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Sample records for drain tank cell

  1. Using Drained Spacecraft Propellant Tanks for Habitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Andrew S. W.

    2009-01-01

    A document proposes that future spacecraft for planetary and space exploration be designed to enable reuse of drained propellant tanks for occupancy by humans. This proposal would enable utilization of volume and mass that would otherwise be unavailable and, in some cases, discarded. Such utilization could enable reductions in cost, initial launch mass, and number of launches needed to build up a habitable outpost in orbit about, or on the surface of, a planet or moon. According to the proposal, the large propellant tanks of a spacecraft would be configured to enable crews to gain access to their interiors. The spacecraft would incorporate hatchways, between a tank and the crew volume, that would remain sealed while the tank contained propellant and could be opened after the tank was purged by venting to outer space and then refilled with air. The interior of the tank would be pre-fitted with some habitation fixtures that were compatible with the propellant environment. Electrical feed-throughs, used originally for gauging propellants, could be reused to supply electric power to equipment installed in the newly occupied space. After a small amount of work, the tank would be ready for long-term use as a habitation module.

  2. 37. DETAIL OF CYANIDE LEACHING TANK DRAIN DOOR AND PIPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. DETAIL OF CYANIDE LEACHING TANK DRAIN DOOR AND PIPING SYSTEM. NOTE SPIGOT UNDER BOARD AT UPPER LEFT INSERTS INTO HOLE IN PIPE AT BOTTOM OF FRAME. CYANIDE SOLUTION WAS PUMPED INTO THE TANKS AND THE PREGNANT SOLUTION DRAINED OUT OF THE TANKS THROUGH THIS PIPE, AND BACK INTO A SEPARATE HOLDING TANK ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE MILL. TAILINGS WERE REMOVED FROM THE TANKS THROUGH THE ROUND DRAIN DOOR IN THE BOTTOM OF THE TANK (MISSING) SEEN AT TOP CENTER. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. Criticality safety considerations for MSRE fuel drain tank uranium aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Hopper, C.M.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary criticality safety study of some potential effects of uranium reduction and aggregation in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel drain tanks (FDTs) during salt removal operations. Since the salt was transferred to the FDTs in 1969, radiological and chemical reactions have been converting the uranium and fluorine in the salt to UF{sub 6} and free fluorine. Significant amounts of uranium (at least 3 kg) and fluorine have migrated out of the FDTs and into the off-gas system (OGS) and the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The loss of uranium and fluorine from the salt changes the chemical properties of the salt sufficiently to possibly allow the reduction of the UF{sub 4} in the salt to uranium metal as the salt is remelted prior to removal. It has been postulated that up to 9 kg of the maximum 19.4 kg of uranium in one FDT could be reduced to metal and concentrated. This study shows that criticality becomes a concern when more than 5 kg of uranium concentrates to over 8 wt% of the salt in a favorable geometry.

  4. Thermal-fluid analysis of the fill and drain operations of a cryrogenic fuel tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Hanna, Gregory J.; Gong, Leslie

    1993-01-01

    The Generic Research Cryogenic Tank was designed to establish techniques for testing and analyzing the behavior of reusable fuel tank structures subjected to cryogenic fuels and aerodynamic heating. The Generic Research Cryogenic Tank tests will consist of filling a pressure vessel to a prescribed fill level, waiting for steady-state conditions, then draining the liquid while heating the external surface to simulate the thermal environment associated with hypersonic flight. Initial tests of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank will use liquid nitrogen with future tests requiring liquid hydrogen. Two-dimensional finite-difference thermal-fluid models were developed for analyzing the behavior of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank during fill and drain operations. The development and results of the two-dimensional fill and drain models, using liquid nitrogen, are provided, along with results and discussion on extrapolating the model results to the operation of the full-size Generic Research Cryogenic Tank. These numerical models provided a means to predict the behavior of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank during testing and to define the requirements for the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank support systems such as vent, drain, pressurization, and instrumentation systems. In addition, the fill model provided insight into the unexpected role of circumferential conduction in cooling the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank pressure vessel during fill operations.

  5. Numerical simulation of spacecraft propellant tank draining characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid residual at the incipience of suction dip, and slosh wave excitation under normal and various reduced gravity environments and different flow rates of liquid have been investigated during the liquid hydrogen draining. It shows that the liquid residual at the incipience of suction dip increases as the values of gravity environment decrease from normal gravity ot lower reduced gravity. Flow fields with lower flow rates of liquid draining are responsible for the excitation higher wave amplitude slosh waves.

  6. 7 CFR 58.416 - Cheese vats, tanks and drain tables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cheese vats, tanks and drain tables. 58.416 Section 58.416 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL...

  7. Drain Tank Information for Developing Design Basis of the Preliminary Design - R00

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J

    2011-01-01

    Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) drain tanks (DTs) serve two functions: normal operation and safety operation. Normal DTs are used for regular maintenance operations when draining is necessary. Safety DTs are used to receive the water leaked into the Vacuum Vessel (VV) after an in-vessel loss of cooling accident (LOCA) event. The preliminary design of the DTs shall be based on the information provided by this document. The capacity of the normal DTs is estimated based on the internal volume of in-vessel components [e.g., First Wall/Blanket (FW/BLK) and Divertor (DIV)], Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) components, and TCWS piping, heat exchangers, electric heaters, pump casing, pressurizers, and valves. Water volumes have been updated based on 2004 design information, changes adopted because of approved Project Change Requests (PCRs), and data verification by U.S. ITER. Two tanks will store water from normal draining operations of the FW/BLK and DIV Primary Heat Transfer Systems (PHTSs). One tank will store water from normal draining operations of the NBI PHTS. The capacity of the safety DTs is based on analysis of a design-basis accident:1 a large leak from in-vessel components. There are two safety DTs that will receive water from a VV LOCA event and drainage from the VV, as needed. In addition, there is one sump tank for the DIV that will be used for collecting drain water from the draining and drying processes and specifically for draining the DIV system as the DIV cassettes lines are at a lower elevation than the DT connection point. Information documented in this report must be refined and verified during the preliminary design of the DTs, and there are several aspects to be considered to complete the preliminary design. Input to these design considerations is discussed in this report and includes, but is not limited to, water inventory; operating procedures/maintenance; Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA); tank layout anddimensions, including design

  8. Drain Tank Information for Developing Design Basis of the Preliminary Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J

    2012-02-01

    Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) drain tanks (DTs) serve two functions: normal operation and safety operation. Normal DTs are used for regular maintenance operations when draining is necessary. Safety DTs are used to receive the water leaked into the Vacuum Vessel (VV) after an in-vessel loss of coolant accident (LOCA) event. The preliminary design of the DTs shall be based on the information provided by this document. The capacity of the normal DTs is estimated based on the internal volume of in-vessel components [e.g., First Wall/Blanket (FW/BLK) and Divertor (DIV)]; Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) components; and TCWS piping, heat exchangers, electric heaters, pump casing, pressurizers, and valves. Water volumes have been updated based on 2004-design information, changes adopted because of approved Project Change Requests (PCRs), and data verification by US ITER and AREVA Federal Services, the US ITER A and E Company. Two tanks will store water from normal draining operations of the FW/BLK and DIV Primary Heat Transfer Systems (PHTSs). One tank will store water from normal draining operations of the NBI PHTS. The capacity of the safety DTs is based on analysis of a design basis accident: a large leak from in-vessel components. There are two safety DTs that will receive water from a VV LOCA event and drainage from the VV, as needed. In addition, there is one sump tank for the DIV that will be used for collecting drain water from the draining and drying processes and specifically for draining the DIV system as the DIV cassette lines are at a lower elevation than the DT connection point. Information documented in this report must be refined and verified during the preliminary design of the DTs, and there are several aspects to be considered to complete the preliminary design. Input to these design considerations is discussed in this report and includes, but is not limited to, water inventory; operating procedures/maintenance; Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA

  9. Determination of the crystalline structure of scale solids from the 16H evaporator gravity drain line to tank 38H

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-10-01

    August 2015, scale solids from the 16H Evaporator Gravity Drain Line (GDL) to the Tank 38H were delivered to SRNL for analysis. The desired analytical goal was to identify and confirm the crystalline structure of the scale material and determine if the form of the aluminosilicate mineral was consistent with previous analysis of the scale material from the GDL.

  10. Numerical simulation of low gravity draining. [computerized simulation of liquid sloshing in cylindrical tanks, and boundary value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizzell, G. D.; Crane, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    A boundary value problem was solved numerically for a liquid that is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible, having a motion that is irrotational and axisymmetric, and having a constant (5 degrees) solid-liquid contact angle. The avoidance of excessive mesh distortion, encountered with strictly Lagrangian or Eulerian kinematics, was achieved by introducing an auxiliary kinematic velocity field along the free surface in order to vary the trajectories used in integrating the ordinary differential equations simulating the moving boundary. The computation of the velocity potential was based upon a nonuniform triangular mesh which was automatically revised to varying depths to accommodate the motion of the free surface. These methods permitted calculation of draining induced axisymmetric slosh through the many (or fractional) finite amplitude oscillations that can occur depending upon the balance of draining, gravitational, and surface tension forces. Velocity fields, evolution of the free surface with time, and liquid residual volumes were computed for three and one half decades of Weber number and for two Bond numbers, tank fill levels, and drain radii. Comparisons with experimental data are very satisfactory.

  11. Analysis of wall heat capacity effects on core makup tank drain-down behavior in ROSA/AP600 experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Masaya; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Asaka, Hideaki

    1997-12-01

    The thermal-hydraulic behavior of the core makeup tank (CMT) during scaled integral experiments on the Westinghouse AP600 reactor design was analyzed using the RELAP5/Mod3 (version 5M5) code. The natural circulation rate through the CMT was predicted well, although the prediction of the thermal stratification in the CMT had a problem due to inability to predict multidimensional mixing in the CMT upper regions. The over-scaled CMT metal mass in the experimental facility affected the CMT drain-down behavior in two experiments: (i) a multiple-failure experiment where the system depressurization became extremely slow due to the simulated failure of the ADS valves; and (ii) a relatively-large break experiment where the CMT started draining before thermal stratification developed in the CMT water inventory. In both experiments, the CMT wall became a heat sink and was a large steam condensation site. This had a effect to limit the CMT drain rate. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Rapid digestion of shredded MSW by sequentially flooding and draining small landfill cells.

    PubMed

    Clarke, William P; Xie, Sihuang; Patel, Miheka

    2016-09-01

    This paper compares the digestion of a packed bed of shredded municipal waste using a flood and drain regime against a control digestion of similarly prepared material using a trickle flow regime. All trials were performed on shallow (2m) beds of the sub-8cm fraction of shredded mixed MSW, encapsulated in a polyethylene bladder. The control cell (Cell 1) was loaded with 1974 tonnes shredded municipal waste and produced 76±9m(3) CH4dryt(-1) (45±2m(3) CH4 'as received't(-1)) over 200days in response to a daily recirculation of the leachate inventory which was maintained at 60m(3). The flood and drain operation was performed on two co-located cells (Cell 2 and Cell 3) that were loaded simultaneously with 1026 and 915 tonnes of the sub-8cm fraction of shredded mixed MSW, with a third empty cell used as a reservoir for 275m(3) of mature landfill leachate. Cell 2 was first digested in isolation by flooding and draining once per week to avoid excessive souring. Gas production from Cell 2 peaked and declined to a steady residual level in 150days. Cell 3 was flooded and drained for the first time 186days after the commencement of Cell 2, using the same inventory of leachate which was now exchanged between the cells, such that each cell was flooded and drained twice per week. Biogas production from Cell 3 commenced immediately with flooding, peaking and reducing to a residual level within 100days. The average CH4 yield from Cells 2 and 3 was 123±15m(3)dryt(-1) (92±2m(3) 'as received't(-1), equal to 95% of the long term (2month) BMP yield. PMID:26718389

  13. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in aspirative drains after neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Mastronicola, R; Berteau, C; Tu, Q; Cortese, S; Guillet, J; Phulpin, B; Gangloff, P; Bezdetnaya, L; Merlin, J-L; Faure, G; Dolivet, G

    2016-02-01

    The dissemination of individual tumor cells is a common phenomenon in solid cancers. Detection of tumor cells in bone marrow disseminated tumor cells (DTC) and in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells (CTC) in nonmetastatic situation is of high prognostic significance. Compared to breast, colon and prostate cancers, the studies on CTC and DTC in head and neck cancers are sparse. The objective of our study was to detect DTC in drains after neck dissection. Fourteen patients undergoing surgery for stages III and IV head and neck cancers were enrolled in this study--twelve presenting with squamous cell carcinoma and two with adenocarcinoma. Redon drain analysis was performed by the Cellsearch method using immunomagnetic and fluorescence approaches. A positivity threshold value was set at 2DTC/7.5 ml of the sample. Tumor cells were detected in drains of 69 % of patients a few days after surgery. The range of quantification was 3-2,094 DTC/5 ml and we showed morphological differences between the two types of carcinoma cells. DTC were detected after neck dissection both in squamous cell carcinoma and in adenocarcinoma. Potential clinical significance of tumor cells needs to be further investigated as their presence could affect pre-surgical and post-operative treatments. PMID:25634063

  14. Safety of peritoneal and pleural drain placement in pediatric stem cell transplant recipients with severe veno-occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Madenci, Arin L; Stetson, Alyssa; Weldon, Christopher B; Lehmann, Leslie E

    2016-08-01

    Hepatic VOD (veno-occlusive disease) is a serious complication of HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) and has historically been associated with high mortality. This obstruction to hepatic flow often results in fluid collections in the peritoneal and pleural cavities. Catheter placement to drain ascites or pleural fluid may reduce intra-abdominal hypertension and/or improve respiratory parameters. The safety of these interventions among critically ill, immunocompromised children is unknown. Among 32 HSCT recipients (2000-2012) with severe VOD, we assessed the primary outcome of procedural complication from peritoneal drain placement. Twenty-four (75%) patients underwent peritoneal drain placement. No patient sustained visceral perforation or hemorrhage with drain placement. Overall mortality was 47% (n = 15). The procedure was not associated with increased overall mortality (p > 0.99). Eight (25%) peritoneal drains required replacement for malfunction. Of 24 patients with peritoneal drains, one (4%) patient had a positive culture from ascitic fluid. Eight (25%) patients underwent pleural drain placement. No pleural drain-related procedural complication or infection occurred. Four (50%) of the eight patients with pleural drains had de-escalation in oxygen requirement at drain removal, compared to time of placement. In this study, peritoneal and pleural drains were safe interventions for children with severe VOD. PMID:27373552

  15. Evaluation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment drain tanks for reuse in salt disposal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This report was prepared to identify the source documentation used to evaluate the drain tanks in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The evaluation considered the original quality of the tanks, their service history, and their intended use during the removal of fluoride salts. It also includes recommendations for a quality verification plan. The estimates of corrosion damage to the salt containing system at the MSRE are low enough to lend optimism that the system will be fit for its intended use, which is disposal of the salt by transferring it to transport containers. The expected corrosion to date is estimated between 10 and 50 mil, or 2 to 10% of the shell wall. The expected corrosion rate when the tanks are used to remove the salt at 110 F is estimated to be .025 to 0.1 mil per hour of exposure to HF and molten salt. To provide additional assurance that the estimates of corrosion damage are accurate, cost effective nondestructive examination (NDE) has been recommended. The NDE procedures are compared with industry standards and give a perspective for the extent of additional measures taken in the recommendation. A methodology for establishing the remaining life has been recommended, and work is progressing towards providing an engineering evaluation based upon thickness and design conditions for the future use of the tanks. These extra measures and the code based analysis will serve to define the risk of salt or radioactive gases leaking during processing and transfer of the salt as acceptable.

  16. Investigation of Threshold Voltage Disturbance Caused by Programmed Adjacent Cell in Virtual Source/Drain NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wandong; Kwon, Dae Woong; Ji, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Shin, Hyungcheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the threshold voltage disturbance caused by programmed adjacent cells in virtual source/drain (VSD) NAND flash memory device. The fringing field induced by charge in an adjacent memory node inhibits the inversion of virtual source/drain region. So, it increases the threshold voltage of the read cell. This is a drawback for the multi-level cell (MLC) operation. The device simulation and measurement data of fabricated devices show that the disturbance increases as the cell gate length and VSD length decreases. It can be minimized by the electric field concentration induced by the arch shape structure.

  17. Imaging of the cross-presenting dendritic cell subsets in the skin-draining lymph node.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Chihiro; Takumi, Akiko; Ikeno, Takashi; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Noriko; Shimizu, Kanako; Fraser, Scott E; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Okada, Takaharu

    2016-01-26

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells specialized for activating T cells to elicit effector T-cell functions. Cross-presenting DCs are a DC subset capable of presenting antigens to CD8(+) T cells and play critical roles in cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune responses to microorganisms and cancer. Although their importance is known, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cross-presenting DCs in vivo are incompletely understood. Here, we study the T-cell zone in skin-draining lymph nodes (SDLNs) and find it is compartmentalized into regions for CD8(+) T-cell activation by cross-presenting DCs that express the chemokine (C motif) receptor 1 gene, Xcr1 and for CD4(+) T-cell activation by CD11b(+) DCs. Xcr1-expressing DCs in the SDLNs are composed of two different populations: migratory (CD103(hi)) DCs, which immigrate from the skin, and resident (CD8α(hi)) DCs, which develop in the nodes. To characterize the dynamic interactions of these distinct DC populations with CD8(+) T cells during their activation in vivo, we developed a photoconvertible reporter mouse strain, which permits us to distinctively visualize the migratory and resident subsets of Xcr1-expressing DCs. After leaving the skin, migratory DCs infiltrated to the deep T-cell zone of the SDLNs over 3 d, which corresponded to their half-life in the SDLNs. Intravital two-photon imaging showed that after soluble antigen immunization, the newly arriving migratory DCs more efficiently form sustained conjugates with antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells than other Xcr1-expressing DCs in the SDLNs. These results offer in vivo evidence for differential contributions of migratory and resident cross-presenting DCs to CD8(+) T-cell activation. PMID:26755602

  18. Imaging of the cross-presenting dendritic cell subsets in the skin-draining lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Chihiro; Takumi, Akiko; Ikeno, Takashi; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Noriko; Shimizu, Kanako; Fraser, Scott E.; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Okada, Takaharu

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells specialized for activating T cells to elicit effector T-cell functions. Cross-presenting DCs are a DC subset capable of presenting antigens to CD8+ T cells and play critical roles in cytotoxic T-cell–mediated immune responses to microorganisms and cancer. Although their importance is known, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cross-presenting DCs in vivo are incompletely understood. Here, we study the T-cell zone in skin-draining lymph nodes (SDLNs) and find it is compartmentalized into regions for CD8+ T-cell activation by cross-presenting DCs that express the chemokine (C motif) receptor 1 gene, Xcr1 and for CD4+ T-cell activation by CD11b+ DCs. Xcr1-expressing DCs in the SDLNs are composed of two different populations: migratory (CD103hi) DCs, which immigrate from the skin, and resident (CD8αhi) DCs, which develop in the nodes. To characterize the dynamic interactions of these distinct DC populations with CD8+ T cells during their activation in vivo, we developed a photoconvertible reporter mouse strain, which permits us to distinctively visualize the migratory and resident subsets of Xcr1-expressing DCs. After leaving the skin, migratory DCs infiltrated to the deep T-cell zone of the SDLNs over 3 d, which corresponded to their half-life in the SDLNs. Intravital two-photon imaging showed that after soluble antigen immunization, the newly arriving migratory DCs more efficiently form sustained conjugates with antigen-specific CD8+ T cells than other Xcr1-expressing DCs in the SDLNs. These results offer in vivo evidence for differential contributions of migratory and resident cross-presenting DCs to CD8+ T-cell activation. PMID:26755602

  19. PRACTICAL INSIGHT ON INSTALLATION AND USE OF A DUAL DRAIN / SWIRL SEPARATOR SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a properly designed dual drain tank, solids laden effluent exists through the bottom of drain of the tank and the cleaner mid-column tank water exists the side drain. Connecting the bottom drain line to a primary solids capture device , such as a swirl separator, has a number of benefits. Primar...

