spectrum to variations of model parameters. We next review the various asteroseismological inferences that have so far been claimed for white dwarfs. We also discuss the potential of exploiting the rates of period change. We finally provide some

  15. A Search for Close Red Dwarf-White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Mark R.; Henry, Todd J.; Subasavage, John P.

    2011-08-01

    We propose to observe 59 objects suspected to be red dwarf-white dwarf (RD-WD) binaries with separations < 3 arcsec using the CTIO 1.0m. Our goals are to use images of these objects to both resolve the systems and to obtain accurate BVRI photometry. The systems have been selected based on positions in three different color-color plots using SuperCOSMOS BRI plate photometry and 2MASS JHK photometry in accordance with the positions of known RD-WD binaries. This effort will identify candidates for detailed observations as part of the RECONS astrometric program on the CTIO 0.9m to yield accurate parallaxes and photocentric orbits. The parallaxes will then be used to determine the ages of the systems from WD cooling curves, and the orbits will eventually be used to measure dynamical masses. Ultimately, we aim to increase significantly the number of dynamical masses for white dwarfs because currently only three have been determined to 5% accuracy. The first observational step outlined here will allow us to identify appropriate systems for long-term work. This 1.0m project is likely to become the undergraduate senior thesis work of the PI.

  16. [The study of M dwarf spectral classification].

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhen-Ping; Pan, Jing-Chang; Luo, A-Li

    2013-08-01

    As the most common stars in the galaxy, M dwarfs can be used to trace the structure and evolution of the Milky Way. Besides, investigating M dwarfs is important for searching for habitability of extrasolar planets orbiting M dwarfs. Spectral classification of M dwarfs is a fundamental work. The authors used DR7 M dwarf sample of SLOAN to extract important features from the range of 600-900 nm by random forest method. Compared to the features used in Hammer Code, the authors added three new indices. Our test showed that the improved Hammer with new indices is more accurate. Our method has been applied to classify M dwarf spectra of LAMOST. PMID:24159887

  17. The physics of white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique; Hernanz, Margarida; Mochkovitch, Robert

    1998-12-01

    White dwarfs are the final remnants of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Their evolution is essentially a cooling process that lasts for 0953-8984/10/49/015/img6 and allows one to obtain information about the age of the Galaxy as well as about the past stellar formation rate in the solar neighbourhood. Therefore, it is important to identify all of the relevant sources of energy as well as the mechanisms that control its flow to the space. We show in this paper that the inclusion of a detailed treatment of phase transitions in Coulomb plasmas made up of a mixture of different chemical species is crucial, since their redistribution can keep the white dwarf warm for 0.5 to 9 Ga depending on the chemical composition and physical assumptions adopted.

  18. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  19. Early formation of massive, compact, spheroidal galaxies with classical profiles by violent disc instability or mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Tweed, Dylan; Primack, Joel

    2015-03-01

    We address the formation of massive stellar spheroids between redshifts z = 4 and 1 using a suite of adaptive mesh refinement hydrocosmological simulations. The spheroids form as bulges, and the spheroid mass growth is partly driven by violent disc instability (VDI) and partly by mergers. A kinematic decomposition to disc and spheroid yields that the mass fraction in the spheroid is between 50 and 90 per cent and is roughly constant in time, consistent with a cosmological steady state of VDI discs that are continuously fed from the cosmic web. The density profile of the spheroid is typically `classical', with a Sérsic index n = 4.5 ± 1, independent of whether it grew by mergers or VDI and independent of the feedback strength. The disc is characterized by n = 1.5 ± 0.5, and the whole galaxy by n = 3 ± 1. The high-redshift spheroids are compact due to the dissipative inflow of gas and the high universal density. The stellar surface density within the effective radius of each galaxy as it evolves remains roughly constant in time after its first growth. For galaxies of a fixed stellar mass, the surface density is higher at higher redshifts.

