Science.gov

Sample records for driven advanced oxidation

  1. A solar-driven UV/Chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Chan, Po Yee; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Bolton, James R

    2012-11-01

    An overlap of the absorption spectrum of the hypochlorite ion (OCl(-)) and the ultraviolet (UV) end of the solar emission spectrum implies that solar photons can probably initiate the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP). The application of this solar process to water and wastewater treatment has been investigated in this study. At the bench-scale, the OCl(-) photolysis quantum yield at 303 nm (representative of the lower end of the solar UV region) and at concentrations from 0 to 4.23 mM was 0.87 ± 0.01. Also the hydroxyl radical yield factor (for an OCl(-) concentration of 1.13 mM) was 0.70 ± 0.02. Application of this process, at the bench-scale and under actual sunlight, led to methylene blue (MB) photobleaching and cyclohexanoic acid (CHA) photodegradation. For MB photobleaching, the OCl(-) concentration was the key factor causing an increase in the pseudo first-order rate constants. The MB photobleaching quantum yield was affected by the MB concentration, but not much by the OCl(-) concentration. For CHA photodegradation, an optimal OCl(-) concentration of 1.55 mM was obtained for a 0.23 mM CHA concentration, and a scavenger effect was observed when higher OCl(-) concentrations were applied. Quantum yields of 0.09 ± 0.01 and 0.89 ± 0.06 were found for CHA photodegradation and OCl(-) photolysis, respectively. In addition, based on the Air Mass 1.5 reference solar spectrum and experimental quantum yields, a theoretical calculation method was developed to estimate the initial rate for photoreactions under sunlight. The theoretical initial rates agreed well with the experimental rates for both MB photobleaching and CHA photodegradation. PMID:22939221

  2. Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Velasco, Yuridia; Torres, Luis G

    2008-12-30

    Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested AOPs with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation. PMID:18423856

  3. Novel MoSe2 hierarchical microspheres for applications in visible-light-driven advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Chu; Qing, Enping; Li, Yong; Zhou, Zhaoxin; Yang, Chao; Tian, Xike; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-11-01

    Advanced oxidation processes as a green technology have been adopted by combining the semiconductor catalyst MoSe2 with H2O2 under visible radiation. And novel three-dimensional self-assembled molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) hierarchical microspheres from nanosheets were produced by using organic, selenium cyanoacetic acid sodium (NCSeCH2COONa) as the source of Se. The obtained products possess good crystallinity and present hierarchical structures with the average diameter of 1 μm. The band gap of MoSe2 microspheres is 1.68 eV and they present excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation in the MoSe2-H2O2 system. This effective photocatalytic mechanism was investigated in this study and can be attributed to visible-light-driven advanced oxidation processes.

  4. Degradation of sodium dodecyl sulphate in water using solar driven Fenton-like advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Peláez, Miguel A; Salgado, Maria J; Torres, Luis

    2008-03-01

    Synthetic wastewater samples containing a model surfactant were treated using two different Fenton-like advanced oxidation processes promoted by solar radiation; the photo-Fenton reaction and Co/PMS/UV processes. Comparison between the different experimental conditions was performed by means of the overall surfactant degradation achieved and by obtaining the initial rate in the first 15 min of reaction (IR15). It was found that, for dark Fenton reaction, the maximum surfactant degradation achieved was 14% under low iron and oxidant concentration. Increasing Fenton reagents by one magnitude order, surfactant degradation achieved 63% in 60 min. The use of solar radiation improved the reaction rate by 17% under same conditions and an additional increase of 12.5% was obtained by adjusting initial pH to 2. IR15 values for dark and irradiated Fenton reactions were 0.143 and 0.154 mmol/min, respectively, for similar reaction conditions and this value increased to 0.189 mmol/min when initial pH was adjusted. The use of the Co/PMS system allow us to determine an increase in the degradation rate, for low reaction conditions (1 mM of transition metal; 4 mM oxidant) similar to those used in dark Fenton reaction. Surfactant degradation increased from 3%, for Fenton reaction, to 44.5% in the case of Co/PMS. When solar irradiation was included in the experiments, under same reaction conditions described earlier, surfactant degradation up to 64% was achieved. By increasing Co/PMS reagent concentration by almost 9 times under irradiated conditions, almost complete (>99%) surfactant degradation was reached in 5 min. Comparing IR15 values for Co/PMS and Co/PMS/UV, it allow us to observe that the use of solar radiation increased the degradation rate in one magnitude order when compared with dark experiments and further increase of reagent concentration increased reaction rate twice. PMID:17658215

  5. Degradation of atrazine using solar driven fenton-like advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Domínguez, Zair; Rivas, Fernanda; Gelover, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) was degraded using cobalt-peroximonosulfate (Co/PMS) advanced oxidation process (AOP). Three Co concentrations (0.00, 0.25 and 0.50 mM) and five peroximonosulfate (PMS) concentrations (0, 5, 8, 16 and 32 mM) were tested. Maximum degradation reached was 88% using dark Co/PMS in 126 minutes when 0.25 mM of cobalt and 32 mM of PMS were used. Complete atrazine degradation was achieved when the samples were irradiated by the sun under the same experimental conditions described. Tests for identification of intermediate products allowed identification and quantification of deethylatrazine in both dark and radiated conditions. Kinetic data for both processes was calculated fitting a pseudo-first order reaction rate approach to the experimental data. Having kinetic parameters enabled comparison between both conditions. It was found that the kinetic approach describes data behavior appropriately (R2 > or = 0.95). Pseudo-kinetic constants determined for both Co/PMS processes, show k value of 10(-4) for Co/PMS and a k value of 10(-3) for Co/PMS/ultraviolet (UV). This means, that, with the same Co/PMS concentrations, UV light increases the reaction rate by around one order of magnitude than performing the reaction under dark conditions. PMID:17162564

  6. Fully solar-driven thermo- and electrochemistry for advanced oxidation processes (STEP-AOPs) of 2-nitrophenol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chunhong; Shao, Nan; Wang, Baohui; Yuan, Dandan; Sui, Xin; Wu, Hongjun

    2016-07-01

    The STEP (Solar Thermal Electrochemical Process) for Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs, combined to STEP-AOPs), fully driven by solar energy without the input of any other forms of energy and chemicals, is introduced and demonstrated from the theory to experiments. Exemplified by the persistent organic pollutant 2-nitrophenol in water, the fundamental model and practical system are exhibited for the STEP-AOPs to efficiently transform 2-nitrophenol into carbon dioxide, water, and the other substances. The results show that the STEP-AOPs system performs more effectively than classical AOPs in terms of the thermodynamics and kinetics of pollutant oxidation. Due to the combination of solar thermochemical reactions with electrochemistry, the STEP-AOPs system allows the requisite electrolysis voltage of 2-nitrophenol to be experimentally decreased from 1.00 V to 0.84 V, and the response current increases from 18 mA to 40 mA. STEP-AOPs also greatly improve the kinetics of the oxidation at 30 °C and 80 °C. As a result, the removal rate of 2-nitrophenol after 1 h increased from 19.50% at 30 °C to 32.70% at 80 °C at constant 1.90 V. Mechanistic analysis reveals that the oxidation pathway is favorably changed because of thermal effects. The tracking of the reaction displayed that benzenediol and hydroquinone are initial products, with maleic acid and formic acid as sequential carboxylic acid products, and carbon dioxide as the final product. The theory and experiments on STEP-AOPs system exemplified by the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol provide a broad basis for extension of the STEP and AOPs for rapid and efficient treatment of organic wastewater. PMID:27093694

  7. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Colin P. Horwitz; Dr. Terrence J. Collins

    2003-11-04

    The removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from automotive fuels is an integral component in the development of cleaner burning and more efficient automobile engines. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein the dibenzothiophene derivative is converted to its corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone is an attractive approach to sulfur removal because the oxidized species are easily extracted or precipitated and filtered from the hydrocarbon phase. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) catalytically convert dibenzothiophene and its derivatives rapidly and effectively at moderate temperatures (50-60 C) and ambient pressure to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones. The oxidation process can be performed in both aqueous systems containing alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol, and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system containing tert-butanol or acetonitrile. In the biphasic system, essentially complete conversion of the DBT to its oxidized products can be achieved using slightly longer reaction times than in homogeneous solution. Among the key features of the technology are the mild reaction conditions, the very high selectivity where no over oxidation of the sulfur compounds occurs, the near stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide, the apparent lack of degradation of sensitive fuel components, and the ease of separation of oxidized products.

  8. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Colin P. Horwitz; Terrence J. Collins

    2003-10-22

    The design of new, high efficiency and cleaner burning engines is strongly coupled with the removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from fuels. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein these dibenzothiophene derivatives are oxidized to their corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones is an approach that has gained significant attention. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) convert in a catalytic process dibenzothiophene and its derivatives to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones rapidly at moderate temperatures (60 C) and ambient pressure. The reaction can be performed in both an aqueous system containing an alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol) to solubilize the DBT and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system where the alcohol is present in both phases and facilitates the oxidation. Under a consistent set of conditions using the FeBF{sub 2} TAML activator, the degree of conversion was found to be t-butanol > methanol > ethanol. In the cases of methanol and ethanol, both the sulfoxide and sulfone were observed while for t-butanol only the sulfone was detected. In the two-phase system, the alcohol may function as an inverse phase transfer agent. The oxidation was carried out using two different TAML activators. In homogeneous solution, approximately 90% oxidation of the DBT could be achieved using the prototype TAML activator, FeB*, by sonicating the solution at near room temperature. In bi-phasic systems conversions as high as 50% were achieved using the FeB* TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide at 100 C. The sonication method yielded only {approx}6% conversion but this may have been due to mixing.

  9. Light-driven water oxidation for solar fuels

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karin J.; Martini, Lauren A.; Milot, Rebecca L.; III, Robert C. Snoeberger; Batista, Victor S.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Light-driven water oxidation is an essential step for conversion of sunlight into storable chemical fuels. Fujishima and Honda reported the first example of photoelectrochemical water oxidation in 1972. In their system, TiO2 was irradiated with ultraviolet light, producing oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at a platinum cathode. Inspired by this system, more recent work has focused on functionalizing nanoporous TiO2 or other semiconductor surfaces with molecular adsorbates, including chromophores and catalysts that absorb visible light and generate electricity (i.e., dye-sensitized solar cells) or trigger water oxidation at low overpotentials (i.e., photocatalytic cells). The physics involved in harnessing multiple photochemical events for multielectron reactions, as required in the four-electron water oxidation process, has been the subject of much experimental and computational study. In spite of significant advances with regard to individual components, the development of highly efficient photocatalytic cells for solar water splitting remains an outstanding challenge. This article reviews recent progress in the field with emphasis on water-oxidation photoanodes inspired by the design of functionalized thin film semiconductors of typical dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:25364029

  10. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, Bruce P.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Striker, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  11. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  12. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  13. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2015-11-01

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  14. Advances in pulsed-power-driven radiography system design.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Hinshelwood, David D.; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Cordova, Steve Ray; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Weber, Bruce V.; Welch, Dale Robert; Shelton, Bradley Allen; Sceiford, Matthew E.; Cooperstein, Gerald; Gignac, Raymond Edward; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David Vincent; Barker, Dennis L.; Van De Valde, David M.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Wilkins, Frank Lee; Molina, Isidro; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Bailey, Vernon Leslie; Maenchen, John Eric; Johnson, David Lee; Griffin, Fawn A.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Smith, Ian

    2004-07-01

    Flash x-ray radiography has undergone a transformation in recent years with the resurgence of interest in compact, high intensity pulsed-power-driven electron beam sources. The radiographic requirements and the choice of a consistent x-ray source determine the accelerator parameters, which can be met by demonstrated Induction Voltage Adder technologies. This paper reviews the state of the art and the recent advances which have improved performance by over an order of magnitude in beam brightness and radiographic utility.

  15. Stochasticity and orbit types in advanced beam-driven FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Francesco; Galeotti, Laura; Barnes, Dan; Dettrick, Sean; Monkhorst, Henk; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Advanced beam-driven FRCs (Field Reversed Configurations) represent a plasma configuration which is aimed to reach steady state through external sustainment. In an advanced beam-driven FRC the plasma has a very rich selection of orbit types, namely, drift, betatron, figure-8 and type-I. How much each type contributes to the total quantity of orbits strongly depends on both plasma and external field parameters and it may include regular and stochastic orbits with very different ratios. We study the orbit type distribution as well as the fractions of regular and stochastic orbits for a set of realistic advanced beam-driven FRC equilibria in very different plasma regimes. In particular, we investigate the dependences of the orbit type distribution on the equilibrium parameters and we discuss the relevant role of the FRC parameter s in providing a good estimate of the total quantity of stochastic orbits. A first investigation of the possible role of stochastic orbits in thermalizing processes induced by magnetic pumping techniques is presented.

  16. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  17. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.

  18. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling upmore » of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.« less

  19. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). By comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.

  20. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). By comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps. PMID:25548155

  1. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  2. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED NONPHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this handbook is to summarize commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced nonphotochemical oxidation (ANPO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and soil. Similar information from pilot-and bench-scale evaluations of ANPO processes is also inclu...

  3. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook summarizes commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced photochemical oxidation (APO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and solids. Similar information from pilot- and bench-scale evaluations of APO processes is also included to supplement the...

  4. Oxidation of Alloys for Advanced Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.E.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-09-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steam oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  5. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces. PMID:27030693

  6. Advances in Mechanisms of Anti-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a family of molecules that are continuously produced from oxygen consumption in aerobic cells. Controlled generation of ROS in normal cells serves useful purposes to regulate important cellular processes such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and immune response, but overproduction of ROS causes oxidative stress that contributes to the development of cancer, chronic disease, and aging. These hugely different consequences of ROS exposure demand a carefully balanced control of ROS production and disposition, which is largely achieved through the body’s elaborate antioxidant system. The human antioxidant system consists of small antioxidants, antioxidant proteins, ROS-metabolizing enzymes, as well as many regulator proteins that mediate adaptive responses to oxidant stress. How such a complex system reacts with oxidants and achieves the required specificity and sensitivity for proper anti-oxidation is incompletely understood. In this respect, new advances in the understanding of the chemistry that determines the reaction of a given oxidant or antioxidant with a protein target provide considerable insights into these and related questions. The findings hold certain promise for new drug development for preventing and treating diseases associated with oxidant tissue damage. PMID:24641954

  7. Characterization of advanced oxidation regenerated GACs

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Cannon, F.S.

    1995-11-01

    Industrial and manufacturing processes that employ organic solvents, such as pharmaceutical production, spray booth coating applications, and petrochemical processing, constitute a major source of airborne volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). VOCs released into the atmosphere react with sunlight to create photochemical smog, oxidants and other pollutants, all of which are considered harmful to animal and plant life. There is thus a need for effective air pollution remediation technologies for such facilities. This paper explores the effects of regeneration by means of advanced oxidation involving UV and ozone, on several properties of granular activated carbons (GACs). The effects of reduction in surface areas and pore volumes, and surface oxidation due to this process of regeneration, on adsorption capacities of some model VOCs is investigated.

  8. Novel imazethapyr detoxification applying advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Stathis, Ioannis; Hela, Dimitra G; Scrano, Laura; Lelario, Filomena; Emanuele, Lucia; Bufo, Sabino A

    2011-01-01

    Different degradation methods have been applied to assess the suitability of advanced oxidation process (AOPs) to promote mineralization of imazethapyr [(RS)-5-ethyl-2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)nicotinic acid], a widely used imidazolinone class herbicide, the persistence of which has been demonstrated in surface and ground waters destined to human uses. Independent of the oxidation process assessed, the decomposition of imazethapyr always followed a pseudo-first order kinetic. The direct UV-irradiation (UV) of the herbicide as well as its oxidation with ozone (O₃), and hydrogen peroxide tied to UV-irradiation (H₂O₂/UV) were sufficiently slow to permit the identification of intermediate products, the formation pathway of which has been proposed. Ozonation joined to UV-irradiation (O₃/UV), ozonation joined to titanium dioxide photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV+O₃), sole photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV), and photo-catalysis reinforced with hydrogen peroxide-oxidation (TiO₂/UV+H₂O₂) were characterized by a faster degradation and rapid formation of a lot of small molecules, which were quickly degraded to complete mineralization. The most effective oxidation methods were those using titanium dioxide photo-catalysis enhanced either by ozonation or hydrogen peroxide. Most of all, these last processes were useful to avoid the development of dangerous by-products. PMID:21726140

  9. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  10. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-01-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields. PMID:24503715

  11. Visible-Light-Driven Water Oxidation by a Molecular Manganese Vanadium Oxide Cluster.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Forster, Johannes; Goetz, McKenna K; Yücel, Duygu; Berger, Claudia; Jacob, Timo; Streb, Carsten

    2016-05-17

    Photosynthetic water oxidation in plants occurs at an inorganic calcium manganese oxo cluster, which is known as the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), in photosystem II. Herein, we report a synthetic OEC model based on a molecular manganese vanadium oxide cluster, [Mn4 V4 O17 (OAc)3 ](3-) . The compound is based on a [Mn4 O4 ](6+) cubane core, which catalyzes the homogeneous, visible-light-driven oxidation of water to molecular oxygen and is stabilized by a tripodal [V4 O13 ](6-) polyoxovanadate and three acetate ligands. When combined with the photosensitizer [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) and the oxidant persulfate, visible-light-driven water oxidation with turnover numbers of approximately 1150 and turnover frequencies of about 1.75 s(-1) is observed. Electrochemical, mass-spectrometric, and spectroscopic studies provide insight into the cluster stability and reactivity. This compound could serve as a model for the molecular structure and reactivity of the OEC and for heterogeneous metal oxide water-oxidation catalysts. PMID:27062440

  12. Kinetically driven instabilities and selectivities in methane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.K.; Vlachos, D.G.

    1997-08-01

    Ignitions, extinctions, and Hopf bifurcations in methane oxidation were studied as a function of pressure and inlet fuel composition. A continuous stirred-tank reactor was modeled with numerical bifurcation techniques, using the 177 reaction/31 species mechanism. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses were performed at turning points to identify the most important reactions and reactive species. Then, simulations were compared with experimental data. Multiple ignitions and extinctions as well as oscillations that are purely kinetically driven were found. Ignition to a partially ignited state with considerable reactivity of methane indicates possible narrow operation windows with high selectivities to partial oxidation products. At 0.1 atm, the authors found a selectivity of up to 80% to CO at 70% CH{sub 4} conversion. The ignition to a fully ignited branch is associated with high selectivity to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The C2 chemistry inhibits the ignition of methane to the partially ignited branch. The methane ignition temperature exhibits two branches with respect to pressure, with only the low-pressure branch being dominant. Reaction path analysis at ignition conditions shows that the preferred pathway of CH{sub 4} oxidation is to form CO and CO{sub 2} though CH{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}(s) intermediates. However, at intermediate to high pressures, the recombination of CH{sub 3} to C{sub 2}H{sub 6} also becomes quite significant.

  13. ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents information on two pilot-field appliations of advanced oxidation technologies for contaminated groundwater with organis. The two UV/oxidation technologies were developed by Ultrox International of Santa Ana, California and Peroxidatrion Systems, Inc. of Tucso...

  14. Iron oxides stimulate sulfate-driven anaerobic methane oxidation in seeps

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Orit; Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Seep sediments are dominated by intensive microbial sulfate reduction coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Through geochemical measurements of incubation experiments with methane seep sediments collected from Hydrate Ridge, we provide insight into the role of iron oxides in sulfate-driven AOM. Seep sediments incubated with 13C-labeled methane showed co-occurring sulfate reduction, AOM, and methanogenesis. The isotope fractionation factors for sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate were about 40‰ and 22‰, respectively, reinforcing the difference between microbial sulfate reduction in methane seeps versus other sedimentary environments (for example, sulfur isotope fractionation above 60‰ in sulfate reduction coupled to organic carbon oxidation or in diffusive sedimentary sulfate–methane transition zone). The addition of hematite to these microcosm experiments resulted in significant microbial iron reduction as well as enhancing sulfate-driven AOM. The magnitude of the isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate from these incubations was lowered by about 50%, indicating the involvement of iron oxides during sulfate reduction in methane seeps. The similar relative change between the oxygen versus sulfur isotopes of sulfate in all experiments (with and without hematite addition) suggests that oxidized forms of iron, naturally present in the sediment incubations, were involved in sulfate reduction, with hematite addition increasing the sulfate recycling or the activity of sulfur-cycling microorganisms by about 40%. These results highlight a role for natural iron oxides during bacterial sulfate reduction in methane seeps not only as nutrient but also as stimulator of sulfur recycling. PMID:25246590

  15. Advanced oxidation technologies for chemical demilitarization

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.; Korzekwa, R.A.; Monagle, M.; Coogan, J.J.; Tennant, R.A.; Brown, L.F.; Currier, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The main project objective was to establish a technical basis for future program development in the area of chemical warfare agent destruction using a Los Alamos-developed advanced oxidation process: a two-stage device consisting of thermal packed-bed reactor (PBR) and a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor. Various compounds were evaluated as potential surrogates for chemical warfare (CW) agents. Representative effluent mass balances were projected for future comparisons with incinerators. The design and construction of lab-scale PBR/NTP reactors (consisting of a liquid injection and metering system, electric furnace, condensers, chemical traps, plasma reactors, power supplies, and chemical diagnostics) has been completed. This equipment, the experience gained from chemical-processing experiments, process modeling, and an initial demonstration of the feasibility of closed-loop operation, have provided a technical basis for further demonstrations and program development efforts.

  16. Insights into the solar light driven thermocatalytic oxidation of VOCs over tunnel structured manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yali; Wang, Wenzhong; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Ling; Li, Xiaoman; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-21

    Different tunnel structured manganese oxides (1*1, 2*2, and 3*3) have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal strategy. The three catalysts exhibit high photothermal performance, resulting in a considerable increase of temperature above the light-off temperature for VOC oxidation. On this point, aerobic oxidation reactions of propane and propylene under simulated sunlight and infrared light irradiation were selected as probe reactions to explore their light driven thermocatalytic activity. Furthermore, the light-off curves of the manganese oxides for propane and propylene were carefully investigated, which clearly explained the possibility of combining both the efficient photothermal effect and excellent thermocatalytic activity of the manganese oxides. Results show that the catalytic effects follow the order of 1*1 < 3*3 < 2*2. 2*2 exhibited the best catalytic properties due to better low-temperature reducibility, suitable tunnel structure and the presence of more Mn(4+). This work suggests new applications for traditional catalysts with intense photoabsorption and provides insights into the overall utilization of solar energy. PMID:27333408

  17. Advances in Optimizing Weather Driven Electric Power Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States (and global) energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. The National Energy with Weather System Simulator (NEWS) is a mathematical optimization tool that allows the construction of weather-driven energy sources that will work in harmony with the needs of the system. For example, it will match the electric load, reduce variability, decrease costs, and abate carbon emissions. One important test run included existing US carbon-free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an increase in electric costs. The key requirement would be a 48 state network of HVDC transmission, creating a national market for electricity not possible in the current AC grid. These results were found without the need for storage. Further, we tested the effect of changing natural gas fuel prices on the optimal configuration of the national electric power system. Another test that was carried out was an extension to global regions. The extension study shows that the same properties found in the US study extend to the most populous regions of the planet. The extra test is a simplified version of the US study, and is where much more research can be carried out. We compare our results to other model results.

  18. Lipid advanced glycosylation: pathway for lipid oxidation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bucala, R; Makita, Z; Koschinsky, T; Cerami, A; Vlassara, H

    1993-01-01

    To address potential mechanisms for oxidative modification of lipids in vivo, we investigated the possibility that phospholipids react directly with glucose to form advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) that then initiate lipid oxidation. Phospholipid-linked AGEs formed readily in vitro, mimicking the absorbance, fluorescence, and immunochemical properties of AGEs that result from advanced glycosylation of proteins. Oxidation of unsaturated fatty acid residues, as assessed by reactive aldehyde formation, occurred at a rate that paralleled the rate of lipid advanced glycosylation. Aminoguanidine, an agent that prevents protein advanced glycosylation, inhibited both lipid advanced glycosylation and oxidative modification. Incubation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) with glucose produced AGE moieties that were attached to both the lipid and the apoprotein components. Oxidized LDL formed concomitantly with AGE-modified LDL. Of significance, AGE ELISA analysis of LDL specimens isolated from diabetic individuals revealed increased levels of both apoprotein- and lipid-linked AGEs when compared to specimens obtained from normal, nondiabetic controls. Circulating levels of oxidized LDL were elevated in diabetic patients and correlated significantly with lipid AGE levels. These data support the concept that AGE oxidation plays an important and perhaps primary role in initiating lipid oxidation in vivo. PMID:8341651

  19. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOP'S FOR THE TREATMENT OF CCL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on treatment of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) chemicals is being conducted. Specific groups of contaminants on the CCL will be evaluated using numerous advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Initially, these CCL contaminants will be evaluated in groups based on chemical...

  20. SULFATE RADICAL-BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES- ACS MEETING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will present an overview of sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation technologies for the destruction of environmentally toxic chemicals in wastewater, industrial water, groundwater and sources of water supply. The paper will include fundamental aspects of the generati...

  1. Oxidation-Reduction Resistance of Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.; Humphrey, D. L.; Setlock, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to oxidation and blanching is a key issue for advanced copper alloys under development for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Candidate alloys, including dispersion-strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb, solution-strengthened Cu-Ag-Zr, and ODS Cu-Al2O3, are being evaluated for oxidation resistance by static TGA exposures in low-p(O2) and cyclic oxidation in air, and by cyclic oxidation-reduction exposures (using air for oxidation and CO/CO2 or H2/Ar for reduction) to simulate expected service environments. The test protocol and results are presented.

  2. Magnetically-Driven Isentropic Compression Status and Future Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeney, Christopher

    2005-07-01

    Since the development of magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments (ICE) on the Z accelerator by Asay et al, this technique has continued to grow in maturity. At lower pressures, isentropic compression has been employed to identify and then study phase transitions and their kinetics. In addition, experiments have used the same techniques to study re-solidification, the response of explosives, and the crush up of porous materials. Most of these experiments rely on the ability of ICE to generate very smooth ramps that can be applied to multiple samples for relative experiments. For equation of state studies, the intrinsic accuracy and peak pressures continue to demand improvement in understanding, analysis techniques and diagnostics. We have spent significant effort in these areas over the last few years because we believe that we must demonstrate a well characterized and understood method to obtain accurate EOS data with well-behaved materials to give confidence in future comparisons between ICE data and calculations of material properties. In our presentation, we will discuss the status of Z experiments, our recent data at multi-megabar pressures with aluminum and other materials, and the status of our analysis abilities. We will also discuss the need for future improvements in diagnostics plus the anticipated capabilities of the ZR facility and the small pulser. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company..

  3. Ellerman bombs: Advances driven by high-resolution observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Gregal

    Ellerman bombs, transient brightenings that have traditionally been observed in the wings of the Balmer Halpha line, are a ubiquitous phenomenon in the lower atmosphere of active regions with considerable flux emergence. These explosive events display sub-arcsecond fine structure, fast dynamical evolution and their energies tend to fall in the nanoflare ballpark. Over the past decade and a half, several high-resolution ground-based and space-based telescopes have contributed greatly to further characterising Ellerman bombs, offering a view in spectral diagnostics ranging from the UV to the infrared. I will highlight some of the recent advances that have been made - both observationally and from a theoretical point of view - in determining their properties (quantitative morphology, energies, flows and proper motion, driving mechanism, etc.), and discuss the potential of observations from relatively new space-based telescopes, such as SDO and IRIS, to add to our understanding of this phenomenon.

  4. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  5. Liquid-Sn-driven lateral growth of poly-GeSn on insulator assisted by surface oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Masashi; Taoka, Noriyuki; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Miyao, Masanobu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2013-09-01

    Effects of surface oxide layers on liquid-Sn-driven GeSn crystallization on insulators at various temperatures (<475 °C) are investigated. An amorphous Ge in neighborhood of patterned-Sn (<3.5 μm) becomes to polycrystalline Ge1-xSnx (x ≈ 0.025 - 0.14) after annealing at 150-475 °C, which is independent of the surface oxide thickness. Interestingly, a 50-μm-length lateral growth of polycrystalline Ge0.99Sn0.01 layers achieved by combination of thickening of the surface-oxide treated by NH4OH and annealing above melting temperature of Sn (231.9 °C). The growth length is 15 times longer than without the treatment. The advanced process promises to achieve group-IV-based optic and electronic devices on flexible substrates and Si platforms.

  6. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  7. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  8. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications. PMID:27199184

  9. Advanced launch system. Advanced development oxidizer turbopump program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    On May 19, 1989, Pratt & Whitney was awarded contract NAS8-37595 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville Alabama for an Advanced Development Program (ADP) to design, develop and demonstrate a highly reliable low cost, liquid oxygen turbopump for the Advanced Launch System (ALS). The ALS had an overall goal of reducing the cost of placing payloads in orbit by an order of magnitude. This goal would require a substantial reduction in life cycle costs, with emphasis on recurring costs, compared to current launch vehicles. Engine studies supporting these efforts were made for the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). The emphasis on low cost required design simplification of components and subsystems such that the ground maintenance and test operations was minimized. The results of the Oxygen Turbopump ADP technology effort would provide data to be used in the STME. Initially the STME baseline was a gas generator cycle engine with a vacuum thrust level of 580,000 lbf. This was later increased to 650,000 lbf and the oxygen turbopump design approach was changed to reflect the new thrust level. It was intended that this ADP program be conducted in two phases. Phase 1, a basic phase, would encompass the preliminary design effort, and Phase II, an optional contract phase to cover design, fabrication and test evaluation of an oxygen turbopump at a component test facility at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The basic phase included preliminary design and analysis, evaluation of low cost concepts, and evaluation of fabrication techniques. The option phase included design of the pump and support hardware, analysis of the final configuration to ensure design integrity, fabrication of hardware to demonstrate low cost, DVS Testing of hardware to verify the design, assembly of the turbopump and full scale turbopump testing. In December 1990, the intent of this ADP to support the design and development was

  10. Advanced launch system. Advanced development oxidizer turbopump program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    On May 19, 1989, Pratt & Whitney was awarded contract NAS8-37595 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville Alabama for an Advanced Development Program (ADP) to design, develop and demonstrate a highly reliable low cost, liquid oxygen turbopump for the Advanced Launch System (ALS). The ALS had an overall goal of reducing the cost of placing payloads in orbit by an order of magnitude. This goal would require a substantial reduction in life cycle costs, with emphasis on recurring costs, compared to current launch vehicles. Engine studies supporting these efforts were made for the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). The emphasis on low cost required design simplification of components and subsystems such that the ground maintenance and test operations was minimized. The results of the Oxygen Turbopump ADP technology effort would provide data to be used in the STME. Initially the STME baseline was a gas generator cycle engine with a vacuum thrust level of 580,000 lbf. This was later increased to 650,000 lbf and the oxygen turbopump design approach was changed to reflect the new thrust level. It was intended that this ADP program be conducted in two phases. Phase 1, a basic phase, would encompass the preliminary design effort, and Phase II, an optional contract phase to cover design, fabrication and test evaluation of an oxygen turbopump at a component test facility at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The basic phase included preliminary design and analysis, evaluation of low cost concepts, and evaluation of fabrication techniques. The option phase included design of the pump and support hardware, analysis of the final configuration to ensure design integrity, fabrication of hardware to demonstrate low cost, DVS Testing of hardware to verify the design, assembly of the turbopump and full scale turbopump testing. In December 1990, the intent of this ADP to support the design and development was

  11. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C.; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications.Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2

  12. Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

  13. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  14. Advanced metal oxide varistor concepts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Philipp, H.R.; Mahan, G.D.; Levinson, L.M.

    1984-07-01

    Zinc oxide varistors are ZnO-based ceramic semiconductor devices with highly nonlinear current-voltage characteristics similar to back-to-back Zener diodes but with much greater current, voltage, and energy-handling capabilities. Zinc oxide varistors have proven useful in a variety of applications, particularly as high-quality voltage suppression devices for the protection of ac and dc electric power transmission systems against the effects of transient overvoltages due to switching surges and lightning strikes. In the work described in this report, we have chosen to study simple varistor systems that use Bi or Pr as the varistor-forming additive and Co or Mn as the varistor-performance ingredient. Commercial varistor materials generally use Bi as the varistor-forming ingredient, and the sintering process in such material probably proceeds in the liquid phase. Varistor materials that use Pr as the varistor-forming ingredient are also produced commercially. However, owing to the high melting point of Pr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ compared to Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/, sintering in these materials probably takes place in the solid state. The performance ingredients Co and Mn are present in almost all commercial mixes. Co is an interesting choice because it is known to introduce a deep level into ZnO, giving such varistors a green color.

  15. Studies of Jet Outflow from Advanced Beam-Driven FRC Plasma on C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheftman, Daniel; Gupta, Deepak; Giammanco, Francesco; Conti, Fabio; Marsili, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Experiments demonstrating sustainment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma via neutral beam injection have been carried out on C-2U. Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy through open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven FRC plasma. Passive Doppler spectroscopy and microwave interferometry measurements provide an initial view of the behavior of the open-field-line plasmas on the C-2U device. These measurements and estimations of plasma density, flow velocity, excluded-magnetic flux, and ion temperature of the jet outflow plasmas are discussed. In addition, possible contributions from fast-ion losses from the advanced beam-driven FRC plasma to the jet will be explored and presented.

  16. Polarization-driven catalysis via ferroelectric oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2016-07-20

    The surface chemistry and physics of oxide ferroelectric surfaces with a fixed polarization state have been studied experimentally for some time. Here, we discuss the possibility of using these materials in a different mode, namely under cyclically changing polarization conditions achievable via periodic perturbations by external fields (e.g., temperature, strain or electric field). We use Density Functional Theory (DFT) and electronic structure analysis to understand the polarization-dependent surface physics and chemistry of ferroelectric oxide PbTiO3 as an example of this class of materials. This knowledge is then applied to design catalytic cycles for industrially important reactions including NOx direct decomposition and SO2 oxidation into SO3. The possibility of catalyzing direct partial oxidation of methane to methanol is also investigated. More generally, we discuss how using ferroelectrics under cyclically changing polarization conditions can help overcome some of the fundamental challenges facing the catalysis community such as the limitations imposed by the Sabatier principle and scaling relations. PMID:27381676

  17. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent development of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.

  18. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent developmentmore » of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.« less

  19. Advanced oxidation processes with coke plant wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, A; Kwarciak-Kozłowska, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the most efficient method of coke wastewater treatment. This research examined two processes - advanced oxidation with Fenton and photo-Fenton reaction. It was observed that the use of ultraviolet radiation with Fenton process had a better result in removal of impurities. PMID:24804662

  20. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs. The goal is to modify and improve the current state-of-the-art materials and minimize the total number of cations in each material to avoid negative effects on the materials properties. Materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabricatoin and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions.

  1. Thermally-driven structural changes of graphene oxide multilayer films deposited on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazauskas, A.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Grigaliūnas, V.; Guobienė, A.; Prosyčevas, I.; Narmontas, P.; Abakevičienė, B.; Tamulevičius, S.

    2014-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been recognized as an important intermediate compound for a potential low-cost large-scale graphene-like film fabrication. In this work, graphene oxide multilayer films deposited on glass substrate were reduced using different thermal reduction methods, including low-temperature annealing, flame-induced and laser reduction, and the corresponding surface morphology and structural properties were investigated. These graphene oxide thermal reduction methods strongly affected surface morphology and differently facilitated structural and chemical transformations of graphene oxide. As evidenced by Raman measurements, thermal annealing and laser reduction of graphene oxide produced more ordered graphene-like structure multilayer films. However, surface morphological differences were observed and attributed to the different de-oxidation mechanisms of GO. This Letter provides an important systematic comparison between the GO reduction methods and thermally-driven structural changes they provide to the reduced GO multilayer films obtained.

  2. Solar driven water oxidation by a bioinspired manganese molecular catalyst.

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, Robin; Koo, Annette; Dismukes, G Charles; Swiegers, Gerhard F; Spiccia, Leone

    2010-03-10

    A photoelectrochemical cell was designed that catalyzes the photooxidation of water using visible light as the sole energy source and a molecular catalyst, [Mn(4)O(4)L(6)](+) (1(+), L = bis(methoxyphenyl)phosphinate), synthesized from earth-abundant elements. The essential features include a photochemical charge separation system, [Ru(II)(bipy)(2)(bipy(COO)(2))], adhered to titania-coated FTO conductive glass, and 1(+) embedded within a proton-conducting membrane (Nafion). The complete photoanode represents a functional analogue of the water-oxidizing center of natural photosynthesis. PMID:20155923

  3. Oxidative Lipidomics Coming of Age: Advances in Analysis of Oxidized Phospholipids in Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidized phospholipids are now well recognized as markers of biological oxidative stress and bioactive molecules with both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects. While analytical methods continue to be developed for studies of generic lipid oxidation, mass spectrometry (MS) has underpinned the advances in knowledge of specific oxidized phospholipids by allowing their identification and characterization, and it is responsible for the expansion of oxidative lipidomics. Recent Advances: Studies of oxidized phospholipids in biological samples, from both animal models and clinical samples, have been facilitated by the recent improvements in MS, especially targeted routines that depend on the fragmentation pattern of the parent molecular ion and improved resolution and mass accuracy. MS can be used to identify selectively individual compounds or groups of compounds with common features, which greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity of detection. Application of these methods has enabled important advances in understanding the mechanisms of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, steatohepatitis, leprosy, and cystic fibrosis, and it offers potential for developing biomarkers of molecular aspects of the diseases. Critical Issues and Future Directions: The future in this field will depend on development of improved MS technologies, such as ion mobility, novel enrichment methods and databases, and software for data analysis, owing to the very large amount of data generated in these experiments. Imaging of oxidized phospholipids in tissue MS is an additional exciting direction emerging that can be expected to advance understanding of physiology and disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1646–1666. PMID:25694038

  4. Advanced Launch System advanced development oxidizer turbopump program: Technical implementation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlita, F.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Launch Systems (ALS) Advanced Development Oxidizer Turbopump Program has designed, fabricated and demonstrated a low cost, highly reliable oxidizer turbopump for the Space Transportation Engine that minimizes the recurring cost for the ALS engines. Pratt and Whitney's (P and W's) plan for integrating the analyses, testing, fabrication, and other program efforts is addressed. This plan offers a comprehensive description of the total effort required to design, fabricate, and test the ALS oxidizer turbopump. The proposed ALS oxidizer turbopump reduces turbopump costs over current designs by taking advantage of design simplicity and state-of-the-art materials and producibility features without compromising system reliability. This is accomplished by selecting turbopump operating conditions that are within known successful operating regions and by using proven manufacturing techniques.

  5. Air-Driven Potassium Iodide-Mediated Oxidative Photocyclization of Stilbene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Watanabe, Soichiro

    2016-09-01

    A new method has been developed for the potassium iodide-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives. Compared with conventional iodine-mediated oxidative photocyclization reactions, this new method requires shorter reaction times and affords cyclized products in yields of 45-97%. This reaction proceeds with a catalytic amount of potassium iodide and works in an air-driven manner without the addition of an external scavenger. The radical-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives using TEMPO was also investigated. PMID:27508401

  6. Liquid crystallinity driven highly aligned large graphene oxide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is an emerging graphitic carbon materials, consisting of sp2 hybridized two dimensinal honeycomb structure. It has been widely studied to incorporate graphene with polymer to utilize unique property of graphene and reinforce electrical, mechanical and thermal property of polymer. In composite materials, orientation control of graphene significantly influences the property of composite. Until now, a few method has been developed for orientation control of graphene within polymer matrix. Here, we demonstrate facile fabrication of high aligned large graphene oxide (LGO) composites in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix exploiting liquid crystallinity. Liquid crystalline aqueous dispersion of LGO is parallel oriented within flat confinement geometry. Freeze-drying of the aligned LGO dispersion and subsequent infiltration with PDMS produce highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites. Owing to the large shape anisotropy of LGO, liquid crystalline alignment occurred at low concentration of 2 mg/ml in aqueous dispersion, which leads to the 0.2 wt% LGO loaded composites.

  7. Light-driven oxidation of polysaccharides by photosynthetic pigments and a metalloenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Cannella, D.; Möllers, K. B.; Frigaard, N.-U.; Jensen, P. E.; Bjerrum, M. J.; Johansen, K. S.; Felby, C.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative processes are essential for the degradation of plant biomass. A class of powerful and widely distributed oxidative enzymes, the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), oxidize the most recalcitrant polysaccharides and require extracellular electron donors. Here we investigated the effect of using excited photosynthetic pigments as electron donors. LPMOs combined with pigments and reducing agents were exposed to light, which resulted in a never before seen 100-fold increase in catalytic activity. In addition, LPMO substrate specificity was broadened to include both cellulose and hemicellulose. LPMO enzymes and pigment derivatives common in the environment of plant-degrading organisms thus form a highly reactive and stable light-driven system increasing the turnover rate and versatility of LPMOs. This light-driven system may find applications in biotechnology and chemical processing. PMID:27041218

  8. Impact of leachate composition on the advanced oxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are gaining importance as an alternative to the biological or physicochemical treatments for the management of leachates. In this work, it has been studied the effect of the characteristics of the leachate (content in humic acids, landfill age and degree of stabilization) on the wet oxidation process and final quality of the treated effluent. A high concentration of humic acids in the leachate had a positive effect on the COD removal because this fraction is more easily oxidizable. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of humic acid and the intermediates generated during the oxidation process improved the degradation of this acid, since such intermediates are stronger initiators of free radicals than the humic acid itself. Similar values of COD removals (49% and 51%) and biodegradability indices (0.30 and 0.35) were observed, after 8 h of wet oxidation, for the stabilised leachate (biologically pretreated) and the raw one, respectively. Nevertheless, final colour removal was much higher for the stabilised leachate, achieving values up to 91%, whereas for the raw one only 56% removal was attained for the same reaction time. Besides, wet oxidation treatment was more efficient for the young leachate than for the old one, with final COD conversions of 60% and 37%, respectively. Eventually, a triangular "three-lump" kinetic model, which considered direct oxidation to CO2 and partial oxidation through intermediate compounds, was here proposed. PMID:26517790

  9. Liquid crystallinity driven highly aligned large graphene oxide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-04-15

    Graphene is an emerging graphitic carbon materials, consisting of sp{sup 2} hybridized two dimensinal honeycomb structure. It has been widely studied to incorporate graphene with polymer to utilize unique property of graphene and reinforce electrical, mechanical and thermal property of polymer. In composite materials, orientation control of graphene significantly influences the property of composite. Until now, a few method has been developed for orientation control of graphene within polymer matrix. Here, we demonstrate facile fabrication of high aligned large graphene oxide (LGO) composites in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix exploiting liquid crystallinity. Liquid crystalline aqueous dispersion of LGO is parallel oriented within flat confinement geometry. Freeze-drying of the aligned LGO dispersion and subsequent infiltration with PDMS produce highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites. Owing to the large shape anisotropy of LGO, liquid crystalline alignment occurred at low concentration of 2 mg/ml in aqueous dispersion, which leads to the 0.2 wt% LGO loaded composites. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystalline LGO aqueous dispersions are spontaneous parallel aligned between geometric confinement for highly aligned LGO/polymer composite fabrication. - Highlights: • A simple fabrication method for highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites is proposed. • LGO aqueous dispersion shows nematic liquid crystalline phase at 0.8 mg/ml. • In nematic phase, LGO flakes are highly aligned by geometric confinement. • Infiltration of PDMS into freeze-dried LGO allows highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites.

  10. Increased Hepatic Fatty Acids Uptake and Oxidation by LRPPRC-Driven Oxidative Phosphorylation Reduces Blood Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shi; Sun, Run-zhu; Wang, Di; Gong, Mei-zhen; Su, Xiang-ping; Yi, Fei; Peng, Zheng-wu

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is one of the major risk factors of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of leucine rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC)-driven hepatic oxidative phoshorylation on blood lipid levels. The hepatic LRPPRC level was modulated by liver-specific transgenic or adeno-associated virus 8 carried shRNA targeting Lrpprc (aav-shLrpprc). Mice were fed with a high fat diet to induce obesity. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and / or western blot. The hepatic ATP level, hepatic and serum lipids contents, and mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) complex activities were measured using specific assay kits. The uptake and oxidation of fatty acid by hepatocytes were assessed using 14C-palmitate. LRPPRC regulated the expression of genes encoded by mitochondrial genome but not those by nuclear genome involved in mitochondria biogenesis, OxPhos, and lipid metabolism. Increased OxPhos in liver mediated by LRPPRC resulted in the increase of hepatic ATP level. Lrpprc promoted palmitate uptake and oxidation by hypatocytes. The hepatic and serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were inversely associated with the hepatic LRPPRC level. These data demonstrated that LRPPRC-driven hepatic OxPhos could promote fatty acids uptake and oxidation by hepatocytes and reduce both hepatic and circulating triglyceride and cholesterol levels. PMID:27462273

  11. Increased Hepatic Fatty Acids Uptake and Oxidation by LRPPRC-Driven Oxidative Phosphorylation Reduces Blood Lipid Levels.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shi; Sun, Run-Zhu; Wang, Di; Gong, Mei-Zhen; Su, Xiang-Ping; Yi, Fei; Peng, Zheng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is one of the major risk factors of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of leucine rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC)-driven hepatic oxidative phoshorylation on blood lipid levels. The hepatic LRPPRC level was modulated by liver-specific transgenic or adeno-associated virus 8 carried shRNA targeting Lrpprc (aav-shLrpprc). Mice were fed with a high fat diet to induce obesity. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and / or western blot. The hepatic ATP level, hepatic and serum lipids contents, and mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) complex activities were measured using specific assay kits. The uptake and oxidation of fatty acid by hepatocytes were assessed using (14)C-palmitate. LRPPRC regulated the expression of genes encoded by mitochondrial genome but not those by nuclear genome involved in mitochondria biogenesis, OxPhos, and lipid metabolism. Increased OxPhos in liver mediated by LRPPRC resulted in the increase of hepatic ATP level. Lrpprc promoted palmitate uptake and oxidation by hypatocytes. The hepatic and serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were inversely associated with the hepatic LRPPRC level. These data demonstrated that LRPPRC-driven hepatic OxPhos could promote fatty acids uptake and oxidation by hepatocytes and reduce both hepatic and circulating triglyceride and cholesterol levels. PMID:27462273

  12. Trace element cycling through iron oxide minerals during redox-driven dynamic recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Luo, Yun; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2011-11-17

    Microbially driven iron redox cycling in soil and sedimentary systems, including during diagenesis and fluid migration, may activate secondary abiotic reactions between aqueous Fe(II) and solid Fe(III) oxides. These reactions catalyze dynamic recrystallization of iron oxide minerals through localized and simultaneous oxidative adsorption of Fe(II) and reductive dissolution of Fe(III). Redox-active trace elements undergo speciation changes during this process, but the impact redox-driven recrystallization has on redox-inactive trace elements associated with iron oxides is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that Ni is cycled through the minerals goethite and hematite during redox-driven recrystallization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that during this process adsorbed Ni becomes progressively incorporated into the minerals. Kinetic studies using batch reactors containing aqueous Fe(II) and Ni preincorporated into iron oxides display substantial release of Ni to solution. We conclude that iron oxide recrystallization activated by aqueous Fe(II) induces cycling of Ni through the mineral structure, with adsorbed Ni overgrown in regions of Fe(II) oxidative adsorption and incorporated Ni released in regions of reductive dissolution of structural Fe(III). The redistribution of Ni among the mineral bulk, mineral surface, and aqueous solution appears to be thermodynamically controlled and catalyzed by Fe(II). Our work suggests that important proxies for ocean composition on the early Earth may be invalid, identifies new processes controlling micronutrient availability in soil, sedimentary, and aquatic ecosystems, and points toward a mechanism for trace element mobilization during diagenesis and enrichment in geologic fluids.

