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Sample records for drift wave stability

  1. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, {eta}{sub e}{sup crit}, is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient.

  2. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of drift waves in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-03-15

    Four wave-nonlinear coupling of a large amplitude whistler with low frequency drift wave and whistler wave sidebands is examined. The pump and whistler sidebands exert a low frequency ponderomotive force on electrons introducing a frequency shift in the drift wave. For whistler pump propagating along the ambient magnetic field B{sub s}z-caret with wave number k(vector sign){sub 0}, drift waves of wave number k(vector sign)=k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack }+k{sub ||}z-caret see an upward frequency shift when k{sub Up-Tack }{sup 2}/k{sub 0}{sup 2}>4k{sub ||}/k{sub 0} and are stabilized once the whistler power exceeds a threshold value. The drift waves of low transverse wavelength tend to be destabilized by the nonlinear coupling. Oblique propagating whistler pump with transverse wave vector parallel to k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack} is also effective but with reduced effectiveness.

  3. Drift waves in rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Liu, J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of the electron drift wave is investigated in the presence of E x B plasma rotation typical of the central cell plasma in tandem mirrors. It is shown that a rotationally-driven drift wave may occur at low azimuthal mode numbers. Conditions for rotational instabilities are derived. Quasilinear formulas are given for the anomalous transport associated with the unstable fluctuations.

  4. Collisional Drift Waves in Stellarator Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-10-07

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a stellarator with an helical magnetic axis is presented. Three coupled field equations, describing the collisional drift wave dynamics in the linear approximation, are solved as an initial-value problem along the magnetic field line. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  5. Drift Wave Turbulence and Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important feature in collisionless magnetic reconnection is the development of sharp discontinuities along the separatrices bounding the Alfvenic outflow. The typical scale length of these features is ρs (the Larmor radius based on the sound speed) for guide field reconnection. Temperature gradients in the inflowing plasma (as might be found in the magnetopause and the magnetotail) can lead to instabilities at these separatrices, specifically drift wave turbulence. We present standalone 2D and 3D PIC simulations of drift wave turbulence to investigate scaling properties and growth rates. We specifically consider stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) and the development of this instability in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. Further investigations of the relative importance of drift wave turbulence in the development of reconnection will also be considered.

  6. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3  ×  107 s‑1.

  7. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  8. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Angus, J. R.

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  9. Drift waves in helically symmetric stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Hegna, C.

    2005-11-15

    The local linear stability of electron drift waves and ion temperature gradient modes (ITG) is investigated in a quasihelically symmetric (QHS) stellarator and a conventional asymmetric (Mirror) stellarator. The geometric details of the different equilibria are emphasized. Eigenvalue equations for the models are derived using the ballooning mode formalism and solved numerically using a standard shooting technique in a fully three-dimensional stellarator configuration. While the eigenfunctions have a similar shape in both magnetic geometries, they are slightly more localized along the field line in the QHS case. The most unstable electron drift modes are strongly localized at the symmetry points (where stellarator symmetry is present) and in the regions where normal curvature is unfavorable and magnitude of the local magnetic shear and magnetic field is minimum. The presence of a large positive local magnetic shear in the bad curvature region is found to be destabilizing. Electron drift modes are found to be more affected by the normal curvature than by the geodesic curvature. The threshold of stability of the ITG modes in terms of {eta}{sub i} is found to be 2/3 in this fluid model consistent with the smallest threshold for toroidal geometry with adiabatic electrons. Optimization to favorable drift wave stability has small field line curvature, short connection lengths, the proper combination of geodesic curvature and local magnetic shear, large values of local magnetic shear, and the compression of flux surfaces in the unfavorable curvature region.

  10. Damping of lower hybrid waves by low-frequency drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Nicholas A.

    1989-11-01

    The conditions under which a spectrum of lower hybrid drift waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves (LFD) are calculated. The purpose is to help understand why lower hybrid drift waves are not seen in all field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiments in which they are predicted. It is concluded that if there is in the plasma a LFD wave amplitude above a critical level, lower hybrid waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves. The critical level required to stabilize TRX-2 [Phys. Fluids 30, 1497 (1987)] is calculated and found to be reasonably consistent with theoretical estimates.

  11. On the drift magnetosonic waves in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Naim, Hafsa; Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-10-15

    A generalized dispersion relation of obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic waves is derived by using the gyrokinetic theory for anisotropic low beta plasmas. The stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is performed to understand the stabilization mechanism of the drift magnetosonic instability and the estimation of the growth rate is also presented. It is noted that the growth rate of the drift instability enhances for small anisotropy (A{sub e,i} = T{sub ⊥e,i}/T{sub ∥e,i} < 1) whereas it is suppressed for large anisotropy (A{sub e,i} > 1)

  12. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-04-25

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects.

  13. Stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability by resonant electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Nevins, W.M.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1981-09-16

    The lower hybrid drift instability was studied with a two dimensional electrostatic simulation code. Simulations showed good agreement of the measured local growth rates and frequencies with the results of local theory during the early stage of wave growth. At later times nonlocal effects become important, and a coherent mode structure develops. This normal mode was observed to propagate up the density gradient. At zero plasma beta and zero electron temperature, we found that the lower hybrid drift instability is stabilized by the local current relaxation due to both ion quasilinear diffusion and electron E x B trapping which causes electron heating to occur.

  14. Drift kinetic Alfvén wave in temperature anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Naim, Hafsa Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-03-15

    By using the gyrokinetic theory, the kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) are discussed to emphasize the drift effects through the density inhomogeneity and the temperature anisotropy on their dispersion characteristics. The dependence of stabilization mechanism of the drift-Alfvén wave instability on the temperature anisotropy is highlighted. The estimate of the growth rate and the threshold condition for a wide range of parameters are also discussed.

  15. Spatiotemporal mode structure of nonlinearly coupled drift wave modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas; Negrete, Jose Jr.; Bousselin, Guillaume; Brochard, Frederic; Bonhomme, Gerard; Oldenbuerger, Stella

    2011-11-15

    This paper presents full cross-section measurements of drift waves in the linear magnetized plasma of the Mirabelle device. Drift wave modes are studied in regimes of weakly developed turbulence. The drift wave modes develop azimuthal space-time structures of plasma density, plasma potential, and visible light fluctuations. A fast camera diagnostic is used to record visible light fluctuations of the plasma column in an azimuthal cross section with a temporal resolution of 10 {mu}s corresponding approximately to 10% of the typical drift wave period. Mode coupling and drift wave dispersion are studied by spatiotemporal Fourier decomposition of the camera frames. The observed coupling between modes is compared to calculations of nonlinearly coupled oscillators described by the Kuramoto model.

  16. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers.

  17. Anomalous phase shifts in drift wave fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Ahmed; Skiff, Fred

    2003-10-01

    Ion phase space density fluctuation measurements are performed in a linearly magnetized device using Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF). An ICP source produces an 8cm diameter plasma column that drifts in a cylindrical vessel whose diameter and length are 40 cm and 3 m, respectively. These experiments are performed using a CW singly ionized Argon plasma that is immersed in a 1kG magnetic field along the axis of the cylinder. A density of the order of 10^9 cm-3 is obtained under a regulated neutral background pressure of 2.× 10-4 torr. The electron and ion temperature are respectively 2 eV and 0.1 eV. LIF is carried out by pumping the Ar II metastable (3d^1)^2G_9/2, using a CW tunable laser centered at 611.6653 nm scanned over 6 GHz, to metastable (4p^1)F_7/2, and then detecting the 460nm photons emitted from its transition to (4s^1)^2F_5/2. This collection is made possible using two low f-umber periscopes that are directed to PMTs. Here we present measurements of the complex two-point correlation function < f(v_i_allel),z_1,ω)f(v_i_allel,z_2,ω)> as a function of the spatial separation of two LIF detection systems Δ d = z_2-z_1, the ion parallel velocity v_i_allel and the frequency ω. Preliminary results show ion particle velocity dependent phase shifts at the drift wave frequency.

  18. Drift laws for spiral waves on curved anisotropic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dierckx, Hans; Brisard, Evelien; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2013-07-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize spatial patterns in chemical, physical, and biological excitable systems. Factors affecting their dynamics, such as spatiotemporal drift, are of great interest for particular applications. Here, we propose a quantitative description for spiral wave dynamics on curved surfaces which shows that for a wide class of systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and anisotropic cardiac tissue, the Ricci curvature scalar of the surface is the main determinant of spiral wave drift. The theory provides explicit equations for spiral wave drift direction, drift velocity, and the period of rotation. Depending on the parameters, the drift can be directed to the regions of either maximal or minimal Ricci scalar curvature, which was verified by direct numerical simulations. PMID:23944539

  19. Drift wave instability in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Hill, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    A linear normal mode analysis of the drift wave instability in the Io plasma torus was carried out on the basis of the Richmond (1973) and Huang et al. (1990) analyses of drift waves in the vicinity of the earth's plasmapause. Results indicate that the outer torus boundary is linearly unstable to the growth of electrostatic drift waves. It is shown that the linear growth rate is proportional to the ion drift frequency and to the ratio of the flux tube charge content to the Jovian ionospheric Pedersen conductance. It is also shown that various theoretical models of global radial transport in Jupiter's atmosphere (including corotating convection, interchange diffusion, and transient flux tube convection) can be understood as plausible nonlinear evolutions of electrostatic drift waves.

  20. Drift laws for spiral waves on curved anisotropic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierckx, Hans; Brisard, Evelien; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2013-07-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize spatial patterns in chemical, physical, and biological excitable systems. Factors affecting their dynamics, such as spatiotemporal drift, are of great interest for particular applications. Here, we propose a quantitative description for spiral wave dynamics on curved surfaces which shows that for a wide class of systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and anisotropic cardiac tissue, the Ricci curvature scalar of the surface is the main determinant of spiral wave drift. The theory provides explicit equations for spiral wave drift direction, drift velocity, and the period of rotation. Depending on the parameters, the drift can be directed to the regions of either maximal or minimal Ricci scalar curvature, which was verified by direct numerical simulations.

  1. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  2. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  3. Drift wave instability in a nonuniform quantum dusty magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Salimullah, M.; Jamil, M.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-03-15

    Using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas and with quantum effects arising through the Bohm potential and the Fermi degenerate pressure, the possible drift waves and their instabilities have been investigated in considerable detail in a nonuniform dusty magnetoplasma. It is found that in the presence of a nonuniform ambient magnetic field, the drift waves grow in amplitude by taking energy from the streaming ions and density inhomogeneity. The implication of the drift wave instability for nonthermal electrostatic fluctuations to laboratory and astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  4. Drift wave transport scalings introduced by varying correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, J.; Holod, I.

    2005-01-01

    Scalings of the correlation length of drift wave turbulence with magnetic current q, shear, elongation, and temperature ratio have been introduced into a drift wave transport model. The correlation length is calculated from linear scaling of the fastest growing mode. Such a procedure is supported by previous turbulence simulations with absorbing boundaries for short and long wavelengths. The resulting q and s scalings are now in better agreement with experimental scalings. In particular, the simulation results for transport barrier shots improve.

  5. Propagations of drift waves in toroidal plasma systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-05-01

    Drift wave patterns in toroidal plasmas are studied. The dispersion relation was simplified to retain both the shear and the toroidal coupling effects. Since the dispersion relation does not depend on the toroidal angle, {phi}, the dispersion is solved in the two- dimensional space made up with minor radius and poloidal angle. The dispersion relation can be reduced into second-order, partial differential equations of a hyperbolic type. The one-dimensional convective mode analysis, which was originated in the 1960's, was extended into the two-dimensional analysis. Depending on the strength of the magnetic shear, one can obtain either the convective or the localized solutions. The results show that the plasma is expected to be unstable for large azimuthal mode number and that the plasma instability tends to be more stabilized for large mass ions. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Interactions between Drift-Wave Microturbulence and the Tearing Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. D.; Brennan, D. P.; Izacard, O.; Holland, C.

    2014-10-01

    Turbulent dynamics are known to be affected by the presence of a magnetic island. The evolution of a magnetic island is also known to be affected by evolving turbulent fields. Capturing this interaction is a challenging computational problem due to the disparate scales involved. Using a Hasegawa-Wakatani model for the small spatial and temporal scale drift-wave microturbulence and coupling it to Ohm's Law for evolving the larger-scale magnetic island we can capture the dynamics of this interaction self-consistently. We have developed a new code, TURBO, to simulate this system using an equilibrium with prescribed turbulent drives and magnetohydrodynamic stability properties. We present progress toward understanding this interaction via comparisons with analytic predictions for a turbulent resistivity and turbulent viscosity. These two transport coefficients are calculated as integrals over the wave spectrum and the scaling with wave number is investigated. An extension to a five-field model including the ion temperature gradient is also presented. Supported in part by US DOE Grant DE-SC0007851

  7. Growth and stabilization of drift-tearing modes in weakly collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso\\ad{a}, D.; Ottaviani, M.; Porcelli\\ad{a}, F.

    2002-09-01

    In the limit where the electron drift-wave frequency exceeds the electron-ion collision frequency, drift-tearing modes are found to grow with a linear growth rate independent of resistivity and proportional to the product of the electron inertial skin depth and the ion sound Larmor radius. The stabilization of these modes in collisionless and semi-collisional regimes is investigated. The stabilization mechanism is related to the coupling and propagation of drift-acoustic perturbations away from the reconnecting mode-rational surface. Analytic and numerical solutions of the four-field reduced fluid model in the slab geometry approximation with constant electron temperature and negligible ion temperature are presented. The actual stability threshold can occur at values of the normalized tearing mode stability parameter Δ' as high as 102.\\pacs{52.35.P}} \\fnm{1}{Permanent address: Istituto Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Department of Energetics, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  8. On the modulational stability of magnetic structures in electron drift turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jucker, Martin; Pavlenko, Vladimir P.

    2007-10-15

    The generation of large-scale magnetic fields in magnetic electron drift mode turbulence is investigated. In particular, the mechanism of modulational instability caused by three-wave interactions is elucidated and the explicit increment is calculated. Also, a stability criterion similar to the known Lighthill criterion is found.

  9. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  10. Antenna excitation of drift wave in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, A.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.; Skiff, F.

    2007-10-15

    In a magnetized toroidal plasma, an antenna tunable in vertical wave number is used to excite density perturbations. Coherent detection is performed by means of Langmuir probes to directly determine both the wave vector and the plasma response induced by the antenna. Comparison between the theoretical density response predicted by the generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and the experimentally determined density response enables us the identification of one peak of the plasma response as a drift wave.

  11. Drift and ion acoustic wave driven vortices with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Shan, S.; Haque, Q.

    2012-08-15

    Linear and nonlinear analysis of coupled drift and acoustic mode is presented in an inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma with {kappa}-distributed electrons. A linear dispersion relation is found which shows that the phase speed of both the drift wave and the ion acoustic wave decreases in the presence of superthermal electrons. Several limiting cases are also discussed. In the nonlinear regime, stationary solutions in the form of dipolar and monopolar vortices are obtained. It is shown that the condition for the boundedness of the solution implies that the speed of drift wave driven vortices reduces with increase in superthermality effect. Ignoring density inhomogeniety, it is investigated that the lower and upper limits on the speed of the ion acoustic driven vortices spread with the inclusion of high energy electrons. The importance of results with reference to space plasmas is also pointed out.

  12. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Adámek, J.

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  13. Route to Drift Wave Chaos and Turbulence in a Bounded Low-{beta} Plasma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, T.; Latten, A.; Piel, A.; Bonhomme, G.; Pierre, T.; Dudok de Wit, T.

    1997-11-01

    The transition scenario from stability to drift wave turbulence is experimentally investigated in a magnetized low-{beta} plasma with cylindrical geometry. It is demonstrated that the temporal dynamics is determined by the interaction and destabilization of spatiotemporal patterns, in particular, traveling waves. The analysis of the temporal and the spatiotemporal data shows that the bifurcations sequence towards weakly developed turbulence follows the Ruelle-Takens scenario. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Scroll wave drift along steps, troughs, and corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hua; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional excitable systems can create nonlinear scroll waves that rotate around one-dimensional phase singularities. Recent theoretical work predicts that these filaments drift along step-like height variations. Here, we test this prediction using experiments with thin layers of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. We observe that over short distances scroll waves are attracted towards the step and then rapidly commence a steady drift along the step line. The translating filaments always reside on the shallow side of the step near the edge. Accordingly, filaments in the deep domain initially collide with and shorten at the step wall. The drift speeds obey the predicted proportional dependence on the logarithm of the height ratio and the direction depends on the vortex chirality. We also observe drift along the perimeter of rectangular plateaus and find that the filaments perform sharp turns at the corners. In addition, we investigate rectangular troughs for which vortices of equal chirality can drift in different directions. The latter two effects are reproduced in numerical simulations with the Barkley model. The simulations show that narrow troughs instigate scroll wave encounters that induce repulsive interaction and symmetry breaking. Similar phenomena could exist in the geometrically complicated ventricles of the human heart where reentrant vortex waves cause tachycardia and fibrillation.

  15. Nonlinear interaction of drift waves with driven plasma currents

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas

    2010-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetized plasma, coherent drift wave modes are synchronized by a mode selective drive of plasma currents. Nonlinear effects of the synchronization are investigated in detail. Frequency pulling is observed over a certain frequency range. The dependence of the width of this synchronization range on the amplitude of the driven plasma currents forms Arnold tongues. The transition between complete and incomplete synchronization is indicated by the onset of periodic pulling and phase slippage. Synchronization is observed for driven current amplitudes, which are some percent of the typical value of parallel currents generated by drift waves.

  16. Numerical experiments on the drift wave-zonal flow paradigm for nonlinear saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Holland, C.

    2008-12-15

    This paper confirms that ExB shearing from toroidally symmetric (toroidal mode number n=0) 'radial modes' provides the dominant nonlinear saturation mechanism for drift wave (n{ne}0) turbulence, which in turn nonlinearly drives the modes. In common usage, this is loosely referred to as the 'drift wave-zonal flow paradigm' for nonlinear saturation despite the fact that radial modes have several components distinguished in this paper: a residual or zero mean frequency 'zonal flow' part and an oscillatory 'geodesic acoustic mode' (GAM) part. Linearly, the zonal flows (and GAMs) are weakly damped only by ion-ion collisions, while the GAMs are strongly Landau damped only at low safety factor q. At high q the Hinton-Rosenbluth residual flow from an impulse vanishes and only the weakly damped GAMs remain. With the linear physics and driving rates of the finite-n transport modes unchanged, this paper argues that GAMs are only somewhat less effective than the residual zonal flows in providing the nonlinear saturation, and in some cases ExB shearing from GAMs (or at least the GAM physics) appears to dominate: transport appears to be nearly linear in the GAM frequency. By deleting the drift wave-drift wave nonlinear coupling, it is found that drift wave-radial mode nonlinear coupling triads account for most of the nonlinear saturation. Furthermore, the ExB shear components of the radial modes nonlinearly stabilize the finite-n modes, while the diamagnetic components nonlinearly destabilize them. Finally, from wave number spectral contour plots of the time average nonlinear entropy transfer function (and rates), it is shown that the peak in entropy generation coincides with the peak in transport production, while entropy dissipation (like Landau damping) is spread equally over all n modes (including n=0). Most of these conclusions appear to hold about equally well for all types of drift wave turbulence.

  17. Drift induced by repeated hydropeaking waves in controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiolini, Bruno; Bruno, M. Cristina; Biffi, Sofia; Cashman, Matthew J.

    2014-05-01

    Repeated hydropeaking events characterize most alpine rivers downstream of power plants fed by high elevation reservoirs. The effects of hydropeaking on the benthic communities are well known, and usually each hydropeaking wave causes an increase in tractive force and changes in temperature and water quality. Simulations of hydropeaking in artificial system can help to disentangle the direct effects of the modified flow regime from impacts associated with other associated physio-chemical changes, and with the effects of river regulation and land-use changes that often accompany water resource development. In September 2013 we conducted a set of controlled simulations in five steel flumes fed by an Alpine stream (Fersina stream, Adige River catchment, Trentino, Italy), where benthic invertebrates can freely colonize the flumes. One flume was used as control with no change in flow, in the other four flumes we simulated an hydropeaking wave lasting six hours, and repeated for five consecutive days. Flow was increased by twice baseflow in two flumes, and three times in the other two. We collected benthic samples before the beginning (morning of day 1) and after the end (afternoon of day 5) of the set of simulations to evaluate changes in the benthic communities due to induced drift migration. During each simulation, we collected drifting organisms at short time intervals to assess the responses to: 1) the initial discharge increase, 2) the persistence of high flows for several hours; 3) the decrease of discharge to the baseflow; 4) the change in drift with each successive day. Preliminary results indicate typical strong increases of catastrophic drift on the onset of each simulated hydropeaking, drift responses proportional to the absolute discharge increase, a decrease in the drift responses over successive days. Different taxa responded with different patterns: taxa which resist tractive force increased in drift only during the periods of baseflow that follow the

  18. Stabilization of the lower-hybrid drift instability by resonant electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Nevins, W.M.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1983-09-01

    The lower-hybrid drift instability is studied with a two-dimensional electrostatic simulation code. Simulations show good agreement of the measured local growth rates and frequencies with the results of local theory during the early stage of wave growth. At later times nonlocal effects become important, and a coherent mode structure develops. This normal mode is observed to propagate up the density gradient. At zero plasma beta and zero electron temperature, it is found that the lower-hybrid drift instability is stabilized by the local current relaxation due to both ion quasilinear diffusion and electron E x B trapping which causes electron heating to occur.

  19. Impacts of wave spreading and multidirectional waves on estimating Stokes drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Stokes drift, and its leading-order approximation, for a random sea depend upon the interaction of different wave groups and the process of wave spreading. Here Stokes drift direction and magnitude from prescribed spectra, local observational buoy data, and global model WAVEWATCH III output are used to analyze approximations of Stokes drift for directional random seas in deep water. To facilitate analysis, a new approximation is defined to incorporate the systematic effects of wave spreading. Stokes drift is typically overestimated by ignoring these effects or by ignoring directional differences in swell and wind seas. These two errors are differentiated and found to be largely uncorrelated. These errors depend strongly on depth, with deeper Stokes drift favoring narrow-banded swell and shallower Stokes drift favoring wind seas. Results are consistent among the data examined. Mean Stokes drift magnitude reductions from wave spreading and multidirectional wave effects alone are 14-20% and 7-23% respectively, giving a combined reduction of 20-40% versus unidirectional waves, depending on wave age and depth. Approximations that do not include these reductions however, will on average overestimate Stokes drift by 16-26%, 26-43%, and 45-71% respectively. In addition to magnitude, the direction of Stokes drift is also affected and multidirectional waves generate a directional veer with depth: the 30/60/90% confidence intervals are bounded (approximately) by ± 0.12/0.28/0.84 radians (± 7/16/48 deg) at the surface, with smaller intervals at depth. Complementary depth-integrated approximations are also investigated and directional effects are similar with depth-dependent subsurface results. Furthermore, an optimized directional spread correction for the surface is nearly identical for global simulations and a buoy located at Ocean Weather Station P (50°N 145°W), and does not require directional wave spectrum data.