  20. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  1. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Theodoraki, Maria A.; Rezende, Celso O.; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D.; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.; Alpaugh, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroidsMARY-X, that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroidsMARY-X model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/−0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/−0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroidsMARY-X with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/−3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroidsMARY-X model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  2. The optical-infrared colour distribution of a statistically complete sample of faint field spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menanteau, F.; Ellis, R. S.; Abraham, R. G.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    1999-10-01

    In hierarchical models, where spheroidal galaxies are primarily produced via a continuous merging of disc galaxies, the number of intrinsically red systems at faint limits will be substantially lower than in `traditional' models where the bulk of star formation was completed at high redshifts. In this paper we analyse the optical-near-infrared colour distribution of a large flux-limited sample of field spheroidal galaxies identified morphologically from archival Hubble Space Telescope data. The I_814-HK' colour distribution for a sample jointly limited at I_814<23mag and HK'<19.5mag is used to constrain their star formation history. We compare visual and automated methods for selecting spheroidals from our deep HST images and, in both cases, detect a significant deficit of intrinsically red spheroidals relative to the predictions of high-redshift monolithic-collapse models. However, the overall space density of spheroidals (irrespective of colour) is not substantially different from that seen locally. Spectral synthesis modelling of our results suggests that high-redshift spheroidals are dominated by evolved stellar populations polluted by some amount of subsidiary star formation. Despite its effect on the optical-infrared colour, this star formation probably makes only a modest contribution to the overall stellar mass. We briefly discuss the implications of our results in the context of earlier predictions based on models where spheroidals assemble hierarchically.

  3. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2014-06-15

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  4. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria A; Rezende, Celso O; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Alpaugh, Mary L

    2015-08-28

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroids(MARY-X), that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroids(MARY-X) model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/-0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/-0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroids(MARY-X) with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/-3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroids(MARY-X) model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  5. An injectable spheroid system with genetic modification for cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Nomoto, Takahiro; Endo, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Yu; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    The new methodology to increase a therapeutic potential of cell transplantation was developed here by the use of three-dimensional spheroids of transplanting cells subsequent to the genetic modification with non-viral DNA vectors, polyplex nanomicelles. Particularly, spheroids in regulated size of 100-μm of primary hepatocytes transfected with luciferase gene were formed on the micropatterned culture plates coated with thermosensitive polymer, and were recovered in the form of injectable liquid suspension simply by cooling the plates. After subcutaneously transplanting these hepatocyte spheroids, efficient transgene expression was observed in host tissue for more than a month, whereas transplantation of a single-cell suspension from a monolayer culture resulted in an only transient expression. The spheroid system contributed to the preservation of innate functions of transplanted hepatocytes in the host tissue, such as albumin expression, thereby possessing high potential for expressing transgene. Intravital observation of transplanted cells showed that those from spheroid cultures had a tendency to localize in the vicinity of blood vessels, making a favorable microenvironment for preserving cell functionality. Furthermore, spheroids transfected with erythropoietin-expressing DNA showed a significantly higher hematopoietic effect than that of cell suspensions from monolayer cultures, demonstrating high potential of this genetically-modified spheroid transplantation system for therapeutic applications. PMID:24388386

  6. Incompressible fluid ellipsoids in halos. I - The second-harmonic oscillations of the Maclaurin spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    The structure and stability of Maclaurin spheroids embedded in rigid uniform-density oblate spheroidal halos are determined by the tensor virial-equation method. These spheroid-halo systems can be thought of as crude fluid analogs of disk galaxies with halos. The halos are assumed to have the same center, the same axis of symmetry, and the same equatorial radius as the Maclaurin spheroids. Only halos with lower eccentricity than the Maclaurin spheroids are considered. The dynamic instability of the toroidal (barlike) modes is suppressed when m, the ratio of the halo mass to Maclaurin spheroid mass, is greater than 3 pi/8 for spherical halos and when m is greater than 1/2 for halos congruent to the Maclaurin spheroids. Intermediate halo flattenings yield intermediate critical m-values. On the other hand, a neutral point of the toroidal modes in the rotating and inertial frames occurs for all m and for all allowed halo flattenings. Growth rates for secular instability beyond the neutral point are calculated, and the eigenfrequencies of all second-harmonic modes are given for select cases. The Ostriker-Peebles (1973) conjecture concerning the stability of disk galaxies against barlike perturbations appears to be incorrect.

  7. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  8. AST3: dwarf nova outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi; Shang, Zhaohui; Wang, Lifan

    2016-05-01

    AST3#2 OT J024453.11-580940.1 discovery - new dwarf nova outburst with ampl > 5.8 The 2nd Antarctic Survey Telescope (AST3#2) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 02:44:53.11 -58:09:40.1 on 2016-05-06.071 UT with Sloan-g magnitude of 15.5m (limit 18.6m).