  13. Evaluation of advanced oxidation process for the treatment of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, S.B. II ); Peyton, G.R. ); Rice, L.E. . Kansas City Div.)

    1990-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process utilizing ozone, ultraviolet radiation, and hydrogen peroxide was selected for the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons, particularly trichlorethene and 1,2-dichlorethene, from groundwater underlying the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant. Since the performance of this process for the removal of organics from groundwater is not well-documented, an evaluation was initiated to determine the performance of the treatment plant, document the operation and maintenance costs experience, and evaluate contaminant removal mechanisms. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Oxidation of alloys targeted for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-03-12

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  15. Merits of Stirling-driven vapor-compression systems and their advanced technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, Noboru

    1997-12-31

    Stirling engines have unique advantages including a high thermal efficiency, preferable exhaust gas characteristics, multi-fuel usage, and low noise and vibration. On the other hand, heat pump systems are very attractive because of their potential to save energy and to get applicability for space heating and industrial usage. This paper introduced the recognized merits of efficient and environmental-friendly Stirling-driven vapor-compression (SDVC) systems. The differences between SDVC systems and conventional systems were discussed from the aspects of the performance and operating cost. The results show SDVC systems have many advantages. This paper also mentioned about the future R and D which will be required to realize more attractive SDVC system including the initial cost issues and several advance technologies for SDVC. The Lorenz cycle and flash gas removal technologies for heat pump cycle were introduced as the advanced SDVC technologies.

  16. Alloys for advanced steam turbines--Oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-10-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. Current research on the oxidation of candidate materials for advanced steam turbines is presented with a focus on a methodology for estimating chromium evaporation rates from protective chromia scales. The high velocities and pressures of advanced steam turbines lead to evaporation predictions as high as 5 × 10-8 kg m-2s-1 of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760°C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.077 mm per year of solid Cr loss.

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS UTILIZING NB-DOPED TIO2 ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrochemical advanced oxidation process has been developed utilizing electrodes which generate hydroxyl free radical (HO) by oxidizing water. All substrates tested are oxidized, mostly with reaction rates proportional to the corresponding rate constants for reaction with hy...

  18. ELECTROCHEMICAL ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS UTILIZING NB-DOPED TIO2 ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrochemical advanced oxidation process has been developed, utilizing electrodes which generate hydroxyl free radical (HO) by oxidizing water. All substrates tested are oxidized, mostly with reaction rates proportional to the corresponding rate constants for reaction with h...

  19. FPIC: A Key Next Step for Stability Studies of Advanced Beam Driven FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettrick, Sean; Barnes, Dan; Ceccherini, Francesco; Galeotti, Laura; Guerrero, Victor; Hendrix, Doug; Hubbard, Kevin; Milroy, Richard; Necas, Ales; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the C-2U experiment is to use neutral beam heating and edge biasing to sustain an advanced beam-driven FRC for many milliseconds, longer than the growth times of known instabilities and the resistive wall time. To guide the experiment further into unexplored parameter regimes, it is desirable to have a stability code suitable for beam-driven FRC plasmas, in which the bulk of ion orbits are not Larmor-like and hence gyrokinetic approximations are inapplicable. Fully kinetic ions are required for stability simulations of beam driven FRCs, as are multiple ion species, end boundary conditions, and a resistive boundary. To meet these challenges a new 3D quasineutral hybrid code, FPIC, is being developed. FPIC has a choice of zero electron mass and finite electron mass Ohm's law solvers. Uniform staggered grids, finite differencing, and cut cell boundaries are used to simplify and optimize the PIC while allowing arbitrary boundary shapes. Finite resistivity of the boundary is implemented by coupling free-space exterior solutions to the cut-cell edges. The code is MPI parallelized and the particle push is GPU accelerated. Code benchmarks will be presented including the stability of the FRC tilt mode.

  20. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roo, Jonathan; van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C.; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs--including their surface composition--unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  1. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs-including their surface composition-unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity. PMID:26808460

  2. Summary of oxidation driven mobilization data and their use in fusion safety assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, K. A.; Smolik, G. R.; Hagrman, D. L.; Petti, D. A.

    1996-10-01

    We have carried out experiments to simulate accident conditions with air or steam ingress, and determine the amount of material mobilized from the material. We also perform first principles modeling to understand the mechanisms involved in mobilization, and determine whether volatilization or oxide spalling dominates mobilization. Our results indicate that if long-term accident temperatures are kept below ˜ 700°C, oxidation-driven mobilization may be less important than resuspension of tokamak dust, release of corrosion products, and release of plasma-vaporized material.

  3. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ke; Saadi, Fadl H; Lichterman, Michael F; Hale, William G; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Zhou, Xinghao; Plymale, Noah T; Omelchenko, Stefan T; He, Jr-Hau; Papadantonakis, Kimberly M; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Lewis, Nathan S

    2015-03-24

    Reactively sputtered nickel oxide (NiOx) films provide transparent, antireflective, electrically conductive, chemically stable coatings that also are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxidation of water to O2(g). These NiOx coatings provide protective layers on a variety of technologically important semiconducting photoanodes, including textured crystalline Si passivated by amorphous silicon, crystalline n-type cadmium telluride, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Under anodic operation in 1.0 M aqueous potassium hydroxide (pH 14) in the presence of simulated sunlight, the NiOx films stabilized all of these self-passivating, high-efficiency semiconducting photoelectrodes for >100 h of sustained, quantitative solar-driven oxidation of water to O2(g). PMID:25762067

  4. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke; Saadi, Fadl H.; Lichterman, Michael F.; Hale, William G.; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Zhou, Xinghao; Plymale, Noah T.; Omelchenko, Stefan T.; He, Jr-Hau; Papadantonakis, Kimberly M.; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Reactively sputtered nickel oxide (NiOx) films provide transparent, antireflective, electrically conductive, chemically stable coatings that also are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxidation of water to O2(g). These NiOx coatings provide protective layers on a variety of technologically important semiconducting photoanodes, including textured crystalline Si passivated by amorphous silicon, crystalline n-type cadmium telluride, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Under anodic operation in 1.0 M aqueous potassium hydroxide (pH 14) in the presence of simulated sunlight, the NiOx films stabilized all of these self-passivating, high-efficiency semiconducting photoelectrodes for >100 h of sustained, quantitative solar-driven oxidation of water to O2(g). PMID:25762067

  5. Advanced oxidation of alkylphenol ethoxylates in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Nagarnaik, Pranav M; Boulanger, Bryan

    2011-10-01

    Alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates are ubiquitous wastewater contaminants. In this study the oxidation of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEO) and octylphenol ethoxylates (OPEO) by oxidant systems generating hydroxide radicals was evaluated. The reaction of each oxidant with a technical mixture of NPEO (Tergitol™) and OPEO (Triton X-100™) in ultrapure laboratory water and four aqueous environmental matrices was carried out in order to develop an understanding of reaction kinetics. The oxidation of APEOs was evaluated by hydroxyl radical generated by (1) hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ultraviolet light, (2) Fenton's reagent, and (3) a photo-Fenton's process. The second order kinetic rate constant for both NPEO and OPEO with hydroxyl radical was calculated to be 1.1×10¹⁰ M⁻¹ s⁻¹. The efficacy of the AOPs within an aqueous environmental matrix was dependent on the rate of formation of hydroxyl radical and the scavenging capacity of the matrix. A model based on the hydroxyl radical formation, scavenging capacity and the kinetic rate constant of target APEO was developed from the existing literature and applied to predict the concentration of APEOs in solution during advanced oxidation in different aqueous environmental matrices. PMID:21784502

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Flows in an Oxidation Ditch Driven by a New Surface Aerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weidong; Li, Kun; Wang, Gan; Wang, Yingzhe

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we present a newly designed inverse umbrella surface aerator, and tested its performance in driving flow of an oxidation ditch. Results show that it has a better performance in driving the oxidation ditch than the original one with higher average velocity and more uniform flow field. We also present a computational fluid dynamics model for predicting the flow field in an oxidation ditch driven by a surface aerator. The improved momentum source term approach to simulate the flow field of the oxidation ditch driven by an inverse umbrella surface aerator was developed and validated through experiments. Four kinds of turbulent models were investigated with the approach, including the standard k−ɛ model, RNG k−ɛ model, realizable k−ɛ model, and Reynolds stress model, and the predicted data were compared with those calculated with the multiple rotating reference frame approach (MRF) and sliding mesh approach (SM). Results of the momentum source term approach are in good agreement with the experimental data, and its prediction accuracy is better than MRF, close to SM. It is also found that the momentum source term approach has lower computational expenses, is simpler to preprocess, and is easier to use. PMID:24302850

  7. Observation of Energetic Particle Driven Modes Relevant to Advanced Tokamak Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; B. Alper; H.L. Berk; D. Borba; C. Boswell; R.V. Budny; K.H. Burrell; C.Z. Cheng; E.J. Doyle; E. Edlund; R.J. Fonck; A. Fukuyama; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.M. Greenfield; D.J. Gupta; M. Ishikawa; R.J. Jayakumar; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; R.J. La Haye; G.R. McKee; W.A. Peebles; S.D. Pinches; M. Porkolab; J. Rapp; T.L. Rhodes; S.E. Sharapov; K. Shinohara; J.A. Snipes; W.M. Solomon; E.J. Strait; M. Takechi; M.A. Van Zeeland; W.P. West; K.L. Wong; S. Wukitch; L. Zeng

    2004-10-21

    Measurements of high-frequency oscillations in JET [Joint European Torus], JT-60U, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas are contributing to a new understanding of fast ion-driven instabilities relevant to Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes. A model based on the transition from a cylindrical-like frequency-chirping mode to the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) has successfully encompassed many of the characteristics seen in experiments. In a surprising development, the use of internal density fluctuation diagnostics has revealed many more modes than has been detected on edge magnetic probes. A corollary discovery is the observation of modes excited by fast particles traveling well below the Alfven velocity. These observations open up new opportunities for investigating a ''sea of Alfven Eigenmodes'' in present-scale experiments, and highlight the need for core fluctuation and fast ion measurements in a future burning-plasma experiment.

  8. Importance of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a prognostic factor for patients with stage IV melanoma. To gain insights into the biology underlying this prognostic factor, we analyzed total serum LDH, serum LDH isoenzymes, and serum lactate in up to 49 patients with metastatic melanoma. Our data demonstrate that high serum LDH is associated with a significant increase in LDH isoenzymes 3 and 4, and a decrease in LDH isoenzymes 1 and 2. Since LDH isoenzymes play a role in both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), we subsequently determined using tissue microarray (TMA) analysis that the levels of proteins associated with mitochondrial function, lactate metabolism, and regulators of glycolysis were all elevated in advanced melanomas compared with nevic melanocytes. To investigate whether in advanced melanoma, the glycolysis and OXPHOS pathways might be linked, we determined expression of the monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) 1 and 4. Analysis of a nevus-to-melanoma progression TMA revealed that MCT4, and to a lesser extend MCT1, were elevated with progression to advanced melanoma. Further analysis of human melanoma specimens using the Seahorse XF24 extracellular flux analyzer indicated that metastatic melanoma tumors derived a large fraction of energy from OXPHOS. Taken together, these findings suggest that in stage IV melanomas with normal serum LDH, glycolysis and OXPHOS may provide metabolic symbiosis within the same tumor, whereas in stage IV melanomas with high serum LDH glycolysis is the principle source of energy. PMID:23043612

  9. Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped organic assisted advanced ZnO nanomaterial for solar driven photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Namratha, K; Byrappa, K; Byrappa, S; Venkateswarlu, P; Rajasekhar, D; Deepthi, B K

    2015-08-01

    Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped (Ag(+)+Pd(3+)) advanced ZnO nanomaterial has been carried out under mild pressure temperature conditions (autogeneous; 150°C). Gluconic acid has been used as a surface modifier to effectively control the particle size and morphology of these ZnO nanoparticles. The experimental parameters were tuned to achieve optimum conditions for the synthesis of selectively doped ZnO nanomaterials with an experimental duration of 4 hr. These selectively doped ZnO nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The solar driven photocatalytic studies have been carried out for organic dyes, i.e., Procion MX-5B dye, Cibacron Brilliant Yellow dye, Indigo Carmine dye, separately and all three mixed, by using gluconic acid modified selectively doped advanced ZnO nanomaterial. The influence of catalyst, its concentration and initial dye concentration resulted in the photocatalytic efficiency of 89% under daylight. PMID:26257367

  10. Conventional and Advanced Silicagel-water Adsorption Cycles Driven by Near - environmental Temperature Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boelman, Elisa; B. Saha, Bidyut; Tanaka, Aiharu; Kashiwagi, Takao

    This work aims at clarifying the possible operating temperature ranges for silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycles driven by near-environmental temperature heat sources (between 50°C and 85°C), with relatively small regenerating temperature lifts (10 K to 65 K). A newly developed three stage advanced silica gel-water cycle, which is operational with 50°C driving heat source and 30°C cooling source is introduced and compared with a conventional single stage cycle. The cycles are evaluated in terms of cooling capacity, COP and the viability of operation with near-environmental temperature driving heat sources. The analysis is based on experimental and cycle simulation work. The results showed the advanced three stage cycle to be particularly suited for operation with low grade waste heat driving sources, since it worked with small regenerating temperature lifts (ΔTregen)of 10K to 30K. Another significant advantage of operation with small ΔTregen is the possibility to reduce irreversible heat losses from batched cycle operation. Experiments carried out on full-size machine suggested that, even with smallΔTregen, adsorber /desorber heat exchanger improvements such as higher thermal conductance and smaller heat capacitance can contribute to reduce heat losses while improving cycle performance in terms of cooling capacity and COP.

  11. Direct Observation of Electrostatically Driven Band Gap Renormalization in a Degenerate Perovskite Transparent Conducting Oxide.

    PubMed

    Lebens-Higgins, Z; Scanlon, D O; Paik, H; Sallis, S; Nie, Y; Uchida, M; Quackenbush, N F; Wahila, M J; Sterbinsky, G E; Arena, Dario A; Woicik, J C; Schlom, D G; Piper, L F J

    2016-01-15

    We have directly measured the band gap renormalization associated with the Moss-Burstein shift in the perovskite transparent conducting oxide (TCO), La-doped BaSnO_{3}, using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We determine that the band gap renormalization is almost entirely associated with the evolution of the conduction band. Our experimental results are supported by hybrid density functional theory supercell calculations. We determine that unlike conventional TCOs where interactions with the dopant orbitals are important, the band gap renormalization in La-BaSnO_{3} is driven purely by electrostatic interactions. PMID:26824566

  12. Efficient visible light-driven water oxidation catalyzed by an all-inorganic copper-containing polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Du, Xiaoqiang; Ding, Yong; Chen, Hongli; Zhou, Panpan

    2015-12-21

    [Cu5(OH)4(H2O)2(A-α-SiW9O33)2](10-) (1) was tested as the first copper-containing polyoxometalate catalyst for O2 production via visible light-driven water oxidation. Multiple experiments confirm that 1 is an active and dominant catalyst during water oxidation. PMID:26468511

  13. Bacterial domination over archaea in ammonia oxidation in a monsoon-driven tropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Puthiya Veettil, Vipindas; Abdulaziz, Anas; Chekidhenkuzhiyil, Jasmin; Kalanthingal Ramkollath, Lallu; Karayadi Hamza, Fausia; Kizhakkepat Kalam, Balachandran; Kallungal Ravunnikutty, Muraleedharan; Nair, Shanta

    2015-04-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing microorganisms, which are responsible for the rate-limiting step of nitrification in most aquatic systems, have not been studied in tropical estuaries. Cochin estuary (CE) is one of the largest, productive, and monsoon-driven estuary in India opening into the southeast Arabian Sea. CE receives surplus quantities of ammonia through industrial and domestic discharges. The distribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (anammox) were studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and their relative contribution to the process as well as the governing factors were examined and reported for the first time from CE. The order of occurrence of these assemblages was β-proteobacteria (0.79 to 2 × 10(5) cells ml(-1)) > γ-proteobacteria (0.9 to 4.6 × 10(4) cells ml(-1)) > anammox (0.49 to 1.9 × 10(4) cells ml(-1)) > AOA (0.56 to 6.3 × 10(3) cells ml(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis of DGGE bands showed major affiliation of AOB to β-proteobacteria, while AOA was affiliated to Crenarchaeota. The abundance of AOB was mostly influenced by ammonia concentrations. The recovered ammonia oxidation rate of AOB was in the range of 45-65%, whereas for AOA, it was 15-45%, indicating that AOB were mostly responsible for the ammonia oxidation in CE during the study period. Overall, the present study provides an insight into the relevance and contribution of different groups of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in CE and emphasizes the need for further in depth studies across space and on season scale. PMID:25344857

  14. Iron-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Catalysts for Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Le; Xu, Qian; Liang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jide; Su, Xintai

    2016-03-01

    The development of earth-abundant, active, and stable catalysts is important for solar energy conversion. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been viewed as a promising class of porous materials, which may have innovative application in photocatalysis. In this paper, three types of Fe-based MOFs and their aminofunctionalized derivatives have been fabricated and systematically studied as water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) for oxygen evolution under visible light irradiation. MIL-101(Fe) possesses a higher current density and earlier onset potential and exhibits excellent visible light-driven oxygen evolution activity than the other Fe-based catalysts. It speeds up the oxygen evolution reaction rate with the higher initial turnover frequencies value of 0.10 s(-1) . Our study demonstrates that Fe-based MOFs as efficient WOCs are promising candidates for photocatalytic water oxidation process. PMID:26756919

  15. Design Principles for Metal Oxide Redox Materials for Solar-Driven Isothermal Fuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Ronald; Botu, Venkatesh; Hargus, Cory M; Peterson, Andrew A; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The performance of metal oxides as redox materials is limited by their oxygen conductivity and thermochemical stability. Predicting these properties from the electronic structure can support the screening of advanced metal oxides and accelerate their development for clean energy applications. Specifically, reducible metal oxide catalysts and potential redox materials for the solar-thermochemical splitting of CO2 and H2O via an isothermal redox cycle are examined. A volcano-type correlation is developed from available experimental data and density functional theory. It is found that the energy of the oxygen-vacancy formation at the most stable surfaces of TiO2, Ti2O3, Cu2O, ZnO, ZrO2, MoO3, Ag2O, CeO2, yttria-stabilized zirconia, and three perovskites scales with the Gibbs free energy of formation of the bulk oxides. Analogously, the experimental oxygen self-diffusion constants correlate with the transition-state energy of oxygen conduction. A simple descriptor is derived for rapid screening of oxygen-diffusion trends across a large set of metal oxide compositions. These general trends are rationalized with the electronic charge localized at the lattice oxygen and can be utilized to predict the surface activity, the free energy of complex bulk metal oxides, and their oxygen conductivity. PMID:26855639

  16. A unique isotopic fingerprint during sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, G.; Turchyn, A. V.; Herut, B.; Sivan, O.

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction is responsible for the majority of anaerobic methane oxidation in modern marine sediments. This sulfate-driven AOM can often metabolize all the methane produced within marine sediments, preventing any from reaching the overlying ocean. In certain areas, however, methane concentrations are high enough to form bubbles, which can reach the seafloor, only partially metabolized through sulfate-driven AOM; these areas where methane bubbles into the ocean are called cold seeps, or methane seeps. We use the sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate (d34SSO4 and d18OSO4) in locations where sulfate-driven AOM is occurring both in methane seeps as well as lower flux methane transition zones to show that in methane seeps, the d34SSO4 and d18OSO4 data during the coupled sulfate reduction fall into a very narrow range and with a close to linear relationship (slope 0.37± 0.01 (R^2= 0.98, n=52, 95% confidence interval). In the studied environments, considerably different physical properties exist, excluding the possibility that this linear relationship can be attributed to physical processes such as diffusion, advection or mixing of two end-members. This unique isotopic signature emerges during bacterial sulfate reduction by methane in 'cold' seeps and differs when sulfate is reduced by either organic matter oxidation or by a slower, diffusive flux of methane within marine sediments. We show also that this unique isotope fingerprint is preserved in the rock record in authigenic build-ups of carbonates and barite associated with methane seeps, and may serve as a powerful tool for identifying catastrophic methane release in the geological record.

  17. Overview of the C-2U Advanced Beam-Driven FRC Experimental Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Barnes, D.; Dettrick, S.; Garate, E.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Ivanov, A. A.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The world's largest compact toroid (CT) device, C-2, has recently been upgraded to C-2U at Tri Alpha Energy to seek for a sustainment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by neutral-beam (NB) injection. The C-2 experimental program was successfully completed with dramatic improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas, as well as demonstrated plasma pressure increase and plasma heating by NB injection. To enhance the NB injection effect and further improve the FRC performance, the C-2U experimental program has started with following key system upgrades: (i) increased total NB input power to 10 + MW (15 keV hydrogen) with tilted injection angle; (ii) enhanced edge-biasing capability for stability control; (iii) upgraded particle inventory control systems. The initial C-2U experiment has already demonstrated much further improvements, revealing advanced beam-driven FRC plasmas. In the best operating regime we have successfully achieved plasma sustainment up to 5 + ms; while, in the longer-pulsed regime the plasma lifetime can be extended up to the end of NB pulse-duration (8 + ms). The overall C-2U experimental program and the initial experimental results will be presented at the meeting.

  18. Advancing data reuse in phyloinformatics using an ontology-driven Semantic Web approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses can resolve historical relationships among genes, organisms or higher taxa. Understanding such relationships can elucidate a wide range of biological phenomena, including, for example, the importance of gene and genome duplications in the evolution of gene function, the role of adaptation as a driver of diversification, or the evolutionary consequences of biogeographic shifts. Phyloinformaticists are developing data standards, databases and communication protocols (e.g. Application Programming Interfaces, APIs) to extend the accessibility of gene trees, species trees, and the metadata necessary to interpret these trees, thus enabling researchers across the life sciences to reuse phylogenetic knowledge. Specifically, Semantic Web technologies are being developed to make phylogenetic knowledge interpretable by web agents, thereby enabling intelligently automated, high-throughput reuse of results generated by phylogenetic research. This manuscript describes an ontology-driven, semantic problem-solving environment for phylogenetic analyses and introduces artefacts that can promote phyloinformatic efforts to promote accessibility of trees and underlying metadata. PhylOnt is an extensible ontology with concepts describing tree types and tree building methodologies including estimation methods, models and programs. In addition we present the PhylAnt platform for annotating scientific articles and NeXML files with PhylOnt concepts. The novelty of this work is the annotation of NeXML files and phylogenetic related documents with PhylOnt Ontology. This approach advances data reuse in phyloinformatics. PMID:24565381

  19. Advancing data reuse in phyloinformatics using an ontology-driven Semantic Web approach.

    PubMed

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Sheth, Amit P; Ranabahu, Ajith; Vos, Rutger A; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses can resolve historical relationships among genes, organisms or higher taxa. Understanding such relationships can elucidate a wide range of biological phenomena, including, for example, the importance of gene and genome duplications in the evolution of gene function, the role of adaptation as a driver of diversification, or the evolutionary consequences of biogeographic shifts. Phyloinformaticists are developing data standards, databases and communication protocols (e.g. Application Programming Interfaces, APIs) to extend the accessibility of gene trees, species trees, and the metadata necessary to interpret these trees, thus enabling researchers across the life sciences to reuse phylogenetic knowledge. Specifically, Semantic Web technologies are being developed to make phylogenetic knowledge interpretable by web agents, thereby enabling intelligently automated, high-throughput reuse of results generated by phylogenetic research. This manuscript describes an ontology-driven, semantic problem-solving environment for phylogenetic analyses and introduces artefacts that can promote phyloinformatic efforts to promote accessibility of trees and underlying metadata. PhylOnt is an extensible ontology with concepts describing tree types and tree building methodologies including estimation methods, models and programs. In addition we present the PhylAnt platform for annotating scientific articles and NeXML files with PhylOnt concepts. The novelty of this work is the annotation of NeXML files and phylogenetic related documents with PhylOnt Ontology. This approach advances data reuse in phyloinformatics. PMID:24565381

  20. Treatment of real industrial wastewater using the combined approach of advanced oxidation followed by aerobic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, Lokeshkumar P; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-05-01

    Fenton oxidation and ultrasound-based pretreatment have been applied to improve the treatment of real industrial wastewater based on the use of biological oxidation. The effect of operating parameters such as Fe(2+) loading, contact time, initial pH, and hydrogen peroxide loading on the extent of chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and change in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5)/COD ratio has been investigated. The optimum operating conditions established for the pretreatment were initial pH of 3.0, Fe(2+) loading of 2.0, and 2.5 g L(-1) for the US/Fenton/stirring and Fenton approach, respectively, and temperature of 25 °C with initial H2O2 loading of 1.5 g L(-1). The use of pretreatment resulted in a significant increase in the BOD5/COD ratio confirming the production of easily digestible intermediates. The effect of the type of sludge in the aerobic biodegradation was also investigated based on the use of primary activated sludge (PAS), modified activated sludge (MAS), and activated sludge (AS). Enhanced removal of the pollutants as well as higher biomass yield was observed for MAS as compared to PAS and AS. The use of US/Fenton/stirring pretreatment under the optimized conditions followed by biological oxidation using MAS resulted in maximum COD removal at 97.9 %. The required hydraulic retention time for the combined oxidation system was also significantly lower as compared to only biological oxidation operation. Kinetic studies revealed that the reduction in the COD followed a first-order kinetic model for advanced oxidation and pseudo first-order model for biodegradation. The study clearly established the utility of the combined technology for the effective treatment of real industrial wastewater. PMID:26846248

  1. Mechanistic study of the visible-light-driven photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria by graphene oxide-zinc oxide composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; An, Taicheng; Li, Guiying; Wang, Wei; Cai, Yuncheng; Yip, Ho Yin; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-12-01

    The visible-light-driven (VLD) photocatalytic activity of graphene oxide-zinc oxide (GO-ZnO) composite prepared by a simple hydrothermal method was evaluated toward the inactivation of Escherichia coli K-12. The results showed that GO-ZnO composite had excellent VLD photocatalytic bacterial inactivation activity, comparing with those of ZnO and GO, which was attributed to the strong interaction between ZnO and GO in the composite. Accordingly, an interaction induced VLD photocatalytic inactivation mechanism of the strong interaction of GO with ZnO within the GO-ZnO composite was proposed. GO served as a photosensitizer and facilitated the charge separation and transfer, thus boosted the massive production of reactive oxygen species such as rad OHbulk, which was identified as the major reactive species from conduction band of ZnO, and resulted in a remarkable enhancement of bacterial inactivation efficiency. Moreover, GO-ZnO composite showed obviously superior photocatalytic bacterial inactivation within 10 min under natural solar light irradiation, indicating that GO-ZnO composite has great potential in wastewater treatment and environmental protection.

  2. Oxidative Stress to the Cornea, Changes in Corneal Optical Properties, and Advances in Treatment of Corneal Oxidative Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cejka, Cestmir; Cejkova, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress) leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger from potential oxidative damage evoked by them. Oxidative stress may initiate or develop ocular injury resulting in decreased visual acuity or even vision loss. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed. Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown. PMID:25861412

  3. Oxidative stress to the cornea, changes in corneal optical properties, and advances in treatment of corneal oxidative injuries.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Cestmir; Cejkova, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress) leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger from potential oxidative damage evoked by them. Oxidative stress may initiate or develop ocular injury resulting in decreased visual acuity or even vision loss. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed. Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown. PMID:25861412

  4. Large-scale retreat and advance of shallow seas in Southeast Asia driven by mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Flament, Nicolas; Dietmar Müller, R.; Seton, Maria; Gurnis, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Indonesian islands and surrounding region represent one of the most submerged, low-lying continental areas on Earth. Almost half of this region, known as Sundaland, is presently inundated by a shallow sea. The role of mantle convection in driving long-wavelength topography and vertical motion of the lithosphere in this region has largely been ignored when interpreting regional stratigraphic sections, despite a consensus that Southeast Asia presently situated on a "dynamic topography low" resulting from long-term post-Pangea subduction. However, dynamic topography is typically described as a temporally and spatially transient process, implying that Sundaland may have experienced significant vertical motions in the geological past, and thus must be considered when interpreting relative sea level changes and the paleogeographic indicators of advancing and retreating shallow seas. Although the present-day low regional elevation has been attributed to the massive volume of oceanic slabs sinking in the mantle beneath Southeast Asia, a Late Cretaceous to Eocene regional unconformity indicates that shallow seas retreated following regional flooding during the mid-Cretaceous sea level highstand. During the Eocene, less than one fifth of Sundaland was submerged, despite global sea level being ~200 m higher than at present. The regional nature of the switch from marine to terrestrial environments, that is out-of-sync with eustatic sea levels, suggests that broad mantle-driven dynamic uplift may have led to the emergence of Sundaland in the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. We use numerical forward modelling of plate tectonics and mantle convection, and compare the predicted trends of dynamic topography with evidence from regional paleogeography and eustasy to determine the extent to which mantle-driven vertical motions of the lithosphere have influenced regional basin histories in Southeast Asia. A Late Cretaceous collision of Gondwana-derived terranes with Sundaland choked

  5. Electroluminescence from localized defects in zinc oxide: toward electrically driven single photon sources at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sumin; Berhane, Amanuel M; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-03-18

    Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography, and quantum communications. However, the majority of room temperature emitters to date are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically driven light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit in the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open possibilities for building new ZnO-based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies. PMID:25741632

  6. Climate change-driven treeline advances in the Urals alter soil microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djukic, Ika; Moiseev, Pavel; Hagedorn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Climatic warming may affect microbial communities and their functions either directly through increased temperatures or indirectly by changes in vegetation. Treelines are temperature-limited vegetation boundaries from tundra to forests. In unmanaged regions of the Ural mountains, there is evidence that the forest-tundra ecotone has shifted upward in response to climate warming during the 20th century. Little is known about the effects of the treeline advances on the microbial structure and function and hence they feedbacks on the belowground carbon and nitrogen cycling In our study, we aimed to estimate how ongoing upward shifts of the treeline ecotone might affect soil biodiversity and its function and hence soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in the Southern and Polar Ural mountains. Along altitudinal gradients reaching from the tundra to forests, we determined the soil microbial community composition (using Phospholipid Fatty Acids method) and quantified the activity of several extracellular enzymes involved in the C and nutrient cycling. In addition, we measured C pools in biomass and soils and quantified C and N mineralization. The results for the top soils, both in South Urals and in the Polar Ural, indicate a close link between climate change driven vegetation changes and soil microbial communities. The observed changes in microbial structure are induced through the resulting more favorable conditions than due to a shift in litter quality. The activities of chitinase were significantly higher under trees than under herbaceous plants, while activities of cellulase and protease declined with altitude from the tundra to the closed forest. In contrast to enzymatic activities, soil carbon stocks did not change significantly with altitude very likely as a result of a balancing out of increased C inputs from vegetation by an enhanced C output through mineralization with forest expansion. The accelerated organic matter turnover in the forest than in the tundra

  7. First-principles data-driven discovery of transition metal oxides for artificial photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qimin

    We develop a first-principles data-driven approach for rapid identification of transition metal oxide (TMO) light absorbers and photocatalysts for artificial photosynthesis using the Materials Project. Initially focusing on Cr, V, and Mn-based ternary TMOs in the database, we design a broadly-applicable multiple-layer screening workflow automating density functional theory (DFT) and hybrid functional calculations of bulk and surface electronic and magnetic structures. We further assess the electrochemical stability of TMOs in aqueous environments from computed Pourbaix diagrams. Several promising earth-abundant low band-gap TMO compounds with desirable band edge energies and electrochemical stability are identified by our computational efforts and then synergistically evaluated using high-throughput synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening techniques by our experimental collaborators at Caltech. Our joint theory-experiment effort has successfully identified new earth-abundant copper and manganese vanadate complex oxides that meet highly demanding requirements for photoanodes, substantially expanding the known space of such materials. By integrating theory and experiment, we validate our approach and develop important new insights into structure-property relationships for TMOs for oxygen evolution photocatalysts, paving the way for use of first-principles data-driven techniques in future applications. This work is supported by the Materials Project Predictive Modeling Center and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis through the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources also provided by the Department of Energy through the National Energy Supercomputing Center.

  8. Photoactivation: The Light-Driven Assembly of the Water Oxidation Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Han; Burnap, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster of photosystem II. The assembly of the Mn4O5Ca requires light and involves a sequential process called photoactivation. This process harnesses the charge-separation of the photochemical reaction center and the coordination environment provided by the amino acid side chains of the protein to oxidize and organize the incoming manganese ions to form the oxo-bridged metal cluster capable of H2O-oxidation. Although most aspects of this assembly process remain poorly understood, recent advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the fully assembled cyanobacterial PSII complex help in the interpretation of the rich history of experiments designed to understand this process. Moreover, recent insights on the structure and stability of the constituent ions of the Mn4CaO5 cluster may guide future experiments. Here we consider the literature and suggest possible models of assembly including one involving single Mn2+ oxidation site for all Mn but requiring ion relocation. PMID:27200051

  9. Applications of advanced oxidation processes: present and future.

    PubMed

    Suty, H; De Traversay, C; Cost, M

    2004-01-01

    The use of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to remove pollutants in various water treatment applications has been the subject of study for around 30 years. Most of the available processes (Fenton reagent, O3 under basic conditions, O3/H2O2, O3/UV, O3/solid catalyst, H2O2/M(n+), H2O2/UV, photo-assisted Fenton, H2O2/solid catalyst, H2O2/NaClO, TiO2/UV etc.) have been investigated in depth and a considerable body of knowledge has been built up about the reactivity of many pollutants. Various industrial applications have been developed, including ones for ground remediation (TCE, PCE), the removal of pesticides from drinking water, the removal of formaldehyde and phenol from industrial waste water and a reduction in COD from industrial waste water. The development of such AOP applications has been stimulated by increasingly stringent regulations, the pollution of water resources through agricultural and industrial activities and the requirement that industry meet effluent discharge standards. Nevertheless, it is difficult to obtain an accurate picture of the use of AOPs and its exact position in the range of water treatment processes has not been determined to date. The purpose of this overview is to discuss those processes and provide an indication of future trends. PMID:15077976

  10. A comparison between conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation and other advanced oxidation processes for the treatment of synthetic melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, P; Hernández-Ortega, M; Rodrigo, M A; Barrera-Díaz, C E; Roa-Morales, G; Sáez, C

    2009-05-15

    In this study, three technologies classified as Advanced Oxidation Processes (Conductive-Diamond Electrochemical Oxidation (CDEO), ozonation and Fenton oxidation) have been compared to treat wastes produced in fermentation processes, and characterized by a significant color and a high organic load. Results of CDEO seem to strongly depend on the addition of an electrolyte salt, not only to decrease the energy cost but also to improve efficiency. The addition of sodium chloride as supporting electrolyte improves the removal percentages of organic load, indicating the important role of mediated oxidation processes carried out by the electrogenerated oxidants (hypochlorite). Fenton oxidation and ozonation seem to be less efficient, and mainly Fenton oxidation favors the accumulation of refractory compounds. The differences observed can be explained in terms of the contribution of hydroxyl radicals and other specific oxidation mechanisms involved in each technology. PMID:18789836

  11. A carbon-free polyoxometalate molecular catalyst with a cobalt-arsenic core for visible light-driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chao; Wang, Xin-Long; Qin, Chao; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min; Wang, En-Bo

    2016-07-21

    A carbon-free, stable, homogeneous water oxidation catalyst based on the unique hepta-nuclear cobalt-arsenic core ("fused" double-quasi-cubane) and polyoxometalate ligands, Na12[{Co(II)7As(III)6O9(OH)6}(A-α-SiW9O34)2]·8H2O (1), was synthesized, thoroughly characterized and employed to catalyze water oxidation under visible-light-driven conditions. PMID:27383015

  12. Electron-Driven Metal Oxide Effusion and Graphene Gasification at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ta, Huy Q; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Warner, Jamie H; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Yinghui; Zhao, Jiong; Gemming, Thomas; Trzebicka, Barbara; Liu, Zhongfan; Pribat, Didier; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2016-06-28

    Metal oxide nanoparticles decorating graphene have attracted abundant interest in the scientific community owing to their significant application in various areas such as batteries, gas sensors, and photocatalysis. In addition, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are of great interest for the etching of graphene, for example, to form nanoribbons, through gasification reactions. Hence it is important to have a good understanding of how nanoparticles interact with graphene. In this work we examine, in situ, the behavior of CuO and ZnO nanoparticles on graphene at room temperature while irradiated by electrons in a transmission electron microscope. ZnO is shown to etch graphene through gasification. In the gasification reaction C from graphene is released as CO or CO2. We show that the reaction can occur at room temperature. Moreover, CuO and ZnO particles trapped within a graphene fold are shown to effuse out of a fold through small ruptures. The mass transport in the effusion process between the CuO and ZnO particles is fundamentally different. Mass transport for CuO occurs in an amorphous phase, while for ZnO mass transport occurs through the short-lived gliding of vacancies and dislocations. The work highlights the potential and wealth of electron beam driven chemical reactions of nanomaterials, even at room temperature. PMID:27218864

  13. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Protects Hepatocytes from Type I Interferon-Driven Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Anannya; Hegazy, Ahmed N.; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Kosack, Lindsay; Cupovic, Jovana; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Merkler, Doron; Kühl, Anja A.; Vilagos, Bojan; Schliehe, Christopher; Panse, Isabel; Khamina, Kseniya; Baazim, Hatoon; Arnold, Isabelle; Flatz, Lukas; Xu, Haifeng C.; Lang, Philipp A.; Aderem, Alan; Takaoka, Akinori; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Ludewig, Burkhard; Löhning, Max; Bergthaler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tissue damage caused by viral hepatitis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Using a mouse model of viral hepatitis, we identified virus-induced early transcriptional changes in the redox pathways in the liver, including downregulation of superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Sod1−/− mice exhibited increased inflammation and aggravated liver damage upon viral infection, which was independent of T and NK cells and could be ameliorated by antioxidant treatment. Type I interferon (IFN-I) led to a downregulation of Sod1 and caused oxidative liver damage in Sod1−/− and wild-type mice. Genetic and pharmacological ablation of the IFN-I signaling pathway protected against virus-induced liver damage. These results delineate IFN-I mediated oxidative stress as a key mediator of virus-induced liver damage and describe a mechanism of innate-immunity-driven pathology, linking IFN-I signaling with antioxidant host defense and infection-associated tissue damage. Video Abstract PMID:26588782

  14. Effects of Temperature and Acidic Pre-Treatment on Fenton-Driven Oxidation of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temperature-dependent mechanisms in the Fenton-driven chemical oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated. Prior to iron (Fe) amendment to the GAC, acid-treatment altered the surface chemistry of the GAC and lowered the pH ...

  15. Effects on temperature and acidic pre-treatment on Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temperature-dependent mechanisms in the Fenton-driven chemical oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated. Prior to iron (Fe) amendment to the GAC, acid-treatment altered the surface chemistry of the GAC and lowered the p...

  16. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  17. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  18. Integration of advanced oxidation technologies and biological processes: recent developments, trends, and advances.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Gelareh Bankian; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2004-01-01

    The greatest challenge of today's wastewater treatment technology is to optimize the use of biological and chemical wastewater treatment processes. The choice of the process and/or integration of the processes depend strongly on the wastewater characteristics, concentrations, and the desired efficiencies. It has been observed by many investigators that the coupling of a bioreactor and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) could reduce the final concentrations of the effluent to the desired values. However, optimizing the total cost of the treatment is a challenge, as AOPs are much more expensive than biological processes alone. Therefore, an appropriate design should not only consider the ability of this coupling to reduce the concentration of organic pollutants, but also try to obtain the desired results in a cost effective process. To consider the total cost of the treatment, the residence time in biological and photochemical reactors, the kinetic rates, and the capital and operating costs of the reactors play significant roles. In this study, recent developments and trends (1996-2003) on the integration of photochemical and biological processes for the degradation of problematic pollutants in wastewater have been reviewed. The conditions to get the optimum results from this integration have also been considered. In most of the studies, it has been shown that the integrated processes were more efficient than individual processes. However, slight changes in the configuration of the reactors, temperature, pH, treatment time, concentration of the oxidants, and microorganism's colonies could lead to a great deviation in results. It has also been demonstrated that the treatment cost in both reactors is a function of time, which changes by the flow rate. The minimum cost in the coupling of the processes cannot be achieved unless considering the best treatment time in chemical and biological reactors individually. PMID:15533022

  19. Remediation of a winery wastewater combining aerobic biological oxidation and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-05-15

    Apart from a high biodegradable fraction consisting of organic acids, sugars and alcohols, winery wastewaters exhibit a recalcitrant fraction containing high-molecular-weight compounds as polyphenols, tannins and lignins. In this context, a winery wastewater was firstly subjected to a biological oxidation to mineralize the biodegradable fraction and afterwards an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) was applied in order to mineralize the refractory molecules or transform them into simpler ones that can be further biodegraded. The biological oxidation led to above 97% removals of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), but was inefficient on the degradation of a bioresistant fraction corresponding to 130 mg L(-1) of DOC, 380 mg O2 L(-1) of COD and 8.2 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) of total dissolved polyphenols. Various EAOPs such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar PEF (SPEF) were then applied to the recalcitrant effluent fraction using a 2.2 L lab-scale flow plant containing an electrochemical cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-PTFE air-diffusion cathode and coupled to a photoreactor with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs). The influence of initial Fe(2+) concentration and current density on the PEF process was evaluated. The relative oxidative ability of EAOPs increased in the order AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF ≤ SPEF. The SPEF process using an initial Fe(2+) concentration of 35 mg L(-1), current density of 25 mA cm(-2), pH of 2.8 and 25 °C reached removals of 86% on DOC and 68% on COD after 240 min, regarding the biologically treated effluent, along with energy consumptions of 45 kWh (kg DOC)(-1) and 5.1 kWh m(-3). After this coupled treatment, color, odor, COD, BOD5, NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) parameters complied with the legislation targets and, in addition, a total

  20. IRON-PEROXYMONOSULFATE: A NOVEL SULFATE RADICAL BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY FOR DEGRADATION OF PCBS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the degradation of recalcitrant polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) using sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation technologies. Sulfate radicals are generated through coupling of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) with iron (Fe(II), Fe(III)). Sulfate radicals have very ...

  1. Demonstrating Advanced Oxidation Coupled with Biodegradation for Removal of Carbamazepine (WERF Report INFR6SG09)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbamazepine is an anthropogenic pharmaceutical found in wastewater effluents that is quite resistant to removal by conventional wastewater treatment processes. Hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes can transform carbamazepine into degradation products but cannot m...

  2. Nitric Oxide-Driven Hypoxia Initiates Synovial Angiogenesis, Hyperplasia and Inflammatory Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Fei; Wu, Pei; Xiao, Na; Qiu, Frank; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA) that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO). Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2), reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA), an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP) causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusions/Significance Like collagen, bacteria also

  3. Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241

    SciTech Connect

    Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio; Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio

    2013-07-01

    The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation

  4. High-performance photoelectrochemical cells based on a binuclear ruthenium catalyst for visible-light-driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Gao, Yan; Ding, Xin; Yu, Ze; Sun, Licheng

    2014-10-01

    Two photoanodes based on a binuclear (2) and a mononuclear ruthenium (3) water oxidation catalysts were assembled in combination with a molecular photosensitizer (1) by using a co-adsorption method. The anodes were used in dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DS-PECs) for visible-light-driven water splitting. A DS-PEC device using TiO2 (1+2) as working electrode (WE) exhibits better performance than TiO2 (1+3) as WE in light-driven water splitting. Detailed photoelectrochemical studies on these DS-PEC devices are discussed. PMID:25139154

  5. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-05-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate.

  6. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate. PMID:27242172

  7. Importance of Plasmonic Heating on Visible Light Driven Photocatalysis of Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Tanujjal; Zoepfl, David; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Herein we explore the role of localized plasmonic heat generated by resonantly excited gold (Au) NPs on visible light driven photocatalysis process. Au NPs are deposited on the surface of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). The localized heat generated by Au NPs under 532 nm continuous laser excitation (SPR excitation) was experimentally probed using Raman spectroscopy by following the phonon modes of ZnO. Under the resonant excitation the temperature at the surface of the Au-ZnO NRs reaches up to about 300 °C, resulting in almost 6 times higher apparent quantum yield (AQY) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) compared to the bare ZnO NRs. Under solar light irradiation the Au-ZnO NRs demonstrated visible light photocatalytic activity twice that of what was achieved with bare ZnO NRs, while significantly reduced the activation energy required for the photocatalytic reactions allowing the reactions to occur at a faster rate. PMID:27242172

  8. Halogenated earth abundant metalloporphyrins as photostable sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation in a neutral phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    Very photostable tetrachloro-metalloporphyrins were developed as sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation coupled to cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts in concentrated (0.1 M) phosphate buffer solution. Potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) acts as a sacrificial electron acceptor to oxidize the metalloporphyrin photosensitizers in their excited states. The radical cations thus produced drive the cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts: Co4O4-cubane and Co(NO3)2 as pre-catalyst for cobalt-oxide (CoOx) nanoparticles. Two different metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) both showed very high photostability in the photocatalytic reaction, as compared to non-halogenated analogues. This indicates that photostability primarily depends on the substitution of the porphyrin macrocycle, not on the central metal. Furthermore, our molecular design strategy not only positively increases the electrochemical potential by 120-140 mV but also extends the absorption spectrum up to ∼600 nm. As a result, the solar photon capturing abilities of halogenated metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) are comparable to that of the natural photosynthetic pigment, chlorophyll a. We successfully demonstrate long-term (>3 h) visible-light-driven water oxidation using our molecular system based on earth-abundant (first-row transition) metals in concentrated phosphate buffer solution. PMID:27197873

  9. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy densityphysics and heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy,P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, Qin H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev,E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2006-07-05

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport; and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by > 50 X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. They are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy.

  10. Nox control for high nitric oxide concentration flows through combustion-driven reduction

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, James T.; Ekmann, James M.; Pennline, Henry W.; Drummond, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    An improved method for removing nitrogen oxides from concentrated waste gas streams, in which nitrogen oxides are ignited with a carbonaceous material in the presence of substoichiometric quantities of a primary oxidant, such as air. Additionally, reductants may be ignited along with the nitrogen oxides, carbonaceous material and primary oxidant to achieve greater reduction of nitrogen oxides. A scrubber and regeneration system may also be included to generate a concentrated stream of nitrogen oxides from flue gases for reduction using this method.