  20. Drift waves and vortices: a dynamical point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Interactions of localized vortices with drift waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  1. Drift prediction for a roll-stabilized inertial measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    A roll-stabilized inertial measurement system is being developed by Sandia National Laboratories. This system will measure three orthogonal-body angular rates and three orthogonal-body accelerations and will calculate three Euler angles for attitude control of small rocket systems and/or large rocket payloads in flight. An analysis of the predicted drift in the Euler angles has been undertaken to aid in the definition of computational hardware characteristics (such as gyro resolution and gyro sample frequency) and to assess the performance of the system over typical trajectories. The method of analysis uses two different techniques to calculate Euler angles and to compare the results. The first technique results in a true Euler angle which is calculated by a Bortz equation (a method to relate vehicle body coordinates to earth coordinates). The second technique simulates the in-flight calculations by including effects of drift from the truncated Bortz algorithm, quantization, and random gyro drift. The comparison results in drift as a function of time for the three Euler angles, roll, pitch, and yaw. Examples of predicted drift over typical trajectories are presented.

  2. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  3. Shock drift acceleration in the presence of waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the initial results of a model designed to study the modification of the scatter-free, shock drift acceleration of energetic test particles by wave activity in the vicinity of a quasi-perpendicular, fast-mode MHD shock. It is emphasized that the concept of magnetic moment conservation is a valid approximation only in the perpendicular and nearly perpendicular regimes, when the angle theta-Bn between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field vector is in the range from 70 deg to 90 deg. The present investigation is concerned with one step in a program which is being developed to combine the shock drift and diffusive processes at a shock of arbitrary theta-Bn.

  4. Drift-Wave Instabilities and Transport in Non - Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Daniel Duc

    Motivated by experimental scaling laws that suggest an improvement in the confinement time of fusion plasmas in tokamaks with elongated cross section, we search theoretically for favorable dependence on elongation for drift-wave instabilities, which may be responsible for anomalous transport in tokamaks. First, using thermodynamic methods, we derive upper bounds on thermal diffusivities for drift-wave instabilities in tokamaks but find no elongation dependence to lowest order. Also, compared with experimentally inferred ion thermal diffusivities from the DIIID tokamak, the thermodynamic bounds are as much as 100 times bigger in the plasma core. Second, utilizing a simulation code to calculate linear growth rates, we obtain mixing-length estimates of ion thermal diffusivities for a specific drift wave, the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode, which becomes unstable only if the temperature gradient exceeds a finite threshold value (whereas the thermodynamic constraints allow instability for any value). We find that the simulation growth rates and the diffusivities estimated from them do decrease for increasing elongation, due to finite Larmor radius effects (which do not explicitly appear in the thermodynamic constraints). Compared with the experimentally inferred diffusivities, the simulation diffusivities are similar near the edge but are 10 times bigger in the core. However, a small adjustment in the temperature profile, within experimental and theoretical uncertainties, would produce good agreement everywhere. Therefore, we suggest that for the DIIID experiments studied, the plasma is actually very close to the ITG instability threshold in the core and farther away from threshold near the edge, but not far enough to induce the full thermodynamic level of diffusivities. This conjecture is supported by model transport calculations that reproduce the experimental diffusivity profile fairly well.

  5. Large-scale drift and Rossby wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K. L.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study drift/Rossby wave turbulence described by the large-scale limit of the Charney–Hasegawa–Mima equation. We define the zonal and meridional regions as Z:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\gt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} and M:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\lt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} respectively, where {k}=({k}x,{k}y) is in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field such that k x is along the isopycnals and k y is along the plasma density gradient. We prove that the only types of resonant triads allowed are M≤ftrightarrow M+Z and Z≤ftrightarrow Z+Z. Therefore, if the spectrum of weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence is initially in Z it will remain in Z indefinitely. We present a generalised Fjørtoft’s argument to find transfer directions for the quadratic invariants in the two-dimensional {k}-space. Using direct numerical simulations, we test and confirm our theoretical predictions for weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence, and establish qualitative differences with cases when turbulence is strong. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the large-scale limit survive when the typical turbulent scale is only moderately greater than the Larmor/Rossby radius.

  6. Integrated Study of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Collisional Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    George R. Tynan

    2012-04-24

    An existing linear magnetized plasma device, the Controlled Shear Decorrelation experiment (CSDX) was used to study the transition from a state of coherent wave like activity to a state of turbulent activity using the magnetic field and thus magnetization of the plasma as the control parameter. The results show the onset of coherent drift waves consistent with linear stability analysis. As the magnetization is raised, at first multiple harmonics appear, consistent with wave steepening. This period is then followed by the beginning of nonlinear interactions between different wave modes, which then results in the formation of narrow frequency but distributed azimuthal wave number fluctuations that are consistent with the formation of long-lived coherent nonlinear structures within the plasmas. These structures, termed quasicoherent modes, persist as the magnetic field is raised. Measurements of turbulent momentum flux indicate that the plasma is also forming an azimuthally symmetric radially sheared fluid flow that is nonlinearly driven by smaller scaled turbulent fluctuations. Further increases in the magnetic field result in the breakup of the quasicoherent mode, and the clear formation of the sheared flow. Numerical simulations of the experiment reproduce the formation of the sheared flow via a vortex merging process, and confirm that the experiment is providing the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of sheared zonal flows from drift turbulent fluctuations in a magnetized plasma.

  7. Drift stabilizer for reciprocating free-piston devices

    DOEpatents

    Ward, William C.; Corey, John A.; Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-20

    A free-piston device has a stabilized piston drift. A piston having a frequency of reciprocation over a stroke length and with first and second sides facing first and second variable volumes, respectively, for containing a working fluid defining an acoustic wavelength at the frequency of reciprocation. A bypass tube waveguide connects the first and second variable volumes at all times during reciprocation of the piston. The waveguide has a relatively low impedance for steady flow and a relatively high impedance for oscillating flow at the frequency of reciprocation of the piston, so that steady flow returns fluid leakage from about the piston between the first and second volumes while oscillating flow is not diverted through the waveguide. Thus, net leakage about the piston is returned during each stroke of the piston while oscillating leakage is not allowed and pressure buildup on either the first or second side of the piston is avoided to provide a stable piston location.

  8. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  9. Drift-wave fluctuation in an inviscid tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Rong; Mao, Jie-Jian; Tang, Xiao-Yan

    2013-11-01

    In order to describe the characterization of resistive drift-wave fluctuation in a tokamak plasma, a coupled inviscid two-dimensional Hasegawa—Wakatani model is investigated. Two groups of new analytic solutions with and without phase shift between the fluctuant density and the fluctuant potential are obtained by using the special function transformation method. It is demonstrated that the fluctuant potential shares similar spatio—temporal variations with the density. It is found from the solutions without phase shift that the effect of the diffusion and adiabaticity on the fluctuant density is quite complex, and that the fluctuation may be controlled through the adiabaticity and diffusion. By using the typical parameters in the quasi-adiabatic regime in the solutions with phase shift, it is shown that the density gradient becomes larger as the contours become dense toward the plasma edge and the contours have irregular structures, which reveal the nonuniform distribution in the tokamak edge.

  10. Impact of ion diamagnetic drift on ideal ballooning mode stability in rotating tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiba, N.

    2016-04-01

    Drift magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations have been derived in order to investigate the ion diamagnetic drift effect on the stability to ideal MHD modes in rotating plasmas. These drift MHD equations have been simplified with the Frieman-Rotenberg formalism under the incompressible assumption, and a new code, MINERVA-DI, has been developed to solve the derived extended Frieman-Rotenberg equation. Benchmark results of the MINERVA-DI code show good agreements with the analytic theory discussing the stability to an internal kink mode and that to a ballooning mode in static plasmas. The stability analyses of the ballooning mode with respect to toroidal rotation with the ion diamagnetic drift effect have been performed using MINERVA-DI. The stabilizing effect by the ion diamagnetic drift is found to be negligible when the rotation frequency is large compared to the ion diamagnetic drift frequency. The direction of plasma rotation affects the ballooning mode stability when the ion diamagnetic drift effect is taken into account. It is identified that there are two physics mechanisms responsible for the dependence of MHD stability on the rotation direction. One is the correction of the dynamic pressure effect on MHD stability by the ion diamagnetic drift, and the other is the change of the MHD eigenmode structure by the combined effect of plasma rotation and ion diamagnetic drift.

  11. Simulating the coupled evolution of drift-wave turbulence and the tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. D.; Brennan, D. P.; Izacard, O.; Holland, C.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulence and MHD instabilities such as the tearing mode can be computationally expensive and only recently have simulations begun to address their coupled, self-consistent interactions. The disparate scales involved in simulating the coupled evolution of small-scale turbulence and the larger-scale tearing mode make this a challenging numerical problem. Using the newly developed code, TURBO, we have performed nonlinear simulations of Hasegawa-Wakatani drift-wave turbulence coupled to Ohm's law. An equilibrium with prescribed stability properties and turbulent drives is used to examine the impact of drift-wave turbulence on the stability of the tearing mode and the energy transport between them in the context of a turbulent resistivity and turbulent viscosity. We find that the spatial structure of the density flux and these transport coefficients are asymmetric in the poloidal direction and peaked away from the X-point in the presence of an island in a poloidal flow. Similar effects are seen in simulations of ITG turbulence in the presence of a magnetic island and we discuss the connections to our work. Supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0007851.

  12. Physical mechanism behind zonal-flow generation in drift-wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2009-10-16

    The energetic interaction between drift-wave turbulence and zonal flows is studied experimentally in two-dimensional wave number space. The kinetic energy is found to be transferred nonlocally from the drift waves to the zonal flow. This confirms the theoretical prediction that the parametric-modulational instability is the driving mechanism of zonal flows. The physical mechanism of this nonlocal energetic interaction between and zonal flows and turbulent drift-wave eddies in relation to the suppression of turbulent transport is discussed. PMID:19905704

  13. Electrostatic Drift-Wave Instability in Field-Reversed Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Calvin; Fulton, Daniel; Holod, Ihor; Lin, Zhihong; Binderbauer, Michl; Tajima, Toshiki; Schmitz, Lothar

    2015-11-01

    Recent progress in the C-2 advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment [Binderbauer 2015] at Tri Alpha Energy has led to consistently reproducible plasma lifetimes of 5+ ms, ie. transport regimes. To understand the mechanisms, gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of drift-wave instabilities have been carried out for the FRC [Fulton 2015]. The realistic magnetic geometry is represented in Boozer coordinates in the upgraded gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) [Lin 1998]. Radially local simulations find that, in the FRC core, ion scale modes are stable for realistic pressure gradients while the electron scale modes are unstable. On the other hand, in the scrape-off layer (SOL) outside of the separatrix, both ion and electron scale modes are unstable. These findings and linear instability thresholds found in simulation are consistent with the C-2 experimental measurements of density fluctuations [Schmitz 2015]. Collisional effects and instability drive mechanism will be clarified. Nonlocal and nonlinear simulation results will also be reported. supported by TAE.

  14. Rescaling effects on a low-frequency drift wave in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xin; Liu, Sanqiu

    2015-03-01

    The effect of dust on the low-frequency drift wave in inhomogeneous magnetized dusty plasmas is investigated. It is shown that a low-frequency drift wave can be modeled by the Hasegawa-Mima equation (HME) both in mobile and immobile dusty plasmas, which are dust-modified HME and HME in dusty background, respectively. The former is rescaled significantly by the presence of the dust and the space-time scale greatly increases with the increasing density and mass of dust, while the latter is not rescaled, but an additional driving force appears to drive the drift waves.

  15. Spatial localization of resistive drift wave structure in tokamak edge plasmas with an embedded magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shilin; Qu, Hongpeng; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Resistive drift wave instability is investigated numerically in tokamak edge plasma confined by sheared slab magnetic field geometry with an embedded magnetic island. The focus is on the structural characteristics of eigenmode inside the island, where the density profile tends to be flattened. A transition of the dominant eigenmode occurs around a critical island width w{sub c}. For thin islands with a width below w{sub c}, two global long wavelength eigenmodes with approximately the same growth rate but different eigenfrequency are excited, which are stabilized by the magnetic island through two-dimensional mode coupling in both x and y (corresponding to radial and poloidal in tokamak) directions. On the other hand, a short wavelength eigenmode, which is destabilized by thick islands with a width above w{sub c}, dominates the edge fluctuation, showing a prominent structural localization in the region between the X-point and the O-point of the magnetic island. The main destabilization mechanism is identified as the mode coupling in the y direction, which is similar to the so-called toroidal coupling in tokamak plasmas. These three eigenmodes may coexist in the drift wave fluctuation for the island with a width around w{sub c}. It is demonstrated that the structural localization results mainly from the quasilinear flattening of density profile inside the magnetic island.

  16. Streamers generation by small-scale drift-Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Yu, M. Y.

    2014-10-15

    Excitation of streamers by modulationally unstable small-scale drift-Alfvén wave (SSDAW) is investigated. It is found that the excitation depends strongly on the propagation direction of the SSDAW, and the ion and electron diamagnetic drift waves are both unstable due to the generation of streamers. It is also shown that zonal flows can be effectively excited by the SSDAW with the propagation direction different from that for streamer excitation.

  17. Linear study of the nonmodal growth of drift waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Greiner, F.

    2010-06-15

    The main effect of dust on drift wave turbulence is the enhancement of the nonadiabaticity. Previous work found that nonmodal behavior is important in the nonadiabatic regime of the drift wave system. Here, the modal and nonmodal properties of the linear Hasegawa-Wakatani system of dusty plasmas are investigated. The non-normality of the linear evolution operator can lead to enhanced transient growth rates compared to the modal growth rates.

  18. Drift ion acoustic shock waves in an inhomogeneous two-dimensional quantum magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma with neutrals in the background employing the quantum hydrodynamics (QHD) model. In this regard, a quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived for the first time. It is shown that the ion acoustic wave couples with the drift wave if the parallel motion of ions is taken into account. Discrepancies in the earlier works on drift solitons and shocks in inhomogeneous plasmas are also pointed out and a correct theoretical framework is presented to study the one-dimensional as well as the two-dimensional propagation of shock waves in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma. Furthermore, the solution of KPB equation is presented using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation of the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v{sub *}/u, are also investigated. It is found that increasing the number density and collision frequency enhances the strength of the shock. It is also shown that the fast drift shock (i.e., v{sub *}/u>0) increases, whereas the slow drift shock (i.e., v{sub *}/u<0) decreases the strength of the shock. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  19. Nonlinear Drift-Kinetic Equation in the Presence of a Circularly Polarized Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Equations of the single particle motion and nonlinear kinetic equation for plasma in the presence of a circularly polarized wave of arbitrary frequency in the drift approximation are presented. The nonstationarity and inhomogeneity of the plasma-wave system are taken into account.

  20. Nonlinear Drift-Kinetic Equation in the Presence of a Circularly Polarized Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Equations of the single particle motion and nonlinear kinetic equation for plasma in the presence of a circularly polarized wave of arbitrary frequency in the drift approximation are presented. The nonstationarity and inhomogeneity of the plasma-wave system are taken into account. The time dependent part of the ponderomotive force is discussed.

  1. A Computer Simulation Study of Anatomy Induced Drift of Spiral Waves in the Human Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Kharche, Sanjay R.; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Seemann, Gunnar; Zhang, Henggui; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of spiral waves of excitation with atrial anatomy remains unclear. This simulation study isolates the role of atrial anatomical structures on spiral wave spontaneous drift in the human atrium. We implemented realistic and idealised 3D human atria models to investigate the functional impact of anatomical structures on the long-term (∼40 s) behaviour of spiral waves. The drift of a spiral wave was quantified by tracing its tip trajectory, which was correlated to atrial anatomical features. The interaction of spiral waves with the following idealised geometries was investigated: (a) a wedge-like structure with a continuously varying atrial wall thickness; (b) a ridge-like structure with a sudden change in atrial wall thickness; (c) multiple bridge-like structures consisting of a bridge connected to the atrial wall. Spiral waves drifted from thicker to thinner regions and along ridge-like structures. Breakthrough patterns caused by pectinate muscles (PM) bridges were also observed, albeit infrequently. Apparent anchoring close to PM-atrial wall junctions was observed. These observations were similar in both the realistic and the idealised models. We conclude that spatially altering atrial wall thickness is a significant cause of drift of spiral waves. PM bridges cause breakthrough patterns and induce transient anchoring of spiral waves. PMID:26587545

  2. Instability of Drift Waves in Two-Component Solid-State Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, A.A.; Shramkova, O.V.

    2005-09-15

    The instabilities of longitudinal waves in infinite semiconductor plasma containing charge carriers of two types are considered under the assumption that the thermal velocity of electrons slightly exceeds that of holes. The main result of this study is that instability can occur in intrinsic semiconductors if the electron drift velocity is lower than the thermal velocity. Drift wave instabilities are studied in intrinsic semiconductors and semiconductors with identical plasma frequencies of electrons and holes. The influence of dissipation on the instability of these waves is also considered.

  3. Linear and nonlinear coupled drift and ion acoustic waves in collisional pair ion-electron magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Saeed, R.; Haque, Q.

    2011-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled electrostatic drift and ion acoustic waves are studied in inhomogeneous, collisional pair ion-electron plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation for a medium where both dispersion and dissipation are present is derived. An attempt is made to obtain exact solution of KdVB equation by using modified tanh-coth method for arbitrary velocity of nonlinear drift wave. Another exact solution for KdVB is obtained, which gives a structure of shock wave. Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations are derived in limiting cases with solitary and monotonic shock solutions, respectively. Effects of species density, magnetic field, obliqueness, and the acoustic to drift velocity ratio on the solitary and shock solutions are investigated. The results discussed are useful in understanding of low frequency electrostatic waves at laboratory pair ion plasmas.

  4. Observation of drift compressional waves with a mid-latitude decameter coherent radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelpanov, Maksim; Mager, Pavel; Klimushkin, Dmitriy; Berngardt, Oleg; Mager, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Magnetospheric Pc5 pulsations observed on December 26, 2014 are analyzed. They were recorded in the nightside magnetosphere with a mid-latitude coherent decameter radar located near Ekaterinburg. It registers velocity variations in electric drift of ionospheric plasma caused by ULF waves in the magnetosphere. The westward direction of azimuthal propagation of wave coincides with the direction of magnetic drift of protons. A cross-wavelet analysis reveals that the frequency of oscillations depends on the wave number m, and the correlation between them is 0.90. The frequency increase from 2.5 to 5 mHz was followed by an increase in the absolute value m from 20 to 80. These features of the wave under study testify that it should be classified as a drift compressional mode which is typical for the ULF mode in kinetics. Existence conditions for it are the terminal pressure of plasma and its inhomogeneity across magnetic shells.

  5. Up-gradient particle flux in a drift wave-zonal flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, L.; Tynan, G. R.; Thakur, S. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Brandt, C.

    2015-05-15

    We report a net inward, up-gradient turbulent particle flux in a cylindrical plasma when collisional drift waves generate a sufficiently strong sheared azimuthal flow that drives positive (negative) density fluctuations up (down) the background density gradient, resulting in a steepening of the mean density gradient. The results show the existence of a saturation mechanism for drift-turbulence driven sheared flows that can cause up-gradient particle transport and density profile steepening.

  6. Cancellation of drift kinetic effects between thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, Z. R.

    2016-07-01

    Drift kinetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is computationally investigated using MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K following the non-perturbative approach (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503), for both reversed field pinch (RFP) and tokamak plasmas. Toroidal precessional drift resonance effects from trapped energetic ions (EIs) and various kinetic resonances between the mode and the guiding center drift motions of thermal particles are included into the self-consistent toroidal computations. The results show cancellation effects of the drift kinetic damping on the RWM between the thermal particles and EIs contributions, in both RFP and tokamak plasmas, even though each species alone can provide damping and stabilize RWM instability by respective kinetic resonances. The degree of cancellation generally depends on the EIs equilibrium distribution, the particle birth energy, as well as the toroidal flow speed of the plasma.

  7. Non-linear Paradigm for Drift Wave - Zonal Flow interplay: coherence, chaos and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Fulvio

    2003-10-01

    Non-linear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift wave (DW) envelope and zonal flow (ZF) amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent 4-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin and White(chen00). For the sake of simplicity, in this work we assume electrostatic fluctuations; but our formalism is readily extended to electromagnetic fluctuations(chen01). In the local limit, i.e. neglecting equilibrium profile variations, the coherent 4-wave DW-ZF modulation interaction model has successfully demonstrated spontaneous generation of ZFs and non-linear DW/ITG-ZF dynamics in toroidal plasmas(chen00). The present work is an extension of previous analyses to allow both (slow) temporal and spatial variations of the DW/ITG radial envelope; thus, it naturally incorporates the effects of equilibrium variations; i.e., turbulence spreading and size-dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients(lin99). This approach makes it possible to treat equilibrium profile variations and non-linear interactions on the same footing, assuming that coupling among different DWs on the shortest non-linear time scale is mediated by ZF only. At this level, the competition between linear drive/damping, DW spreading due to finite linear (and nonlinear) group velocity(lin02,chen02,kim02) and non-linear energy transfer between DWs and ZF, determines the saturation levels of the fluctuating fields. Despite the coherence of the underlying non-linear dynamics at this level, this system exhibits both chaotic behavior and intermittency, depending on system size and proximity to marginal stability(chen02). The present model can be further extended to include longer time-scale physics such as 3-wave interactions and collisionless damping of zonal flows. 9 chen00 Liu Chen, Zhihong Lin and Roscoe White, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129, (2000). chen01 L. Chen, Z. Lin, R.B. White and

  8. Wave-number spectrum of dissipative drift waves and a transition scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, K.; Gürcan, Ö. D.

    2015-09-01

    We study the steady state spectrum of the Hasegawa-Wakatani (HW) equations that describe drift wave turbulence. Beyond a critical scale kc, which appears as a balance between the nonlinear time and the parallel conduction time, the adiabatic electron response breaks down nonlinearly and an internal energy density spectrum of the form F (k⊥)∝k⊥-3 , associated with the background gradient, is established. More generally a dual power law spectrum, approximately of the form F (k⊥)∝k⊥-3(kc-2+k⊥-2) is obtained, which captures this transition. Using dimensional analysis, an expression of the form kc∝C /κ is derived for the transition scale, where C and κ are normalized parameters of the HW equations signifying the electron adiabaticity and the density gradient, respectively. The results are numerically confirmed using a shell model developed and used for the Hasegawa-Wakatani system.