  9. Fully Automated One-Step Production of Functional 3D Tumor Spheroids for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Monjaret, François; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Argento, Amelie; Degot, Sébastien; Young, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of spheroids within high-content screening (HCS) has lagged behind high-throughput screening (HTS) due to issues with running complex assays on large three-dimensional (3D) structures.To enable multiplexed imaging and analysis of spheroids, different cancer cell lines were grown in 3D on micropatterned 96-well plates with automated production of nine uniform spheroids per well. Spheroids achieve diameters of up to 600 µm, and reproducibility was experimentally validated (interwell and interplate CV(diameter) <5%). Biphoton imaging confirmed that micropatterned spheroids exhibit characteristic cell heterogeneity with distinct microregions. Furthermore, central necrosis appears at a consistent spheroid size, suggesting standardized growth.Using three reference compounds (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and staurosporine), we validated HT-29 micropatterned spheroids on an HCS platform, benchmarking against hanging-drop spheroids. Spheroid formation and imaging in a single plate accelerate assay workflow, and fixed positioning prevents structures from overlapping or sticking to the well wall, augmenting image processing reliability. Furthermore, multiple spheroids per well increase the statistical confidence sufficiently to discriminate compound mechanisms of action and generate EC50 values for endpoints of cell death, architectural change, and size within a single-pass read. Higher quality data and a more efficient HCS work chain should encourage integration of micropatterned spheroid models within fundamental research and drug discovery applications. PMID:26385905

  10. Characterizing Accreting White Dwarf Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the population, mass distribution, and evolution of accreting white dwarfs impacts the entire realm of binary interaction, including the creation of Type Ia supernovae. We are concentrating on accreting white dwarf pulsators, as the pulsation properties allow us a view of how the accretion affects the interior of the star. Our ground- based photometry on 11 accreting pulsators with corresponding temperatures from HST UV spectra suggest a broad instability strip in the range of 10500 to 16000K. Additionally, tracking a post-outburst heated white dwarf as it cools and crosses the blue edge and resumes pulsation provides an independent method to locate the empirical instability strip. Determining a post-outburst cooling curve yields an estimate of the amount of heating and the accreted mass during the outburst. We request additional photometry of 2 objects that present unique properties: GW Lib which has not yet returned to its pre-outburst pulsation spectrum after 6 yrs, and EQ Lyn which returned to its pre- outburst pulsation after 3 yrs but is now turning on and off without ongoing outbursts. Following the pulsation spectrum changes over stretches of several nights in a row will provide specific knowledge of the stability of the observed modes.

  11. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  12. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  13. Planetary nebulae: the universal mass-metallicity relation for Local Group dwarf galaxies and the chemistry of NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Denise R.; Magrini, Laura; Teodorescu, Ana M.; Carneiro, Carolina M.

    2014-10-01

    Here we study 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 205 by using Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs (GMOS@Gemini) spectra to derive their physical and chemical parameters. The chemical patterns and evolutionary tracks for 14 of our PNe suggest that there are no type I PNe among them. These PNe have an average oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H) = 8.08 ± 0.28 and progenitor masses of 2-2.5 M⊙ and thus were born ˜1.0-1.7 Gyr ago. Our results are in good agreement with previous PN studies of NGC 205. The present 12+log(O/H) is combined with our previous work and results in the literature to study the PN metallicity trends of Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies, in an effort to establish the PN luminosity-metallicity and mass-metallicity relations (LZR and MZR) for LG dwarf irregulars (dIrrs) and dwarf spheroidals (dSphs). Previous attempts to obtain such relations failed to provide correct conclusions because they were based on limited samples. As far as we are able to compare stellar with nebular metallicities, our MZR is in very good agreement with the slope of the MZR recently obtained for LG dwarf galaxies using spectroscopic stellar metallicities by Kirby and coauthors. In fact, we found that both dIrr and dSph galaxies follow the same MZR, at variance with the differences claimed in the past. Moreover, our MZR is also consistent with the global MZR of star-forming galaxies, which span a wider stellar mass range (˜106-1011 M⊙).