  11. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  12. Photocatalytic oxidation of organic dyes with visible-light-driven codoped TiO2 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongfang; Zeng, Fanbin

    2011-06-01

    A novel copper (II) and zinc (II) codoped TiO2 photocatalyst was synthesized by a modified sol-gel method using titanium (IV) isopropoxide, Zn(NO3)2 · 6H2O and copper(Il) nitrate as precursors. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photo-luminescence spectra (PL). The XRD results showed undoped and Zn, Cu-codoped TiO2 nanoparticles mainly including anatase phase and a tiny amount of Zn- and Cu-oxides exist in the mixed system, which is attributed to the decomposition of copper and zinc nitrates in the TiO2 gel to form CuO and ZnO and randomly dispersed on the TiO2 surface. On the basis of the optical characterization results, we found that the codoping of copper (II) and zinc (II) resulted a red shift of adsorption and lower recombination probability between electrons and holes, which were the reasons for high photocatalytic activity of Zn, Cu-codoped TiO2 nanoparticles under visible light (λ > 400 nm). The photocatalytic activity of samples was tested for degradation of methyl orange (MO) in solutions. The results indicated that the visible-light driven capability of the codoped catalyst were much higher than that of the pure TiO2 catalyst under visible irradiation. Because of the synergetic effect of copper (II) and zinc (II) element, the Zn, Cu-codoped TiO2 catalyst will show higher quantum yield and enhance absorption of visible light. In the end, a key mechanism was proposed in order to account for the enhanced activity.

  13. Recent anode advances in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunwen; Stimming, Ulrich

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical reactors that can directly convert the chemical energy of a fuel gas into electrical energy with high efficiency and in an environment-friendly way. The recent trends in the research of solid oxide fuel cells concern the use of available hydrocarbon fuels, such as natural gas. The most commonly used anode material Ni/YSZ cermet exhibits some disadvantages when hydrocarbons were used as fuels. Thus it is necessary to develop alternative anode materials which display mixed conductivity under fuel conditions. This article reviews the recent developments of anode in SOFCs with principal emphasis on the material aspects. In addition, the mechanism and kinetics of fuel oxidation reactions are also addressed. Various processes used for the cost-effective fabrication of anode have also been summarized. Finally, this review will be concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  14. Electrocatalyst advances for hydrogen oxidation in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.

    1984-01-01

    The important considerations that presently exist for achieving commercial acceptance of fuel cells are centered on cost (which translates to efficiency) and lifetime. This paper addresses the questions of electrocatalyst utilization within porous electrode structures and the preparation of low-cost noble metal electrocatalyst combinations with extreme dispersions of the metal. Now that electrocatalyst particles can be prepared with dimensions of 10 A, either singly or in alloy combinations, a very large percentage of the noble metal atoms in a crystallite are available for reaction. The cost savings for such electrocatalysts in the present commercially driven environment are considerable.

  15. The muscle oxidative regulatory response to acute exercise is not impaired in less advanced COPD despite a decreased oxidative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Slot, Ilse G M; van den Borst, Bram; Hellwig, Valéry A C V; Barreiro, Esther; Schols, Annemie M W J; Gosker, Harry R

    2014-01-01

    Already in an early disease stage, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are confronted with impaired skeletal muscle function and physical performance due to a loss of oxidative type I muscle fibers and oxidative capacity (i.e. oxidative phenotype; Oxphen). Physical activity is a well-known stimulus of muscle Oxphen and crucial for its maintenance. We hypothesized that a blunted response of Oxphen genes to an acute bout of exercise could contribute to decreased Oxphen in COPD. For this, 28 patients with less advanced COPD (age 65 ± 7 yrs, FEV1 59 ± 16% predicted) and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls performed an incremental cycle ergometry test. The Oxphen response to exercise was determined by the measurement of gene expression levels of Oxphen markers in pre and 4h-post exercise quadriceps biopsies. Because exercise-induced hypoxia and oxidative stress may interfere with Oxphen response, oxygen saturation and oxidative stress markers were assessed as well. Regardless of oxygen desaturation and absolute exercise intensities, the Oxphen regulatory response to exercise was comparable between COPD patients and controls with no evidence of increased oxidative stress. In conclusion, the muscle Oxphen regulatory response to acute exercise is not blunted in less advanced COPD, regardless of exercise-induced hypoxia. Hence, this study provides further rationale for incorporation of exercise training as integrated part of disease management to prevent or slow down loss of muscle Oxphen and related functional impairment in COPD. PMID:24587251

  16. Glutamine-driven oxidative phosphorylation is a major ATP source in transformed mammalian cells in both normoxia and hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Mathew, Robin; Chung, Michelle K; White, Eileen; Shlomi, Tomer; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian cells can generate ATP via glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration. Oncogene activation and hypoxia promote glycolysis and lactate secretion. The significance of these metabolic changes to ATP production remains however ill defined. Here, we integrate LC-MS-based isotope tracer studies with oxygen uptake measurements in a quantitative redox-balanced metabolic flux model of mammalian cellular metabolism. We then apply this approach to assess the impact of Ras and Akt activation and hypoxia on energy metabolism. Both oncogene activation and hypoxia induce roughly a twofold increase in glycolytic flux. Ras activation and hypoxia also strongly decrease glucose oxidation. Oxidative phosphorylation, powered substantially by glutamine-driven TCA turning, however, persists and accounts for the majority of ATP production. Consistent with this, in all cases, pharmacological inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation markedly reduces energy charge, and glutamine but not glucose removal markedly lowers oxygen uptake. Thus, glutamine-driven oxidative phosphorylation is a major means of ATP production even in hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:24301801

  17. Transport behavior across the field-driven superconductor-insulator transition in amorphous indium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Soo

    Superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) in two-dimensional (2D) thin films is a beautiful realization of a zero temperature quantum phase transition (QPT) and has been explored both theoretically and experimentally over the last two decades. In addition to the several intrinsic ways (such as thickness) of tuning the transition, external magnetic field has been used to tune from one ground state to another in various condensed matter systems. Amorphous indium oxide thin films, with their unique capability of tuning the disorder level in the system easily, have been proven to be an excellent model system to study the transport mechanisms near and across the SIT in 2D. In this thesis, magnetic field-driven SIT in 2D films of amorphous InO x is studied. The goal of this work is to understand the microscopic transport mechanisms responsible for driving the SIT when the magnetic field direction is continually varied from being perpendicular to the sample plane to parallel. Applying a perpendicular magnetic field resulting in a clear field-driven SIT and a magneto-resistance peak on the insulating side in InO x films have been previously understood in a bosonic picture put forward by M. P. A. Fisher and coworkers. However, this boson-vortex duality picture is expected to give rise to markedly different transport characteristics when the magnetic field is applied parallel to the sample plane. Features found in the parallel-field transport data however can also be explained by the bosonic picture, thereby questioning the applicability of the hitherto successful models to the physics of SIT. An isotropic magnetic field value, where the sample has the exact same resistance irrespective of the angle between the sample plane and magnetic field direction, is found. This isotropic point lies at field values above the critical field (Bc) of the SIT (in both perpendicular and parallel configurations) and above the magnetoresistance peak. The isotropic point is very weakly

  18. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  19. Photovoltaic-driven organic electrosynthesis and efforts toward more sustainable oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Perkins, Robert J; Smith, Jake A

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combination of visible light, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry provides a convenient, inexpensive platform for conducting a wide variety of sustainable oxidation reactions. The approach presented in this article is compatible with both direct and indirect oxidation reactions, avoids the need for a stoichiometric oxidant, and leads to hydrogen gas as the only byproduct from the corresponding reduction reaction. PMID:25815081

  20. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, Francois; Mihalcea, Daniel; Piot, Philippe; Zhu, Jun

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  1. Simulation of fast-ion-driven Alfvén eigenmodes on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Youjun; Todo, Y.; Pei, Youbin; Li, Guoqiang; Qian, Jinping; Xiang, Nong; Zhou, Deng; Ren, Qilong; Huang, Juan; Xu, Liqing

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic-MHD hybrid simulations are carried out to investigate possible fast-ion-driven modes on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. Three typical kinds of fast-ion-driven modes, namely, toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes, reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes, and energetic-particle continuum modes, are observed simultaneously in the simulations. The simulation results are compared with the results of an ideal MHD eigenvalue code, which shows agreement with respect to the mode frequency, dominant poloidal mode numbers, and radial location. However, the modes in the hybrid simulations take a twisted structure on the poloidal plane, which is different from the results of the ideal MHD eigenvalue code. The twist is due to the radial phase variation of the eigenfunction, which may be attributed to the non-perturbative kinetic effects of the fast ions. By varying the stored energy of fast ions to change the fast ion drive in the simulations, it is demonstrated that the twist (i.e., the radial phase variation) is positively correlated with the fast ion drive.

  2. Direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic reaction activity of Au nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxides by SERS.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu; You, Tingting; Liu, Dapeng; Lang, Xiufeng; Tan, Enzhong; Shi, Jihua; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-04-21

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have recently attracted tremendous research interest in the field of catalysis due to their unique optical and electronic properties. However, direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles (NPs) supported on reduced graphene oxides (Au/rGO) has rarely been reported. Herein, based on the reduction from 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), the catalytic property of Au/rGO nanocomposites was investigated and compared with corresponding Au NP samples with similar size distribution. Our results show that Au/rGO nanocomposites could serve as a good catalytic and analytic platform for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. In addition, systematic comparisons were conducted during power- and time-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments, which exhibited a lower power threshold and higher catalytic efficiency for Au/rGO as compared to Au NPs toward the reaction. PMID:25793752

  3. Light-driven artificial enzymes for selective oxidation of guanosine triphosphate using water-soluble POSS network polymers.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Hwan; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2014-09-01

    The light-driven artificial enzymes were constructed to realize unnatural reactions concerning bio-significant molecules. In this manuscript, the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-selective oxidation is reported using the network polymers composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). We synthesized the water-soluble POSS network polymer containing the naphthyridine ligands to capture GTP inside the networks and the ruthenium complexes to oxidize the captured GTP under light irradiation. Initially, the binding affinities of the guanosine nucleosides to the naphthyridine ligand inside the POSS network polymer were evaluated from the emission quenching experiments. Accordingly, it was observed that the naphthyridine ligand can form the stable complex only with GTP (K(a) = 5.5 × 10(6) M(-1)). These results indicate that only GTP can be captured by the network polymer. Next, the photo-catalytic activity of the ruthenium complex-modified POSS network polymer was investigated. Finally, it was revealed that the network polymer can decompose GTP efficiently under light irradiation. This is the first example, to the best of our knowledge, to offer not only the GTP-selective host polymers but also the light-driven artificial enzyme for GTP oxidation. PMID:25026217

  4. Development of an advanced bond coat for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, An-Chou; Chen, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chien-Kuo; Shong, Wei-Ja

    2015-11-01

    An advanced bond coat has been developed for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications; a low thermal expansion superalloy has been selected as the substrate, and the newly developed bond coat is applied between the substrate and the LSM top coat. The bond coat composition is designed to be near thermodynamic equilibrium with the substrate to minimize interdiffusion with the substrate while providing oxidation protection for the substrate. The bond coat exhibits good oxidation resistance, a low area specific resistance, and a low thermal expansion coefficient at 800 °C; experimental results indicate that interdiffusion between the bond coat and the substrate can be hindered.

  5. Recent Advances in Applicability of TEMHD Driven Liquid Lithium as a Fusion Relevant PFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szott, Matthew; Fiflis, Peter; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid lithium displays increasing promise as a replacement to solid plasma facing components (PFC) in fusion device applications. Liquid PFCs reduce erosion and thermal stress damage, prolonging device lifetime, while lithium has been shown to decrease edge recycling, reduce impurities, and enhance plasma performance. The Liquid Metal Infused Trench (LiMIT) concept developed at UIUC successfully demonstrates horizontal and vertical thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) flow of liquid lithium through metal trenches for use as a PFC. Installed in the HT-7 tokamak and at the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device, the system performed effectively in fusion relevant conditions. In high heat flux tests, trench dry-out was observed, which exposes solid trench material due to higher TEMHD force on the area with the highest heat flux. A 3D free surface fluid model of dry-out and experimental tests conducted to mitigate the detrimental effect are described. The final designs for the upcoming test of LiMIT as a limiter for the EAST tokamak are discussed, along with velocity characteristics of steady-state TEMHD driven flow through the LiMIT system inclined up to 180 degrees from horizontal, which is necessary for broad applicability of a liquid lithium PFC system.

  6. Recent Advances in VisIt: AMR Streamlines and Query-Driven Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, Wes; Borovikov, Sergey; Childs, Hank; Deines, Eduard; Garth, Christoph; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth; Martin, David; Meredith, Jeremy; Prabhat,; Pugmire, David; Rubel, Oliver; Van Straalen, Brian; Wu, Kesheng

    2009-11-12

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective method for simulations spanning a large range of spatiotemporal scales such as those encountered in astrophysical simulations. Combining research in novel AMR visualization algorithms and basic infrastructure work, the Department of Energy's (DOEs) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) has extended VisIt, an open source visualization tool that can handle AMR data without converting it to alternate representations. This paper focuses on two recent advances in the development of VisIt. First, we have developed streamline computation methods that properly handle multi-domain data sets and utilize effectively multiple processors on parallel machines. Furthermore, we are working on streamline calculation methods that consider an AMR hierarchy and detect transitions from a lower resolution patch into a finer patch and improve interpolation at level boundaries. Second, we focus on visualization of large-scale particle data sets. By integrating the DOE Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center's FastBit indexing technology into VisIt, we are able to reduce particle counts effectively by thresholding and by loading only those particles from disk that satisfy the thresholding criteria. Furthermore, using FastBit it becomes possible to compute parallel coordinate views efficiently, thus facilitating interactive data exploration of massive particle data sets.

  7. A Multi-layer, Data-driven Advanced Reasoning Tool for Intelligent Data Mining and Analysis for Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.

    2012-12-31

    This paper presents the multi-layer, data-driven advanced reasoning tool (M-DART), a proof-of-principle decision support tool for improved power system operation. M-DART will cross-correlate and examine different data sources to assess anomalies, infer root causes, and anneal data into actionable information. By performing higher-level reasoning “triage” of diverse data sources, M-DART focuses on early detection of emerging power system events and identifies highest priority actions for the human decision maker. M-DART represents a significant advancement over today’s grid monitoring technologies that apply offline analyses to derive model-based guidelines for online real-time operations and use isolated data processing mechanisms focusing on individual data domains. The development of the M-DART will bridge these gaps by reasoning about results obtained from multiple data sources that are enabled by the smart grid infrastructure. This hybrid approach integrates a knowledge base that is trained offline but tuned online to capture model-based relationships while revealing complex causal relationships among data from different domains.

  8. Pressure driven spinning: A multifaceted approach for preparing nanoscaled functionalized fibers, scaffolds, and membranes with advanced materials

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Suwan N.; Suter, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning, a flexible jet-based fiber, scaffold, and membrane fabrication approach, has been elucidated as having significance to the heath sciences. Its capabilities have been most impressive as it possesses the ability to spin composite fibers ranging from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. Nonetheless, electrospinning has limitations and hazards, negating its wider exploration, for example, the inability to handle highly conducting suspensions, to its hazardous high voltage. Hence, to date electrospinning has undergone an exhaustive research regime to a point of cliché. Thus, in the work reported herein we unveil a competing technique to electrospinning, which has overcome the above limitations and hazards yet comparable in capabilities. The fiber preparation approach unearthed herein is referred to as “pressure driven spinning (PDS).” The driving mechanism exploited in this fiber spinning process is the pressurized by-pass flow. This mechanism allows the drawing of either micro- or nanosized fibers while processing polymeric suspensions containing a wide range of advanced materials spanning structural, functional, and biological entities. Similar to electrospinning if the collection time of these continuous formed fibers is varied, composite scaffolds and membranes are generated. In keeping with our interests, multicompositional structural entities such as these could have several applications in biology and medicine, for example, ranging from the development of three-dimensional cultures (including disease models) to the development of synthetic tissues and organ structures to advanced approaches for controlled and targeted therapeutics. PMID:20644675

  9. Dietary advanced lipid oxidation endproducts are risk factors to human health.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Lipid oxidation in foods is one of the major degradative processes responsible for losses in food quality. The oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids results in significant generation of dietary advanced lipid oxidation endproducts (ALEs) which are in part cytotoxic and genotoxic compounds. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to dietary oxidized food compounds, after digestion a part of them are absorbed into the lymph or directly into the blood stream. After ingestion of oxidized fats animals and human have been shown to excrete in urine increase amounts of malondialdehyde but also lipophilic carbonyl compounds. Oxidized cholesterol in the diet was found to be a source of oxidized lipoproteins in human serum. Some of the dietary ALEs, which are absorbed from the gut to the circulatory system, seems to act as injurious chemicals that activate an inflammatory response which affects not only circulatory system but also organs such as liver, kidney, lung, and the gut itself. We believe that repeated consumption of oxidized fat in the diet poses a chronic threat to human health. High concentration of dietary antioxidants could prevent lipid oxidation and ALEs generation not only in foods but also in stomach condition and thereby potentially decrease absorption of ALEs from the gut. This could explains the health benefit of diets containing large amounts of dietary antioxidants such those present in fruits and vegetables, or products such as red-wine or tea consuming during the meal. PMID:17854006

  10. A comparison of single oxidants versus advanced oxidation processes as chlorine-alternatives for wild blueberry processing (Vaccinium angustifolium).

    PubMed

    Crowe, Kristi M; Bushway, Alfred A; Bushway, Rodney J; Davis-Dentici, Katherine; Hazen, Russell A

    2007-05-01

    Advanced oxidation processes and single chemical oxidants were evaluated for their antimicrobial efficacy against common spoilage bacteria isolated from lowbush blueberries. Predominant bacterial flora were identified using biochemical testing with the assessment of relative abundance using non-selective and differential media. Single chemical oxidants evaluated for postharvest processing of lowbush blueberries included 1% hydrogen peroxide, 100 ppm chlorine, and 1 ppm aqueous ozone while advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) included combinations of 1% hydrogen peroxide/UV, 100 ppm chlorine/UV, and 1 ppm ozone/1% hydrogen peroxide/UV. Enterobacter agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens were found to comprise 90-95% of the bacterial flora on lowbush blueberries. Results of inoculation studies reveal significant log reductions (p< or 5) in populations of E. agglomerans and P. fluorescens on all samples receiving treatment with 1% hydrogen peroxide, 1% hydrogen peroxide/UV, 1 ppm ozone, or a combined ozone/hydrogen peroxide/UV treatment as compared to chlorine treatments and unwashed control berries. Although population reductions approached 2.5 log CFU/g, microbial reductions among these treatments were not found to be significantly different (p< or 5) from each other despite the synergistic potential that should result from AOPs; furthermore, as a single oxidant, UV inactivation of inoculated bacteria was minimal and did not prove effective as a non-aqueous bactericidal process for fresh pack blueberries. Overall, results indicate that hydrogen peroxide and ozone, as single chemical oxidants, are as effective as AOPs and could be considered as chlorine-alternatives in improving the microbiological quality of lowbush blueberries. PMID:17350128

  11. Power, resolution and bias: recent advances in insect phylogeny driven by the genomic revolution.

    PubMed

    Yeates, David K; Meusemann, Karen; Trautwein, Michelle; Wiegmann, Brian; Zwick, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding on the phylogenetic relationships of insects has been revolutionised in the last decade by the proliferation of next generation sequencing technologies (NGS). NGS has allowed insect systematists to assemble very large molecular datasets that include both model and non-model organisms. Such datasets often include a large proportion of the total number of protein coding sequences available for phylogenetic comparison. We review some early entomological phylogenomic studies that employ a range of different data sampling protocols and analyses strategies, illustrating a fundamental renaissance in our understanding of insect evolution all driven by the genomic revolution. The analysis of phylogenomic datasets is challenging because of their size and complexity, and it is obvious that the increasing size alone does not ensure that phylogenetic signal overcomes systematic biases in the data. Biases can be due to various factors such as the method of data generation and assembly, or intrinsic biological feature of the data per se, such as similarities due to saturation or compositional heterogeneity. Such biases often cause violations in the underlying assumptions of phylogenetic models. We review some of the bioinformatics tools available and being developed to detect and minimise systematic biases in phylogenomic datasets. Phylogenomic-scale data coupled with sophisticated analyses will revolutionise our understanding of insect functional genomics. This will illuminate the relationship between the vast range of insect phenotypic diversity and underlying genetic diversity. In combination with rapidly developing methods to estimate divergence times, these analyses will also provide a compelling view of the rates and patterns of lineagenesis (birth of lineages) over the half billion years of insect evolution. PMID:27436549

  12. Degenerate epitaxy-driven defects in monolayer silicon oxide on ruthenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Shashank; Vlaic, Sergio; Machado-Charry, Eduardo; Vu, Anh-Duc; Guisset, Valérie; David, Philippe; Hadji, Emmanuel; Pochet, Pascal; Coraux, Johann

    2015-10-01

    The structure of the ultimately thin crystalline allotrope of silicon oxide, prepared on a ruthenium surface, is unveiled down to the atomic scale with chemical sensitivity, owing to high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and first principles calculations. An ordered oxygen lattice is imaged which coexists with the two-dimensional monolayer oxide. This coexistence signals a displacive transformation from an oxygen-reconstructed Ru(0001) to silicon oxide, along which laterally shifted domains form, each with equivalent and degenerate epitaxial relationships with the substrate. The unavoidable character of defects at the boundaries between these domains appeals for the development of alternative methods capable of producing single-crystalline two-dimensional oxides.

  13. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven proton-boron fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Morrissey, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-02-01

    A low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with relatively low intensity (3 × 1016 W cm-2) was used to enhance the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the "ultraclean" proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha-particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as target. The combination of the specific target geometry and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed enhancing the yield of alpha-particles up to 109 per steradian, i.e 100 times higher than previous experimental achievements. Moreover the alpha particle stream presented a clearly peaked angular and energy distribution, which make this secondary source attractive for potential applications. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  14. ADVANCED OXIDATION AND REDUCTION PROCESSES IN THE GAS PHASE USING NON-THERMAL PLASMAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past several years interest in gas-phase pollution control has increased, arising from a larger body of regulations and greater respect for the environment. Advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs), historically used to treat recalcitrant water pollutants via hydroxyl-radica...

  15. DEMONSTRATION OF THE HIPOX ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT OF MTBE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiPOx technology is an advanced oxidation process that incorporates high-precision delivery of ozone and hydrogen peroxide to chemically destroy organic contaminants with the promise of minimizing bromate formation. A MTBE-contaminated groundwater from the Ventura County Nava...

  16. TiO2-Based Advanced Oxidation Nanotechnologies For Water Purification And Reuse

    EPA Science Inventory

    TiO2 photocatalysis, one of the UV-based advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) and nanotechnologies (AONs), has attracted great attention for the development of efficient water treatment and purification systems due to the effectiveness of TiO2 to generate ...

  17. DEMONSTRATION OF THE HIPOX ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT OF MTBE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiPOx technology is an advanced oxidation process that incorporates high-precision delivery of ozone and hydrogen peroxide to chemically destroy organic contaminants with the promise of minimizing bromate formation. A MTBE-contaminated groundwater from the Ventura County Nav...

  18. DESTRUCTION OF PAHS AND PCBS IN WATER USING SULFATE RADICAL-BASED CATALYTIC ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new class of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radicals is being tested for the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in aqueous solution. These AOPs are based on the generation of sulfate radicals through...

  19. Early experience with digital advance care planning and directives, a novel consumer-driven program

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Spivey, Christy; Boardman, Bonnie; Courtney, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Barriers to traditional advance care planning (ACP) and advance directive (AD) creation have limited the promise of ACP/AD for individuals and families, the healthcare team, and society. Our objectives were to determine the results of a digital ACP/AD through which consumers create, store, locate, and retrieve their ACP/AD at no charge and with minimal physician involvement, and the ACP/AD can be integrated into the electronic health record. The authors chose 900 users of MyDirectives, a digital ACP/AD tool, to achieve proportional representation of all 50 states by population size and then reviewed their responses. The 900 participants had an average age of 50.8 years (SD = 16.6); 84% of the men and 91% of the women were in self-reported good health when signing their ADs. Among the respondents, 94% wanted their physicians to consult a supportive and palliative care team if they were seriously ill; nearly 85% preferred cessation of life-sustaining treatments during their final days; 76% preferred to spend their final days at home or in a hospice; and 70% would accept attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in limited circumstances. Most respondents wanted an autopsy under certain conditions, and 62% wished to donate their organs. In conclusion, analysis of early experience with this ACP/AD platform demonstrates that individuals of different ages and conditions can engage in an interrogatory process about values, develop ADs that are more nuanced than traditional paper-based ADs in reflecting those values, and easily make changes to their ADs. Online ADs have the potential to remove barriers to ACP/AD and thus further improve patient-centered end-of-life care. PMID:27365867

  20. Early experience with digital advance care planning and directives, a novel consumer-driven program.

    PubMed

    Fine, Robert L; Yang, Zhiyong; Spivey, Christy; Boardman, Bonnie; Courtney, Maureen

    2016-07-01

    Barriers to traditional advance care planning (ACP) and advance directive (AD) creation have limited the promise of ACP/AD for individuals and families, the healthcare team, and society. Our objectives were to determine the results of a digital ACP/AD through which consumers create, store, locate, and retrieve their ACP/AD at no charge and with minimal physician involvement, and the ACP/AD can be integrated into the electronic health record. The authors chose 900 users of MyDirectives, a digital ACP/AD tool, to achieve proportional representation of all 50 states by population size and then reviewed their responses. The 900 participants had an average age of 50.8 years (SD = 16.6); 84% of the men and 91% of the women were in self-reported good health when signing their ADs. Among the respondents, 94% wanted their physicians to consult a supportive and palliative care team if they were seriously ill; nearly 85% preferred cessation of life-sustaining treatments during their final days; 76% preferred to spend their final days at home or in a hospice; and 70% would accept attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in limited circumstances. Most respondents wanted an autopsy under certain conditions, and 62% wished to donate their organs. In conclusion, analysis of early experience with this ACP/AD platform demonstrates that individuals of different ages and conditions can engage in an interrogatory process about values, develop ADs that are more nuanced than traditional paper-based ADs in reflecting those values, and easily make changes to their ADs. Online ADs have the potential to remove barriers to ACP/AD and thus further improve patient-centered end-of-life care. PMID:27365867

  1. Differential oxidative status and immune characterization of the early and advanced stages of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Freitas, L F; De Rossi, T; Campos, F C; Simão, A N Colado; Barbosa, D S; Pinge-Filho, P; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is the malignant neoplasia with the highest incidence in women worldwide. Chronic oxidative stress and inflammation have been indicated as major mediators during carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Human studies have not considered the complexity of tumor biology during the stages of cancer advance, limiting their clinical application. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic oxidative stress and immune response parameters in early (ED; TNM I and II) and advanced disease (AD; TNM III and IV) of patients diagnosed with infiltrative ductal carcinoma breast cancer. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated by plasmatic lipoperoxidation, carbonyl content, thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), nitric oxide levels (NO), total radical antioxidant parameter (TRAP), superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities and GSH levels. Immune evaluation was determined by TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 levels and leukocytes oxidative burst evaluation by chemiluminescence. Tissue damage analysis included heart (total CK and CKMB), liver (AST, ALT, GGT), and renal (creatinine, urea, and uric acid) plasmatic markers. C-reactive protein (CRP) and iron metabolism were also evaluated. Analysis of the results verified different oxidative stress statuses occur at distinct cancer stages. ED was characterized by reduction in catalase, 8-isoprostanes, and GSH levels, with enhanced lipid peroxidation and TBARS levels. AD exhibited more pronounced oxidative status, with reduction in catalase activity and TRAP, intense lipid peroxidation and high levels of NO, TBARs, and carbonyl content. ED patients presented a Th2 immune pattern, while AD exhibited Th1 status. CRP levels and ferritin were increased in both stages of disease. Leukocytes burst impairment was observed in both the groups. Plasma iron levels were significantly elevated in AD. The data obtained indicated that oxidative stress enhancement and immune response impairment may be necessary to ensure

  2. Advances in Understanding the Actions of Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Quock, Raymond M

    2007-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) has been used for well over 150 years in clinical dentistry for its analgesic and anxiolytic properties. This small and simple inorganic chemical molecule has indisputable effects of analgesia, anxiolysis, and anesthesia that are of great clinical interest. Recent studies have helped to clarify the analgesic mechanisms of N2O, but the mechanisms involved in its anxiolytic and anesthetic actions remain less clear. Findings to date indicate that the analgesic effect of N2O is opioid in nature, and, like morphine, may involve a myriad of neuromodulators in the spinal cord. The anxiolytic effect of N2O, on the other hand, resembles that of benzodiazepines and may be initiated at selected subunits of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor. Similarly, the anesthetic effect of N2O may involve actions at GABAA receptors and possibly at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors as well. This article reviews the latest information on the proposed modes of action for these clinicaleffects of N2O. PMID:17352529

  3. Advanced oxide powders processing based on cascade plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, O. P.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of the potential advantages offered to thermal spraying and powder processing by the implementation of plasma torches with inter-electrode insert (IEI) or, in other words, cascade plasma torches (CPTs) is presented. The paper provides evidence that the modular designed single cathode CPT helps eliminate the following major disadvantages of conventional plasma torches: plasma parameters drifting, 1-5 kHz pulsing of plasma flow, as well as excessive erosion of electrodes. More stable plasma results in higher quality, homogeneity and reproducibility of plasma sprayed coatings and powders treated. In addition, CPT offers an extremely wide operating window, which allows better control of plasma parameters, particle dwell time and, consequently, particle temperature and velocity within a wide range by generating high enthalpy quasi-laminar plasmas, medium enthalpy transient plasmas, as well as relatively low enthalpy turbulent plasmas. Stable operation, flexibility with plasma gases as well as wide operating window of CPT should help significantly improve the existing plasma spraying processes and coatings, and also help develop new advanced technologies.

  4. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Hafnium-Praseodymium-Indium Oxide System

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Griffin, C.W.; Weber, W.J.

    1988-06-01

    The HfO/sub 2/-PrO/sub 1.83/-In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system has been studied at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop alternative, highly electrically conducting oxides as electrode and interconnection materials for solid oxide fuel cells. A coprecipitation process was developed for synthesizing single-phase, mixed oxide powders necessary to fabricate powders and dense oxides. A ternary phase diagram was developed, and the phases and structures were related to electrical transport properties. Two new phases, an orthorhombic PrInO/sub 3/ and a rhombohedral Hf/sub 2/In/sub 2/O/sub 7/ phase, were identified. The highest electronic conductivity is related to the presence of a bcc, In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ solid solution (ss) containing HfO/sub 2/ and PrO/sub 1.83/. Compositions containing more than 35 mol % of the In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ss have electrical conductivities greater than 10/sup /minus/1/ (ohm-cm)/sup /minus/1/, and the two or three phase structures that contain this phase appear to exhibit mixed electronic-ionic conduction. The high electrical conductivities and structures similar to the Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/(HfO/sub 2/) electrolyte give these oxides potential for use as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells. 21 refs.

  5. Mineralization of paracetamol in aqueous solution with advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Torun, Murat; Gültekin, Özge; Şolpan, Dilek; Güven, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Paracetamol is a common analgesic drug widely used in all regions of the world more than hundred tonnes per year and it poses a great problem for the aquatic environment. Its phenolic intermediates are classified as persistent organic pollutants and toxic for the environment as well as human beings. In the present study, the irradiation of aqueous solutions of paracetamol with 60Co gamma-rays was examined on a laboratory scale and its degradation path was suggested with detected radiolysis products. The synergic effect of ozone on gamma-irradiation was investigated by preliminary ozonation before irradiation which reduced the irradiation dose from 5 to 3 kGy to completely remove paracetamol and its toxic intermediate hydroquinone from 6 to 4 kGy as well as increasing the radiation chemical yield (Gi values 1.36 and 1.66 in the absence and presence of ozone, respectively). The observed amount of formed hydroquinone was also decreased in the presence of ozone. There is a decrease in pH from 6.4 to 5.2 and dissolved oxygen consumed, which is up to 0.8 mg l(-1), to form some peroxyl radicals used for oxidation. Analytical measurements were carried out with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC) both qualitatively and quantitatively. Amounts of paracetamol and hydroquinone were measured with gas chromatography after trimethylsilane derivatization. Small aliphatic acids, such as acetic acid, formic acid and oxalic acid, were measured quantitatively with IC as well as inorganic ions (nitrite and nitrate) in which their yields increase with irradiation. PMID:25263253

  6. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L. )

    1992-11-01

    The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm[sup 2] at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 [Omega]-cm[sup 2]/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

  7. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L.

    1992-11-01

    The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 {Omega}-cm{sup 2}/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

  8. Electrochemically Deposited Ceria Structures for Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Evan C.

    As the pursuit towards emissions reduction intensifies with growing interest and nascent technologies, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) remain an illustrious candidate for achieving our goals. Despite myriad advantages, SOFCs are still too costly for widespread deployment, even as unprecedented materials developments have recently emerged. This suggests that, in addition to informed materials selection, the necessary power output--and, thereby, cost-savings--gains must come from the fuel cell architecture. The work presented in this manuscript primarily investigates cathodic electrochemical deposition (CELD) as a scalable micro-/nanoscale fabrication tool for engineering ceria-based components in a SOFC assembly. Also, polymer sphere lithography was utilized to deposit fully connected, yet fully porous anti-dot metal films on yttira-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with specific and knowable geometries, useful for mechanistic studies. Particular attention was given to anode structures, for which anti-dot metal films on YSZ served as composite substrates for subsequent CELD of doped ceria. By tuning the applied potential, a wide range of microstructures from high surface area coatings to planar, thin films was possible. In addition, definitive deposition was shown to occur on the electronically insulating YSZ surfaces, producing quality YSZ|ceria interfaces. These CELD ceria deposits exhibited promising electrochemical activity, as probed by A.C. Impedance Spectroscopy. In an effort to extend its usefulness as a SOFC fabrication tool, the CELD of ceria directly onto common SOFC cathode materials without a metallic phase was developed, as well as templated deposition schemes producing ceria nanowires and inverse opals.

  9. Cadmium attenuates bradykinin-driven nitric oxide production by interplaying with the localization pattern of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Syamantak; Gupta, Ravi; Reddy, Himabindu; Sinha, Swaraj; Muley, Ajit; Kolluru, Gopi Krishna; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium, a ubiquitous heavy metal, interferes with endothelial functions and angiogenesis. Bradykinin is a Ca-mobilizing soluble peptide that acts via nitric oxide to promote vasodilation and capillary permeability. The objective of the present study was to explore the Cd implications in bradykinin-dependent endothelial functions. An egg yolk angiogenesis model was employed to evaluate the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced angiogenesis. The results demonstrate that 100 nmol/L Cd attenuated bradykinin-dependent angiogenesis. The results of the in vitro wound healing and tube formation assays by using EAhy 926, a transformed endothelial cell line, suggest that Cd blocked bradykinin-mediated endothelial migration and tube formation by 38% and 67%, respectively, while nitric oxide supplementation could reverse the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced endothelial migration by 94%. The detection of nitric oxide by using a DAF-2DA fluorescent probe, Griess assay, and ultrasensitive electrode suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-induced nitric oxide production. Fluorescence imaging of eNOS-GFP transfected endothelial cells, immunofluorescence, and Western blot studies of Cd and bradykinin-treated cells show that Cd interfered with the localization pattern of eNOS, which possibly attenuates nitric oxide production in part. Additionally, Ca imaging of Cd- and bradykinin-treated cells suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-dependent Ca influx into the cells, thus partially blocking Ca-dependent nitric oxide production in endothelial cells. The results of this study conclude that Cd blunted the effect of bradykinin by interfering with the Ca-associated NOS activity specifically by impeding subcellular trafficking of eNOS. PMID:19767824

  10. Efficient Light-Driven Oxidation of Alcohols Using an Organic Chromophore-Catalyst Assembly Anchored to TiO2.

    PubMed

    Pho, Toan V; Sheridan, Matthew V; Morseth, Zachary A; Sherman, Benjamin D; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M; Schanze, Kirk S; Reynolds, John R

    2016-04-13

    The ligand 5-PO3H2-2,2':5',2″-terthiophene-5-trpy, T3 (trpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), was prepared and studied in aqueous solutions along with its metal complex assembly [Ru(T3)(bpy)(OH2)](2+) (T3-Ru-OH2, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). T3 contains a phosphonic acid group for anchoring to a TiO2 photoanode under aqueous conditions, a terthiophene fragment for light absorption and electron injection into TiO2, and a terminal trpy ligand for the construction of assemblies comprising a molecular oxidation catalyst. At a TiO2 photoanode, T3 displays efficient injection at pH 4.35 as evidenced by the high photocurrents (∼350 uA/cm(2)) arising from hydroquinone oxidation. Addition of [Ru(bpy)(OTf)][OTf]2 (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, OTf(-) = triflate) to T3 at the free trpy ligand forms the molecular assembly, T3-Ru-OH2, with the oxidative catalyst fragment: [Ru(trpy)(bpy)(OH2)](2+). The new assembly, T3-Ru-OH2, was used to perform efficient light-driven oxidation of phenol (230 μA/cm(2)) and benzyl alcohol (25 μA/cm(2)) in a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell. PMID:27032068

  11. Arsenite oxidation and removal driven by a bio-electro-Fenton process under neutral pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Qin; Liu, Chuan-Ping; Yuan, Yong; Li, Fang-bai

    2014-06-30

    The iron-catalyzed oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) associated with Fenton or Fenton-like reactions is one of the most efficient arsenic removal methods. However, the conventional chemical or electro-Fenton systems for the oxidation of As(III) are only efficient under acid conditions. In the present study, a cost-effective and efficient bio-electro-Fenton process was performed for As(III) oxidation in a dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) under neutral pH conditions. In such a system, the Fenton reagents, including H2O2 and Fe(II), were generated in situ by microbial-driven electro-reduction of O2 and γ-FeOOH, respectively, without an electricity supply. The results indicated that the process was capable of inducing As(III) oxidation with an apparent As(III) depletion first-order rate constant of 0.208 h(-1). The apparent oxidation current efficiency was calculated to be as high as 73.1%. The γ-FeOOH dosage in the cathode was an important factor in determining the system performance. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis indicated that As(V) was bound to the solid surface as a surface complex but not as a precipitated solid phase. The mechanism of bio-E-Fenton reaction for As(III) oxidation was also proposed. The bio-electro-Fenton system makes it potentially attractive method for the detoxification of As(III) from aqueous solution. PMID:24857903

  12. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Verrastro, Ivan; Pasha, Sabah; Tveen Jensen, Karina; Pitt, Andrew R.; Spickett, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs) of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease. PMID:25874603

  13. Treeline advances along the Urals mountain range - driven by improved winter conditions?

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Frank; Shiyatov, Stepan G; Mazepa, Valeriy S; Devi, Nadezhda M; Grigor'ev, Andrey A; Bartysh, Alexandr A; Fomin, Valeriy V; Kapralov, Denis S; Terent'ev, Maxim; Bugman, Harald; Rigling, Andreas; Moiseev, Pavel A

    2014-11-01

    High-altitude treelines are temperature-limited vegetation boundaries, but little quantitative evidence exists about the impact of climate change on treelines in untouched areas of Russia. Here, we estimated how forest-tundra ecotones have changed during the last century along the Ural mountains. In the South, North, Sub-Polar, and Polar Urals, we compared 450 historical and recent photographs and determined the ages of 11,100 trees along 16 altitudinal gradients. In these four regions, boundaries of open and closed forests (crown covers above 20% and 40%) expanded upwards by 4 to 8 m in altitude per decade. Results strongly suggest that snow was an important driver for these forest advances: (i) Winter precipitation has increased substantially throughout the Urals (~7 mm decade(-1) ), which corresponds to almost a doubling in the Polar Urals, while summer temperatures have only changed slightly (~0.05°C decade(-1) ). (ii) There was a positive correlation between canopy cover, snow height and soil temperatures, suggesting that an increasing canopy cover promotes snow accumulation and, hence, a more favorable microclimate. (iii) Tree age analysis showed that forest expansion mainly began around the year 1900 on concave wind-sheltered slopes with thick snow covers, while it started in the 1950s and 1970s on slopes with shallower snow covers. (iv) During the 20th century, dominant growth forms of trees have changed from multistemmed trees, resulting from harsh winter conditions, to single-stemmed trees. While 87%, 31%, and 93% of stems appearing before 1950 were from multistemmed trees in the South, North and Polar Urals, more than 95% of the younger trees had a single stem. Currently, there is a high density of seedlings and saplings in the forest-tundra ecotone, indicating that forest expansion is ongoing and that alpine tundra vegetation will disappear from most mountains of the South and North Urals where treeline is already close to the highest peaks. PMID

  14. Recent advances (2010-2015) in studies of cerium oxide nanoparticles' health effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Peng; Yu, Hua; Bian, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles, widespread applied in our life, have attracted much concern for their human health effects. However, most of the works addressing cerium oxide nanoparticles toxicity have only used in vitro models or in vivo intratracheal instillation methods. The toxicity studies have varied results and not all are conclusive. The information about risk assessments derived from epidemiology studies is severely lacking. The knowledge of occupational safety and health (OSH) for exposed workers is very little. Thus this review focuses on recent advances in studies of toxicokinetics, antioxidant activity and toxicity. Additionally, aim to extend previous health effects assessments of cerium oxide nanoparticles, we summarize the epidemiology studies of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles used as automotive diesel fuel additive, aerosol particulate matter in air pollution, other industrial ultrafine and nanoparticles (e.g., fumes particles generated in welding and flame cutting processes). PMID:27088851

  15. Rational design of metal oxide nanocomposite anodes for advanced lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Yu, Shenglan; Yuan, Tianzhi; Yan, Mi; Jiang, Yinzhu

    2015-05-01

    Metal-oxide anodes represent a significant future direction for advanced lithium ion batteries. However, their practical applications are still seriously hampered by electrode disintegration and capacity fading during cycling. Here, we report a rational design of 3D-staggered metal-oxide nanocomposite electrode directly fabricated by pulsed spray evaporation chemical vapor deposition, where various oxide nanocomponents are in a staggered distribution uniformly along three dimensions and across the whole electrode. Such a special design of nanoarchitecture combines the advantages of nanoscale materials in volume change and Li+/electron conduction as well as uniformly staggered and compact structure in atom migration during lithiation/delithiation, which exhibits high specific capacity, good cycling stability and excellent rate capability. The rational design of metal-oxide nanocomposite electrode opens up new possibilities for high performance lithium ion batteries.

  16. Oxygen Penalty for Waste Oxidation in an Advanced Life Support System: A Systems Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Fisher, John

    2002-01-01

    Oxidation is one of a number of technologies that are being considered for waste management and resource recovery from waste materials generated on board space missions. Oxidation processes are a very effective and efficient means of clean and complete conversion of waste materials to sterile products. However, because oxidation uses oxygen there is an "oxygen penalty" associated either with resupply of oxygen or with recycling oxygen from some other source. This paper is a systems approach to the issue of oxygen penalty in life support systems and presents findings on the oxygen penalty associated with an integrated oxidation-Sabatier-Oxygen Generation System (OGS) for waste management in an Advanced Life Support System. The findings reveal that such an integrated system can be operated to form a variety of useful products without a significant oxygen penalty.

  17. Application of UV based advanced oxidation to treat sulfolane in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linlong; Mehrabani-Zeinabad, Mitra; Achari, Gopal; Langford, Cooper H

    2016-10-01

    Several oxidative methods were studied to degrade sulfolane in an aqueous medium. These include UVA and UVC irradiation with suitable photoactive oxidants, including ozone, H2O2, and TiO2 based photocatalysis and their combinations. Since sulfolane lacks absorption bands in the UV range beyond 200 nm, initiation of reactions depends on the spectra and photochemistry of the oxidants. Among all the advanced oxidation processes investigated, combinations of (a) UVC with H2O2 and O3 (b) UVC with H2O2 and (c) UVC with O3 led to the highest rate of sulfolane loss in synthetic water samples. Experiments on sulfolane contaminated groundwater samples also indicated that these three combinations can efficiently degrade sulfolane. Furthermore, a synergistic effect was observed in the combination of H2O2 and O3 photolysis. PMID:27372265

  18. Advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloys for LWR fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    Application of advanced oxidation-resistant iron alloys as light water reactor fuel cladding is proposed. The motivations are based on specific limitations associated with zirconium alloys, currently used as fuel cladding, under design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident scenarios. Using a simplified methodology, gains in safety margins under severe accidents upon transition to advanced oxidation-resistant iron alloys as fuel cladding are showcased. Oxidation behavior, mechanical properties, and irradiation effects of advanced iron alloys are briefly reviewed and compared to zirconium alloys as well as historic austenitic stainless steel cladding materials. Neutronic characteristics of iron-alloy-clad fuel bundles are determined and fed into a simple economic model to estimate the impact on nuclear electricity production cost. Prior experience with steel cladding is combined with the current understanding of the mechanical properties and irradiation behavior of advanced iron alloys to identify a combination of cladding thickness reduction and fuel enrichment increase (∼0.5%) as an efficient route to offset any penalties in cycle length, due to higher neutron absorption in the iron alloy cladding, with modest impact on the economics.