  20. Compartmentalized storage tank for electrochemical cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin Michael (Inventor); Dalton, Luke Thomas (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A compartmentalized storage tank is disclosed. The compartmentalized storage tank includes a housing, a first fluid storage section disposed within the housing, a second fluid storage section disposed within the housing, the first and second fluid storage sections being separated by a movable divider, and a constant force spring. The constant force spring is disposed between the housing and the movable divider to exert a constant force on the movable divider to cause a pressure P1 in the first fluid storage section to be greater than a pressure P2 in the second fluid storage section, thereby defining a pressure differential.

  1. Somatic cells count in cow's bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Olechnowicz, Jan; Jaśkowski, Jedrzej M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was therefore to present factors affecting somatic cell counts in bovine bulk milk as a result of intramammary infections as well as non-infectious factors. The paper presents also the impact of on-farm management practices on the level of bulk milk somatic cell counts and presents quality indicators in bulk tank milk. At the farm level bulk milk bacterial infection takes place through three main sources: bacterial contamination from the external surface of the udder and teats, from the surface of the milking equipment, and from mastitis microorganisms within the udder. The threshold of 200,000 cells/ml identifies bacteriological negative quarters of the udder. The counts of mammary pathogens in bulk tank milk are relatively low, on average not exceeding 1,000 cfu/ml. Environmental pathogens predominate in bulk tank milk samples with somatic cells count <300 × 10(3) ml. PMID:22230979

  2. Hemovac drain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gloves Five or 6 cotton swabs Gauze pads Clean soapy water Plastic trash bag Surgical tape Waterproof pad or ... Use a cotton swab dipped in the soapy water to clean the skin around the drain. Do this 3 ...

  3. Myeloid Cell Isolation from Mouse Skin and Draining Lymph Node Following Intradermal Immunization with Live Attenuated Plasmodium Sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Mac-Daniel, Laura; Buckwalter, Matthew R; Gueirard, Pascale; Ménard, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Malaria infection begins when the sporozoite stage of Plasmodium is inoculated into the skin of a mammalian host through a mosquito bite. The highly motile parasite not only reaches the liver to invade hepatocytes and transform into erythrocyte-infective form. It also migrates into the skin and to the proximal lymph node draining the injection site, where it can be recognized and degraded by resident and/or recruited myeloid cells. Intravital imaging reported the early recruitment of brightly fluorescent Lys-GFP positive leukocytes in the skin and the interactions between sporozoites and CD11c(+) cells in the draining lymph node. We present here an efficient procedure to recover, identify and enumerate the myeloid cell subsets that are recruited to the mouse skin and draining lymph node following intradermal injection of immunizing doses of sporozoites in a murine model. Phenotypic characterization using multi-parametric flow cytometry provides a reliable assay to assess early dynamic cellular changes during inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. PMID:27286053

  4. Dynamics of CD11c+ dendritic cell subsets in lymph nodes draining the site of intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Balic, Adam; Smith, Katherine A.; Harcus, Yvonne; Maizels, Rick M.

    2009-01-01

    Helminth parasites drive dominant Th2 responses through an as yet unidentified pathway. We have previously shown that the rodent gastrointestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis secretes products which selectively activate in vitro-derived dendritic cells to induce Th2 responses on in vivo transfer. We now show that, during active infection with this parasite, the draining mesenteric lymph node dendritic cell population is altered significantly. Although there is substantial expansion of DC numbers during infection, the CD86hi-CD8αint-CD11b− subset is markedly diminished, and expression levels of CD40, CD86 and CD103 are reduced. Notably, the reduced frequency of CD8αint DCs is evident only in those mesenteric lymph nodes draining the anterior site of infestation. In infections with the longer lived Heligmosomoides polygyrus, the proportion of CD8αint DCs in the MLNC falls to below 10% of total DC numbers by 35 days post-infection. Further, infection alters TLR responsiveness, as IL-12 production (as measured by ex vivo intracellular staining of CD11c+ DCs) in response to LPS stimulation is reduced, while IL-6, TNF-α and in particular, IL-10 all increase following infection with either nematode parasite. These changes suggest the possibility that helminth parasites modulate gastrointestinal immunity both by inhibiting migration of CD8αint DCs to the draining lymph nodes, and modifying DC responsiveness in a manner which favours a Th2 outcome. PMID:19766674

  5. The site of tumor development determines immunogenicity via temporal mobilization of antigen-laden dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Joncker, Nathalie T; Bettini, Sarah; Boulet, Delphine; Guiraud, Martine; Guerder, Sylvie

    2016-03-01

    The elimination of solid tumors largely depends on effective T-cell priming by dendritic cells (DCs). For decades, studies focusing on antitumoral immune responses have been performed with tumors transplanted subcutaneously (s.c.). These studies however do not take into account the heterogeneous tissue distribution and functionality of the different DC subsets. Given the crucial role of DCs in inducing protective immune response, we postulated that the anatomic location of tumor development may greatly impact tumor immunogenicity. We therefore implanted tumor cells either in the DC-rich dermis environment or in the s.c. tissue that mainly contains macrophages and monocytes. We showed that intradermal (i.d.), but not s.c. tumors are rapidly rejected in a T-cell-dependent manner and induce protective T-cell responses. The rejection of i.d. tumors correlates with rapid recruitment of dermal DCs presenting the tumor antigen to both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the draining lymph nodes (dLNs). The same DC subsets were mobilized upon s.c. tumor transplantation but with delayed kinetics. Altogether, our results show that the anatomical site of tumor development influences tumor immunogenicity, notably by controlling the kinetics of DC mobilization in the draining LNs. PMID:26626316

  6. Sidewall-box airlift pump provides large flows for aeration, CO2 stripping, and water rotation in large dual-drain circular tanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional gas transfer technologies for aquaculture systems occupy a large amount of space, require a considerable capital investment, and can contribute to high electricity demand. In addition, diffused aeration in a circular culture tank can interfere with the hydrodynamics of water rotation a...

  7. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  8. 14 CFR 25.999 - Fuel system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel system drains. 25.999 Section 25.999... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System Components § 25.999 Fuel system drains. (a) Drainage of the fuel system must be accomplished by the use of fuel strainer and fuel tank sump drains....

  9. 14 CFR 25.999 - Fuel system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system drains. 25.999 Section 25.999... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System Components § 25.999 Fuel system drains. (a) Drainage of the fuel system must be accomplished by the use of fuel strainer and fuel tank sump drains....

  10. Think Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A new inspection robot from Solex Robotics Systems was designed to eliminate hazardous inspections of petroleum and chemical storage tanks. The submersible robot, named Maverick, is used to inspect the bottoms of tanks, keeping the tanks operational during inspection. Maverick is able to provide services that will make manual tank inspections obsolete. While the inspection is conducted, Maverick's remote human operators remain safe outside of the tank. The risk to human health and life is now virtually eliminated. The risk to the environment is also minimal because there is a reduced chance of spillage from emptying and cleaning the tanks, where previously, tons of pollutants were released through the process of draining and refilling.

  11. Impact of Source/Drain Junction and Cell Shape on Random Telegraph Noise in NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fu-Hai; Shirota, Riichiro

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive numerical study of threshold voltage fluctuation (ΔVT) in scaled NAND flash memory caused by random telegraph noise (RTN) and discrete dopant fluctuation (RDF) in both the channel and the cell-to-cell space [source/drain (S/D)] region was carried out. Following a three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo (MC) procedure, the statistical distribution of ΔVT is estimated, considering the effects of both the random placement of discrete doping atoms and a discrete single trap at the tunnel oxide/substrate interface. The result demonstrates the significant influence of the doping in the S/D regions. For the cells with and without an S/D junction, the electron concentration in the S/D region is determined by the pass voltage of the unselected cell (Vpass) and the neighboring cell VT (VT(n)), owing to the fringing fields of neighboring floating gates (FGs). As a result, ΔVT increases in the S/D region as Vpass - VT(n) decreases. The fluctuation amplitude strongly depends on the [single-trap RTN] position along the cell length (L) and width (W) directions. For the cell shape with rounding of the active area (AA) at the shallow trench isolation (STI) edge, the results indicate that the high ΔVT area moves from the AA edge towards the center area along the W-direction.

  12. A Think Tank of TINK/TANKs: Tumor-Infiltrating/Tumor-Associated Natural Killer Cells in Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This “polarization” has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as “TINKs”) and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call “TANKs”) are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  13. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Waste tank sludge rheology within a hot spot or during draining. Homogeneous flow versus flow through a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Fauske, H.K.; Cash, R.J.

    1993-11-01

    The conditions under which ferrocyanide waste sludge flows as a homogeneous non-Newtonian two-phase (solid precipitate-liquid) mixture rather than as a liquid through a porous medium (of stationary precipitate) are examined theoretically, based on the notion that the preferred rheological behavior of the sludge is the one which imposes the least resistance to the sludge flow. The homogeneous two-phase mixture is modeled as a power-law fluid and simple criteria are derived that show that the homogeneous power-law sludge-flow is a much more likely flow situation than the porous medium model of sludge flow. The implication of this finding is that the formation of a hot spot or the drainage of sludge from a waste tank are not likely to result in the uncovering (drying) and subsequent potential overheating of the reactive-solid component of the sludge.

  14. Age-Dependent Cell Trafficking Defects in Draining Lymph Nodes Impair Adaptive Immunity and Control of West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Richner, Justin M.; Gmyrek, Grzegorz B.; Govero, Jennifer; Tu, Yizheng; van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Metcalf, Talibah U.; Haddad, Elias K.; Textor, Johannes; Miller, Mark J.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired immune responses in the elderly lead to reduced vaccine efficacy and increased susceptibility to viral infections. Although several groups have documented age-dependent defects in adaptive immune priming, the deficits that occur prior to antigen encounter remain largely unexplored. Herein, we identify novel mechanisms for compromised adaptive immunity that occurs with aging in the context of infection with West Nile virus (WNV), an encephalitic flavivirus that preferentially causes disease in the elderly. An impaired IgM and IgG response and enhanced vulnerability to WNV infection during aging was linked to delayed germinal center formation in the draining lymph node (DLN). Adoptive transfer studies and two-photon intravital microscopy revealed a decreased trafficking capacity of donor naïve CD4+ T cells from old mice, which manifested as impaired T cell diapedesis at high endothelial venules and reduced cell motility within DLN prior to antigen encounter. Furthermore, leukocyte accumulation in the DLN within the first few days of WNV infection or antigen-adjuvant administration was diminished more generally in old mice and associated with a second aging-related defect in local cytokine and chemokine production. Thus, age-dependent cell-intrinsic and environmental defects in the DLN result in delayed immune cell recruitment and antigen recognition. These deficits compromise priming of early adaptive immune responses and likely contribute to the susceptibility of old animals to acute WNV infection. PMID:26204259

  15. Induction of antigen-specific regulatory T cells in the liver-draining celiac lymph node following oral antigen administration.

    PubMed

    Hultkrantz, Susanne; Ostman, Sofia; Telemo, Esbjörn

    2005-11-01

    Regulatory T cells are induced by oral administration of an antigen, but the physiological requirements and localization of the inductive sites are largely unknown. Using an adoptive transfer system of cells transgenic for ovalbumin T-cell receptor (OVA TCR tg), we found that antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were activated in the liver-draining celiac lymph node (CLN) shortly after ovalbumin feeding, and that a significantly higher proportion of the T cells in the CLN developed into the putative regulatory phenotype [co-expressing CD25 with the glucocortico-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family related gene (GITR), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4 and CD103] than in Peyer's patches, the mesenteric and peripheral lymph nodes and the spleen. In addition, a particularly high level of expression of CD103 on the OVA-specific T cells in the CLN may favour homing to the epithelium of the intestine. While equally suppressive, OVA tg T cells isolated from the CLN of OVA-fed DO11.10 mice were less dependent on transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta for suppression than cells isolated from the peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes, which indicates the involvement of an additional suppressive mechanism. The expression of FoxP3 was not up-regulated in any of the lymph node compartments studied. Our phenotypic and functional findings suggest that the induction of regulatory T cells in the CLN may be relevant in the control of the immune response to dietary antigens. PMID:16236126

  16. Regulatory T cells sequentially migrate from the site of tissue inflammation to the draining LN to suppress the alloimmune response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schröppel, Bernd; Lal, Girdhari; Jakubzick, Claudia; Mao, Xia; Chen, Dan; Yin, Na; Jessberger, Rolf; Ochando, Jordi C.; Ding, Yaozhong; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    To determine site and mechanism of suppression, regulatory T cell (Treg) migration and function were investigated in an islet allograft model. Treg first migrated from blood to the inflammed allografts, this depended on CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, and P- and E-selectin ligands, and was essential for suppression of alloimmunity. In the allograft, Treg were activated, upregulated effector molecules, migrated to the draining lymph nodes (dLN) in a CCR2, CCR5, and CCR7 fashion, and this movement was essential for optimal suppression. Treg inhibited dendritic cell migration in a TGFβ and IL-10 dependent fashion; and suppressed antigen specific T effector cell migration, accumulation, and proliferation in dLNs and allografts. These results showed that sequential migration from blood to the target tissue and then to dLNs were required for nTreg to differentiate and execute fully their suppressive function, by inhibiting DC in the peripheral tissue, and T effector cell responses in dLN and allografts. PMID:19303390

  17. Activation of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Colon-Draining Lymph Nodes during Citrobacter rodentium Infection Involves Pathogen-Sensing and Inflammatory Pathways Distinct from Conventional Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Raine; Kong, Lingjia; Rasool, Omid; Lund, Riikka J; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Hänninen, Arno

    2016-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) bear the main responsibility for initiation of adaptive immune responses necessary for antimicrobial immunity. In the small intestine, afferent lymphatics convey Ags and microbial signals to mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs) to induce adaptive immune responses against microbes and food Ags derived from the small intestine. Whether the large intestine is covered by the same lymphatic system or represents its own lymphoid compartment has not been studied until very recently. We identified three small mesenteric LNs, distinct from small intestinal LNs, which drain lymph specifically from the colon, and studied DC responses to the attaching and effacing pathogen Citrobacter rodentium in these. Transcriptional profiling of conventional (CD11c(high)CD103(high)) DC and plasmacytoid (plasmacytoid DC Ag-1(high)B220(+)CD11c(int)) DC (pDC) populations during steady-state conditions revealed activity of distinct sets of genes in these two DC subsets, both in small intestinal and colon-draining LNs. C. rodentium activated DC especially in colon-draining LNs, and gene expression changed in pDC more profoundly than in conventional DC. Among the genes most upregulated in pDC were C-type lectin receptor CLEC4E, IL-1Rs (IL-1R1 and -2), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1a and IL-6), and TLR6. Our results indicate that colon immune surveillance is distinct from that of the small intestine in terms of draining LNs, and identify pDC as active sentinels of colonic inflammation and/or microbial dysbiosis. PMID:27183629

  18. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 198: Test Cell C Filter Tank Closure Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Bonn

    1998-12-01

    This closure report (CR) provides documentation for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 198 identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The site is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 Test Cell C Complex (Figure 1). The CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-12 which includes two aboveground radioactive wastewater filter tanks used during the Nuclear Furnace Testing at Test Cell C. The Test Cell C complex was one of several facilities dedicated to the development of nuclear rocket technology. Test Cell C was designed to test nuclear rocket reactors. Part of the testing program included Nuclear Furnace Tests. The Nuclear Furnace was a water-moderated, hydrogen-cooled, 44-megawatt reactor used to test fuel elements for the nuclear rocket engine. The Nuclear Furnace in itself was not a nuclear rocket engine. During testing, hydrogen exited the reactor at a temperature of 2,440 degrees Kelvin. Water was injected into the gas stream to cool the hydrogen and capture the various radiological isotopes. Hydrogen gas effluent was decontaminated through a multistage process before being burned at the Test Cell C flare stack. A by-product of the decontamination process produced water contaminated with mixed fission products. Prior to discharge to a tile drain system (CAU 267) the water was filtered through the two 2271-liters (600-gallon) filter tanks (Department of Energy [DOE], 1998). Reactor development, engine testing, and rocket development activities were ended in the early 1970s. The filter tanks have remained inactive since that time. The site is currently roped off and posted with ''Caution Radiation Area'' signs. The filter tanks were located on the east side of Test Cell C, approximately 15.2 meters (50 feet) from the facility fence line (Figure 2).

  19. Hot cell remote nuclear scanning of tank core samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.; Blewett, G.R.; Troyer, G.L.; Keele, B.D.; Addleman, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    A Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-designed remote measurement system has been constructed for gamma and beta isotopic characterization of Hanford Site high-level waste tank core sample materials in a hot cell. A small, collimated, planar CdZnTe detector is used for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Spectral resolution of 2% full-width-at-maximum at 662 kiloelectronvolts (keV) has been obtained remotely using risetime compensation and limited pulse shape discrimination (PSD). Isotopic measurement of high-energy beta emitters was accomplished with a ruggedly made, deeply depleted, surface barrier silicon detector. The primary function of the remote nuclear screening system is to provide a fast, qualitative stratigraphic assessment (with isotopic information) of high-level radioactive material. Both gamma spectroscopy and beta measurements have been performed on actual core segments. Differences in radionuclide content, which correspond with color or texture variations, have been seen in constant cross section core samples, although for many samples the activity variation can be ascribed to geometry and/or mass factors. Discussion of the design, implementation, results and potential benefits will be presented.

  20. Drain cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002779.htm Drain cleaner poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drain cleaners contain very dangerous chemicals that can be ...

  1. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    SciTech Connect

    Boomer, Kayle D.; Engeman, Jason K.; Gunter, Jason R.; Joslyn, Cameron C.; Vazquez, Brandon J.; Venetz, Theodore J.; Garfield, John S.

    2014-01-20

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

  2. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  3. SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 51 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David; Best, David

    2010-04-28

    Qualification simulant testing was completed to determine appropriate processing conditions and assumptions for the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) Shielded Cells demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet using the qualification sample from Tank 51 for SB6 after SRNL washing. It was found that an acid addition window of 105-139% of the DWPF acid equation (100-133% of the Koopman minimum acid equation) gave acceptable Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) results for nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 117%, 133%, and 150% stoichiometry (Koopman) were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 42 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 150% acid run reached 110% of the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lb H{sub 2}/hr, and the 133% acid run reached 75% of the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lb H{sub 2}/hr. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 25 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two other processing issues were noted. First, incomplete mercury suspension impacted mercury stripping from the SRAT slurry. This led to higher SRAT product mercury concentrations than targeted (>0.45 wt% in the total solids). Associated with this issue was a general difficulty in quantifying the mass of mercury in the SRAT vessel as a function of time, especially as acid stoichiometry increased. About ten times more mercury was found after drying the 150% acid SME product to powder than was indicated by the SME product sample results. Significantly more mercury was also found in the 133% acid SME product samples than was found during the SRAT cycle sampling. It appears that mercury is segregating from the bulk slurry in the SRAT vessel, as mercury amalgam deposits for example, and is not being resuspended by the agitators. The second processing issue

  4. 46 CFR 153.1104 - Draining of cargo hose: Categories A, B, C, and D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Draining of cargo hose: Categories A, B, C, and D. 153... Draining of cargo hose: Categories A, B, C, and D. Before a cargo hose used in discharging an NLS from a ship's cargo tank is disconnected, the hose must be drained back to the transfer terminal unless...

  5. Different-Sized Gold Nanoparticle Activator/Antigen Increases Dendritic Cells Accumulation in Liver-Draining Lymph Nodes and CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qianqian; Zhang, Yulong; Du, Juan; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yong; Fu, Qiuxia; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-02-23

    The lack of efficient antigen and activator delivery systems, as well as the restricted migration of dendritic cells (DCs) to secondary lymph organs, dramatically limits DC-based adoptive immunotherapy. We selected two spherical gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based vehicles of optimal size for activator and antigen delivery. Their combination (termed the NanoAu-Cocktail) was associated with the dual targeting of CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) and an OVA peptide (OVAp) to DC subcellular compartments, inducing enhanced antigen cross-presentation, upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and elevated secretion of T helper1 cytokines. We demonstrated that the intravenously transfused NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs showed dramatically improved in vivo homing ability to lymphoid tissues and were settled in T cell area. Especially, by tissue-distribution analysis, we found that more than 60% of lymphoid tissues-homing DCs accumulated in liver-draining lymph nodes (LLNs). The improved homing ability of NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs was associated with the high expression of chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and rearrangement of the cytoskeletons. In addition, by antigen-specific tetramers detection, NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs were proved able to elicit strong antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, which provided enhanced protection from viral invasions. This study highlights the importance of codelivering antigen/adjuvant using different sized gold nanoparticles to improve DC homing and therapy. PMID:26771692

  6. The Draining Cylinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James Graham-Eagle

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the time it takes for a liquid to drain from a cylindrical container through a hole in the bottom. Using dimensional analysis and some thought experiments this time is determined and Torricelli's law derived as a consequence. Finally, the effect of pouring liquid into the container as it drains is considered.