  9. Fundamental mode of ultra-low frequency electrostatic dust-cyclotron surface waves in a magnetized complex plasma with drifting ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lee, Myoung-Jae

    2012-10-01

    The electrostatic dust-cyclotron (EDC) waves in a magnetized dusty plasma was reported that they could be excited by gravity in a collisional plasma [1]. Rosenberg suggested that EDC waves could be excited by ions drifting along the magnetic field in a collisional plasma containing dust grains with large thermal speeds [2]. The existing investigations, however, focus on EDC volume waves in which the boundary effects are not considered. In this work, we attempt to obtain some physical results concerning the fundamental mode of EDC surface wave and the stability of wave by utilizing a kinetic method. The EDC surface wave is assumed to propagate along an external magnetic field at the interface between the plasma and the vacuum. The plasma is comprised of drifting ions flowing along an external magnetic field. To derive the growth rate of surface waves, we employ the specular reflection boundary conditions. The EDC surface wave is found to be unstable when the ion drift velocity is larger than the phase velocity of the wave. In addition, the wave becomes to be more unstable if dust particles carry more negative charges.[4pt] [1] N. D'Angelo, Phys. Lett. A 323, 445 (2004).[0pt] [2] M. Rosenberg, Phys. Scr. 82, 035505 (2010).

  10. Modulation of drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A. P. E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com

    2014-04-15

    We study the amplitude modulation of low-frequency, long-wavelength electrostatic drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma consisting of cold ions and degenerate electrons. The effects of tunneling associated with the quantum Bohm potential and the Fermi pressure for nonrelativistic degenerate electrons, as well as the equilibrium density and magnetic field inhomogeneities are taken into account. Starting from a set of quantum magnetohydrodynamic equations, we derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) that governs the dynamics of the modulated quantum drift-wave packets. The NLSE is used to study the modulational instability (MI) of a Stoke's wave train to a small plane wave perturbation. It is shown that the quantum tunneling effect as well as the scale length of inhomogeneity plays crucial roles for the MI of the drift-wave packets. Thus, the latter can propagate in the form of bright and dark envelope solitons or as drift-wave rogons in degenerate dense magnetoplasmas.

  11. Drift Wave Chaos and Turbulence in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Cami; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Wise, Joe; Birge-Lee, Henry; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Thomas, Sam; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Whenever there is a pressure gradient in a magnetized plasma drift waves occur spontaneously. Drift waves have density and electrical potential fluctuations but no self magnetic field. In our experiment the drift waves form spontaneously in a narrow plasma column. (ne = 5 ×1011 cm3 , Te = 5 eV , B = 200 Gauss, dia = 25 cm , L = 1 . 5 m). As the drift waves grow from noise simple averaging techniques cannot be used to map them out in space and time. The ion saturation current Isat n√{Te} is recorded for an ensemble of 50 shots on a fixed probe located on the density gradient and for a movable probe. The probe signals are not sinusoidal and are filtered to calculate the cross-spectral function CSF = ∫ ∑ nshot Ifix, ωr->1 , tImov , ω (r->1 + δr-> , t + τ) dt , which can be used to extract the temporal and spatially varying wave patterns. The dominant wave at 18 kHz is a rotating spiral with m =2. LAPTAG is a university-high school alliance outreach program, which has been in existence for over 20 years. Work done at the BaPSF and supported by NSF/DOE.

  12. A theory of non-local linear drift wave transport

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, S.; Anderson, J.; Weyssow, B.

    2011-06-15

    Transport events in turbulent tokamak plasmas often exhibit non-local or non-diffusive action at a distance features that so far have eluded a conclusive theoretical description. In this paper a theory of non-local transport is investigated through a Fokker-Planck equation with fractional velocity derivatives. A dispersion relation for density gradient driven linear drift modes is derived including the effects of the fractional velocity derivative in the Fokker-Planck equation. It is found that a small deviation (a few percent) from the Maxwellian distribution function alters the dispersion relation such that the growth rates are substantially increased and thereby may cause enhanced levels of transport.

  13. Fast scanning cavity offset lock for laser frequency drift stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Smith, Nicolas; Blythe, Peter; Keller, Matthias; Lange, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    We have implemented a compact setup for long-term laser frequency stabilization. Light from a stable reference laser and several slave lasers is coupled into a confocal Fabry-Pérot resonator. By stabilizing the position of the transmission peaks of the slave lasers relative to successive peaks of the master laser as the length of the cavity is scanned over one free spectral range, the long-term stability of the master laser is transferred to the slave lasers. By using fast analog peak detection and low-latency microcontroller-based digital feedback, with a scanning frequency of 3 kHz, we obtain a feedback bandwidth of 380 Hz and a relative stability of better than 10 kHz at timescales longer than 1 s, a significant improvement on previous scanning-cavity stabilization systems.

  14. Dynamics of vortices and drift waves: a point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    The complex interactions of localized vortices with waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  15. Ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations due to the quasi 2 day wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sheng-Yang; Liu, Han-Li; Li, Tao; Dou, Xiankang

    2015-05-01

    The thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics-general circulation model is utilized to study the vertical E × B drift perturbations due to the westward quasi 2 day wave with zonal wave numbers 2 and 3 (W2 and W3). The simulations show that both wind components contribute directly and significantly to the vertical drift, which is not merely confined to low latitudes. The vertical drifts at the equator induced by the total wind perturbations of W2 are comparable with that at middle latitudes, while the vertical drifts from W3 are much stronger at middle latitudes than at the equator. The ion drift perturbations induced by the zonal and meridional wind perturbations of W2 are nearly in-phase with each other, whereas the phase discrepancies of the ion drift induced by the individual wind component of W3 are much larger. This is because the wind perturbations of W2 and W3 have different latitudinal structures and phases, which result in different ionospheric responses through wind dynamo.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, M.; Kendl, A.

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occurring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  17. On the kinetic stability of magnetic structures in electron drift turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jucker, Martin; Pavlenko, Vladimir P.

    2007-03-15

    The generation of large-scale magnetic fields in magnetic electron drift mode turbulence is investigated. The mechanism of magnetic Reynolds stress is elucidated with the help of kinetic theory, and a sufficient criterion in the form of Nyquist's criterion for the generation of zonal magnetic fields is developed. This criterion is then applied to a narrow wave packet, where an amplitude threshold due to finite width of the wave spectrum in k space is found.

  18. Current-Driven Drift Wave Turbulence and Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Diamond, P. H.; Porkolab, M.

    2009-11-01

    Recent analyses (Y. Lin, M. Porkolab; 2009) have indicated that the ``usual suspects'' for the mechanism of electron thermal transport, such as ITG, ETG, CTEM modes, etc, cannot explain results from modest density, Te>Ti plasmas, in either OH or ECH heating regimes. Interestingly, such plasmas exhibit very large toroidal current drift parameters vd/cs, thus naturally suggesting a re-visitation of current driven drift waves. In this paper, we discuss the linear, quasilinear and non-linear theory of current driven drift waves in tokamaks. Parallel electron velocity scattering, a critical effect beyond the capacity of most, gyrokinetic codes is a major focus of investigations. The coupled transport of current density and heat are considered. Work is ongoing and results will be presented.

  19. A probe array for the investigation of spatio-temporal structures in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Latten, A.; Klinger, T.; Piel, A.; Pierre, T.

    1995-05-01

    A probe array with 64 azimuthally arranged Langmuir probes is presented as a new diagnostic tool for the investigation of drift waves. A parallel data acquisition system provides full spatio-temporal data of azimuthally propagating waves. For both regular and turbulent states of current-driven drift waves, the information provided by such space-time patterns is compared with results obtained from conventional two-point correlation methods. The probe array allows one to directly estimate the time-averaged wave number spectrum. In a turbulent state, the spectrum yields to a power law of {ital S}({ital k}){proportional_to}{ital k}{sup {minus}3.6{plus_minus}0.1}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Models for electrostatic drift waves with density variations along magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, O. E.; Pécseli, H. L.

    2013-11-01

    Drift waves with vertical magnetic fields in gravitational ionospheres are considered where the unperturbed plasma density is enhanced in a magnetic flux tube. The gravitational field gives rise to an overall decrease of plasma density for increasing altitude. Simple models predict that drift waves with finite vertical wave vector components can increase in amplitude merely due to a conservation of energy density flux of the waves. Field-aligned currents are some of the mechanisms that can give rise to fluctuations that are truly unstable. We suggest a self-consistent generator or "battery" mechanism that in the polar ionospheres can give rise to magnetic field-aligned currents even in the absence of electron precipitation. The free energy here is supplied by steady state electric fields imposed in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field in the collisional lower parts of the ionosphere or by neutral winds that have similar effects.

  1. Plasma diffusion at the magnetopause - The case of lower hybrid drift waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treumann, R. A.; Labelle, J.; Pottelette, R.

    1991-01-01

    The diffusion expected from the quasi-linear theory of the lower hybrid drift instability at the earth's magnetopause is recalculated. The resulting diffusion coefficient is marginally large enough to explain the thickness of the boundary layer under quiet conditions, based on observational upper limits for the wave intensities. Thus, one possible model for the boundary layer could involve equilibrium between the diffusion arising from lower hybrid waves and various loss processes.

  2. The Use of the Information Wave Function in a Drift Dependent Option Price: A Simple Example

    SciTech Connect

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2009-03-10

    This paper briefly describes how a drift-dependent option price is obtained, following the work of Tan. We briefly argue how the information wave function concept, which has now been used in various financial settings, can be used in this type of option price.

  3. Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. I. Variational formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-07-15

    A unified theoretical framework is presented for analyzing various branches of drift Alfvén waves and describing their linear and nonlinear behaviors, covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Nonlinear gyrokinetic quasineutrality condition and vorticity equation, derived for drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles in fusion plasmas, are cast in integral form, which is generally variational in the linear limit; and the corresponding gyrokinetic energy principle is obtained. Well known forms of the kinetic energy principle are readily recovered from this general formulation. Furthermore, it is possible to demonstrate that the general fishbone like dispersion relation, obtained within the present theoretical framework, provides a unified description of drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles as either Alfvén eigenmodes or energetic particle modes. The advantage of the present approach stands in its capability of extracting underlying linear and nonlinear physics as well as spatial and temporal scales of the considered fluctuation spectrum. For these reasons, this unified theoretical framework can help understanding experimental observations as well as numerical simulation and analytic results with different levels of approximation. Examples and applications are given in Paper II [F. Zonca and L. Chen, “Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. II. The general fishbone-like dispersion relation,” Phys. Plasmas 21, 072121 (2014)].

  4. Generation of zonal flows by electrostatic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaladze, T. D.; Shad, M.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.

    2010-02-15

    Generation of large-scale zonal flows by comparatively small-scale electrostatic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas is considered. The generation mechanism is based on the parametric excitation of convective cells by finite amplitude drift waves having arbitrary wavelengths (as compared with the ion Larmor radius of plasma ions at the plasma electron temperature). Temperature inhomogeneity of electrons and positrons is taken into account assuming ions to be cold. To describe the generation of zonal flow generalized Hasegawa-Mima equation containing both vector and two scalar (of different nature) nonlinearities is used. A set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of drift waves and zonal flows is deduced. Explicit expressions for the maximum growth rate as well as for the optimal spatial dimensions of the zonal flows are obtained. Enriched possibilities of zonal flow generation with different growth rates are revealed. The present theory can be used for interpretations of drift wave observations in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Dust magneto-gravitational drift wave in g×B configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a magnetized complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate perpendicular to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of magnetized microparticles. The numerical results show that an unstable low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. This unstable mode is transformed into an aperiodic stationary structure at a cut-off wavenumber. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the instability is essentially due to the E×B drift motion of plasma particles. However, in the absence of weak electric field, the g×B drift motion of microparticles can cause the instability in a wide range of wavenumbers. It is also found that by increasing the magnetic field strength, the wave frequency is first increased and then decreased. This behaviour is explained by the existence of an extremum point in the dust magneto-gravitational drift velocity.

  6. The Entropy and Complexity of Drift waves in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birge-Lee, Henry; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Thomas, Sam; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Drift waves grow from noise on a density gradient in a narrow (dia = 3 cm, L = 1.5 m) magnetized (Boz = 160G) plasma column. A two-dimensional probe drive measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data was used to generate the Bandt-Pompe/Shannon entropy, H, and Jensen-Shannon complexity, CJS. C-H diagrams can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos, random noise and stochastic processes and simple waves, which makes it a powerful tool in nonlinear dynamics. The C-H diagram in this experiment, reveal that the combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations is a deterministically chaotic system. The PDF of the time series, the wave spectra the spatial dependence of the entropy wave complexity will be presented. LAPTAG is a university-high school alliance outreach program, which has been in existence for over 20 years. Work done at BaPSF at UCLA and supported by NSF and DOE.

  7. Drift wave model for geomagnetic pulsations in a high. beta. plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, V.L.; Ng, P.H.; Cahill, L.J. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    A dispersion relation for the instability of the coupled drift compressional drift mirror, and shear Alven waves in the magnetospheric plasma is analyzed by numerical method. The analysis is suitable for the storm time plasma conditions in the magnetosphere which usually has gradients in plasma density temperature, magnetic field, and anisotropy in temperature. The effect of high ..beta.. which is characteristic of storm time plasma is included in the model. For a given appropriate set of plasma parameters, and wave parameters of a mode relative wave amplitudes are calculated from the model. A comparison is made of model generated and observed relative wave amplitudes by using two sample wave events observed by Explorer 45 during the August 4--6, 1972, magnetic storm. The quantitative analysis shows good agreement between theory and observations for a gradient-driven Alvenlike instability; however, growth rates are veery small for this mode. The anisotropy-driven drift mirror instability has large growth rates but does not show correlation between theory and observations of relative wave amplitudes.

  8. A Hybrid Statistics/Amplitude Approach to the Theory of Interacting Drift Waves and Zonal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Krommes, John

    2012-10-01

    An approach to the theory of drift-wave--zonal-flow systems is adopted in which only the DW statistics but the full ZF amplitude are kept. Any statistical description of turbulence must inevitably face the closure problem. A particular closure, the Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (SSST), has been recently studied in plasmafootnotetextB. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, Phys. Plasmas 16, 112903 (2009). as well as atmospheric-science contexts. First, the predictions of the SSST are examined in the weakly inhomogeneous limit, using the generalized Hasegawa--Mima model as a simple example. It is found that the equations do not admit a complete solution, as the characteristic ZF scale cannot be calculated. To address that deficiency, an analysis is performed of a bifurcation from a DW-only state to a DW--ZF state in the Hasegawa--Wakatani model in order to gain analytical insight into a nonlinear DW--ZF equilibrium, including prediction of the charactistic scale. The calculation permits discussion of the relative importance of eddy shearing and coupling to damped eigenmodes for the saturation of the self-consistently regulated turbulence level.

  9. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau's unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar's approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel'dovich's approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable.

  10. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar`s approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel`dovich`s approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Long-term stability and zero drift of digital barometric pressure gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, M.; Kobata, T.; Fujii, K.

    2015-04-01

    Several digital pressure gauges at the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) have been calibrated in the barometric pressure range on a regular basis for over ten years. The long-term stability of the zero and span readings for these pressure gauges was evaluated using their historical calibration data. The evaluation showed that most of the gauges have quite good long-term stabilities for the span readings, but some have large zero drifts with rates of about (10 to 50) Pa yr-1. This paper discusses the causes for this drift: it can be explained by the combination of a small leak and gas emissions from the sensor volume, which are estimated from the typical drift rates. The zero drift of a particular gauge is well-approximated by an exponential function of time; the fitting function may give a good estimation of the zero drift in the future. This indicates that continuous characterization of a pressure gauge may enable appropriate correction of the indication and provide users more reliable data with less calibration work.

  12. The role of coherent vorticity in turbulent transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, W. J. T.; Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Schneider, K.

    2008-07-15

    The coherent vortex extraction method, a wavelet technique for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows, is applied to simulations of resistive drift-wave turbulence in magnetized plasma (Hasegawa-Wakatani system). The aim is to retain only the essential degrees of freedom, responsible for the transport. It is shown that the radial density flux is carried by these coherent modes. In the quasi-hydrodynamic regime, coherent vortices exhibit depletion of the polarization-drift nonlinearity and vorticity strongly dominates strain, in contrast to the quasiadiabatic regime.

  13. Parallel-velocity-shear-modified drift wave in negative ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, R.; Kaneko, T.; Hayashi, K.; Tamura, S.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2009-03-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of a parallel velocity shear and negative ions on the collisionless drift wave instability has for the first time been realized by simultaneously using a segmented tungsten hot plate of a Q-machine and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas in a magnetized potassium plasma. The parallel velocity shear of the positive ion flow tends to decrease the fluctuation level of the drift wave. The introduction of negative ions first increases the fluctuation level and then starts to decrease it at the negative ion exchange fraction of around 10%, while keeping the above-mentioned shear effect qualitatively. In addition, a simple dispersion relation based on the local model has been calculated to show that it can predict wave characteristics similar to the experimental results. Our findings provide a potential for gaining a more profound insight into the physics of space/circumterrestrial plasmas.

  14. Impurity transport due to electromagnetic drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Mollén, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2012-03-01

    Finite β effects on impurity transport are studied through local linear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Report No. GA-A26818, 2011]; in particular, we investigate the parametric dependences of the impurity peaking factor (zero-flux density gradient) and the onset of the kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs). We find that electromagnetic effects even at low β can have significant impact on the impurity transport. The KBM instability threshold depends on the plasma parameters, particularly strongly on plasma shape. We have shown that magnetic geometry significantly influences the results, and the commonly used s-α model overestimates the KBM growth rates and ITG stabilization at high β. In the β range, where the KBM is the dominant instability the impurity peaking factor is strongly reduced, with very little dependence on β and the impurity charge.

  15. Asymptotic Linear Stability of Solitary Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pego, Robert L.; Sun, Shu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    We prove an asymptotic stability result for the water wave equations linearized around small solitary waves. The equations we consider govern irrotational flow of a fluid with constant density bounded below by a rigid horizontal bottom and above by a free surface under the influence of gravity neglecting surface tension. For sufficiently small amplitude waves, with waveform well-approximated by the well-known sech-squared shape of the KdV soliton, solutions of the linearized equations decay at an exponential rate in an energy norm with exponential weight translated with the wave profile. This holds for all solutions with no component in (that is, symplectically orthogonal to) the two-dimensional neutral-mode space arising from infinitesimal translational and wave-speed variation of solitary waves. We also obtain spectral stability in an unweighted energy norm.

  16. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  17. A link between nonlinear self-organization and dissipation in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Stroth, U.; Ramisch, M.

    2012-08-15

    Structure formation and self-organization in two-dimensional drift-wave turbulence show up in many different faces. Fluctuation data from a magnetized plasma are analyzed and three mechanisms transferring kinetic energy to large-scale structures are identified. Beside the common vortex merger, clustering of vortices constituting a large-scale strain field and vortex thinning, where due to the interactions of vortices of different scales larger vortices are amplified by the smaller ones, are observed. The vortex thinning mechanism appears to be the most efficient one to generate large scale structures in drift-wave turbulence. Vortex merging as well as vortex clustering are accompanied by strong energy transfer to small-scale noncoherent fluctuations (dissipation) balancing the negative entropy generation due to the self-organization process.

  18. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  19. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-15

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  20. Shear flow driven drift waves and the counter-rotating vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown that the drift waves can become unstable due to the shear flow produced by externally applied electric field. The modified Rayleigh instability condition is obtained which is applicable to both electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is proposed that the shear flow driven drift waves can be responsible for large amplitude electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak edges. In the nonlinear regime the stationary structures may appear in electron-positron-ion plasmas as well as electron-ion plasmas. A particular form of the shear flow can give rise to counter-rotating dipole vortices and vortex chains. The speed and amplitude of the structures are affected by the presence of positrons in the electron ion plasma. The relevance of this investigation to laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is pointed out.

  1. Spatiotemporal control and synchronization of flute modes and drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Bonhomme, G.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-05-15

    An open-loop spatiotemporal synchronization method is applied to flute modes in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. It is demonstrated that synchronization can be achieved only if the exciter signal rotates in the same direction as the propagating mode. Moreover, the efficiency of the synchronization is shown to depend on the radial properties of the instability under consideration. It is also demonstrated that the control disposition can alternatively be used to produce strongly developed turbulence of drift waves or flute instabilities.

  2. Kinetic vortex chain solution in the drift-wave plasma regime

    PubMed

    Jovanovic; Pegoraro

    2000-01-01

    A fully nonlinear Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal stationary solution is found in the form of a quasi-three-dimensional chain of electron holes coupled to hydrodynamic vortices. This new coherent structure is enabled by the trapping and depletion of resonant particles, and the cyclotron dissipation of the singular current sheets. It is expected to play an important role in the collisionless magnetic field line reconnection in the drift-wave plasma regime, where it represents a plausible saturated state. PMID:11015843

  3. Observation of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Interactions in a Drift-Wave Streamer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Inagaki, S.; Kamataki, K.; Yagi, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.; Arakawa, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2010-11-26

    A streamer, which is a bunching of drift-wave fluctuations, and its mediator, which generates the streamer by coupling with other fluctuations, have been observed in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. Their radial structures were investigated in detail by using the biphase analysis. Their quasi-two-dimensional structures were revealed to be equivalent with a pair of fast and slow modes predicted by a nonlinear Schroedinger equation based on the Hasegawa-Mima model.

  4. Drifts of a three-axis stabilizer under vibration of the frames and platform with unbalanced dynamically tuned gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbrutskii, A. V.; Sarapulov, S. A.

    1985-10-01

    It is shown that the unbalance of a dynamically tuned gyro, leading to gyro self-excitation through vibration of the platform in a gimball suspension, causes drifts of the stabilizer. The magnitude of the drift depends on the gyro balancing precision, the location of gyros on the platform, and the relationship between the moments of inertia of the suspension elements, the precision of the adjustment, and the ultimate rigidity of the platform. Ways to reduce the drifts of the system are examined.

  5. An analysis of the role of drift waves in equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labelle, J.; Kelley, M. C.; Seyler, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of results of rocket measurements of the wave number spectrum of equatorial spread F irregularities, with emphasis on wavelengths less than 100 m. The measurements were made from two sounding rockets launched from Peru as part of Project Condor. The Condor density fluctuation spectra display a break at a wavelength near 100 m, identical to that found in the PLUMEX experiment (Kelley et al., 1982). The Condor data also confirm a subrange in which the density and the wave potential obey the Boltzmann relation - a strong indication of the presence of low-frequency electrostatic waves with finite wavelength parallel to the magnetic field, perhaps low-frequency drift waves as proposed by Kelley et al. The Condor data are also consistent with the previous conjecture that drift waves only exist above 300 km altitude. To investigate the difference in spectra observed over two altitude ranges, the data must be fitted to a form for the power spectrum taken from Keskinen and Ossakow (1981). The fitted spectrum, along with empirically determined growth and dissipation rates, is used to calculate the energy pumped into the spectrum at long wavelengths as well as the energy dissipated at shorter wavelengths. It is found that the energy is balanced by classical collisional effects in the low-altitude case, but energy balance in the high-altitude case requires an enhanced dissipation of about 500 times that due to classical diffusion. The model is consistent with, but does not uniquely imply, an inverse cascade of drift wave turbulence in equatorial spread F.