  19. Advanced oxidation for indirect potable reuse: a practical application in Australia.

    PubMed

    Poussade, Y; Roux, A; Walker, T; Zavlanos, V

    2009-01-01

    December 2008 marked the completion of Stage 2B of the Western Corridor Recycled Water (WCRW) Project in South East Queensland, Australia. With a maximum combined production capacity of 232 million litres of purified recycled water a day, it is the third largest recycled water scheme in the world and the largest in southern hemisphere. A seven-barrier approach has been used to ensure very highest quality, safe water is produced at all times for the purpose of indirect potable reuse. Three of these barriers occur in the advanced water treatment section of the WCRW Project: micro- or ultra-filtration (MF), reverse osmosis (RO), and H(2)O(2)/UV advanced oxidation. In addition to providing very efficient disinfection, the advanced oxidation process specifically aims at destroying compounds not fully rejected by RO that are potential health hazards. This includes N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which is a potential carcinogenic product likely to be formed by chlorination or chloramination of wastewaters. As in many other countries, Australia has adopted a stringent guideline limit for this compound of 10 ng/L in purified recycled water. After 16 months of operations of the WCRW Project's first plant, the advanced oxidation system has been proven effective in removing NDMA and ensuring 100% compliance with the regulation at a controlled cost. PMID:19901475

  20. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control. PMID:26427371

  1. Efficient removal of insecticide "imidacloprid" from water by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Turabik, Meral; Oturan, Nihal; Gözmen, Belgin; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of imidacloprid (ICP) has been carried out by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), anodic oxidation, and electro-Fenton, in which hydroxyl radicals are generated electrocatalytically. Carbon-felt cathode and platinum or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes were used in electrolysis cell. To determine optimum operating conditions, the effects of applied current and catalyst concentration were investigated. The decay of ICP during the oxidative degradation was well fitted to pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics and absolute rate constant of the oxidation of ICP by hydroxyl radicals was found to be k abs(ICP) = 1.23 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1). The results showed that both anodic oxidation and electro-Fenton process with BDD anode exhibited high mineralization efficiency reaching 91 and 94% total organic carbon (TOC) removal at 2 h, respectively. For Pt-EF process, mineralization efficiency was also obtained as 71%. The degradation products of ICP were identified and a plausible general oxidation mechanism was proposed. Some of the main reaction intermediates such as 6-chloronicotinic acid, 6-chloronicotinaldehyde, and 6-hydroxynicotinic acid were determined by GC-MS analysis. Before complete mineralization, formic, acetic, oxalic, and glyoxylic acids were identified as end-products. The initial chlorine and organic nitrogen present in ICP were found to be converted to inorganic anions Cl(-), NO₃(-), and NH₄(+). PMID:24671401

  2. Reduced TiO2-Graphene Oxide Heterostructure As Broad Spectrum-Driven Efficient Water-Splitting Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihua; Yu, Lili; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    The reduced TiO2-graphene oxide heterostructure as an alternative broad spectrum-driven efficient water splitting photocatalyst has become a really interesting topic, however, its syntheses has many flaws, e.g., tedious experimental steps, time-consuming, small scale production, and requirement of various additives, for example, hydrazine hydrate is widely used as reductant to the reduction of graphene oxide, which is high toxicity and easy to cause the second pollution. For these issues, herein, we reported the synthesis of the reduced TiO2-graphene oxide heterostructure by a facile chemical reduction agent-free one-step laser ablation in liquid (LAL) method, which achieves extended optical response range from ultraviolet to visible and composites TiO2-x (reduced TiO2) nanoparticle and graphene oxide for promoting charge conducting. 30.64% Ti(3+) content in the reduced TiO2 nanoparticles induces the electronic reconstruction of TiO2, which results in 0.87 eV decrease of the band gap for the visible light absorption. TiO2-x-graphene oxide heterostructure achieved drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate, up to 23 times with respect to the blank experiment. Furthermore, a maximum H2 production rate was measured to be 16 mmol/h/g using Pt as a cocatalyst under the simulated sunlight irradiation (AM 1.5G, 135 mW/cm(2)), the quantum efficiencies were measured to be 5.15% for wavelength λ = 365 ± 10 nm and 1.84% for λ = 405 ± 10 nm, and overall solar energy conversion efficiency was measured to be 14.3%. These findings provided new insights into the broad applicability of this methodology for accessing fascinate photocatalysts. PMID:26986700

  3. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra-efficient and low-emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttria based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  4. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  5. In Vitro Oxidation of Collagen Promotes the Formation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and the Activation of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; de Campos, Luízi Prestes; Sangoi, Manuela Borges; Fernandes, Natieli Flores; Gomes, Patrícia; Moretto, Maria Beatriz; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) has been linked to several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated collagen as a potential source for AOPP formation and determined the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-treated collagen (collagen-AOPPs) on human neutrophil activity. We also assessed whether alpha-tocopherol could counteract these effects. Exposure to HOCl increased the levels of collagen-AOPPs. Collagen-AOPPs also stimulated the production of AOPPs, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide radicals (O2 (-)), and HOCl by neutrophils. Collagen-AOPPs induced apoptosis and decreased the number of viable cells. Alpha-tocopherol prevented the formation of collagen-AOPPs, strongly inhibited the collagen-AOPP-induced production of O2 (-) and HOCl, and increased the viability of neutrophils. Our results suggest that collagen is an important protein that interacts with HOCl to form AOPPs, and consequently, collagen-AOPP formation is related to human neutrophil activation and cell death. PMID:26920846

  6. Self-Driven Desalination and Advanced Treatment of Wastewater in a Modularized Filtration Air Cathode Microbial Desalination Cell.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kuichang; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Zuo, Jiaolan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2016-07-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) extract organic energy from wastewater for in situ desalination of saline water. However, to desalinate salt water, traditional MDCs often require an anolyte (wastewater) and a catholyte (other synthetic water) to produce electricity. Correspondingly, the traditional MDCs also produced anode effluent and cathode effluent, and may produce a concentrate solution, resulting in a low production of diluate. In this study, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube membranes and Pt carbon cloths were utilized as filtration material and cathode to fabricate a modularized filtration air cathode MDC (F-MDC). With real wastewater flowing from anode to cathode, and finally to the middle membrane stack, the diluate volume production reached 82.4%, with the removal efficiency of salinity and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reached 93.6% and 97.3% respectively. The final diluate conductivity was 68 ± 12 μS/cm, and the turbidity was 0.41 NTU, which were sufficient for boiler supplementary or industrial cooling. The concentrate production was only 17.6%, and almost all the phosphorus and salt, and most of the nitrogen were recovered, potentially allowing the recovery of nutrients and other chemicals. These results show the potential utility of the modularized F-MDC in the application of municipal wastewater advanced treatment and self-driven desalination. PMID:27269411

  7. Integrated magnetic and kinetic control of advanced tokamak plasmas on DIII-D based on data-driven models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, D.; Walker, M. L.; Ferron, J. R.; Liu, F.; Schuster, E.; Barton, J. E.; Boyer, M. D.; Burrell, K. H.; Flanagan, S. M.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R. J.; Holcomb, C. T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Johnson, R. D.; La Haye, R. J.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Park, J. M.; Penaflor, B. G.; Shi, W.; Turco, F.; Wehner, W.; the ITPA-IOS Group members; experts

    2013-06-01

    The first real-time profile control experiments integrating magnetic and kinetic variables were performed on DIII-D in view of regulating and extrapolating advanced tokamak scenarios to steady-state devices and burning plasma experiments. Device-specific, control-oriented models were obtained from experimental data using a generic two-time-scale method that was validated on JET, JT-60U and DIII-D under the framework of the International Tokamak Physics Activity for Integrated Operation Scenarios (Moreau et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 063009). On DIII-D, these data-driven models were used to synthesize integrated magnetic and kinetic profile controllers. The neutral beam injection (NBI), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) systems and ohmic coil provided the heating and current drive (H&CD) sources. The first control actuator was the plasma surface loop voltage (i.e. the ohmic coil), and the available beamlines and gyrotrons were grouped to form five additional H&CD actuators: co-current on-axis NBI, co-current off-axis NBI, counter-current NBI, balanced NBI and total ECCD power from all gyrotrons (with off-axis current deposition). Successful closed-loop experiments showing the control of (a) the poloidal flux profile, Ψ(x), (b) the poloidal flux profile together with the normalized pressure parameter, βN, and (c) the inverse of the safety factor profile, \\bar{\\iota}(x)=1/q(x) , are described.

  8. Identification of transformation products during advanced oxidation of diatrizoate: Effect of water matrix and oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Gilboa, Maayan; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-15

    Removal of micropollutants from reverse osmosis (RO) brines of wastewater desalination by oxidation processes is influenced by the scavenging capacity of brines components, resulting in the accumulation of transformation products (TPs) rather than complete mineralization. In this work the iodinated contrast media diatrizoate (DTZ) was used as model compound due to its relative resistance to oxidation. Identification of TPs was performed in ultrapure water (UPW) and RO brines applying nonthermal plasma (NTP) and UVA-TiO2 as oxidation techniques. The influence of main RO brines components in the formation and accumulation of TPs, such as chloride, bicarbonate alkalinity and humic acid, was also studied during UVA-TiO2. DTZ oxidation pattern in UPW resulted similar in both UVA-TiO2 and NTP achieving 66 and 61% transformation, respectively. However, DTZ transformation in RO brines was markedly lower in UVA-TiO2 (9%) than in NTP (27%). These differences can be attributed to the synergic effect of RO brines components during NTP. Moreover, reactive species other than hydroxyl radical contributed to DTZ transformation, i.e., direct photolysis in UVA-TiO2 and direct photolysis + O3 in NTP accounted for 16 and 23%, respectively. DTZ transformation led to iodide formation in both oxidation techniques but it further oxidized to iodate by ozone in NTP. In total 14 transformation products were identified in UPW of which 3 were present only in UVA-TiO2 and 2 were present exclusively in NTP; 5 of the 14 TPs were absent in RO brines. Five of them were new and were denoted as TP-474A/B, TP-522, TP-586, TP-602, TP-628. TP-522 (mono-chlorinated) was elucidated only in presence of high chloride titer-synthetic water matrix in NTP, most probably formed by active chlorine species generated in situ. TPs accumulation in RO brines was markedly different in comparison to UPW. This denotes the influence of RO brines components in the formation of reactive species that could further attack

  9. Osmium(ii) complexes for light-driven aerobic oxidation of amines to imines.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Le; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Li, Zhao-Sheng; Yan, Shi-Cheng; Chen, Guang-Hui; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of three Os(ii) complexes (i.e., [Os(fptz)2(PPhMe2)2] (1, fptzH = 3-trifluoromethyl-5-pyridyl-1,2,4-triazole), [Os(fptz)2(CO)(L1)] (2, L1 = PPh3; 3, L1 = pyridine)) that have been successfully utilized as good photocatalysts to promote aerobic oxidative coupling of amines to imines with molecular oxygen in air as a green oxidant. Complex 1 is the most effective catalyst for the oxidative coupling of benzylamine with molecular O2 (air) as the oxidant because of the complex's strong absorption of visible light and long-lived triplet state. The application of a low catalyst loading (0.06 mol%) of complex 1 to the oxidative coupling of a wide range of amines affords the corresponding imines efficiently and selectively in most cases. The reaction mechanism was investigated via relevant control and quenching experiments. The results indicated that the reaction occurs via an active (1)O2-involved pathway. The (1)O2-generating ability of complex 1 as a photosensitizer was evaluated using 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA) as a chemical trap for (1)O2. PMID:27431765

  10. Design of a visible light driven photo-electrochemical/electro-Fenton coupling oxidation system for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xing; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we report on a photo-electrochemical/electro-Fenton oxidation (PEC/EF) system by coupling visible light driven photo-electrochemical oxidation (PEC) and electro-Fenton oxidation (EF) in an undivided cell. Bi2WO6 nanoplates deposited on FTO glass (Bi2WO6/FTO) and Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires supported on activated carbon fiber (Fe@Fe2O3/ACF) were used as the anode and the cathode in the PEC/EF system, respectively. This novel PEC/EF system showed much higher activity than the single PEC and EF systems on degradation of rhodamine B in aqueous solution at natural pH. Moreover, the degradation and the instantaneous current efficiencies of the PEC/EF system were increased by 154% and 26% in comparison with the sum of those of single PEC and EF systems, respectively. These significant enhancements could be attributed to the synergetic effect from better separation of photo-generated carriers in the photo-anode and the transfer of photo-electrons to the oxygen diffusion cathode to generate more electro-generated H2O2 and hydroxyl radicals on the Fenton cathode. The better separation of photo-generated carriers contribute more to the overall degradation enhancement than the photo-electrons generated H2O2 and the subsequent Fenton reaction on the cathode during the PEC/EF process. PMID:23017238

  11. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter. PMID:23369258

  12. Single Sublattice Endotaxial Phase Separation Driven by Charge Frustration in a Complex Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Complex transition-metal oxides are important functional materials in areas such as energy and information storage. The cubic ABO3 perovskite is an archetypal example of this class, formed by the occupation of small octahedral B-sites within an AO3 network defined by larger A cations. We show that introduction of chemically mismatched octahedral cations into a cubic perovskite oxide parent phase modifies structure and composition beyond the unit cell length scale on the B sublattice alone. This affords an endotaxial nanocomposite of two cubic perovskite phases with distinct properties. These locally B-site cation-ordered and -disordered phases share a single AO3 network and have enhanced stability against the formation of a competing hexagonal structure over the single-phase parent. Synergic integration of the distinct properties of these phases by the coherent interfaces of the composite produces solid oxide fuel cell cathode performance superior to that expected from the component phases in isolation. PMID:23750709

  13. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses. PMID:24212283

  14. Ternary Cobalt Spinel Oxides for Solar Driven Hydrogen Production: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A.; Ahn, K. S.; Shet, S.; Huda, M. N.; Deutsch, T. G.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; Wei, S. H.; Yan, Y.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Discovery of a chemically stable, light absorbing and low resistivity metal oxide with band edges aligned to the water redox potentials has been a goal of physical scientists for the past forty years. Despite an immense amount of effort, no solution has been uncovered. We present a combined theoretical and experimental exploration of a series of unconventional ternary cobalt spinel oxides, which offer chemical functionality through substitution on the octahedral spinel B site. First-principles predictions of the substitution of group 13 cations (Al, Ga, In) in Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} to form a series of homologous CoX{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel compounds are combined with experimental synthesis and photoelectrochemical characterization. Ultimately, while tunable band gaps in the visible range can be obtained, the material performance is limited by poor carrier transport properties associated with small polaron carriers. Future design pathways for metal oxide exploration are discussed.

  15. Vox/Eox-Driven Breakdown of Ultrathin SiON Gate Dielectrics in p-Type Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors under Low-Voltage Inversion Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujikawa, Shimpei; Shiga, Katsuya; Umeda, Hiroshi; Yugami, Jiro

    2007-01-01

    The breakdown mechanism of ultrathin SiON gate dielectrics in p-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors having p+gates (p+gate-pMOSFETs) has been studied. Systematic study with varying gate doping concentrations has revealed that, in the case of p+gate-pMOSFET in inversion mode, gate dielectric breakdown under stress voltage lower than -4 V is driven by oxide voltage (Vox) or oxide field (Eox), while the breakdown under stress voltage higher than -4 V is driven by gate voltage (Vg). The Vox/Eox-driven breakdown observed under low stress voltage is quite important to the reliability of low-voltage complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS). By studying the mechanism of the breakdown, it has been clarified that the breakdown is not induced by electron current. The concept that the breakdown is due to same mechanism as the negative bias temperature instability (NBTI), namely the interfacial hydrogen release driven by Eox, has been shown to be possible. However, direct tunneling of holes driven by Vox has also been found to be a possible driving force of the breakdown. Although a decisive conclusion concerning the mechanism issue has not yet been obtained, the key factor that governs the breakdown has been shown to be Vox or Eox.

  16. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    PubMed

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system. PMID:22483836

  17. Advanced Catalysts for the Ambient Temperature Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide and Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, Tim; Eldridge, Christopher; Yu, Ping; Alpetkin, Gokhan; Graf, John

    2010-01-01

    The primary applications for ambient temperature carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation catalysts include emergency breathing masks and confined volume life support systems, such as those employed on the Shuttle. While Hopcalite is typically used in emergency breathing masks for terrestrial applications, in the 1970s, NASA selected a 2% platinum (Pt) on carbon for use on the Shuttle since it is more active and also more tolerant to water vapor. In the last 10-15 years there have been significant advances in ambient temperature CO oxidation catalysts. Langley Research Center developed a monolithic catalyst for ambient temperature CO oxidation operating under stoichiometric conditions for closed loop carbon dioxide (CO2) laser applications which is also advertised as having the potential to oxidize formaldehyde (HCHO) at ambient temperatures. In the last decade it has been discovered that appropriate sized nano-particles of gold are highly active for CO oxidation, even at sub-ambient temperatures, and as a result there has been a wealth of data reported in the literature relating to ambient/low temperature CO oxidation. In the shorter term missions where CO concentrations are typically controlled via ambient temperature oxidation catalysts, formaldehyde is also a contaminant of concern, and requires specially treated carbons such as Calgon Formasorb as untreated activated carbon has effectively no HCHO capacity. This paper examines the activity of some of the newer ambient temperature CO and formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation catalysts, and measures the performance of the catalysts relative to the NASA baseline Ambient Temperature Catalytic Oxidizer (ATCO) catalyst at conditions of interest for closed loop trace contaminant control systems.

  18. Nitrite-driven nitrous oxide production under aerobic soil conditions: Kinetics and biochemical controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  19. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  20. Direct Light-Driven Water Oxidation by a Ladder-Type Conjugated Polymer Photoanode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A conjugated polymer known for high stability (poly[benzimidazobenzophenanthroline], coded as BBL) is examined as a photoanode for direct solar water oxidation. In aqueous electrolyte with a sacrificial hole acceptor (SO32–), photoelectrodes show a morphology-dependent performance. Films prepared by a dispersion-spray method with a nanostructured surface (feature size of ∼20 nm) gave photocurrents up to 0.23 ± 0.02 mA cm–2 at 1.23 VRHE under standard simulated solar illumination. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals a constant flat-band potential over a wide pH range at +0.31 VNHE. The solar water oxidation photocurrent with bare BBL electrodes is found to increase with increasing pH, and no evidence of semiconductor oxidation was observed over a 30 min testing time. Characterization of the photo-oxidation reaction suggests H2O2 or •OH production with the bare film, while functionalization of the interface with 1 nm of TiO2 followed by a nickel–cobalt catalyst gave solar photocurrents of 20–30 μA cm–2, corresponding with O2 evolution. Limitations to photocurrent production are discussed. PMID:26576469

  1. Data-driven Modeling of Metal-oxide Sensors with Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosangi, Rakesh; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2011-09-01

    We present a data-driven probabilistic framework to model the transient response of MOX sensors modulated with a sequence of voltage steps. Analytical models of MOX sensors are usually built based on the physico-chemical properties of the sensing materials. Although building these models provides an insight into the sensor behavior, they also require a thorough understanding of the underlying operating principles. Here we propose a data-driven approach to characterize the dynamical relationship between sensor inputs and outputs. Namely, we use dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), probabilistic models that represent temporal relations between a set of random variables. We identify a set of control variables that influence the sensor responses, create a graphical representation that captures the causal relations between these variables, and finally train the model with experimental data. We validated the approach on experimental data in terms of predictive accuracy and classification performance. Our results show that DBNs can accurately predict the dynamic response of MOX sensors, as well as capture the discriminatory information present in the sensor transients.

  2. Indium-substituted ZnO/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites: Solvothermal synthesis and enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; He, Wanhong; Zhang, Lu; Xiang, Xu; Li, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    A new protocol was developed to obtain a composite photocatalyst by incorporating indium to ZnO and subsequently assembling it with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The incorporation of indium led to lattice distortion of ZnO and introduction of defect levels. The hybridization with RGO could improve the electron transport and extend the lifetime of photo-generated carriers, leading to enhanced activity for dye degradation driven by visible light. The photocatalytic activity appeared to be dependent on the relative quantity of RGO. The optimized quantity resulted in the highest activity due to the dual role of electron shuttle and "shielding effect" of RGO. In addition, the composite photocatalyst exhibited excellent repeatable use performance, suggestive of its high stability. This study proposed a promising strategy to construct photocatalysts by rational bandgap engineering and tunable composite technology.

  3. Advanced oxidation processes for degradation of 2,4-dichlo- and 2,4-dimethylphenol

    SciTech Connect

    Trapido, M.; Veressinina, Y.; Munter, R.

    1998-08-01

    The efficiency of different advanced oxidation processes for degradation of two phenols, 2,4-dimethylphenol (2,4-DMP) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), has been under study. Advanced oxidation processes, especially the Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/ultraviolet (UV) system, were found to be effective in decomposing phenols and chlorophenols. The degradation rate for 2,4-DCP followed the order, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Fe{sup 2+}/UV > H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Fe{sup 2+} > O{sub 3}/ultrasound (US) > O{sub 3} {ge} O{sub 3}/UV > UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} {ge} US > UV. The corresponding order for 2,4-DMP was H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Fe{sup 2+}/UV > O{sub 3}/US > O{sub 3} {ge} O{sub 3}/UV > H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Fe{sup 2+} > US {ge} UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} > UV. Therefore, the chemical treatment, especially advanced oxidation processes, may be an alternative method for destruction of phenols and purification of wastewaters containing phenolic compounds.

  4. Oxidation behavior of plasma sintered beryllium-titanium intermetallic compounds as an advanced neutron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nakamichi, Masaru

    2013-07-01

    Beryllium intermetallic compounds (beryllides) such as Be12Ti are very promising candidates for advanced neutron multiplier materials in a demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO). However, beryllides are too brittle to be fabricated either into pebble-type or rod-type shapes via conventional methods (i.e. arc melting and hot isostatic pressing). We have proposed a plasma sintering technique as a new method for beryllide fabrication, and our studies on the properties of plasma sintered beryllides are ongoing. In the present work, the oxidation properties of plasma sintered beryllides were investigated at 1273 K for 24 h in a dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature properties of this material. Thermal gravimetry measurements indicate that specimens with larger fractions of Be12Ti phase corresponding to samples that have been sintered for longer time periods, exhibit superior oxidation properties. Our evaluation of the oxidation behavior of each phase in our beryllide samples is as follows: Be12Ti and Be17Ti2 both have good oxidation resistance, owing to the formation of dense and protective scales, while the Be and Be2Ti phases are mainly responsible for thermal-gravimetry (TG) weight gains, which is indicative of severe oxidation. We attribute the degradation in oxidation resistance specifically to Be2Ti that transforms into TiO2, and also find this phase to be the cause of deterioration in the mechanical properties of samples, owing to cracks near Be2Ti phase conglomerates.

  5. Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide in self-driven microbial fuel cell - Microbial electrolysis cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liping; Yao, Binglin; Wu, Dan; Quan, Xie

    2014-08-01

    Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide requires to firstly leach cobalt from particles LiCoO2 and then recover cobalt from aqueous Co(II). A self-driven microbial fuel cell (MFC)-microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) system can completely carry out these two processes, in which Co(II) is firstly released from particles LiCoO2 on the cathodes of MFCs and then reduced on the cathodes of MECs which are powered by the cobalt leaching MFCs. A cobalt leaching rate of 46 ± 2 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 1.5 ± 0.1 g Co g-1 COD (MFCs) and a Co(II) reduction rate of 7 ± 0 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 0.8 ± 0.0 g Co g-1 COD (MECs), as well as a overall system cobalt yield of 0.15 ± 0.01 g Co g-1 Co can be achieved in this self-driven MFC-MEC system. Coulombic efficiencies reach 41 ± 1% (anodic MFCs), 75 ± 0% (anodic MECs), 100 ± 2% (cathodic MFCs), and 29 ± 1% (cathodic MECs) whereas overall system efficiency averages 34 ± 1%. These results provide a new process of linking MFCs to MECs for complete recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with no external energy consumption.

  6. Photo-driven oxidation of water on α-Fe2O3 surfaces: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Seriani, Nicola; Piccinin, Simone; Gebauer, Ralph

    2014-02-14

    Adopting the theoretical scheme developed by the Nørskov group [see, for example, Nørskov et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 17886 (2004)], we conducted a density functional theory study of photo-driven oxidation processes of water on various terminations of the clean hematite (α-Fe2O3) (0001) surface, explicitly taking into account the strong correlation among the 3d states of iron through the Hubbard U parameter. Six best-known terminations, namely, Fe−Fe−O3− (we call S1), O−Fe−Fe−(S2), O2−Fe−Fe−(S3), O3−Fe−Fe− (S4), Fe−O3−Fe− (S5), and O−Fe−O3−(S6), are first exposed to water, the stability of resulting surfaces is investigated under photoelectrochemical conditions by considering different chemical reactions (and their reaction free energies) that lead to surfaces covered by O atoms or/and OH groups. Assuming that the water splitting reaction is driven by the redox potential for photogenerated holes with respect to the normal hydrogen electrode, UVB, at voltage larger than UVB, most 3-oxygen terminated substrates are stable. These results thus suggest that the surface, hydroxylated in the dark, should release protons under illumination. Considering the surface free energy of all the possible terminations shows that O3–S5 and O3–S1 are the most thermodynamically stable. While water oxidation process on the former requires an overpotential of 1.22 V, only 0.84 V is needed on the latter. PMID:24527933

  7. Spin-orbit driven magnetic insulating state with Jeff=1/2 character in a 4d oxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Calder, S.; Li, Ling; Okamoto, Satoshi; Choi, Yongseong; Mukherjee, Rupam; Haskel, Daniel; Mandrus, D.

    2015-11-30

    The unusual magnetic and electronic ground states of 5d iridates has been shown to be driven by intrinsically enhanced spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The influence of appreciable but reduced SOC in creating the manifested magnetic insulating states in 4d oxides is less clear, with one hurdle being the existence of such compounds. Here we present experimental and theoretical results on Sr4RhO6 that reveal SOC dominated behavior. Neutron measurements show the octahedra are both spatially separated and locally ideal, making the electronic ground state susceptible to alterations by SOC. Magnetic ordering is observed with a similar structure to an analogous Jeff=1/2 Mottmore » iridate. We consider the underlying role of SOC in this rhodate with density functional theory and x-ray absorption spectroscopy and find a magnetic insulating ground state with Jeff =1/2 character.The unusual magnetic and electronic ground states of 5d iridates have been shown to be driven by intrinsically enhanced spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The influence of appreciable but reduced SOC in creating the manifested magnetic insulating states in 4d oxides is less clear, with one hurdle being the existence of such compounds. Here, we present experimental and theoretical results on Sr4RhO6 that reveal SOC dominated behavior. Neutron measurements show the octahedra are both spatially separated and locally ideal, making the electronic ground state susceptible to alterations by SOC. Magnetic ordering is observed with a similar structure to an analogous Jeff=1/2 Mott iridate. We consider the underlying role of SOC in this rhodate with density functional theory and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and find a magnetic insulating ground state with Jeff=12 character.« less

  8. Soil remediation by an advanced oxidative method assisted with ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Flores, Roberto; Blass, Georgina; Domínguez, Vanessa

    2007-02-01

    A new process for the remediation of soil contaminated with hydrocarbons is proposed. The innovation consists on coupling an advanced oxidative method, using a Fenton-type catalyst, with the application of ultrasonic energy. The use of ultrasonic energy not only assists the desorption of the contaminants from the soil, but also promotes the formation of OH radicals, which are the oxidant agents involved in the oxidation process. Different Fenton-like catalysts were employed in the present study; however, the highest removal of toluene and xylenes were obtained with iron sulfate and copper sulfate, respectively. Also, hydrogen peroxide was tested at different concentrations, and it was found that increasing its concentration enhanced the removal of all the contaminants. Finally, it was demonstrated that applying ultrasonic energy to the reacting system process noticeably enhanced the global efficiency of the process due to a synergistic effect in conjunction with the hydrogen peroxide concentration and type of catalyst. PMID:17079076

  9. Advanced Oxide Material Systems for 1650 C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are being developed for low-emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor and vane applications to extend the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vapor-containing combustion environments. The advanced 1650 C TEBC system is required to have a better high-temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and more resistance to sintering and thermal stress than current coating systems under engine high-heat-flux and severe thermal cycling conditions. In this report, the thermal conductivity and water vapor stability of selected candidate hafnia-, pyrochlore- and magnetoplumbite-based TEBC materials are evaluated. The effects of dopants on the materials properties are also discussed. The test results have been used to downselect the TEBC materials and help demonstrate the feasibility of advanced 1650 C coatings with long-term thermal cycling durability.

  10. Impact-Driven Thermite Reactions with Iodine Pentoxide and Silver Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R.; Bless, S.; Pantoya, M.

    2011-04-01

    Thermite reactions using aluminum (Al) fuel and either iodine pentoxide (I2O5) or silver oxide (Ag2O) were initiated by high-velocity impact or thermal initiation and examined for their flame propagation behavior. In the impact-ignition experiments, the Al-Ag2O reaction produced more energy than the Al-I2O5 reaction; in the thermal-ignition experiments, the I2O5 reaction produced higher flame propagation rates (1,305 m/s compared with 531 m/s). The energy released from impact-initiated reactions is significantly enhanced by reducing the size of the oxide particles. Results suggest that the reaction propagation mechanisms may be the same, even though ignition is spurred by two different stimuli (mechanically induced compaction versus thermal).

  11. Visible-light-driven photocatalytic water oxidation catalysed by iron-based metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yu; Toyao, Takashi; Miyahara, Kenta; Zakary, Lionet; Van, Dang Do; Kamata, Yusuke; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lee, Soo Wohn; Matsuoka, Masaya

    2016-04-14

    An iron-based metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Fe), promotes photocatalytic water oxidation to produce oxygen from aqueous silver nitrate solution under visible-light irradiation. The finely dispersed iron-oxo clusters embedded as nodes of the porous framework would contribute importantly to the efficient promotion of the reaction as compared to bulk hematite (α-Fe2O3). PMID:26996996

  12. Pressure-driven suppression of the Jahn-Teller effects and structural changes in cupric oxide.

    PubMed

    Greschner, Michael J; Chen, Ning; Yao, Yansun

    2016-01-20

    Multiferroics have been of interest as materials for use in data storage due to their coexisting ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. The properties of cupric oxide have been studied at pressures below 70 GPa, and it has even been suggested that it may be a room temperature multiferroic at pressures of 20 to 40 GPa. However, the properties of cupric oxide above these pressures have yet to be thoroughly examined. Here, we investigate changes in the crystal structure of cupric oxide via first principles methods. We find that the crystal structure transforms from a monoclinic structure at low pressure to a face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structure at high pressure. We also find that the magnetic ordering switches from antiferromagnetic in the monoclinic phase to net zero magnetic moment in the face-centred cubic phase and ferromagnetic in the body-centred cubic phase. This shift in magnetic ordering is due to the superexchange interactions and Jahn-Teller instabilities, or the lack of thereof, arising from the d-orbital electrons of the cupric ions, which disrupt the mechanical stability of other possible magnetic orderings. PMID:26678699

  13. Pressure-driven suppression of the Jahn-Teller effects and structural changes in cupric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greschner, Michael J.; Chen, Ning; Yao, Yansun

    2016-01-01

    Multiferroics have been of interest as materials for use in data storage due to their coexisting ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. The properties of cupric oxide have been studied at pressures below 70 GPa, and it has even been suggested that it may be a room temperature multiferroic at pressures of 20 to 40 GPa. However, the properties of cupric oxide above these pressures have yet to be thoroughly examined. Here, we investigate changes in the crystal structure of cupric oxide via first principles methods. We find that the crystal structure transforms from a monoclinic structure at low pressure to a face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structure at high pressure. We also find that the magnetic ordering switches from antiferromagnetic in the monoclinic phase to net zero magnetic moment in the face-centred cubic phase and ferromagnetic in the body-centred cubic phase. This shift in magnetic ordering is due to the superexchange interactions and Jahn-Teller instabilities, or the lack of thereof, arising from the d-orbital electrons of the cupric ions, which disrupt the mechanical stability of other possible magnetic orderings.

  14. Modeling of Total Ionizing Dose Effects in Advanced Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Esqueda, Ivan

    2011-12-01

    The increased use of commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies in harsh radiation environments has resulted in a new approach to radiation effects mitigation. This approach utilizes simulation to support the design of integrated circuits (ICs) to meet targeted tolerance specifications. Modeling the deleterious impact of ionizing radiation on ICs fabricated in advanced CMOS technologies requires understanding and analyzing the basic mechanisms that result in buildup of radiation-induced defects in specific sensitive regions. Extensive experimental studies have demonstrated that the sensitive regions are shallow trench isolation (STI) oxides. Nevertheless, very little work has been done to model the physical mechanisms that result in the buildup of radiation-induced defects and the radiation response of devices fabricated in these technologies. A comprehensive study of the physical mechanisms contributing to the buildup of radiation-induced oxide trapped charges and the generation of interface traps in advanced CMOS devices is presented in this dissertation. The basic mechanisms contributing to the buildup of radiation-induced defects are explored using a physical model that utilizes kinetic equations that captures total ionizing dose (TID) and dose rate effects in silicon dioxide (SiO2). These mechanisms are formulated into analytical models that calculate oxide trapped charge density (Not) and interface trap density (Nit) in sensitive regions of deep-submicron devices. Experiments performed on field-oxide-field-effect-transistors (FOXFETs) and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors permit investigating TID effects and provide a comparison for the radiation response of advanced CMOS devices. When used in conjunction with closed-form expressions for surface potential, the analytical models enable an accurate description of radiation-induced degradation of transistor electrical characteristics. In this dissertation, the incorporation

  15. Hydrogen Oxidation-Driven Hot Electron Flow Detected by Catalytic Nanodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hervier, Antoine; Renzas, J. Russell; Park, Jeong Y.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-07-20

    Hydrogen oxidation on platinum is shown to be a surface catalytic chemical reaction that generates a steady state flux of hot (>1 eV) conduction electrons. These hot electrons are detected as a steady-state chemicurrent across Pt/TiO{sub 2} Schottky diodes whose Pt surface is exposed to hydrogen and oxygen. Kinetic studies establish that the chemicurrent is proportional to turnover frequency for temperatures ranging from 298 to 373 K for P{sub H2} between 1 and 8 Torr and P{sub O2} at 760 Torr. Both chemicurrent and turnover frequency exhibit a first order dependence on P{sub H2}.

  16. Multiphosphine-Oxide Hosts for Ultralow-Voltage-Driven True-Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Diodes with External Quantum Efficiency beyond 20.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ding, Dongxue; Wei, Ying; Han, Fuquan; Xu, Hui; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-20

    Highly efficient low-voltage-driven -true-blue thermally activated -delayed fluorescence diodes are realized through employing a tri-phosphine oxide host (2,2',4-tris(di(phenyl) -phosphoryl)-diphenylether (DPETPO)) with a record external quantum efficiency of 23.0% and the lowest onset voltage of 2.8 V to date. PMID:26588189

  17. Integration of advanced oxidation processes at mild conditions in wet scrubbers for odourous sulphur compounds treatment.

    PubMed

    Vega, Esther; Martin, Maria J; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The effectiveness of different advanced oxidation processes on the treatment of a multicomponent aqueous solution containing ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide (0.5 mg L(-1) of each sulphur compound) was investigated with the objective to assess which one is the most suitable treatment to be coupled in wet scrubbers used in odour treatment facilities. UV/H2O2, Fenton, photo-Fenton and ozone treatments were tested at mild conditions and the oxidation efficiency obtained was compared. The oxidation tests were carried out in magnetically stirred cylindrical quartz reactors using the same molar concentration of oxidants (hydrogen peroxide or ozone). The results show that ozone and photo-Fenton are the most efficient treatments, achieving up to 95% of sulphur compounds oxidation and a mineralisation degree around 70% in 10 min. Furthermore, the total costs of the treatments taking into account the capital and operational costs were also estimated for a comparative purpose. The economic analysis revealed that the Fenton treatment is the most economical option to be integrated in a wet scrubber to remove volatile organic sulphur compounds, as long as there are no space constraints to install the required reactor volume. In the case of reactor volume limitation or retrofitting complexities, the ozone and photo-Fenton treatments should be considered as viable alternatives. PMID:24873715

  18. Enhancing hydrophilicity and water permeability of PET track-etched membranes by advanced oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Zdorovets, Maxim V.; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present results on the application of advanced oxidation systems for effective and non-toxic oxidation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) to improve their wettability and water transport properties. Two oxidizing systems: H2O2 under UV irradiation (H2O2/UV) and Fenton system under visible light (Fenton/H2O2/Vis) were compared. The surface of functionalized PET TeMs was characterized by using colorimetric assay, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results clearly showed that water permeability of PET TeMs treated with H2O2/UV was improved by 28 ± 5% compared with etched-only membrane, the same parameter was found to increase by 13 ± 4% in the case of Fenton/H2O2/Vis treatment. The proposed oxidation technique is very simple, environment friendly and not requiring special equipment or expensive chemicals. The surface hydrophilicity of the membranes stored for 360 days in air between paper sheets was analyzed by contact angle test, colorimetric assay to measure concentration of carboxylic groups on the surface with toluidine blue and XPS analysis. The hydrophilic properties of oxidized PET TeMs were found to be stable for a long period of time.

  19. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  20. Gold-TiO2-Nickel catalysts for low temperature-driven CO oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Reyes, Mariana; Zanella, Rodolfo; Maturano-Rojas, Viridiana; Rodríguez-González, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    Nickel-doped-TiO2 catalysts were prepared by the sol-gel method and surface modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by the urea-deposition-precipitation technique. The as-synthesized catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman and XPS spectroscopies, N2 physisorption, STEM-HAADF microscopy and TPR hydrogen consumption. The Au/TiO2-Ni catalysts were evaluated catalytically performing CO oxidation reactions. The catalyst with nickel content of 1 wt. % (Au/TiO2-Ni 1) showed the highest CO conversion with respect to the high-nickel-content or bare/commercial TiO2 at 0 °C. In situ DRIFTS showed a strong participation of both nickel due to the presence of surface-nickel-metallic nanoparticles formed during the CO adsorption process at reaction temperatures above 200 °C, and surface-bridged-nickel-CO species. A minor deactivation rate was observed for the Au/TiO2-Ni 1 catalyst in comparison with the Au/TiO2 one. The oxygen vacancies that were created on the sol-gel-doped TiO2 improved the catalytic behavior during the performance of CO oxidation reactions, and inhibited the AuNP sintering.

  1. Exchange-Driven Spin Relaxation in Ferromagnet-Oxide-Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Yi-Hsin; Harmon, N. J.; Odenthal, Patrick; Sheffield, Matthew; Chilcote, Michael; Kawakami, R. K.; Flatté, M. E.; Johnston-Halperin, E.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that electron spin relaxation in GaAs in the proximity of a Fe /MgO layer is dominated by interaction with an exchange-driven hyperfine field at temperatures below 60 K. Temperature-dependent spin-resolved optical pump-probe spectroscopy reveals a strong correlation of the electron spin relaxation with carrier freeze-out, in quantitative agreement with a theoretical interpretation that at low temperatures the free-carrier spin lifetime is dominated by inhomogeneity in the local hyperfine field due to carrier localization. As the regime of large nuclear inhomogeneity is accessible in these heterostructures for magnetic fields <3 kG , inferences from this result resolve a long-standing and contentious dispute concerning the origin of spin relaxation in GaAs at low temperature when a magnetic field is present. Further, this improved fundamental understanding clarifies the importance of future experiments probing the time-dependent exchange interaction at a ferromagnet-semiconductor interface and its consequences for spin dissipation and transport during spin pumping.

  2. Advanced characterizations of austenitic oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels for high-temperature reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin

    Future advanced nuclear systems involve higher operation temperatures, intenser neutron flux, and more aggressive coolants, calling for structural materials with excellent performances in multiple aspects. Embedded with densely and dispersedly distributed oxide nanoparticles that are capable of not only pinning dislocations but also trapping radiation-induced defects, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels provide excellence in mechanical strength, creep resistance, and radiation tolerance. In order to develop ODS steels with qualifications required by advanced nuclear applications, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of the enhancement of ODS steels in mechanical properties. In this dissertation, a series of austenitic ODS stainless steels were investigated by coordinated state-of-the-art techniques. A series of different precipitate phases, including multiple Y-Ti-O, Y-Al-O, and Y-Ti-Hf-O complex oxides, were observed to form during mechanical alloying. Small precipitates are likely to have coherent or cubic-on-cubic orientation relationships with the matrix, allowing the dislocation to shear through. The Orowan looping mechanism is the dominant particle-dislocation interaction mode as the temperature is low, whereas the shearing mechanism and the Hirsch mechanism are also observed. Interactions between the particles and the dislocations result in the load-partitioning phenomenon. Smaller particles were found to have the stronger loading-partitioning effect. More importantly, the load-partitioning of large size particles are marginal at elevated temperatures, while the small size particles remain sustaining higher load, explaining the excellent high temperature mechanical performance of ODS steels.

  3. Recent advances in metal oxide-based electrode architecture design for electrochemical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jinping; Huang, Xintang; Yuan, Changzhou; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-10-01

    Metal oxide nanostructures are promising electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors because of their high specific capacity/capacitance, typically 2-3 times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials. However, their cycling stability and rate performance still can not meet the requirements of practical applications. It is therefore urgent to improve their overall device performance, which depends on not only the development of advanced electrode materials but also in a large part "how to design superior electrode architectures". In the article, we will review recent advances in strategies for advanced metal oxide-based hybrid nanostructure design, with the focus on the binder-free film/array electrodes. These binder-free electrodes, with the integration of unique merits of each component, can provide larger electrochemically active surface area, faster electron transport and superior ion diffusion, thus leading to substantially improved cycling and rate performance. Several recently emerged concepts of using ordered nanostructure arrays, synergetic core-shell structures, nanostructured current collectors, and flexible paper/textile electrodes will be highlighted, pointing out advantages and challenges where appropriate. Some future electrode design trends and directions are also discussed. PMID:22912066

  4. Unipolar assembly of zinc oxide rods manifesting polarity-driven collective luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ujjal K.; Imura, Masataka; Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Bando, Yoshio; Fang, Xiaosheng; Dierre, Benjamin; Sakharov, Leonid; Govindaraj, A.; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri; Rao, C. N. R.

    2010-01-01

    Oriented assemblies of small crystals forming larger structures are common in nature and crucial for forthcoming technologies as they circumvent the difficulties of structural manipulation at microscopic scale. We have discovered two distinctive concentric assemblies of zinc oxide rods, wherein each rod has an intrinsically positive and a negative polar end induced by the noncentrosymmetric arrangement of Zn and O atoms. All the rods in a single assembly emanate out of a central core maintaining a single polar direction. Due to growth along the two polar surfaces with different atomic arrangements, these assemblies are distinct in their intrinsic properties and exhibit strong UV luminescence in the exterior of Zn-polar assemblies, unlike the O-polar assemblies. Although novel applications can be envisioned, these observations suggest that hierarchical organization with respect to internal asymmetry might be widespread in natural crystal assemblies. PMID:20643960

  5. Oxidative degradation of endotoxin by advanced oxidation process (O3/H2O2 & UV/H2O2).

    PubMed

    Oh, Byung-Taek; Seo, Young-Suk; Sudhakar, Dega; Choe, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Park, Youn-Jong; Cho, Min

    2014-08-30

    The presence of endotoxin in water environments may pose a serious public health hazard. We investigated the effectiveness of advanced oxidative processes (AOP: O3/H2O2 and UV/H2O2) in the oxidative degradation of endotoxin. In addition, we measured the release of endotoxin from Escherichia coli following typical disinfection methods, such as chlorine, ozone alone and UV, and compared it with the use of AOPs. Finally, we tested the AOP-treated samples in their ability to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The production of hydroxyl radical in AOPs showed superior ability to degrade endotoxin in buffered solution, as well as water samples from Korean water treatment facilities, with the ozone/H2O2 being more efficient compared to UV/H2O2. In addition, the AOPs proved effective not only in eliminating E. coli in the samples, but also in endotoxin degradation, while the standard disinfection methods lead to the release of endotoxin following the bacteria destruction. Furthermore, in the experiments with macrophages, the AOPs-deactivated endotoxin lead to the smallest induction of TNF-α, which shows the loss of inflammation activity, compared to ozone treatment alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that AOPs offer an effective and mild method for endotoxin degradation in the water systems. PMID:25038578

  6. Biodegradability of iopromide products after UV/H₂O₂ advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Love, Nancy G; Aga, Diana S; Linden, Karl G

    2016-02-01

    Iopromide is an X-ray and MRI contrast agent that is virtually non-biodegradable and persistent through typical wastewater treatment processes. This study determined whether molecular transformation of iopromide in a UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) can result in biodegradable products. The experiments used iopromide labeled with carbon-14 on the aromatic ring to trace degradation of iopromide through UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation and subsequent biodegradation. The biotransformation assay tracked the formation of radiolabeled (14)CO2 which indicated full mineralization of the molecule. The results indicated that AOP formed biodegradable iopromide products. There was no (14)C released from the pre-AOP samples, but up to 20% of all radiolabeled carbon transformed into (14)CO2 over the course of 42 days of biodegradation after iopromide was exposed to advanced oxidation (compared to 10% transformation in inactivated post-AOP controls). In addition, the quantum yield of photolysis of iopromide was determined using low pressure (LP) and medium pressure (MP) mercury lamps as 0.069 ± 0.005 and 0.080 ± 0.007 respectively. The difference in the quantum yields for the two UV sources was not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval (p = 0.08), which indicates the equivalency of using LP or MP UV sources for iopromide treatment. The reaction rate between iopromide and hydroxyl radicals was measured to be (2.5 ± 0.2) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). These results indicate that direct photolysis is a dominant degradation pathway in UV/H2O2 AOP treatment of iopromide. Other iodinated contrast media may also become biodegradable after exposure to UV or UV/H2O2. PMID:26433937

  7. UV irradiation and UV-H₂O₂ advanced oxidation of the roxarsone and nitarsone organoarsenicals.

    PubMed

    Adak, Asok; Mangalgiri, Kiranmayi P; Lee, Jessica; Blaney, Lee

    2015-03-01

    Roxarsone (ROX) and nitarsone (NIT) are used as additives in animal feeding operations and have been detected in animal manure, agricultural retention ponds, and adjacent surface waters. This work investigates treatment of organoarsenicals using UV-based treatment processes, namely UV irradiation at 253.7 nm and the UV-H2O2 advanced oxidation process. The apparent molar absorptivity was mapped for ROX and NIT across pH and wavelength. For UV irradiation at 253.7 nm, the fluence-based pseudo-first order rate constant (kp(')) and effective quantum yield (Φ) for ROX were 8.10-29.7 × 10(-5) cm(2)/mJ and 2.34-8.37 × 10(-3) mol/E, respectively; the corresponding constants were slightly lower for NIT. The observed rate constants are higher during advanced oxidation (e.g., kp,ROX(')=3.92(±0.19)-217(±48) × 10(-4) cm(2)/mJ). Second order rate constants for organoarsenical transformation by hydroxyl radicals were determined to be 3.40(±0.45) × 10(9) and 8.28(±0.49) × 10(8) M(-1)s(-1) for ROX and NIT, respectively. Solution pH and nitrate concentration did not significantly impact ROX transformation during advanced oxidation; however, bicarbonate and dissolved organic matter from chicken litter reduced ROX transformation through hydroxyl radical scavenging. Inorganic arsenic was the predominant transformation product of ROX during UV-H2O2 treatment. PMID:25514660

  8. Reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Ding, Lili

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the reduction of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), intI1 and 16S rRNA genes, by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely Fenton oxidation (Fe(2+)/H2O2) and UV/H2O2 process. The ARGs include sul1, tetX, and tetG from municipal wastewater effluent. The results indicated that the Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process could reduce selected ARGs effectively. Oxidation by the Fenton process was slightly better than that of the UV/H2O2 method. Particularly, for the Fenton oxidation, under the optimal condition wherein Fe(2+)/H2O2 had a molar ratio of 0.1 and a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) with a pH of 3.0 and reaction time of 2h, 2.58-3.79 logs of target genes were removed. Under the initial effluent pH condition (pH=7.0), the removal was 2.26-3.35 logs. For the UV/H2O2 process, when the pH was 3.5 with a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) accompanied by 30min of UV irradiation, all ARGs could achieve a reduction of 2.8-3.5 logs, and 1.55-2.32 logs at a pH of 7.0. The Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process followed the first-order reaction kinetic model. The removal of target genes was affected by many parameters, including initial Fe(2+)/H2O2 molar ratios, H2O2 concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. Among these factors, reagent concentrations and pH values are the most important factors during AOPs. PMID:26815295

  9. Controlling Magnetism in Spin-Orbit-Driven Oxides with Epitaxial Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    The layered perovskite iridates Sr2IrO4andBa2IrO4 are the prototypical spin-orbital Mott insulators, displaying a novel jeff = 1/2 ground state driven by strong 5d spin-orbit coupling effects. Efforts to understand, and ultimately control, this spin-orbit-induced ground state have led to a surge of interest in thin film iridates, which offer unique opportunities for the tuning of electronic and magnetic properties via epitaxial strain. We have performed complementary resonant magnetic x-ray scattering (RMXS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on epitaxial thin film samples of Sr2IrO4andBa2IrO4. By measuring 13 to 50 nm films grown on a variety of different substrates (PSO, GSO, STO, LSAT), we are able to investigate the impact of applied tensile and compressive strain on the magnetic structure, correlation lengths, and characteristic excitations of these materials. We find that the dispersion of the low-lying magnetic and orbital excitations is strongly affected by strain-induced structural changes, and show that epitaxial strain provides an effective method for tuning three distinct energy scales: the magnetic ordering temperature (TN) , the magnetic exchange interactions (J), and the non-cubic crystal field splitting (ΔCEF) . Perhaps most strikingly, we demonstrate that hard x-ray RIXS can be used to perform detailed magnetic dispersion measurements on thin film samples of 13 nm (~5 unit cells) or less. Work performed in collaboration with H. Gretarsson, A. Lupascu, J.A. Sears, Z. Nie, Y.-J. Kim (University of Toronto), Z. Islam, M.H. Upton, J. Kim, D. Casa, T. Gog, A.H. Said (Argonne National Laboratory), J. Nichols, J. Terzic, S.S.A. Seo, G. Cao (University of Kentucky), M. Uchida, D.G. Schlom, K.M. Shen (Cornell University), H. Stoll (University of Stuttgart), V.M. Katukuri, L.Hozoi, J. van den Brink (IFW Dresden).