  7. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled “Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor” by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view. PMID:26958613

  8. Functional CD25- and CD25+ mucosal regulatory T cells are induced in gut-draining lymphoid tissue within 48 h after oral antigen application.

    PubMed

    Hauet-Broere, Femke; Unger, Wendy W J; Garssen, Johan; Hoijer, Maarten A; Kraal, Georg; Samsom, Janneke N

    2003-10-01

    Oral antigen application induces tolerance, leading to suppression of a subsequent systemic challenge with this antigen. The suppression is mediated by mucosal regulatory T (Tr) cells that may differentiate from naive peripheral T cells in the gut-draining lymphoid tissue. However, little is known about the initial steps of this differentiation process. In this study we show that 48 h after oral OVA treatment, antigen-specific T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's Patches (PP) were activated and had divided up to four times. The first division was already seen in PP after 24 h. Analysis of surface marker expression and cytokine secretion of the dividing antigen-specific T cells revealed that they sequentially obtained an activation- and memory-like phenotype. These cells secreted IL-2 in most stages of division but only transiently IFN-gamma whereas no IL-4 or IL-10 secretion was detected. Remarkably, 48 h after antigen application, isolated dividing cells were suppressive, as they transferred tolerance to naive mice. Even though CD25 was expressed heterogeneously, both CD25(+) and CD25(-) OVA-specific T cells from MLN could transfer tolerance. Together these findings show that differentiation of functional Tr cells occurs in the MLN and PP within 2 days after antigen ingestion and involves the generation of CD25(+) and CD25(-) antigen-specific T cells. PMID:14515264

  9. Monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid production by Uncaria tomentosa (Willd) D.C. cell suspension cultures in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-01-01

    Cell growth, monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid (MOA) production, and morphological properties of Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures in a 2-L stirred tank bioreactor were investigated. U. tomentosa (cell line green Uth-3) was able to grow in a stirred tank at an impeller tip speed of 95 cm/s (agitation speed of 400 rpm), showing a maximum biomass yield of 11.9 +/- 0.6 g DW/L and a specific growth rate of 0.102 d(-1). U. tomentosa cells growing in a stirred tank achieved maximum volumetric and specific MOA concentration (467.7 +/- 40.0 microg/L, 44.6 +/- 5.2 microg/g DW) at 16 days of culture. MOA chemical profile of cell suspension cultures growing in a stirred tank resembled that of the plant. Depending on culture time, from the total MOA produced, 37-100% was found in the medium in the bioreactor culture. MOA concentration achieved in a stirred tank was up to 10-fold higher than that obtained in Erlenmeyer flasks (agitated at 110 rpm). In a stirred tank, average area of the single cells of U. tomentosa increased up to 4-fold, and elliptical form factor increased from 1.40 to 2.55, indicating enlargement of U. tomentosa single cells. This work presents the first report of U. tomentosa green cell suspension cultures that grow and produce MOA in a stirred tank bioreactor. PMID:15932257

  10. Dermal Vγ4(+) γδ T cells possess a migratory potency to the draining lymph nodes and modulate CD8(+) T-cell activity through TNF-α production.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Satoshi; Egawa, Gyohei; Tomura, Michio; Sakai, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Soken; Kitoh, Akihiko; Honda, Tetsuya; Otsuka, Atsushi; Nakajima, Saeko; Dainichi, Teruki; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Mitsuyama, Masao; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    A large number of gamma delta T cells (γδ T cells) are located within epithelial tissues including the skin. In mice, epidermal and dermal γδ T cells consist of distinct subsets and have specific roles in cutaneous immune responses. A recent study demonstrated that γδ T cells and cutaneous dendritic cells migrate from the skin to the draining lymph nodes (LNs). However, it remains unclear whether they regulate the antigen-specific immune response within the LNs. Herein, we investigated their properties and role in the LNs using the Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) infection model. In vivo cell labeling analysis revealed that most of the migratory subset comprised dermal Vγ4(+) cells. This population transmigrated from the skin to the LNs in a Gi-coupled chemokine receptor-independent manner. By depleting Vγ4(+) cells, the intranodal expansion of CD8(+) T cell against BCG was significantly attenuated. In addition, in vitro analysis revealed that Vγ4(+) cells produced TNF-α and enhanced IL-12 production by dendritic cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that dermal Vγ4(+) cells are a unique subset that possesses a migratory potency to the skin-draining LNs and enhances the dendritic cell function therein. PMID:25493651

  11. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS WITH TANK 40 AND H CANYON NEPTUNIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M

    2009-04-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40. SB5 contains the contents of Tank 51 from November 2008, qualified by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the heel in Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 4. Current Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) plans are to (1) decant supernatant from Tank 40 to remove excess liquid caused by a leaking slurry pump and (2) receive a Np stream from H Canyon It should be noted that the Np stream contains significant nitrate requiring addition of nitrite to Tank 40 to maintain a high nitrite to nitrate ratio for corrosion control. SRNL has been requested to qualify the proposed changes; determine the impact on DWPF processability in terms of hydrogen generation, rheology, etc.; evaluate antifoam addition strategy; and evaluate mercury stripping. Therefore, SRNL received a 3 L sample of Tank 40 following the transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40 (Tank Farm Sample HTF-40-08-157 to be used in testing and to perform the required Waste Acceptance Product Specifications radionuclide analyses). Based on Tank Farm projections, SRNL decanted a portion* of the sample, added sodium nitrite, and added a Np solution from H Canyon representative of the Np to be dispositioned to Tank 40 (neutralized to 0.6 M excess hydroxide). The resulting material was used in a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration -- a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle. Preliminary data from the demonstration has been reported previously. This report includes discussion of these results and additional results, including comparisons to Tank Farm projections and the SB5 demonstration.

  12. Blockade of CCR7 leads to decreased dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes and promotes graft survival in low-risk corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hos, D; Dörrie, J; Schaft, N; Bock, F; Notara, M; Kruse, F E; Krautwald, S; Cursiefen, C; Bachmann, B O

    2016-05-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for migration of mature dendritic cells (DCs) to the regional lymph nodes, and it has been shown that blocking of CCR7 improves graft survival after high-risk corneal transplantation in vascularized recipient corneas. However, it is so far unknown whether blocking of CCR7 reduces migration of DCs from the avascular cornea to the draining lymph nodes and whether this leads to improved graft survival also in the low-risk setting of corneal transplantation, which accounts for the majority of perforating transplantations performed. Therefore, in this study, pellets containing Freund's adjuvant and bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated to Alexa488 fluorescent dye were implanted into the corneal stroma of BALB/c mice to analyze antigen uptake by corneal DCs and their migration to the regional lymph nodes. After pellet implantation, mice were either treated by local administration of a CCR7 blocking fusion protein that consisted of CCL19 fused to the Fc part of human IgG1 or a control-IgG. In vivo fluorescence microscopy showed uptake of Alexa488-conjugated BSA by corneal DCs within 8 h. Furthermore, analysis of single cell suspensions of draining lymph nodes prepared after 48 h revealed that 2.1 ± 0.3% of CD11c(+) cells were also Alexa488(+). Importantly, DC migration was significantly reduced after topical administration of CCL19-IgG (1.2 ± 0.2%; p < 0.05). To test the effect of CCR7 blockade on graft rejection after allogeneic low-risk keratoplasty, corneal transplantations were performed using C57BL/6-mice as donors and BALB/c-mice as recipients. Treatment mice received two intraperitoneal loading doses of CCL19-IgG prior to transplantation, followed by local treatment with CCL19-IgG containing eye drops for the first two weeks after transplantation. Control mice received same amounts of control-IgG. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that in the CCL19-IgG treated group, 76% of the grafts survived through the end

  13. SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 40 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David

    2010-04-28

    Phase III simulant flowsheet testing was completed using the latest composition estimates for SB6/Tank 40 feed to DWPF. The goals of the testing were to determine reasonable operating conditions and assumptions for the startup of SB6 processing in the DWPF. Testing covered the region from 102-159% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. Nitrite ion concentration was reduced to 90 mg/kg in the SRAT product of the lowest acid run. The 159% acid run reached 60% of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) limit of 0.65 lb H2/hr, and then sporadically exceeded the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) limit of 0.223 lb H2/hr. Hydrogen generation rates peaked at 112% of the SME limit, but higher than targeted wt% total solids levels may have been partially responsible for rates seen. A stoichiometric factor of 120% met both objectives. A processing window for SB6 exists from 102% to something close to 159% based on the simulant results. An initial recommendation for SB6 processing is at 115-120% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. The addition of simulated Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) streams to the SRAT cycle had no apparent impact on the preferred stoichiometric factor. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 120%, 118.4% with ARP/MCU, and 159% stoichiometry were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 36 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 120% acid run reached 23% of the SRAT limit and 37% of the SME limit. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 29 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two processing issues, identified during SB6 Phase II flowsheet testing and qualification simulant testing, were monitored during Phase III. Mercury material balance closure was impacted by acid stoichiometry

  14. Priming of tumor-specific T cells in the draining lymph nodes after immunization with interleukin 2-secreting tumor cells: three consecutive stages may be required for successful tumor vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Maass, G; Schmidt, W; Berger, M; Schilcher, F; Koszik, F; Schneeberger, A; Stingl, G; Birnstiel, M L; Schweighoffer, T

    1995-01-01

    Although both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are clearly required to generate long-lasting anti-tumor immunity induced by s.c. vaccination with interleukin 2 (IL-2)-transfected, irradiated M-3 clone murine melanoma cells, some controversy continues about the site and mode of T-cell activation in this system. Macrophages, granulocytes, and natural killer cells infiltrate the vaccination site early after injection into either syngeneic euthymic DBA/2 mice or athymic nude mice and eliminate the inoculum within 48 hr. We could not find T cells at the vaccination site, which argues against the concept that T-cell priming by the IL-2-secreting cancer cells occurs directly at that location. However, reverse transcription-PCR revealed transcripts indicative of T-cell activation and expansion in the draining lymph nodes of mice immunized with the IL-2-secreting vaccine but not in mice vaccinated with untransfected, irradiated M-3 cells. We therefore propose that the antigen-presenting cells, which invade the vaccination site, process tumor-derived antigens and, subsequently, initiate priming of tumor-specific T lymphocytes in lymphoid organs. These findings suggest a three-stage process for the generation of effector T cells after vaccination with IL-2-secreting tumor cells: (i) tumor-antigen uptake and processing at the site of injection by antigen-presenting cells, (ii) migration of antigen-presenting cells into the regional draining lymph nodes, where T-cell priming occurs, and (iii) circulation of activated T cells that either perform or initiate effector mechanisms leading to tumor cell destruction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777545

  15. Vehicular hydrogen storage using lightweight tanks (regenerative fuel cell systems)

    SciTech Connect

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

    1999-06-01

    Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight tankage to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will leverage work for aerospace applications supported by other sponsors (including BMDO, NASA, and USAF) to develop URFC systems for transportation and utility applications. Lightweight tankage is important for primary fuel cell powered vehicles that use on-board storage of hydrogen. Lightweight pressure vessels with state-of-the-art performance factors were designed, and prototypes are being fabricated to meet the DOE 2000 goals (4000 Wh/kg, 12% hydrogen by weight, 700 Wh/liter, and $20/kWh in high volume production). These pressure vessels use technologies that are easily adopted by industrial partners. Advanced liners provide permeation barriers for gas storage and are mandrels for composite overwrap. URFCs are important to the efficient use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and enabler of renewable energy. H{sub 2}/halogen URFCs may be advantageous for stationary applications whereas H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/air URFCs are advantageous for vehicular applications. URFC research and development is required to improve performance (efficiency), reduce catalyst loading, understand engineering operation, and integrate systems. LLNL has the experimental equipment and advanced URFC membrane electrode assemblies (some with reduced catalyst loading) for evaluating commercial hardware (not funded by DOE in FY1999).

  16. Microenvironment Matters: Unique Conditions Within Gut-Draining Lymph Nodes Favor Efficient De Novo Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Pasztoi, Maria; Pezoldt, Joern; Huehn, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes the largest surface of the body and thus has developed multitude mechanisms to either prevent pathogen entry or to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens. At the same time, the gastrointestinal system has to avoid unwanted immune responses against self and harmless nonself antigens, such as nutrients and commensal microbiota. Therefore, it is somewhat not unexpected that the gastrointestinal mucosa serves as the largest repository of immune cells throughout the body, harboring both potent pro- as well as anti-inflammatory properties. One additional key element of this regulatory machinery is created by trillions of symbiotic commensal bacteria in the gut. The microbiota not only simply contribute to the breakdown of nutrients, but are essential in limiting the expansion of pathogens, directing the development of the intestinal immune system, and establishing mucosal tolerance by fostering the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this review, we will discuss our current understanding about the microenvironmental factors fostering the de novo generation of Tregs within the gastrointestinal immune system, focusing on unique properties of antigen-presenting cells, tolerogenic cytokines, commensal-derived metabolites and the contribution of lymph node stromal cells. PMID:26615091

  17. Viscous dampers cut vibration in heater drain line

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, B.; Rencher, D. ); Keowen, R.S.; Hueffmann, G.K.

    1993-06-01

    This article discusses the control of unacceptable vibration levels that persisted for about two years in a 400 F heater drain piping system at Comanche Peak's 1100-MW Unit 1. The system in this PWR nuclear power plant is made up of approximately 300 ft of 8-in., Schedule 40 piping that runs from the steam generator heater to two 10-ft-diameter horizontal drain tanks. During start-up and shut-down operations, flashing of the 400 F water to steam occurs at the intakes of the tanks. This flashing caused severe vibration in the 8-in. piping from the tanks to about 80 ft upstream. Peak displacements of approximately three inches were measured. Viscous dampers were installed to solve the problem.

  18. 324 Radiochemical engineering cells and high level vault tanks mixed waste compliance status

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-29

    The 324 Building in the Hanford 300 Area contains Radiochemical Engineering Cells and High Level Vault tanks (the {open_quotes}REC/HLV{close_quotes}) for research and development activities involving radioactive materials. Radioactive mixed waste within this research installation, found primarily in B-Cell and three of the high level vault tanks, is subject to RCRA/DWR ({open_quotes}RCRA{close_quotes}) regulations for storage. This white paper provides a baseline RCRA compliance summary of MW management in the REC/HLV, based on best available knowledge. The REC/HLV compliance project, of which this paper is a part, is intended to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable given the special technical difficulties of managing high activity radioactive materials, and to assure protection of human health and safety and the environment. The REC/HLV was constructed in 1965 to strict standards for the safe management of highly radioactive materials. Mixed waste in the REC/HLV consists of discarded tools and equipment, dried feed stock from nuclear waste melting experiments, contaminated particulate matter, and liquid feed stock from various experimental programs in the vault tanks. B-Cell contains most of these materials. Total radiological inventory in B-Cell is estimated at 3 MCi, about half of which is potentially {open_quotes}dispersible{close_quotes}, that is, it is in small pieces or mobile particles. Most of the mixed waste currently in the REC/HLV was generated or introduced before mixed wastes were subjected to RCRA in 1987.

  19. The Application of Bulk Tank Somatic Cell Counts to Monitoring Mastitis Levels in Dairy Herds

    PubMed Central

    Meek, A.H.; Barnum, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of developing a system whereby measurements taken on bulk tank milk samples could be used to monitor the level of subclinical mastitis in dairy herds. The variables that were examined were the logarithmically transformed total somatic cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channel 8 (volumes from 89.2 to 178.3 µm3), the presence or absence of Streptococcus agalactiae and various husbandry/management factors including herdsize and the use of teat dips. Each of the use of actual monthly and rolling average bulk tank cell count determinations was investigated. It was found that the inclusion of all variables resulted in a correct classification of approximately 85% of herds and that no improvement was achieved by the use of rolling as opposed to actual monthly values. The inclusion of various husbandry/management practices improved the percentage correct classification to some extent over that achieved by the sole use of total somatic cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channel 8 when the herds were grouped on the basis of quarter infection rate (<10%, >10%) but not in the case of the cow infection rate categories (<20%, >20%). The use of both total cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channel 8 did not improve the overall predictive value over that achieved by the sole use of percentage of cell volume in channel 8 in the case of the quarter infection rate groupings but did to some extent in the case of the cow infection rate groupings. When the classification functions were applied prospectively and considering combinations of the two cell count determinations only, it was found that they were able to correctly classify, on the basis of the quarter infection rate groupings, approximately 75% of the study herds. It is concluded that the system described herein has limited application as a basis for selecting problem herds. PMID:7042053

  20. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  1. Unit cell modeling in support of interim performance assessment for low level tank waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, N.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    A unit cell model is used to simulate the base analysis case and related sensitivity cases for the interim performance assessment of low level tank waste disposal. Simulation case results are summarized in terms of fractional contaminant release rates to the vadose zone and to the water table at the unconfined aquifer. Results suggest that the crushed glass water conditioning layer at the top of the facility and the chemical retardation pad at the bottom of the facility can be important components of the facility. Results also suggest that the release rates to the water table are dominated by the release rate from the waste form.

  2. Angle of Inclination of Tank-Treading Red Cells: Dependence on Shear Rate and Suspending Medium

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thomas M.; Korzeniewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Red cells suspended in solutions much more viscous than blood plasma assume an almost steady-state orientation when sheared above a threshold value of shear rate. This orientation is a consequence of the motion of the membrane around the red cell called tank-treading. Observed along the undisturbed vorticity of the shear flow, tank-treading red cells appear as slender bodies. Their orientation can be quantified as an angle of inclination (θ) of the major axis with respect to the undisturbed flow direction. We measured θ using solution viscosities (η0) and shear rates (γ˙) covering one and three orders of magnitude, respectively. At the lower values of η0, θ was almost independent of γ˙. At the higher values of η0, θ displayed a maximum at intermediate shear rates. The respective maximal values of θ increased by ∼10° from 10.7 to 104 mPas. After accounting for the absent membrane viscosity in models by using an increased cytoplasmic viscosity, their predictions of θ agree qualitatively with our data. Comparison of the observed variation of θ at constant γ˙ with model results suggests a change in the reference configuration of the shear stiffness of the membrane. PMID:25809249

  3. DNA Persistence in Sink Drain Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm.

  4. Generation of airborne Listeria innocua from model floor drains.

    PubMed

    Berrang, Mark E; Frank, Joseph F

    2012-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can colonize floor drains in poultry processing and further processing facilities, remaining present even after cleaning and disinfection. Therefore, during wash down, workers exercise caution to avoid spraying hoses directly into drains in an effort to prevent the escape and transfer of drain microflora to food contact surfaces. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which an inadvertent water spray into a colonized floor drain can cause the spread of airborne Listeria. Listeria innocua was used to inoculate a polyvinyl chloride model floor drain, resulting in approximately 10(8) cells per ml of phosphate-buffered saline and 10(4) attached cells per square centimeter of inner surface. Each model drain was subjected to a 2-s spray of tap water at 68.9 kPa from a distance of 1 m. Drains were sprayed while filled and again after emptying. Airborne cells were collected by using sedimentation plates containing Listeria selective agar which were placed on the floor and walls of a contained room at incremental horizontal and vertical distances of 0.6, 1.2, 2.4, or 4.0 m from the drain. Sedimentation plates were exposed for 10 min. A mechanical sampler was used to also collect air by impaction on the surface of Listeria selective agar to determine the number of cells per liter of air. The experiment was conducted in triplicate rooms for each of four replications. L. innocua was detected on sedimentation plates on the floor as far as 4.0 m from the drain and on walls as high as 2.4 m above the floor and 4 m from the drain. A 2-s spray with a water hose into a contaminated drain can cause airborne spread of Listeria, resulting in the potential for cross-contamination of food contact surfaces, equipment, and exposed product. PMID:22980019

  5. Bacterial diversity of floor drain biofilms and drain waters in a Listeria monocytogenes contaminated food processing environment.