  6. Anatomy of Drift Ridges Revealed by Shallow Seismic Shear Wave Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. C.

    2005-12-01

    Ridges, up to 30 m high and generally oriented NE-SW across the Illinois Episode drift plain in southern Illinois, USA, have been variously interpreted as eskers, crevasse fills, moraines, and kames. The ice contact diamictons and sorted sediments that occur in these ridges are typically Illinois Episode in age and likely record the final melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet near its southernmost extent in the continental U.S. Shallow shear wave seismic profiles across several of these ridges help reveal their complex origins. Borehole control includes sediment cores with shear wave and natural gamma logs. The shear wave profiles reveal m-scale features of drift and bedrock over a depth range of 1 up to 100 m. Terrapin Ridge overlies a bedrock valley with drift up to 70 m thick. Dipping seismic reflectors on the stoss side are interpreted as imbricated till sheets, whereas horizontal reflectors on the lee side are interpreted as mainly outwash sediments over basal till and glacilacustrine sediment. Although most ridges were probably formed during the Illinois Episode, based on current data, the core of this particular ridge may be a remnant moraine from a pre-Illinois Episode glaciation.

  7. Simulating the effects of stellarator geometry on gyrokinetic drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertel, Jessica Ann

    Nuclear fusion is a clean, safe form of energy with abundant fuel. In magnetic fusion energy (MFE) experiments, the plasma fuel is confined by magnetic fields at very high temperatures and densities. One fusion reactor design is the non-axisymmetric, torus-shaped stellarator. Its fully-3D fields have advantages over the simpler, better-understood axisymmetric tokamak, including the ability to optimize magnetic configurations for desired properties, such as lower transport (longer confinement time). Turbulence in the plasma can break MFE confinement. While turbulent transport is known to cause a significant amount of heat loss in tokamaks, it is a new area of research in stellarators. Gyrokinetics is a good mathematical model of the drift-wave instabilities that cause turbulence. Multiple gyrokinetic turbulence codes that had great success comparing to tokamak experiments are being converted for use with stellarator geometry. This thesis describes such adaptations of the gyrokinetic turbulence code, GS2. Herein a new computational grid generator and upgrades to GS2 itself are described, tested, and benchmarked against three other gyrokinetic codes. Using GS2, detailed linear studies using the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry were conducted. The first compares stability in two equilibria with different β=(plasma pressure)/(magnetic pressure). Overall, the higher β case was more stable than the lower β case. As high β is important for MFE experiments, this is encouraging. The second compares NCSX linear stability to a tokamak case. NCSX was more stable with a 20% higher critical temperature gradient normalized by the minor radius, suggesting that the fusion power might be enhanced by ˜ 50%. In addition, the first nonlinear, non-axisymmetric GS2 simulations are presented. Finally, linear stability of two locations in a W7-AS plasma were compared. The experimentally-measured parameters used were from a W7-AS shot in which measured heat fluxes

  8. Observation of anomalous ion heating by broadband drift-wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Enge, S; Birkenmeier, G; Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2010-10-22

    Using laser induced fluorescence and passive spectroscopy on a magnetically confined low-temperature plasma, anomalous ion heating is observed which exceeds collisional heating from the electrons by a factor of up to five. Direct wave heating due to the 2.45 GHz microwave as well as stochastic heating by large-amplitude fluctuations could be ruled out as explanations. Good quantitative agreement is found when comparing the missing power in the ion species with heating power due to the dissipation of drift-wave turbulence. This turbulent energy transfer into the ion channel could have important consequences for the interpretation of transport in fusion plasmas. PMID:21231054

  9. Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.

    1958-01-01

    Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles.

  10. Coupled nonlinear drift and ion acoustic waves in dense dissipative electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-11-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) quantum magnetoplasma with neutrals in the background using the well known quantum hydrodynamic model. In this regard, Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equations are obtained. Furthermore, the solutions of KdVB and KPB equations are presented by using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation in the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and the ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v{sub *}/u, is also investigated. It is found that increasing the positron concentration and collision frequency decreases the strength of the shock. It is also shown that when the localized structure propagates with velocity greater than the diamagnetic drift velocity (i.e., u>v{sub *}), the shock strength decreases. However, the shock strength is observed to increase when the localized structure propagates with velocity less than that of drift velocity (i.e., u

  11. On the onset of surface wind drift at short fetches as observed in a wind wave flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Robles, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Ocean surface drift is of great relevance to properly model wind waves and specially the early stages of surface waves development and ocean-atmosphere fluxes during incipient wind events and storms. In particular, wave models are not so accurate predicting wave behaviour at short fetches, where wind drift onset might be very important. The onset of surface drift induced by wind and waves is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide reference information to the corresponding surface drift onset recorded at rather short non-dimensional fetches. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Surface drift values were up to 0.5 cm/s for the highest wind while very distinctive shear was detected in the upper 1.5 cm. Rather linear variation of surface drift was observed with depth. Evolution of the surface drift velocity is analysed and onset behaviour is addressed with particular emphasis in accelerated winds. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from ANUIES-ECOS M09-U01 project, CONACYT-187112 Estancia Sabática, and Institute Carnot, is greatly acknowledged.

  12. Stability of post-fertilization traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Gilberto; Plaza, Ramón G.

    This paper studies the stability of a family of traveling wave solutions to the system proposed by Lane et al. [D.C. Lane, J.D. Murray, V.S. Manoranjan, Analysis of wave phenomena in a morphogenetic mechanochemical model and an application to post-fertilization waves on eggs, IMA J. Math. Appl. Med. Biol. 4 (4) (1987) 309-331], to model a pair of mechanochemical phenomena known as post-fertilization waves on eggs. The waves consist of an elastic deformation pulse on the egg's surface, and a free calcium concentration front. The family is indexed by a coupling parameter measuring contraction stress effects on the calcium concentration. This work establishes the spectral, linear and nonlinear orbital stability of these post-fertilization waves for small values of the coupling parameter. The usual methods for the spectral and evolution equations cannot be applied because of the presence of mixed partial derivatives in the elastic equation. Nonetheless, exponential decay of the directly constructed semigroup on the complement of the zero eigenspace is established. We show that small perturbations of the waves yield solutions to the nonlinear equations decaying exponentially to a phase-modulated traveling wave.

  13. Effects of dust correlations on the marginal stability of ion stream driven dust acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Manish K.; Avinash, K.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of dust–dust correlations on the marginal stability of dust acoustic waves excited by ion drift is studied. The ion drift is driven by the electric field {E}0 which is generally present in the discharge. Correlation effects on marginal stability are studied using augmented Debye–Hückel approximation. The marginal stability boundary is calculated in {E}0-{P}0 (P 0 is the pressure of the neutral gas) space with correlated dust grains. We show that due to dust-dust correlation the stability boundary moves into the unstable region thereby stabilizing the DAW. The effects are significant for smaller values of κ (=a/{λ }d) below unity (a is the mean particle distance and {λ }d is Debye length).

  14. Electrostatic drift waves in a 2D magnetic current sheet - a new kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.; Tur, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons has been proposed for several years. Fruit et al. 2013 already used it to investigate the possibilities for electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations.It turns out that some corrections should be added to the electrostatic version of Fruit et al. 2013. We propose to revist the theory in this present paper.Starting with a modified 2D Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electrostatic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electrostatic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition.The new feature of the present model is the inclusion of diamagnetic drift effects due to the density gradient in the tail. It is well known in MHD theory that drift waves are driven unstable through collisions or other dissipative effects. Here electrostatic drift waves are revisited in this more complete kinetic model including bouncing electrons and finite Larmor radius effects. A new mode has been found with original propagation proprieties. It is moreover mildly unstable due to electron or ion damping (dissipative instability).

  15. Transition from flute modes to drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Bonhomme, G.

    2005-06-15

    Recent experiments performed on the low {beta} plasma device Mirabelle [T. Pierre, G. Leclert, and F. Braun, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 6 (1987)] using a limiter have shown that transitions between various gradient driven instabilities occurred on increasing the magnetic field strength. New thorough measurements allow to identify unambiguously three instability regimes. At low magnetic field the strong ExB velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, whereas at high magnetic field drift waves are only observed. A centrifugal (Rayleigh-Taylor) instability is also observed in between when the ExB velocity is shearless and strong enough. A close connection is made between the ratio {rho}{sub s}/L{sub perpendicular} of the drift parameter to the radial density gradient length and each instability regime.

  16. Kinetic Electron Closures for Electromagnetic Simulation of Drift and Shear-Alfven Waves (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Dimits, A M; Nevins, W M; Chen, Y; Parker, S

    2001-10-11

    An electromagnetic hybrid scheme (fluid electrons and gyrokinetic ions) is elaborated in example calculations and extended to toroidal geometry. The scheme includes a kinetic electron closure valid for {beta}{sub e} > m{sub e}/m{sub i} ({beta}{sub e} is the ratio of the plasma electron pressure to the magnetic field energy density). The new scheme incorporates partially linearized ({delta}f) drift-kinetic electrons whose pressure and number density moments are used to close the fluid momentum equation for the electron fluid (Ohm's law). The test cases used are small-amplitude kinetic shear-Alfven waves with electron Landau damping, the ion-temperature-gradient instability, and the collisionless drift instability (universal mode) in an unsheared slab as a function of the plasma {beta}{sub e}. Attention is given to resolution and convergence issues in simulations of turbulent steady states.

  17. Effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth on Stokes drift estimation based on short-term variation of wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Wang, Hong; Holmedal, Lars Erik

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes drift represents an important transport component of ocean circulation models. Locally it is responsible for transport of e.g. contaminated ballast water from ships, oil spills, plankton and larvae. It also plays an important role in mixing processes across the interphase between the atmosphere and the ocean. The Stokes drift is the mean Lagrangian velocity obtained from the water particle trajectory in the wave propagation direction; it is maximum at the surface, decreasing rapidly with the depth below the surface. The total mean mass transport is obtained by integrating the Stokes drift over the water depth; this is also referred to as the volume Stokes transport. The paper provides a simple analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth based on short-term variation of wave conditions. This is achieved by using a joint distribution of individual wave heights and wave periods together with an explicit solution of the wave dispersion equation. The mean values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport for individual random waves within a sea state are presented, and the effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth parameter are discussed. Furthermore, example of results corresponding to typical field conditions are presented to demonstrate the application of the method, including the Stokes drift profile in the water column beneath the surface. Thus, the present analytical method can be used to estimate the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth for random waves within a sea state based on available wave statistics.

  18. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and it is well known that turbulence couples energy input to dissipation by cascade processes. Plasma turbulence play a critical role in tokamak confinement. Magnetized plasma turbulence is quasi 2D, anisotropic, wave like and two fluid (i.e. electrons and ions) in structure. Thus, weakly collisional plasma turbulence can mediate electron and ion energy transfer. The issue of anomalous electron and ion energy coupling is particularly important for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER. In this work, we reconsider the classic problem of turbulent heating and energy transfer pathways in drift wave turbulence. The total turbulent heating, composed of quasilinear electron cooling, quasilinear ion heating, nonlinear ion heating and zonal flow frictional heating, is analyzed. In Chapter 2, the electron and ion energy exchange via linear wave and particle resonance will be computed. To address net heating, we show the turbulent heating in an annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential across this region. We show this net heating is proportional to the Reynolds work on the zonal flow. Zonal flow friction heats ions, thus the turbulence and zonal flow interaction enters as an important energy transfer channel. Since zonal flows are nonlinearly generated, it follows that we should apply weak turbulence theory to calculate the nonlinear ion turbulent heating via the virtual mode resonance in the electron drift wave turbulence, which will be discussed in Chapter 3. We defines a new collisionless turbulent energy transfer channel through nonlinear Landau damping in the electron and ion energy coupling process. The result shows that nonlinear ion heating can exceed quasilinear ion heating, so that nonlinear heating becomes the principal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel in electron drift wave turbulence. This follows since the beat mode resonates with the bulk of the ion distribution, in

  19. Anomalous perturbative transport in tokamaks due to drift-Alfven-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Thoul, A.A. ); Similon, P.L. ); Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-03-01

    The method developed in Thoul, Similon, and Sudan [Phys. Plasmas [bold 1], 579 (1994)] is used to calculate the transport due to drift-Alfven-wave turbulence, in which electromagnetic effects such as the fluttering of the magnetic field lines are important. Explicit expressions are obtained for all coefficients of the anomalous transport matrix relating particle and heat fluxes to density and temperature gradients in the plasma. Although the magnetic terms leave the transport by trapped electrons unaffected, they are important for the transport by circulating electrons.

  20. Stability evaluation of the Panel 1 rooms and the E140 drift at WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Maleki, H.; Chaturvedi, L.

    1996-08-01

    WIPP, intended for underground permanent disposal of defense transuranic waste, is located 40 km east of Carlsbad at a depth of 655 m in the salt beds of the 600-m thick Permian Salado Formation. It will consist of 56 ``rooms`` each 91.5 m long, 10 m wide, and 4 m high, grouped in 8 ``panels`` of 7 rooms each. About 7.5 km of access drifts will also be provided. Excavation began in 1982 and surface/access/test facilities and one panel were completed by 1988, many years before it could be used. Current plans are to start emplacing waste in WIPP in 1998 and continue for 35 years. The north- south drift E140 is the widest (25 ft) of the four main north-south drifts and is the main north-south passage. Plans to conduct experiments with waste in 1993 were abandoned, and the plan now is to use panel 1 for permanent disposal of waste starting in 1998. The stability evaluation resulted in the conclusion that, while it would be possible to safely use portions of panel 1 for waste emplacement, it would be best to abandon panel 1 and mine a new panel after the decision has been made to use WIPP as a repository and the necessary permits obtained.

  1. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza; Ramberger, Suitbert

    2016-04-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TSn' is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN's Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100 %/MHz down to ±3 %/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1 %/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  2. Possible inverse cascade behavior for drift-wave turbulence. [in plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Montgomery, D.

    1979-01-01

    The turbulent spectral properties of the dynamical equation of Hasegawa and Mima (1978) governing the evolution of the electrostatic potential in drift-wave turbulence is investigated for two formulations of the problem: (1) as a nondissipative initial value problem, with the potential represented by a truncated Fourier series with large number of terms, and (2) as a dissipative problem with a small viscous dissipation at very short spatial scales, and a long wavelength forcing term at longer wavelengths. It is found that Hasegawa and Mima's prediction for the nondissipative, truncated initial value modal problem is accurate, but substantial differences exist for the forced dissipative case between computer results and analytical predictions based on a wave kinetic equation of Kadomtsev. Much better agreement is found with a simple dual-cascade model based on Kraichnan's generalization of Kolmogorov's cascade arguments.

  3. Spontaneous profile self-organization in a simple realization of drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Ashourvan, A.; Thakur, S. C.; Hong, R.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of a transport bifurcation that occurs by spontaneous self-organization of a drift-wave and shear flow system in a linear plasma device. As we increase the magnetic field above a threshold ( BC r = 1200 G), a global transition occurs, with steepening of mean density and ion pressure profiles, onset of strong E ×B shearing, a reduction of turbulence, and improved turbulent radial particle transport. An abrupt transition appears in the graph of turbulent particle flux versus density gradient. Hysteresis in the density gradient further confirms this transport bifurcation. The total Reynolds work on the flow sharply increases above threshold. This correlates with the increase of density steepness, which suggests the Reynolds stress-driven flow that plays an essential role in density steepening and transport bifurcation. A change in turbulence feature from drift waves (DWs) to a mix of DWs and ion temperature gradients also coincides with the transport bifurcation. Interesting phenomena related to the transport bifurcation are also reported; a local inward particle flux, the co-existence of ion and electron features, and a self-sustained axial flow absent momentum input.

  4. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on secondary structures in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-08-15

    Recent experiments showed a decrease of long range correlations during the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) [Y. Xu et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 063020 (2011)]. This finding suggests that RMPs damp zonal flows. To elucidate the effect of the RMPs on zonal structures in drift wave turbulence, we construct a generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model including RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large RMP amplitude. A predator-prey model coupling the primary drift wave dynamics to the zonal modes evolution is derived. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. The novel regime has a power threshold which increases with RMP amplitude as {gamma}{sub c}{approx}[({delta}B{sub r}/B)]{sup 2}.

  5. Intended motion estimation using fuzzy Kalman filtering for UAV image stabilization with large drifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Tiantian; Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Lu

    2015-03-01

    Videos from a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are always unstable because of the wobble of the vehicle and the impact of surroundings, especially when the motion has a large drifting. Electronic image stabilization aims at removing the unwanted wobble and obtaining the stable video. Then estimation of intended motion, which represents the tendency of global motion, becomes the key to image stabilization. It is usually impossible for general methods of intended motion estimation to obtain stable intended motion remaining as much information of video images and getting a path as much close to the real flying path at the same time. This paper proposed a fuzzy Kalman filtering method to estimate the intended motion to solve these problems. Comparing with traditional methods, the fuzzy Kalman filtering method can achieve better effect to estimate the intended motion.

  6. Resolving Structural Isomers of Monosaccharide Methyl Glycosides Using Drift Tube and Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Giles, Kevin; Bendiak, Brad; Kaplan, Kimberly; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    Monosaccharide structural isomers including sixteen methyl-D-glycopyranosides and four methyl-N-acetylhexosamines were subjected to ion mobility measurements by electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. Two ion mobility-MS systems were employed: atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a Synapt G2 HDMS system which incorporates a low pressure traveling wave ion mobility separator. All the compounds were investigated as [M+Na]+ ions in the positive mode. A majority of the monosaccharide structural isomers exhibited different mobility drift times in either system, depending on differences in their anomeric and stereochemical configurations. In general, drift time patterns (relative drift times of isomers) matched between the two instruments. Higher resolving power was observed using the atmospheric pressure drift tube. Collision cross section values of monosaccharide structural isomers were directly calculated from the atmospheric pressure ion mobility experiments and a collision cross section calibration curve was made for the traveling wave ion mobility instrument. Overall, it was demonstrated that ion mobility-mass spectrometry using either drift tube or traveling wave ion mobility is a valuable technique for resolving subtle variations in stereochemistry among the sodium adducts of monosaccharide methyl glycosides. PMID:22339760

  7. Kinetic water-bag model of global collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient instabilities in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gravier, E.; Plaut, E.

    2013-04-15

    Collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities are studied using a linear water-bag kinetic model [P. Morel et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 112109 (2007)]. An efficient spectral method, already validated in the case of drift waves instabilities [E. Gravier et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 67, 7 (2013)], allows a fast solving of the global linear problem in cylindrical geometry. The comparison between the linear ITG instability properties thus computed and the ones given by the COLUMBIA experiment [R. G. Greaves et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 34, 1253 (1992)] shows a qualitative agreement. Moreover, the transition between collisional drift waves and ITG instabilities is studied theoretically as a function of the ion temperature profile.

  8. Reduction effect of neutral density on the excitation of turbulent drift waves in a linear magnetized plasma with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Saitou, Y.; Yonesu, A.; Shinohara, S.; Ignatenko, M. V.; Kasuya, N.; Kawaguchi, M.; Terasaka, K.; Nishijima, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Azumi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2007-07-15

    The importance of reducing the neutral density to reach strong drift wave turbulence is clarified from the results of the extended magnetohydrodynamics and Monte Carlo simulations in a linear magnetized plasma. An upper bound of the neutral density relating to the ion-neutral collision frequency for the excitation of drift wave instability is shown, and the necessary flow velocity to excite this instability is also estimated from the neutral distributions. Measurements of the Mach number and the electron density distributions using Mach probe in the large mirror device (LMD) of Kyushu University [S. Shinohara et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37, 1015 (1995)] are reported as well. The obtained results show a controllability of the neutral density and provide the basis for neutral density reduction and a possibility to excite strong drift wave turbulence in the LMD.

  9. Fast and Ultra-fast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett Marques Brum, C.; Abdu, M. A.; Batista, P. P.; Gurubaran, S.; Pancheva, D.; Bageston, J. V.; Batista, I. S.; Takahashi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating Fast (FK) and Ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubbles irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium Frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with TIMED/SABER temperature in the 40 km - 100 km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisondes operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of the both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (~10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electro dynamic coupling process as responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/ plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day-to-day variability of the ESF in its occurrence season.

  10. Fast and ultrafast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Brum, Christiano GM; Batista, Paulo P.; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Pancheva, Dora; Bageston, Jose V.; Batista, Inez S.; Takahashi, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating fast (FK) and ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubble irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (TIMED/SABER) temperature in the 40- to 100-km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisonde (Lowell Digisonde International, LLC, Lowell, MA, USA) operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (approximately 10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electrodynamic coupling process as being responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK-induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day

  11. Seismic architecture and morphology of Neogenic sediment waves and drifts, offshore West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglioni, Luca; Bonamini, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    The three dimension visualisation softwares of seismic data and the recent development of semi-automatic interpretation tools allow to define the 3D morphology of ancient depositional systems at a resolution never achieved before. This study analyses a Neogenic stratigraphic interval in the deep water of the West African margin. The purpose of the work is the understanding of the sedimentary architectures and the link with the genetic depositional processes. The study is mainly based on the interpretation of seismic geometries and amplitude/isochron maps derived from newly-interpreted seismic horizons. The seismic stratigraphy reveals abrupt changes in depositional styles and sedimentary processes. Transitions between Sediment Drifts (SD), Sediment Waves (SWs) and Mass Transport Complexes (MTCs) are here frequently observed, suggesting that cyclically either bottom-current intensity decreased or gravity-flow input overwhelmed the bottom-current signal. The lower studied interval corresponds to a SD sequence, made up of stacked individual packages and having a maximum thickness of 300 ms. The landward drift morphology is characterized by convex-upward, mounded seismic reflections. Each drift onlaps on a seaward-dipping reflection interpreted as paleo-slope. These contouritic deposits are concentrated near the base of slope, and fade out downdip. The drift appears to be grown from the deeper part of the basin and backstepped up the slope. It is inferred that the deposition of the drifts took place under the influence of a marine current, subparallel to the southern margin of West African coast. The backstepping of the onlapping architecture may have resulted from bottom current acceleration across the ramp. The intermediate studied interval represents a transitional sequence in which SW are alternated with MTDs of minor size (up to 60 ms thick). In this transition interval, onlap relationships and thickness variations suggest that gravity flow deposits preferentially

  12. Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-08-15

    We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

  13. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-04-01

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  14. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-04-15

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  15. Drift-Alfven wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-06-15

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfven waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28x0.24 ion sound-gyroradii {rho}{sub s}=c{sub s}/{omega}{sub ci}. The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k{sub perpendicular}{rho}{sub s}{approx}0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  16. A mini-max principle for drift waves and mesoscale fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2011-01-01

    A mini-max principle for the system of the drift waves and mesoscale fluctuations (e.g. zonal flows, etc) is studied. For the system of model equations a Lyapunov function is constructed, which takes the minimum when the stationary state is realized. The dynamical evolution describes the access to the state that is realized. The competition between different mesoscale fluctuations is explained. The origins of irreversibility that cause an approach to the stationary state are discussed. A selection rule among fluctuations is derived, and conditions, under which different kinds of mesocale fluctuations coexist, are investigated. An analogy of this minimum principle to the principle of 'minimum Helmholtz free energy' in thermal equilibrium is shown.