  10. Post-treatment of reclaimed waste water based on an electrochemical advanced oxidation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. D.; Salinas, Carlos E.; Rogers, Tom D.

    1992-01-01

    The purification of reclaimed water is essential to water reclamation technology life-support systems in lunar/Mars habitats. An electrochemical UV reactor is being developed which generates oxidants, operates at low temperatures, and requires no chemical expendables. The reactor is the basis for an advanced oxidation process in which electrochemically generated ozone and hydrogen peroxide are used in combination with ultraviolet light irradiation to produce hydroxyl radicals. Results from this process are presented which demonstrate concept feasibility for removal of organic impurities and disinfection of water for potable and hygiene reuse. Power, size requirements, Faradaic efficiency, and process reaction kinetics are discussed. At the completion of this development effort the reactor system will be installed in JSC's regenerative water recovery test facility for evaluation to compare this technique with other candidate processes.

  11. Removal of residual pharmaceuticals from aqueous systems by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Klavarioti, Maria; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Kassinos, Despo

    2009-02-01

    Over the past few years, pharmaceuticals are considered as an emerging environmental problem due to their continuous input and persistence to the aquatic ecosystem even at low concentrations. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are technologies based on the intermediacy of hydroxyl and other radicals to oxidize recalcitrant, toxic and non-biodegradable compounds to various by-products and eventually to inert end-products. The environmental applications of AOPs are numerous, including water and wastewater treatment (i.e. removal of organic and inorganic pollutants and pathogens), air pollution abatement and soil remediation. AOPs are applied for the abatement of pollution caused by the presence of residual pharmaceuticals in waters for the last decade. In this light, this paper reviews and assesses the effectiveness of various AOPs for pharmaceutical removal from aqueous systems. PMID:18760478

  12. Advanced Oxide Material Systems For 1650 C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal/environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) are being developed for low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor and vane applications to extend the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vapor containing combustion environments. The 1650 C T/EBC system is required to have better thermal stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance than current coating systems. In this paper, the thermal conductivity, water vapor stability and cyclic durability of selected candidate zirconia-/hafnia-, pyrochlore- and magnetoplumbite-based T/EBC materials are evaluated. The test results have been used to downselect the T/EBC coating materials, and help demonstrate advanced 1650OC coatings feasibility with long-term cyclic durability.

  13. Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors: a review of recent advances.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, E; Barquinha, P; Martins, R

    2012-06-12

    Transparent electronics is today one of the most advanced topics for a wide range of device applications. The key components are wide bandgap semiconductors, where oxides of different origins play an important role, not only as passive component but also as active component, similar to what is observed in conventional semiconductors like silicon. Transparent electronics has gained special attention during the last few years and is today established as one of the most promising technologies for leading the next generation of flat panel display due to its excellent electronic performance. In this paper the recent progress in n- and p-type oxide based thin-film transistors (TFT) is reviewed, with special emphasis on solution-processed and p-type, and the major milestones already achieved with this emerging and very promising technology are summarizeed. After a short introduction where the main advantages of these semiconductors are presented, as well as the industry expectations, the beautiful history of TFTs is revisited, including the main landmarks in the last 80 years, finishing by referring to some papers that have played an important role in shaping transparent electronics. Then, an overview is presented of state of the art n-type TFTs processed by physical vapour deposition methods, and finally one of the most exciting, promising, and low cost but powerful technologies is discussed: solution-processed oxide TFTs. Moreover, a more detailed focus analysis will be given concerning p-type oxide TFTs, mainly centred on two of the most promising semiconductor candidates: copper oxide and tin oxide. The most recent data related to the production of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices based on n- and p-type oxide TFT is also be presented. The last topic of this review is devoted to some emerging applications, finalizing with the main conclusions. Related work that originated at CENIMAT|I3N during the last six years is included in more detail, which

  14. Degradation of the commercial surfactant nonylphenol ethoxylate by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Salatiel Wohlmuth; Klauck, Cláudia Regina; Siqueira, Marco Antônio; Bernardes, Andréa Moura

    2015-01-23

    Four different oxidation process, namely direct photolysis (DP) and three advanced oxidation processes (heterogeneous photocatalysis - HP, eletrochemical oxidation - EO and photo-assisted electrochemical oxidation - PEO) were applied in the treatment of wastewater containing nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPnEO). The objective of this work was to determine which treatment would be the best option in terms of degradation of NPnEO without the subsequent generation of toxic compounds. In order to investigate the degradation of the surfactant, the processes were compared in terms of UV/Vis spectrum, mineralization (total organic carbon), reaction kinetics, energy efficiency and phytotoxicity. A solution containing NPnEO was prepared as a surrogate of the degreasing wastewater, was used in the processes. The results showed that the photo-assisted processes degrade the surfactant, producing biodegradable intermediates in the reaction. On the other hand, the electrochemical process influences the mineralization of the surfactant. The process of PEO carried out with a 250W lamp and a current density of 10mA/cm(2) showed the best results in terms of degradation, mineralization, reaction kinetics and energy consumption, in addition to not presenting phytotoxicity. Based on this information, this process can be a viable alternative for treating wastewater containing NPnEO, avoiding the contamination of water resources. PMID:25262384

  15. Engineered crumpled graphene oxide nanocomposite membrane assemblies for advanced water treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Wang, Wei-Ning; Liu, Di; Nie, Yao; Li, Wenlu; Wu, Jiewei; Zhang, Fuzhong; Biswas, Pratim; Fortner, John D

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we describe multifunctional, crumpled graphene oxide (CGO) porous nanocomposites that are assembled as advanced, reactive water treatment membranes. Crumpled 3D graphene oxide based materials fundamentally differ from 2D flat graphene oxide analogues in that they are highly aggregation and compression-resistant (i.e., π-π stacking resistant) and allow for the incorporation (wrapping) of other, multifunctional particles inside the 3D, composite structure. Here, assemblies of nanoscale, monomeric CGO with encapsulated (as a quasi core-shell structure) TiO2 (GOTI) and Ag (GOAg) nanoparticles, not only allow high water flux via vertically tortuous nanochannels (achieving water flux of 246 ± 11 L/(m(2)·h·bar) with 5.4 μm thick assembly, 7.4 g/m(2)), outperforming comparable commercial ultrafiltration membranes, but also demonstrate excellent separation efficiencies for model organic and biological foulants. Further, multifunctionality is demonstrated through the in situ photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO), as a model organic, under fast flow conditions (tres < 0.1 s); while superior antimicrobial properties, evaluated with GOAg, are observed for both biofilm (contact) and suspended growth scenarios (>3 log effective removal, Escherichia coli). This is the first demonstration of 3D, crumpled graphene oxide based nanocomposite structures applied specifically as (re)active membrane assemblies and highlights the material's platform potential for a truly tailored approach for next generation water treatment and separation technologies. PMID:25942505

  16. Occurrence and Removal of Organic Micropollutants in Landfill Leachates Treated by Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Oturan, Nihal; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Zhang, Hui; Mazeas, Laurent; Budzinski, Hélène; Le Menach, Karyn; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-10-20

    In recent years, electrochemical advanced oxidation processes have been shown to be an effective alternative for the removal of refractory organic compounds from water. This study is focused on the effective removal of recalcitrant organic matter (micropollutants, humic substances, etc.) present in municipal solid waste landfill leachates. A mixture of eight landfill leachates has been studied by the electro-Fenton process using a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon felt cathode or by the anodic oxidation process with a BDD anode. These processes exhibit great oxidation ability due to the in situ production of hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), a highly powerful oxidizing species. Both electrochemical processes were shown to be efficient in the removal of dissolved total organic carbon (TOC) from landfill leachates. Regarding the electro-Fenton process, the replacement of the classical anode Pt by the anode BDD allows better performance in terms of dissolved TOC removal. The occurrence and removal yield of 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 15 volatile organic compounds, 7 alkylphenols, 7 polychlorobiphenyls, 5 organochlorine pesticides, and 2 polybrominated diphenyl ethers in landfill leachate were also investigated. Both electrochemical processes allow one to reach a quasicomplete removal (about 98%) of these organic micropollutants. PMID:26378656

  17. Contribution of free radicals to chlorophenols decomposition by several advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F J; Beltran-Heredia, J; Acero, J L; Rubio, F J

    2000-10-01

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous solutions of various chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol (4-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) and 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP)), which are environmental priority pollutants, is studied by means of single oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, UV radiation, Fenton's reagent and ozone at pH 2 and 9), and by the Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) constituted by combinations of these oxidants (UV/H2O2 UV/Fenton's reagent and O3/UV). For all these reactions the degradation rates are evaluated by determining their first-order rate constants and the half-life times. Ozone is more reactive with higher substituted CPs while OH* radicals react faster with those chlorophenols having lower number of chlorine atoms. The improvement in the decomposition levels reached by the combined processes, due to the generation of the very reactive hydroxyl radicals. in relation to the single oxidants is clearly demonstrated and evaluated by kinetic modeling. PMID:10901258

  18. Sono-bromination of aromatic compounds based on the ultrasonic advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mitsue; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Komatsu, Naoki; Kimura, Takahide

    2015-11-01

    A novel, mild "sono-halogenation" of various aromatic compounds with potassium halide was investigated under ultrasound in a biphasic carbon tetrachloride/water medium. The feasibility study was first undertaken with the potassium bromide and then extended to chloride and iodide analogues. This methodology could be considered as a new expansion of the ultrasonic advanced oxidation processes (UAOPs) into a synthetic aspect as the developed methodology is linked to the sonolytic disappearance of carbon tetrachloride. Advantages of the present method are not only that the manipulation of the bromination is simple and green, but also that the halogenating agents used are readily available, inexpensive, and easy-handling. PMID:26186842

  19. Combining Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment Of Process Additivity, Synergism, And Antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Sharma, M.P.; Gbadebo Adewuyi, Yusuf

    2007-07-01

    This paper addresses the process interactions from combining integrated processes (such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), biological operations, air stripping, etc.). AOPs considered include: Fenton's reagent, ultraviolet light, titanium dioxide, ozone (O{sub 3}), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), sonication/acoustic cavitation, among others. A critical review of the technical literature has been performed, and the data has been analyzed in terms of the processes being additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Predictions based on the individual unit operations are made and compared against the behavior of the combined unit operations. The data reported in this paper focus primarily on treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. (authors)

  20. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation. Quarterly report, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  1. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  2. BiVO(4)/CuWO(4) heterojunction photoanodes for efficient solar driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pilli, Satyananda Kishore; Deutsch, Todd G; Furtak, Thomas E; Brown, Logan D; Turner, John A; Herring, Andrew M

    2013-03-01

    BiVO(4)/CuWO(4) heterojunction electrodes were prepared using spray deposition of a highly porous bismuth vanadate film onto the surface of an electrodeposited three dimensional network connected copper tungstate. Bilayer BiVO(4)/CuWO(4)/fluorine doped tin oxide glass (FTO) electrodes demonstrated higher photocurrent magnitudes than either with BiVO(4)/FTO or CuWO(4)/FTO electrodes in 1.0 M Na(2)SO(4) electrolyte buffered at pH 7. The photocurrent is enhanced by the formation of the heterojunction that aids charge carrier collection brought about by the band edge offsets. When the pH 7 buffered electrolytes contained 1.0 M bicarbonate is employed instead of 1.0 M sulfate, the charge transfer resistance was decreased. This led to nearly 1.8 times the photocurrent density at 1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The photocurrent was stable over 24 hours in bicarbonate electrolyte. PMID:23348367

  3. Biogenic concrete protection driven by the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    PubMed Central

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Wang, Jianyun; Ramos, Jose A.; Derluyn, Hannelore; Rahier, Hubert; Cnudde, Veerle; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Microbiologically Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) from the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP as an alternative process for concrete protection was investigated. MICP was induced on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), the model material, by immersing the material in 109 M. parvus cells mL−1 containing 5 g L−1 of calcium formate. A 2 days immersion of the material gave the maximum weight increase of the specimens (38 ± 19 mg) and this was likely due to the deposition of calcium carbonate, biomass, and unconverted calcium formate. The solid deposition mainly occurred in the micropores of the specimen, close to the outer surface. A significantly lower water absorption was observed in the bacterially treated specimens compared to the non-treated ones (up to 2.92 ± 0.91 kg m−2) and this could be attributed to the solid deposition. However, the sonication test demonstrated that the bacterial treatment did not give a consolidating effect to the material. Overall, compared to the currently employed urea hydrolysis process, the formate-based MICP by M. parvus offers a more environmentally friendly approach for the biotechnological application to protect concrete. PMID:26284061

  4. High-temperature electromagnons in the magnetically induced multiferroic cupric oxide driven by intersublattice exchange.

    PubMed

    Jones, S P P; Gaw, S M; Doig, K I; Prabhakaran, D; Hétroy Wheeler, E M; Boothroyd, A T; Lloyd-Hughes, J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetically induced ferroelectric multiferroics present an exciting new paradigm in the design of multifunctional materials, by intimately coupling magnetic and polar order. Magnetoelectricity creates a novel quasiparticle excitation--the electromagnon--at terahertz frequencies, with spectral signatures that unveil important spin interactions. To date, electromagnons have been discovered at low temperature (<70 K) and predominantly in rare-earth compounds such as RMnO3. Here we demonstrate using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy that intersublattice exchange in the improper multiferroic cupric oxide (CuO) creates electromagnons at substantially elevated temperatures (213-230 K). Dynamic magnetoelectric coupling can therefore be achieved in materials, such as CuO, that exhibit minimal static cross-coupling. The electromagnon strength and energy track the static polarization, highlighting the importance of the underlying cycloidal spin structure. Polarized neutron scattering and terahertz spectroscopy identify a magnon in the antiferromagnetic ground state, with a temperature dependence that suggests a significant role for biquadratic exchange. PMID:24777198

  5. Are sperm capacitation and apoptosis the opposite ends of a continuum driven by oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Robert J; Baker, Mark A; Nixon, Brett

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores the possibility that capacitation and apoptosis are linked processes joined by their common dependence on the continued generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). According to this model capacitation is initiated in spematozoa following their release into the female reproductive tract as a consequence of intracellular ROS generation, which stimulates intracellular cAMP generation, inhibits tyrosine phosphatase activity and enhances the formation of oxysterols prior to their removal from the sperm surface by albumin. The continued generation of ROS by capacitating populations of spermatozoa eventually overwhelms the limited capacity of these cells to protect themselves from oxidative stress. As a result the over-capacitation of spermatozoa leads to a state of senescence and the activation of a truncated intrinsic apoptotic cascade characterized by enhanced mitochondrial ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, motility loss, caspase activation and phosphatidylserine externalization. The latter may be particularly important in instructing phagocytic leukocytes that the removal of senescent, moribund spermatozoa should be a silent process unaccompanied by the generation of proinflammatory cytokines. These observations reveal the central role played by redox chemistry in defining the life and death of spermatozoa. A knowledge of these mechanisms may help us to engineer novel solutions to both support and preserve the functionality of these highly specialized cells. PMID:25999358

  6. Biogenic concrete protection driven by the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Wang, Jianyun; Ramos, Jose A; Derluyn, Hannelore; Rahier, Hubert; Cnudde, Veerle; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Microbiologically Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) from the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP as an alternative process for concrete protection was investigated. MICP was induced on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), the model material, by immersing the material in 10(9) M. parvus cells mL(-1) containing 5 g L(-1) of calcium formate. A 2 days immersion of the material gave the maximum weight increase of the specimens (38 ± 19 mg) and this was likely due to the deposition of calcium carbonate, biomass, and unconverted calcium formate. The solid deposition mainly occurred in the micropores of the specimen, close to the outer surface. A significantly lower water absorption was observed in the bacterially treated specimens compared to the non-treated ones (up to 2.92 ± 0.91 kg m(-2)) and this could be attributed to the solid deposition. However, the sonication test demonstrated that the bacterial treatment did not give a consolidating effect to the material. Overall, compared to the currently employed urea hydrolysis process, the formate-based MICP by M. parvus offers a more environmentally friendly approach for the biotechnological application to protect concrete. PMID:26284061

  7. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Behnaz; Song, Weihua; Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J.

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) and reducing aqueous electron (e -aq), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with rad OH determined, (6.96±0.16)×10 9, (2.92±0.06)×10 9, (4.16±0.13)×10 9, and (3.13±0.15)×10 9 M -1 s -1, and for e -aq (2.31±0.06)×10 9, (0.45±0.01)×10 9, (1.26±0.01)×10 9, and (0.69±0.02)×10 9 M -1 s -1, respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using 137Cs γ-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  8. A summary and assessment of oxidation driven volatility experiments at the INEL and their application to fusion reactor safety assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.A.; Smolik, G.R.; Harms, S.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report contains a summary and assessment of oxidation-driven volatility tests through March 1994 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Materials tested include a Cu alloy in air and steam, PCA stainless steel (similar to 316SS) in air and steam, AMCR-033 steel in air, HT-9 steel in air and steam, a Nb alloy in air and steam, a W alloy in air and steam, and two V alloys in air with a limited number of tests in steam. We give a brief description of the tests, including alloy compositions and test temperatures. For many materials, our results indicate that both volatility and oxide spalling are responsible for mobilizing mass, thus we refer to our measurements as mass flux or mobility flux. We plot mobility data for each element and present curve fits to the data. We include a section on how the mobility information is used in safety assessments. We calculate the early dose inventory of a first wall made of each material tested (the early dose to the maximum exposed individual that would result if all the material were mobilized and transported to the site boundary), and the early dose that would result when mobility fractions are considered in the calculation. We use this information to assess the data by determining which elements are the most important and concentrating on providing the mobility data for those elements. We discuss where more data are needed, and our plans for obtaining that data. Additionally, we discuss what must be done to produce a database that will withstand regulatory scrutiny.

  9. Advances in Instrumentation for Quantification of Isotopic Nitrous Oxide from ppb levels to 100%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, F.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J.; Provencal, R. A.; Owano, T. G.; Baer, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic composition of trace gases provides information of their origin and fate that cannot be determined from their concentration measurements alone. Biological source and loss processes, like bacterial production of nitrous oxide, are typically accompanied by isotopic selectivity associated with the kinetics of bond formation and destruction. Of the three important biologically mediated greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O), the understanding of nitrous oxide isotopic budget in air lags behind the other two gases primarily due to the relatively low concentration of N2O in ambient air (~320 ppb). Furthermore, the origin of nitrates in rivers, lakes, ocean and other water supplies may be determined from analyses of isotopic nitrous oxide produced via chemical reduction or biological conversion. These processes can produce nitrous oxide at levels considerably greater than those present in ambient air. To date, analyses of isotopic nitrous oxide requires either pre-concentration of samples containing low concentrations or dilution of samples with high concentrations. We report significant advances of instrumentation for real-time measurements of site-specific isotopic nitrogen (δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ15N, δ18O) and mixing ratio [N2O] of nitrous oxide over a very wide range of mole fractions in air. Specifically, LGR's Isotopic N2O Analyzer can report site-specific isotopic nitrogen and isotopic oxygen continuously in flows ranging from 0.2 to over 20 ppm (parts per million) nitrous oxide in air (with preconcentration or dilution). Furthermore, for samples of limited volume, a batch technique may be used for similar isotopic measurements in discrete samples containing 0.2 ppm to 100% nitrous oxide (e.g., sample volumes from bacterial digestion can be as little as 1-10 mL). This novel technology, which employs cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) and a mid-infrared laser (4.56 microns) and does not require any cryogenic components, has been

  10. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  11. Nitrous oxide emission budgets and land-use-driven hotspots for organic soils in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, T.; Dechow, R.; Gebbert, S.; Freibauer, A.; Lohila, A.; Augustin, J.; Drösler, M.; Fiedler, S.; Glatzel, S.; Höper, H.; Järveoja, J.; Lærke, P. E.; Maljanen, M.; Mander, Ü.; Mäkiranta, P.; Minkkinen, K.; Ojanen, P.; Regina, K.; Strömgren, M.

    2014-12-01

    Organic soils are a main source of direct emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas (GHG). Observed N2O emissions from organic soils are highly variable in space and time, which causes high uncertainties in national emission inventories. Those uncertainties could be reduced when relating the upscaling process to a priori-identified key drivers by using available N2O observations from plot scale in empirical approaches. We used the empirical fuzzy modelling approach MODE to identify main drivers for N2O and utilize them to predict the spatial emission pattern of European organic soils. We conducted a meta-study with a total amount of 659 annual N2O measurements, which was used to derive separate models for different land use types. We applied our models to available, spatially explicit input driver maps to upscale N2O emissions at European level and compared the inventory with recently published IPCC emission factors. The final statistical models explained up to 60% of the N2O variance. Our study results showed that cropland and grasslands emitted the highest N2O fluxes 0.98 ± 1.08 and 0.58 ± 1.03 g N2O-N m-2 a-1, respectively. High fluxes from cropland sites were mainly controlled by low soil pH value and deep-drained groundwater tables. Grassland hotspot emissions were strongly related to high amount of N-fertilizer inputs and warmer winter temperatures. In contrast, N2O fluxes from natural peatlands were predominantly low (0.07 ± 0.27 g N2O-N m-2 a-1) and we found no relationship with the tested drivers. The total inventory for direct N2O emissions from organic soils in Europe amount up to 149.5 Gg N2O-N a-1, which also included fluxes from forest and peat extraction sites and exceeds the inventory calculated by IPCC emission factors of 87.4 Gg N2O-N a-1. N2O emissions from organic soils represent up to 13% of total European N2O emissions reported in the European Union (EU) greenhouse gas inventory of 2011 from only 7% of the EU area

  12. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  13. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Immobilized Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) Complex for Efficient Visible-Light-Driven Reductive Dehalogenation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Hao, Zhongkai; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hexing

    2016-05-18

    A sodium benzenesulfonate (PhSO3Na)-functionalized reduced graphene oxide was synthesized via a two-step aryl diazonium coupling and subsequent NaCl ion-exchange procedure, which was used as a support to immobilize tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex (Ru(bpy)3Cl2) by coordination reaction. This elaborated Ru(bpy)3-rGO catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic efficiency in visible-light-driven reductive dehalogenation reactions under mild conditions, even for ary chloride. Meanwhile, it showed the comparable reactivity with the corresponding homogeneous Ru(bpy)3Cl2 catalyst. This high catalytic performance could be attributed to the unique two-dimensional sheet-like structure of Ru(bpy)3-rGO, which efficiently diminished diffusion resistance of the reactants. Meanwhile, the nonconjugated PhSO3Na-linkage between Ru(II) complex and the support and the very low electrical conductivity of the catalyst inhibited energy/electron transfer from Ru(II) complex to rGO support, resulting in the decreased support-induced quenching effect. Furthermore, it could be easily recycled at least five times without significant loss of catalytic reactivity. PMID:27104739

  14. Theoretical model for surface diffusion driven Ni-particle agglomeration in anode of solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Sheng; Li, Jiayu; Lin, Zijing

    2014-06-01

    The agglomeration of Ni particles in nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode is an important degradation mechanism for the solid oxide fuel cell and is widely believed to be driven by surface diffusion. This work aims to develop a quantitative model to describe the agglomeration kinetics. The model treats the anode as a system of random packing Ni and YSZ particles. Surface diffusion occurs between the connected Ni particles of different sizes characterized by two representative radii, but is influenced by the YSZ network. The Fick's law for diffusion, the Gibbs-Thomson relation for vacancy concentration and the coordination number theory for percolating Ni network are employed in the mathematical derivation. The growth kinetics is expressed as an analytical function consisting of two model parameters, one for the Ni-particle size distribution and the other for the influence of the YSZ backbone. The model is in excellent agreement with the available experiments. The influence of the YSZ backbone is further considered to obtain a model with just one fitting parameter. The one-parameter model is also in good agreement with the experiments and the fundamental physics for the Ni-particle growth is therefore believed to be well characterized.

  15. Diffused sunlight driven highly synergistic pathway for complete mineralization of organic contaminants using reduced graphene oxide supported photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Babu, Sundaram Ganesh; Ramalingam Vinoth; Neppolian, Bernaurdshaw; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2015-06-30

    Diffused sunlight is found to be an effective light source for the efficient degradation and mineralization of organic pollutant (methyl orange as a probe) by sono-photocatalytic degradation using reduced graphene oxide (rGO) supported CuO-TiO2 photocatalyst. The prepared catalysts are characterized by XRD, XPS, UV-vis DRS, PL, photoelectrochemical, SEM-EDS and TEM. A 10 fold synergy is achieved for the first time by combining sonochemical and photocatalytic degradation under diffused sunlight. rGO loading augments the activity of bare CuO-TiO2 more than two fold. The ability of rGO in storing, transferring, and shuttling electrons at the heterojunction between TiO2 and CuO facilitates the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, as evidenced by the photoluminescence results. The complete mineralization of MO and the by-products within a short span of time is confirmed by TOC analysis. Further, hydroxyl radical mediated degradation under diffused sunlight is confirmed by LC-MS. This system shows similar activity for the degradation of methylene blue and 4-chlorophenol indicating the versatility of the catalyst for the degradation of various pollutants. This investigation is likely to open new possibilities for the development of highly efficient diffused sunlight driven TiO2 based photocatalysts for the complete mineralization of organic contaminants. PMID:25771214

  16. Uniform distribution of graphene oxide sheets into a poly-vinylidene fluoride nanoparticle matrix through shear-driven aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xinxin; Xie, Delong; Zhang, Xinya; Zhong, Li; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    A general methodology has been developed for preparing nanocomposites with uniform, random distribution of fillers in polymer matrices, purely based on intense shear-driven aggregation, while avoiding filler aggregation. This procedure is demonstrated for a binary colloid composed of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanoparticles (NPs), both negatively charged and stable at rest. On the other hand, the PVDF NPs are shear-active (i.e. aggregation occurs under intensive shear), while the GO sheets are shear-inactive. It is found that when the two suspensions are mixed and the resulting binary colloid is forced to pass through a microchannel (MC) device (at a very high shear rate, G = 1.2 × 10(6) s(-1)), the shear-inactive GO sheets are captured and well distributed inside the PVDF NP clusters or gels. In addition, it is shown that in order to have 100% capture efficiency for the GO sheets, a minimum solid content of the binary colloid is required, which can be identified experimentally as the minimum leading to gelation after passing through the MC only one time. PMID:27334421

  17. In-situ synthesis of highly efficient visible light driven stannic oxide/graphitic carbon nitride heterostructured photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Tao, Binglin; Yan, Zifeng

    2016-10-15

    Novel and efficient visible-light-driven stannic oxide/graphitic carbon nitride heterostructured photocatalysts are prepared via a simple in-situ solvothermal method. Characterization results demonstrate that there exist strong interactions between SnO2 nanoparticles and g-C3N4 matrix, which indicates the formation of SnO2/g-C3N4 heterojunction. The as-synthesized SnO2/g-C3N4 composite exhibits improved efficiency for photodegradation of rhodamine B in aqueous solutions, with an apparent rate constant 6.5 times higher than that of commercial TiO2 (Degussa P25). The enhanced photocatalytic activity is attributed to synergistic effect between SnO2 and g-C3N4, resulting in effective interfacial charge transfer and prolonged charge-hole separation time. Moreover, SnO2/g-C3N4 composite photocatalysts possess excellent durability and stability after 6 recycling runs, and a possible photocatalytic mechanism is also proposed. This research highlights the promising applications of two dimensional g-C3N4 based composite photocatalysts in the field of waste water disposal and environmental remediation. PMID:27421114

  18. Application of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes to the mineralization of the herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    Pipi, Angelo R F; Sirés, Ignasi; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Brillas, Enric

    2014-08-01

    Here, solutions with 0.185mM of the herbicide diuron of pH 3.0 have been treated by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) like electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) or solar PEF (SPEF). Trials were performed in stirred tank reactors of 100mL and in a recirculation flow plant of 2.5L using a filter-press reactor with a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode for H2O2 electrogeneration. Oxidant hydroxyl radicals were formed from water oxidation at the anode and/or in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and generated H2O2. In both systems, the relative oxidation ability of the EAOPs increased in the sequence EO-H2O2

  19. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zayas Pérez, Teresa; Geissler, Gunther; Hernandez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculation and advanced oxidation processes (AOP) had been studied. The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions. For each of these processes, different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater. Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and low total suspended solids. The outcomes of coffee wastewater treatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD, color, and turbidity. It was found that a reduction in COD of 67% could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculation with lime and coagulant T-1. When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H2O2, a COD reduction of 86% was achieved, although only after prolonged UV irradiation. Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered, UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3, we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective, with an efficiency of color, turbidity and further COD removal of 87%, when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater. PMID:17918591

  20. Degradation of estrone in water and wastewater by various advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shubhajit; Ali, Sura; Rehmann, Lars; Nakhla, George; Ray, Madhumita B

    2014-08-15

    A comprehensive study was conducted to determine the relative efficacy of various advanced oxidation processes such as O3, H2O2, UV, and combinations of UV/O3, UV/H2O2 for the removal of estrone (E1) from pure water and secondary effluent. In addition to the parent compound (E1) removal, performance of the advanced oxidation processes was characterized using removal of total organic carbon (TOC), and estrogenicity of the effluent. Although E1 removal was high for all the AOPs, intermediates formed were more difficult to degrade leading to slow TOC removal. Energy calculations and cost analysis indicated that, although UV processes have low electricity cost, ozonation is the least cost option ($ 0.34/1000 gallons) when both capital and operating costs were taken into account. Ozonation also is superior to the other tested AOPs due to higher removal of TOC and estrogenicity. The rate of E1 removal decreased linearly with the background TOC in water, however, E1 degradation in the secondary effluent from a local wastewater treatment plant was not affected significantly due to the low COD values in the effluent. PMID:24937659

  1. Treatment of coking wastewater by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Haiyang; Sun, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    In this study the treatment of coking wastewater was investigated by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide. Particular attention was paid to the effect of initial pH, dosage of H(2)O(2) and to improvement in biodegradation. The results showed that higher COD and total phenol removal rates were achieved with a decrease in initial pH and an increase in H(2)O(2) dosage. At an initial pH of less than 6.5 and H(2)O(2) concentration of 0.3 M, COD removal reached 44-50% and approximately 95% of total phenol removal was achieved at a reaction time of 1 h. The oxygen uptake rate of the effluent measured at a reaction time of 1h increased by approximately 65% compared to that of the raw coking wastewater. This indicated that biodegradation of the coking wastewater was significantly improved. Several organic compounds, including bifuran, quinoline, resorcinol and benzofuranol were removed completely as determined by GC-MS analysis. The advanced Fenton oxidation process is an effective pretreatment method for the removal of organic pollutants from coking wastewater. This process increases biodegradation, and may be combined with a classical biological process to achieve effluent of high quality. PMID:22014660

  2. Electrochemical advanced oxidation and biological processes for wastewater treatment: a review of the combined approaches.

    PubMed

    Ganzenko, Oleksandra; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    As pollution becomes one of the biggest environmental challenges of the twenty-first century, pollution of water threatens the very existence of humanity, making immediate action a priority. The most persistent and hazardous pollutants come from industrial and agricultural activities; therefore, effective treatment of this wastewater prior to discharge into the natural environment is the solution. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have caused increased interest due to their ability to degrade hazardous substances in contrast to other methods, which mainly only transfer pollution from wastewater to sludge, a membrane filter, or an adsorbent. Among a great variety of different AOPs, a group of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), including electro-Fenton, is emerging as an environmental-friendly and effective treatment process for the destruction of persistent hazardous contaminants. The only concern that slows down a large-scale implementation is energy consumption and related investment and operational costs. A combination of EAOPs with biological treatment is an interesting solution. In such a synergetic way, removal efficiency is maximized, while minimizing operational costs. The goal of this review is to present cutting-edge research for treatment of three common and problematic pollutants and effluents: dyes and textile wastewater, olive processing wastewater, and pharmaceuticals and hospital wastewater. Each of these types is regarded in terms of recent scientific research on individual electrochemical, individual biological and a combined synergetic treatment. PMID:24965093

  3. Fenton Reaction-Generated Advanced Oxidation Protein Products Induces Inflammation in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; López, José Luis Rosa; Siebel, Anna Maria; Gomes, Patrícia; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-08-01

    Fenton reaction is a new mechanism able to generate advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) by exposing the human serum albumin to the Fenton system. Here, we characterized the effects of Fenton reaction-generated advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP-FR) on the gene transcription of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). To investigate the effects of AOPP-FR and AOPP-HOCl on transcription of inflammatory genes, the NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 luciferase promoter activities were analyzed. AOPP-FR and AOPP-HOCl were able to induce the activation of the gene transcription of NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 in HEK 293 cells. However, the effects of AOPP-FR were significantly higher than the effects of AOPP-HOCl in relation to COX-2 and IL-6. AOPP-FR induces the activation of the gene transcription of NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 and may represent a novel pathogenic mediator of inflammation in kidney. PMID:27145783

  4. Performance evaluation of different solar advanced oxidation processes applied to the treatment of a real textile dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Diego R; Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Módenes, Aparecido N; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    The performance of different solar-driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as TiO2/UV, TiO2/H2O2/UV, and Fe(2+)/H2O2/UV-visible in the treatment of a real textile effluent using a pilot plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs), was investigated. The influence of the main photo-Fenton reaction variables such as iron concentration (20-100 mg Fe(2+) L(-1)), pH (2.4-4.5), temperature (10-50 °C), and irradiance (22-68 WUV m(-2)) was evaluated in a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation. The real textile wastewater presented a beige color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (8.1), moderate organic content (dissolved organic carbon (DOC) = 129 mg C L(-1) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 496 mg O2 L(-1)), and high conductivity mainly associated to the high concentration of chloride (1.1 g Cl(-) L(-1)), sulfate (0.4 g SO 4 (2 -) L(- 1)), and sodium (1.2 g Na(+) L(-1)) ions. Although all the processes tested contributed to complete decolorization and effective mineralization, the most efficient process was the solar photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 70 % mineralization (DOCfinal = 41 mg C L(-1); CODfinal < 150 mg O2 L(-1)) at pH 3.6, requiring a UV energy dose of 3.5 kJUV L(-1) (t 30 W = 22.4 min; [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and consuming 18.5 mM of H2O2. PMID:24737016

  5. Study of solid oxide fuel cell interconnects, protective coatings and advanced physical vapor deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Paul Edward

    High energy conversion efficiency, decreased environmentally-sensitive emissions and fuel flexibility have attracted increasing attention toward solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for stationary, transportation and portable power generation. Critical durability and cost issues, however, continue to impede wide-spread deployment. Many intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar SOFC systems employ metallic alloy interconnect components, which physically connect individual fuel cells into electric series, facilitate gas distribution to appropriate SOFC electrode chambers (fuel/anode and oxidant[air]/cathode) and provide SOFC stack mechanical support. These demanding multifunctional requirements challenge commercially-available and inexpensive metallic alloys due to corrosion and related effects. Many ongoing investigations are aimed at enabling inexpensive metallic alloys (via bulk and/or surface modifications) as SOFC interconnects (SOFC(IC)s). In this study, two advanced physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques: large area filtered vacuum arc deposition (LAFAD), and filtered arc plasma-assisted electron beam PVD (FA-EBPVD) were used to deposit a wide-variety of protective nanocomposite (amorphous/nanocrystalline) ceramic thin-film (<5microm) coatings on commercial and specialty stainless steels with different surface finishes. Both bare and coated steel specimens were subjected to SOFC(IC)-relevant exposures and evaluated using complimentary surface analysis techniques. Significant improvements were observed under simulated SOFC(IC) exposures with many coated specimens at ˜800°C relative to uncoated specimens: stable surface morphology; low area specific resistance (ASR <100mO·cm 2 >1,000 hours); and, dramatically reduced Cr volatility (>30-fold). Analyses and discussions of SOFC(IC) corrosion, advanced PVD processes and protective coating behavior are intended to advance understanding and accelerate the development of durable and commercially-viable SOFC

  6. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures. PMID:26580737

  7. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in electrochemical advanced oxidation process with diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Griessler, M; Knetsch, S; Schimpf, E; Schmidhuber, A; Schrammel, B; Wesner, W; Sommer, R; Kirschner, A K T

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) with diamond electrodes may serve as an additional technology to the currently approved methods for water disinfection. Only few data exist on the microbicidal effect of the EAOP. The aim of our study was to investigate the microbicidal effect of a flow-through oxidation cell with diamond electrodes, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the test organism. Without electrical current the EAOP had no measurable effect on investigated microbiological and chemical parameters. For direct electrical current a stronger impact was observed at low flow rate than at higher flow rate. Depending on the contact time of the oxidants and the type of quenching reagent added, inactivation of P. aeruginosa was in the range log 1.6-3.6 at the higher flow rate and log 2.4-4.4 at the lower rate. Direct electrical current showed a stronger microbicidal effect than alternating current (maximum reduction log 4.0 and log 2.9, respectively). The microbiological results of experiments with this EAOP prototype revealed higher standard deviations than expected, based on our experience with standard water disinfection methods. Safe use of an EAOP system requires operating parameters to be defined and used accurately, and thus specific monitoring tests must be developed. PMID:21902043

  8. Degradation of triketone herbicides, mesotrione and sulcotrione, using advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jović, Milica; Manojlović, Dragan; Stanković, Dalibor; Dojčinović, Biljana; Obradović, Bratislav; Gašić, Uroš; Roglić, Goran

    2013-09-15

    Degradation of two triketone herbicides, mesotrione and sulcotrione, was studied using four different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): ozonization, dielectric barrier discharge (DBD reactor), photocatalysis and Fenton reagent, in order to find differences in mechanism of degradation. Degradation products were identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD) and UHPLC-Orbitrap-MS analyses. A simple mechanism of degradation for different AOP was proposed. Thirteen products were identified during all degradations for both pesticides. It was assumed that the oxidation mechanisms in the all four technologies were not based only on the production and use of the hydroxyl radical, but they also included other kinds of oxidation mechanisms specific for each technology. Similarity was observed between degradation mechanism of ozonation and DBD. The greatest difference in the products was found in Fenton degradation which included the opening of benzene ring. When degraded with same AOP pesticides gave at the end of treatment the same products. Global toxicity and COD value of samples was determined after all degradations. Real water sample was used to study influence of organic matter on pesticide degradation. These results could lead to accurate estimates of the overall effects of triketone herbicides on environmental ecosystems and also contributed to the development of improved removal processes. PMID:23892174

  9. Incorporation of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes in a multistage treatment system for sanitary landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Soler, J; Fonseca, Amélia; Saraiva, Isabel; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-09-15

    The current study has proved the technical feasibility of including electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) in a multistage strategy for the remediation of a sanitary landfill leachate that embraced: (i) first biological treatment to remove the biodegradable organic fraction, oxidize ammonium and reduce alkalinity, (ii) coagulation of the bio-treated leachate to precipitate humic acids and particles, followed by separation of the clarified effluent, and (iii) oxidation of the resulting effluent by an EAOP to degrade the recalcitrant organic matter and increase its biodegradability so that a second biological process for removal of biodegradable organics and nitrogen content could be applied. The influence of current density on an UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) process was firstly assessed. The oxidation ability of various EAOPs such as electro-Fenton (EF) with two distinct initial total dissolved iron concentrations ([TDI]0), PEF and solar PEF (SPEF) was further evaluated and these processes were compared with their analogous chemical ones. A detailed assessment of the two first treatment stages was made and the biodegradability enhancement during the SPEF process was determined by a Zahn-Wellens test to define the ideal organics oxidation state to stop the EAOP and apply the second biological treatment. The best current density was 200 mA cm(-2) for a PEF process using a BDD anode, [TDI]0 of 60 mg L(-1), pH 2.8 and 20 °C. The relative oxidation ability of EAOPs increased in the order EF with 12 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) < EF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) < PEF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) ≤ SPEF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1), using the abovementioned conditions. While EF process was much superior to the Fenton one, the superiority of PEF over photo-Fenton was less evident and SPEF attained similar degradation to solar photo-Fenton. To provide a final dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 163 mg L(-1) to fulfill the discharge limits into the environment after

  10. Reduction of clarithromycin and sulfamethoxazole-resistant Enterococcus by pilot-scale solar-driven Fenton oxidation.

    PubMed

    Karaolia, Popi; Michael, Irene; García-Fernández, Irene; Agüera, Ana; Malato, Sixto; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo

    2014-01-15

    The presence of pathogenic antibiotic-resistant bacteria in aquatic environments has become a health threat in the last few years. Their presence has increased due to the presence of antibiotics in wastewater effluents, which are not efficiently removed by conventional wastewater treatments. As a result there is a need to study the possible ways of removal of the mixtures of antibiotics present in wastewater effluents and the antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which may also spread the antibiotic resistance genes to other bacterial populations. In this study the degradation of a mixture of antibiotics i.e. sulfamethoxazole and clarithromycin, the disinfection of total enterococci and the removal of those resistant to: a) sulfamethoxazole, b) clarithromycin and c) to both antibiotics have been examined, along with the toxicity of the whole effluent mixture after treatment to the luminescent aquatic bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Solar Fenton treatment (natural solar driven oxidation) using Fenton reagent doses of 50 mg L(-1) of hydrogen peroxide and 5 mg L(-1) of Fe(3+) in a pilot-scale compound parabolic collector plant was used to examine the disinfection and antibiotic resistance removal efficiency in different aqueous matrices, namely distilled water, simulated and real wastewater effluents. There was a faster complete removal of enterococci and of antibiotics in all aqueous matrices by applying solar Fenton when compared to photolytic treatment of the matrices. Sulfamethoxazole was more efficiently degraded than clarithromycin in all three aqueous matrices (95% removal of sulfamethoxazole and 70% removal of clarithromycin in real wastewater). The antibiotic resistance of enterococci towards both antibiotics exhibited a 5-log reduction with solar Fenton in real wastewater effluent. Also after solar Fenton treatment, there were 10 times more antibiotic-resistant enterococci in the presence of sulfamethoxazole than in the presence of clarithromycin. Finally, the toxicity

  11. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts.The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV

  12. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. PMID:27434736

  13. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of catalytic ultrasound oxidation and membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Xu, Peng; Hou, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were conducted to investigate a novel system integrating catalytic ultrasound oxidation (CUO) with membrane bioreactor (CUO-MBR) on advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater. Results indicated that CUO with catalyst of FeOx/SBAC (sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) which loaded Fe oxides) represented high efficiencies in eliminating TOC as well as improving the biodegradability. The integrated CUO-MBR system with low energy intensity and high frequency was more effective in eliminating COD, BOD5, TOC and reducing transmembrane pressure than either conventional MBR or ultrasound oxidation integrated MBR. The enhanced hydroxyl radical oxidation, facilitation of substrate diffusion and improvement of cell enzyme secretion were the mechanisms for CUO-MBR performance. Therefore, the integrated CUO-MBR was the promising technology for advanced treatment in engineering applications. PMID:25936898

  14. Noise Survey Under Static Conditions of a Turbine-Driven Transonic Propeller with an Advance Ratio of 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurbjun, Max C.

    1959-01-01

    Overall sound-pressure levels and frequency spectra have been obtained under static conditions on a transonic propeller with an advance ratio of 4.0. This advance ratio represents a practical minimum tip speed for transonic flight speeds. The three-blade, 6.85-foot-diameter, 1,710-rpm propeller is powered by a turbine engine and is designed to operate at a forward Mach number of 0.82 at an altitude of 35,000 feet. The results consist of overall sound-pressure levels and frequency spectra obtained from analyses made of recordings taken during ground runups of the propeller with an advance ratio of 4.0. These results are compared with similar results obtained from a supersonic propeller having an advance ratio of 2.2 reported in NACA Technical Note 4059 and from a modified supersonic propeller having an advance ratio of 3.2 reported in NACA Technical Note 4172. The advance-ratio-4.0 propeller of the present investigation produced a maximum sound-pressure level of 117.5 decibels when corrected to 1,400 horsepower. This overall noise output represents a lowering of the maximum overall sound-pressure level by approximately 5 decibels from that of the advance-ratio-3.2 propeller and by 14 decibels from that of the advance-ratio-2.2 propeller at comparable engine horsepowers. The frequency spectrum for the present propeller was the same as that for the advance-ratio-3.2 propeller, that is, high sound-pressure levels for the low-blade-passage harmonics with a rapid decrease in level with increasing order of harmonic. The 5-decibels reduction, under static conditions, is not considered sufficient to warrant the increased weight and operational penalties that would accompany this selection over the more efficient advance-ratio-3.2 propeller. At high forward speeds, however, the noise level of the present advance-ratio-4.0 propeller, especially in the fre- quency range where passenger comfort is important, should probably be substantially lower than that of the advance

  15. Medium pressure UV combined with chlorine advanced oxidation for trichloroethylene destruction in a model water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Hofmann, Ron

    2012-10-01

    The effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) combined with chlorine as a novel advanced oxidation process (AOP) for drinking water treatment was evaluated in a bench scale study by comparing the rate of trichloroethylene (TCE) decay when using UV/chlorine to the rates of decay by UV alone and UV/hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) at various pH values. A medium pressure mercury UV lamp was used. The UV/chlorine process was more efficient than the UV/H₂O₂ process at pH 5, but in the neutral and alkaline pH range, the UV/H₂O₂ process became more efficient. The pH effect was probably controlled by the increasing concentration of OCl⁻ at higher pH values. A mechanistic kinetic model of the UV/chlorine treatment of TCE showed good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:22763292

  16. Removal of persistent organic pollutant hexachlorocyclohexane isomers by advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Organochlorine insecticide Lindane (gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane) and its isomers (alpha, beta, delta-HCH) are recalcitrant and toxic compounds. They were progressively banished in most of the countries, because of their persistence and toxicity. Due to their nonselective production process and widespread use, they are still occurring in the environment. These insecticides and isomers were detected in all media like soil, ground water, sediments, vegetables and even in human tissues. In this study, UV, H2O2, UV+H2O2, Fenton's reagent, UV+Fenton's reagent, Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) have been applied for degradation of HCH isomers (a, beta, gamma and delta-HCH). The results revealed that the UV+H2O2 treatment was most effective, which could do 99% degradation of all isomers of HCH within 75 minutes. The results in detail are presented and discussed in this paper. PMID:24749381

  17. Advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment using a plasma/ozone combination system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Nozomi; Kamiya, Yu; Saeki, Ryo; Tachibana, Kosuke; Yasuoka, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Advanced oxidation process (AOP) using OH radicals is a promising method for the decomposition of persistent organic compounds in wastewater. Although many types of plasma reactors have been developed for the AOP, they are unsuitable for the complete decomposition of highly concentrated organic compounds. The reason for the incomplete decomposition is that OH radicals, particularly at a high density, recombine among themselves to form hydrogen peroxide. We have developed a combination plasma reactor in which ozone gas is fed, so that the generated hydrogen peroxide is re-converted to OH radicals. Pulsed plasmas generated within oxygen bubbles supply not only OH radicals but also hydrogen peroxide into wastewater. The total organic carbon (TOC) of the wastewater was more than 1 gTOC/L. The TOC values decreased linearly with time, and the persistent compounds which could not be decomposed by ozone were completely mineralized within 8 h of operation.