    PubMed

    Dzieciol, Monika; Schornsteiner, Elisa; Muhterem-Uyar, Meryem; Stessl, Beatrix; Wagner, Martin; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2016-04-16

    Sanitation protocols are applied on a daily basis in food processing facilities to prevent the risk of cross-contamination with spoilage organisms. Floor drain water serves along with product-associated samples (slicer dust, brine or cheese smear) as an important hygiene indicator in monitoring Listeria monocytogenes in food processing facilities. Microbial communities of floor drains are representative for each processing area and are influenced to a large degree by food residues, liquid effluents and washing water. The microbial communities of drain water are steadily changing, whereas drain biofilms provide more stable niches. Bacterial communities of four floor drains were characterized using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to better understand the composition and exchange of drain water and drain biofilm communities. Furthermore, the L. monocytogenes contamination status of each floor drain was determined by applying cultivation-independent real-time PCR quantification and cultivation-dependent detection according to ISO11290-1. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes of drain water and drain biofilm bacterial communities yielded 50,611 reads, which were clustered into 641 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), affiliated to 16 phyla dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. The most abundant OTUs represented either product- (Lactococcus lactis) or fermentation- and food spoilage-associated phylotypes (Pseudomonas mucidolens, Pseudomonas fragi, Leuconostoc citreum, and Acetobacter tropicalis). The microbial communities in DW and DB samples were distinct in each sample type and throughout the whole processing plant, indicating the presence of indigenous specific microbial communities in each processing compartment. The microbiota of drain biofilms was largely different from the microbiota of the drain water. A sampling approach based on drain water alone may thus only provide reliable information on planktonic bacterial cells but might not allow conclusions

  6. EVALUATION OF FABRIC MEMBRANES FOR USE IN SALTSTONE DRAIN WATER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Pickenheim, B.; Miller, D.; Burket, P.

    2012-03-08

    Saltstone Disposal Unit 2 contains a sheet drain fabric intended to separate solids from drain water to be returned to the Salt Feed Tank. A similar system installed in Vault 4 appears to be ineffective in keeping solids out of the drain water return lines. Waste Solidification Engineering is considering installation of an additional fabric membrane to supplement the existing sheet drain in SDU 2. Amerdrain 200 is the product currently installed in SDU 2. This product is no longer available, so Sitedrain 94 was used as the replacement product in this testing. Fabrics with apparent opening sizes of 10, 25, 50 and 100 microns were evaluated. These fabrics were evaluated under three separate test conditions, a water flow test, a solids retention test and a grout pour test. A flow test with water showed that installation of an additional filter layer will predictably reduce the theoretical flux through the sheet drain. The manufacturer reports the flux for Sitedrain 94 as 150 gpm/ft{sup 2} by ASTM D-4491. This compares reasonably well with the 117 gpm/ft{sup 2} obtained in this testing. A combination of the 10 micron fabric with Sitedrain 94 could be expected to decrease flux by about 10 times as compared to Sitedrain 94 alone. The different media were used to filter a slag and fly ash mixture from water. Slag historically has the smallest nominal particle size of the premix components. Cement was omitted from the test because of its reactivity with water would prohibit accurately particle size measurements of the filtered samples. All four media sizes were able to remove greater than 95% of particles larger than 100 microns from the slurry. The smaller opening sizes were increasingly effective in removing more particles. The 10 micron filter captured 15% of the total amount of solids used in the test. This result implies that some insoluble particles may still be able to enter the drain water collection system, although the overall solids rejection is significantly

  7. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed

  8. Consequence of alternative standards for bulk tank somatic cell count of dairy herds in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of dairy operations failing compliance with current US and European Union (EU) standards for bulk-tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) as well as BTSCC standards proposed by 3 national organizations were evaluated using 2 populations of US dairy herds: Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHI) ...

  9. Plumbing the brain drain.

    PubMed Central

    Saravia, Nancy Gore; Miranda, Juan Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Opportunity is the driving force of migration. Unsatisfied demands for higher education and skills, which have been created by the knowledge-based global economy, have generated unprecedented opportunities in knowledge-intensive service industries. These multi-trillion dollar industries include information, communication, finance, business, education and health. The leading industrialized nations are also the focal points of knowledge-intensive service industries and as such constitute centres of research and development activity that proactively draw in talented individuals worldwide through selective immigration policies, employment opportunities and targeted recruitment. Higher education is another major conduit of talent from less-developed countries to the centres of the knowledge-based global economy. Together career and educational opportunities drive "brain drain and recirculation". The departure of a large proportion of the most competent and innovative individuals from developing nations slows the achievement of the critical mass needed to generate the enabling context in which knowledge creation occurs. To favourably modify the asymmetric movement and distribution of global talent, developing countries must implement bold and creative strategies that are backed by national policies to: provide world-class educational opportunities, construct knowledge-based research and development industries, and sustainably finance the required investment for these strategies. Brazil, China and India have moved in this direction, offering world-class education in areas crucial to national development, such as biotechnology and information technology, paralleled by investments in research and development. As a result, only a small proportion of the most highly educated individuals migrate from these countries, and research and development opportunities employ national talent and even attract immigrants. PMID:15375451

  10. Plumbing the brain drain.

    PubMed

    Saravia, Nancy Gore; Miranda, Juan Francisco

    2004-08-01

    Opportunity is the driving force of migration. Unsatisfied demands for higher education and skills, which have been created by the knowledge-based global economy, have generated unprecedented opportunities in knowledge-intensive service industries. These multi-trillion dollar industries include information, communication, finance, business, education and health. The leading industrialized nations are also the focal points of knowledge-intensive service industries and as such constitute centres of research and development activity that proactively draw in talented individuals worldwide through selective immigration policies, employment opportunities and targeted recruitment. Higher education is another major conduit of talent from less-developed countries to the centres of the knowledge-based global economy. Together career and educational opportunities drive "brain drain and recirculation". The departure of a large proportion of the most competent and innovative individuals from developing nations slows the achievement of the critical mass needed to generate the enabling context in which knowledge creation occurs. To favourably modify the asymmetric movement and distribution of global talent, developing countries must implement bold and creative strategies that are backed by national policies to: provide world-class educational opportunities, construct knowledge-based research and development industries, and sustainably finance the required investment for these strategies. Brazil, China and India have moved in this direction, offering world-class education in areas crucial to national development, such as biotechnology and information technology, paralleled by investments in research and development. As a result, only a small proportion of the most highly educated individuals migrate from these countries, and research and development opportunities employ national talent and even attract immigrants. PMID:15375451

  11. SINDA/FLUINT Stratified Tank Modeling for Cryrogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A general purpose SINDA/FLUINT (S/F) stratified tank model was created to simulate self-pressurization and axial jet TVS; Stratified layers in the vapor and liquid are modeled using S/F lumps.; The stratified tank model was constructed to permit incorporating the following additional features:, Multiple or singular lumps in the liquid and vapor regions of the tank, Real gases (also mixtures) and compressible liquids, Venting, pressurizing, and draining, Condensation and evaporation/boiling, Wall heat transfer, Elliptical, cylindrical, and spherical tank geometries; Extensive user logic is used to allow detailed tailoring - Don't have to rebuilt everything from scratch!!; Most code input for a specific case is done through the Registers Data Block:, Lump volumes are determined through user input:; Geometric tank dimensions (height, width, etc); Liquid level could be input as either a volume percentage of fill level or actual liquid level height

  12. Composition, proteolysis indices and coagulating properties of ewe milk as affected by bulk tank somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Martí-De Olives, Ana; Navarro-Ríos, María Jesús; Rubert-Alemán, Joaquín; Fernández, Nemesio; Molina, Maria Pilar

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of ovine bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) on composition, proteose-peptone (p-p) content and casein fractions as indicating parameters for proteolysis and coagulating properties of milk. A total of 97 samples of bulk tank milk from Manchega breed ewe flocks were grouped according to somatic cell count (SCC) into four classes: fewer than 500,000 cells/ml, from 500,000 to 10,00000 cells/ml, from 10,00000 to 15,00000 and more than 15,00000 cells/ml. The casein : protein ratio and lactose content decreased with BTSCC. Proteolysis increased with BTSCC, causing a drop in β-casein and an increase in the γ-caseins from a concentration of 500,000 cells/ml. Regarding coagulation behaviour, the rennet clotting time (RCT) and firming time (k20) rose from 10,00000-15,00000 cells/ml of milk. The results showed that the impairment of milk quality and milk ability to make cheese as affected by intramammary infection (IMI) can be inferred from the bulk tank milk of flocks with poor udder health. PMID:26104824

  13. Closed suction drain with bulb

    MedlinePlus

    ... gloves Five or 6 cotton swabs Gauze pads Clean soapy water Plastic trash bag Surgical tape Waterproof pad or ... Use a cotton swab dipped in the soapy water to clean the skin around the drain. Do this 3 ...

  14. Paternal antigen-specific proliferating regulatory T cells are increased in uterine-draining lymph nodes just before implantation and in pregnant uterus just after implantation by seminal plasma-priming in allogeneic mouse pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shima, Tomoko; Inada, Kumiko; Nakashima, Akitoshi; Ushijima, Akemi; Ito, Mika; Yoshino, Osamu; Saito, Shigeru

    2015-04-01

    Paternal antigen-specific regulatory T (PA-specific Treg) cells play an important role in feto-maternal tolerance. To detect the PA-specific Tregs, female BALB/c mice were mated with male DBA/2 mice. Mls Ia antigen on DBA/2 mice is recognized by the T-cell receptor Vβ6; thus, CD4(+)Foxp3(+)Vβ6(+) cells are recognized as PA-specific Treg cells. CD4(+)CD25(+)Vβ6(+) cells effectively suppressed the allo-reactive proliferation of lymphocytes compared with that of CD4(+)CD25(+)Vβ6(-) cells. Vβ6(+) PA-specific Treg cells expressed CCR4 and CCR5 on their surface. The frequency of Ki67(+) PA-specific Treg cells among Treg cells was significantly increased in draining lymph nodes on day 3.5 post-coitus (pc; 6.8±1.1%, p<0.05) and day 5.5 pc (7.2±1.1%, p<0.05) in allogeneic pregnant mice compared with that in nonpregnant mice (2.7±0.2%). The frequency of Ki67(+) PA-specific Treg cells in the uterus increased significantly after day 5.5 pc in allogeneic pregnant mice compared with that in nonpregnant mice (8.8±2.8% vs. 1.2±1.3%, p<0.05). However, Ki67(-)PA-specific Tregs did not change during pregnancy. To analyze the role of seminal fluid or sperm in Treg expansion, female BALB/c mice were mated with vasectomized DBA/2 male mice (VAS) or seminal vesicle-excised DBA/2 male mice (SVX). The frequency of Ki67(+) PA-specific Treg cells did not increase in draining lymph nodes or uterus in BALB/c×DBA/2 (SVX) allogeneic mating mice. These findings suggest that the priming by seminal fluid is important for the induction of proliferating PA-specific Tregs in uterine-draining lymph nodes just before implantation and pregnant uterus after implantation, resulting in successful implantation and the maintenance of allogeneic pregnancy. PMID:25817463

  15. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  16. BCG Skin Infection Triggers IL-1R-MyD88-Dependent Migration of EpCAMlow CD11bhigh Skin Dendritic cells to Draining Lymph Node During CD4+ T-Cell Priming

    PubMed Central

    Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Harumi Yamashiro, Lívia; Feng, Xiaogang; Bierschenk, Damiën; Gao, Yu; Blom, Hans; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Nylén, Susanne; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti

    2015-01-01

    The transport of antigen from the periphery to the draining lymph node (DLN) is critical for T-cell priming but remains poorly studied during infection with Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). To address this we employed a mouse model to track the traffic of Dendritic cells (DCs) and mycobacteria from the BCG inoculation site in the skin to the DLN. Detection of BCG in the DLN was concomitant with the priming of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells at that site. We found EpCAMlow CD11bhigh migratory skin DCs to be mobilized during the transport of BCG to the DLN. Migratory skin DCs distributed to the T-cell area of the LN, co-localized with BCG and were found in close apposition to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Consequently, blockade of skin DC traffic into DLN dramatically reduced mycobacterial entry into DLN and muted T-cell priming. Interestingly, DC and mycobacterial entry into the DLN was dependent on IL-1R-I, MyD88, TNFR-I and IL-12p40. In addition, we found using DC adoptive transfers that the requirement for MyD88 in BCG-triggered migration was not restricted to the migrating DC itself and that hematopoietic expression of MyD88 was needed in part for full-fledged migration. Our observations thus identify a population of DCs that contribute towards the priming of CD4+ T cells to BCG infection by transporting bacilli into the DLN in an IL-1R-MyD88-dependent manner and reveal both DC-intrinsic and -extrinsic requirements for MyD88 in DC migration. PMID:26440518

  17. BCG Skin Infection Triggers IL-1R-MyD88-Dependent Migration of EpCAMlow CD11bhigh Skin Dendritic cells to Draining Lymph Node During CD4+ T-Cell Priming.

    PubMed

    Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Harumi Yamashiro, Lívia; Feng, Xiaogang; Bierschenk, Damiën; Gao, Yu; Blom, Hans; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Nylén, Susanne; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti

    2015-10-01

    The transport of antigen from the periphery to the draining lymph node (DLN) is critical for T-cell priming but remains poorly studied during infection with Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). To address this we employed a mouse model to track the traffic of Dendritic cells (DCs) and mycobacteria from the BCG inoculation site in the skin to the DLN. Detection of BCG in the DLN was concomitant with the priming of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells at that site. We found EpCAMlow CD11bhigh migratory skin DCs to be mobilized during the transport of BCG to the DLN. Migratory skin DCs distributed to the T-cell area of the LN, co-localized with BCG and were found in close apposition to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Consequently, blockade of skin DC traffic into DLN dramatically reduced mycobacterial entry into DLN and muted T-cell priming. Interestingly, DC and mycobacterial entry into the DLN was dependent on IL-1R-I, MyD88, TNFR-I and IL-12p40. In addition, we found using DC adoptive transfers that the requirement for MyD88 in BCG-triggered migration was not restricted to the migrating DC itself and that hematopoietic expression of MyD88 was needed in part for full-fledged migration. Our observations thus identify a population of DCs that contribute towards the priming of CD4+ T cells to BCG infection by transporting bacilli into the DLN in an IL-1R-MyD88-dependent manner and reveal both DC-intrinsic and -extrinsic requirements for MyD88 in DC migration. PMID:26440518

  18. WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

    2008-04-28

    The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus

  19. 14 CFR 25.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... must have a sump with an effective capacity, in the normal ground attitude, of not less than the... with the airplane in the ground attitude. (c) Each fuel tank sump must have an accessible drain...

  20. Perfusion Stirred-Tank Bioreactors for 3D Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Simão, Daniel; Arez, Francisca; Terasso, Ana P; Pinto, Catarina; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic breakthroughs in neurological disorders have been hampered by the lack of accurate central nervous system (CNS) models. The development of these models allows the study of the disease onset/progression mechanisms and the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics. This has traditionally relied on genetically engineered animal models that often diverge considerably from the human phenotype (developmental, anatomic, and physiological) and 2D in vitro cell models, which fail to recapitulate the characteristics of the target tissue (cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, cell polarity, etc.). Recapitulation of CNS phenotypic and functional features in vitro requires the implementation of advanced culture strategies, such as 3D culture systems, which enable to mimic the in vivo structural and molecular complexity. Models based on differentiation of human neural stem cells (hNSC) in 3D cultures have great potential as complementary tools in preclinical research, bridging the gap between human clinical studies and animal models. The development of robust and scalable processes for the 3D differentiation of hNSC can improve the accuracy of early stage development in preclinical research. In this context, the use of software-controlled stirred-tank bioreactors (STB) provides an efficient technological platform for hNSC aggregation and differentiation. This system enables to monitor and control important physicochemical parameters for hNSC culture, such as dissolved oxygen. Importantly, the adoption of a perfusion operation mode allows a stable flow of nutrients and differentiation/neurotrophic factors, while clearing the toxic by-products. This contributes to a setting closer to the physiological, by mimicking the in vivo microenvironment. In this chapter, we address the technical requirements and procedures for the implementation of 3D differentiation strategies of hNSC, by operating STB under perfusion mode for long-term cultures. This strategy is suitable

  1. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of themore » sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively.« less

  2. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of the sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively. PMID:26230525

  3. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of the sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively.

  4. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration workplan for Corrective Action Unit 198: Test Cell C filter tank closure, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This plan addresses characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 198 identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The site is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 Test Cell C Complex. The CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-12 which includes two aboveground radioactive wastewater filter tanks. The tanks have an estimated capacity of 2,271 liters (600 gallons) each and were used to filter radioactive wastewater originating from the Test Cell C ``Nuclear Furnace 1`` testing. The tanks contain radioisotopes. Process knowledge indicates that the most likely isotopes of concern include {sup 90}Strontium and {sup 137}Cesium.

  5. 14 CFR 23.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... system must have a sediment bowl or chamber that is accessible for drainage; has a capacity of 1 ounce... normal flight attitude, water will drain from all parts of the tank except the sump to the sediment bowl or chamber. (d) Each sump, sediment bowl, and sediment chamber drain required by paragraphs (a),...

  6. 14 CFR 23.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... system must have a sediment bowl or chamber that is accessible for drainage; has a capacity of 1 ounce... normal flight attitude, water will drain from all parts of the tank except the sump to the sediment bowl or chamber. (d) Each sump, sediment bowl, and sediment chamber drain required by paragraphs (a),...

  7. 14 CFR 23.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... system must have a sediment bowl or chamber that is accessible for drainage; has a capacity of 1 ounce... normal flight attitude, water will drain from all parts of the tank except the sump to the sediment bowl or chamber. (d) Each sump, sediment bowl, and sediment chamber drain required by paragraphs (a),...

  8. Prediction of bulk tank somatic cell count violations based on monthly individual cow somatic cell count data.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, V; Bouchard, E; Haine, D; Scholl, D T; Roy, J P

    2015-04-01

    The regulatory limit in Canada for bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) was recently lowered from 500,000 to 400,000 cells/mL. Herd indices based on changes in cow somatic cell count over 2 consecutive months (e.g., proportion of healthy or chronically infected cows, cows cured, and new intramammary infection rate) could be used as predictors for BTSCC violations. The objective of this study was to develop a predictive model for exceeding the limit of 400,000 cells/mL in the next month using these herd indices. Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) data were used from 924 dairy herds in Québec, Canada. Test-day BTSCC was estimated by dividing the sum of all cows' DHI test-day somatic cell count times DHI test-day milk production by the total volume of milk produced by the herd on that test-day. In total, 986 of 8,681 (11.4%) estimated BTSCC exceeded 400,000 cells/mL. The final predictive model included 6 variables: mean herd somatic cell score at the current test-month, proportion of cows >500,000 cells/mL at the current test-month, proportion of healthy cows during lactation at the current test-month, proportion of chronically infected cows at the current test-month, average days in milk at the current test-month, and annual mean daily milk production. The optimized sensitivity and specificity of the model were 76 and 74%, respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 25 and 95%, respectively. This low positive predictive value and high negative predictive value demonstrated that the model was less accurate at predicting herds that would violate the estimated BTSCC threshold but very accurate at identifying herds that would not. In addition, the area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.82, suggesting that the model had excellent discrimination between test-months that did and did not exceed 400,000 cells/mL. An internal validation was completed using a bootstrapped resampling-based estimation method and

  9. Developing NDE Techniques for Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Don; Starr, Stan; Arens, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Shuttle Program requires very large cryogenic ground storage tanks in which to store liquid oxygen and hydrogen. The existing Pads A and B Launch Complex-39 tanks, which will be passed onto future launch programs, are 45 years old and have received minimal refurbishment and only external inspections over the years. The majority of the structure is inaccessible without a full system drain of cryogenic liquid and granular insulation in the annular region. It was previously thought that there was a limit to the number of temperature cycles that the tanks could handle due to possible insulation compaction before undergoing a costly and time consuming complete overhaul; therefore the tanks were not drained and performance issues with these tanks, specifically the Pad B liquid hydrogen tank, were accepted. There is a needind an opportunity, as the Shuttle program ends and work to upgrade the launch pads progresses, to develop innovative non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to analyze the current tanks. Techniques are desired that can aid in determining the extent of refurbishment required to keep the tanks in service for another 20+ years. A nondestructive technique would also be a significant aid in acceptance testing of new and refurbished tanks, saving significant time and money, if corrective actions can be taken before cryogen is introduced to the systems.