  17. Anomalous perturbative transport in tokamaks due to drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Thoul, A.A. ); Similon, P.L. ); Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-03-01

    A new method for calculating the anomalous transport in tokamak plasmas is presented. The renormalized nonlinear plasma response function is derived using the direct-interaction approximation (DIA). A complete calculation for the case of electrostatic drift-wave turbulence is presented. Explicit expressions for all coefficients of the anomalous transport matrix relating particle and heat fluxes to density and temperature gradients in the plasma are obtained. The anomalous transport matrix calculated using the DIA does not have the Onsager symmetry. As an example of application, the parameters of the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) [Nucl. Technol. Fusion [bold 1], 479 (1981)] are used to evaluate all transport coefficients numerically, as well as the spectrum modulation. The relation between the theoretical results and the experimental data is discussed. Although this paper focuses on electron transport for simplicity, the method can also be used to calculate anomalous transport due to ion instabilities, such as the ion-temperature-gradient instability.

  18. Small scale coherent vortex generation in drift wave-zonal flow turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z. B. Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-12-15

    We present a paradigm for the generation of small scale coherent vortex (SSCV) in drift wave-zonal flow (DW-ZF) turbulence. We demonstrate that phases of DWs can couple coherently, mediated by the ZF shearing. A SSCV is formed when the phases of the DWs are “attracted” to form a stable “phase cluster.” We show that the ZF shearing induces asymmetry between “attractive” and “repulsive” phase couplings, so that a net attractive phase coupling results. The turbulent DWs will (partially)synchronize into a stable SSCV at locations, where the attractive phase coupling induced by the ZF shearing exceeds the “detuning” effects by the DW dispersion and random phase scattering. We also discuss the “self-binding” effect of the newly formed SSCV.

  19. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Zonca, F.

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  20. ECE Imaging of Temperature Fluctuations and Drift Waves in DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemedkun, Samuel; Munsat, Tobin; Tobias, Benjamin; Luhmann, Neville; Domier, Calvin

    2012-10-01

    Recent observations of 2-D turbulent structures have been performed with the ECEI instrument on DIII-D. The experiments were performed in NBI and ECH-heated plasmas, over a range of external heating power. Correlation techniques similar to those used in Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission (CECE) systems are employed, with the advantage that the ECEI system detects a full 2-D array of plasma locations: vertical separation is provided by an optical system and horizontal separation is provided by frequency discrimination in the detection electronics. Among the results are 2-D images of poloidally-propagating drift-waves, and correlation properties of fluctuations (<200 kHz) in both the radial and poloidal directions. Scaling and parameter dependencies on plasma and heating conditions will be presented. In addition to the physics results, the data demonstrates the viability of the ECEI system in the presence of ECH heating, which will also be discussed.

  1. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Martinell, J.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B

    2013-01-01

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E x B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E x B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E x B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  2. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Martinell, Julio J.; Castillo-Negrete, Diego del

    2013-02-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E Multiplication-Sign B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E Multiplication-Sign B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E Multiplication-Sign B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  3. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-15

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓ{sub c}, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓ{sub c} are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  4. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓc, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓc are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  5. Density-dependence, Drift and Disturbance: Feedbacks and Interactions Between Hydraulics, Bed Stability and Invertebrates in a Sandy Gravel-bed River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbins, C. N.; Vericat, D.; Batalla, R.

    2008-12-01

    Whether invertebrate drift is dependent on benthic density or not remains a key but unresolved question in stream ecology. Downstream drift is important not only because voluntary entry into the water column is one of the main ways in which invertebrates can affect their redistribution, but because involuntary drift during floods is a very obvious cause of disturbance to benthic communities. Moreover, drifting invertebrates are an important source of food for many fish and so drift influences wider ecosystem processes. Despite its importance, a number of issues related to drift remain unclear and/or contentious; notable amongst these is the issue of whether drift rates depend on benthic density (i.e. whether drift is density-dependent). In this paper we assess whether channel hydraulics and bed stability affect the density-dependence of drift. We use a portable flume to manipulate hydraulic conditions in a section of river with contrasting sediment sizes, levels of bed stability and benthic densities and assess the drift responses of invertebrates. We describe the interactions and feedbacks between benthic invertebrate density, drift losses and substrate stability, focusing particularly on whether drift changes from being density dependent to independent once bed material is mobilized during flood events. The paper emphasizes the importance of substrate size and stability both for benthic assemblages and the magnitude of drift losses during periods of physical disturbance. It argues that large scale loss of animals from the bed can occur rapidly during small floods and even minor discharge fluctuations, such that exhaustion of the benthic source pool affects subsequent drift losses. Local (within- reach) differences in sediment sizes, bed structure and substrate stability influence the dependence of drift on benthic density.

  6. Selecting, Characterizing, and Acting on Drift Waves and Flute Modes Turbulence in a Low-{beta} Magnetized Plasma Column

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, G.; Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-01-15

    We report on experiments performed on the low-{beta} plasma device MIRABELLE. Using a limiter, we recently observed that when increasing the magnetic field strength transitions between various gradient driven instabilities occur. New thorough measurements allow to identify unambiguously three instability regimes. At low magnetic field the strong ErxB velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, whereas at high magnetic field drift waves are only observed. A centrifugal (Rayleigh-Taylor) instability is also observed in between when the poloidal velocity field is shearless and strong enough. A close connection is made between the ratio {rho}s /L perpendicular of the drift parameter to the radial density gradient length and each instability regime. The transition scenario from regular waves to turbulence was experimentally investigated. As for drift waves the transition from regular state to spatio-temporal chaos and turbulence follows the quasi-periodicity (or Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse) route. Eventually we present new results on the efficiency of control and synchronization methods on Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor spatio-temporal chaos in comparison with drift waves.

  7. Estimates of Lagrangian particle transport by wave groups: forward transport by Stokes drift and backward transport by the return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton S.; Taylor, Paul H.

    2014-11-01

    Although the literature has examined Stokes drift, the net Lagrangian transport by particles due to of surface gravity waves, in great detail, the motion of fluid particles transported by surface gravity wave groups has received considerably less attention. In practice nevertheless, the wave field on the open sea often has a group-like structure. The motion of particles is different, as particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. We use WKB theory to study the variation of the Lagrangian transport by the return current with depth distinguishing two-dimensional seas, three-dimensional seas, infinite depth and finite depth. We then provide dimensional estimates of the net horizontal Lagrangian transport by the Stokes drift on the one hand and the return flow on the other hand for realistic sea states in all four cases. Finally we propose a simple scaling relationship for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current.

  8. Precursor wave structure, prereversal vertical drift, and their relative roles in the development of post sunset equatorial spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil; Sobral, José; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of large-scale wave structure in the equatorial bottomside F region that are present during daytime as precursor to post sunset development of the spread F/plasma bubble irregularities are investigated in this paper. Digisonde data from three equatorial sites in Brazil (Fortaleza, Sao Luis and Cachimbo) for a period of few months at low to medium/high solar activity phases are analyzed. Small amplitude oscillations in the F layer true heights, representing wave structure in polarization electric field, are identified as upward propagating gravity waves having zonal scale of a few hundred kilometers. Their amplitudes undergo amplification towards sunset, and depending on the amplitude of the prereversal vertical drift (PRE) they may lead to post sunset generation of ESF/plasma bubble irregularities. On days of their larger amplitudes they appear to occur in phase coherence on all days, and correspondingly the PRE vertical drift velocities are larger than on days of the smaller amplitudes of the wave structure that appear at random phase on the different days. The sustenance of these precursor waves structures is supported by the relatively large ratio (approaching unity) of the F region-to- total field line integrated Pedersen conductivities as calculated using the SUPIM simulation of the low latitude ionosphere. This study examines the role of the wave structure relative to that of the prereversal vertical drift in the post sunset spread F irregularity development.

  9. Reentrant stability of BEC standing wave patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Kalas, Ryan M; Solenov, Dmitry; Timmermans, Eddy M

    2009-01-01

    We describe standing wave patterns induced by an attractive finite-ranged external potential in a large Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC). As the potential depth increases, the time independent Gross-Pitaevskii equation develops pairs of solutions that have nodes in their wavefunction. We elucidate the nature of these states and study their dynamical stability. Although we study the problem in a two-dimensional BEC subject to a cylindrically symmetric square-well potential of a radius that is comparable to the coherence length of the BEC, our analysis reveals general trends, valid in two and three dimensions, independent of the symmetry of the localized potential well, and suggestive of the behavior in general, short- and large-range potentials. One set of nodal BEC wavefunctions resembles the single particle n node bound state wavefunction of the potential well, the other wavefunctions resemble the n - 1 node bound-state wavefunction with a kink state pinned by the potential. The second state, though corresponding to the lower free energy value of the pair of n node BEC states, is always unstable, whereas the first can be dynamically stable in intervals of the potential well depth, implying that the standing wave BEC can evolve from a dynamically unstable to stable, and back to unstable status as the potential well is adiabatically deepened, a phenomenon that we refer to as 'reentrant dynamical stability'.

  10. Drift and diffusion of spin and charge density waves in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi; Koralek, J. D.; Orenstein, J.; Tibbetts, D. R.; Reno, J. L.; Lilly, M. P.

    2011-03-01

    We use transient grating spectroscopy (TGS) to study the persistent spin helix (PSH) state and electron-hole density wave (EHDW) in a 2D electron gas in the presence of an in-plane electric field parallel to the wavevector of the PSH or EHDW. By directly measuring the phase, we can measure the PSH and EHDW displacement with 10 nm spatial and sub-picosecond time resolution. We obtain both the spin diffusion and mobility and ambipolar diffusion and mobility from the TGS measurements of PSH and EHDW, respectively. The spin transresistivity extracted from the spin diffusion is in excellent agreement with the RPA theory of spin Coulomb drag (SCD). The spin mobility data indicate that SCD may also play a role in the spin wave drifting process. From the ambipolar diffusion and mobility, we obtain the transresistivity of electrons and holes in the same layer, which is much stronger than is typically seen in the conventional Coulomb drag experiments on coupled quantum wells.

  11. Coupled ion acoustic and drift waves in magnetized superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa; Mahmood, S.

    2014-09-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled drift-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a nonuniform magnetoplasma having kappa distributed electrons and positrons. In the linear regime, the role of kappa distribution and positron content on the dispersion relation has been highlighted; it is found that strong superthermality (low value of κ) and addition of positrons lowers the phase velocity via decreasing the fundamental scalelengths of the plasmas. In the nonlinear regime, first, coherent nonlinear structure in the form of dipoles and monopoles are obtained and the boundary conditions (boundedness) in the context of superthermality and positron concentrations are discussed. Second, in case of scalar nonlinearity, a Korteweg–de Vries-type equation is obtained, which admit solitary wave solution. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive solitons are formed in the present model. The present work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron positron ion plasmas, which exist in astrophysical plasma situations such as those found in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  12. Rossby and drift wave turbulence and zonal flows: The Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connaughton, Colm; Nazarenko, Sergey; Quinn, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma, exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form, survive in more realistic and complicated models. As such, they form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. The jets in the strongly nonlinear case further roll up into vortex streets and saturate, while for the weaker nonlinearities, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet, which is slightly inclined to the zonal direction, and a dominant primary wave. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence-zonostrophy. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively well-conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjørtoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the well-known drift wave-zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation mechanisms, extracting energy from

  13. Collective behavior of stabilized reaction-diffusion waves.

    PubMed

    Steele, Aaron J; Tinsley, Mark; Showalter, Kenneth

    2008-06-01

    Stabilized wave segments in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction are directionally controlled with intensity gradients in the applied illumination. The constant-velocity waves behave like self-propelled particles, and multiple waves interact via an applied interaction potential. Alignment arises from the intrinsic properties of the interacting waves, leading to processional and rotational behavior. PMID:18601510

  14. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  15. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  16. Stabilized wave segments in an excitable medium with a phase wave at the wave back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, V. S.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2014-04-01

    The propagation velocity and the shape of a stationary propagating wave segment are determined analytically for excitable media supporting excitation waves with trigger fronts and phase backs. The general relationships between the medium's excitability and the wave segment parameters are obtained in the framework of the free boundary approach under quite usual assumptions. Two universal limits restricting the region of existence of stabilized wave segments are found. The comparison of the analytical results with numerical simulations of the well-known Kessler-Levine model demonstrates their good quantitative agreement. The findings should be applicable to a wide class of systems, such as the propagation of electrical waves in the cardiac muscle or wave propagation in autocatalytic chemical reactions, due to the generality of the free-boundary approach used.

  17. The Influence of Drift Gas Composition on the Separation Mechanism in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Insight from Electrodynamic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    May, Jody C.; McLean, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of three different drift gases (helium, nitrogen, and argon) on the separation mechanism in traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry is explored through ion trajectory simulations which include considerations for ion diffusion based on kinetic theory and the electrodynamic traveling wave potential. The model developed for this work is an accurate depiction of a second-generation commercial traveling wave instrument. Three ion systems (cocaine, MDMA, and amphetamine) whose reduced mobility values have previously been measured in different drift gases are represented in the simulation model. The simulation results presented here provide a fundamental understanding of the separation mechanism in traveling wave, which is characterized by three regions of ion motion: (1) ions surfing on a single wave, (2) ions exhibiting intermittent roll-over onto subsequent waves, and (3) ions experiencing a steady state roll-over which repeats every few wave cycles. These regions of ion motion are accessed through changes in the gas pressure, wave amplitude, and wave velocity. Resolving power values extracted from simulated arrival times suggest that momentum transfer in helium gas is generally insufficient to access regions (2) and (3) where ion mobility separations occur. Ion mobility separations by traveling wave are predicted to be effectual for both nitrogen and argon, with slightly lower resolving power values observed for argon as a result of band-broadening due to collisional scattering. For the simulation conditions studied here, the resolving power in traveling wave plateaus between regions (2) and (3), with further increases in wave velocity contributing only minor improvements in separations. PMID:23888124

  18. Note: Autocollimation with ultra-high resolution and stability using telephoto objective together with optical enlargement and beam drift compensation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Tan, Xinran; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    An autocollimation (AC) setup with ultra-high resolution and stability for micro-angle measurement is presented. The telephoto objective, which is characterized in long focal length at a compact structure size, and the optical enlargement unit, which can magnify the image displacement to improve its measurement resolution and accuracy, are used to obtain an ultra-high measurement resolution of the AC. The common-path beam drift compensation is used to suppress the drift of measurement results, which is evident in the high-resolution AC, thus to obtain a high measurement stability. Experimental results indicate that an effective resolution of better than 0.0005 arc sec (2.42 nrad) over a measurement range of ±30 arc sec and a 2-h stability of 0.0061 arc sec (29.57 nrad) can be achieved. PMID:27587181

  19. Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Miguel D.; Hayat, Umar

    2013-09-01

    We consider the set of Diophantine equations that arise in the context of the partial differential equation called "barotropic vorticity equation" on periodic domains, when nonlinear wave interactions are studied to leading order in the amplitudes. The solutions to this set of Diophantine equations are of interest in atmosphere (Rossby waves) and Tokamak plasmas (drift waves), because they provide the values of the spectral wavevectors that interact resonantly via three-wave interactions. These wavenumbers come in "triads", i.e., groups of three wavevectors. We provide the full solution to the Diophantine equations in the physically sensible limit when the Rossby deformation radius is infinite. The method is completely new, and relies on mapping the unknown variables via rational transformations, first to rational points on elliptic curves and surfaces, and from there to rational points on quadratic forms of "Minkowski" type (such as the familiar space-time in special relativity). Classical methods invented centuries ago by Fermat, Euler, Lagrange, Minkowski, are used to classify all solutions to our original Diophantine equations, thus providing a computational method to generate numerically all the resonant triads in the system. Computationally speaking, our method has a clear advantage over brute-force numerical search: on a 10,0002 grid, the brute-force search would take 15 years using optimised C codes on a cluster, whereas our method takes about 40 min using a laptop. Moreover, the method is extended to generate so-called quasi-resonant triads, which are defined by relaxing the resonant condition on the frequencies, allowing for a small mismatch. Quasi-resonant triads' distribution in wavevector space is robust with respect to physical perturbations, unlike resonant triads' distribution. Therefore, the extended method is really valuable in practical terms. We show that the set of quasi-resonant triads form an intricate network of connected triads, forming

  20. Nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould Waves: Frequency, Functional Form, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2015-11-01

    This poster considers the frequency, spatial form, and stability, of nonlinear Trivelpiece- Gould (TG) waves on a cylindrical plasma column of length L and radius rp, treating both traveling and standing waves, and focussing on the regime of experimental interest in which L/rp >> 1. In this regime TG waves are weakly dispersive, allowing strong mode-coupling between Fourier harmonics. The mode coupling implies that linear theory for such waves is a poor approximation even at fairly small amplitudes, and nonlinear theories that include only a small number of harmonics (such as 3-wave parametric resonance theory) fail to fully capture the stability properties of the system. We find that nonlinear standing waves suffer jumps in their functional form as their amplitude is varied continuously. The jumps are caused by nonlinear resonances between the standing wave and nearly linear waves whose frequencies and wave numbers are harmonics of the standing wave. Also, the standing waves are found to be unstable to a multi-wave version of 3-wave parametric resonance, with an amplitude required for instability onset that is much larger than expected from three wave theory. For traveling wave, linearly stability is found for all amplitudes that could be studied, in contradiction to 3-wave theory. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570, Department of Energy Grants DE-SC0002451and DE-SC0008693.

  1. On wave stability in relativistic cosmic-ray hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Wave stability of a two-fluid hydrodynamical model describing the acceleration of cosmic rays by the first-order Fermi mechanism in relativistic, cosmic-ray-modified shocks is investigated. For a uniform background state, the short- and long-wavelength wave speeds are shown to interlace, thus assuring wave stability in this case. A JWKB analysis is performed to investigate the stability of short-wavelength thermal gas sound waves in the smooth, decelerating supersonic flow upstream of a relativistic, cosmic-ray-modified shock. The stability of the waves is assessed both in terms of the fluid velocity and density perturbations, as well as in terms of the wave action. The stability and interaction of the short-wavelength cosmic-ray coherent mode with the background flow is also studied.

  2. Flow topology, Lagrangian statistics, and transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoch, B.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Bos, W. J. T.; Schneider, K.

    2012-10-01

    Transport is strongly influenced by coherent structures. In particular, trapping in vortices tends to arrest transport and zonal flows can induce large Lagrangian displacements. It is thus of interest to characterize coherent structures from a Lagrangian perspective. For 2-D flows, the Eulerian Weiss criterion provides a tool to partition the flow into topologically different regions: elliptic (vortex dominated), hyperbolic (deformation dominated), and intermediate (turbulent background). In Ref.footnotetextB. Kadoch, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, W.J.T Bos, and K. Schneider, Phys. Rev. E 83, 036314 (2011). we proposed the Lagrangian Weiss criterion (i.e. the Weiss field computed along particle orbits) and applied it to 2-D Navier-Stokes turbulence. Here we apply this criterion to resistive drift-wave turbulence. The probability density functions (pdfs) of residence time in the topologically different regions are computed for ensembles of Lagrangian tracers. It is shown that in elliptic and hyperbolic regions the pdfs have algebraically decaying tails. The pdf of residence time in elliptic regions is proposed as a measure of particle trapping, and the relationship with waiting time statistics in continuous time random walk models of anomalous transport is explored.

  3. Flow topology and Lagrangian conditional statistics in dissipative drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoch, Benjamin; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Lagrangian statistics in drift-wave turbulence, modeled by the Hasegawa-Wakatani system and its modified version, are investigated. The later shows the emergence of pronounced zonal flows. Different values of the adiabaticity parameter are considered. The main goal is to characterize the role of coherent structures (vortices and zonal flows) on the Lagrangian statistics of particles. Computationally intensive simulations following ensembles of test particles over hundreds of eddy turnover times are considered in statistically stationary turbulent flows. The flow topology is characterized using the Lagrangian Okubo-Weiss criterion [Kadoch et al., Phys. Rev. E 83 (2011)], and the flow is thus split into topologically different domains. In elliptic and hyperbolic regions, the probability density functions (pdfs) of the residence time have self-similar algebraic decaying tails. However, in the intermediate regions the pdfs do exhibit exponentially decaying tails. Topologically conditioned pdfs of the Lagrangian velocity and acceleration are also computed. The differences between the classical Hasegawa-Wakatani system and its modified version are assessed.

  4. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on nonlinearly driven modes in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows, and confinement in the framework of resistive drift wave turbulence. We extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}). Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress) and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find states that are similar to the ZF-dominated state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude, the energy of zonal flows decreases and the turbulence energy increases with ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}), corresponding to a damping of zonal flows.

  5. Shear flow and drift wave turbulence dynamics in a cylindrical plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-03-15

    The experimental observations of the dynamics of the coupled drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device using a combination of Langmuir probe and fast-framing imaging measurements are reported. The results show the presence of an azimuthal ZF that exhibits low frequency (approx250 Hz) fluctuations. The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5 kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulent-driven shear flow sustained against the collisional and viscous damping. The radial turbulence correlation length and cross-field particle transport are reduced during periods of strong flow shear. The results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations for coupled DWT-ZF dynamics.

  6. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state. PMID:22974196

  7. Traveling wave solutions of compressible fluid equations and orbital stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Weiguo; Li, Zhengming

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we discuss the existence of traveling wave solutions for compressible fluid equations by applying the theory and method of planar dynamical system, and obtain explicit expressions for all bounded traveling wave solutions by undetermined coefficient method, including kink and bell profile traveling wave solutions, as well as periodic wave solutions. We prove the kink profile solitary wave solution, both sides of which asymptotic values are not zero, is orbitally stable by the theory of Grillakis-Shatah-Strauss orbital stability.