  18. Intrinsic Chemiluminescence Generation during Advanced Oxidation of Persistent Halogenated Aromatic Carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Huang, Chun-Hua; Gao, Hui-Ying; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2015-07-01

    The ubiquitous distribution coupled with their carcinogenicity has raised public concerns on the potential risks to both human health and the ecosystem posed by the halogenated aromatic compounds (XAr). Recently, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been increasingly favored as an "environmentally-green" technology for the remediation of such recalcitrant and highly toxic XAr. Here, we show that AOPs-mediated degradation of the priority pollutant pentachlorophenol and all other XAr produces an intrinsic chemiluminescence that directly depends on the generation of the extremely reactive hydroxyl radicals. We propose that the hydroxyl radical-dependent formation of quinoid intermediates and electronically excited carbonyl species is responsible for this unusual chemiluminescence production. A rapid, sensitive, simple, and effective chemiluminescence method was developed to quantify trace amounts of XAr and monitor their real-time degradation kinetics. These findings may have broad biological and environmental implications for future research on this important class of halogenated persistent organic pollutants. PMID:26009932

  19. Can activated sludge treatments and advanced oxidation processes remove organophosphorus flame retardants?

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Ramos, Dayana D; Dantas, Renato F; Machulek Junior, Amilcar; Lacorte, Silvia; Sans, Carme; Esplugas, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the occurrence of 10 OPFRs (including chlorinated, nonchlorinated alkyl and aryl compounds) in influent, effluent wastewaters and partitioning into sludge of 5 wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Catalonia (Spain). All target OPFRs were detected in the WWTPs influents, and the total concentration ranged from 3.67 µg L(-1) to 150 µg L(-1). During activated sludge treatment, most OPFRs were accumulated in the sludge at concentrations from 35.3 to 9980 ng g(-1) dw. Chlorinated compounds tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and tris(2,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCPP) were not removed by the conventional activated sludge treatment and they were released by the effluents at approximately the same inlet concentration. On the contrary, aryl compounds tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP) and 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP) together with alkyl tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEHP) were not detected in any of the effluents. Advanced oxidation processes (UV/H2O2 and O3) were applied to investigate the degradability of recalcitrant OPFRs in WWTP effluents. Those detected in the effluent sample (TCEP, TCIPP, TDCPP, tributyl phosphate (TNBP), tri-iso-butyl phosphate (TIBP) and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP)) had very low direct UV-C photolysis rates. TBOEP, TNBP and TIBP were degraded by UV/H2O2 and O3. Chlorinated compounds TCEP, TDCPP and TCIPP were the most recalcitrant OPFR to the advanced oxidation processes applied. The study provides information on the partitioning and degradability pathways of OPFR within conventional activated sludge WWTPs. PMID:26540311

  20. Responses to oxidative and heavy metal stresses in cyanobacteria: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk. PMID:25561236

  1. Responses to Oxidative and Heavy Metal Stresses in Cyanobacteria: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk. PMID:25561236

  2. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process. PMID:17438808

  3. Feasibility studies: UV/chlorine advanced oxidation treatment for the removal of emerging contaminants.

    PubMed

    Sichel, C; Garcia, C; Andre, K

    2011-12-01

    UV/chlorine (UV/HOCl and UV/ClO(2)) Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were assessed with varying process layout and compared to the state of the art UV/H(2)O(2) AOP. The process comparison focused on the economical and energy saving potential of the UV/chlorine AOP. Therefore the experiments were performed at technical scale (250 L/h continuous flow reactor) and at process energies, oxidant and model contaminant concentrations expected in full scale reference plants. As model compounds the emerging contaminants (ECs): desethylatrazine, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, diclofenac, benzotriazole, tolyltriazole, iopamidole and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were degraded at initial compound concentrations of 1 μg/L in tap water and matrixes with increased organic load (46 mg/L DOC). UV/chlorine AOP organic by-product forming potential was assessed for trihalomethanes (THMs) and N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). A process design was evaluated which can considerably reduce process costs, energy consumption and by-product generation from UV/HOCl AOPs. PMID:22000058

  4. Inactivation of dinoflagellate Scripsiella trochoidea in synthetic ballast water by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhishan; Jiang, Wenju; Zhang, Yi; Lim, T M

    2015-01-01

    Ship-borne ballast water contributes significantly to the transfer of non-indigenous species across aquatic environments. To reduce the risk of bio-invasion, ballast water should be treated before discharge. In this study, the efficiencies of several conventional and advanced oxidation processes were investigated for potential ballast water treatment, using a marine dinoflagellate species, Scripsiella trochoidea, as the indicator organism. A stable and consistent culture was obtained and treated by ultraviolet (UV) light, ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and their various combinations. UV apparently inactivated the cells after only 10 s of irradiation, but subsequently photo-reactivation of the cells was observed for all methods involving UV. O3 exhibited 100% inactivation efficiency after 5 min treatment, while H2O2 only achieved maximum 80% inactivation in the same duration. Combined methods, e.g. UV/O3 and UV/H2O2, were found to inhibit photo-reactivation and improve treatment efficiency to some degree, indicating the effectiveness of using combined treatment processes. The total residual oxidant (TRO) levels of the methods were determined, and the results indicated that UV and O3 generated the lowest and highest TRO, respectively. The synergic effect of combined processes on TRO generation was found to be insignificant, and thus UV/O3 was recommended as a potentially suitable treatment process for ballast water. PMID:25182606

  5. Application of several advanced oxidation processes for the destruction of terephthalic acid (TPA).

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatachari, Ramesh; Kwon, Tae Ouk; Jun, Jung Chul; Balaji, Subramanian; Matheswaran, Manickam; Moon, Il Shik

    2007-04-01

    Terephthalic acid (TPA) is widely applied as a raw material in making polyester fiber, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, polyester films, etc. TPA is toxic and is known to act as endocrine disruptor. TPA wastewater is traditionally treated by biological process and this study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of several advanced oxidation processes on TPA removal. The oxidation processes studied were: UV-TiO(2), UV-H(2)O(2), UV-H(2)O(2)-Fe, O(3), O(3)/Fe, O(3)/TiO(2), UV-O(3)-H(2)O(2)-Fe and UV-O(3)-H(2)O(2)-Fe-TiO(2). The results indicate that the time required for the complete destruction of 50 ppm of TPA can be minimized from 10h using UV-TiO(2) system, to less than 10 min by UV-H(2)O(2)-Fe-O(3) system. Some of the likely organic intermediates identified during TPA destruction include, benzoquinone, benzene, maleic acid and oxalic acid. Possible destruction pathway of TPA has been proposed. TPA degradation by various systems was also analyzed based on the reaction kinetics and operating costs. PMID:17023113

  6. Unexpected toxicity to aquatic organisms of some aqueous bisphenol A samples treated by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tišler, Tatjana; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Şenilă, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, photocatalytic and catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) processes were used to examine removal efficiency of bisphenol A from aqueous samples over several titanate nanotube-based catalysts. Unexpected toxicity of bisphenol A (BPA) samples treated by means of the CWAO process to some tested species was determined. In addition, the CWAO effluent was recycled five- or 10-fold in order to increase the number of interactions between the liquid phase and catalyst. Consequently, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis indicated higher concentrations of some toxic metals like chromium, nickel, molybdenum, silver, and zinc in the recycled samples in comparison to both the single-pass sample and the photocatalytically treated solution. The highest toxicity of five- and 10-fold recycled solutions in the CWAO process was observed in water fleas, which could be correlated to high concentrations of chromium, nickel, and silver detected in tested samples. The obtained results clearly demonstrated that aqueous samples treated by means of advanced oxidation processes should always be analyzed using (i) chemical analyses to assess removal of BPA and total organic carbon from treated aqueous samples, as well as (ii) a battery of aquatic organisms from different taxonomic groups to determine possible toxicity. PMID:26114268

  7. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Tsydenova, Oyuna; Batoev, Valeriy; Batoeva, Agniya

    2015-01-01

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fenton. Complex water matrices with high loads of pathogens and chemical pollutants negatively affect the efficiency of disinfection and pollutant removal. This is due to competition between chemical substances and pathogens for generated ROS. Other possible negative effects include light screening, competitive photon absorption, adsorption on the catalyst surface (thereby inhibiting its photocatalytic activity), etc. Besides, some matrix components may serve as nutrients for pathogens, thus hindering the disinfection process. Each type of water/wastewater would require a tailor-made approach and the variables that were shown to influence the processes—catalyst/oxidant concentrations, incident radiation flux, and pH—need to be adjusted in order to achieve the required degree of pollutant and pathogen removal. Overall, the solar-enhanced AOPs hold promise as an environmentally-friendly way to substitute or supplement conventional water/wastewater treatment, particularly in areas without access to centralized drinking water or sewage/wastewater treatment facilities. PMID:26287222

  8. Comparison of various advanced oxidation processes for the degradation of phenylurea herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Krisztina; Farkas, János; Veréb, Gábor; Arany, Eszter; Simon, Gergő; Schrantz, Krisztina; Dombi, András; Hernádi, Klára; Alapi, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    Various types of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as UV photolysis, ozonation, heterogeneous photocatalysis and their combinations were comparatively examined at the same energy input in a home-made reactor. The oxidative transformations of the phenylurea herbicides fenuron, monuron and diuron were investigated. The initial rates of transformation demonstrated that UV photolysis was highly efficient in the cases of diuron and monuron. Ozonation proved to be much more effective in the transformation of fenuron than in those of the chlorine containing monuron and diuron. In heterogeneous photocatalysis, the rate of decomposition decreased with increase of the number of chlorine atoms in the target molecule. Addition of ozone to UV-irradiated solutions and/or TiO2-containing suspensions markedly increased the initial rates of degradation. Dehalogenation of monuron and diuron showed that each of these procedures is suitable for the simultaneous removal of chlorinated pesticides and their chlorinated intermediates. Heterogeneous photocatalysis was found to be effective in the mineralization. PMID:26764571

  9. Bioassays as a tool for evaluating advanced oxidation processes in water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Luigi

    2011-10-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been widely used in water and wastewater treatment for the removal of organic and inorganic contaminants as well as to improve biodegradability of industrial wastewater. Unfortunately, the partial oxidation of organic contaminants may result in the formation of intermediates more toxic than parent compounds. In order to avoid this drawback, AOPs are expected to be carefully operated and monitored, and toxicity tests have been used to evaluate whether effluent detoxification takes place. In the present work, the effect of AOPs on the toxicity of aqueous solutions of different classes of contaminants as well as actual aqueous matrices are critically reviewed. The dualism toxicity-biodegradability when AOPs are used as pre-treatment step to improve industrial wastewater biodegradability is also discussed. The main conclusions/remarks include the followings: (i) bioassays are a really useful tool to evaluate the dangerousness of AOPs as well as to set up the proper operative conditions, (ii) target organisms for bioassays should be chosen according to the final use of the treated water matrix, (iii) acute toxicity tests may be not suitable to evaluate toxicity in the presence of low/realistic concentrations of target contaminants, so studies on chronic effects should be further developed, (iv) some toxicity tests may be not useful to evaluate biodegradability potential, in this case more suitable tests should be applied (e.g., activated sludge bioassays, respirometry). PMID:21722938

  10. Chemical and toxicological evaluation of transformation products during advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    vom Eyser, C; Börgers, A; Richard, J; Dopp, E; Janzen, N; Bester, K; Tuerk, J

    2013-01-01

    The entry of pharmaceuticals into the water cycle from sewage treatment plants is of growing concern because environmental effects are evident at trace levels. Ozonation, UV- and UV/H(2)O(2)-treatment were tested as an additional step in waste water treatment because they have been proven to be effective in eliminating aqueous organic contaminants. The pharmaceuticals carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, diclofenac, metoprolol and sulfamethoxazole as well as the personal care products galaxolide and tonalide were investigated in terms of degradation efficiency and by-product formation in consideration of toxic effects. The substances were largely removed from treatment plant effluent by ozonation, UV- and UV/H(2)O(2)-treatment. Transformation products were detected in all tested treatment processes. Accompanying analysis showed no genotoxic, cytotoxic or estrogenic potential for the investigated compounds after oxidative treatment of real waste waters. The results indicate that by-product formation from ozonation and advanced oxidation processes does not have any negative environmental impact. PMID:24225097

  11. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y Q; Liu, X Y; Yang, G W

    2016-03-01

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec(-1), while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts. PMID:26864279

  12. Advanced oxidation degradation kinetics as a function of ultraviolet LED duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Kelsey; Spencer, Michael; Bates, Christopher; Miller, Michael E; Almquist, Catherine; Grimaila, Michael; Magnuson, Matthew; Willison, Stuart; Phillips, Rebecca; Racz, LeeAnn

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) may be a viable option as a UV light source for advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) utilizing photocatalysts or oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide. The effect of UV-LED duty cycle, expressed as the percentage of time the LED is powered, was investigated in an AOP with hydrogen peroxide, using methylene blue (MB) to assess contaminant degradation. The UV-LED AOP degraded the MB at all duty cycles. However, adsorption of MB onto the LED emitting surface caused a linear decline in reactor performance over time. With regard to the effect of duty cycle, the observed rate constant of MB degradation, after being adjusted to account for the duty cycle, was greater for 5 and 10% duty cycles than higher duty cycles, providing a value approximately 160% higher at 5% duty cycle than continuous operation. This increase in adjusted rate constant at low duty cycles, as well as contaminant fouling of the LED surface, may impact design and operational considerations for pulsed UV-LED AOP systems. PMID:25945855

  13. Combination of Advanced Oxidation Processes and biological treatments for wastewater decontamination--a review.

    PubMed

    Oller, I; Malato, S; Sánchez-Pérez, J A

    2011-09-15

    Nowadays there is a continuously increasing worldwide concern for development of alternative water reuse technologies, mainly focused on agriculture and industry. In this context, Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) are considered a highly competitive water treatment technology for the removal of those organic pollutants not treatable by conventional techniques due to their high chemical stability and/or low biodegradability. Although chemical oxidation for complete mineralization is usually expensive, its combination with a biological treatment is widely reported to reduce operating costs. This paper reviews recent research combining AOPs (as a pre-treatment or post-treatment stage) and bioremediation technologies for the decontamination of a wide range of synthetic and real industrial wastewater. Special emphasis is also placed on recent studies and large-scale combination schemes developed in Mediterranean countries for non-biodegradable wastewater treatment and reuse. The main conclusions arrived at from the overall assessment of the literature are that more work needs to be done on degradation kinetics and reactor modeling of the combined process, and also dynamics of the initial attack on primary contaminants and intermediate species generation. Furthermore, better economic models must be developed to estimate how the cost of this combined process varies with specific industrial wastewater characteristics, the overall decontamination efficiency and the relative cost of the AOP versus biological treatment. PMID:20956012

  14. Recent Advances in Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular Imaging and Targeted Therapy Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Xuan, Shouhu; Port, Marc; Idee, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Advances of nanotechnology have led to the development of nanomaterials with both potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Among them, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have received particular attention. Over the past decade, various SPIOs with unique physicochemical and biological properties have been designed by modifying the particle structure, size and coating. This article reviews the recent advances in preparing SPIOs with novel properties, the way these physicochemical properties of SPIOs influence their interaction with cells, and the development of SPIOs in liver and lymph nodes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. Cellular uptake of SPIO can be exploited in a variety of potential clinical applications, including stem cell and inflammation cell tracking and intra-cellular drug delivery to cancerous cells which offers higher intra-cellular concentration. When SPIOs are used as carrier vehicle, additional advantages can be achieved including magnetic targeting and hyperthermia options, as well as monitoring with MRI. Other potential applications of SPIO include magnetofection and gene delivery, targeted retention of labeled stem cells, sentinel lymph nodes mapping, and magnetic force targeting and cell orientation for tissue engineering. PMID:23621536

  15. Development of Nonalcoholic Hepatopathy: Contributions of Oxidative Stress and Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana Célia de F.; Valentim, Iara B.; de Araújo, Orlando R. P.; Ataide, Terezinha da R.; Goulart, Marília O. F.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are generated spontaneously in cells; however, under conditions of hyperglycemia and lipid peroxidation, their levels are higher than usual, which contribute to the development of diseases such as the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is associated with oxidative stress (OS), which is linked to the transition of steatosis to steatohepatitis due to lipid peroxidation. The AGE-receptor interaction in hepatic stellate cells leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species and enhances the proliferation and activation of these cells, worsening liver fibrosis and disease progression. In this vicious cycle, there is production of (carboxymethyl)lysine, a biomarker for products of advanced glycation and lipid peroxidation, being a shared component between the two pathways. In this review, we aim to compile evidence to support the basic molecular mechanisms of AGEs and OS generation and their influence, independently or combined, on the evolution of NAFLD. The deeper understanding of the interrelations of AGEs + OS may help to elucidate the pathogenic pathways of NAFLD and to devise rational therapeutic interventions for this disease, with an expected positive impact on quality of life of patients. PMID:24084729

  16. Manufacture and engine test of advanced oxide dispersion strengthened alloy turbine vanes. [for space shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide-Dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-Cr-Al alloy systems were exploited for turbine engine vanes which would be used for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Available commercial and developmental advanced ODS alloys were evaluated, and three were selected based on established vane property goals and manufacturing criteria. The selected alloys were evaluated in an engine test. Candidate alloys were screened by strength, thermal fatigue resistance, oxidation and sulfidation resistance. The Ni-16Cr (3 to 5)Al-ThO2 system was identified as having attractive high temperature oxidation resistance. Subsequent work also indicated exceptional sulfidation resistance for these alloys.

  17. Fluctuations in Ammonia Oxidizing Communities Across Agricultural Soils are Driven by Soil Structure and pH

    PubMed Central

    Pereira e Silva, Michele C.; Poly, Franck; Guillaumaud, Nadine; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2012-01-01

    The milieu in soil in which microorganisms dwell is never constant. Conditions such as temperature, water availability, pH and nutrients frequently change, impacting the overall functioning of the soil system. To understand the effects of such factors on soil functioning, proxies (indicators) of soil function are needed that, in a sensitive manner, reveal normal amplitude of variation. Thus, the so-called normal operating range (NOR) of soil can be defined. In this study we determined different components of nitrification by analyzing, in eight agricultural soils, how the community structures and sizes of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively), and their activity, fluctuate over spatial and temporal scales. The results indicated that soil pH and soil type are the main factors that influence the size and structure of the AOA and AOB, as well as their function. The nitrification rates varied between 0.11 ± 0.03 μgN h−1 gdw−1 and 1.68 ± 0.11 μgN h−1 gdw−1, being higher in soils with higher clay content (1.09 ± 0.12 μgN h−1 gdw−1) and lower in soils with lower clay percentages (0.27 ± 0.04 μgN h−1 gdw−1). Nitrifying activity was driven by soil pH, mostly related to its effect on AOA but not on AOB abundance. Regarding the influence of soil parameters, clay content was the main soil factor shaping the structure of both the AOA and AOB communities. Overall, the potential nitrifying activities were higher and more variable over time in the clayey than in the sandy soils. Whereas the structure of AOB fluctuated more (62.7 ± 2.10%) the structure of AOA communities showed lower amplitude of variation (53.65 ± 3.37%). Similar trends were observed for the sizes of these communities. The present work represents a first step toward defining a NOR for soil nitrification. The sensitivity of the process and organisms to impacts from the milieu support their use as proxies in the

  18. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOPS) FOR DESTRUCTION OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE -AN UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT) IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) provide a promising treatment option for the destruction of MTBE directly in surface and ground waters. An ongoing study is evaluating the ability of three AOPs; hydrogen peroxide/ozone (H2O2/ O3), ultraviolet irradiation/ozone (UV/O3) and ultr...

  19. Effect Of Inorganic, Synthetic And Naturally Occurring Chelating Agents On Fe(II) Mediated Advanced Oxidation Of Chlorophenols

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the feasibility and application of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs) for the treatment of chlorophenols that are included in US EPA priority pollutant list. A novel class of sulfate/hydroxyl radical-based homogeneous AOTs (Fe(II)/PS, Fe(II)/PMS, Fe(II)/H...

  20. Mission-Driven Expected Impact: Assessing Scholarly Output for 2013 Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulet, Laurel R.; Lopes, Kevin J.; White, John Bryan

    2016-01-01

    As of the 2016-2017 academic year, all schools undergoing Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business accreditation will be assessed on the new standards that were ratified in 2013, which include the assessment of the impact of portfolios of intellectual contributions. The authors discuss key ideas underlying a business school's research…

  1. Optimization of stabilized leachate treatment using ozone/persulfate in the advanced oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Amr, Salem S.; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Ozone and persulfate reagent (O{sub 3}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) was used to treat stabilized leachate. ► Central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied. ► Operating variables including ozone and persulfate dosage, pH variance, and reaction time. ► Optimum removal of COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N was 72%, 96%, and 76%, respectively. ► A good value of ozone consumption (OC) obtained with 0.60 (kg O{sub 3}/kg COD). - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of employing persulfate reagent in the advanced oxidation of ozone to treat stabilized landfill leachate in an ozone reactor. A central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate the relationships between operating variables, such as ozone and persulfate dosages, pH, and reaction time, to identify the optimum operating conditions. Quadratic models for the following four responses proved to be significant with very low probabilities (<0.0001): COD, color, NH{sub 3}–N, and ozone consumption (OC). The obtained optimum conditions included a reaction time of 210 min, 30 g/m{sup 3} ozone, 1 g/1 g COD{sub 0}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} ratio, and pH 10. The experimental results were corresponded well with predicted models (COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N removal rates of 72%, 96%, and 76%, respectively, and 0.60 (kg O{sub 3}/kg COD OC). The results obtained in the stabilized leachate treatment were compared with those from other treatment processes, such as ozone only and persulfate S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} only, to evaluate its effectiveness. The combined method (i.e., O{sub 3}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N compared with other studied applications. Furthermore, the new method is more efficient than ozone/Fenton in advanced oxidation process in the treatment of the same studied leachate.

  2. Applicability of fluidized bed reactor in recalcitrant compound degradation through advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Tisa, Farhana; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-12-15

    Treatment of industrial waste water (e.g. textile waste water, phenol waste water, pharmaceutical etc) faces limitation in conventional treatment procedures. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) do not suffer from the limits of conventional treatment processes and consequently degrade toxic pollutants more efficiently. Complexity is faced in eradicating the restrictions of AOPs such as sludge formation, toxic intermediates formation and high requirement for oxidants. Increased mass-transfer in AOPs is an alternate solution to this problem. AOPs combined with Fluidized bed reactor (FBR) can be a potential choice compared to fixed bed or moving bed reactor, as AOP catalysts life-span last for only maximum of 5-10 cycles. Hence, FBR-AOPs require lesser operational and maintenance cost by reducing material resources. The time required for AOP can be minimized using FBR and also treatable working volume can be increased. FBR-AOP can process from 1 to 10 L of volume which is 10 times more than simple batch reaction. The mass transfer is higher thus the reaction time is lesser. For having increased mass transfer sludge production can be successfully avoided. The review study suggests that, optimum particle size, catalyst to reactor volume ratio, catalyst diameter and liquid or gas velocity is required for efficient FBR-AOP systems. However, FBR-AOPs are still under lab-scale investigation and for industrial application cost study is needed. Cost of FBR-AOPs highly depends on energy density needed and the mechanism of degradation of the pollutant. The cost of waste water treatment containing azo dyes was found to be US$ 50 to US$ 500 per 1000 gallons where, the cost for treating phenol water was US$ 50 to US$ 800 per 1000 gallons. The analysis for FBR-AOP costs has been found to depend on the targeted pollutant, degradation mechanism (zero order, 1st order and 2nd order) and energy consumptions by the AOPs. PMID:25190594

  3. Advanced Glycation End Products and Oxidative Stress in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nowotny, Kerstin; Jung, Tobias; Höhn, Annika; Weber, Daniela; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a very complex and multifactorial metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance and β cell failure leading to elevated blood glucose levels. Hyperglycemia is suggested to be the main cause of diabetic complications, which not only decrease life quality and expectancy, but are also becoming a problem regarding the financial burden for health care systems. Therefore, and to counteract the continually increasing prevalence of diabetes, understanding the pathogenesis, the main risk factors, and the underlying molecular mechanisms may establish a basis for prevention and therapy. In this regard, research was performed revealing further evidence that oxidative stress has an important role in hyperglycemia-induced tissue injury as well as in early events relevant for the development of T2DM. The formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), a group of modified proteins and/or lipids with damaging potential, is one contributing factor. On the one hand it has been reported that AGEs increase reactive oxygen species formation and impair antioxidant systems, on the other hand the formation of some AGEs is induced per se under oxidative conditions. Thus, AGEs contribute at least partly to chronic stress conditions in diabetes. As AGEs are not only formed endogenously, but also derive from exogenous sources, i.e., food, they have been assumed as risk factors for T2DM. However, the role of AGEs in the pathogenesis of T2DM and diabetic complications—if they are causal or simply an effect—is only partly understood. This review will highlight the involvement of AGEs in the development and progression of T2DM and their role in diabetic complications. PMID:25786107

  4. Expression of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Oligodendrocytes in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jingdong; Goswami, Rajendra; Dawson, Sylvia; Dawson, Glyn

    2008-01-01

    Demyelination is a common result of oxidative stress in the nervous system, and we report here that the response of oligodendrocytes to oxidative stress involves the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). RAGE has not previously been reported in neonatal rat oligodendrocytes (NRO), but, by using primers specific for rat RAGE, we were able to show expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for RAGE in NRO, and a 55-kDa protein was detected by Western blotting with antibodies to RAGE. Neonatal rat oligodendrocytes stained strongly for RAGE, suggesting membrane localization of RAGE. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (100 μM) initiated 55-kDa RAGE shedding from the cell membrane and the appearance of “soluble” 45-kDa RAGE in the culture medium, followed by restoration of RAGE expression to normal levels. Increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration (>200 μM) resulted in no restoration of RAGE, and the cells underwent apoptosis and necrosis. We further confirmed the observation in a human oligodendroglioma-derived (HOG) cell line. Both the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and the broad-spectrum metalloproteases inhibitor TAPI0 were able partially to inhibit shedding of RAGE, suggesting involvement of metalloproteases in cleavage to produce soluble RAGE. The level of 55-kDa RAGE in autopsy brain of patients undergoing neurodegeneration with accompanying inflammation [multiple sclerosis and neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (Batten's disease)] was much lower than that in age-matched controls, suggesting that shedding of RAGE might occur as reactive oxygen species accumulate in brain cells and be part of the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:18438937

  5. [Effects of organic pollutants in drinking water on the removal of dimethyl phthalate by advanced oxidation processes].

    PubMed

    Rui, Min; Gao, Nai-yun; Xu, Bin; Li, Fu-sheng; Zhao, Jian-fu; Le, Lin-sheng

    2006-12-01

    Humic acids were used to simulate natural organic compounds in water for the investigation of DMP oxidation by three different AOPs (advanced oxidation processes) of UV-H2O2, O3 and UV-O3. The results showed that pseudo-first-order reaction equation could describe the oxidation of DMP by UV-H2O2 perfectly, which was strongly affected humic acids in water. The relationship between pseudo-first-order reaction rate and TOC value could be expressed as K = 0. 162 0 [TOC]-0.8171. It was also found that humic acids in the water exhibited obvious influence on the oxidation of DMP by UV-O3. However, effect of humic acids on the oxidation of DMP by ozone was not obvious. It was also analyzed that oxidation of DMP was dominated by ozone oxidation both in ozonation process and UV-O3 process; the importance of "OH in the oxidation of DMP was enhanced as the concentration of DMP decreased in UV-O3 process. The degree of impact form humic acids towards different AOPs could be ranked in a decreasing order as UV-H2O3, UV-O3, 03. PMID:17304847

  6. UVA Light-excited Kynurenines Oxidize Ascorbate and Modify Lens Proteins through the Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Fan, Xingjun; Monnier, Vincent M.; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to lens protein pigmentation and cross-linking during aging and cataract formation. In vitro experiments have shown that ascorbate (ASC) oxidation products can form AGEs in proteins. However, the mechanisms of ASC oxidation and AGE formation in the human lens are poorly understood. Kynurenines are tryptophan oxidation products produced from the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-mediated kynurenine pathway and are present in the human lens. This study investigated the ability of UVA light-excited kynurenines to photooxidize ASC and to form AGEs in lens proteins. UVA light-excited kynurenines in both free and protein-bound forms rapidly oxidized ASC, and such oxidation occurred even in the absence of oxygen. High levels of GSH inhibited but did not completely block ASC oxidation. Upon UVA irradiation, pigmented proteins from human cataractous lenses also oxidized ASC. When exposed to UVA light (320–400 nm, 100 milliwatts/cm2, 45 min to 2 h), young human lenses (20–36 years), which contain high levels of free kynurenines, lost a significant portion of their ASC content and accumulated AGEs. A similar formation of AGEs was observed in UVA-irradiated lenses from human IDO/human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter-2 mice, which contain high levels of kynurenines and ASC. Our data suggest that kynurenine-mediated ASC oxidation followed by AGE formation may be an important mechanism for lens aging and the development of senile cataracts in humans. PMID:24798334

  7. Magnetic transitions driven by temperature in surface oxidized Co{sub 0.10}Ni{sub 0.90}/Cu(001) ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Ying-Ta; Shen, Wen-He; Lee, Kuo-Long; Pan, Wei

    2014-01-15

    The magnetization of Co{sub 0.10}Ni{sub 0.90}/Cu(001) films before and after surface oxidization at 300 K is presented. Before the oxidization, the magnetization of the films in the thickness of 11 to 20 monolayers (ML) is in the in-plane direction at the temperature ranging from 140 K to 300 K. After the oxidization, the magnetizations of the films are in the in-plane direction at the temperature above 200 K, but transit to magnetization demolishment, in-plane-and-out-of-plane co-existence, spin reorientation transition, and coercivity enhancement, for films of 11, 12, 13, and above 15 ML, respectively. The blocking temperature of this film is also 200 K, which implies the transitions might be driven by the ordering of the antiferromagnetic surface oxides. The various magnetizations provide a model system for manipulating the magnetization direction, as well as a spin valve device by combination of the oxidized films.

  8. Development of nanomaterial-enabled advanced oxidation techniques for treatment of organic micropollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulton, Rebekah Lynn

    Increasing demand for limited fresh water resources necessitates that alternative water sources be developed. Nonpotable reuse of treated wastewater represents one such alternative. However, the ubiquitous presence of organic micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in wastewater effluents limits use of this resource. Numerous investigations have examined PPCP fate during wastewater treatment, focusing on their removal during conventional and advanced treatment processes. Analysis of influent and effluent data from published studies reveals that at best 1-log10 concentration unit of PPCP removal can generally be achieved with conventional treatment. In contrast, plants employing advanced treatment methods, particularly ozonation and/or membranes, remove most PPCPs often to levels below analytical detection limits. However, membrane treatment is cost prohibitive for many facilities, and ozone treatment can be very selective. Ozone-recalcitrant compounds require the use of Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs), which utilize highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (*OH) to target resistant pollutants. Due to cost and energy use concerns associated with current AOPs, alternatives such as catalytic ozonation are under investigation. Catalytic ozonation uses substrates such as activated carbon to promote *OH formation during ozonation. Here, we show that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) represent another viable substrate, promoting *OH formation during ozonation to levels exceeding activated carbon and equivalent to conventional ozone-based AOPs. Via a series of batch reactions, we observ a strong correlation between *OH formation and MWCNT surface oxygen concentrations. Results suggest that deprotonated carboxyl groups on the CNT surface are integral to their reactivity toward ozone and corresponding *OH formation. From a practical standpoint, we show that industrial grade MWCNTs exhibit similar *OH production as their research

  9. High Temperature Oxidation of Silicon Carbide and Advanced Iron-Based Alloys in Steam-Hydrogen Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Keiser, James R; Brady, Michael P; Cheng, Ting; Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Pint, Bruce A; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    A side by side comparison of the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloys with SiC materials and advanced iron-based alloys is provided. Oxidation tests were conducted in steam and steam-hydrogen environments at 800-1350 C and 0.34-2MPa for durations up to 48 hours. Monolithic SiC specimens as well as SiC/SiC composites were examined during the study where the material recession mechanism appeared to be governed by silica layer volatilization at the surface for CVD SiC. A wide set of austenitic and ferritic steels were also examined where a critical Cr content (>20 wt.%) was shown to be necessary to achieve oxidation resistance at high temperatures. SiC materials and alumina-forming ferritic steels exhibited slowest oxidation kinetics; roughly two orders of magnitude lower than zirconium alloys.

  10. Short-Term Oxidation Studies on Nicrofer- 6025HT in Air at Elevated Temperatures for Advanced Coal Based Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Meier, Alan; Darsell, Jens T.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Bowden, Mark E.; Weil, K. Scott

    2013-04-01

    Several advanced air separation unit (ASU) designs being considered for use in coal gasification rely on the use of solid state mixed ionic and electronic conductors. Nicrofer-6025HT, a nickel-based alloy, has been identified as a potential manifold material to transport the hot gases into the ASUs. In the current study, isothermal oxidation tests were conducted on Nicrofer-6025HT in the temperature range of 700–900 °C for up to 24 h. The evolution of oxide scale was evaluated using SEM, XRD, and XPS. The composite surface oxide layer that formed consisted of an outer chromia-rich scale and an inner alumina scale. For the longer times at the higher temperatures evaluated, a NiCr2O4 spinel phase was located at the interface between the alumina and chromia. Based on the experimental results a four-step oxidation model was proposed.

  11. Simulation for supporting scale-up of a fluidized bed reactor for advanced water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tisa, Farhana; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40-90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment. PMID:25309949

  12. Response surface methodology for ozonation of trifluralin using advanced oxidation processes in an airlift photoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behin, J.; Farhadian, N.

    2016-06-01

    Degradation of trifluralin, as a wide used pesticide, was investigated by advance oxidation process comprising O3/UV/H2O2 in a concentric tube airlift photoreactor. Main and interactive effects of three independent factors including pH (5-9), superficial gas velocity (0.05-0.15 cm/s) and time (20-60 min) on the removal efficiency were assessed using central composite face-centered design and response surface method (RSM). The RSM allows to solve multivariable equations and to estimate simultaneously the relative importance of several contributing parameters even in the presence of complex interaction. Airlift photoreactor imposed a synergistic effect combining good mixing intensity merit with high ozone transfer rate. Mixing in the airlift photoreactor enhanced the UV light usage efficiency and its availability. Complete degradation of trifluralin was achieved under optimum conditions of pH 9 and superficial gas velocity 0.15 cm/s after 60 min of reaction time. Under these conditions, degradation of trifluralin was performed in a bubble column photoreactor of similar volume and a lower efficiency was observed.

  13. Formation of disinfection by-products in the ultraviolet/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-06-15

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation may be a concern when applying ultraviolet light and free chlorine (UV/chlorine) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for drinking water treatment, due to typically large chlorine doses (e.g. 5-10 mg L(-1) as free chlorine). A potential mitigating factor is the low chlorine contact times for this AOP treatment (e.g. seconds). Full-scale and pilot-scale test results showed minimal trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation during UV/chlorine treatment, while dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) were produced rapidly. Adsorbable organic halide (AOX) formation was significant when applying the UV/chlorine process in water that had not been previously chlorinated, while little additional formation was observed in prechlorinated water. Chlorine photolysis led to chlorate and bromate formation, equivalent to approximately 2-17% and 0.01-0.05% of the photolyzed chlorine, respectively. No perchlorate or chlorite formation was observed. During simulated secondary disinfection of AOP-treated water, DBP formation potential for THMs, HAAs, HANs, and AOX was observed to increase approximately to the same extent as was observed for pretreatment using the more common AOP of UV combined with hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2). PMID:25747363

  14. Reaction kinetics of selected micropollutants in ozonation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    Second-order reaction rate constants of micropollutants with ozone (k(O3)) and hydroxyl radicals (k(OH)) are essential for evaluating their removal efficiencies from water during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes. Kinetic data are unavailable for many of the emerging micropollutants. Twenty-four micropollutants with very diverse structures and applications including endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products were selected, and their k(O3) and k(OH) values were determined using bench-scale reactors (at pH 7 and T = 20 °C). Reactions with molecular ozone are highly selective as indicated by their k(O3) values ranging from 10(-2)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The general trend of ozone reactivity can be explained by micropollutant structures in conjunction with the electrophilic nature of ozone reactions. All of the studied compounds are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals as shown by their high k(OH) values (10(8)-10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) even though they are structurally very diverse. For compounds with a low reactivity toward ozone, hydroxyl radical based treatment such as O(3)/H(2)O(2) or UV/H(2)O(2) is a viable alternative. This study contributed to filling the data gap pertaining kinetic data of organic micropollutants while confirming results reported in the literature where available. PMID:23079129

  15. Recent advances in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for in vitro and in vivo cancer nanotheranostics.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Ganeshlenin; Maity, Dipak

    2015-12-30

    Recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been extensively used in cancer therapy and diagnosis (theranostics) via magnetic targeting, magnetic resonance imaging, etc. due to their remarkable magnetic properties, chemical stability, and biocompatibility. However, the magnetic properties of SPIONs are influenced by various physicochemical and synthesis parameters. So, this review mainly focuses on the influence of spin canting effects, introduced by the variations in size, shape, and organic/inorganic surface coatings, on the magnetic properties of SPIONs. This review also describes the several predominant chemical synthesis procedures and role of the synthesis parameters for monitoring the size, shape, crystallinity and composition of the SPIONs. Moreover, this review discusses about the latest developments of the inorganic materials and organic polymers for encapsulation of the SPIONs. Finally, the most recent advancements of the SPIONs and their nanopackages in combination with other imaging/therapeutic agents have been comprehensively discussed for their effective usage as in vitro and in vivo theranostic agents in cancer treatments. PMID:26520409

  16. LiNiFe-based layered structure oxide and composite for advanced single layer fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bin; Fan, Liangdong; Deng, Hui; He, Yunjune; Afzal, Muhammad; Dong, Wenjing; Yaqub, Azra; Janjua, Naveed K.

    2016-06-01

    A layered structure metal oxide, LiNi0.1Fe0.90O2-δ (LNF), is explored for the advanced single layer fuel cells (SLFCs). The temperature dependent impedance profiles and concentration cells (hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and H2/air atmospheres) tests prove LNF to be an intrinsically electronic conductor in air while mixed electronic and proton conductor in H2/air environment. SLFCs constructed by pure LNF materials show significant short circuiting reflected by a low device OCV and power output (175 mW cm-2 at 500 °C) due to high intrinsic electronic conduction. The power output is improved up to 640 and 760 mW cm-2, respectively at 500 and 550 °C by compositing LNF with ion conducting material, e.g., samarium doped ceria (SDC), to balance the electronic and ionic conductivity; both reached at 0.1 S cm-1 level. Such an SLFC gives super-performance and simplicity over the conventional 3-layer (anode, electrolyte and cathode) FCs, suggesting strong scientific and commercial impacts.

  17. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe3+ and Fe2+ mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40–90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment. PMID:25309949

  18. Conventional and advanced oxidation processes used in disinfection of treated urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Chueca, J; Ormad, M P; Mosteo, R; Sarasa, J; Ovelleiro, J L

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the current study is to compare the inactivation of Escherichia coli in wastewater effluents using conventional treatments (chlorination) and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as UV irradiation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/solar irradiation, and photo-Fenton processes. In addition, an analysis of the operational costs of each treatment is carried out taking into account the optimal dosages of chemicals used. Total inactivation of bacteria (7.5 log) was achieved by means of chlorination and UV irradiation. However, bacterial regrowth was observed 6 hours after the completion of UV treatment, obtaining a disinfection value around 3 to 4 log. On the other hand, the combination H2O2/solar irradiation achieved a maximum inactivation of E. coli of 3.30 ± 0.35 log. The photo-Fenton reaction achieved a level of inactivation of 4.87 ± 0.10 log. The order of disinfection, taking into account the reagent/cost ratio of each treatment, is as follows: chlorination > UV irradiation > photo-Fenton > H2O2/sunlight irradiation. PMID:25842540

  19. Pilot-scale treatment of olive oil mill wastewater by physicochemical and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M Yalili; Yonar, T; Kestioğlu, K

    2013-01-01

    The pilot-scale treatability of olive oil mill wastewater (OOMW) by physicochemical methods, ultrafiltration and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) was investigated. Physicochemical methods (acid cracking, oil separation and coagulation-flocculation) showed high efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (85%), oil and grease (O&G) (> 97%), suspended solids (SS) (> 99%) and phenol (92%) removal from the OOMW. Ultrafiltration followed by physicochemical methods is effective in reducing the SS, O&G. The final permeate quality is found to be excellent with over 90% improvements in the COD and phenol parameters. AOPs (ozonation at a high pH, O3/UV, H2O2/UV, and O3/H2O2/UV) increased the removal efficiency and the O3/H2O2/UV combination among other AOPs studied in this paper was found to give the best results (> 99% removal for COD, > 99% removal for phenol and > 99% removal for total organic carbon). Pilot-scale treatment plant has been continuously operated on site for three years (3 months olive oil production campaign period of each year). The capital and operating costs of the applied treatment alternatives were also determined at the end of these seasons. The results obtained in this study have been patented for 7 years by the Turkish Patent Institute. PMID:24191487

  20. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  1. Visible-Light-Driven Oxidation of Primary C–H Bonds over CdS with Dual Co-catalysts Graphene and TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min-Quan; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhang, Nan; Tang, Zi-Rong; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Selective activation of primary C–H bonds for fine chemicals synthesis is of crucial importance for the sustainable exploitation of available feedstocks. Here, we report a viable strategy to synthesize ternary GR-CdS-TiO2 composites with an intimate spatial integration and sheet-like structure, which is afforded by assembling two co-catalysts, graphene and TiO2, into the semiconductor CdS matrix with specific morphology as a visible light harvester. The GR-CdS-TiO2 composites are able to serve as a highly selective visible-light-driven photocatalyst for oxidation of saturated primary C–H bonds using benign oxygen as oxidant under ambient conditions. This work demonstrates a wide, promising scope of adopting co-catalyst strategy to design more efficient semiconductor-based photocatalyst toward selective activation of C–H bonds using solar light and molecular oxygen. PMID:24264835

  2. Combined advanced oxidation and biodegradation of industrial effluents from the production of stilbene-based fluorescent whitening agents.

    PubMed

    Hörsch, Philip; Speck, Andreas; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2003-06-01

    Three different industrial wastewaters from the production of stilbene-based fluorescent whitening agents were investigated with regard to the applicability of advanced oxidation processes combined with biodegradation. Oxidation processes included the application of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, UV-radiation and Fenton's reagent (Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)). Characterization of the combined chemical-biological treatment was done by sum parameters and HPLC analysis. In addition, toxicity was determined using the luminescence inhibition test. Results showed that processes producing OH-radicals without the need of UV-irradiation proved to be suited for the oxidation of all three wastewaters. H(2)O(2)/UV processes were ineffective due to the high inner filter effect of the effluents. Comparing the combined oxidative-biological process with biological treatment, the applied pre-oxidation steps did not always lead to a significant improvement of the biological degradation. In one case, an inverted treatment starting with biodegradation followed by oxidation turned out to be the preferable procedure. After oxidation with ozone or ozone combined with UV-irradiation, an increase in toxicity was partly observed indicating the formation of toxic intermediate products. In some cases samples had to be diluted before the biodegradation step to achieve a better biodegradability. PMID:12753853

  3. A Ru-Co hybrid material based on a molecular photosensitizer and a heterogeneous catalyst for light-driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Jiefang; Styring, Stenbjörn; Ott, Sascha; Thapper, Anders

    2014-02-28

    A novel approach to anchor a molecular photosensitizer onto a heterogeneous water oxidation catalyst via coordination bonds is presented. A photosensitizer (1) based on [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and decorated with two methylenediphosphonate (M2P) groups has been designed and synthesized for this purpose. The M2P groups in complex 1 allow for coordination of cobalt ions to afford a novel molecular-heterogeneous hybrid material P1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize P1 as an amorphous, non-uniform material that contains Ru and Co in a ratio of 1 : 2. A suspension of P1 in a buffered aqueous solution is active as a light-driven water oxidation catalyst in the presence of persulfate (S2O8(2-)) as electron acceptor. The yield of oxygen is higher when P1 is prepared in situ by mixing and illuminating 1 and Co(2+) in the presence of S2O8(2-). After oxygen evolution ceases, a second material P2 can be isolated from the reaction mixture. P2 is characterized by a lower Ru content than P1, and contains Co in a higher oxidation state. Interestingly, P2 as a freshly prepared suspension is also active for light-driven water oxidation. It is shown that 1 resides in the interior of P1 and P2, and is thus in a location where undesirable quenching pathways of the photo-excited state of 1 limit the oxygen production yields for both P1 and P2. PMID:24419175

  4. Computerized pathway elucidation for hydroxyl radical-induced chain reaction mechanisms in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Crittenden, John

    2009-04-15

    The radical reaction mechanism that is involved in advanced oxidation processes is complex. An increasing number of trace contaminants and stringent drinking water standards call for a rule-based model to provide insight to the mechanism of the processes. A model was developed to predict the pathway of contaminant degradation and byproduct formation during advanced oxidation. The model builds chemical molecules as graph objects, which enables mathematic abstraction of chemicals and preserves chemistry information. The model algorithm enumerates all possible reaction pathways according to the elementary reactions (built as reaction rules) established from experimental observation. The method can predict minor pathways that could lead to toxic byproducts so that measures can be taken to ensure drinking water treatment safety. The method can be of great assistance to water treatment engineers and chemists who appreciate the mechanism of treatment processes. PMID:19475958

  5. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  6. Advanced oxidative protein products induced human keratinocyte apoptosis through the NOX-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baihui; Ding, Ruoting; Yu, Wenlin; Wu, Yanhong; Wang, Bulin; Li, Qin

    2016-07-01

    Impaired wound healing is a major diabetes-related complication. Keratinocytes play an important role in wound healing. Multiple factors have been proposed that can induce dysfunction in keratinocytes. The focus of present research is at a more specific molecular level. We investigated the role of advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs) in inducing human immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell apoptosis and the cellular mechanism underlying the proapoptotic effect of AOPPs. HaCaT cells were treated with increasing concentrations of AOPP-human serum albumin or for increasing time durations. The cell viability was measured using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide method, and flow cytometry was used to assess the rate of cell apoptosis. A loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed through a confocal laser scanning microscope system, and the level of ROS generation was determined using a microplate reader. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX)4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and apoptosis-related downstream protein interactions were investigated using the Western blot analysis. We found that AOPPs triggered HaCaT cell apoptosis and MMP loss. After AOPP treatment, intracellular ROS generation increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Proapoptotic proteins, such as Bax, caspase 9/caspase 3, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 were activated, whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein was downregulated. AOPPs also increased NOX4, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that extracellular AOPP accumulation triggered NOX-dependent ROS production, which activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, and induced HaCaT cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3 and PARP-1. PMID:27155970

  7. Aspects of decontamination of ivermectin and praziquantel from environmental waters using advanced oxidation technology.