  10. Preliminary safety criteria for organic watch list tanks at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, A.B.; Stewart, J.L.; Turner, O.A.; Plys, M.G.; Malinovic, B.; Grigsby, J.M.; Camaioni, D.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Samuels, W.O.; Toth, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    Condensed-phase, rapid reactions of organic salts with nitrates/nitrites in Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste single-shell tanks could lead to structural failure of the tanks resulting in significant releases of radionuclides and toxic materials. This report establishes appropriate preliminary safety criteria to ensure that tank wastes will be maintained safe. These criteria show that if actual dry wastes contain less than 1.2 MJ/kg of reactants reaction energy or less 4.5 wt % of total organic carbon, then the waste will be safe and will not propagate if ignited. Waste moisture helps to retard reactions; when waste moisture exceeds 20 wt %, rapid reactions are prevented, regardless of organic carbon concentrations. Aging and degradation of waste materials has been considered to predict the types and amounts to organic compounds present in the waste. Using measurements of 3 waste phases (liquid, salt cake, and sludge) obtained from tank waste samples analyzed in the laboratory, analysis of variance (ANOVA) models were used to estimate waste states for unmeasured tanks. The preliminary safety criteria are based upon calorimetry and propagation testing of likely organic compounds which represent actual tank wastes. These included sodium salts of citrate, formate, acetate and hydroxyethylethylenediaminetricetate (HEDTA). Hot cell tests of actual tank wastes are planned for the future to confirm propagation tests performed in the laboratory. The effects of draining liquids from the tanks which would remove liquids and moisture were considered because reactive waste which is too dry may propagate. Evaporation effects which could remove moisture from the tanks were also calculated. The various ways that the waste could be heated or ignited by equipment failures or tank operations activities were considered and appropriate monitoring and controls were recommended.

  11. Adaptable stirred-tank culture strategies for large scale production of multicellular spheroid-based tumor cell models.

    PubMed

    Santo, Vítor E; Estrada, Marta F; Rebelo, Sofia P; Abreu, Sofia; Silva, Inês; Pinto, Catarina; Veloso, Susana C; Serra, Ana Teresa; Boghaert, Erwin; Alves, Paula M; Brito, Catarina

    2016-03-10

    Currently there is an effort toward the development of in vitro cancer models more predictive of clinical efficacy. The onset of advanced analytical tools and imaging technologies has increased the utilization of spheroids in the implementation of high throughput approaches in drug discovery. Agitation-based culture systems are commonly proposed as an alternative method for the production of tumor spheroids, despite the scarce experimental evidence found in the literature. In this study, we demonstrate the robustness and reliability of stirred-tank cultures for the scalable generation of 3D cancer models. We developed standardized protocols to a panel of tumor cell lines from different pathologies and attained efficient tumor cell aggregation by tuning hydrodynamic parameters. Large numbers of spheroids were obtained (typically 1000-1500 spheroids/mL) presenting features of native tumors, namely morphology, proliferation and hypoxia gradients, in a cell line-dependent mode. Heterotypic 3D cancer models, based on co-cultures of tumor cells and fibroblasts, were also established in the absence or presence of additional physical support from an alginate matrix, with maintenance of high cell viability. Altogether, we demonstrate that 3D tumor cell model production in stirred-tank culture systems is a robust and versatile approach, providing reproducible tools for drug screening and target verification in pre-clinical oncology research. PMID:26815388

  12. Alternatively Activated Mononuclear Phagocytes from the Skin Site of Infection and the Impact of IL-4Rα Signalling on CD4+T Cell Survival in Draining Lymph Nodes after Repeated Exposure to Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Catriona T.; Sanin, David E.; Mountford, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    In a murine model of repeated exposure of the skin to infective Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, events leading to the priming of CD4 cells in the skin draining lymph nodes were examined. The dermal exudate cell (DEC) population recovered from repeatedly (4x) exposed skin contained an influx of mononuclear phagocytes comprising three distinct populations according to their differential expression of F4/80 and MHC-II. As determined by gene expression analysis, all three DEC populations (F4/80-MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIint) exhibited major up-regulation of genes associated with alternative activation. The gene encoding RELMα (hallmark of alternatively activated cells) was highly up-regulated in all three DEC populations. However, in 4x infected mice deficient in RELMα, there was no change in the extent of inflammation at the skin infection site compared to 4x infected wild-type cohorts, nor was there a difference in the abundance of different mononuclear phagocyte DEC populations. The absence of RELMα resulted in greater numbers of CD4+ cells in the skin draining lymph nodes (sdLN) of 4x infected mice, although they remained hypo-responsive. Using mice deficient for IL-4Rα, in which alternative activation is compromised, we show that after repeated schistosome infection, levels of regulatory IL-10 in the skin were reduced, accompanied by increased numbers of MHC-IIhigh cells and CD4+ T cells in the skin. There were also increased numbers of CD4+ T cells in the sdLN in the absence of IL-4Rα compared to cells from singly infected mice. Although their ability to proliferate was still compromised, increased cellularity of sdLN from 4x IL-4RαKO mice correlated with reduced expression of Fas/FasL, resulting in decreased apoptosis and cell death but increased numbers of viable CD4+ T cells. This study highlights a mechanism through which IL-4Rα may regulate the immune system through the induction of IL-10 and regulation of Fas/FasL mediated cell death

  13. Alternatively Activated Mononuclear Phagocytes from the Skin Site of Infection and the Impact of IL-4Rα Signalling on CD4+T Cell Survival in Draining Lymph Nodes after Repeated Exposure to Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Catriona T; Sanin, David E; Mountford, Adrian P

    2016-08-01

    In a murine model of repeated exposure of the skin to infective Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, events leading to the priming of CD4 cells in the skin draining lymph nodes were examined. The dermal exudate cell (DEC) population recovered from repeatedly (4x) exposed skin contained an influx of mononuclear phagocytes comprising three distinct populations according to their differential expression of F4/80 and MHC-II. As determined by gene expression analysis, all three DEC populations (F4/80-MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIint) exhibited major up-regulation of genes associated with alternative activation. The gene encoding RELMα (hallmark of alternatively activated cells) was highly up-regulated in all three DEC populations. However, in 4x infected mice deficient in RELMα, there was no change in the extent of inflammation at the skin infection site compared to 4x infected wild-type cohorts, nor was there a difference in the abundance of different mononuclear phagocyte DEC populations. The absence of RELMα resulted in greater numbers of CD4+ cells in the skin draining lymph nodes (sdLN) of 4x infected mice, although they remained hypo-responsive. Using mice deficient for IL-4Rα, in which alternative activation is compromised, we show that after repeated schistosome infection, levels of regulatory IL-10 in the skin were reduced, accompanied by increased numbers of MHC-IIhigh cells and CD4+ T cells in the skin. There were also increased numbers of CD4+ T cells in the sdLN in the absence of IL-4Rα compared to cells from singly infected mice. Although their ability to proliferate was still compromised, increased cellularity of sdLN from 4x IL-4RαKO mice correlated with reduced expression of Fas/FasL, resulting in decreased apoptosis and cell death but increased numbers of viable CD4+ T cells. This study highlights a mechanism through which IL-4Rα may regulate the immune system through the induction of IL-10 and regulation of Fas/FasL mediated cell death

  14. A Physical Model for Shallow Groundwater Studies and the Simulation of Land Drain Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Robert; Reid, Ian

    1987-01-01

    Describes a two-dimensional sand-tank model that illustrates the influence of ground slope on tile drain discharge and the movement of groundwater in general. The model can be used to demonstrate the effect of topography on sub-surface water movement in agricultural catchments, thus it is a useful hydrological teaching aid. (Author/BSR)

  15. Reappraisal of flow to tile drains III. Drains with limited flow capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S.; Rushton, K. R.

    1996-09-01

    This third paper of the series on the reappraisal of flow to tile drains considers the time-variant situations in tile drain drainage systems when the quantity of water carried by tile drains is limited due to the capacity of the drains or the pumping equipment. Two categories of problem are analysed in this paper: (i) a series of parallel tile drains with a maximum specified flow and (ii) interceptor drains in the vicinity of canals. Complete details for satisfying the maximum specified flow conditions in tile drains are given. The effect of different capacities of tile drains on the performance of drainage system is explored.

  16. An expert system to manage the operation of the Space Shuttle's fuel cell cryogenic reactant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphey, Amy Y.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a rule-based expert system to manage the operation of the Space Shuttle's cryogenic fuel system. Rules are based on standard fuel tank operating procedures described in the EECOM Console Handbook. The problem of configuring the operation of the Space Shuttle's fuel tanks is well-bounded and well defined. Moreover, the solution of this problem can be encoded in a knowledge-based system. Therefore, a rule-based expert system is the appropriate paradigm. Furthermore, the expert system could be used in coordination with power system simulation software to design operating procedures for specific missions.

  17. 49 CFR 179.200-9 - Compartment tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with at least one tapped drain hole at their lowest point, and a tapped hole at the top of the tank. The top hole must be closed, and the bottom hole may be closed, with not less than three-fourths inch... their lowest point and a tapped hole at top of tank. The top hole shall be closed and the bottom...

  18. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. quations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reaction rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. n analytical solution for the...

  19. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. Equations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reation rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. An analytical solution for ...

  20. 33 CFR 183.550 - Fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... fuel tank must not support a deck, bulkhead, or other structural component. (d) Water must drain from... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel tanks: Installation. 183.550...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.550 Fuel...

  1. 33 CFR 183.550 - Fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fuel tank must not support a deck, bulkhead, or other structural component. (d) Water must drain from... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel tanks: Installation. 183.550...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.550 Fuel...

  2. 33 CFR 183.550 - Fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... fuel tank must not support a deck, bulkhead, or other structural component. (d) Water must drain from... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel tanks: Installation. 183.550...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.550 Fuel...

  3. Numerical Study of Liquid Sloshing on Anti-sloshing Device Using Open Cell Metal Foams in Oil Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Qu, Z. G.; Tao, W. Q.; Lu, T. J.

    2010-03-01

    A new baffle structure design named open-cell metal foams baffle for anti-sloshing device in oil tank is presented in this study. Numerical simulation study on the liquid sloshing with various baffles is carried out using FLUENT with the volume-of-fluid (VOF) model. Four types of baffles were studied, namely non-baffle (type A), conventional parallel-baffle (type B), cross-baffle (type C) and open- cell metal foams baffles (type D). The oil velocity distribution, centroid and oil occupancy in the sloshing process is revealed in the case of vehicle speeding up and turning respectively. It is found that type D reduce velocity of oil, increase the value of oil occupancy in the suction pipe entrance of the oil tank and lower the centroid of oil obviously comparing with the other types. As for the same open-cell metal foam pore density, lower open-cell metal foam porosity has much better effect of inhibition of liquid sloshing, but there is little deviation among different porosity for the absolute value. Moreover, according to the same porosity, the oil centroid can be lowered obviously with the increase of pore density. The results of type D show practical significance and referable guideline for baffles design to improve the safety and stability of vehicle.

  4. Heater drain system transient monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Voll, B.J.; Farsaci, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    Feedwater heater drain systems are susceptible to unstable, two phase flow conditions. These instabilities are difficult to predict and are dependent on plant-specific system designs and operating conditions. Therefore, significant vibrations and transient events can occur that the systems are not specifically designed for. This paper describes how heater drain system responses due to unanticipated transient events at a nuclear plant were captured and quantified using a digital data acquisition system. The setup of the data acquisition system, including the determination of what parameters to monitor and how to effectively capture potential transient events, is discussed. This paper also discusses the monitoring results and their relevance to system modification evaluations and root cause evaluations.

  5. Generation of airborne listeria from floor drains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes can colonize floor drains in poultry processing and further processing facilities remaining even after cleaning and disinfection. Therefore, during wash down, workers exercise caution to prevent escape and transfer of drain microflora to food contact surfaces. The objective ...

  6. DETECTION AND FATE OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS (STERNE) VEGETATIVE CELLS AND SPORES ADDED TO BULK TANK MILK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A preparation of spores of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) was utilized to evaluate commercially available reagents and portable equipment for detecting anthrax contamination using real time PCR and to assess the fate of spores added directly to bulk tank milk. The Ruggedized Automated Pathogen ...

  7. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  8. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  9. Zero Additional Process, Local Charge Trap, Embedded Flash Memory with Drain-Side Assisted Erase Scheme Using Minimum Channel Length/Width Standard Complemental Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single Transistor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Kousuke; Shinozuka, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Ken

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes for the first time the completely complemental metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible embedded flash memory with the small cell size as well as the lowest process cost. The single transistor cell with the minimum channel length and width realizes the ideal smallest cell. The non-volatile memory operation is realized with locally injected electrons at the drain-edge by the hot electron injection. This paper also proposes the novel forward-bias assisted erase. The proposed memory is experimentally demonstrated with the 65 nm standard CMOS process without additional process or mask. The cell size is 10F2 with the 65 nm CMOS logic design rule. The excellent reliability such as 100-times program/erase endurance, 10-year data retention and high immunity to the read/program/erase disturb is also experimentally demonstrated. The proposed cell is the ideal candidate for the code-storage embedded non-volatile memories in system-on-chip and microcontroller unit.

  10. Safety drain system for fluid reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A safety drain system includes a plurality of drain sections, each of which defines distinct fluid flow paths. At least a portion of the fluid flow paths commence at a side of the drain section that is in fluid communication with a reservoir's fluid. Each fluid flow path at the side communicating with the reservoir's fluid defines an opening having a smallest dimension not to exceed approximately one centimeter. The drain sections are distributed over at least one surface of the reservoir. A manifold is coupled to the drain sections.

  11. Short communication: effect of dry therapy using an intramammary infusion on bulk tank somatic cell count in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, C; Linage, B; Carriedo, J A; Juárez, M T; Beneitez, E; Martínez, A; De La Fuente, L F

    2009-01-01

    A total of 3,141 records of bulk tank milk somatic cell counts (BTSCC) and bulk tank milk total bacterial counts (BTTBC) were obtained over 24 mo from 25 dairy flocks of Assaf ewes belonging to the Consortium for Ovine Promotion in Castilla-León, Spain, in which a complete dry therapy program was carried out in 10,313 ewes using an antibiotic infusion containing 100 mg of penethamate hydriodide, 280 mg of benethamine penicillin, and 100 mg of framycetin sulfate. The selection criteria for all flocks were BTSCC mean values > or =1,000 x 10(3) cells/mL and absence of dry therapy before the start of this experiment. Significant effects on log BTSCC were detected for treatment, milking system, flock within milking system, month within flock by treatment, the interactions treatment by milking system and flock by treatment within milking system, and log BTTBC. After dry therapy was implemented, log BTSCC decreased significantly in machine-milked flocks (5.95 +/- 0.007) compared with values before antibiotic treatment (6.13 +/- 0.008). The effect was observed at the beginning of the second lactation posttreatment (5.98 +/- 0.013). However, dry therapy was not effective in hand-milked flocks, suggesting poor hygiene conditions. A significant relationship was found between BTSCC and BTTBC; therefore, programs for improving milk hygiene should be implemented for both BTSCC and BTTBC variables at the same time. PMID:19109274

  12. Continuous IBE fermentation by immobilized growing Clostridium beijerinckii cells in a stirred-tank fermentor. [Isopropanol-Butanol-Ethanol (IBE)

    SciTech Connect

    Krouwel, P.G.; Groot, W.J.; Kossen, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of continuous isopropanol-butanol-ethanol (IBE) fermentation by Ca-alginate-immobilized Clostridium beijerinckii cells in a continuous stirred-tank reactor is investigated. A mathematical model is presented to describe steady-state reactor performance. It appeared to be possible to use the biocatalyst particles repeatedly for successive fermentations (at least three times for a total duration of two months). Reactor productivity was 6-16 times higher than that of a batch fermentation (free cells), while the solvents yield was also increased. Measurements of substrate, product, and biomass concentrations were only partially in agreement with the model; however, a solid basis for further technological development of the process has been laid. (Refs. 15).

  13. A case of a retained drain tip following intercostal drain insertion: avoiding a 'never event'.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Nicola K; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud; Rajesh, Pala B; Steyn, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    Pleural effusions are commonly drained with Seldinger intercostal drains. One uncommon but serious risk of drain insertion is that of a foreign body being retained in the pleural cavity following removal. We report a case in which the tip of the drain was retained in the pleural space following difficult insertion of a Seldinger intercostal drain in a district general hospital. Prompt recognition and clear patient communication are important at the occurrence of an unusual complication. Surgical removal of the foreign body was performed following transfer. We report this case to raise awareness that insertion and withdrawal of drains over the guidewire during insertion may damage the drain and highlight the need for doctors who insert chest drains to perform a count of instruments during ward or clinic-based procedures as well as those performed in theatres. We now include removable parts of chest drains in our theatre instrument count. PMID:27076623

  14. Contamination of raw poultry meat by airborne listeria originating from a floor drain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry processing plants can become colonized with Listeria resulting in long term residence in floor drains. Earlier work showed that an inadvertent two second water spray into a contaminated floor drain causes airborne dissemination of low numbers of Listeria cells. The objective of the current...

  15. Cardiovascular collapse with attempted pericardial drain withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Molly B; Spitznagel, Rachel A; Kugler, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a rare but serious emergency condition in the pediatric population. As treatment, a pericardial drain is often placed to evacuate the fluid. We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with cardiac tamponade secondary to renal failure. After the tamponade resolved, she suffered cardiovascular collapse upon attempted drain withdrawal. This case highlights an unusual cause for cardiovascular collapse, which occurred on blind removal of a pericardial drain. PMID:27625522

  16. Composite Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A composite tank for containing liquid oxygen and the method of making the same Wherein a water-soluble mandrel having ing the desired tank configuration and a cylindrical protuberance on at least one end is fitted with an inner boss conformance, to the configuration of the mandrel and in outer boss conforming to the configuration of the inner boss, the bosses each having a tubular portion for receiving the protuberance on the mandrel and a spherical portion. The mandrel and the bosses are first coated with a nickel coating. The mandrel is then wrapped with graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and this resin is cured. A layer of insulating foam is then applied to the tank and cured. The insulating foam is machined to a desired concentration and a layer of aramid fibers wetted with a second epoxy resin is wrapped around the tank. The second resin is cured and the water soluble mandrel is washed from inside the tank.

  17. Performance of electric forklift with low-temperature polymer exchange membrane fuel cell power module and metal hydride hydrogen storage extension tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Tolj, Ivan; Parsons, Adrian; Smith, Fahmida; Sita, Cordellia; Linkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    We present test results of a commercial 3-tonne electric forklift (STILL) equipped with a commercial fuel cell power module (Plug Power) and a MH hydrogen storage tank (HySA Systems and TF Design). The tests included: (i) performance evaluation of "hybrid" hydrogen storage system during refuelling at low (<185 bar) dispensing pressures; (ii) comparison of the forklift performances during heavy-duty operation when changing the powering in the series: standard battery - fuel cell power module (alone) - power module with integrated MH tank; and (iii) performance tests of the forklift during its operation under working conditions. It was found that (a) the forklift with power module and MH tank can achieve 83% of maximum hydrogen storage capacity during 6 min refuelling (for full capacity 12-15 min); (b) heavy-duty operation of the forklift is characterised by 25% increase in energy consumption, and during system operation more uniform power distribution occurs when operating in the fuel cell powering mode with MH, in comparison to the battery powering mode; (c) use of the fully refuelled fuel cell power module with the MH extension tank allows for uninterrupted operation for 3 h 6 min and 7 h 15 min, for heavy- and light-duty operation, respectively.

  18. Outlet baffles: Effect on liquid residuals from zero-gravity draining of hemispherically ended cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the relative effectiveness of various outlet baffles in reducing liquid residuals resulting from the draining of hemispherically ended cylindrical tanks in a weightless environment. Three different baffles were employed. The relative effectiveness of each baffle was determined by comparing the results obtained, in the form of liquid residuals, with results for an unbaffled tank. Data indicate that all the baffles tested reduced residuals. Reductions betweem 10 and 60 percent were obtained, depending on baffle geometry and outlfow Weber number.

  19. Characterization of septic and drain system releases at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, M.R.; Galloway, R.B. |

    1997-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project is tasked with performing the assessment and remediation of environmental releases resulting from the almost 50 years of engineering development and testing activities. Operable Unit 1295, Septic Tanks and Drainfields, includes inactive septic and drain systems at 23 separate ER sites that were listed as Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) in the SNL/NM Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) Module Permit. These sites were identified, based on process histories and interviews with facility personnel, as the subset of all SNL/NM septic and drain systems that had the highest potential for releases of hazardous and radioactive wastes into the environment. An additional 101 septic and drain systems not currently classified as SWMUs also have been identified as needing future characterization.