  8. Generation of Large-Scale Zonal Structures by Drift Flute Waves in High-Beta HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Essam; Sotnikov, Vladmir; Kindel, Joseph; Onishchenko, O. G.; Leboeuf, J. N.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim is to develop a more general analysis of nonlinear dynamics of drift-flute waves, applicable to arbitrary plasma beta and arbitrary spatial scales in comparison with the ion Larmor radius. This study is of interest for fundamental plasma theory as well as for the interpretation of Z-pinch and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Description of low-frequency waves and in particular drift flute waves in a high beta plasma, generally speaking, requires a kinetic approach, based on the Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. In the present work we show that the alternative two-fluid description can adequately describe the ion perturbations with arbitrary ratio of the characteristic spatial scales to the ion Larmor radius in so-called Pade approximation. For this purpose reduced two-fluid hydrodynamic equations which describe nonlinear dynamics of the flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales and arbitrary plasma beta are derived. The linear dispersion relation of the flute waves and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are analyzed. A general nonlinear dispersion relation which describes generation of large-scale zonal structures by the flute waves is presented and analyzed.

  9. Stabilization of lower hybrid drift modes by finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farengo, R.; Guzdar, P. N.; Lee, Y. C.

    1989-08-01

    The effect of finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients on the lower hybrid drift instability is studied in the parameter regime corresponding to the TRX-2 device [Fusion Technol. 9, 48 (1986)]. Perturbations in the electrostatic potential and all three components of the vector potential are considered and finite beta electron orbit modifications are included. The electron temperature gradient decreases the growth rate of the instability but, for kz=0, unstable modes exist for ηe(=T'en0/Ten0)>6. Since finite kz effects completely stabilize the mode at small values of kz/ky(≂5×10-3), magnetic shear could be responsible for stabilizing the lower hybrid drift instability in field-reversed configurations.

  10. Stability Design and Response to Waves by Batoids.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Hoffman, Jessica L

    2015-10-01

    Unsteady flows in the marine environment can affect the stability and locomotor costs of animals. For fish swimming at shallow depths, waves represent a form of unsteady flow. Waves consist of cyclic oscillations, during which the water moves in circular or elliptical orbits. Large gravity waves have the potential to displace fish both cyclically and in the direction of wave celerity for animals floating in the water column or holding station on the bottom. Displacement of a fish can exceed its stability control capability when the size of the wave orbit is equivalent to the size of the fish. Previous research into compensatory behaviors of fishes to waves has focused on pelagic osteichthyan fishes with laterally compressed bodies. However, dorsoventrally compressed batoid rays must also contend with waves. Examination of rays subjected to waves showed differing strategies for stability between pelagic and demersal species. Pelagic cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) would glide through or be transported by waves, maintaining a positive dihedral of the wing-like pectoral fins. Demersal Atlantic stingrays (Dasyatis sabina) and freshwater rays (Potamotrygon motoro) maintained contact with the bottom and performed compensatory fin motions and body postures. The ability to limit displacement due to wave action by the demersal rays was also a function of the bottom texture. The ability of rays to maintain stability due to wave action suggests mechanisms to compensate for the velocity flux of the water impinging on the large projected area of the enlarged pectoral fins of rays. PMID:26060212

  11. Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. II. The general fishbone-like dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-07-15

    The theoretical framework of the general fishbone-like dispersion relation (GFLDR), presented and discussed in the Companion Paper [Phys. Plasmas 21, 072120 (2014)], is applied to cases of practical interest of shear/drift Alfvén waves (SAWs/DAWs) excited by energetic particles (EPs) in toroidal fusion plasmas. These applications demonstrate that the GFLDR provides a unified approach that allows analytical and numerical calculations of stability properties, as well as mode structures and, in general, nonlinear evolutions, based on different models and with different levels of approximation. They also show the crucial importance of kinetic descriptions, accurate geometries and boundary conditions for predicting linear as well as nonlinear SAW/DAW and EP behaviors in burning plasmas. Thus, the GFLDR unified theoretical framework elevates the interpretative capability for both experimental and numerical simulation results.

  12. A simple model for testing the effects of gravity-wave-produced vertical oscillations of scattering irregularities on spaced-antenna, horizontal drift measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, C. E.; Reid, I. M.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the velocities produced by the spaced antenna partial-reflection drift experiment may constitute a measure of the vertical oscillations due to short-period gravity waves rather than the mean horizontal flow. The contention is that the interference between say two scatterers, one of which is traveling upward, and the other down, will create a pattern which sweeps across the ground in the direction (or anti-parallel) of the wave propagation. Since the expected result, viz., spurious drift directions, is seldom, if ever, seen in spaced antenna drift velocities, this speculation is tested in an atmospheric model.

  13. Attribution of ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations to large-scale waves and the dependence on solar activity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Richmond, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we quantify the contribution of individual large-scale waves to ionospheric electrodynamics, and examine the dependence of the ionospheric perturbations on solar activity. We focus on migrating diurnal tide (DW1) plus mean winds, migrating semidiurnal tide (SW2), quasi-stationary planetary wave 1 (QSPW1), and nonmigrating semidiurnal westward wave 1 (SW1) under northern winter conditions, when QSPW1 and SW1 are climatologically strong. From TIME-GCM simulations under solar minimum conditions, we calculate equatorial vertical ExB drifts due to mean winds and DW1, SW2, SW1 and QSPW1. In particular, wind components of both SW2 and SW1 become large at mid to high latitudes in the E-region, and kernel functions obtained from numerical experiments reveal that they can significantly affect the equatorial ion drift, likely through modulating the E-region wind dynamo. The most evident changes of total ionospheric vertical drift when solar activity is increased are seen around dawn and dusk, reflecting the more dominant role of large F-region Pedersen conductivity and of the F-region dynamo under high solar activity. Therefore, the lower atmosphere driving of the ionospheric variability is more evident under solar minimum conditions, not only because variability is more identifiable in a quieter background, but also because the E-region wind dynamo is more significant. These numerical experiments also demonstrate that the amplitudes, phases and latitudinal and vertical structures of large-scale waves are important in quantifying the ionospheric responses.

  14. Temporal indications of atmospheric stability affecting off-target spray drift in the midsouth U S

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine atmospheric conditions favorable for long-distance spray drift deleterious to susceptible crops. A tall meteorological monitoring tower equipped with six precision (and periodically calibrated) thermistors at six heights to 27.4 m and wind speed anemometers at fo...

  15. Long-range correlations induced by the self-regulation of zonal flows and drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2010-11-15

    By means of a unique probe array, the interaction between zonal flows and broad-band drift-wave turbulence has been investigated experimentally in a magnetized toroidal plasma. Homogeneous potential fluctuations on a magnetic flux surface, previously reported as long range correlations, could be traced back to a predator-prey-like interaction between the turbulence and the zonal flow. At higher frequency the nonlocal transfer of energy to the zonal flow is dominant and the low-frequency oscillations are shown to result from the reduced turbulence activity due to this energy loss. This self-regulation process turns out to be enhanced with increased background shear flows.

  16. The stability of Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Benkui

    1990-11-01

    An investigation is undertaken of the stability of linear Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid by means of a qualitative theory employing ordinary differential equations. It is noted that, while the basic current has no detectable shear, the Rossby waves are always stable. If the basic current possesses only horizontal shear, the unstable criterion for waves takes one form, but it takes entirely another in the case where the basic current possesses only vertical shear.

  17. Hysteresis and drift of spiral waves near heterogeneities: From chemical experiments to cardiac simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Totz, Jan Frederik; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver; Engel, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative patterns in excitable reaction-diffusion systems can be strongly affected by spatial heterogeneities. Using the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, we show a hysteresis effect in the transition between free and pinned spiral rotation. The latter state involves the rotation around a disk-shaped obstacle with an impermeable and inert boundary. The transition is controlled by changes in light intensity. For permeable heterogeneities of higher excitability, we observe spiral drift along both linear and circular boundaries. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions and, in the case of spiral drift, are further reproduced by numerical simulations with a modified Oregonator model. Additional simulations with a cardiac model show that orbital motion can also exist in anisotropic and three-dimensional systems.

  18. Hysteresis and drift of spiral waves near heterogeneities: From chemical experiments to cardiac simulations.

    PubMed

    Nakouzi, Elias; Totz, Jan Frederik; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver; Engel, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative patterns in excitable reaction-diffusion systems can be strongly affected by spatial heterogeneities. Using the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, we show a hysteresis effect in the transition between free and pinned spiral rotation. The latter state involves the rotation around a disk-shaped obstacle with an impermeable and inert boundary. The transition is controlled by changes in light intensity. For permeable heterogeneities of higher excitability, we observe spiral drift along both linear and circular boundaries. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions and, in the case of spiral drift, are further reproduced by numerical simulations with a modified Oregonator model. Additional simulations with a cardiac model show that orbital motion can also exist in anisotropic and three-dimensional systems. PMID:26986327

  19. On the nonlinear stability of a quasi-two-dimensional drift kinetic model for ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Plunk, G. G.

    2015-04-15

    We study a quasi-two-dimensional electrostatic drift kinetic system as a model for near-marginal ion temperature gradient driven turbulence. A proof is given for the nonlinear stability of this system under conditions of linear stability. This proof is achieved using a transformation that diagonalizes the linear dynamics and also commutes with nonlinear E × B advection. For the case when linear instability is present, a corollary is found that forbids nonlinear energy transfer between appropriately defined sets of stable and unstable modes. It is speculated that this may explain the preservation of linear eigenmodes in nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Based on this property, a dimensionally reduced (∞×∞→1) system is derived that may be useful for understanding dynamics around the critical gradient of Dimits.

  20. Cosmic ray drift, shock wave acceleration and the anomalous component of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Jokipii, J. R.; Eichler, D.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the anomalous component of the quiet-time cosmic ray flux is presented in which ex-interstellar neutral particles are accelerated continuously in the polar regions of the solar-wind termination shock, and then drift into the equatorial regions of the inner heliosphere. The observed solar-cycle variations, radial gradient, and apparent latitude gradient of the anomalous component are a natural consequence of this model.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion velocity in a DC magnetron microdischarge with self-organized drift wave modes propagating in the direction opposite the E x B electron drift velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Chris; Gascon, Nicolas; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark; Ito, Tsuyohito; Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory Collaboration; Osaka University CenterAtomic; Molecular Technologies Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Evidence is presented of rotating azimuthal wave structures in a planar DC magnetron microdischarge operating in argon and xenon. Plasma emission captured using a high frame rate camera reveals waves of varying azimuthal modes propagating in the negative E x B direction. The dominant stable mode structure depends on discharge voltage. The negative drift direction is attributed to a local field reversal arising from strong density gradients that drive excess ions towards the anode. The transition between modes is shown to be consistent with models of gradient drift-wave dispersion in the presence of such a field reversal when the fluid representation includes ambipolar diffusion along the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Time-average and time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence measurements are carried out to elucidate the anode-bound ion dynamics driven by the field reversal. This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Orbital stability of solitary waves for Kundu equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Qin, Yinghao; Zhao, Yan; Guo, Boling

    In this paper, we consider the Kundu equation which is not a standard Hamiltonian system. The abstract orbital stability theory proposed by Grillakis et al. (1987, 1990) cannot be applied directly to study orbital stability of solitary waves for this equation. Motivated by the idea of Guo and Wu (1995), we construct three invariants of motion and use detailed spectral analysis to obtain orbital stability of solitary waves for Kundu equation. Since Kundu equation is more complex than the derivative Schrödinger equation, we utilize some techniques to overcome some difficulties in this paper. It should be pointed out that the results obtained in this paper are more general than those obtained by Guo and Wu (1995). We present a sufficient condition under which solitary waves are orbitally stable for 2c+sυ<0, while Guo and Wu (1995) only considered the case 2c+sυ>0. We obtain the results on orbital stability of solitary waves for the derivative Schrödinger equation given by Colin and Ohta (2006) as a corollary in this paper. Furthermore, we obtain orbital stability of solitary waves for Chen-Lee-Lin equation and Gerdjikov-Ivanov equation, respectively.

  3. Lower hybrid drift instability with temperature gradient in a perpendicular shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y. M.; Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    Finite beta effects and an electron temperature gradient are included in the present study of the perpendicular bow shock geometry's lower hybrid instability, where the flute mode that is stable at the shock for constant electron temperature is destabilized in the case of a sufficiently great temperature gradient. Numerical solutions are given for cases in which the ion distribution is either drifting Maxwellian or consists of two Maxwellians, to represent the effect of reflected ions at the shock. A discussion is presented of the implications of results obtained for ion and electron heating and electron acceleration at the bow shock.

  4. Ion-wave stabilization of an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J.C.; Mackay, R.

    2006-04-24

    Stabilization of the rf power driving an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has implications for fields ranging from atomic clocks to analytical chemistry to illumination technology. Here, we demonstrate a technique in which the plasma itself acts as a probe of radio wave power, and provides a correction signal for active rf-power control. Our technique takes advantage of the resonant nature of forced ion waves in the plasma, and their observation in the ICP's optical emission.

  5. Stabilized High Power Laser for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.; Fallnich, C.; Frede, M.; Heurs, M.; King, P.; Kracht, D.; Kwee, P.; Savage, R.; Seifert, F.; Wilhelm, R.

    2006-03-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with several 100W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. In this paper we discuss possible setups to achieve high laser power and describe a 200W prestabilized laser system (PSL). The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the most demanding power stabilization requiremets and new results (RIN <= 4×10-9/surdHz) will be presented.

  6. Phase change in terahertz waves emitted from differently doped graphite: The role of carrier drift

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, Muhammad; Yim, Jong-Hyuk; Jho, Young-Dahl; Kim, Changyoung; Wook Lee, Sang

    2013-11-11

    We investigate characteristics of THz waves radiated from differently doped graphite samples excited by femtosecond laser pulses. Between n-type single-crystalline graphite and p-type polycrystalline graphite films, we observe the phase reversal of THz waves regardless of excitation energy variations around K-valley. In addition, variations in other parameters such as excitation fluence and azimuthal angle produce no changes in the phase of THz waves, which correlate well with the opposite dipole polarization between differently doped samples rather than unidirectional diffusive transport.

  7. Coherent vorticity extraction in resistive drift-wave turbulence: Comparison of orthogonal wavelets versus proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, Shimpei; Bos, Wouter J. T.; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Schneider, Kai; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Farge, Marie

    2011-03-01

    We assess two techniques for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows: the wavelet based Coherent Vorticity Extraction (CVE) and the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). The former decomposes the flow field into an orthogonal wavelet representation and subsequent thresholding of the coefficients allows one to split the flow into organized coherent vortices with non-Gaussian statistics and an incoherent random part which is structureless. POD is based on the singular value decomposition and decomposes the flow into basis functions which are optimal with respect to the retained energy for the ensemble average. Both techniques are applied to direct numerical simulation data of two-dimensional drift-wave turbulence governed by Hasegawa-Wakatani equation, considering two limit cases: the quasi-hydrodynamic and the quasi-adiabatic regimes. The results are compared in terms of compression rate, retained energy, retained enstrophy and retained radial flux, together with the enstrophy spectrum and higher order statistics.

  8. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events. PMID:25615346

  9. On the energetic stability of solitary water waves.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Alexander

    2002-10-15

    We study solutions of the water-wave problem for a fluid layer of finite depth in the presence of gravity and surface tension. We use the canonical Hamiltonian formulation by Zakharov in terms of the surface elevation and the trace of the velocity potential on the surface. With a new continuity result for the Dirichlet-Neumann operator in terms of the surface as a function in H(1)(R), we show conditional energetic stability of the trivial solution in certain regions of the parameter space. In the same region we obtain stability of solitary waves under the additional assumption that the second variation of the energy has only one negative eigenvalue. The latter assumption is shown to be fulfilled for the small-amplitude solitary waves first constructed by Amick & Kirchgässner. PMID:12804235

  10. Two-dimensional bispectral analysis of drift wave turbulence in a cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Inagaki, S.; Yagi, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Shinohara, S.; Terasaka, K.; Kamataki, K.; Arakawa, H.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.

    2010-05-15

    Bispectral analysis and multichannel measurement are becoming attractive investigation tools in plasma fluctuation studies. In the Large Mirror Device-Upgrade, the measurement of fluctuations in the ion saturation-current with a 64-channel poloidal Langmuir probe array was performed. The two-dimensional (2D) (poloidal wave number and frequency) power spectrum showed a number of pronounced peaks and broadband fluctuations in the poloidal wave number-frequency space. We applied 2D bispectral analysis, which considers both the matching conditions of poloidal wave number and frequency, to the spatiotemporal waveform, and confirmed the nonlinear couplings between coherent-coherent, coherent-broadband, and broadband-broadband fluctuation components. More than ten peaks were revealed to have as their origins only three original parent modes generated in the plasma. Comparison between the theoretical estimate and experimental observation for the bicoherence showed good agreement.

  11. Stability of traveling waves of a diffusive susceptible-infective-removed (SIR) epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Li, Wan-Tong; Yang, Yun-Rui

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability and uniqueness of traveling waves of a delayed diffusive susceptible-infective-removed (SIR) epidemic model. We first prove the exponential stability of traveling waves by using the weighted energy method, where the traveling waves are allowed to be non-monotone. Then we establish the exact asymptotic behavior of traveling waves at -∞ by using Ikehara's theorem. Finally, the uniqueness of traveling waves is proved by the stability result of traveling waves.

  12. Existence and uniqueness of stabilized propagating wave segments in wave front interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jong-Shenq; Ninomiya, Hirokazu; Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2010-02-01

    Recent experimental studies of photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction have revealed the existence of propagating wave segments. The propagating wave segments are unstable, but can be stabilized by using a feedback control to continually adjust the excitability of the medium. Experimental studies also indicate that the locus of the size of a stabilized wave segment as a function of the excitability of the medium gives the excitability boundary for the existence of 2D wave patterns with free ends in excitable media. To study the properties of this boundary curve, we use the wave front interaction model proposed by Zykov and Showalter. This is equivalent to study a first order system of three ordinary differential equations which includes a singular nonlinearity. Using two different reduced first order systems of two ordinary differential equations, we first show the existence of wave segments for any given propagating velocity. Then the wave profiles can be classified into two types, namely, convex and non-convex types. More precisely, when the normalized propagating velocity is small, we show that the wave profile is of convex type, while the wave profile is of non-convex type when the normalized velocity is close to 1.

  13. Existence and Stability of Relativistic Solitary Waves in Warm Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Maza-Palacios, Marco A.; Herrera-Velazquez, J. Julio E.

    2006-12-04

    A variational mehod for one dimensional relativistic solitons is established, within the two fluid model framework, including finite temperature effects. Our starting point is a Lagrangian for a two species fluid plasma, which allows the deduction of the conserved quantities of the system by means of Noether's theorem, as well as the model equations. At a first stage, travelling wave solutions are studied with the usual shape of envelope solitary waves. It is found that bounded travelling waves (bright solitons) exist for most velocities, if both ions and electrons are assumed to be relativistic, except for a window at small values of v/c. In order to study their stability, we obtain the evolution equations of the solitary wave parameters, along those of radiation.

  14. Effect of the magnetic field curvature on the generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Kovalishen, E. A.; Shirokov, M. S.; Tsypin, V. S.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2007-05-15

    The generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves is studied with allowance for magnetic curvature effects. The basic plasmadynamic equations relating the electrostatic potential, vector potential, and perturbed plasma density are the vorticity equation, longitudinal Ohm's law, and continuity equation. The basic equations are analyzed by applying a parametric formalism similar to that used in the theory of the generation of convective cells. In contrast to most previous investigations on the subject, consideration is given to primary modes having an arbitrary spectrum rather than to an individual monochromatic wave packet. The parametric approach so modified makes it possible to reveal a new class of instabilities of zonal flows that are analogous to two-stream instabilities in linear theory. It is shown that, in the standard theory of zonal flows, the zonal components of the vector potential and perturbed density are not excited. It is pointed out that zonal flows can be generated both in the case of a magnetic hill and in the case of a magnetic well. In the first case, the instabilities of zonal flows are analogous to negative-mass instabilities in linear theory, and, in the second case, they are analogous to two-stream instabilities.

  15. Natural Analoges as a Check of Predicted Drift Stability at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stuckless

    2006-03-10

    Calculations made by the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project as part of the licensing of a proposed geologic repository (in southwestern Nevada) for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste, predict that emplacement tunnels will remain open with little collapse long after ground support has disintegrated. This conclusion includes the effects of anticipated seismic events. Natural analogues cannot provide a quantitative test of this conclusion, but they can provide a reasonableness test by examining the natural and anthropogenic examples of stability of subterranean openings. Available data from a variety of sources, combined with limited observations by the author, show that natural underground openings tend to resist collapse for millions of years and that anthropogenic subterranean openings have remained open from before recorded history through today. This stability is true even in seismically active areas. In fact, the archaeological record is heavily skewed toward preservation of underground structures relative to those found at the surface.

  16. Analogues as a check of predicted drift stability at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Calculations made by the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project as part of the licensing of a proposed geologic repository in southwestern Nevada for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste, predict that emplacement tunnels will remain open with little collapse long after ground support has disintegrated. This conclusion includes the effects of anticipated seismic events. Natural analogues cannot provide a quantitative test of this conclusion, but they can provide a reasonableness test by examining the naturally occuring and anthropogenic examples of stability of subterranean openings. Available data from a variety of sources, combined with limited observations by the author, show that natural underground openings tend to resist collapse for millions of years and that anthropogenic subterranean openings have remained open from before recorded history through today. This stability is true even in seismically active areas. In fact, the archaeological record is heavily skewed toward preservation of underground structures relative to those found at the surface.