    PubMed

    Havlíková, Lucie; Šatínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Recently performed environmental risk assessments of ivermectin demonstrated the need to complete the information regarding the fate of ivermectin in environment. There is also a lack of information concerning the fate and stability of praziquantel. The forced degradation study and photocatalytic degradation pathways in aqueous TiO2 suspensions of the two anthelmintics ivermectin and praziquantel were investigated and compared. The degradation efficiency increased for both compounds with the increase in the TiO2 concentration from 0.25 to 2.00 g L(-1), and then remained constant. The estimated k-values were from 0.36 h(-1) to 0.64 h(-1) for IVE and from 0.29 h(-1) to 0.47 h(-1) for PZQ, respectively. The degradation rate was not significantly impacted by the change of the pH value (pH 3, 5, 7, and 9) at 2.0 g L(-1) of TiO2. The photo degradation was about 90% for both compounds after 5 h of irradiation and it was significantly inhibited in the presence of iodide anion and isopropyl alcohol, which indicated, that hydroxyl radicals as well as holes contributed to the degradation of both anthelmintics. The contribution of hydroxyl radicals and holes was 92.1% for IVE and 93.2% for PZQ, respectively. Photocatalytic process of ivermectin resulted in three degradation intermediates; another two were formed during acidic and basic hydrolysis. Praziquantel underwent degradation to six degradation intermediates; four of them were formed under photocatalytic irradiation. The intermediates were identified using UHPLC-MS/MS. UV/TiO2 photolysis has been found as an effective advanced oxidation technology for the decontamination of ivermectin and praziquantel. PMID:26344145

  8. Re-engineering an artificial sweetener: transforming sucralose residuals in water via advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Linden, Karl G

    2013-07-01

    Sucralose is an artificial sweetener persistently present in wastewater treatment plant effluents and aquatic environments impacted by human activity. It has a potential to accumulate in the water cycle due to its resistance to common water and wastewater treatment processes. This study examined UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation and found that hydroxyl substitution of the chlorine atoms on the sucralose molecule can form a carbohydrate consisting of fructose and sugar alcohol, very similar to environmentally benign sucrose. The second-order reaction rate constant for loss of parent molecule via reaction with hydroxyl radical was determined to be (1.56 ± 0.03)·10(9) M(-1)s(-1). The degradation pathway involves substitution of a single chlorine by a hydroxyl group, with cyclic moiety being a preferential site for initial dechlorination. Further reaction leads to full dechlorination of the molecule, presumably via hydroxyl group substitution as well. No direct photolysis by UV wavelengths above 200 nm was observed. Because of its photostability when exposed to UV wavelengths ≥200 nm, known stability with ozone, limits of quantification by mass spectrometry close to or below environmental concentrations (<5 μg/L) without preconcentration, and otherwise stable nature, sucralose can be used as an in situ hydroxyl radical probe for UV-based and ozone-based AOP processes. As a compound safe for human consumption, sucralose makes a suitable full scale hydroxyl radical probe fit even for drinking water treatment plant applications. Its main drawback as a probe is lack of UV detection and as a result a need for mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:23410009

  9. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions. PMID:16719117

  10. Incorporating biodegradation and advanced oxidation processes in the treatment of spent metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    MacAdam, Jitka; Ozgencil, Haci; Autin, Olivier; Pidou, Marc; Temple, Clive; Parsons, Simon; Jefferson, Bruce

    2012-12-01

    The treatment of spent metalworking fluids (MWFs) is difficult due to their complex and variable composition. Small businesses often struggle to meet increasingly stringent legislation and rising costs as they need to treat this wastewater on site annually over a short period. Larger businesses that treat their wastewater continuously can benefit from the use of biological processes, although new MWFs designed to resist biological activity represent a challenge. A three-stage treatment is generally applied, with the oil phase being removed first, followed by a reduction in COD loading and then polishing of the effluent's quality in the final stage. The performance of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), which could be of benefit to both types of businesses was studied. After assessing the biodegradability of spent MFW, different AOPs were used (UV/H2O2, photo-Fenton and UV/TiO2) to establish the treatability of this wastewater by hydroxyl radicals (*OH). The interactions of both the chemical and biological treatments were also investigated. The wastewater was found to be readily biodegradable in the Zahn-Wellens test with 69% COD and 74% DOC removal. The UV/TiO2 reactor was found to be the cheapest option achieving a very good COD removal (82% at 20 min retention time and 10 L min(-1) aeration rate). The photo-Fenton process was found to be efficient in terms of degradation rate, achieving 84% COD removal (1 M Fe2+, 40 M H2O2, 20.7 J cm(-2), pH 3) and also improving the wastewater's biodegradability. The UV/H202 process was the most effective in removing recalcitrant COD in the post-biological treatment stage. PMID:23437675

  11. Transformation of polyfluorinated compounds in natural waters by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Dagnino, Sonia; Vandervort, Darcy R; Snyder, Shane A

    2016-02-01

    The presence of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in source and finished drinking waters is a concern with studies showing bioaccumulation and adverse toxicological effects in wildlife and potentially humans. Per/Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) such as fluorotelomer alcohols have been identified as precursors for PFCAs in biological pathways. In this study, we investigated the fate of 6:2 and 8:2 homologues of the fluorotelomer unsaturated carboxylic acids (FTUCAs) during advanced oxidation process (AOPs). Results showed 6:2 FTUCA and 8:2 FTUCA transformed into 6-C PFCA (PFHxA) and 8-C PFCA (PFOA) respectively with very little other PFCA formation for all AOPs. The degradation of 6:2 FTUCA and 8:2 FTUCA was greater in the GW compared to SW for the ozone processes but similar for UV/H2O2. The formation of n-C PFCA followed O3>O3/H2O2 at same dose and UV/H2O2 had much lower formation at the doses tested. Non-targeted analysis with the LC-MS-qTOF indicated the production of other PFCAs which contribute to the total mass balance, although no intermediate product was discovered indicating a rapid and direct transformation from the FTUCAs to the PFCAs and/or significant volatilization of intermediates. With the use of AOPs essential to water reuse treatment schemes, this work raises concerns over the risk of potential formation of PFCAs in the treatment and their adverse health effects in finished drinking water. PMID:26524147

  12. Comparison of different advanced oxidation process to reduce toxicity and mineralisation of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Schrank, S G; José, H J; Moreira, R F P M; Schröder, H Fr

    2004-01-01

    Many organic compounds contained in wastewater are resistant to conventional chemical and/or biological treatment. Because of this reason different degradation techniques are studied as an alternative to biological and classical physico-chemical processes. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) probably have developed to become the best options in the near future. AOP while making use of different reaction systems, are all characterised by the same chemical feature: production of OH radicals (*OH). The versatility of AOPs is also enhanced by the fact that they offer different possibilities for OH radical production, thus allowing them to conform to specific treatment requirements. The main problem with AOPs is their high cost. The application of solar technologies to these processes could help to diminish that problem by reducing the energy consumption required for generating UV radiation. In this work, different AOPs (O3, TiO2/UV, Fenton and H2O2/UV) were examined to treat tannery wastewater or as a pre-treatment step for improving the biodegradation of tannery wastewater, at different pH and dosage of the chemicals. Under certain circumstances retardation in biodegradation and/or an increase in toxicity may be observed within these treatment steps. Two different bioassays (Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri) have been used for testing the progress of toxicity during the treatment. In parallel other objectives were to analyse and identify organic compounds present in the untreated wastewater and arising degradation products in AOP treated wastewater samples. For this purpose substance specific techniques, e.g., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in positive electron impact (El(+)) mode and atmospheric pressure ionisation (API) in combination with flow injection analysis (FIA) or liquid chromatography-mass and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS or LC-MS-MS) were performed. PMID:15497865

  13. Visible-light-driven selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol and thioanisole by molecular ruthenium catalyst modified hematite.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lichen; Li, Fei; Wang, Yong; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Sun, Licheng

    2016-08-11

    Molecular ruthenium catalysts were found to selectively catalyze the oxidation of thioanisole to sulfoxide with a yield up to 100% in the presence of visible light and sacrificial reagents when they were anchored onto hematite powder. The composite photocatalysts also showed about 5 times higher efficiencies in benzyl alcohol oxidation than the system composed of dispersed molecular catalysts and hematite particles in aqueous solution. A photoelectrochemical cell based on a molecular catalyst modified hematite photoanode was further fabricated, which exhibited high activity towards the oxidation of organic substrates. PMID:27411498

  14. Use of solar advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment: Follow-up on degradation products, acute toxicity, genotoxicity and estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Brienza, M; Mahdi Ahmed, M; Escande, A; Plantard, G; Scrano, L; Chiron, S; Bufo, S A; Goetz, V

    2016-04-01

    Wastewater tertiary treatment by advanced oxidation processes is thought to produce a treated effluent with lower toxicity than the initial influent. Here we performed tertiary treatment of a secondary effluent collected from a Waste Water Treatment Plant via homogeneous (solar/HSO5(-)/Fe(2+)) and heterogeneous (solar/TiO2) solar advanced oxidation aiming at the assessment of their effectiveness in terms of contaminants' and toxicity abatement in a plain solar reactor. A total of 53 organic contaminants were qualitatively identified by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry after solid phase extraction. Solar advanced oxidation totally or partially removed the major part of contaminants detected within 4.5 h. Standard toxicity tests were performed using Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Brachionus calyciflorus organisms to evaluate acute and chronic toxicity in the secondary or tertiary effluents, and the EC50% was calculated. Estrogenic and genotoxic tests were carried out in an attempt to obtain an even sharper evaluation of potential hazardous effects due to micropollutants or their degradation by-products in wastewater. Genotoxic effects were not detected in effluent before or after treatment. However, we observed relevant estrogenic activity due to the high sensitivity of the HELN ERα cell line. PMID:26841289

  15. AMS+ALS: Kinetic and Product Studies of the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Organic Aerosol at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J. H.; Wilson, K. R.; Kessler, S. H.; Browne, E. C.; Nah, T.; Smith, J.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of condensed-phase organic species can have a major influence on the composition, properties, and impacts of organic aerosol (OA); however the rates and products of such "aging" reactions are poorly constrained. Here we describe a series of laboratory experiments aimed at better understanding one class of aging reactions, the heterogeneous oxidation of OA by gas-phase oxidants. Central to these experiments is the availability of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source at LBNL, which enables the implementation of VUV photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry. This technique allows for the real-time, speciated measurement of OA composition, yielding molecular information that is highly complementary to ensemble data from electron-impact ionization. OA composition is measured with both ionization schemes as a function of oxidant exposure within a flow reactor, providing detailed information on the kinetics and products of heterogeneous oxidation over multiple generations of oxidation. Specific topics investigated include the branching between functionalization and fragmentation of OA components, the formation of secondary organic aerosol from photolytically-generated radical species, and the heterogeneous aging of soot-associated organic species.

  16. Ammonia oxidation driven by archaea rather than bacteria in the hot spring at Tengchong geothermal field, China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Li, Jiwei; Ta, Kaiwen

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of microbial mediated ammonia oxidation and these organisms are present in large numbers in natural environments indicated a potential biogeochemical role for them in the global nitrogen cycle. However, very little is understood about their role and contribution to nitrification in the high temperature extreme environments. Here we explore the ammonia oxidation rates and abundance of potential ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in upper and bottom sediments from Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The 15N-incorporating AOA cells and cell aggregated were detected with Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (Nano-SIMS). Ammonia oxidation rates measured using 15N-NO3- pool dilution in upper and bottom sediments (without NH4+ stimulated) were 4.8 and 5.3 nmol N g-1h-1, respectively. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both of the two spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Furthermore, it should be noted that no ammonia-oxidizing bacterial clones detected in this study. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that AOA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 2.75-9.80×105 and 0.128-1.96×108 gene copies g-1 sediment. Based on the reaction rates and AOA abundance, we estimated the cell-specific nitrification rates were 0.41 to 0.79 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, which are comparable to those observed in estuary environment. We suggest that AOA have the responsibility in nitrification in this hot spring, and these archaea rather than bacteria may be considered as a driver in nitrogen cycling in terrestrial hot ecosystems. Key words: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA); nitrification; ammonia-oxidizing rate; hot spring;

  17. Free Radical Reactions in Aqueous Solutions: Examples from Advanced Oxidation Processes for Wastewater from the Chemistry in Airborne Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, N. Colin

    1997-07-01

    Inorganic chemistry involving free radicals in aqueous solutions can be important in environmental processes. A common free radical reaction in aqueous solution is electron transfer, especially to the hydroxyl radical and to ozone. Hydrogen peroxide and free radicals related to it act as weak acids, so both their neutral and deprotonated forms must be considered in reactions. In Advanced Oxidation Processes, the hydroxyl radical concentration in water is greatly increased by reactions involving ozone and/or ultraviolet light. Irradiation of solid titanium dioxide can also be used to generate the radicals. The hydroxyl radicals are used in the Processes to initiate the oxidation of dissolved organic pollutants. Free radical reactions also play an important role in the chemistry of water droplets suspended in air in clouds and fogs. The radicals arise indirectly from the photoionization of dissolved organic compounds such as aldehydes and from the iron-catalyzed decomposition of dissolved hydrogen peroxide. They oxidize dissolved sulfur dioxide and certain organic compounds.

  18. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of heterogeneous Fenton oxidation and biological process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Xu, Chunyan; Wang, Dexin

    2015-04-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were conducted in order to investigate a novel system integrating heterogeneous Fenton oxidation (HFO) with anoxic moving bed biofilm reactor (ANMBBR) and biological aerated filter (BAF) process on advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (CGW). The results indicated that HFO with the prepared catalyst (FeOx/SBAC, sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) which loaded Fe oxides) played a key role in eliminating COD and COLOR as well as in improving the biodegradability of raw wastewater. The surface reaction and hydroxyl radicals (OH) oxidation were the mechanisms for FeOx/SBAC catalytic reaction. Compared with ANMBBR-BAF process, the integrated system was more effective in abating COD, BOD5, total phenols (TPs), total nitrogen (TN) and COLOR and could shorten the retention time. Therefore, the integrated system was a promising technology for engineering applications. PMID:25724695

  19. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  20. Tracking the changing oxidation state of Erebus magmas, from mantle to surface, driven by magma ascent and degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Yves; Oppenheimer, Clive; Scaillet, Bruno; Gaillard, Fabrice; Kyle, Philip; Peters, Nial; Hartley, Margaret; Berlo, Kim; Donovan, Amy

    2014-05-01

    The conventional view holds that the oxidation state of a mantle-derived degassed magma reflects its source. During magma ascent and degassing the oxidation state is thought to follow a redox buffer. While this view has been challenged by petrological data, geochemical models and volcanic gas measurements, the fingerprints of such redox changes and their driving forces have not hitherto been captured by an integrated study. Here, we track the redox evolution of an alkaline magmatic suite at Erebus volcano, Antarctica, from the mantle to the surface, using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the iron and sulphur K-edges. We find that strong reduction of Fe and S dissolved in the melt accompanies magma ascent. Using a model of gas-melt chemical equilibria, we show that sulphur degassing is the driving force behind this evolutionary trend, which spans a wide compositional and depth range. Our results explain puzzling shifts in the oxidation state of gases emitted from Erebus volcano, and indicate that, where sulphur degassing occurs, the oxidation states of degassed volcanic rocks may not reflect their mantle source or co-eruptive gas phase. This calls for caution when inferring the oxidation state of the upper mantle from extrusive rocks and a possible re-assessment of the contribution of volcanic degassing to the early Earth's atmosphere and oceans. The relationship between magma redox conditions and pressure (depth) emphasises the value of measuring redox couples in gases emitted from volcanoes for the purposes of operational forecasting.

  1. The oxidant and laser power-dependent plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis reaction of p-aminothiophenol dimerizing into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Enzhong; Yin, Penggang; Yu, Chunna; Yu, Ge; Zhao, Chang

    2016-09-01

    Recently, plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis (PDSPC) reactions have attracted more and more attention by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) because we can in situ monitor the reaction process and determine the final products and their quantities by the real-time SERS spectrum. In this work, self-assembly AuNPs with both high catalytic activity and strong SERS effect were used as a bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of PDSPC reactions. p-Aminothiophenol (PATP), a famous model molecule, was selected as a probe molecule and FeCl3 and NaClO were selected as oxidants. In this way, oxidation reaction of PATP dimerizing into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) has been investigated by SERS, and the results show that oxidant and laser power can alter the conversion rate of the reaction. This work provides a novel approach for controlling PDSPC reaction rate, which may be useful for understanding the mechanism of PDSPC reactions. PMID:27179296

  2. The oxidant and laser power-dependent plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis reaction of p-aminothiophenol dimerizing into p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene on Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Enzhong; Yin, Penggang; Yu, Chunna; Yu, Ge; Zhao, Chang

    2016-09-01

    Recently, plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis (PDSPC) reactions have attracted more and more attention by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) because we can in situ monitor the reaction process and determine the final products and their quantities by the real-time SERS spectrum. In this work, self-assembly AuNPs with both high catalytic activity and strong SERS effect were used as a bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of PDSPC reactions. p-Aminothiophenol (PATP), a famous model molecule, was selected as a probe molecule and FeCl3 and NaClO were selected as oxidants. In this way, oxidation reaction of PATP dimerizing into p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) has been investigated by SERS, and the results show that oxidant and laser power can alter the conversion rate of the reaction. This work provides a novel approach for controlling PDSPC reaction rate, which may be useful for understanding the mechanism of PDSPC reactions.

  3. A model of nitrous oxide evolution from soil driven by rainfall events. I - Model structure and sensitivity. II - Model applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Changsheng, LI; Frolking, Steve; Frolking, Tod A.

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of N2O and CO2 emissions from soils were conducted with a rain-event driven, process-oriented model (DNDC) of nitrogen and carbon cycling processes in soils. The magnitude and trends of simulated N2O (or N2O + N2) and CO2 emissions were consistent with the results obtained in field experiments. The successful simulation of these emissions from the range of soil types examined demonstrates that the DNDC will be a useful tool for the study of linkages among climate, soil-atmosphere interactions, land use, and trace gas fluxes.

  4. Comprehensive study on effects of water matrices on removal of pharmaceuticals by three different kinds of advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, Masahiro; Sugawara, Asato; Raknuzzaman, Mohammad; Habibullah-Al-Mamun, Md; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2016-09-01

    Simple semi-theoretical models were developed to estimate the performance of three different kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in the degradation of pharmaceuticals. The AOPs included the photo-Fenton process as an example of a liquid-liquid reaction, the TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation process as a solid-liquid reaction, and the combined ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation process as a gas-liquid reaction; the effects of the aqueous matrices (CESs: co-existing substances) of actual wastewater on the removal of pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and diclofenac) was taken into account. By comparing the characteristic parameters of the models, obtained from the experiments using pure water and actual wastewater, the effects of CESs on the respective removal mechanisms could be separately and quantitatively evaluated. As a general tendency, the AOPs proceeded less effectively (were inhibited) in the matrices containing CESs, as observed with the use of a lower initial concentration of pharmaceuticals. The inhibition mechanisms differed for the three types of AOPs. In the photo-Fenton process, the Fenton reaction was improved by the incorporation of CESs, while the photo-reduction reaction was significantly inhibited. In the TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation process, competition between the pharmaceuticals and CESs for adsorption on the catalyst surface was a less significant inhibitory factor than the scavenger effects of the CESs. The combined ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation process was most strongly inhibited by CESs among the AOPs investigated in this study. PMID:27317938

  5. Degradation of a commercial textile biocide with advanced oxidation processes and ozone.

    PubMed

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of significant amounts of biocidal finishing agents in the environment as a consequence of intensive textile finishing activities has become a subject of major public health concern and scientific interest only recently. In the present study, the treatment efficiency of selected, well-known advanced oxidation processes (Fenton, Photo-Fenton, TiO(2)/UV-A, TiO(2)/UV-A/H(2)O(2)) and ozone was compared for the degradation and detoxification of a commercial textile biocide formulation containing a 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether as the active ingredient. The aqueous biocide solution was prepared to mimic typical effluent originating from the antimicrobial finishing operation (BOD(5,o) < or =5 mg/L; COD(o)=200 mg/L; DOC(o) (dissolved organic carbon)=58 mg/L; AOX(o) (adsorbable organic halogens)=48 mg/L; LC(50,o) (lethal concentration causing 50% death or immobilization in Daphnia magna)=8% v/v). Ozonation experiments were conducted at different ozone doses (500-900 mg/h) and initial pH (7-12) to assess the effect of ozonation on degradation (COD, DOC removal), dearomatization (UV(280) and UV(254) abatement), dechlorination (AOX removal) and detoxification (changes in LC(50)). For the Fenton experiments, the effect of varying ferrous iron catalyst concentrations and UV-A light irradiation (the Photo-Fenton process) was examined. In the heterogenous photocatalytic experiments, Degussa P25-type TiO(2) was used as the catalyst and the effect of reaction pH (3, 7 and 12) and H(2)O(2) addition on the photocatalytic treatment efficiency was examined. Although in the photochemical (i.e. Photo-Fenton, TiO(2)/UV-A and TiO(2)/UV-A/H(2)O(2)) experiments appreciably higher COD and DOC removal efficiencies were obtained, ozonation appeared to be equally effective to achieve dearomatization (UV(280) abatement) at all studied reaction pH. During ozonation of the textile biocide effluent, AOX abatement proceeded significantly faster than dearomatization and was

  6. Kinetics and pathways of ibuprofen degradation by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yingying; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-03-01

    The UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP), which forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as chlorine atoms (Cl) and Cl2(-), is being considered as an alternative to the UV/H2O2 AOP for the degradation of emerging contaminants. This study investigated the kinetics and pathways of the degradation of a recalcitrant pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP)-ibuprofen (IBP)-by the UV/chlorine AOP. The degradation of IBP followed the pseudo first-order kinetics. The first-order rate constant was 3.3 times higher in the UV/chlorine AOP than in the UV/H2O2 AOP for a given chemical molar dosage at pH 6. The first-order rate constant decreased from 3.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) to 5.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) with increasing pH from 6 to 9. Both HO and RCS contributed to the degradation, and the contribution of RCS increased from 22% to 30% with increasing pH from 6 to 9. The degradation was initiated by HO-induced hydroxylation and Cl-induced chlorine substitution, and sustained through decarboxylation, demethylation, chlorination and ring cleavage to form more stable products. Significant amounts of chlorinated intermediates/byproducts were formed from the UV/chlorine AOP, and four chlorinated products were newly identified. The yield of total organic chlorine (TOCl) was 31.6 μM after 90% degradation of 50 μM IBP under the experimental conditions. The known disinfection by-products (DBPs) comprised 17.4% of the TOCl. The effects of water matrix in filtered drinking water on the degradation were not significant, demonstrating the practicality of the UV/chlorine AOP for the control of some refractory PPCPs. However, the toxicity of the chlorinated products should be further assessed. PMID:26748208

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of cylindrospermopsin destruction by sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; O'Shea, Kevin E; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2014-10-15

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a potent cyanobacterial toxin frequently found in water bodies worldwide raising concerns over the safety of drinking and recreational waters. A number of technologies have been investigated to remove and/or degrade cyanotoxins with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) being among the most promising and effective for water detoxification. In this study, the degradation of CYN by sulfate radical-based UV-254 nm-AOPs was evaluated. The UV/S2O8(2-) (UV/peroxydisulfate) was more efficient than UV/HSO5(-) (UV/peroxysulfate) and UV/H2O2 (UV/hydrogen peroxide) processes when natural water samples were used as reaction matrices. The observed UV fluence based pseudo-first-order rate constants followed the expected order of radical quantum yields. The presence of 200 μM natural organic matter (NOM) as carbon slightly inhibited the destruction of CYN; 1.24 mg L(-1)NO3(-) (nitrate) had no significant influence on the removal efficiency and 50 μg L(-1) Fe(2+) [iron (2+)] or Cu(2+) [copper (2+)] improved the performance of UV/S2O8(2-). The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (t-BuOH; hydroxyl radical scavenger) in the reaction yielded byproducts that indicated specific sites in CYN preferentially attacked by sulfate radicals (SRs). The predominant CYN degradation byproduct was P448 consistent with fragmentation of the C5C6 bond of the uracil ring. The subsequent formation of P420 and P392 through a stepwise loss of carbonyl group(s) further supported the fragmentation pathway at C5C6. The byproduct P432 was identified exclusively as mono-hydroxylation of CYN at tricyclic guanidine ring, whereas P414 was detected as dehydrogenation at the tricyclic ring. The elimination of sulfate group and the opening of tricyclic ring were also observed. The possible degradation pathways of CYN by SR-AOP were presented. PMID:25000199

  8. Mechanistic modeling of vacuum UV advanced oxidation process in an annular photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Crapulli, F; Santoro, D; Sasges, M R; Ray, A K

    2014-11-01

    A novel mechanistic model that describes the vacuum UV advanced oxidation process in an annular photoreactor initiated by 172 nm and 185 nm (in combination with 253.7 nm, with and without exogenous H2O2) is presented in this paper. The model was developed from first principles by incorporating the vacuum UV-AOP kinetics into the theoretical framework of in-series continuous flow stirred tank reactors. After conducting a sensitivity analysis, model predictions were compared against experiments conducted under a variety of conditions: (a) photo-induced formation of hydrogen peroxide by water photolysis at 172 nm (for both air- and oxygen-saturated conditions); (b) photo-induced formation of hydrogen peroxide by water photolysis at 185 + 253.7 nm (in the presence of formic acid, with and without the initial addition of hydrogen peroxide); (c) direct photolysis of hydrogen peroxide by 253.7 nm; (d) degradation of formic acid by 185 + 253.7 nm (with and without initial addition of hydrogen peroxide); and (e) degradation of formic acid by 253.7 nm (with the addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide). In all cases, the model was able to accurately predict the time-dependent profiles of hydrogen peroxide and formic acid concentrations. Two newly recognized aspects associated with water photolysis were identified through the use of the validated model. Firstly, unlike the 185 nm and 253.7 nm cases, water photolysis by the 172 nm wavelength revealed a depth of photoactive water layer an order of magnitude greater (∼230-390 μm, depending on the specific operating conditions) than the 1-log photon penetration layer (∼18 μm). To further investigate this potentially very important finding, a computational fluid dynamics model was set up to assess the role of transport mechanisms and species distributions within the photoreactor annulus. The model confirmed that short-lived hydroxyl radicals were present at a radial distance far beyond the ∼18 μm photon

  9. On-line sensor monitoring for chemical contaminant attenuation during UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Weon; Anumol, Tarun; Park, Minkyu; Pepper, Ian; Scheideler, Jens; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-09-15

    A combination of surrogate parameters and indicator compounds were measured to predict the removal efficiency of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) using low pressure (LP)-UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP), engaged with online sensor-based monitoring system. Thirty-nine TOrCs were evaluated in two distinct secondary wastewater effluents in terms of estimated photochemical reactivity, as a function of the rate constants of UV direct photolysis (kUV) and hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation (kOH). The selected eighteen TOrCs were classified into three groups that served as indicator compounds: Group 1 for photo-susceptible TOrCs but with minor degradation by OH oxidation (diclofenac, fluoxetine, iohexol, iopamidol, iopromide, simazine and sulfamethoxazole); Group 2 for TOrCs susceptible to both direct photolysis and OH oxidation (benzotriazole, diphenhydramine, ibuprofen, naproxen and sucralose); and Group 3 for photo-resistant TOrCs showing dominant degradation by OH oxidation (atenolol, carbamazepine, DEET, gemfibrozil, primidone and trimethoprim). The results indicate that TOC (optical-based measurement), UVA254 or UVT254 (UV absorbance or transmittance at 254 nm), and total fluorescence can all be used as suitable on-line organic surrogate parameters to predict the attenuation of TOrCs. Furthermore, the automated real-time monitoring via on-line surrogate sensors and equipped with the developed degradation profiles between sensor response and a group of TOrCs removal can provide a diagnostic tool for process control during advanced treatment of reclaimed waters. PMID:26074188

  10. Abiotic process for Fe(II) oxidation and green rust mineralization driven by a heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (Klebsiella mobilis).

    PubMed

    Etique, Marjorie; Jorand, Frédéric P A; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Despas, Christelle; Ruby, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Green rusts (GRs) are mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides with a high reactivity toward organic and inorganic pollutants. GRs can be produced from ferric reducing or ferrous oxidizing bacterial activities. In this study, we investigated the capability of Klebsiella mobilis to produce iron minerals in the presence of nitrate and ferrous iron. This bacterium is well-known to reduce nitrate using an organic carbon source as electron donor but is unable to enzymatically oxidize Fe(II) species. During incubation, GR formation occurred as a secondary iron mineral precipitating on cell surfaces, resulting from Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite produced via bacterial respiration of nitrate. For the first time, we demonstrate GR formation by indirect microbial oxidation of Fe(II) (i.e., a combination of biotic/abiotic processes). These results therefore suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can potentially contribute to the formation of GR in natural environments. In addition, the chemical reduction of nitrite to ammonium by GR is observed, which gradually turns the GR into the end-product goethite. The nitrogen mass-balance clearly demonstrates that the total amount of ammonium produced corresponds to the quantity of bioreduced nitrate. These findings demonstrate how the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in ferrous environments may provide a direct link between the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and iron. PMID:24605878

  11. Oxidative stress-driven mechanisms of nordihydroguaiaretic acid-induced apoptosis in FL5.12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Vaidehee S. . E-mail: vaidehee@hotmail.com; Kehrer, James P.

    2006-08-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a general lipoxygenase (LOX) enzyme inhibitor, induces apoptosis independently of its activity as a LOX inhibitor in murine pro-B lymphocytes (FL.12 cells) by a mechanism that is still not fully understood. Glutathione depletion, oxidative processes and mitochondrial depolarization appear to contribute to the apoptosis induced by NDGA. The current data demonstrate that NDGA (20 {mu}M)-induced apoptosis in FL5.12 cells is partially protected by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (10 mM) and dithiothreitol (DTT) (500 {mu}M) pretreatment, confirming a role for oxidative processes. In addition, the treatment of FL5.12 cells with NDGA led to an increase in phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinases ERK, JNK and p38. Although pretreatment with ERK inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126) abolished ERK phosphorylation in response to NDGA, neither inhibitor had any effect on NDGA-induced apoptosis. SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, did not have any effect on NDGA-induced phosphorylation of JNK nor apoptosis. Pretreatment with the p38 inhibitor SB202190 attenuated NDGA-induced apoptosis by 30% and also abolished p38 phosphorylation, compared to NDGA treatment alone. NAC, but not DTT, also decreased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK supporting a role for oxidative processes in activating these kinases. Neither NAC nor DTT blocked the phosphorylation of ERK suggesting that this activation is not related to oxidative stress. The release of cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3 induced by NDGA were inhibited by NAC. SB202190 slightly attenuated caspase-3 activation and had no effect on the release of cytochrome c. These data suggest that several independent mechanisms, including oxidative reactions, activation of p38 kinase and cytochrome c release contribute to NDGA-induced apoptosis.

  12. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Stabilization of Nickel and Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles: A Green Adeptness.

    PubMed

    Imran Din, Muhammad; Rani, Aneela

    2016-01-01

    Green protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles have been attracting a lot of attention because they are eco-friendly, rapid, and cost-effective. Nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized by green routes and characterized for impact of green chemistry on the properties and biological effects of nanoparticles in the last five years. Green synthesis, properties, and applications of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been reported in the literature. This review summarizes the synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles using different biological systems. This review also provides comparative overview of influence of chemical synthesis and green synthesis on structural properties of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles and their biological behavior. It concludes that green methods for synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles are better than chemical synthetic methods. PMID:27413375

  13. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Stabilization of Nickel and Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles: A Green Adeptness

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Aneela

    2016-01-01

    Green protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles have been attracting a lot of attention because they are eco-friendly, rapid, and cost-effective. Nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized by green routes and characterized for impact of green chemistry on the properties and biological effects of nanoparticles in the last five years. Green synthesis, properties, and applications of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been reported in the literature. This review summarizes the synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles using different biological systems. This review also provides comparative overview of influence of chemical synthesis and green synthesis on structural properties of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles and their biological behavior. It concludes that green methods for synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles are better than chemical synthetic methods. PMID:27413375

  14. Solar-Driven H2 O2 Generation From H2 O and O2 Using Earth-Abundant Mixed-Metal Oxide@Carbon Nitride Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruirui; Pan, Kecheng; Han, Dandan; Jiang, Jingjing; Xiang, Chengxiang; Huang, Zhuangqun; Zhang, Lu; Xiang, Xu

    2016-09-01

    Light-driven generation of H2 O2 only from water and molecular oxygen could be an ideal pathway for clean production of solar fuels. In this work, a mixed metal oxide/graphitic-C3 N4 (MMO@C3 N4 ) composite was synthesized as a dual-functional photocatalyst for both water oxidation and oxygen reduction to generate H2 O2 . The MMO was derived from a NiFe-layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor for obtaining a high dispersion of metal oxides on the surface of the C3 N4 matrix. The C3 N4 is in the graphitic phase and the main crystalline phase in MMO is cubic NiO. The XPS analyses revealed the doping of Fe(3+) in the dominant NiO phase and the existence of surface defects in the C3 N4 matrix. The formation and decomposition kinetics of H2 O2 on the MMO@C3 N4 and the control samples, including bare MMO, C3 N4 matrix, Ni- or Fe-loaded C3 N4 and a simple mixture of MMO and C3 N4 , were investigated. The MMO@C3 N4 composite produced 63 μmol L(-1) of H2 O2 in 90 min in acidic solution (pH 3) and exhibited a significantly higher rate of production for H2 O2 relative to the control samples. The positive shift of the valence band in the composite and the enhanced water oxidation catalysis by incorporating the MMO improved the light-induced hole collection relative to the bare C3 N4 and resulted in the enhanced H2 O2 formation. The positively shifted conduction band in the composite also improved the selectivity of the two-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to H2 O2 . PMID:27484581

  15. Development of HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene assays in human cells for assessing the oxidative damage induced by silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lili; Wang, Jianshu; Zhang, Leshuai W; Che, Bizhong; Dong, Guangzhu; Fan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Kaiming

    2016-08-01

    The exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products requires novel tools for rapid and cost-effective toxicology screening. In order to assess the oxidative damage induced by nanoparticles, toxicity test systems based on a human HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter in HepG2, LO2, A549, and HBE cells were established. After treated with heat shock and a group of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different primary particle sizes, the cell viability, oxidative damage, and luciferase activity were determined. The time-dependent Ag(+) ions release from AgNPs in cell medium was also evaluated. Our results showed that heat shock produced a strong time-dependent induction of relative luciferase activity in the four luciferase reporter cells. Surprisingly, at 4h of recovery, the relative luciferase activity was >98× the control level in HepG2-luciferase cells. Exposure to different sizes of AgNPs resulted in activation of the HSPA1A promoter in a dose-dependent manner, even at low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic doses. The smaller (5nm) AgNPs were more potent in luciferase induction than the larger (50 and 75nm) AgNPs. These results were generally in accordance with the oxidative damage indicated by malondialdehyde concentration, reactive oxygen species induction and glutathione depletion, and Ag(+) ions release in cell medium. Compared with the other three luciferase reporter cells, the luciferase signal in HepG2-luciferase cells is obviously more sensitive and stable. We conclude that the luciferase reporter cells, especially the HepG2-luciferase cells, could provide a valuable tool for rapid screening of the oxidative damage induced by AgNPs. PMID:27211842

  16. Unique and facile solvothermal synthesis of mesoporous WO3 using a solid precursor and a surfactant template as a photoanode for visible-light-driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Chandra, Debraj; Saito, Kenji; Yui, Tatsuto; Yagi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous tungsten trioxide (WO3) was prepared from tungstic acid (H2WO4) as a tungsten precursor with dodecylamine (DDA) as a template to guide porosity of the nanostructure by a solvothermal technique. The WO3 sample (denoted as WO3-DDA) prepared with DDA was moulded on an electrode to yield efficient performance for visible-light-driven photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of the WO3-DDA sample calcined at 400°C indicate a crystalline framework of the mesoporous structure with disordered arrangement of pores. N2 physisorption studies show a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area up to 57 m(2) g(-1) together with type IV isotherms and uniform distribution of a nanoscale pore size in the mesopore region. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images exhibit well-connected tiny spherical WO3 particles with a diameter of ca. 5 to 20 nm composing the mesoporous network. The WO3-DDA electrode generated photoanodic current density of 1.1 mA cm(-2) at 1.0 V versus Ag/AgCl under visible light irradiation, which is about three times higher than that of the untemplated WO3. O2 (1.49 μmol; Faraday efficiency, 65.2%) was evolved during the 1-h photoelectrolysis for the WO3-DDA electrode under the conditions employed. The mesoporous electrode turned out to work more efficiently for visible-light-driven water oxidation relative to the untemplated WO3 electrode. PMID:25313301

  17. Unique and facile solvothermal synthesis of mesoporous WO3 using a solid precursor and a surfactant template as a photoanode for visible-light-driven water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous tungsten trioxide (WO3) was prepared from tungstic acid (H2WO4) as a tungsten precursor with dodecylamine (DDA) as a template to guide porosity of the nanostructure by a solvothermal technique. The WO3 sample (denoted as WO3-DDA) prepared with DDA was moulded on an electrode to yield efficient performance for visible-light-driven photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of the WO3-DDA sample calcined at 400°C indicate a crystalline framework of the mesoporous structure with disordered arrangement of pores. N2 physisorption studies show a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area up to 57 m2 g-1 together with type IV isotherms and uniform distribution of a nanoscale pore size in the mesopore region. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images exhibit well-connected tiny spherical WO3 particles with a diameter of ca. 5 to 20 nm composing the mesoporous network. The WO3-DDA electrode generated photoanodic current density of 1.1 mA cm-2 at 1.0 V versus Ag/AgCl under visible light irradiation, which is about three times higher than that of the untemplated WO3. O2 (1.49 μmol; Faraday efficiency, 65.2%) was evolved during the 1-h photoelectrolysis for the WO3-DDA electrode under the conditions employed. The mesoporous electrode turned out to work more efficiently for visible-light-driven water oxidation relative to the untemplated WO3 electrode. PMID:25313301

  18. Spin-orbit driven magnetic insulating state with Jeff=1/2 character in a 4d oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, S.; Li, Ling; Okamoto, Satoshi; Choi, Yongseong; Mukherjee, Rupam; Haskel, Daniel; Mandrus, D.

    2015-11-30

    The unusual magnetic and electronic ground states of 5d iridates has been shown to be driven by intrinsically enhanced spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The influence of appreciable but reduced SOC in creating the manifested magnetic insulating states in 4d oxides is less clear, with one hurdle being the existence of such compounds. Here we present experimental and theoretical results on Sr4RhO6 that reveal SOC dominated behavior. Neutron measurements show the octahedra are both spatially separated and locally ideal, making the electronic ground state susceptible to alterations by SOC. Magnetic ordering is observed with a similar structure to an analogous Jeff=1/2 Mott iridate. We consider the underlying role of SOC in this rhodate with density functional theory and x-ray absorption spectroscopy and find a magnetic insulating ground state with Jeff =1/2 character.The unusual magnetic and electronic ground states of 5d iridates have been shown to be driven by intrinsically enhanced spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The influence of appreciable but reduced SOC in creating the manifested magnetic insulating states in 4d oxides is less clear, with one hurdle being the existence of such compounds. Here, we present experimental and theoretical results on Sr4RhO6 that reveal SOC dominated behavior. Neutron measurements show the octahedra are both spatially separated and locally ideal, making the electronic ground state susceptible to alterations by SOC. Magnetic ordering is observed with a similar structure to an analogous Jeff=1/2 Mott iridate. We consider the underlying role of SOC in this rhodate with density functional theory and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and find a magnetic insulating ground state with Jeff=12 character.

  19. Photo-driven oxidation of water on α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong Seriani, Nicola; Piccinin, Simone

    2014-02-14

    Adopting the theoretical scheme developed by the Nørskov group [see, for example, Nørskov et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 17886 (2004)], we conducted a density functional theory study of photo-driven oxidation processes of water on various terminations of the clean hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) (0001) surface, explicitly taking into account the strong correlation among the 3d states of iron through the Hubbard U parameter. Six best-known terminations, namely, Fe − Fe −O{sub 3}− (we call S{sub 1}), O− Fe − Fe − (S{sub 2}), O{sub 2}− Fe − Fe −(S{sub 3}), O{sub 3}− Fe − Fe − (S{sub 4}), Fe −O{sub 3}− Fe − (S{sub 5}), and O− Fe −O{sub 3}−(S{sub 6}), are first exposed to water, the stability of resulting surfaces is investigated under photoelectrochemical conditions by considering different chemical reactions (and their reaction free energies) that lead to surfaces covered by O atoms or/and OH groups. Assuming that the water splitting reaction is driven by the redox potential for photogenerated holes with respect to the normal hydrogen electrode, U{sub VB}, at voltage larger than U{sub VB}, most 3-oxygen terminated substrates are stable. These results thus suggest that the surface, hydroxylated in the dark, should release protons under illumination. Considering the surface free energy of all the possible terminations shows that O{sub 3}–S{sub 5} and O{sub 3}–S{sub 1} are the most thermodynamically stable. While water oxidation process on the former requires an overpotential of 1.22 V, only 0.84 V is needed on the latter.

  20. Reversible wettability of electron-beam deposited indium-tin-oxide driven by ns-UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Persano, Luana; Del Carro, Pompilio; Pisignano, Dario

    2012-04-09

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the most widely used semiconductor oxides in the field of organic optoelectronics, especially for the realization of anode contacts. Here the authors report on the control of the wettability properties of ITO films deposited by reactive electron beam deposition and irradiated by means of nanosecond-pulsed UV irradiation. The enhancement of the surface water wettability, with a reduction of the water contact angle larger than 50 deg., is achieved by few tens of seconds of irradiation. The analyzed photo-induced wettability change is fully reversible in agreement with a surface-defect model, and it can be exploited to realize optically transparent, conductive surfaces with controllable wetting properties for sensors and microfluidic circuits.

  1. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1998-06-01

    'Understanding factors which control the long-term survival and activity of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in subsurface sedimentary environments is important for predicting their ability to serve as agents for bioremediation of organic and inorganic contaminants. This project seeks to refine the authors quantitative understanding of microbiological and geochemical controls on bacterial Fe(III) oxide reduction and growth of FeRB, using laboratory reactor systems which mimic to varying degrees the physical and chemical conditions of subsurface sedimentary environments. Methods for studying microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and FeRB growth in experimental systems which incorporate advective aqueous phase flux are being developed for this purpose. These methodologies, together with an accumulating database on the kinetics of Fe(III) reduction and bacterial growth with various synthetic and natural Fe(III) oxide minerals, will be applicable to experimental and modeling studies of subsurface contaminant transformations directly coupled to or influenced by bacterial Fe(III) oxide reduction and FeRB activity. This report summarizes research accomplished after approximately 1.5 yr of a 3-yr project. A central hypothesis of the research is that advective elimination of the primary end-product of Fe(III) oxide reduction, Fe(II), will enhance the rate and extent of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction in open experimental systems. This hypothesis is based on previous studies in the laboratory which demonstrated that association of evolved Fe(II) with oxide and FeRB cell surfaces (via adsorption or surface precipitation) is a primary cause for cessation of Fe(III) oxide reduction activity in batch culture experiments. Semicontinuous culturing was adopted as a first approach to test this basic hypothesis. Synthetic goethite or natural Fe(III) oxide-rich subsoils were used as Fe(III) sources, with the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga as the test organism.'

  2. Electrochemical driven water oxidation by molecular catalysts in situ polymerized on the surface of graphite carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Fan, Ke; Daniel, Quentin; Duan, Lele; Li, Fusheng; Philippe, Bertrand; Rensmo, Håkan; Chen, Hong; Sun, Junliang; Sun, Licheng

    2015-05-01

    A simple strategy to immobilize highly efficient ruthenium based molecular water-oxidation catalysts on the basal-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (BPG) by polymerization has been demonstrated. The electrode 1@BPG has obtained a high initial turnover frequency (TOF) of 10.47 s(-1) at ∼700 mV overpotential, and a high turnover number (TON) up to 31600 in 1 h electrolysis. PMID:25854858

  3. Nanostructured bismuth vanadate-based materials for solar-energy-driven water oxidation: a review on recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhen-Feng; Pan, Lun; Zou, Ji-Jun; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li

    2014-11-01

    Water oxidation is the key step for both photocatalytic water splitting and CO2 reduction, but its efficiency is very low compared with the photocatalytic reduction of water. Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) is the most promising photocatalyst for water oxidation and has become a hot topic for current research. However, the efficiency achieved with this material to date is far away from the theoretical solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, mainly due to the poor photo-induced electron transportation and the slow kinetics of oxygen evolution. Fortunately, great breakthroughs have been made in the past five years in both improving the efficiency and understanding the related mechanism. This review is aimed at summarizing the recent experimental and computational breakthroughs in single crystals modified by element doping, facet engineering, and morphology control, as well as macro/mesoporous structure construction, and composites fabricated by homo/hetero-junction construction and co-catalyst loading. We aim to provide guidelines for the rational design and fabrication of highly efficient BiVO4-based materials for water oxidation.