  14. Spheroid Formation and Evaluation of Hepatic Cells in a Three-Dimensional Culture Device

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Yagi, Tohru; Hayashi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, it is very important to evaluate liver cells within an organism. Compared to 2D culture methods, the development of 3D culture techniques for liver cells has been successful in maintaining long-term liver functionality with the formation of a hepatic-specific structure. The key to performing drug testing is the establishment of a stable in vitro evaluation system. In this article, we report a Tapered Stencil for Cluster Culture (TASCL) device developed to create liver spheroids in vitro. The TASCL device will be applied as a toxicity evaluation system for drug discovery. The TASCL device was created with an overall size of 10 mm × 10 mm, containing 400 microwells with a top aperture (500 µm × 500 µm) and a bottom aperture (300 µm diameter circular) per microwell. We evaluated the formation, recovery, and size of HepG2 spheroids in the TASCL device. The formation and recovery were both nearly 100%, and the size of the HepG2 spheroids increased with an increase in the initial cell seeding density. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the spheroids among the microwells. In addition, the HepG2 spheroids obtained using the TASCL device were alive and produced albumin. The morphology of the HepG2 spheroids was investigated using FE-SEM. The spheroids in the microwells exhibited perfectly spherical aggregation. In this report, by adjusting the size of the microwells of the TASCL device, uniform HepG2 spheroids were created, and the device facilitated more precise measurements of the liver function per HepG2 spheroid. Our TASCL device will be useful for application as a toxicity evaluation system for drug testing. PMID:26858908

  15. Spheroid Formation and Evaluation of Hepatic Cells in a Three-Dimensional Culture Device.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Yagi, Tohru; Hayashi, Shuji

    2015-12-17

    In drug discovery, it is very important to evaluate liver cells within an organism. Compared to 2D culture methods, the development of 3D culture techniques for liver cells has been successful in maintaining long-term liver functionality with the formation of a hepatic-specific structure. The key to performing drug testing is the establishment of a stable in vitro evaluation system. In this article, we report a Tapered Stencil for Cluster Culture (TASCL) device developed to create liver spheroids in vitro. The TASCL device will be applied as a toxicity evaluation system for drug discovery. The TASCL device was created with an overall size of 10 mm × 10 mm, containing 400 microwells with a top aperture (500 µm × 500 µm) and a bottom aperture (300 µm diameter circular) per microwell. We evaluated the formation, recovery, and size of HepG2 spheroids in the TASCL device. The formation and recovery were both nearly 100%, and the size of the HepG2 spheroids increased with an increase in the initial cell seeding density. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the spheroids among the microwells. In addition, the HepG2 spheroids obtained using the TASCL device were alive and produced albumin. The morphology of the HepG2 spheroids was investigated using FE-SEM. The spheroids in the microwells exhibited perfectly spherical aggregation. In this report, by adjusting the size of the microwells of the TASCL device, uniform HepG2 spheroids were created, and the device facilitated more precise measurements of the liver function per HepG2 spheroid. Our TASCL device will be useful for application as a toxicity evaluation system for drug testing. PMID:26858908

  16. Stellar mass functions of galaxies, discs and spheroids at z ˜ 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanjavur, Karun; Simard, Luc; Bluck, Asa F. L.; Mendel, Trevor

    2016-06-01

    We present the stellar mass functions (SMFs) and mass densities of galaxies, and their spheroid and disc components in the local (z ˜ 0.1) Universe over the range 8.9 ≤ log(M/M⊙) ≤ 12 from spheroid+disc decompositions and corresponding stellar masses of a sample of over 600 000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven spectroscopic sample. The galaxy SMF is well represented by a single Schechter function (M* = 11.116 ± 0.011, α = -1.145 ± 0.008), though with a hint of a steeper faint end slope. The corresponding stellar mass densities are (2.670 ± 0.110), (1.687 ± 0.063) and (0.910 ± 0.029)× 108 M⊙ Mpc-3 for galaxies, spheroids and discs, respectively. We identify a crossover stellar mass of log(M/M⊙) = 10.3 ± 0.030 at which the spheroid and disc SMFs are equal. Relative contributions of four distinct spheroid/disc dominated sub-populations to the overall galaxy SMF are also presented. The mean disc-to-spheroid stellar mass ratio shows a five-fold disc dominance at the low-mass end, decreasing monotonically with a corresponding increase in the spheroidal fraction till the two are equal at a galaxy stellar mass, log(M/M⊙) = 10.479 ± 0.013; the dominance of spheroids then grows with increasing stellar mass. The relative numbers of composite disc and spheroid-dominated galaxies show peaks in their distributions, perhaps indicative of a preferred galaxy mass. Our characterization of the low-redshift galaxy population provides stringent constraints for numerical simulations to reproduce.

  17. Electron optics of spheroid charged particle energy analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubric, D.; Kholine, N.; Konishi, I.

    2011-07-01

    A new class of charged particle energy analyzers, spheroid energy analyzers (SEA) that are characterized with very high energy resolution and transmission, is presented. A prototype analyzer was built that has achieved a relative energy resolution of 0.05% at a transmission of 21% out of a 2π steradian. A very high order of focusing of these analyzers is presented via simulation that indicates the existence of 13th order focusing in one of our models. This promises further improvements in energy resolution in future practical analyzer embodiments. A novel geometrical framework is presented, which describes SEA analyzers in general terms within which well known types of analyzers CMA and CHA appear to be only particular examples.