  20. Hanford Technology Development (Tank Farms) - 12509

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    soil between the ground surface and the water table 200-to-300 feet below. The project tracks and monitors contamination in the soil. Technologies are being developed and deployed to detect and monitor contaminants. Interim surface barriers, which are barriers put over the single-shell tanks, prevent rain and snow from soaking into the ground and spreading contamination. The impermeable barrier placed over T Farm, which was the site of the largest tank waste leak in Hanford's history, is 60,000 square feet and sloped to drain moisture outside the tank farm. The barrier over TY Farm is constructed of asphalt and drains moisture to a nearby evaporation basin. Our discussion of technology will address the incredible challenge of removing waste from Hanford's single-shell tanks. Under the terms of the Tri-Party Agreement, ORP is required to remove 99 percent of the tank waste, or until the limits of technology have been reached. All pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks, and work now focuses on removing the non-pumpable liquids. Waste retrieval was completed from the first single-shell tank in late 2003. Since then, another six single-shell tanks have been retrieved to regulatory standards. (authors)

  1. Computational Analyses of Pressurization in Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Mattick, Stephen; Lee, Chun P.; Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry

    2008-01-01

    A) Advanced Gas/Liquid Framework with Real Fluids Property Routines: I. A multi-fluid formulation in the preconditioned CRUNCH CFD(Registered TradeMark) code developed where a mixture of liquid and gases can be specified: a) Various options for Equation of state specification available (from simplified ideal fluid mixtures, to real fluid EOS such as SRK or BWR models). b) Vaporization of liquids driven by pressure value relative to vapor pressure and combustion of vapors allowed. c) Extensive validation has been undertaken. II. Currently working on developing primary break-up models and surface tension effects for more rigorous phase-change modeling and interfacial dynamics B) Framework Applied to Run-time Tanks at Ground Test Facilities C) Framework Used For J-2 Upper Stage Tank Modeling: 1) NASA MSFC tank pressurization: a) Hydrogen and oxygen tank pre-press, repress and draining being modeled at NASA MSFC. 2) NASA AMES tank safety effort a) liquid hydrogen and oxygen are separated by a baffle in the J-2 tank. We are modeling pressure rise and possible combustion if a hole develops in the baffle and liquid hydrogen leaks into the oxygen tank. Tank pressure rise rates simulated and risk of combustion evaluated.

  2. Sloshing in the Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen Propellant Tanks After Main Engine Cut Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sura; West, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is designing and developing the Main Propulsion System (MPS) for Ares launch vehicles. Propellant sloshing in the liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant tanks after Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) was modeled using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) module of the computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The present simulation shows that there is substantial sloshing side forces acting on the LH2 tank during the deceleration of the vehicle after MECO. The LH2 tank features a side wall drain pipe. The side loads result from the residual propellant mass motion in the LH2 tank which is initiated by the stop of flow into the drain pipe at MECO. The simulations show that radial force on the LH2 tank wall is less than 50 lbf and the radial moment calculated based up through the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted to be as high as 300 lbf-ft. The LO2 tank features a bottom dome drain system and is equipped with sloshing baffles. The remaining LO2 in the tank slowly forms a liquid column along the centerline of tank under the zero gravity environments. The radial force on the LO2 tank wall is predicted to be less than 100 lbf. The radial moment calculated based on the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted as high as 4500 lbf-ft just before MECO and dropped down to near zero after propellant draining stopped completely.

  3. 14 CFR 29.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil system drains. 29.1021 Section 29.1021... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil system drains. 27.1021 Section 27.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be accessible; and...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil system drains. 27.1021 Section 27.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be accessible; and...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil system drains. 25.1021 Section 25.1021... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil system drains. 25.1021 Section 25.1021... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil system drains. 25.1021 Section 25.1021... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil system drains. 27.1021 Section 27.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be accessible; and...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil system drains. 25.1021 Section 25.1021... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil system drains. 29.1021 Section 29.1021... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil system drains. 29.1021 Section 29.1021... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil system drains. 27.1021 Section 27.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each drain must— (a) Be accessible; and...

  14. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  15. [Studies on the cell suspension culture of Saussarea medusa in a stirred tank bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Zhao, D X; Lu, D P; Yan, F; Li, Z H; Chen, H Z; Zhao, Q

    2001-09-01

    The cell suspension culture of Saussarea medusa in a 2L aerated and agitated bioreactor with a four-pitch-blade impeller was investigated. The effects of agitation speed, aeration and inoculum size on cell growth and flavonoids production were studied and it was found that cells had optimum growth and flavonoids production when cultivated at 75 r/min, 700-1000 L/min and an inoculum of 4.0-5.0 g/L. A high cell biomass of 13.8 g/L and flavonoids production of 416 mg/L were achieved after 12 days of cultivation. Time course study revealed that flavonoids biosynthesis was growth-associated. The studies on aggregates size distribution in the bioreactor showed that the aggregates break-up caused by hydrodynamic stress might adversely affect cell growth and lead to significant reduction of cell biomass and flavonoids production. PMID:11797222

  16. Developing NDE Techniques for Large Cryogenic Tanks - Year 2 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen; youngquist, Robert; McFall, Judith; Simmons, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The Shuttle Program requires very large cryogenic ground storage tanks in which to store liquid oxygen and hydrogen. The existing Launch Complex-39 Pad tanks, which will be passed onto future launch programs, are over 40 years old and have received minimal refurbishment and only external inspections over the years. The majority of the structure is inaccessible without a full system drain of cryogenic liquid and insulation in the annular region. It was previously thought that there was a limit to the number of temperature cycles that the tanks could handle due to possible insulation compaction before undergoing a costly and time consuming complete overhaul; therefore the tanks were not drained and performance issues with these tanks, specifically the Pad B LH2 tank, were accepted. There is a need and an opportunity, as the Shuttle program ends and work to upgrade the launch pad progresses, to develop innovative non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to analyze the current tanks. Techniques are desired that can aid in determining the extent of refurbishment required to keep the tanks in service for another 20+ years. A non-destructive technique would also be a significant aid in acceptance testing of new and refurbished tanks, saving significant time and money, if corrective actions can be taken before cryogen is introduced to the systems. Year one of this project concentrated on analysis of the current tanks located at LC-39 while cryogen was present. Year two of this project concentrated on analysis of detectable thermal variations on the outer surface of the tanks as the cryogen was drained and the inner vessel warmed to ambient conditions. Two techniques have been deployed in the field to monitor the tank. The first consisted of a displacement sensor to monitor for any expansions at the base of the tank during warm-up that could indicate a compaction issue with the insulation. The second technique was continued thermal monitoring of the tank through and

  17. Urokinase-Treated Antithrombogenic Drains and Optimized Drain Placement in Endoscopic Lumbar Decompressive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shu; Ikeda, Shoji; Taguchi, Mitsuto

    2016-07-01

    Background Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) frequently occurs after microendoscopic decompressive laminotomy (MEDL), and a drain may not be functioning sufficiently. Objective To reduce the incidence of SEH after MEDL. Methods  A urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain, which is available only with a large diameter, was reduced in diameter and used after MEDL. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed 36 to 48 hours after surgery. The size of the SEH was measured by MRI, and the location of the drain tip was assessed by CT scan. After imaging, the drain was removed. Results Use of the urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain reduced the incidence of SEH. However, the drain was not adequately placed in many cases, limiting the effect of the drainage. When the urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain was placed contralaterally to the approach side using an unsheathed endoscope, the incidence of SEH was further reduced. Conclusions The urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain prevented thrombus-related drain obstruction. In addition, unsheathed endoscopic contralateral placement of the drain was effective for SEH prevention. PMID:26935298

  18. High-density mammalian cell cultures in stirred-tank bioreactor without external pH control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sen; Chen, Hao

    2016-08-10

    Maintaining desired pH is a necessity for optimal cell growth and protein production. It is typically achieved through a two-sided pH control loop on the bioreactor controller. Here we investigated cell culture processes with minimum or no pH control and demonstrated that high-density mammalian cell cultures could be maintained for long-term protein production without pH control. The intrinsic interactions between pCO2, lactate, and pH were leveraged to maintain culture pH. Fed-batch cultures at the same lower pH limit of 6.75 but different upper pH limits (7.05, 7.30, 7.45, 7.65) were evaluated in the 3L bioreactors and comparable results were obtained. Neither CO2 sparging nor base addition was required to control pH in the pH range of 6.75-7.65. The impact of sparger configurations (drilled hole sparger vs. frit sparger) and scales (3L vs. 200L) on CO2 accumulation and culture pH was also demonstrated. The same principle was applied in two perfusion cultures with steady state cell densities at 42.5±3.3 or 68.3±6.0×10(6)cells/mL with low cell specific perfusion rates (15±2 to 23±3pL/cell/day), achieving up to 1.9±0.1g/L/day bioreactor productivity. Culture pH level in the 3L perfusion bioreactors was steadily maintained by controlling the residual lactate and pCO2 levels without the requirement of external pH control for up to 40days with consistent productivity and product quality. Furthermore, culture pH could be potentially modulated via adjusting residual glucose levels and CO2 stripping capability in perfusion cultures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a systematic study was performed to evaluate the long-term cell cultivation and protein production in stirred-tank bioreactors without external pH control. PMID:27320019

  19. Might digital drains speed up the time to thoracic drain removal?

    PubMed

    Afoke, Jonathan; Tan, Carol; Hunt, Ian; Zakkar, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: might digital drains speed up the time to thoracic drain removal in terms of time till chest drain removal, hospital stay and overall cost? A total of 296 papers were identified as a result of the search as described below. Of these, five papers provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of the papers are tabulated. A literature search revealed that several single-centre prospective randomized studies have shown significantly earlier removal of chest drains with digital drains ranging between 0.8 and 2.1 days sooner. However, there was heterogeneity in studies in the management protocol of chest drains in terms of the use of suction, number of drains and assessment for drain removal. Some protocols such as routinely keeping drains irrespective of the presence of air leak or drain output may have skewed results. Differences in exclusion criteria and protocols for discharging home with portable devices may have biased results. Due to heterogeneity in the management protocol of chest drains, there is conflicting evidence regarding hospital stay. The limited data on cost suggest that there may be significantly lower postoperative costs in the digital drain group. All the studies were single-centre series generally including patients with good preoperative lung function tests. Further larger studies with more robust chest drain management protocols are required especially to assess length of hospital stay, cost and whether the results are applicable to a larger patient population. PMID:24722516

  20. Influence of aeration-homogenization system in stirred tank bioreactors, dissolved oxygen concentration and pH control mode on BHK-21 cell growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo Fernández; Leme, Jaci; de Almeida Parizotto, Letícia; Chagas, Wagner Antonio; de Rezende, Alexandre Gonçalves; da Costa, Bruno Labate Vale; Monteiro, Daniela Cristina Ventini; Boldorini, Vera Lucia Lopes; Jorge, Soraia Attie Calil; Astray, Renato Mancini; Pereira, Carlos Augusto; Caricati, Celso Pereira; Tonso, Aldo

    2014-08-01

    This work focused on determining the effect of dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) on growth and metabolism of BHK-21 cell line (host cell for recombinant proteins manufacturing and viral vaccines) cultured in two stirred tank bioreactors with different aeration-homogenization systems, as well as pH control mode. BHK-21 cell line adapted to single-cell suspension was cultured in Celligen without aeration cage (rotating gas-sparger) and Bioflo 110, at 10, 30 and 50 % air saturation (impeller for gas dispersion from sparger-ring). The pH was controlled at 7.2 as far as it was possible with gas mixtures. In other runs, at 30 and 50 % (DO) in Bioflo 110, the cells grew at pH controlled with CO2 and NaHCO3 solution. Glucose, lactate, glutamine, and ammonium were quantified by enzymatic methods. Cell concentration, size and specific oxygen consumption were also determined. When NaHCO3 solution was not used, the optimal DOs were 10 and 50 % air saturation for Celligen and Bioflo 110, respectively. In this condition maximum cell concentrations were higher than 4 × 10(6) cell/mL. An increase in maximum cell concentration of 36 % was observed in batch carried out at 30 % air saturation in a classical stirred tank bioreactor (Bioflo 110) with base solution addition. The optimal parameters defined in this work allow for bioprocess developing of viral vaccines, transient protein expression and viral vector for gene therapy based on BHK-21 cell line in two stirred tank bioreactors with different agitation-aeration systems. PMID:23846480

  1. Dual Tank Fuel System

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  2. How to remove a chest drain.

    PubMed

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26443174

  3. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or level flight attitudes, unless drainage is provided. Any drain valve installed must be accessible... one tank and it is necessary to use these tanks in a definite sequence for any reason, the vapor vent... fuel during acrobatic maneuvers, including short periods of inverted flight, must be prevented. It...

  4. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or level flight attitudes, unless drainage is provided. Any drain valve installed must be accessible... one tank and it is necessary to use these tanks in a definite sequence for any reason, the vapor vent... fuel during acrobatic maneuvers, including short periods of inverted flight, must be prevented. It...

  5. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... or level flight attitudes, unless drainage is provided. Any drain valve installed must be accessible... one tank and it is necessary to use these tanks in a definite sequence for any reason, the vapor vent... fuel during acrobatic maneuvers, including short periods of inverted flight, must be prevented. It...

  6. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... or level flight attitudes, unless drainage is provided. Any drain valve installed must be accessible... one tank and it is necessary to use these tanks in a definite sequence for any reason, the vapor vent... fuel during acrobatic maneuvers, including short periods of inverted flight, must be prevented. It...

  7. Think Tank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governick, Heather; Wellington, Thom

    1998-01-01

    Examines the options for upgrading, replacing, and removal or closure of underground storage tanks (UST). Reveals the diverse regulatory control involving USTs, the Environmental Protection Agency's interest in pursuing violators, and stresses the need for administrators to be knowledgeable about state and local agency definitions of regulated…

  8. [A questionnaire about radiation safety management of the draining-water system at nuclear medicine facilities].

    PubMed

    Shizukuishi, Kazuya; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Narita, Hiroto; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tsukada, Masaru; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ikebuchi, Shuji; Kusama, Keiji; Tanaka, Mamoru; Namiki, Norio; Fuiimura, Youko; Horikoshi, Akiko; Inoue, Tomio; Kusakabe, Kiyoko

    2004-05-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey about radiation-safety management condition in Japanese nuclear medicine facilities to make materials of proposition for more reasonable management of medical radioactive waste. We distributed a questionnaire to institutions equipped with Nuclear Medicine facilities. Of 1,125 institutions, 642 institutes (52.8%) returned effective answers. The questionnaire covered the following areas: 1) scale of an institution, 2) presence of enforcement of radiotherapy, 3) system of a tank, 4) size and number of each tank, 5) a form of draining-water system, 6) a displacement in a radioactive rays management area, 7) a measurement method of the concentration of medical radioactive waste in draining water system, 8) planned and used quantity of radioisotopes for medical examination and treatment, 9) an average displacement of hospital for one month. In most institutions, a ratio of dose limitation of radioisotope in draining-water system was less than 1.0, defined as an upper limitation in ordinance. In 499 hospitals without facilities of hospitalization for unsealed radioisotope therapy, 473 hospitals reported that sum of ratios of dose limits in a draining-water system was less than 1.0. It was calculated by used dose of radioisotope and monthly displacement from hospital, on the premise that all used radioisotope entered in the general draining-water system. When a drainage including radioactivity from a controlled area join with that from other area before it flows out of a institution, it may be diluted and its radioactive concentration should be less than its upper limitation defined in the rule. Especially, in all institutions with a monthly displacement of more than 25,000 m3, the sum of ratio of the concentration of each radionuclide to the concentration limit dose calculated by used dose of radioisotope, indicated less than 1.0. PMID:15354724

  9. Continuous 'Passive' Registration of Non-Point Contaminant Loads Via Agricultural Subsurface Drain Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozemeijer, J.; Jansen, S.; de Jonge, H.; Lindblad Vendelboe, A.

    2014-12-01

    Considering their crucial role in water and solute transport, enhanced monitoring and modeling of agricultural subsurface tube drain systems is important for adequate water quality management. For example, previous work in lowland agricultural catchments has shown that subsurface tube drain effluent contributed up to 80% of the annual discharge and 90-92% of the annual NO3 loads from agricultural fields towards the surface water. However, existing monitoring techniques for flow and contaminant loads from tube drains are expensive and labor-intensive. Therefore, despite the unambiguous relevance of this transport route, tube drain monitoring data are scarce. The presented study aimed developing a cheap, simple, and robust method to monitor loads from tube drains. We are now ready to introduce the Flowcap that can be attached to the outlet of tube drains and is capable of registering total flow, contaminant loads, and flow-averaged concentrations. The Flowcap builds on the existing SorbiCells, a modern passive sampling technique that measures average concentrations over longer periods of time (days to months) for various substances. By mounting SorbiCells in our Flowcap, a flow-proportional part of the drain effluent is sampled from the main stream. Laboratory testing yielded good linear relations (R-squared of 0.98) between drainage flow rates and sampling rates. The Flowcap was tested in practice for measuring NO3 loads from two agricultural fields and one glasshouse in the Netherlands. The Flowcap registers contaminant loads from tube drains without any need for housing, electricity, or maintenance. This enables large-scale monitoring of non-point contaminant loads via tube drains, which would facilitate the improvement of contaminant transport models and would yield valuable information for the selection and evaluation of mitigation options to improve water quality.

  10. Control of Listeria spp. by Competitive-Exclusion Bacteria in Floor Drains of a Poultry Processing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tong; Podtburg, Teresa C.; Zhao, Ping; Schmidt, Bruce E.; Baker, David A.; Cords, Bruce; Doyle, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies workers determined that two lactic acid bacterium isolates, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C-1-92 and Enterococcus durans 152 (competitive-exclusion bacteria [CE]), which were originally obtained from biofilms in floor drains, are bactericidal to Listeria monocytogenes or inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes both in vitro and in biofilms at 4 to 37°C. We evaluated the efficacy of these isolates for reducing Listeria spp. contamination of floor drains of a plant in which fresh poultry is processed. Baseline assays revealed that the mean numbers of Listeria sp. cells in floor drains sampled on six different dates (at approximately biweekly intervals) were 7.5 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 8, 4.9 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 3, 4.4 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 2, 4.1 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 4, 3.7 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 1, and 3.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 6. The drains were then treated with 107 CE/ml in an enzyme-foam-based cleaning agent four times in 1 week and twice a week for the following 3 weeks. In samples collected 1 week after CE treatments were applied Listeria sp. cells were not detectable (samples were negative as determined by selective enrichment culture) for drains 4 and 6 (reductions of 4.1 and 3.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2, respectively), and the mean numbers of Listeria sp. cells were 3.7 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 8 (a reduction of 3.8 log10 CFU/100 cm2), <1.7 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 1 (detectable only by selective enrichment culture; a reduction of 3.3 log10 CFU/100 cm2), and 2.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for drain 3 (a reduction of 2.3 log10 CFU/100 cm2). However, the aerobic plate counts for samples collected from floor drains before, during, and after CE treatment remained approximately the same. The results indicate that application of the two CE can greatly reduce the number of Listeria sp. cells in floor drains at 3 to 26°C in a facility in which fresh poultry is processed. PMID:16672472

  11. Tank 241-Z-361 process and characterization history

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1998-08-06

    An Unreviewed Safety Question (Wagoner, 1997) was declared based on lack of adequate authorization basis for Tank 241-Z-361 in the 200W Area at Hanford. This document is a summary of the history of Tank 241-Z-361 through December 1997. Documents reviewed include engineering files, laboratory notebooks from characterization efforts, waste facility process procedures, supporting documents and interviews of people`s recollections of over twenty years ago. Records of transfers into the tank, past characterization efforts, and speculation were used to estimate the current condition of Tank 241-Z-361 and its contents. Information about the overall waste system as related to the settling tank was included to help in understanding the numbering system and process relationships. The Plutonium Finishing Plant was built in 1948 and began processing plutonium in mid-1949. The Incinerator (232-Z) operated from December 1961 until May 1973. The Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF, 236-Z) began operation in May 1964. The Waste Treatment Facility (242-Z) operated from August 1964 until August 1976. Waste from some processes went through transfer lines to 241-Z sump tanks. High salt and organic waste under normal operation were sent to Z-9 or Z-18 cribs. Water from the retention basin may have also passed through this tank. The transfer lines to 241-Z were numbered D-4 to D-6. The 241-Z sump tanks were numbered D-4 through D-8. The D-4, 5, and 8 drains went to the D-6 sump tank. When D-6 tank was full it was transferred to D-7 tank. Prior to transfer to cribs, the D-7 tank contents was sampled. If the plutonium content was analyzed to be more than 10 g per batch, the material was (generally) reprocessed. Below the discard limit, caustic was added and the material was sent to the cribs via the 241-Z-361 settling tank where solids settled out and the liquid overflowed by gravity to the cribs. Waste liquids that passed through the 241-Z-361 settling tank flowed from PFP to ground in

  12. ID-69 Sodium drain experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.C.

    1996-09-19

    This paper describes experiments to determine the sodium retention and drainage from the two key areas of an ID-69. This information is then used as the initiation point for guidelines of how to proceed with washing an ID-69 in the IEM Cell Sodium Removal System.