  17. Evolution of a reassortant North American gull influenza virus lineage: drift, shift and stability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of gulls in the ecology of avian influenza (AI) is different than that of waterfowl. Different constellations of subtypes circulate within the two groups of birds and AI viruses isolated from North American gulls frequently possess reassortant genomes with genetic elements from both North America and Eurasian lineages. A 2008 isolate from a Newfoundland Great Black-backed Gull contained a mix of North American waterfowl, North American gull and Eurasian lineage genes. Methods We isolated, sequenced and phylogenetically compared avian influenza viruses from 2009 Canadian wild birds. Results We analyzed six 2009 virus isolates from Canada and found the same phylogenetic lineage had persisted over a larger geographic area, with an expanded host range that included dabbling and diving ducks as well as gulls. All of the 2009 virus isolates contained an internal protein coding set of genes of the same Eurasian lineage genes except PB1 that was from a North American lineage, and these genes continued to evolve by genetic drift. We show evidence that the 2008 Great Black-backed Gull virus was derived from this lineage with a reassortment of a North American PA gene into the more stable core set of internal protein coding genes that has circulated in avian populations for at least 2 years. From this core, the surface glycoprotein genes have switched several times creating H13N6, H13N2, and H16N3 subtypes. These gene segments were from North American lineages except for the H16 and N3 vRNAs. Conclusions This process appears similar to genetic shifts seen with swine influenza where a stable “triple reassortant internal gene” core has circulated in swine populations with genetic shifts occurring with hemaggluttinin and neuraminidase proteins getting periodically switched. Thus gulls may serve as genetic mixing vessels for different lineages of avian influenza, similar to the role of swine with regards to human influenza. These findings illustrate the

  18. Evolution of a reassortant North American gull influenza virus lineage: drift, shift and stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Stockwell, Timothy; Wentworth, David E.; Dugan, Vivien; Ip, Hon S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of gulls in the ecology of avian influenza (AI) is different than that of waterfowl. Different constellations of subtypes circulate within the two groups of birds and AI viruses isolated from North American gulls frequently possess reassortant genomes with genetic elements from both North America and Eurasian lineages. A 2008 isolate from a Newfoundland Great Black-backed Gull contained a mix of North American waterfowl, North American gull and Eurasian lineage genes. Methods: We isolated, sequenced and phylogenetically compared avian influenza viruses from 2009 Canadian wild birds. Results: We analyzed six 2009 virus isolates from Canada and found the same phylogenetic lineage had persisted over a larger geographic area, with an expanded host range that included dabbling and diving ducks as well as gulls. All of the 2009 virus isolates contained an internal protein coding set of genes of the same Eurasian lineage genes except PB1 that was from a North American lineage, and these genes continued to evolve by genetic drift. We show evidence that the 2008 Great Black-backed Gull virus was derived from this lineage with a reassortment of a North American PA gene into the more stable core set of internal protein coding genes that has circulated in avian populations for at least 2 years. From this core, the surface glycoprotein genes have switched several times creating H13N6, H13N2, and H16N3 subtypes. These gene segments were from North American lineages except for the H16 and N3 vRNAs. Conclusions: This process appears similar to genetic shifts seen with swine influenza where a stable "triple reassortant internal gene" core has circulated in swine populations with genetic shifts occurring with hemaggluttinin and neuraminidase proteins getting periodically switched. Thus gulls may serve as genetic mixing vessels for different lineages of avian influenza, similar to the role of swine with regards to human influenza. These findings illustrate the

  19. Regulation of ion drifts and anisotropies by parametrically unstable finite-amplitude Alfvén-cyclotron waves in the fast solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Araneda, J. A.; Marsch, E.

    2014-03-10

    We study the preferential heating and differential acceleration of minor ions by dissipation of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) generated by parametric instabilities of a finite-amplitude monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron pump wave. We consider the associated kinetic effects of Landau damping and nonlinear pitch-angle scattering of protons and α particles in the tenuous plasma of coronal holes and the fast solar wind. Various data collected by Wind spacecraft show signatures for a local transverse heating of the minor ions, presumably by Alfvén-cyclotron wave dissipation, and an unexpected parallel heating by a so far unknown mechanism. Here, we present the results from a set of 1.5 dimensional hybrid simulations in search for a plausible explanation for the observed field-aligned kinetic features in the fast solar wind minor ions. We investigate the origin and regulation of ion relative drifts and temperature anisotropies in low plasma β, fast solar wind conditions. Depending on their initial drifts, both ion species can heat up not only transversely through cyclotron resonance and non-resonant wave-particle interactions, but also strongly in the parallel direction by Landau damping of the daughter IAWs. We discuss the dependence of the relative ion drifts and temperature anisotropies on the plasma β of the individual species and we describe the effect of the pump wave amplitude on the ion heating and acceleration.

  20. The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-08-15

    The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

  1. Thermal Rossby waves in a rotating annulus. Their stability.

    PubMed

    Pino, D; Net, M; Sánchez, J; Mercader, I

    2001-05-01

    Nonlinear thermal convection in a fast rotating annulus about its axis, with slightly inclined ends, radial gravity and heating, is studied numerically for a fluid of Prandtl number sigma=0.7 and different values of the radius ratio and rotation rate. The properties of the rotating waves that appear after the Hopf bifurcation of the conductive state are analyzed. Near the critical Rayleigh number, different types of solutions with the same wave number coexist, and they are classified as a function of their connection with the two types of modes identified in the linear analysis for this Prandtl number. For different rotation rates, the stability of the primary solutions as a function of the radius ratio is also studied. The shape of the stability regions and the type of dominant disturbances that limit these regions are very sensitive to the proximity to the value of the radius ratio for which the type of dominant mode changes. PMID:11415011

  2. Stability of strong electromagnetic waves in overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeiras, F. J.

    1982-04-01

    The paper considers the stability against small perturbations of a class of exact wave solutions of the equations that describe an unmagnetized relativistic cold electron plasma. The main feature of these nonlinear waves is a transverse circularly polarized electric field with periodic amplitude modulation in the longitudinal direction. Floquet's theory of linear differential equations with periodic coefficients is used to solve the perturbation equations and obtain the instability growth rates. Both an approximate solution for small modulation depth and a numerical treatment for arbitrary depth are presented. It is shown that the well-known small-wavenumber instability of the purely transverse circularly polarized waves of constant amplitude is reduced as the modulation depth increases from zero to its maximum allowed value.

  3. Drift Mode Calculations in Nonaxisymmetric Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.A. Cooper; W.M. Tang

    1999-07-01

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for nonaxisymmetric (stellarator) geometry, in the electrostatic limit. This calculation is a comprehensive solution of the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities, with a model collision operator. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by temperature gradients and/or trapped particle dynamics are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equilibria generated as part of a design effort for a quasiaxisymmetric stellarator. Comparisons of these results with those obtained for typical tokamak cases indicate that the basic trends are similar.

  4. Stability theory for the synchronized waving of marine grass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravi; Mahadevan, Amala; Mandre, Shreyas; Mahadevan, L. M.

    2014-11-01

    Synchronized waving of grass blades in the presence of fluid flow has been observed in cases such as wheat field in wind, marine grass in tidal currents. The synchronous motion can have important environmental and ecological impact via mixing of fluid due to waving. When the hydrodynamic and elastic time scales are well separated, this waving is thought to be due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability resulting from an inflection point in the flow profile. We find that the inflection point is located near the tip of grass canopy. We extend the Orr-Sommerfeld equation for the stability of a shear flow to include a continuum mean-field approximation for the vegetation, thus capturing the essential ingredients for flow instability leading to coherent waving. Our linear stability analysis shows that the flow in presence of grass become unstable not only through a mechanism of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability but also through shear instability of flow above grass. We also find that flow with low submergence ratio of grass becomes unstable due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability whereas flow high submergence ratio becomes unstable due to shear instability of flow above the grass. Numerical results demonstrating these instability mechanism will also be presented.

  5. Theory and simulation of a high-frequency magnetic drift wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium of a nonneutral plasma in a toroidal vessel with a toroidal magnetic field is analyzed. In the zero inertia limit it is heuristically shown from force balance considerations that there is an electrostatic hoop force and a force due to diamagnetism along the major radius. The problem of equilibrium is formulated in terms of solutions of a 2D partial difference equation. This equation is solved in the large-aspect-ratio limit and a general expression for the shift of the potential axis is obtained which shows that the shift is approximately epsilon and that it depends solely on the internal capacitance of the cloud. The simulation study is based upon the modified MHD equations and the nonlocal nature of the mode is investigated. Applications to sub-Alfvenic plasma expansions, electromagnetic waves in the earth's magnetosphere, and plasma switches are discussed.

  6. Nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2008-08-15

    The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB)-type equation is obtained using the quantum hydrodynamic model in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion quantum magnetoplasma with neutral particles in the background. The KdV-type solitary waves, Burgers-type monotonic, and oscillatory shock like solutions are discussed in different limits. The quantum parameter is also dependent on the positron concentration in dense multicomponent plasmas. It is found that both solitary hump and dip are formed and their amplitude and width are dependent on percentage presence of positrons in electron-ion plasmas. The height of the monotonic shock is decreased with the increase of positron concentration and it is independent of the quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion magnetized quantum plasmas. However, the amplitude of the oscillatory shock is dependent on positron concentration and quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  7. Phase stability of transition metal dichalcogenide by competing ligand field stabilization and charge density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C, Santosh K.; Zhang, Chenxi; Hong, Suklyun; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been investigated extensively for potential application as device materials in recent years. TMDs are found to be stable in trigonal prismatic (H), octahedral (T), or distorted octahedral (Td) coordination of the transition metal. However, the detailed understanding of stabilities of TMDs in a particular phase is lacking. In this work, the detailed TMD phase stability using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) has been investigated to clarify the mechanism of phase stabilities of TMDs, consistent with the experimental observation. Our results indicate that the phase stability of TMDs can be explained considering the relative strength of two competing mechanisms: ligand field stabilization of d-orbitals corresponding to transition metal coordination geometry, and charge density wave (CDW) instability accompanied by a periodic lattice distortion (PLD) causing the phase transition in particular TMDs.

  8. Coherent vorticity extraction in resistive drift-wave turbulence: Comparison of orthogonal wavelets versus proper orthogonal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Bos, W.J.T.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Schneider, Kai; Benkadda, S.; Farge, Marie

    2011-01-01

    We assess two techniques for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows: the wavelet based Coherent Vorticity Extraction (CVE) and the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). The former decomposes the flow field into an orthogonal wavelet representation and subsequent thresholding of the coefficients allows one to split the flow into organized coherent vortices with non-Gaussian statistics and an incoherent random part which is structureless. POD is based on the singular value decomposition and decomposes the flow into basis functions which are optimal with respect to the retained energy for the ensemble average. Both techniques are applied to direct numerical simulation data of two-dimensional drift-wave turbulence governed by Hasegawa Wakatani equation, considering two limit cases: the quasi-hydrodynamic and the quasi-adiabatic regimes. The results are compared in terms of compression rate, retained energy, retained enstrophy and retained radial flux, together with the enstrophy spectrum and higher order statistics. (c) 2010 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS on behalf of Academie des sciences.

  9. On the stability of lumps and wave collapse in water waves.

    PubMed

    Akylas, T R; Cho, Yeunwoo

    2008-08-13

    In the classical water-wave problem, fully localized nonlinear waves of permanent form, commonly referred to as lumps, are possible only if both gravity and surface tension are present. While much attention has been paid to shallow-water lumps, which are generalizations of Korteweg-de Vries solitary waves, the present study is concerned with a distinct class of gravity-capillary lumps recently found on water of finite or infinite depth. In the near linear limit, these lumps resemble locally confined wave packets with envelope and wave crests moving at the same speed, and they can be approximated in terms of a particular steady solution (ground state) of an elliptic equation system of the Benney-Roskes-Davey-Stewartson (BRDS) type, which governs the coupled evolution of the envelope along with the induced mean flow. According to the BRDS equations, however, initial conditions above a certain threshold develop a singularity in finite time, known as wave collapse, due to nonlinear focusing; the ground state, in fact, being exactly at the threshold for collapse suggests that the newly discovered lumps are unstable. In an effort to understand the role of this singularity in the dynamics of lumps, here we consider the fifth-order Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation, a model for weakly nonlinear gravity-capillary waves on water of finite depth when the Bond number is close to one-third, which also admits lumps of the wave packet type. It is found that an exchange of stability occurs at a certain finite wave steepness, lumps being unstable below but stable above this critical value. As a result, a small-amplitude lump, which is linearly unstable and according to the BRDS equations would be prone to wave collapse, depending on the perturbation, either decays into dispersive waves or evolves into an oscillatory state near a finite-amplitude stable lump. PMID:18487123

  10. Standardized F1: a consistent measure of strength of modulation of visual responses to sine-wave drifting gratings.

    PubMed

    Wypych, M; Wang, C; Nagy, A; Benedek, G; Dreher, B; Waleszczyk, W J

    2012-11-01

    The magnitude of spike-responses of neurons in the mammalian visual system to sine-wave luminance-contrast-modulated drifting gratings is modulated by the temporal frequency of the stimulation. However, there are serious problems with consistency and reliability of the traditionally used methods of assessment of strength of such modulation. Here we propose an intuitive and simple tool for assessment of the strength of modulations in the form of standardized F1 index, zF1. We define zF1 as the ratio of the difference between the F1 (component of amplitude spectrum of the spike-response at temporal frequency of stimulation) and the mean value of spectrum amplitudes to standard deviation along all frequencies in the spectrum. In order to assess the validity of this measure, we have: (1) examined behavior of zF1 using spike-responses to optimized drifting gratings of single neurons recorded from four 'visual' structures (area V1 of primary visual cortex, superior colliculus, suprageniculate nucleus and caudate nucleus) in the brain of commonly used visual mammal - domestic cat; (2) compared the behavior of zF1 with that of classical statistics commonly employed in the analysis of steady-state responses; (3) tested the zF1 index on simulated spike-trains generated with threshold-linear model. Our analyses indicate that zF1 is resistant to distortions due to the low spike count in responses and therefore can be particularly useful in the case of recordings from neurons with low firing rates and/or low net mean responses. While most V1 and a half of caudate neurons exhibit high zF1 indices, the majorities of collicular and suprageniculate neurons exhibit low zF1 indices. We conclude that despite the general shortcomings of measuring strength of modulation inherent in the linear system approach, zF1 can serve as a sensitive and easy to interpret tool for detection of modulation and assessment of its strength in responses of visual neurons. PMID:23000273

  11. Hurricane-induced ocean waves and stokes drift and their impacts on surface transport and dispersion in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcic, Milan; Chen, Shuyi S.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane Isaac induced large surface waves and a significant change in upper ocean circulation in the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall at the Louisiana coast on 29 August 2012. Isaac was observed by 194 surface drifters during the Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD). A coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model was used to forecast hurricane impacts during GLAD. The coupled model and drifter observations provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the impacts of hurricane-induced Stokes drift on ocean surface currents. The Stokes drift induced a cyclonic (anticyclonic) rotational flow on the left (right) side of the hurricane and accounted for up to 20% of the average Lagrangian velocity. In a significant deviation from drifter measurements prior to Isaac, the scale-dependent relative diffusivity is estimated to be 6 times larger during the hurricane, which represents a deviation from Okubo's (1971) canonical results for lateral dispersion in nonhurricane conditions at the ocean surface.

  12. Mesoscopic stability and sedimentation waves in settling periodic arrays.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2003-11-01

    The stability of a periodic array of particles settling in a viscous incompressible fluid under the influence of gravity is investigated in the framework of the point sedimentation model. The simple cubic array is unstable, but the body-centered and face-centered cubic arrays with gravity directed along one of the crystal axes are mesoscopically stable, i.e., they are stable except for very long wavelength in a certain domain of directions of the wave vector. In such mesoscopically stable arrays the instability is suppressed in periodic boundary conditions for systems smaller than a maximum size. In a stable finite system the particles perform small motions about the positions of the regular array, and sedimentation waves propagate through the system. PMID:14682796

  13. Equilibrium and stability in vortex and wave flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    This dissertation focuses on the development of theoretical and numerical methodologies to study equilibrium and stability in conservative fluid flows. These techniques include: a bifurcation-diagram approach to obtain the stability properties of families of steady flows; a theory of Hamiltonian resonance for vortex arrays; an efficient numerical method for computing vortices with arbitrary symmetry; and a variational principle for compressible, barotropic or baroclinic flows. We employ these theoretical and numerical approaches to obtain new results regarding the structure and stability of several fundamental vortex and wave flows. The applications that we examine involve simple representations of fundamental fluid problems, which may be regarded as prototypical of flows associated with transport and mixing in the ocean and in the atmosphere, with aquatic animal propulsion, and with the dynamics of vortices in quantum condensates. We address two issues affecting the use of a variational argument to determine stability of families of steady flows. By building on ideas from bifurcation theory, we link turning points in a velocity-impulse diagram to gains or losses of stability. We introduce concepts from imperfection theory into these problems, enabling us to reveal hidden solution branches. The resulting methodology detects exchanges of stability through an "imperfect velocity-impulse" (IVI) diagram. We apply the IVI diagram approach to wide variety of vortex and wave flows. These examples include elliptical vortices, translating and rotating vortex pairs, single and double vortex rows, distributed vortices, as well as steep gravity waves. For a few of the flows considered, our work yields the first available stability boundaries. In addition, the IVI diagram methodology leads us to the discovery of several new families of steady flows, which exhibit lower symmetry. We next examine conditions for the development of an oscillatory instability in two

  14. Heterodyne laser frequency stabilization for long baseline optical interferometry in space-based gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichholz, Johannes; Tanner, David B.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the gravitational universe as the science theme for L3, a large space mission with a planned launch in 2034. NASA expressed a strong interest in joining ESA as a junior partner. The goal of the mission is the detection of gravitational waves of frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 0.1 Hz, where many long-lived sources are expected to be steady emitters of gravitational waves. Most likely, the mission design will evolve out of the earlier Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) concept. The interferometric heterodyne phase readout in LISA is performed by phase meters developed specifically to handle the low light powers and Doppler-drift of laser frequencies that appear as complications in the mission baseline. LISA requires the frequency noise of its seed lasers to be below 300 Hz /√{Hz } throughout the measurement band due to uncertainties in the absolute interferometer arm lengths. We have developed and successfully demonstrated Heterodyne Stabilization (HS), a novel cavity-laser frequency stabilization method that integrates well into the LISA mission baseline due to similar component demand. The cavities for the test setup were assembled with Clearceram-Z spacers, an ultralow thermal expansion coefficient material with potential applicability in interferometric space missions. Using HS, we were able to suppress the frequency noise of two lasers in a bench-top experiment to a level that meets the LISA requirement, suggesting both HS and Clearceram-Z can be considered in future mission concepts.

  15. Exact traveling wave solutions and L1 stability for the shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Guo, Yunxi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we developed, for the first time, the exact expressions of several periodic travelling wave solutions and a solitary wave solution for a shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude. Then, we present the existence theorem of the global weak solutions. Finally, we prove the stability of solution in L1(R) space for the Cauchy problem of the equation.

  16. Stability of stagnation via an expanding accretion shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Murakami, M.; Taylor, B. D.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Stagnation of a cold plasma streaming to the center or axis of symmetry via an expanding accretion shock wave is ubiquitous in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density plasma physics, the examples ranging from plasma flows in x-ray-generating Z pinches [Maron et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 035001 (2013)] to the experiments in support of the recently suggested concept of impact ignition in ICF [Azechi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009); Murakami et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 054007 (2014)]. Some experimental evidence indicates that stagnation via an expanding shock wave is stable, but its stability has never been studied theoretically. We present such analysis for the stagnation that does not involve a rarefaction wave behind the expanding shock front and is described by the classic ideal-gas Noh solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry. In either case, the stagnated flow has been demonstrated to be stable, initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic, decay with time for all the eigenmodes. This conclusion has been supported by our simulations done both on a Cartesian grid and on a curvilinear grid in spherical coordinates. Dispersion equation determining the eigenvalues of the problem and explicit formulas for the eigenfunction profiles corresponding to these eigenvalues are presented, making it possible to use the theory for hydrocode verification in two and three dimensions.

  17. Design of stabilization system for medium wave infrared laser power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhong-kui; Wang, Lin; Shi, Xue-shun; Xu, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The 3~5um Medium Wave Infrared(MWIR) laser has gained a lot of attention for its important application values in remote sensing, medical, military and many other fields. However, there are many technical difficulties to fabricate those kind lasers, and the performance of their output power stabilities remain to be improved. In a practical application, the MWIR's output power will be instability when the temperature changes and the current varies. So a system of reducing MWIR power fluctuation should be established. In this paper, a photoelectric system of stabilizing the output power of He-Ne laser is developed, which is designed based on the theory of feedback control. Some primary devices and technologies are presented and the functions of each module are described in detail. Among of those, an auxiliary visible light path is designed to aid to adjust WMIR optical system. A converging lens as spatial filter is employed to eliminate stray light well. Dewar temperature control equipment is also used to reduce circuit noise in IR detector. The power supply of AD conversion circuit is independently designed to avoid the crosstalk caused by the analog section and digital section. Then the system has the advantages of good controllability, stability and high precision after above designation. Finally, the measurement precision of the system is also analyzed and verified.

  18. Reexamination of dynamical stabilization of matter-wave solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Itin, Alexander; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2006-09-15

    We consider dynamical stabilization of Bose-Einstein condensates by time-dependent modulation of the scattering length. The problem has been studied before by several methods: Gaussian variational approximation, the method of moments, the method of modulated Townes soliton, and the direct averaging of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We summarize these methods and find that the numerically obtained stabilized solution has a different configuration than that assumed by the theoretical methods (in particular a phase of the wave function is not quadratic with r). We show that there is presently no clear evidence for stabilization in a strict sense, because in the numerical experiments only metastable (slowly decaying) solutions have been obtained. In other words, neither numerical nor mathematical evidence for a new kind of soliton solutions has been revealed so far. The existence of the metastable solutions is nevertheless an interesting and complicated phenomenon on its own. We try some non-Gaussian variational trial functions to obtain better predictions for the critical nonlinearity g{sub cr} for metastabilization but other dynamical properties of the solutions remain difficult to predict.

  19. Jupiter's winds and Arnol'd's second stability theorem: Slowly moving waves and neutral stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamp, Andrew P.; Dowling, Timothy E.

    1993-01-01

    Since the Voyager encounters in 1979, it has been known that Jupiter's cloud-top zonal winds violate the barotropic stability criterion. A vortex-tube stretching analysis of the Voyager wind data indicates that the more general Charney-Stern stability criterion is also violated. On the other hand, the zonal winds determined by tracking cloud features in Hubble Space Telescope images taken in 1991 precisely match the zonal winds determined by tracking cloud features in Voyager images, and it is hard to understand how a complicated zonal wind profile like Jupiter's could be unstable and yet not change at all in 12 years. In fact, there are at least two unknown ways to violate the Charney-Stern stability criterion and still have a stable flow. The better known of these is called Fjortoft's theorem, or Arnol'd's 1st theorem for the case of large-amplitude perturbations. Although the Fjortoft-Arnol'd theorem has been extended from the quasi-geostrophic equations to the primitive equations, the basic requirement that the potential vorticity be an increasing function of streamfunction is opposite to the case found in Jupiter, where the Voyager data indicate that the potential vorticity is a decreasing function of streamfunction. But this second case is precisely that which is covered by Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. In fact, the Voyager data suggest that Jupiter's zonal winds are neutrally stable with respect to Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. Here, we analyze the linear stability problem of a one-parameter family of sinusoidal zonal wind profiles that are close to neutral stability with respect to Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. We find numerically that the most unstable mode is always stationary, which may help to explain the slowly moving mode 10 waves observed on Jupiter. We find that violation of Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem is both necessary and sufficient for instability of sinusoidal profiles. However, there appears to be no simple extension of Arnol'd's 2

  20. Stabilization of three-wave vortex beams in the waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammal, Arnaldo; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-04-01

    We consider two-dimensional (2D) localized vortical modes in the three-wave system with the quadratic ({{χ }(2)}) nonlinearity, alias nondegenerate second-harmonic (SH)-generating system, guided by the isotropic harmonic-oscillator (alias parabolic) confining potential. In addition to the straightforward realization in optics, the system models mixed atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates. The main issue is stability of the vortex modes, which is investigated through computation of instability growth rates for eigenmodes of small perturbations, and by means of direct simulations. The threshold of parametric instability for single-color beams, represented solely by the SH with zero vorticity, is found in an analytical form with the help of the variational approximation. Trapped states with vorticities ≤ft( +1,-1,0 \\right) in the two fundamental-frequency components and the SH one (the so-called hidden-vorticity modes) are completely unstable. Also unstable are semi-vortices, with component vorticities ≤ft( 1,0,1 \\right). However, full vortices, with charges ≤ft( 1,1,2 \\right), have a well-defined stability region. Unstable full vortices feature regions of robust dynamical behavior, where they periodically split and recombine, keeping their vortical content.