  18. Histology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea in Labrador.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G. J.; Overall, M.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specimens of the corneas of patients from Labrador and Northern Newfoundland affected by spheroidal degeneration (climatic droplet keratopathy) have been examined microscopically. Histochemical stains confirmed studies of similar corneal degenerations from other geographical areas that the droplets contain a protein which does not have all the characteristic properties of elastic tissue. Staining compatible in some instances with fibrin and "fibrinoid" was found. By immunoperoxidase techniques the droplets were located in the zones of greatest concentration of various plasma constituents, especially albumin and immunoglobulins G and A. Reasons are given why the abnormal deposits are not thought to be derived directly from corneal collagen. It is suggested that some of the plasma proteins, which are known to be diffusing through the cornea from the limbal vessels under normal conditions are acted upon by the ultraviolet light reflected from the ice of Labrador and degraded so that they accumulate in the superficial stroma. Images PMID:629911

  19. Quantitative Microfluidic Dynamics Of Spheroidal Particles Within Periodic Optical Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Brandon Lee

    2011-12-01

    Over the past 4 decades, research and development of optical manipulation techniques has been primarily focused on observable phenomena. Trapping, sorting, mixing, aligning, and organizing particles---often times spheres on the order of 1 -- 100mum---has been shown by several groups using many different optical trapping and optical potential techniques. However, relatively little been reported on either the quantification of the various forces on the particles or on the theoretical aspects of the motion of the particles. Even less has been reported regarding the theoretical aspects of the motion of non-spherical particles within optical traps and landscapes. It is the objective of this dissertation to address these deficits by means of modeling and experimentally verifying the behavior of particles within periodic optical landscapes. First, we report on our development of a quantifiable analysis of these phenomena by means of a form factor model of spheroidal particle motion in periodic optical landscapes. Using this model, we show that shape does indeed have a quantifiable impact on a particle's motion in an optical landscape. We conclude that a collection of particles will all traverse an optical landscape differently based directly on their respective sizes, refractive indices, and shapes, sometimes with a high degree of dispersion. Next, we report on our development of a second model of spheroidal particle motion in periodic optical landscapes. Based on the T-matrix scattering approach, this model addresses the scattering forces and the electric field polarization effects on the particles' motion. We conclude that as the particle size gets larger, the scattering forces become greater and very quickly rise above an order of magnitude larger than the gradient forces of the optical landscape. Our conclusions provide quantifiable conditions for when scattering forces and electric field-induced torques within an optical landscape are significant and should not be

  20. Biochemical markers of neurodegeneration in hereditary diffuse leucoencephalopathy with spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Philipp; Kohl, Zacharias; Gölitz, Philipp; Coras, Roland; Blümcke, Ingmar; Brück, Wolfgang; Dörfler, Arnd; Maihöfner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse leucoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease with unknown pathophysiology. Diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is increasingly based on biomarkers. Although lumbar puncture is routinely performed during the diagnostic workup of HDLS, reports on alterations of neurodegeneration-specific biochemical markers have not been documented so far. We report a 35-year-old woman with clinical, radiological and neuropathological signs of HDLS. She suffered from a rapidly progressive frontal lobe syndrome. Brain MRI revealed diffuse leucoencephalopathy with predominant involvement of the periventricular white matter and corpus callosum. Although she was severely impaired and leucoencephalopathy was prominent, only cerebrospinal fluid total-τ was moderately elevated. Other markers of neuronal (NSE) and astrocytic (S100B) damage were within normal range. Therefore, biochemical markers of central nervous system damage are not helpful in the diagnosis of HDLS. PMID:24891473

  1. Spheroidal droplet measurements based on generalized rainbow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Xu, Feng; Tropea, Cameron

    2013-09-01

    The character of the rainbow from a droplet is investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the experiment, light scattering from spheroidal droplets in the vicinity of the primary rainbow region has been observed to contain a variety of characteristic interference patterns which are a generalization of the rainbow from a sphere. These patterns start from being a fold rainbow, change to transverse cusp caustics and then to hyperbolic umbilic catastrophe as the aspect ratio of the droplet increases. A comparison of the observed rainbow patterns in the horizontal equatorial plane with those of Airy theory reveals that these patterns can be used for characterizing droplet, in particular for determining the refractive index and the diameter of the droplet in the equatorial plane. The absolute error of the refractive index is smaller than 1.5×10-4. The absolute relative error of the equatorial diameter is less than 5%.