  13. Tank 241-S-111: Tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-07

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, ORNL, and PNL tank vapor program. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-S-111 (this tank is on the organic and flammable gas watch list). This tank received Redox plant waste, among other wastes.

  14. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil system drains. 23.1021 Section 23.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil system drains. 23.1021 Section 23.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil system drains. 23.1021 Section 23.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1021 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil system drains. 23.1021 Section 23.1021... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1021 Oil system drains. A drain (or drains) must be provided to allow safe drainage of the oil system. Each...

  2. 3. DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING, REINFORCED CONCRETE MUSHROOM COLUMNS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING, REINFORCED CONCRETE MUSHROOM COLUMNS WITH DROP PANELS SUPPORTING DRAINING BINS (IRON VALVES OF DRAINING BINS ARE EMBEDDED IN THE CEILING), VIEW LOOKING WEST - Mill "C" Complex, Sand Draining & Drying Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  3. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  4. 14 CFR 23.999 - Fuel system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system drains. 23.999 Section 23.999... § 23.999 Fuel system drains. (a) There must be at least one drain to allow safe drainage of the entire fuel system with the airplane in its normal ground attitude. (b) Each drain required by paragraph...

  5. 14 CFR 125.159 - Vent and drain lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vent and drain lines. 125.159 Section 125... Requirements § 125.159 Vent and drain lines. All vent and drain lines, and their fittings, that are located in... Administrator finds that the rupture or breakage of any vent or drain line may result in a fire hazard....

  6. 14 CFR 121.261 - Vent and drain lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vent and drain lines. 121.261 Section 121... drain lines. All vent and drain lines and their fittings, that are located in a designated fire zone... the rupture or breakage of any vent or drain line may result in a fire hazard....

  7. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  8. Herd management and social variables associated with bulk tank somatic cell count in dairy herds in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Schewe, R L; Kayitsinga, J; Contreras, G A; Odom, C; Coats, W A; Durst, P; Hovingh, E P; Martinez, R O; Mobley, R; Moore, S; Erskine, R J

    2015-11-01

    The ability to reduce somatic cell counts (SCC) and improve milk quality depends on the effective and consistent application of established mastitis control practices. The US dairy industry continues to rely more on nonfamily labor to perform critical tasks to maintain milk quality. Thus, it is important to understand dairy producer attitudes and beliefs relative to management practices, as well as employee performance, to advance milk quality within the changing structure of the dairy industry. To assess the adoption rate of mastitis control practices in United States dairy herds, as well as assess social variables, including attitudes toward employees relative to mastitis control, a survey was sent to 1,700 dairy farms in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Florida in January and February of 2013. The survey included questions related to 7 major areas: sociodemographics and farm characteristics, milking proficiency, milking systems, cow environment, infected cow monitoring and treatment, farm labor, and attitudes toward mastitis and related antimicrobial use. The overall response rate was 41% (21% in Florida, 39% in Michigan, and 45% in Pennsylvania). Herd size ranged from 9 to 5,800 cows. Self-reported 3-mo geometric mean bulk tank SCC (BTSCC) for all states was 194,000 cells/mL. Multivariate analysis determined that proven mastitis control practices such as the use of internal teat sealants and blanket dry cow therapy, and not using water during udder preparation before milking, were associated with lower BTSCC. Additionally, farmer and manager beliefs and attitudes, including the perception of mastitis problems and the threshold of concern if BTSCC is above 300,000 cells/mL, were associated with BTSCC. Ensuring strict compliance with milking protocols, giving employees a financial or other penalty if BTSCC increased, and a perceived importance of reducing labor costs were negatively associated with BTSCC in farms with nonfamily employees. These findings highlight the

  9. Tank Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  10. Reverse draining of a magnetic soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D. E.; Pelesko, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the draining of a vertical magnetic soap film in the presence of a strong, nonuniform magnetic field. A colloidal suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a regular soap solution yields a magnetic soap solution, from which a soap film is formed across an isolated frame. Experiments demonstrate that with a strong magnet placed above the frame, the film may be made to flow upward against gravity. The amount of film draining upward is altered by varying the distance between the frame and magnet. A first mathematical model is developed for the evolution of the film. Simulations demonstrate qualitative agreement with the experiment.

  11. Designing and Testing of Self-Cleaning Recirculating Zebrafish Tanks.

    PubMed

    Nema, Shubham; Bhargava, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    Maintenance of large number of zebrafish in captive conditions is a daunting task. This can be eased by the use of recirculating racks with self-cleaning zebrafish tanks. Commercially available systems are costly, and compatibility of intercompany products has never been investigated. Although various cost-effective designs and methods of construction of custom-made recirculating zebrafish racks are available in literature, the design of self-cleaning zebrafish tanks is still not available. In this study, we report the design and method of construction of the self-cleaning unit, which can be fitted in any zebrafish tank. We validated the design by investigating sediment cleaning process in rectangular and cylindrical tank geometries using time lapse imaging. Our results suggest that for both tank geometries, the tanks fitted with self-cleaning unit provided superior sediment cleaning than the tanks fitted with overflow-drain unit. Although the self-cleaning unit could clean the sediment completely from both geometries over prolonged period, the cleaning of sediments was faster in the cylindrical tank than the rectangular tank. In conclusion, cost and efforts of zebrafish maintenance could be significantly reduced through the installation of our self-cleaning unit in any custom-made zebrafish tank. PMID:27096937

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 135: Areas 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Cox

    2001-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, was closed in accordance with the approved Corrective Action Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). CAU 135 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CAS). Two of these CAS's were identified in the Corrective Action Investigation Data Quality Objective meeting as being improperly identified as underground storage tanks. CAS 25-02-03 identified as the Deluge Valve Pit was actually an underground electrical vault and CAS 25-02-10 identified as an Underground Storage Tank was actually a former above ground storage tank filled with demineralized water. Both of these CAS's are recommended for a no further action closure. CAS 25-02-01 the Underground Storage Tanks commonly referred to as the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault was closed by decontaminating the vault structure and conducting a radiological verification survey to document compliance with the Nevada Test Site unrestricted use release criteria. The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive and cell service area drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999, discussed in ''The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (DOE/NV, 199a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples exceeded the preliminary action levels for polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. The CAU 135 closure activities consisted of scabbling radiological ''hot spots'' from the concrete vault, and the drilling

  13. Runtime and Pressurization Analyses of Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Lee, Chung P.

    2007-01-01

    , shown in blue on the right-hand side of the figures, enters the tank from the diffuser at the top of the figures and impinges on the RP-1, shown in red, while the propellant is being continuously drained at the rate of 1050 lbs/sec through a pipe at the bottom of the tank. The sequence of frames in Figure 1 shows the resultant velocity fields and mixing between nitrogen and RP-1 in a cross-section of the tank at different times. A vortex is seen to form in the incoming nitrogen stream that tends to entrain propellant, mixing it with the pressurant gas. The RP-1 mass fraction contours in Figure 1 are also indicative of the level of mixing and contamination of the propellant. The simulation is used to track the propagation of the pure propellant front as it is drawn toward the exit with the evolution of the mixing processes in the tank. The CFD simulation modeled a total of 10 seconds of run time. As is seen from Figure 1d, after 5.65 seconds the propellant front is nearing the drain pipe, especially near the center of the tank. Behind this pure propellant front is a mixed fluid of compromised quality that would require the test to end when it reaches the exit pipe. Such unsteady simulations provide an estimate of the time that a high-quality propellant supply to the test article can be guaranteed at the modeled mass flow rate. In the final paper, we will discuss simulations of the LOX and propellant tanks at NASA SSC being pressurized by an inert ullage. Detailed comparisons will be made between the CFD simulations and lower order models as well as with test data. Conditions leading to cryo collapse in the tank will also be identified.

  14. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  15. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  16. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  17. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  18. Composite Tank Technologies Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The need for cryogenic fuel tanks continues to expand, and research at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is addressing these needs. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of composite tank development, including tank testing, cryogenic materials research, tank liners, and dual-walled tanks, at MSFC.

  19. Integral Radiator and Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Miller, John R.; Jakupca, Ian; Sargi,Scott

    2007-01-01

    A simplified, lightweight system for dissipating heat of a regenerative fuel- cell system would include a heat pipe with its evaporator end placed at the heat source and its condenser end integrated into the wall of the regenerative fuel cell system gas-storage tanks. The tank walls act as heat-radiating surfaces for cooling the regenerative fuel cell system. The system was conceived for use in outer space, where radiation is the only physical mechanism available for transferring heat to the environment. The system could also be adapted for use on propellant tanks or other large-surface-area structures to convert them to space heat-radiating structures. Typically for a regenerative fuel cell system, the radiator is separate from the gas-storage tanks. By using each tank s surface as a heat-radiating surface, the need for a separate, potentially massive radiator structure is eliminated. In addition to the mass savings, overall volume is reduced because a more compact packaging scheme is possible. The underlying tank wall structure provides ample support for heat pipes that help to distribute the heat over the entire tank surface. The heat pipes are attached to the outer surface of each gas-storage tank by use of a high-thermal conductance, carbon-fiber composite-material wrap. Through proper choice of the composite layup, it is possible to exploit the high longitudinal conductivity of the carbon fibers (greater than the thermal conductivity of copper) to minimize the unevenness of the temperature distribution over the tank surface, thereby helping to maximize the overall heat-transfer efficiency. In a prototype of the system, the heat pipe and the composite wrap contribute an average mass of 340 g/sq m of radiator area. Lightweight space radiator panels have a mass of about 3,000 g/sq m of radiator area, so this technique saves almost 90 percent of the mass of separate radiator panels. In tests, the modified surface of the tank was found to have an emissivity of 0

  20. A case of a retained drain tip following intercostal drain insertion: avoiding a ‘never event’

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Nicola K.; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud; Rajesh, Pala B.; Steyn, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Pleural effusions are commonly drained with Seldinger intercostal drains. One uncommon but serious risk of drain insertion is that of a foreign body being retained in the pleural cavity following removal. We report a case in which the tip of the drain was retained in the pleural space following difficult insertion of a Seldinger intercostal drain in a district general hospital. Prompt recognition and clear patient communication are important at the occurrence of an unusual complication. Surgical removal of the foreign body was performed following transfer. We report this case to raise awareness that insertion and withdrawal of drains over the guidewire during insertion may damage the drain and highlight the need for doctors who insert chest drains to perform a count of instruments during ward or clinic-based procedures as well as those performed in theatres. We now include removable parts of chest drains in our theatre instrument count. PMID:27076623

  1. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart G of Part 63—Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7 Tank diameter D (feet) b No. of vacuum breakers, NF6 Pontoon...

  2. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart G of Part 63—Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7 Tank diameter D (feet) b No. of vacuum breakers, NF6 Pontoon...

  3. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart G of Part 63—Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7 Tank diameter D (feet) b No. of vacuum breakers, NF6 Pontoon...

  4. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart G of Part 63—Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7 Tank diameter D (feet) b No. of vacuum breakers, NF6 Pontoon...

  5. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart G of Part 63—Typical Number of Vacuum Breakers, NF6 and Roof Drains, a NF7 Tank diameter D (feet) b No. of vacuum breakers, NF6 Pontoon...

  6. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  7. Thermal Imaging for Inspection of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The end of the Shuttle Program provides an opportunity to evaluate and possibly refurbish launch support infrastructure at the Kennedy Space Center in support of future launch vehicles. One major infrastructure element needing attention is the cryogenic fuel and oxidizer system and specifically the cryogenic fuel ground storage tanks located at Launch Complex 39. These tanks were constructed in 1965 and served both the Apollo and Shuttle Programs and will be used to support future launch programs. However, they have received only external inspection and minimal refurbishment over the years as there were no operational issues that warranted the significant time and schedule disruption required to drain and refurbish the tanks while the launch programs were ongoing. Now, during the break between programs, the health of the tanks is being evaluated and refurbishment is being performed as necessary to maintain their fitness for future launch programs. Thermography was used as one part of the inspection and analysis of the tanks. This paper will describe the conclusions derived from the thermal images to evaluate anomalous regions in the tanks, confirm structural integrity of components within the annular region, and evaluate the effectiveness of thermal imaging to detect large insulation voids in tanks prior to filling with cryogenic fluid. The use of thermal imaging as a tool to inspect unfilled tanks will be important if the construction of additional storage tanks is required to fuel new launch vehicles.

  8. Sloshing in Liquid Hydrogen and LOX Propellant Tanks After Main Engine Cut-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sura

    2011-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is designing and developing the Main Propulsion System (MPS) for Ares launch vehicles. The objective of this study is to calculate the sloshing forces and moments in the LH2 and LO2 propellant tanks using a CFD/VOF analysis under realistic flight conditions. Propellant sloshing in the liquid hydrogen (LH2) and the liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant tanks after Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) was modeled using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) module of the computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The present simulation shows that there are substantial sloshing side forces acting on the LH2 tank during the deceleration of the vehicle after MECO. The LH2 tank features a side wall drain pipe. The side loads result from the residual propellant mass motion in the LH2 tank which is initiated by the stop of flow into the drain pipe at MECO. The simulations show that radial force on the LH2 tank wall is less than 50 lbf and the radial moment calculated based up the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted to be as high as 300 lbf-ft. The LO2 tank features a bottom dome drain system and is equipped with sloshing baffles. The remaining LO2 in the tank slowly forms a liquid column along the centerline of tank under the zero gravity environments. The radial force on the LO2 tank wall is predicted less than 100 lbf. The radial moment calculated based on the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted as high as 4500 lbf-ft just before MECO and dropped down to near zero after propellant draining stopped completely.

  9. Drain Current Modulation of a Single Drain MOSFET by Lorentz Force for Magnetic Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Prasenjit; Chow, Hwang-Cherng; Feng, Wu-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a detailed analysis of the drain current modulation of a single-drain normal-gate n channel metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (n-MOSFET) under an on-chip magnetic field. A single-drain n-MOSFET has been fabricated and placed in the center of a square-shaped metal loop which generates the on-chip magnetic field. The proposed device designed is much smaller in size with respect to the metal loop, which ensures that the generated magnetic field is approximately uniform. The change of drain current and change of bulk current per micron device width has been measured. The result shows that the difference drain current is about 145 µA for the maximum applied magnetic field. Such changes occur from the applied Lorentz force to push out the carriers from the channel. Based on the drain current difference, the change in effective mobility has been detected up to 4.227%. Furthermore, a detailed investigation reveals that the device behavior is quite different in subthreshold and saturation region. A change of 50.24 µA bulk current has also been measured. Finally, the device has been verified for use as a magnetic sensor with sensitivity 4.084% (29.6 T(-1)), which is very effective as compared to other previously reported works for a single device. PMID:27589747

  10. Climate mitigation scenarios of drained peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimir Klemedtsson, Åsa; Coria, Jessica; He, Hongxing; Liu, Xiangping; Nordén, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The national inventory reports (NIR) submitted to the UNFCCC show Sweden - which as many other countries has wetlands where parts have been drained for agriculture and forestry purposes, - to annually emit 12 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalents, which is more GHG'es than industrial energy use release in Sweden. Similar conditions can be found in other northern countries, having cool and wet conditions, naturally promoting peat accumulation, and where land use management over the last centuries have promoted draining activities. These drained peatland, though covering only 2% of the land area, have emissions corresponding to 20% of the total reported NIR emissions. This substantial emission contribution, however, is hidden within the Land Use Land Use Change and Forestry sector (LULUCF) where the forest Carbon uptake is even larger, which causes the peat soil emissions become invisible. The only drained soil emission accounted in the Swedish Kyoto reporting is the N2O emission from agricultural drained organic soils of the size 0.5 million tonnes CO2e yr-1. This lack of visibility has made incentives for land use change and management neither implemented nor suggested, however with large potential. Rewetting has the potential to decrease soil mineralization, why CO2 and N2O emissions are mitigated. However if the soil becomes very wet CH4 emission will increase together with hampered plant growth. By ecological modeling, using the CoupModel the climate change mitigation potential have been estimated for four different land use scenarios; 1, Drained peat soil with Spruce (business as usual scenario), 2, raised ground water level to 20 cm depth and Willow plantation, 3, raised ground water level to 10 cm depth and Reed Canary Grass, and 4, rewetting to an average water level in the soil surface with recolonizing wetland plants and mosses. We calculate the volume of biomass production per year, peat decomposition, N2O emission together with nitrate and DOC

  11. Wettable Ceramic-Based Drained Cathode Technology for Aluminum Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.N. Bruggeman; T.R. Alcorn; R. Jeltsch; T. Mroz

    2003-01-09

    The goal of the project was to develop the ceramic based materials, technology, and necessary engineering packages to retrofit existing aluminum reduction cells in order to reduce energy consumption required for making primary aluminum. The ceramic materials would be used in a drained cathode configuration which would provide a stable, molten aluminum wetted cathode surface, allowing the reduction of the anode-cathode distance, thereby reducing the energy consumption. This multi-tasked project was divided into three major tasks: (1) Manufacturing and laboratory scale testing/evaluation of the ceramic materials, (2) Pilot scale testing of qualified compositions from the first task, and (3) Designing, retrofitting, and testing the ceramic materials in industrial cells at Kaiser Mead plant in Spokane, Washington. Specific description of these major tasks can be found in Appendix A - Project Scope. Due to the power situation in the northwest, the Mead facility was closed, thus preventing the industrial cell testing.

  12. Internally drained condenser for spacecraft thermal management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Drew, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux condenser for use in two-phase spacecraft thermal management loops. The objective is to obtain a several fold increase in condensation heat transfer coefficient over those which can be achieved with shear-controlled or capillary-wick condensers. The internally drained condenser relies on shaped fins to develop a capillary pressure gradient over the surface of the fins and drive the condensate toward narrow drainage grooves separating the fins. The condensate then flows through a drainage network embedded in the condenser walls. Heat transfer coefficients of up to 8 W/sq cm C were measured in steam, providing a heat transfer enhancement ratio greater than a factor of 8. In the paper the proof-of-concept experiments are described and simplified models to predict the performance of the internally drained condenser are presented.