  1. Stability of periodic traveling waves in the Aliev-Panfilov reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. Osman; Ogawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    We study the two-component Aliev-Panfilov reaction-diffusion system of cardiac excitation. It is known that the model exhibits spiral wave instability in two-dimensional spatial domains. In order to describe the spiral wave instability, it is important to understand periodic traveling wave instability resulting from the model. We determine the existence and stability of periodic traveling waves in the model. In addition, we calculate the stability boundary between stable and unstable periodic traveling waves in a two-dimensional parameter plane. It is observed that the periodic traveling waves express instability by a stability change of Eckhaus type. As a result, a stable wave bifurcates to an oscillating periodic traveling wave. We describe these phenomena by calculating the essential spectra of the waves. Furthermore, we study the stability of the waves as a function of the gaps between two nullclines. In two dimensions, we determine the spiral wave instability based on the stability boundary of the periodic traveling waves.

  2. Stability of capillary-gravity interfacial waves between two bounded fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Paul; Dias, Frédéric

    1995-12-01

    Two-dimensional periodic capillary-gravity waves at the interface between two bounded fluids of different densities are considered. Based on a variational formulation, the relation between wave frequency and wave amplitude is obtained through a weakly nonlinear analysis. All classes of space-periodic waves are studied: traveling and standing waves as well as a degenerate class of mixed waves. As opposed to water waves, mixed interfacial waves exist even for pure gravity waves. The stability of traveling and standing waves with respect to three-dimensional modulations is then studied. By using the method of multiple scales, Davey-Stewartson-type equations are obtained. A detailed stability analysis is performed in three cases: pure gravity waves, capillary-gravity waves when one layer is infinitely deep, and capillary-gravity waves when both layers are infinitely deep. The main results for oblique (i.e., combined longitudinal and transverse) modulations reveal a mostly stabilizing effect of the density ratio for traveling waves and a destabilizing effect for standing waves.

  3. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves

  4. Quantification of the Effect of Pressure Wire Drift on the Diagnostic Performance of Fractional Flow Reserve, Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio, and Whole-Cycle Pd/Pa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Yousif; Shun-Shin, Matthew J.; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Petraco, Ricardo; Al-Lamee, Rasha; Mayet, Jamil; Francis, Darrel P.; Sen, Sayan; Davies, Justin E.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Small drifts in intracoronary pressure measurements (±2 mm Hg) can affect stenosis categorization using pressure indices. This has not previously been assessed for fractional flow reserve (FFR), instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR), and whole-cycle distal pressure/proximal pressure (Pd/Pa) indices. Methods and Results—Four hundred forty-seven stenoses were assessed with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa. Cut point values for significance were predefined as ≤0.8, <0.90, and <0.93, respectively. Pressure wire drift was simulated by offsetting the distal coronary pressure trace by ±2 mm Hg. FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa indices were recalculated and stenosis misclassification quantified. Median (±median absolute deviation) values for FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa were 0.81 (±0.11), 0.90 (±0.07), and 0.93 (±0.06), respectively. For the cut point of FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, 34.6% (155), 50.1% (224), and 62.2% (278) of values, respectively, lay within ±0.05 U. With ±2 mm Hg pressure wire drift, 21% (94), 25% (110), and 33% (148) of the study population were misclassified with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, respectively. Both FFR and iFR had significantly lower misclassification than whole-cycle Pd/Pa (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the diagnostic performance of FFR and iFR (P=0.125). Conclusions— In a substantial proportion of cases, small amounts of pressure wire drift are enough to cause stenoses to change classification. Whole-cycle Pd/Pa is more vulnerable to such reclassification than FFR and iFR. PMID:27076571

  5. Stability of shock waves for multi-dimensional hyperbolic-parabolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dening

    1988-01-01

    The uniform linear stability of shock waves is considerd for quasilinear hyperbolic-parabolic coupled conservation laws in multi-dimensional space. As an example, the stability condition and its dynamic meaning for isothermal shock wave in radiative hydrodynamics are analyzed.

  6. The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-15

    The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  7. The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-01

    The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  8. Stability of negative solitary waves for an integrable modified Camassa-Holm equation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Jiuli; Tian Lixin; Fan Xinghua

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, we prove that the modified Camassa-Holm equation is Painleve integrable. We also study the orbital stability problem of negative solitary waves for this integrable equation. It is shown that the negative solitary waves are stable for arbitrary wave speed of propagation.

  9. On the Stability of Self-Similar Solutions to Nonlinear Wave Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, Ovidiu; Donninger, Roland; Glogić, Irfan; Huang, Min

    2016-04-01

    We consider an explicit self-similar solution to an energy-supercritical Yang-Mills equation and prove its mode stability. Based on earlier work by one of the authors, we obtain a fully rigorous proof of the nonlinear stability of the self-similar blowup profile. This is a large-data result for a supercritical wave equation. Our method is broadly applicable and provides a general approach to stability problems related to self-similar solutions of nonlinear wave equations.

  10. The influence of genetic drift on the formation and stability of polymorphisms arising from negative frequency-dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Waxman, David

    2016-02-21

    We consider the simplest form of negative frequency-dependent selection in a biallelic haploid population, where the selection coefficient of a mutant allele is a linear function of the allele's frequency, and changes from positive to negative as the frequency is increased. In an effectively infinite population this behaviour leads to a stable polymorphism. We present a theoretical investigation of what occurs in a finite population, where a long-lived polymorphism may be formed, but which fluctuates and ultimately disappears due to random genetic drift. We model the dynamics as a branching process and explicitly take into account differences between the census population size and the effective population size, which play different roles in the dynamics. We characterise the behaviour of the population in terms of three distinct timescales associated with: (i) early loss of mutant alleles, (ii) achievement of the long-lived polymorphism, (iii) disappearance of the polymorphism. Timescales (i) and (iii) depend on the effective population size and are, as a consequence, affected by random genetic drift, while timescale (ii) depends primarily on the census size and is relatively insensitive to genetic drift. Analysis and simulations of the branching process clarify the different influences of the census and effective population sizes. One substantial quantitative difference, between populations where the effective and census population sizes coincide and where they differ, lies in the number of mutant alleles in the long-lived polymorphism. This number is approximately proportional to the census size. Thus assuming the census size equals a much smaller effective population size predicts a much smaller number of mutants in the long-lived polymorphism. PMID:26656188

  11. Stability of a superposition of shock waves with contact discontinuities for systems of viscous conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huihui

    In this paper, we show the large time asymptotic nonlinear stability of a superposition of viscous shock waves with viscous contact waves for systems of viscous conservation laws with small initial perturbations, provided that the strengths of these viscous waves are small with the same order. The results are obtained by elementary weighted energy estimates based on the underlying wave structure and a new estimate on the heat equation.

  12. Slosh wave excitation and stability of spacecraft fluid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    The instability of liquid and gas interface can be induced by the pressure of longitudinal and lateral accelerations, vehicle vibration, and rotational fields of spacecraft in a microgravity environment. Characteristics of slosh waves excited by the restoring force field of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitters excite slosh waves with higher ratio of maximum amplitude to wave length than that of the slosh waves generated by the higher frequency gravity jitters.

  13. On the stability of the moments of the maximum entropy wind wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, H.G.

    1983-03-01

    The stability of some current wind wave parameters as a function of high-frequency cut-off and degrees of freedom of the spectrum has been numerically investigated when computed in terms of the moments of the wave energy spectrum. From the Pierson-Moskovitz wave spectrum type, a sea surface profile is simulated and its wave energy spectrum is estimated by the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM). As the degrees of freedom of the MEM spectral estimation are varied, the results show a much better stability of the wave parameters as compared to the classical periodogram and correlogram spectral approaches. The stability of wave parameters as a function of high-frequency cut-off has the same result as obtained by the classical techniques.

  14. Drift mode calculations for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.M. Tang; H. Sugama; N. Nakajima; K.Y. Watanabe; S. Murakami; H. Yamada; W.A. Cooper

    2000-06-08

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for a case for the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A.Iiyoshi, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1998, Nucl.Fusion 39, 1245 (1999)]. This calculation retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped particle dynamics and ion temperature gradients are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics equilibria reconstructed from experimental measurements. The effects of helically-trapped particles and helical curvature are investigated.

  15. Global transition from drift wave dominated regimes to multi-instability plasma dynamics and simultaneous formation of a radial transport barrier in helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Cui, Lang; Gosselin, Jordan; Vaezi, Payam; Holland, Chris; Tynan, George

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies in CSDX reported a sharp global transition in the plasma dynamics during the route to turbulence. For B <140 mT, the plasma is dominated by density gradient driven drift waves [DW]. For B >140 mT, a new global equilibrium is achieved with simultaneous existence of three radially separated plasma instabilities: coherent Rayleigh Taylor [RT] modes at the center, DW at the density gradient and turbulent, shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz [KH] instabilities at the edge. Only the RT modes rotate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. The radial particle flux is directed outward for small radii and inward for large radii, forming a radial particle transport barrier leading to stiff profiles and increased core density. Simultaneously the core Ar-II light emission increases (×10) forming a very bright blue core. The radial extent of the inner RT mode and the blue core coincides with the radial location of the particle transport barrier. This equilibrium with simultaneous RT-DW-KH instabilities shows very rich plasma dynamics including intermittency, blob formation and propagation, inward particle flux against density gradients etc. We report detailed studies of azimuthal momentum balance and time resolved dynamics leading to the transition using Langmuir probes, fast imaging, spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence etc.

  16. Stability and Asymptotic Behavior of Periodic Traveling Wave Solutions of Viscous Conservation Laws in Several Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Myunghyun; Zumbrun, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Under natural spectral stability assumptions motivated by previous investigations of the associated spectral stability problem, we determine sharp L p estimates on the linearized solution operator about a multidimensional planar periodic wave of a system of conservation laws with viscosity, yielding linearized L 1 ∩ L p → L p stability for all {p ≥q 2} and dimensions {d ≥q 1} and nonlinear L 1 ∩ H s → L p ∩ H s stability and L 2-asymptotic behavior for {p≥q 2} and {d≥q 3} . The behavior can in general be rather complicated, involving both convective (that is, wave-like) and diffusive effects.

  17. Stabilized high-power laser system for the gravitational wave detector advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Kwee, P; Bogan, C; Danzmann, K; Frede, M; Kim, H; King, P; Pöld, J; Puncken, O; Savage, R L; Seifert, F; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; Willke, B

    2012-05-01

    An ultra-stable, high-power cw Nd:YAG laser system, developed for the ground-based gravitational wave detector Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), was comprehensively characterized. Laser power, frequency, beam pointing and beam quality were simultaneously stabilized using different active and passive schemes. The output beam, the performance of the stabilization, and the cross-coupling between different stabilization feedback control loops were characterized and found to fulfill most design requirements. The employed stabilization schemes and the achieved performance are of relevance to many high-precision optical experiments. PMID:22565688

  18. Stability of a family of travelling wave solutions in a feedforward chain of phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanford, O. E., III; Mintchev, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Travelling waves are an important class of signal propagation phenomena in extended systems with a preferred direction of information flow. We study the generation of travelling waves in unidirectional chains of coupled oscillators communicating via a phase-dependent pulse-response interaction borrowed from mathematical neuroscience. Within the context of such systems, we develop a widely applicable, jointly numerical and analytical methodology for deducing existence and stability of periodic travelling waves. We provide careful numerical studies that support the existence of a periodic travelling wave solution as well as the asymptotic relaxation of a single oscillator to the wave when it is forced with the wave profile. Using this evidence as an assumption, we analytically prove global stability of waves in the infinite chain, with respect to initial perturbations of downstream sites. This rigorous stability result suggests that asymptotic relaxation to the travelling wave occurs even when the forcing is perturbed from the wave profile, a property of the motivating system that is supported by previous work as well as the convergence of the more sophisticated numerical algorithm that we propose in order to compute a high-precision approximation to the solution. We provide additional numerical studies that show that the wave is part of a one-parameter family, and we illustrate the structural robustness of this family with respect to changes in the coupling strength.

  19. Stability of periodic waves generated by long-wavelength instabilities in isotropic and anisotropic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar, Doron E.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    1999-08-01

    We consider spontaneous generation of long waves in the presence of a conservation law in both cases of isotropic systems (e.g., Bénard-Marangoni waves) and anisotropic systems (e.g., waves in a film on an inclined plane). We found that near the instability threshold the problem is governed by the dissipation-modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation in the former case and by the anisotropic dissipation-modified Korteweg-de Vries equation in the latter case. In frames of the derived 2+1-dimensional amplitude equations, we investigate the stability of one-dimensional waves. In isotropic systems the one-dimensional waves turned out to be always unstable with respect to a long-wave transverse modulation of the front. In anisotropic systems, only the one-dimensional periodic waves moving in the most preferred direction are found to be stable. Any deviation from this direction leads to instability of such an oblique wave.

  20. Surface drift in the upper centimetres of the water column in short fetches and the behaviour of the diffusive sub-layer from experiments in a wind wave flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Robles, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    Ocean surface drift is of great relevance to properly model exchange processes between the ocean and the atmosphere. It is also important to better understand the early stages of surface waves development and their implications in the momentum transfer across the sea surface. In this work we study the the onset of surface drift induced by wind and waves through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Momentum transfer through the water surface, waves and surface drift were being measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. In a station in the middle of the tank momentum fluxes were estimated directly through the eddy correlation method to provide reference information for the corresponding surface drift onset recorded at very short fetch. During each experimental run very low wind was set on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0 at the end of each experiment. The 3-d velocity vertical profile is measured with an acoustic sensor (Nortek Vectrino Profiler), with a vertical resolution of 0.1 cm and sampling rate of 100 Hz, over a column of 3.5 cm in length. Under the highest wind conditions a very distinctive shear was detected in the upper 1.5 cm while the strongest surface drift was recorded as about 0.5 cm/s. A rather linear variation of surface drift was observed with depth under cases of low to moderate wind speed. Evolution of the surface drift velocity is analysed and onset behaviour is addressed with particular emphasis in accelerated winds. A strong surface drift is expected to play a major role in the early stages of surface wave spectrum development, which is to be addressed in terms of frequency spectra estimated from a capacitance gauge deployed in the vicinity of

  1. Doppler effect in a solid medium: Spin wave emission by a precessing domain wall drifting in spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a fundamental physical phenomenon observed for waves propagating in vacuum or various media, commonly gaseous or liquid. Here, we report on the occurrence of a Doppler effect in a solid medium. Instead of a real object, a topological soliton, i.e., a magnetic domain wall (DW) traveling in a current-carrying ferromagnetic nanowire, plays the role of the moving wave source. The Larmor precession of the DW in an external field stimulates emission of monochromatic spin waves (SWs) during its motion, which show a significant Doppler effect, comparable to the acoustic one of a train whistle. This process involves two prominent spin-transfer-torque effects simultaneously, the current-driven DW motion and the current-induced SW Doppler shift. The latter gives rise to an interesting feature, i.e., the observed SW Doppler effect appears resulting from a stationary source and a moving observer, contrary to the laboratory frame.

  2. Linear stability of multiple internal solitary waves in fluids of great depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Y.; Kaup, D. J.

    1997-02-01

    The linear stability of the multiple solitary wave solution of the Benjamin-Ono (BO) equation is studied analytically. By establishing the completeness relation for the eigenfunctions of the BO equation linearized about multisoliton solutions, we solve the initial value problem for this system. We find that the wave under consideration is stable against infinitesimal perturbations.

  3. Stability of the kinetic Alfven wave in a current-less plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekala, G.; Sebastian, Sijo; Michael, Manesh; Abraham, Noble P.; Renuka, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2015-06-01

    The two potential theory of Hasegawa has been used to derive the dispersion relation for the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) in a plasma composed of hydrogen, oxygen and electrons. All three components have been modeled by ring distributions (obtained by subtracting two Maxwellian distributions with different temperatures) with the hydrogen and electrons drifting, respectively, with velocities VdH and Vde. For the most general case, the dispersion relation is a polynomial equation of order five; it reduces to a relation which supports only one mode when VdH = 0. For typical parameters at comet Halley, we find that both VdH and Vde can drive the wave unstable; the KAW is thus driven unstable in a current-less plasma. Such an instability was found for the ion acoustic wave by Vranjes et al. (2009).

  4. Stability of the kinetic Alfven wave in a current-less plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Noble P.; C, Venugopal; Sebastian, Sijo; Renuka, G.; Balan, Nanan; Sreekala, G.

    The two potential theory of Hasegawa has been used to derive the dispersion relation for the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) in a plasma composed of hydrogen, oxygen and electrons. All three components have been modeled by ring distributions (obtained by subtracting two Maxwellian distributions with different temperatures) with the hydrogen and electrons drifting, respectively, with velocities V_{dH} and V_{de}. For the most general case, the dispersion equation is a polynomial equation of order five; it reduces to a relation which supports only one mode when V_{dH}=0. For typical parameters at comet Halley, we find that both V_{dH} and V_{de} can drive the wave unstable; the KAW is thus driven unstable in a current-less plasma. Such an instability was found for the ion acoustic wave by Vranjes et al.

  5. Stability of the solitary wave solutions to a coupled BBM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongqiu; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a stability criteria for the solitary wave solutions to a BBM system that contains coupled nonlinear terms. Using the idea by Bona, Chen and Karakashian [5] and exploiting the accurate point spectrum information of the associated Schrödinger operator, we improve the stability results previously gotten by Pereira [15].

  6. A proof for the mode stability of a self-similar wave map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, O.; Donninger, R.; Xia, X.

    2016-08-01

    We study the fundamental self-similar solution to the SU(2) sigma model, found by Shatah and Turok–Spergel. We give a rigorous proof for its mode stability. Based on earlier results by the second author, the present paper constitutes the last building block for a completely rigorous proof of the nonlinear stability of the Shatah–Turok–Spergel wave map.

  7. Effect of a backward wave on the stability of an ultrahigh gain gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Du Chaohai; Liu Pukun; Xue Qianzhong; Wang Minghong

    2008-12-15

    A systematic stability analysis method using theoretical tools combining linear and self-consistent nonlinear theory is presented to analyze an ultrahigh gain gyrotron traveling-wave (gyro-TWT) amplifier operated in the fundamental TE{sub 11} mode in the Ka-band. It characterizes the role that the backward-wave component plays in the internal feedback physical processes of two major kinds of self-induced oscillations associated with TE{sub 11}{sup (1)} absolute instability and TE{sub 21}{sup (2)} gyrobackward-wave oscillation. For the first time, self-induced constriction in TE{sub 11}{sup (1)} absolute instability caused by a strong backward-wave component is revealed through simulation. Both the thickness and resistivity of the distributed wall loss loaded on the inside of the interaction waveguide have obvious effects on stabilizing both kinds of oscillations. Following the stability analysis, a multistage interaction circuit is proposed by nonlinear analysis which shortens the length of the entire structure and enables the ultrahigh gain gyro-TWT to operate with high stability and wide bandwidth.

  8. Asymptotic nonlinear stability of traveling waves to conservation laws arising from chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tong; Wang, Zhi-An

    In this paper, we establish the existence and the nonlinear stability of traveling wave solutions to a system of conservation laws which is transformed, by a change of variable, from the well-known Keller-Segel model describing cell (bacteria) movement toward the concentration gradient of the chemical that is consumed by the cells. We prove the existence of traveling fronts by the phase plane analysis and show the asymptotic nonlinear stability of traveling wave solutions without the smallness assumption on the wave strengths by the method of energy estimates.

  9. S-parameter characterization and lumped-element modelling of millimeter-wave single-drift impact-ionization avalanche transit-time diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wogong; Yamamoto, Yuji; Oehme, Michael; Matthies, Klaus; Raju, Ashraful I.; Senthil Srinivasan, V. S.; Körner, Roman; Gollhofer, Martin; Bechler, Stefan; Funk, Hannes; Tillack, Bernd; Kasper, Erich; Schulze, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Five silicon (Si) p++-n--n++ samples were grown at various doping concentrations (1.0 × 1017-2.2 × 1017 cm-3) in an n- layer by using the reduced-pressure CVD technique. By using these samples, 30 × 2 µm2 single-drift (SD) impact-ionization avalanche transit-time (IMPATT) diodes were processed with Si-based monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (SIMMWIC) technology.1 , 2 ) The samples within a small process window exhibited a large negative differential resistance at approximately the avalanche frequency, as confirmed by small-signal S-parameter characterization. A model based on depletion width was given to explain the conditions for the appearance of the negative differential IMPATT resistance, which is the basis of millimeter-wave amplifier and oscillator applications. Furthermore, a measurement-based small-signal lumped-element model was established to describe the IMPATT functionality from the circuit component aspect. This lumped-element model shows a negative differential resistance within a well-defined range in the given element parameters, which can explain the experimental observations.

  10. Uniqueness and stability of traveling waves for cellular neural networks with multiple delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhi-Xian; Mei, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of traveling waves to a class of lattice differential equations for cellular neural networks with multiple delays. Following the previous study [38] on the existence of the traveling waves, here we focus on the uniqueness and the stability of these traveling waves. First of all, by establishing the a priori asymptotic behavior of traveling waves and applying Ikehara's theorem, we prove the uniqueness (up to translation) of traveling waves ϕ (n - ct) with c ≤c* for the cellular neural networks with multiple delays, where c* < 0 is the critical wave speed. Then, by the weighted energy method together with the squeezing technique, we further show the global stability of all non-critical traveling waves for this model, that is, for all monotone waves with the speed c waves, when the initial perturbations around the monotone traveling waves decay exponentially at far fields, but can be arbitrarily large in other locations.