  2. Regulation of Multicellular Spheroids by MAPK and FYN Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey; Ramos, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not progressed significantly in the past 60 years, with 5-year survival remaining at approximately 50%. The epidemic of Human Papilloma Virus and its associated SCC warrants a renewed emphasis on fully understanding this disease. We previously used the 3-dimensional multicellular spheroid (MCS) model system to evaluate SCC behavior more accurately. In this study, we determined that SCC growth in MCS approximates epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Organization of an MCS requires the full-length β6 integrin subunit and its maintenance requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Limiting FYN kinase activation results in the down-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin and an increase in expression of N-cadherin and SNAIL. These results indicate that the microenvironment and growth patterns in an MCS are complex and require MAPK and FYN kinase. PMID:27466485

  3. Raising and lowering operators of spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Abhay G.; Whiting, Bernard F.

    2016-06-01

    Differential operators for raising and lowering angular momentum for spherical harmonics are used widely in many branches of physics. Less well known are raising and lowering operators for both spin and the azimuthal component of angular momentum (Goldberg et al. in J Math Phys 8:2155, 1967). In this paper we generalize the spin-raising and lowering operators of spin-weighted spherical harmonics to operators linear-in-γ for spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics, where γ is an additional parameter present in the second order ordinary differential equation governing these harmonics. Constructing these operators has required using all the ℓ -, s- and m-raising and lowering operators (and various combinations of them) for spin-weighted spherical harmonics, which have been calculated and shown explicitly in this paper. Following a well-defined procedure, the operators given could be generalized to higher powers in γ.

  4. Spherical and spheroidal shells as models in magnetic detection

    SciTech Connect

    Frumkis, L.; Kaplan, B.Z.

    1999-09-01

    Magnetic detection is a widespread technique utilizing the Earth's magnetic field anomaly measurements in geophysics, in submarine detection, in environmental cleanup, and in detection of other hidden objects. The expressions for the scalar potentials of prolate and oblate spheroidal shells immersed in a dc uniform magnetic field are obtained. The expressions for the induced dipole moment of the shells are also evaluated. The problem is solved by finding solutions for the Laplace equation that satisfy boundary conditions at the shell surfaces. The shell thickness effect on the induced dipole moment and on its orientation are evaluated. The results appear to be useful for the analysis and for the prediction of magnetic signatures of hidden ferromagnetic objects belonging to a relatively large family.

  5. Landslides and Mass shedding on spinning spheroidal asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    Conditions for regolith landslides to occur on spinning, gravitating spheroidal asteroids and their aftermath are studied. These conditions are developed by application of classical granular mechanics stability analysis to the asteroid environment. As part of our study we determine how slopes evolve across the surface of these bodies as a function of spin rate, the dynamical fate of material that exceeds the angle of repose, and an analysis of how the shape of the body may be modified based on these results. We find specific characteristics for body surfaces and shapes when spun near the surface disruption limit and develop what their observable implications are. The small, oblate and rapidly spinning asteroids such as 1999 KW4 Alpha and 2008 EV5 exhibit some of these observable traits. The detailed mechanisms outlined here can also provide insight and constraints on the recently observed active asteroids such as P/2013 P5, and the creation of asteroidal meteor streams.

  6. Auroral Phenomena in Brown Dwarf Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, J. Sebastian; Hallinan, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery of radio emission from brown dwarfs some 15 years ago, investigations into the nature of this emission have revealed that, despite their cool and neutral atmospheres, brown dwarfs harbor strong kG magnetic fields, but unlike the warmer stellar objects, they generate highly circularly polarized auroral radio emission, like the giant planets of the Solar System. Our recent results from Keck LRIS monitoring of the brown dwarf LSR1835+32 definitively confirm this picture by connecting the auroral radio emission to spectroscopic variability at optical wavelengths as coherent manifestations of strong large-scale magnetospheric auroral current systems. I present some of the results of my dissertation work to understand the nature brown dwarf auroral phenomena. My efforts include a survey of Late L dwarfs and T dwarfs, looking for auroral Hα emission and a concurrent survey looking for the auroral emission of H3+ from brown dwarfs with radio pulse detections. I discuss the potential connection of this auroral activity to brown dwarf weather phenomena and how brown dwarf aurorae may differ from the analogous emission of the magnetized giant planets in the Solar System.