  13. Coma due to malplaced external ventricular drain.

    PubMed

    Chai, Feng Yih; Farizal, Fadzil; Jegan, Thanabalan

    2013-01-01

    Ventriculostomy or external ventricular drain (EVD) placement by free-hand technique has a high malplacement rate. It is a blind procedure that often requires multiple attempts and revisions. To date, no neurological complication due to EVD malplacement has been reported in the literature. In this report, we present the first case of coma induced by a malplaced EVD and the patient regained consciousness after the drain was adjusted. Our discussion focused on various techniques that can improve the accuracy of EVD insertion. EVD insertion under image guidance provides better accuracy with limited disadvantages. We hypothesized that the patient's coma was due to the mass effect and irritation of the malplaced EVD exerted onto the ventral periaqueductal grey matter and the ascending neurons from upper brainstem. PMID:24101284

  14. Using Smoke Injection in Drains to Identify Potential Preferential Pathways in a Drained Arable Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. H.; Petersen, C. T.; Hansen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Macropores forming a continuous pathway between the soil surface and subsurface drains favour the transport of many contaminants from agricultural fields to surface waters. The smoke injection method presented by Shipitalo and Gibbs (2000) used for demonstrating and quantifying such pathways has been further developed and used on a drained Danish sandy loam. In order to identify the preferential pathways to drains, smoke was injected in three 1.15 m deep tile drains (total drain length 93 m), and smoke emitting macropores (SEMP) at the soil surface were counted and characterized as producing either strong or weak plumes compared to reference plumes from 3 and 6 mm wide tubes. In the two situations investigated in the present study - an early spring and an autumn situation, smoke only penetrated the soil surface layer via earthworm burrows located in a 1.0 m wide belt directly above the drain lines. However, it is known from previous studies that desiccation fractures in a dry summer situation also can contribute to the smoke pattern. The distance between SEMP measured along the drain lines was on average 0.46 m whereas the average spacing between SEMP with strong plumes was 2.3 m. Ponded water was applied in 6 cm wide rings placed above 52 burrows including 17 reference burrows which did not emit smoke. Thirteen pathways in the soil were examined using dye tracer and profile excavation. SEMP with strong plumes marked the entrance of highly efficient transport pathways conducting surface applied water and dye tracer into the drain. However, no single burrow was traced all the way from the surface into the drain, the dye patterns branched off in a network of other macropores. Water infiltration rates were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in SEMP with strong plumes (average rate: 247 mL min-1 n = 19) compared to SEMP with weak plumes (average rate: 87 mL min-1 n = 16) and no plumes (average rate: 56 mL min-1 n = 17). The results suggest that the smoke injection method

  15. 2. INTERIOR OF SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING WITH DRYING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. INTERIOR OF SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING WITH DRYING BINS TO THE RIGHT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Mill "C" Complex, Sand Draining & Drying Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  16. 40 CFR 60.692-2 - Standards: Individual drain systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-2 Standards: Individual drain systems. (a)(1... section. (e) Refinery wastewater routed through new process drains and a new first common...

  17. 40 CFR 60.692-2 - Standards: Individual drain systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-2 Standards: Individual drain systems. (a)(1... section. (e) Refinery wastewater routed through new process drains and a new first common...

  18. 40 CFR 60.692-2 - Standards: Individual drain systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-2 Standards: Individual drain systems. (a)(1... section. (e) Refinery wastewater routed through new process drains and a new first common...

  19. 40 CFR 60.692-2 - Standards: Individual drain systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-2 Standards: Individual drain systems. (a)(1... section. (e) Refinery wastewater routed through new process drains and a new first common...

  20. 40 CFR 60.692-2 - Standards: Individual drain systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-2 Standards: Individual drain systems. (a)(1... section. (e) Refinery wastewater routed through new process drains and a new first common...

  1. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for the Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  2. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Comparato, Joseph R.; Jacobs, Martin

    1982-01-01

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  3. Stirred tank bioreactor culture combined with serum-/xenogeneic-free culture medium enables an efficient expansion of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Amanda; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Carmelo, Joana G; Swiech, Kamilla; Covas, Dimas T; Cabral, Joaquim M S; da Silva, Cláudia L

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are being widely explored as promising candidates for cell-based therapies. Among the different human MSC origins exploited, umbilical cord represents an attractive and readily available source of MSC that involves a non-invasive collection procedure. In order to achieve relevant cell numbers of human MSC for clinical applications, it is crucial to develop scalable culture systems that allow bioprocess control and monitoring, combined with the use of serum/xenogeneic (xeno)-free culture media. In the present study, we firstly established a spinner flask culture system combining gelatin-based Cultispher(®) S microcarriers and xeno-free culture medium for the expansion of umbilical cord matrix (UCM)-derived MSC. This system enabled the production of 2.4 (±1.1) x10(5) cells/mL (n = 4) after 5 days of culture, corresponding to a 5.3 (±1.6)-fold increase in cell number. The established protocol was then implemented in a stirred-tank bioreactor (800 mL working volume) (n = 3) yielding 115 million cells after 4 days. Upon expansion under stirred conditions, cells retained their differentiation ability and immunomodulatory potential. The development of a scalable microcarrier-based stirred culture system, using xeno-free culture medium that suits the intrinsic features of UCM-derived MSC represents an important step towards a GMP compliant large-scale production platform for these promising cell therapy candidates. PMID:27168373

  4. 7 CFR 52.3755 - Minimum drained weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum drained weights. 52.3755 Section 52.3755..., Types, Styles, and Grades § 52.3755 Minimum drained weights. (a) General. (1) The minimum drained weights for the various applicable styles in Table II and III are not incorporated in the grade of...

  5. 14 CFR 125.139 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil system drains. 125.139 Section 125.139....139 Oil system drains. Accessible drains incorporating either a manual or automatic means for positive locking in the closed position must be provided to allow safe drainage of the entire oil system....

  6. 14 CFR 125.139 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil system drains. 125.139 Section 125.139....139 Oil system drains. Accessible drains incorporating either a manual or automatic means for positive locking in the closed position must be provided to allow safe drainage of the entire oil system....

  7. 14 CFR 125.139 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil system drains. 125.139 Section 125.139....139 Oil system drains. Accessible drains incorporating either a manual or automatic means for positive locking in the closed position must be provided to allow safe drainage of the entire oil system....

  8. 14 CFR 125.139 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil system drains. 125.139 Section 125.139....139 Oil system drains. Accessible drains incorporating either a manual or automatic means for positive locking in the closed position must be provided to allow safe drainage of the entire oil system....

  9. 14 CFR 125.139 - Oil system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil system drains. 125.139 Section 125.139....139 Oil system drains. Accessible drains incorporating either a manual or automatic means for positive locking in the closed position must be provided to allow safe drainage of the entire oil system....

  10. 1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR (LOWER RIGHT) THAT EXTENDS TO THE SAND-SORTING BUILDING, AND REMAINS OF ORIGINAL (1917) WASHING, DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (LEFT), VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF SAND-SORTING BUILDING - Mill "C" Complex, Sand Draining & Drying Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  11. 46 CFR 45.157 - Scuppers and gravity drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scuppers and gravity drains. 45.157 Section 45.157 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Conditions of Assignment § 45.157 Scuppers and gravity drains. Scuppers and gravity deck drains from...

  12. 46 CFR 45.157 - Scuppers and gravity drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scuppers and gravity drains. 45.157 Section 45.157 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Conditions of Assignment § 45.157 Scuppers and gravity drains. Scuppers and gravity deck drains from...

  13. 46 CFR 45.157 - Scuppers and gravity drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scuppers and gravity drains. 45.157 Section 45.157 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Conditions of Assignment § 45.157 Scuppers and gravity drains. Scuppers and gravity deck drains from...

  14. 46 CFR 45.157 - Scuppers and gravity drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scuppers and gravity drains. 45.157 Section 45.157 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Conditions of Assignment § 45.157 Scuppers and gravity drains. Scuppers and gravity deck drains from...

  15. 14 CFR 23.999 - Fuel system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel system drains. 23.999 Section 23.999... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System Components § 23.999 Fuel system drains. (a) There must be at least one drain to allow safe drainage of the...

  16. 46 CFR 153.362 - Venting system drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting system drain. 153.362 Section 153.362 Shipping... Systems § 153.362 Venting system drain. Unless a cargo vent system at every point is level or slopes back... system must have a drain valve at each low point (trap) in the vent line....

  17. 14 CFR 27.999 - Fuel system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system drains. 27.999 Section 27.999... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System Components § 27.999 Fuel system drains. (a) There must be at least one accessible drain at the lowest point in each fuel system to completely...

  18. 33 CFR 155.770 - Draining into bilges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Draining into bilges. 155.770 Section 155.770 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED..., Procedures, Equipment, and Records § 155.770 Draining into bilges. No person may intentionally drain oil...

  19. 14 CFR 29.999 - Fuel system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system drains. 29.999 Section 29.999... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System Components § 29.999 Fuel system drains. (a) There must be at least one accessible drain at the lowest point in each fuel system to completely...

  20. 14 CFR 23.999 - Fuel system drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel system drains. 23.999 Section 23.999... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System Components § 23.999 Fuel system drains. (a) There must be at least one drain to allow safe drainage of the...

  1. 46 CFR 45.157 - Scuppers and gravity drains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scuppers and gravity drains. 45.157 Section 45.157 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Conditions of Assignment § 45.157 Scuppers and gravity drains. Scuppers and gravity deck drains from...

  2. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  3. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-11-03

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO`s identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given.

  4. Microbial Characterization of Biofilms in Domestic Drains and the Establishment of Stable Biofilm Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Andrew J.; Bartolo, Robert G.; Catrenich, Carl E.; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G.; Rickard, Alexander H.; Symmons, Sharon A.; Gilbert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We have used heterotrophic plate counts, together with live-dead direct staining and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), to characterize the eubacterial communities that had formed as biofilms within domestic sink drain outlets. Laboratory microcosms of these environments were established using excised biofilms from two separate drain biofilm samples to inoculate constant-depth film fermentors (CDFFs). Drain biofilms harbored 9.8 to 11.3 log10 cells of viable enteric species and pseudomonads/g, while CDFF-grown biofilms harbored 10.6 to 11.4 log10 cells/g. Since live-dead direct staining revealed various efficiencies of recovery by culture, samples were analyzed by DGGE, utilizing primers specific for the V2-V3 region of eubacterial 16S rDNA. These analyses showed that the major PCR amplicons from in situ material were represented in the microcosms and maintained there over extended periods. Sequencing of amplicons resolved by DGGE revealed that the biofilms were dominated by a small number of genera, which were also isolated by culture. One drain sample harbored the protozoan Colpoda maupasi, together with rhabtidid nematodes and bdelloid rotifers. The microcosm enables the maintenance of stable drain-type bacterial communities and represents a useful tool for the modeling of this ecosystem. PMID:12513993

  5. HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    BERRIOCHOA MV

    2011-04-07

    Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

  6. Liquid oxygen sloshing in Space Shuttle External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannapel, M. D.; Przekwas, A. J.; Singhal, A. K.; Costes, N. C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical simulation of the hydrodynamics within the liquid oxygen tank of the Space Shuttle External Tank during liftoff. Before liftoff, the tank is filled with liquid oxygen (LOX) to approximately 97 percent with the other 3 percent containing gaseous oxygen (GOX) and helium. During liftoff, LOX is drained from the bottom of the tank, and GOX is pumped into the tank's ullage volume. There is a delay of several seconds before the GOX reaches the tank which causes the ullage pressure to decrease for several seconds after liftoff; this pressure 'slump' is a common phenomenon in rocket propulsion. When four slosh baffles were removed from the tank, the ullage gas pressure dropped more rapidly than in all previous flights. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether the removal of the baffles could have caused the increased pressure 'slump' by changing the LOX surface dynamics. The results show that the LOX surface undergoes very high vertical accelerations (up to 5 g) and, therefore, splashing almost certainly occurs. The number of baffles does not affect the surface if the structural motion is assumed; but, the number of baffles may affect the structural motion of the tank.

  7. Evaluation of parallel milliliter-scale stirred-tank bioreactors for the study of biphasic whole-cell biocatalysis with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Dennewald, Danielle; Hortsch, Ralf; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    As clear structure-activity relationships are still rare for ionic liquids, preliminary experiments are necessary for the process development of biphasic whole-cell processes involving these solvents. To reduce the time investment and the material costs, the process development of such biphasic reaction systems would profit from a small-scale high-throughput platform. Exemplarily, the reduction of 2-octanone to (R)-2-octanol by a recombinant Escherichia coli in a biphasic ionic liquid/water system was studied in a miniaturized stirred-tank bioreactor system allowing the parallel operation of up to 48 reactors at the mL-scale. The results were compared to those obtained in a 20-fold larger stirred-tank reactor. The maximum local energy dissipation was evaluated at the larger scale and compared to the data available for the small-scale reactors, to verify if similar mass transfer could be obtained at both scales. Thereafter, the reaction kinetics and final conversions reached in different reactions setups were analysed. The results were in good agreement between both scales for varying ionic liquids and for ionic liquid volume fractions up to 40%. The parallel bioreactor system can thus be used for the process development of the majority of biphasic reaction systems involving ionic liquids, reducing the time and resource investment during the process development of this type of applications. PMID:22079751

  8. Using MODFLOW drains to simulate groundwater flow in a karst environment

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.; Tomasko, D.; Glennon, M.A.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1998-07-01

    Modeling groundwater flow in a karst environment is both numerically challenging and highly uncertain because of potentially complex flowpaths and a lack of site-specific information. This study presents the results of MODFLOW numerical modeling in which drain cells in a finite-difference model are used as analogs for preferential flowpaths or conduits in karst environments. In this study, conduits in mixed-flow systems are simulated by assigning connected pathways of drain cells from the locations of tracer releases, sinkholes, or other karst features to outlet springs along inferred flowpaths. These paths are determined by the locations of losing stream segments, ephemeral stream beds, geophysical surveys, fracture lineaments, or other surficial characteristics, combined with the results of dye traces. The elevations of the drains at the discharge ends of the inferred flowpaths are estimated from field data and are adjusted when necessary during model calibration. To simulate flow in a free-flowing conduit, a high conductance is assigned to each drain to eliminate the need for drain-specific information that would be very difficult to obtain. Calculations were performed for a site near Hohenfels, Germany. The potentiometric surface produced by the simulations agreed well with field data. The head contours in the vicinity of the karst features behaved in a manner consistent with a flow system having both diffuse and conduit components, and the sum of the volumetric flow out of the drain cells agreed closely with spring discharges and stream flows. Because of the success of this approach, it is recommended for regional studies in which little site-specific information (e.g., location, number, size, and conductivity of fractures and conduits) is available, and general flow characteristics are desired.

  9. Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

  10. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Roundtable. Strategies to discourage brain drain.

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, Linda; Hofman, Karen; Jarawan, Raya; McDermott, Jeanne; Bridbord, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Building health research expertise in developing countries often requires personnel to receive training beyond national borders. For research funding agencies that sponsor this type of training, a major goal is to ensure that trainees return to their country of origin: attaining this objective requires the use of proactive strategies. The strategies described were developed under the extramural acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) International Training and Research Program (AITRP) funded by the Fogarty International Center (FIC) at the National Institutes of Health, United States. This programme supports universities in the United States that provide research training to scientists from developing countries to enable them to address the global epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS and the related tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. This paper describes the strategies employed to discourage brain drain by the principle investigators (PIs) of five of the longest-funded AITRPs (funded for 15 years). Long-term trainees in these programmes spent from 11 to 96 months (an average of 26 months) studying. Using scientific, political and economic strategies that address brain drain issues, PIs working in AITRPs have attained an average rate of return home for their trainees of 80%. PMID:15375452

  12. Teacher Drain from China's Higher Education Institutions and Some Consequences of This Drain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shufeng, Xu; Shihua, Cui; Zhaoping, Sun; Xianlei, Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Teachers are where the major strength of organizational control lies in the educational process; it is mainly they who restrict the quality of education and teaching and who are the irreplaceable factor in determining how well a school is run and its overall image. Therefore, once a teacher drain from higher education institutions begins, it is…

  13. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  14. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow. PMID:27460561

  15. Transient Migration of Large Numbers of CD14(++) CD16(+) Monocytes to the Draining Lymph Node after Onset of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lund, Hege; Boysen, Preben; Åkesson, Caroline Piercey; Lewandowska-Sabat, Anna Monika; Storset, Anne K

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of skin-draining cells following infection or vaccination provide important insight into the initiation of immune responses. In this study, the local recruitment and activation of immune cells in draining lymph nodes (LNs) was studied in calves in an adjuvant-induced inflammation. A transient but remarkably strong recruitment of monocytes was demonstrated after onset of inflammation, constituting up to 41% of live cells in the draining LNs after 24 h. Numerous CD14(+) cells were visualized in subcutaneous tissues and draining LNs, and the majority of these cells did not express dendritic cell-associated markers CD205 and CD11c. In the LNs, recruited cells were predominately of a CD14(++) and CD16(+) phenotype, consistent with an intermediate monocyte subset characterized to possess a high inflammatory potential. Moreover, monocytes from the draining LN showed a high expression of genes coding for pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, TNFa, and TGFβ. Shortly after their appearance in the LN cortical areas, the monocytes had moved into the medulla followed by an increase in peripheral blood. In conclusion, this study provides novel information on in vivo monocyte recruitment and migration after onset of inflammation. PMID:27621730

  16. Transient Migration of Large Numbers of CD14++ CD16+ Monocytes to the Draining Lymph Node after Onset of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Hege; Boysen, Preben; Åkesson, Caroline Piercey; Lewandowska-Sabat, Anna Monika; Storset, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of skin-draining cells following infection or vaccination provide important insight into the initiation of immune responses. In this study, the local recruitment and activation of immune cells in draining lymph nodes (LNs) was studied in calves in an adjuvant-induced inflammation. A transient but remarkably strong recruitment of monocytes was demonstrated after onset of inflammation, constituting up to 41% of live cells in the draining LNs after 24 h. Numerous CD14+ cells were visualized in subcutaneous tissues and draining LNs, and the majority of these cells did not express dendritic cell-associated markers CD205 and CD11c. In the LNs, recruited cells were predominately of a CD14++ and CD16+ phenotype, consistent with an intermediate monocyte subset characterized to possess a high inflammatory potential. Moreover, monocytes from the draining LN showed a high expression of genes coding for pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, TNFa, and TGFβ. Shortly after their appearance in the LN cortical areas, the monocytes had moved into the medulla followed by an increase in peripheral blood. In conclusion, this study provides novel information on in vivo monocyte recruitment and migration after onset of inflammation. PMID:27621730

  17. CD73-generated Adenosine Restricts Lymphocyte Migration into Draining Lymph Nodes1

    PubMed Central

    Takedachi, Masahide; Qu, Dongfeng; Ebisuno, Yukihiko; Oohara, Hiroyuki; Joachims, Michelle L.; McGee, Stephanie T.; Maeda, Emiko; McEver, Rodger P.; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Murakami, Shinya; Krahn, Thomas; Blackburn, Michael R.; Thompson, Linda F.

    2009-01-01

    After an inflammatory stimulus, lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes increases dramatically to facilitate the encounter of naïve T cells with antigen-loaded dendritic cells. Here we show that CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) plays an important role in regulating this process. CD73 produces adenosine from AMP and is expressed on high endothelial venules (HEV) and subsets of lymphocytes. Cd73-/- mice have normal sized lymphoid organs in the steady state, but approximately 1.5-fold larger draining lymph nodes and 2.5-fold increased rates of L-selectin-dependent lymphocyte migration from the blood through HEV compared to wild type mice 24 hours after LPS administration. Migration rates of cd73+/+ and cd73-/- lymphocytes into lymph nodes of wild type mice are equal, suggesting that it is CD73 on HEV that regulates lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes. The A2B receptor is a likely target of CD73-generated adenosine, as it is the only adenosine receptor expressed on the HEV-like cell line KOP2.16 and it is up regulated by TNFα. Furthermore, increased lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes of cd73-/- mice is largely normalized by pretreatment with the selective A2B receptor agonist BAY 60-6583. Adenosine receptor signaling to restrict lymphocyte migration across HEV may be an important mechanism to control the magnitude of an inflammatory response. PMID:18424752

  18. Liquid rocket metal tanks and tank components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. A.; Keller, R. B. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Significant guidelines are presented for the successful design of aerospace tanks and tank components, such as expulsion devices, standpipes, and baffles. The state of the art is reviewed, and the design criteria are presented along with recommended practices. Design monographs are listed.

  19. Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-12-14

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104.

  20. Tank 241-SX-106 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-08

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-SX-106.

  1. Tank 241-SX-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-08

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-SX-103.

  2. Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-05

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107.

  3. Tank 241-U-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-24

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-103.

  4. Tank 241-TX-118 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-12-09

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-118.

  5. Tank 241-U-105 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-02-03

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-105.

  6. Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-24

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-111.

  7. Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105.

  8. Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-10

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111.

  9. Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-20

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101.

  10. Pesticide residues in agricultural drains, southeastern desert area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eccles, Lawrence A.

    1979-01-01

    A study is being made to determine the occurrence and distribution of pesticides in the agricultural drains for approximately 3/4 million irrigated acres in the southeastern desert area of California. This report describes the results of the first year of sampling and analyzing (1) water in the drains , (2) bed material in the drains, (3) water from field tile-drainage lines, and (4) irrigation tailwater and water in the drains directly exposed to drift from aerial application of pesticides. Residues of almost all the pesticides selected for monitoring were found in water in the drains. Examination of the data to determine the probable source of pesticides indicated generally slight concentrations from bed material in the drains, usually no detectable concentrations from field tile-drainage lines, and apparently large concentrations from irrigation tailwater and drift from aerial application. (Woodard-USGS)