  4. General Scheme for Oxidative Quenching of a Copper Bis-Phenanthroline Photosensitizer for Light-Driven Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Windisch, J; Orazietti, M; Hamm, P; Alberto, R; Probst, B

    2016-07-01

    A new, general reaction scheme for photocatalytic hydrogen production is presented based on oxidative quenching of a homoleptic copper(I) bis-1,10-phenanthroline photosensitizer (PS) by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP(+) ) as the electron relay and subsequent regeneration of the so formed copper(II) complex by a sacrificial electron donor. Electron transfer from the relay to various cobalt based water reduction catalysts and subsequent H2 production was shown to close the catalytic cycle. Transient absorption experiments unambiguously confirmed the proposed pathway, both the oxidative quenching and subsequent regeneration of oxidized PS. Photocatalytic test runs further confirmed the role of MPP(+) and up to 10 turnovers were achieved in the relay. The performance limiting factor of the system was shown to be the decomplexation of the copper PS. Quantum yields of the system were 0.03 for H2 production, but 0.6 for MPP(.) formation, clearly indicating that unproductive pathways still prevail. PMID:27226427

  5. Advances in Homogeneous Catalysis Using Secondary Phosphine Oxides (SPOs): Pre-ligands for Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Achard, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The secondary phosphine oxides are known to exist in equilibrium between the pentavalent phosphine oxides (SPO) and the trivalent phosphinous acids (PA). This equilibrium can be displaced in favour of the trivalent tautomeric form upon coordination to late transition metals. This tutorial review provides the state of the art of the use of secondary phosphine oxides as pre-ligands in transition metal-catalysed reactions. Using a combination of SPOs and several metals such as Pd, Pt, Ru, Rh and Au, a series of effective and original transformations have been obtained and will be discussed here. PMID:26931212

  6. Enhanced cellular oxidant stress by the interaction of advanced glycation end products with their receptors/binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Yan, S D; Schmidt, A M; Anderson, G M; Zhang, J; Brett, J; Zou, Y S; Pinsky, D; Stern, D

    1994-04-01

    Attack by reactive oxygen intermediates, common to many kinds of cell/tissue injury, has been implicated in the development of diabetic and other vascular diseases. Such oxygen-free radicals can be generated by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are nonenzymatically glycated and oxidized proteins. Since cellular interactions of AGEs are mediated by specific cellular binding proteins, receptor for AGE (RAGE) and the lactoferrin-like polypeptide (LF-L), we tested the hypothesis that AGE ligands tethered to the complex of RAGE and LF-L could induce oxidant stress. AGE albumin or AGEs immunoisolated from diabetic plasma resulted in induction of endothelial cell (EC) oxidant stress, including the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and resulted in the activation of NF-kappa B, each of which was blocked by antibodies to AGE receptor polypeptides and by antioxidants. Infusion of AGE albumin into normal animals led to the appearance of malondialdehyde determinants in the vessel wall and increased TBARS in the tissues, activation of NF-kappa B, and induction of heme oxygenase mRNA. AGE-induced oxidant stress was inhibited by pretreatment of animals with either antibodies to the AGE receptor/binding proteins or antioxidants. These data indicate that interaction of AGEs with cellular targets, such as ECs, leads to oxidant stress resulting in changes in gene expression and other cellular properties, potentially contributing to the development of vascular lesions. Further studies will be required to dissect whether oxidant stress occurs on the cell surface or at an intracellular locus. PMID:8144582

  7. A comparative study of the treatment of ethylene plant spent caustic by neutralization and classical and advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hawari, Alaa; Ramadan, Hasanat; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim; Ouederni, Mabrouk

    2015-03-15

    The treatment of spent caustic produced from an ethylene plant was investigated. In the case of neutralization alone it was found that the maximum removal of sulfide was at pH values below 5.5. The higher percentage removal of sulfides (99% at pH = 1.5) was accompanied with the highest COD removal (88%). For classical oxidation using H2O2 the maximum COD removal percentage reached 89% at pH = 2.5 and at a hydrogen peroxide concentration of 19 mM/L. For the advanced oxidation using Fenton's process it was found that the maximum COD removal of 96.5% was achieved at a hydrogen peroxide/ferrous sulfate ratio of (7:1). PMID:25546845

  8. Advanced oxidation of iodinated X-ray contrast media in reverse osmosis brines: the influence of quenching.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Gur-Reznik, Shirra; Heller-Grossman, Lilly; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2014-10-01

    Among the main restrictions for the implementation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for removal of micropollutants present in reverse osmosis (RO) brines of secondary effluents account the quenching performed by background organic and inorganic constituents. Natural organic matter (NOM) and soluble microbial products (SMP) are the main effluent organic matter constituents. The inorganic fraction is largely constituted by chlorides and bicarbonate alkalinity with sodium and calcium as main counterions. The quenching influence of these components, separately and their mixture, in the transformation of model compounds by UVA/TiO2 was studied applying synthetic brines solutions mimicking 2-fold concentrated RO secondary effluents brines. The results were validated using fresh RO brines. Diatrizoate (DTZ) and iopromide (IOPr) were used as model compound. They have been found to exhibit relative high resistance to oxidation process and therefore represent good markers for AOPs techniques. Under the conditions applied, oxidization of DTZ in the background of RO brines was strongly affected by quenching effects. The major contribution to quenching resulted from organic matter (≈70%) followed by bicarbonate alkalinity (≈30%). NOM displayed higher quenching than SMP in spite of its relative lower concentration. Multivalent cations, i.e., Ca(+2), were found to decrease effectiveness of the technique due to agglomeration of the catalyst. However this influence was lowered in presence of NOM. Different patterns of transformation were found for each model compound in which a delayed deiodination was observed for iopromide whereas diatrizoate oxidation paralleled deiodination. PMID:24945978

  9. Removal of C.I. Reactive Red 2 by low pressure UV/chlorine advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Yue; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hongying

    2016-03-01

    Azo dyes are commonly found as pollutants in wastewater from the textile industry, and can cause environmental problems because of their color and toxicity. The removal of a typical azo dye named C.I. Reactive Red 2 (RR2) during low pressure ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine oxidation was investigated in this study. UV irradiation at 254nm and addition of free chlorine provided much higher removal rates of RR2 and color than UV irradiation or chlorination alone. Increasing the free chlorine dose enhanced the removal efficiency of RR2 and color by UV/chlorine oxidation. Experiments performed with nitrobenzene (NB) or benzoic acid (BA) as scavengers showed that radicals (especially OH) formed during UV/chlorine oxidation are important in the RR2 removal. Addition of HCO3(-) and Cl(-) to the RR2 solution did not inhibit the removal of RR2 during UV/chlorine oxidation. PMID:26969069

  10. Eco-Friendly Magnetic Iron Oxide Pillared Montmorillonite for Advanced Catalytic Degradation of Dichlorophenol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eco-friendly pillared montmorillonites, in which the pillars consist of iron oxide are expected to have interesting and unusual magnetic properties that are applicable for environmental decontamination. Completely “green” and effective composite was synthesized using mild reactio...

  11. Recent Advances in Modeling Transition Metal Oxides for Photo-electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspary Toroker, Maytal

    Computational research offers a wide range of opportunities for materials science and engineering, especially in the energy arena where there is a need for understanding how material composition and structure control energy conversion, and for designing materials that could improve conversion efficiency. Potential inexpensive materials for energy conversion devices are metal oxides. However, their conversion efficiency is limited by at least one of several factors: a too large band gap for efficiently absorbing solar energy, similar conduction and valence band edge characters that may lead to unfavorably high electron-hole recombination rates, a valence band edge that is not positioned well for oxidizing water, low stability, low electronic conductivity, and low surface reactivity. I will show how we model metal oxides with ab-initio methods, primarily DFT +U. Our previous results show that doping with lithium, sodium, or hydrogen could improve iron (II) oxide's electronic properties, and alloying with zinc or nickel could improve iron (II) oxide's optical properties. Furthermore, doping nickel (II) oxide with lithium could improve several key properties including solar energy absorption. In this talk I will highlight new results on our understanding of the mechanism of iron (III) oxide's surface reactivity. Our theoretical insights bring us a step closer towards understanding how to design better materials for photo-electrochemistry. References: 1. O. Neufeld and M. Caspary Toroker, ``Pt-doped Fe2O3 for enhanced water splitting efficiency: a DFT +U study'', J. Phys. Chem. C 119, 5836 (2015). 2. M. Caspary Toroker, ``Theoretical Insights into the Mechanism of Water Oxidation on Non-stoichiometric and Ti - doped Fe2O3 (0001)'', J. Phys. Chem. C, 118, 23162 (2014). This research was supported by the Morantz Energy Research Fund, the Nancy and Stephen Grand Technion Energy Program, the I-CORE Program of the Planning and Budgeting Committee, and The Israel Science

  12. DEAMOX--new biological nitrogen removal process based on anaerobic ammonia oxidation coupled to sulphide-driven conversion of nitrate into nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey; Gladchenko, Marina; Mulder, Arnold; Versprille, Bram

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports about the successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for treatment of typical strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulphide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. To generate sulphide and ammonia, a Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor was used as a pre-treatment step. The UASB effluent was split and partially fed to a nitrifying reactor (to generate nitrate) and the remaining part was directly fed to the DEAMOX reactor where this stream was mixed with the nitrified effluent. Stable process performance and volumetric nitrogen loading rates of the DEAMOX reactor well above 1000 mgN/l/d with total nitrogen removal efficiencies of around 90% were obtained after long-term (410 days) optimisation of the process. Important prerequisites for this performance are appropriate influent ratios of the key species fed to the DEAMOX reactor, namely influent N-NO(x)/N-NH(4) ratios >1.2 (stoichiometry of the anammox reaction) and influent S-H(2)S/N-NO(3) ratios >0.57 mgS/mgN (stoichiometry of the sulphide-driven denitrification of nitrate to nitrite). The paper further describes some characteristics of the DEAMOX sludge as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterisation. PMID:16893559

  13. Proximity Driven Commensurate Pinning in YBa2Cu3O7 through All-Oxide Magnetic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rocci, M; Azpeitia, J; Trastoy, J; Perez-Muñoz, A; Cabero, M; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Mompean, F J; Garcia-Hernandez, M; Bouzehouane, K; Sefrioui, Z; Leon, C; Rivera-Calzada, A; Villegas, J E; Santamaria, J

    2015-11-11

    The design of artificial vortex pinning landscapes is a major goal toward large scale applications of cuprate superconductors. Although disordered nanometric inclusions have shown to modify their vortex phase diagram and to produce enhancements of the critical current ( MacManus-Driscoll , J. L. ; Foltyn , S. R. ; Jia , Q. X. ; Wang , H. ; Serquis , A. ; Civale , L. ; Maiorov , B. ; Hawley , M. E. ; Maley , M. P. ; Peterson , D. E. Nat. Mater. 2004 , 3 , 439 - 443 and Yamada , Y. ; Takahashi , K. ; Kobayashi , H. ; Konishi , M. ; Watanabe , T. ; Ibi , A. ; Muroga , T. ; Miyata , S. ; Kato , T. ; Hirayama , T. ; Shiohara , Y. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005 , 87 , 1 - 3 ), the effect of ordered oxide nanostructures remains essentially unexplored. This is due to the very small nanostructure size imposed by the short coherence length, and to the technological difficulties in the nanofabrication process. Yet, the novel phenomena occurring at oxide interfaces open a wide spectrum of technological opportunities to interplay with the superconductivity in cuprates. Here, we show that the unusual long-range suppression of the superconductivity occurring at the interface between manganites and cuprates affects vortex nucleation and provides a novel vortex pinning mechanism. In particular, we show evidence of commensurate pinning in YBCO films with ordered arrays of LCMO ferromagnetic nanodots. Vortex pinning results from the proximity induced reduction of the condensation energy at the vicinity of the magnetic nanodots, and yields an enhanced friction between the nanodot array and the moving vortex lattice in the liquid phase. This result shows that all-oxide ordered nanostructures constitute a powerful, new route for the artificial manipulation of vortex matter in cuprates. PMID:26441137

  14. Decoration of BiOI quantum size nanoparticles with reduced graphene oxide in enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhang; Xu, Weicheng; Fang, Jianzhang; Xu, Xiaoxin; Wu, Shuxing; Zhu, Ximiao; Chen, Zehua

    2012-10-01

    Herein, a reverse microemulsion route was developed to synthesize bismuth oxyiodide (BiOI) nanocrystals and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites as a highly efficient photocatalyst, and both the formation of BiOI and the reduction of RGO were achieved in situ in microemulsions simultaneously at low temperature (60 °C). The uniform nanocrystal size and structure were indicated by XRD, TEM, and the reduction of GO by ascorbic acid was evidenced by FTIR, XPS, and Raman spectra techniques. The enhanced photoactivity of RGO/BiOI nanocomposites under visible light was attributed to improved light absorption and efficient charge separation and transportation.

  15. Hemoglobinuria-related acute kidney injury is driven by intrarenal oxidative reactions triggering a heme toxicity response

    PubMed Central

    Deuel, J W; Schaer, C A; Boretti, F S; Opitz, L; Garcia-Rubio, I; Baek, J H; Spahn, D R; Buehler, P W; Schaer, D J

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis can result in hemoglobinuria with acute kidney injury. In this study we systematically explored two in vivo animal models and a related cell culture system to identify hemoglobinuria-triggered damage pathways. In models of stored blood transfusion and hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in guinea pigs and beagle dogs we found that hemoglobinuria led to intrarenal conversion of ferrous Hb(Fe2+) to ferric Hb(Fe3+), accumulation of free heme and Hb-cross-linking products, enhanced 4-hydroxynonenal reactivity in renal tissue, and acute tubule injury. These changes were associated in guinea pigs with activation of a renal cortex gene expression signature indicative of oxidative stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Tubule cells of hemolytic animals demonstrated enhanced protein expression of heme oxygenase and heat shock protein and enhanced expression of acute kidney injury-related neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. These adverse changes were completely prevented by haptoglobin treatment. The in vivo findings were extrapolated to a MS-based proteome analysis of SILAC-labeled renal epithelial cells that were exposed to free heme within a concentration range estimate of renal tubule heme exposure. These experiments confirmed that free heme is a likely trigger of tubule barrier deregulation and oxidative cell damage and reinforced the hypothesis that uncontrolled free heme could trigger the UPR as an important pathway of renal injury during hemoglobinuria. PMID:26794659

  16. Radiation synthesis of CdS/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Youwei; Cao, Pengfei; Ma, Huiling; Liu, Pinggui; He, Lihua; Peng, Jing; Li, Jiuqiang; Zhai, Maolin

    2016-06-01

    CdS/reduced graphene oxide (CdS/RGO) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized via a one-step gamma-ray radiation-induced reduction method. The composition and structure of the prepared nanocomposites were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, micro FTIR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that increasing dose could improve the degree of reduction of graphite oxide (GO), and the feed ratio of GO to CdCl2·2.5H2O significantly influenced the size and dispersion of the CdS nanoparticles. The nanocomposites prepared under dose of 300 kGy and the feed ratio of GO to CdCl2·2.5H2O 1.0 wt% exhibited high visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of Rhodamine B with degradation efficiency of 93%. This work provides a novel and facile method to produce the nanocomposites as efficient photocatalysts for the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solution.

  17. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Leanne G; Solarska, Renata; Bienkowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J; Augustynski, Jan; Symes, Mark D; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-06-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm(-2) on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  18. Decolorization and mineralization of Allura Red AC aqueous solutions by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdoulaye; Sirés, Ignasi; Garrido, José A; Rodríguez, Rosa M; Brillas, Enric

    2015-06-15

    The decolorization and mineralization of solutions containing 230 mg L(-1) of the food azo dye Allura Red AC at pH 3.0 have been studied upon treatment by electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Experiments were performed with a stirred tank reactor containing a boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Pt anode and an air-diffusion cathode to generate H2O2. The main oxidants were hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The oxidation ability increased in the sequence EO-H2O2 < EF < PEF and faster degradation was always obtained using BDD. PEF process with BDD yielded almost total mineralization following similar trends in SO4(2-), ClO4(-) and NO3(-) media, whereas in Cl(-) medium, mineralization was inhibited by the formation of recalcitrant chloroderivatives. GC-MS analysis confirmed the cleavage of the −N=N− bond with formation of two main aromatics in SO4(2-) medium and three chloroaromatics in Cl(-) solutions. The effective oxidation of final oxalic and oxamic acids by BDD along with the photolysis of Fe(III)-oxalate species by UVA light accounted for the superiority of PEF with BDD. NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) ions were released during the mineralization. PMID:25734532

  19. Recent advances in nanostructured Nb-based oxides for electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Litao; Rui, Xianhong; Chen, Gen; Xu, Weichuan; Zou, Guifu; Luo, Hongmei

    2016-04-01

    For the past five years, nanostructured niobium-based oxides have emerged as one of the most prominent materials for batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cell technologies, for instance, TiNb2O7 as an anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), Nb2O5 as an electrode for supercapacitors (SCs), and niobium-based oxides as chemically stable electrochemical supports for fuel cells. Their high potential window can prevent the formation of lithium dendrites, and their rich redox chemistry (Nb5+/Nb4+, Nb4+/Nb3+) makes them very promising electrode materials. Their unique chemical stability under acid conditions is favorable for practical fuel-cell operation. In this review, we summarized recent progress made concerning the use of niobium-based oxides as electrodes for batteries (LIBs, sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), and vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs)), SCs, and fuel cell applications. Moreover, crystal structures, charge storage mechanisms in different crystal structures, and electrochemical performances in terms of the specific capacitance/capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability of niobium-based oxides are discussed. Insights into the future research and development of niobium-based oxide compounds for next-generation electrochemical devices are also presented. We believe that this review will be beneficial for research scientists and graduate students who are searching for promising electrode materials for batteries, SCs, and fuel cells.

  20. Recent advances in nanostructured Nb-based oxides for electrochemical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Litao; Rui, Xianhong; Chen, Gen; Xu, Weichuan; Zou, Guifu; Luo, Hongmei

    2016-04-28

    For the past five years, nanostructured niobium-based oxides have emerged as one of the most prominent materials for batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cell technologies, for instance, TiNb2O7 as an anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), Nb2O5 as an electrode for supercapacitors (SCs), and niobium-based oxides as chemically stable electrochemical supports for fuel cells. Their high potential window can prevent the formation of lithium dendrites, and their rich redox chemistry (Nb(5+)/Nb(4+), Nb(4+)/Nb(3+)) makes them very promising electrode materials. Their unique chemical stability under acid conditions is favorable for practical fuel-cell operation. In this review, we summarized recent progress made concerning the use of niobium-based oxides as electrodes for batteries (LIBs, sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), and vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs)), SCs, and fuel cell applications. Moreover, crystal structures, charge storage mechanisms in different crystal structures, and electrochemical performances in terms of the specific capacitance/capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability of niobium-based oxides are discussed. Insights into the future research and development of niobium-based oxide compounds for next-generation electrochemical devices are also presented. We believe that this review will be beneficial for research scientists and graduate students who are searching for promising electrode materials for batteries, SCs, and fuel cells. PMID:27074412

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF REACTION-DRIVEN IONIC TRANSPORT MEMBRANES (ITMs) TECHNOLOGY: PHASE IV/BUDGET PERIOD 6 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems”

    SciTech Connect

    David, Studer

    2012-03-01

    Air Products and Chemicals, along with development participants and in association with the U.S. Department of Energy, has made substantial progress in developing a novel air separation technology. Unlike conventional cryogenic processes, this method uses high-temperature ceramic membranes to produce high-purity oxygen. The membranes selectively transport oxygen ions with high flux and infinite theoretical selectivity. Reaction-driven ceramic membranes are fabricated from non-porous, multi-component metallic oxides, operate at temperatures typically over 700°C, and have exceptionally high oxygen flux and selectivity. Oxygen from low-pressure air permeates as oxygen ions through the ceramic membrane and is consumed through chemical reactions, thus creating a chemical driving force that pulls oxygen ions across the membrane at high rates. The oxygen reacts with a hydrocarbon fuel in a partial oxidation process to produce a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture – synthesis gas. This project expands the partial-oxidation scope of ITM technology beyond natural gas feed and investigates the potential for ITM reaction-driven technology to be used in conjunction with gasification and pyrolysis technologies to provide more economical routes for producing hydrogen and synthesis gas. This report presents an overview of the ITM reaction-driven development effort, including ceramic materials development, fabrication and testing of small-scale ceramic modules, ceramic modeling, and the investigation of gasifier integration schemes

  2. Advanced lipid peroxidation end products in oxidative damage to proteins. Potential role in diseases and therapeutic prospects for the inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Negre-Salvayre, A; Coatrieux, C; Ingueneau, C; Salvayre, R

    2007-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl compounds (RCCs) formed during lipid peroxidation and sugar glycoxidation, namely Advanced lipid peroxidation end products (ALEs) and Advanced Glycation end products (AGEs), accumulate with ageing and oxidative stress-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes or neurodegenerative diseases. RCCs induce the ‘carbonyl stress' characterized by the formation of adducts and cross-links on proteins, which progressively leads to impaired protein function and damages in all tissues, and pathological consequences including cell dysfunction, inflammatory response and apoptosis. The prevention of carbonyl stress involves the use of free radical scavengers and antioxidants that prevent the generation of lipid peroxidation products, but are inefficient on pre-formed RCCs. Conversely, carbonyl scavengers prevent carbonyl stress by inhibiting the formation of protein cross-links. While a large variety of AGE inhibitors has been developed, only few carbonyl scavengers have been tested on ALE-mediated effects. This review summarizes the signalling properties of ALEs and ALE-precursors, their role in the pathogenesis of oxidative stress-associated diseases, and the different agents efficient in neutralizing ALEs effects in vitro and in vivo. The generation of drugs sharing both antioxidant and carbonyl scavenger properties represents a new therapeutic challenge in the treatment of carbonyl stress-associated diseases. PMID:17643134

  3. Degradation of carbamazepine by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process and formation of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Xia, Ying; Li, Ting; Yao, Tian; Shi, Zhou; Zhu, Shumin; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals in water are commonly found and are not efficiently removed by current treatment processes. Degradation of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process was systematically investigated in this study. The results showed that the UV/chlorine process was more effective at degrading CBZ than either UV or chlorination alone. The CBZ degradation followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constants (kobs) were affected by the chlorine dose, solution pH, and natural organic matter concentration to different degrees. Degradation of CBZ greatly increased with increasing chlorine dose and decreasing solution pH during the UV/chlorine process. Additionally, the presence of natural organic matter in the solution inhibited the degradation of CBZ. UV photolysis, chlorination, and reactive species (hydroxyl radical •OH and chlorine atoms •Cl) were identified as responsible for CBZ degradation in the UV/chlorine process. Finally, a degradation pathway for CBZ in the UV/chlorine process was proposed and the formation potentials of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products were evaluated. Enhanced formation of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane precursors should be considered when applying UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to drinking water. PMID:27164884

  4. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  5. Thermal Cycling of Advanced Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; CA Lewisohn; M Singh; RE Loehman

    2003-08-25

    Thermal cycling was conducted on the compressive mica seals at 800 degrees C in air. Thin ({approx}0.1 mm) Muscovite mica was pressed between a metal tube and an alumina substrate and tested for leak rates at a stress of 100 psi in the advanced design and the plain design. The advanced design involves adding two glass interlayers and was found to greatly reduce the leak rates. Two metals (Inconcl No.600 and SS430) with high and low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) were used to evaluate the effect of CTE mismatch on thermal cycling. The results showed that the leak rates were lower for the advanced design than the plain micas. In addition, using the lower CTE (SS430) metal tube resulted in lower leak rates as compared to Inconel No.600 metal (high CTE). In general, the leak rates abruptly increased during the first couple of cycles, and the

  6. Mixed Brownian alignment and Néel rotations in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspensions driven by an ac field

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Reeves, Daniel B.; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with highly nonlinear magnetic behavior are attractive for biomedical applications like magnetic particle imaging and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Such particles display interesting magnetic properties in alternating magnetic fields and here we document experiments that show differences between the magnetization dynamics of certain particles in frozen and melted states. This effect goes beyond the small temperature difference (ΔT ~ 20 °C) and we show the dynamics to be a mixture of Brownian alignment of the particles and Néel rotation of their moments occurring in liquid particle suspensions. These phenomena can be modeled in a stochastic differential equation approach by postulating log-normal distributions and partial Brownian alignment of an effective anisotropy axis. We emphasize that precise particle-specific characterization through experiments and nonlinear simulations is necessary to predict dynamics in solution and optimize their behavior for emerging biomedical applications including magnetic particle imaging. PMID:26504371

  7. Fatty Acid Oxidation-Driven Src Links Mitochondrial Energy Reprogramming and Regulation of Oncogenic Properties in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Hyoung; Vithayathil, Sajna; Kumar, Santosh; Sung, Pi-Lin; Dobrolecki, Lacey Elizabeth; Putluri, Vasanta; Bhat, Vadiraja B.; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Gupta, Vineet; Arora, Kavisha; Wu, Danli; Tsouko, Efrosini; Zhang, Yiqun; Maity, Suman; Donti, Taraka R.; Graham, Brett H.; Frigo, Daniel E.; Coarfa, Cristian; Yotnda, Patricia; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Lewis, Michael T.; Creighton, Chad J.; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Summary Transmitochondrial cybrids and multiple OMICs approaches were used to understand mitochondrial reprogramming and mitochondria-regulated cancer pathways in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Analysis of cybrids and established breast cancer (BC) cell lines showed that metastatic TNBC maintains high levels of ATP through fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and activates Src oncoprotein through autophosphorylation at Y419. Manipulation of FAO including the knocking down of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1) and 2 (CPT2), the rate-limiting proteins of FAO, and analysis of patient-derived xenograft models, confirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO in Src activation and metastasis. Analysis of TCGA and other independent BC clinical data further reaffirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO and CPT genes in Src regulation and their significance in BC metastasis. PMID:26923594

  8. Electron-phonon driven spin frustration in multi-band Hubbard models: MX chains and oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T.; Yonemitsu, K.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.; Roeder, H.

    1992-12-01

    We discuss the consequences of both electron-phonon and electron-electron couplings in 1D and 2D multi-band (Peierls-Hubbard) models are discussed. After a brief discussion of various analytic limits, we focused on (Hartree-Fock and exact) numerical studies in the intermediate regime for both couplings, where unusual spin-Peierls as well as long-period, frustrated ground states are found. Doping into such phases or near the phase boundaries can lead to further interesting phenomena such as separation of spin and charge, a dopant-induced phase transition of the global (parent) phase, or real-space (``bipolaronic``) pairing. Possible experimentally observable consequences of this rich phase diagram for halogen-bridged, transition metal, linear chain complexes (MX chains) in 1D and the oxide superconductors in 2D are discussed.

  9. High catalytic activity of heteropolynuclear cyanide complexes containing cobalt and platinum ions: visible-light driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Oyama, Kohei; Gates, Rachel; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-05-01

    A near-stoichiometric amount of O2 was evolved as observed in the visible-light irradiation of an aqueous buffer (pH 8) containing [Ru(II) (2,2'-bipyridine)3 ] as a photosensitizer, Na2 S2 O8 as a sacrificial electron acceptor, and a heteropolynuclear cyanide complex as a water-oxidation catalyst. The heteropolynuclear cyanide complexes exhibited higher catalytic activity than a polynuclear cyanide complex containing only Co(III) or Pt(IV) ions as C-bound metal ions. The origin of the synergistic effect between Co and Pt ions is discussed in relation to electronic and local atomic structures of the complexes. PMID:25866203

  10. Fatty Acid Oxidation-Driven Src Links Mitochondrial Energy Reprogramming and Oncogenic Properties in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hyoung; Vithayathil, Sajna; Kumar, Santosh; Sung, Pi-Lin; Dobrolecki, Lacey Elizabeth; Putluri, Vasanta; Bhat, Vadiraja B; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Gupta, Vineet; Arora, Kavisha; Wu, Danli; Tsouko, Efrosini; Zhang, Yiqun; Maity, Suman; Donti, Taraka R; Graham, Brett H; Frigo, Daniel E; Coarfa, Cristian; Yotnda, Patricia; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Lewis, Michael T; Creighton, Chad J; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-03-01

    Transmitochondrial cybrids and multiple OMICs approaches were used to understand mitochondrial reprogramming and mitochondria-regulated cancer pathways in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Analysis of cybrids and established breast cancer (BC) cell lines showed that metastatic TNBC maintains high levels of ATP through fatty acid β oxidation (FAO) and activates Src oncoprotein through autophosphorylation at Y419. Manipulation of FAO including the knocking down of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1) and 2 (CPT2), the rate-limiting proteins of FAO, and analysis of patient-derived xenograft models confirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO in Src activation and metastasis. Analysis of TCGA and other independent BC clinical data further reaffirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO and CPT genes in Src regulation and their significance in BC metastasis. PMID:26923594

  11. Concentration-driven phase control for low temperature synthesis of phase-pure anatase and rutile titanium oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifeng; Xiao, Chunyan; Yamada, Shuhei; Yoshinaga, Kohji; Bu, Xiu R; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    It is highly desirable to develop controlled synthetic methods at low temperature (<100 °C) for defined phases of titanium oxide nanoparticle. We present here a simple low temperature approach which is based on the peroxide route. This approach allows the preparation of phase-pure rutile and anatase without the use of any additives or surfactants or external acids. The formation of crystalline phases is found to be dependent on reaction temperature and highly dependent on concentration. Phase-pure rutile is obtained in two concentration zones while phase-pure anatase is obtained in one concentration zone. The relationship between phases and reaction conditions (concentration and temperature) fits well with the nucleation diffusion rate model. PMID:25746180

  12. Oxidative stress, redox signaling pathways, and autophagy in cachectic muscles of male patients with advanced COPD and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Rodriguez, Diego A; Lloreta, Josep; Ausin, Pilar; Pascual-Guardia, Sergio; Broquetas, Joan; Roca, Josep; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Muscle dysfunction and wasting are predictors of mortality in advanced COPD and malignancies. Redox imbalance and enhanced protein catabolism are underlying mechanisms in COPD. We hypothesized that the expression profile of several biological markers share similarities in patients with cachexia associated with either COPD or lung cancer (LC). In vastus lateralis of cachectic patients with either LC (n=10) or advanced COPD (n=16) and healthy controls (n=10), markers of redox balance, inflammation, proteolysis, autophagy, signaling pathways, mitochondrial function, muscle structure, and sarcomere damage were measured using laboratory and light and electron microscopy techniques. Systemic redox balance and inflammation were also determined. All subjects were clinically evaluated. Compared to controls, in both cachectic groups of patients, a similar expression profile of different biological markers was observed in their muscles: increased levels of muscle protein oxidation and ubiquitination (p<0.05, both), which positively correlated (r=0.888), redox-sensitive signaling pathways (NF-κB and FoxO) were activated (p<0.05, all), fast-twitch fiber sizes were atrophied, muscle structural abnormalities and sarcomere disruptions were significantly greater (p<0.05, both). Structural and functional protein levels were lower in muscles of both cachectic patient groups than in controls (p<0.05, all). However, levels of autophagy markers including ultrastructural autophagosome counts were increased only in muscles of cachectic COPD patients (p<0.05). Systemic oxidative stress and inflammation levels were also increased in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.005, both). Oxidative stress and redox-sensitive signaling pathways are likely to contribute to the etiology of muscle wasting and sarcomere disruption in patients with respiratory cachexia: LC and COPD. PMID:25464271

  13. Synthesis of bacteria promoted reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide networks for advanced supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiming; Yu, Xinzhi; Guo, Di; Qu, Baihua; Zhang, Ming; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2013-08-14

    Supercapacitors with potential high power are useful and have attracted much attention recently. Graphene-based composites have been demonstrated to be promising electrode materials for supercapacitors with enhanced properties. To improve the performance of graphene-based composites further and realize their synthesis with large scale, we report a green approach to synthesize bacteria-reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (BGNS) networks. By using Bacillus subtilis as spacers, we deposited reduced graphene oxide/Ni3S2 nanoparticle composites with submillimeter pores directly onto substrate by a binder-free electrostatic spray approach to form BGNS networks. Their electrochemical capacitor performance was evaluated. Compared with stacked reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (GNS) prepared without the aid of bacteria, BGNS with unique nm-μm structure exhibited a higher specific capacitance of about 1424 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.75 A g(-1). About 67.5% of the capacitance was retained as the current density increased from 0.75 to 15 A g(-1). At a current density of 75 A g(-1), a specific capacitance of 406 F g(-1) could still remain. The results indicate that the reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide network promoted by bacteria is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors. PMID:23751359

  14. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF CONTROLS ON MICROBIAL FE(III) OXIDE REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fe(III) oxides are ubiquitous components of soils, sediments, and subsurface materials, and are one of the most important sorbents for heavy metals, radionuclides, organic contaminants and organic/metal co-contaminants in the subsurface. These compounds can serve as electron sink...

  15. FINAL REPORT. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF CONTROLS ON MICROBIAL FE(III) OXIDE REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this research project were to refine existing models of microbiological and geochemical controls on Fe(III) oxide reduction, using laboratory reactor systems which mimic to varying degrees the physical and chemical conditions of the subsurface. Novel experimenta...

  16. Advanced Experiment Analysis of controls on Microbial FE(III) Oxide Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, Eric E.; Urrutia, Matilde M.

    1999-06-01

    Understanding factors which control the long-term survival and activity of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in subsurface sedimentary environments is important for predicting the ability of these organisms to serve as agents for bioremediation of organic and inorganic contaminants. This project seeks to refine our quantitative understanding of microbiological and geochemical controls on bacterial Fe(III) oxide reduction and growth of FeRB, using laboratory reactor systems which mimic to varying degrees the physical and chemical conditions of subsurface sedimentary environments. Methods for studying microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and FeRB growth in experimental systems which incorporate advective aqueous phase flux are being developed for this purpose. These methodologies, together with an accumulating database on the kinetics of Fe(III) reduction and bacterial growth with various synthetic and natural Fe(III) oxide minerals, will be applicable to experimental and modeling studies of subsurface contaminant transformations directly coupled to or influenced by bacterial Fe(III) oxide reduction activity.

  17. High Pressure Steam Oxidation of Alloys for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2014-08-05

    A steam oxidation test was conducted at 267 ± 17 bar and 670°C for 293 hr. A comparison test was run at 1 bar. All of the alloys showed an increase in scale thickness and oxidation rate with pressure, and TP304H and IN625 had very large increases. Fine-grained TP304H at 267 bar behaved like a coarse grained alloy, indicative of high pressure increasing the critical Cr level needed to form and maintain a chromia scale. At 267 bar H230, H263, H282, IN617 and IN740 had kp values a factor of one–to-two orders of magnitude higher than at 1 bar. IN625 had a four order of magnitude increase in kp at 267 bar compared to 1 bar. Possible causes for increased oxidation rates with increased pressure were examined, including increased solid state diffusion within the oxide scale and increased critical Cr content to establish and maintain a chromia scale.

  18. Development of mutagenicity during degradation of N-nitrosamines by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Mestankova, Hana; Schirmer, Kristin; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

    2014-12-01

    Development of mutagenicity of five N-nitrosamines (N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA)) was investigated during oxidative processes involving UV-photolysis, ozone and OH radicals. The mutagenicity was detected by the Ames test with 3 different strains, TA98, TAMix and YG7108, a strain which is sensitive for N-nitrosamines, in presence and absence of metabolic activation (S9). UV photolysis of mutagenic N-nitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NDPA and NPYR) leads to the removal of their specific mutagenic activity as detected in YG7108 in the presence of S9. A formation of mutagens during UV photolysis was detected only in case of NDPhA in the strain TA98. Oxidation products of NDMA, NDEA and NDPhA did not show any significant mutagenicity in the strains used, whereas oxidation of NDPA and NPYR by hydroxyl radicals seems to lead to the formation of direct mutagens (mutagenic in the absence of S9) in YG7108 and TAMix. Oxidation by hydroxyl radicals of N-nitrosamines with chains longer than ethyl can mimic metabolic activation of N-nitrosamines in vivo. PMID:25240607

  19. Non-thermal plasmas as gas-phase advanced oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1997-08-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are useful for generating reactive species (free radicals) in a gas stream. Because radical attack reaction rate constants are very large for many chemical species, entrained pollutants are readily decomposed by radicals. Such plasmas can generate both oxidative and reductive radicals; therefore, they show promise for treating a wide variety of pollutants.

  20. Theoretical comparison of advanced methods for calculating nitrous oxide fluxes using non-steady state chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several flux-calculation (FC) schemes are available for determining soil-to-atmosphere emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and other trace gases using data from non-steady-state flux chambers. Recently developed methods claim to provide more accuracy in estimating the true pre-deployment flux (f0) comp...

  1. Comparative study of the degradation of carbamazepine in water by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao-Meng; Zhou, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Duan, Yan-Ping; Qiang, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Tian C

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of carbamazepine (CBZ) using ultraviolet (UV), UV/H2O2, Fenton, UV/Fenton and photocatalytic oxidation with TiO2 (UV/TiO2) was studied in deionized water. The five different oxidation processes were compared for the removal kinetics of CBZ. The results showed that all the processes followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The direct photolysis (UV alone) was found to be less effective than UV/H2O2 oxidation for the degradation of CBZ. An approximate 20% increase in the CBZ removal efficiency occurred with the UV/Fenton reaction as compared with the Fenton oxidation. In the UV/TiO2 system, the kinetics of CBZ degradation in the presence of different concentrations of TiO2 followed the pseudo-first order degradation, which was consistent with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model. On a time basis, the degradation efficiencies ofCBZ were in the following order: UV/Fenton (86.9% +/- 1.7%) > UV/TiO2 (70.4% +/- 4.2%) > Fenton (67.8% +/- 2.6%) > UV/H2O2 (40.65 +/- 5.1%) > UV (12.2% +/- 1.4%). However, the lowest cost was obtained with the Fenton process. PMID:22856279

  2. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  3. 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Sorge, J.N.; Menzies, B.; Smouse, S.M.; Stallings, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Technology project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide NOx emissions from coal-fired boilers. The primary objective of the demonstration is to determine the long-term NOx reduction performance of advanced overfire air (AOFA), low NOx burners (LNB), and advanced digital control/optimization methodologies applied in a stepwise fashion to a 500 MW boiler. The focus of this paper is to report (1) on the installation of three on-line carbon-in-ash monitors and (2) the design and results to date from the advanced digital control/optimization phase of the project.

  4. Advanced Electrochemical Oxidation of 1,4-Dioxane via Dark Catalysis by Novel Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Pellets.

    PubMed

    Jasmann, Jeramy R; Borch, Thomas; Sale, Tom C; Blotevogel, Jens

    2016-08-16

    1,4-dioxane is an emerging groundwater contaminant with significant regulatory implications. Because it is resistant to traditional groundwater treatments, remediation of 1,4-dioxane is often limited to costly ex situ UV-based advanced oxidation. By varying applied voltage, electrical conductivity, seepage velocity, and influent contaminant concentration in flow-through reactors, we show that electrochemical oxidation is a viable technology for in situ and ex situ treatment of 1,4-dioxane under a wide range of environmental conditions. Using novel titanium dioxide (TiO2) pellets, we demonstrate for the first time that this prominent catalyst can be activated in the dark even when electrically insulated from the electrodes. TiO2-catalyzed reactors achieved efficiencies of greater than 97% degradation of 1,4-dioxane, up to 4.6 times higher than noncatalyzed electrolytic reactors. However, the greatest catalytic enhancement (70% degradation versus no degradation without catalysis) was observed in low-ionic-strength water, where conventional electrochemical approaches notoriously fail. The TiO2 pellet's dark-catalytic oxidation activity was confirmed on the pharmaceutical lamotrigine and the industrial solvent chlorobenzene, signifying that electrocatalytic treatment has tremendous potential as a transformative remediation technology for persistent organic pollutants in groundwater and other aqueous environments. PMID:27420906

  5. Recent advances in biosynthetic modeling of nitric oxide reductases and insights gained from nuclear resonance vibrational and other spectroscopic studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Reed, Julian; Sage, Timothy; Branagan, Nicole C.; Petrik, Igor D.; Miner, Kyle D.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. Ercan; Lu, Yi

    2015-08-14

    This Forum Article focuses on recent advances in structural and spectroscopic studies of biosynthetic models of nitric oxide reductases (NORs). NORs are complex metalloenzymes found in the denitrification pathway of Earth's nitrogen cycle where they catalyze the proton-dependent twoelectron reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N2O). While much progress has been made in biochemical and biophysical studies of native NORs and their variants, a. clear mechanistic understanding of this important metalloenzyme related to its function is still elusive. We report herein UV vis and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) studies of mononitrosylated intermediates of the NOR reaction ofmore » a biosynthetic model. The ability to selectively substitute metals at either heme or nonheme metal sites allows the introduction of independent 57Fe probe atoms at either site, as well as allowing the preparation of analogues of stable reaction intermediates by replacing either metal with a redox inactive metal. Together with previous structural and spectroscopic results, we summarize insights gained from studying these biosynthetic models toward understanding structural features responsible for the NOR activity and its mechanism. As a result, the outlook on NOR modeling is also discussed, with an emphasis on the design of models capable of catalytic turnovers designed based on close mimics of the secondary coordination sphere of native NORs.« less

  6. Evaluation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products, Prooxidant-Antioxidant Balance, and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Untreated Vitiligo Patients

    PubMed Central

    Güntaş, Gülcan; Ekmekçi, Özlem Balcı; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Ekmekci, Hakan; Songür, Abdullah; Uzunçakmak, Tuğba Kevser Üstünbaş; Vehid, Hayriye Ertem; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçın; Uzun, Hafize

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a chronic, common disease of unknown etiology, and oxidative stress is suggested to have a role in its etiopathogenesis. Objective Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB), and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) were evaluated regarding their role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo as well as their relationship with clinical presentation and disease severity, and these parameters were compared with those of healthy controls. Methods The study included 53 patients with vitiligo and 20 healthy volunteers as the control group. AOPP level, PAB, and FRAP were determined by colorimetric methods. Results PAB and FRAP level were significantly higher in patients with vitiligo than in healthy controls (p<0.001). The AOPP levels in vitiligo patients were not statistically significantly higher than those in healthy controls. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index positively correlated with disease duration (rs: 0.531, p<0.001). Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of AOPP and PAB status in vitiligo. PAB may be used as an indicator for oxidative stress in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. Our results show that these parameters may play a major role in the melanocyte damage observed in vitiligo. Further studies are required to confirm the mechanisms underlying this effect. PMID:25834357

  7. Application of Engineered Si Nanoparticles in Light-Induced Advanced Oxidation Remediation of a Water-Borne Model Contaminant.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Purkait, Tapas K; Goss, Greg G; Bolton, James R; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Veinot, Jonathan G C

    2016-05-24

    Surface-engineered amphiphilic polymer-coated silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) were employed as photocatalysts to capture and degrade a model organic contaminant (methanol) in water. This study represents the first time SiNPs have been employed in the initiation of advanced oxidation processes that are commonly used to degrade organic constituents in industrial wastewaters. The quantum yield of photocatalytic methanol oxidation and the corresponding yield factor for the generation of active OH radicals are reported. The size and surface defect dependent photocatalytic activity of SiNPs was investigated. The yield factors (η) decreased with increasing particle size and reached impressive values that exceeded that of equivalent TiO2 nanoparticle systems by 3-4 times and are comparable to the robust UV/Cl2 and UV/H2O2 systems. The higher photocatalytic efficiency of SiNPs is attributed to the combined effects of quantum confinement, effective band gap, and surface states, among which surface states play a dominant role. SiNPs provide a potentially tunable, biologically inert, and robust nanoparticle system for photocatalytic oxidation of wastewater contaminants. PMID:27078819

  8. Decreased melatonin levels and increased levels of advanced oxidation protein products in the seminal plasma are related to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Ewa Maria; Piwowar, Agnieszka; Zeman, Michal; Stebelová, Katarína; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine secreted by the pineal gland, is known as a powerful free-radical scavenger and wide-spectrum antioxidant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to correlate markers of oxidative protein damage (advanced oxidation protein products, AOPPs) and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) with melatonin levels in the seminal plasma of men with azoospermia (n=37), theratozoospermia (n=29) and fertile controls (normozoospermia, n=37). Melatonin concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The levels of AOPP as well as TAC efficiency (determined by the ferric reducing antioxidant power, FRAP) were estimated by spectrophotometric methods. The concentration of melatonin and AOPP significantly differed in azoospermic (P<0.0001) and theratozoospermic (P<0.0001) patients versus fertile men, and correlated negatively (r=-0.33, P=0.0016). The TAC levels were significantly higher in azoospermia than in theratozoospermia (P=0.0022) and the control group (P=0.00016). In azoospermia, the AOPP concentration was also significantly higher than that observed in theratozoospermia (P=0.00029). Decreased levels of melatonin together with elevated AOPP altered the oxidative-antioxidative balance in the ejaculate, thereby reducing fertility. Therefore, melatonin and AOPP levels may serve as additional diagnostic markers of semen quality and male reproductive potential. PMID:25218686

  9. Recent advances in biosynthetic modeling of nitric oxide reductases and insights gained from nuclear resonance vibrational and other spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Reed, Julian; Sage, Timothy; Branagan, Nicole C.; Petrik, Igor D.; Miner, Kyle D.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. Ercan; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-05

    This Forum Article focuses on recent advances in structural and spectroscopic studies of biosynthetic models of nitric oxide reductases (NORs). NORs are complex metalloenzymes found in the denitrification pathway of Earth's nitrogen cycle where they catalyze the proton-dependent twoelectron reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N2O). While much progress has been made in biochemical and biophysical studies of native NORs and their variants, a. clear mechanistic understanding of this important metalloenzyme related to its function is still elusive. We report herein UV vis and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) studies of mononitrosylated intermediates of the NOR reaction of a biosynthetic model. The ability to selectively substitute metals at either heme or nonheme metal sites allows the introduction of independent 57Fe probe atoms at either site, as well as allowing the preparation of analogues of stable reaction intermediates by replacing either metal with a redox inactive metal. Together with previous structural and spectroscopic results, we summarize insights gained from studying these biosynthetic models toward understanding structural features responsible for the NOR activity and its mechanism. As a result, the outlook on NOR modeling is also discussed, with an emphasis on the design of models capable of catalytic turnovers designed based on close mimics of the secondary coordination sphere of native NORs.

  10. Removal of coloured compounds from textile industry effluents by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nagel-Hassemer, Maria Eliza; Carvalho-Pinto, Catia Regina S; Matias, William Gerson; Lapolli, Flávio Rubens

    2011-12-01

    This study has investigated the reduction in coloured substances and toxic compounds present in textile industry effluent by the use of an advanced oxidation process using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant, activated by ultraviolet radiation. The investigation was carried out on industrial effluents, both raw and after biological treatment, using different concentrations of H2O2 in a photochemical reactor equipped with a 250 W high-pressure mercury vapour lamp. The results showed that after 60 minutes of ultraviolet irradiation a H2O2 concentration of 500 mg L(-1) was able to remove approximately 73% of the coloured compounds present in raw effluent and 96% of those present in biologically treated effluent. Additionally, post-treatment toxicity tests performed using the microcrustacean Daphnia magna showed a significant effective reduction in the acute toxicity of the raw effluent. In tests carried out with treatment at a concentration of 750 and 1000 mg L(-1) H2O2, analysis of the frequency ofmicronuclei in erythrocytes of Tilapia cf rendalli exposed to treated effluent samples confirmed that there were no mutagenic effects on the fish. Together, these results indicate that the oxidation process offers a good alternative for the removal of colour and toxicity from textile industry effluent. PMID:22439575

  11. Establishment of a novel advanced oxidation process for economical and effective removal of SO2 and NO.

    PubMed

    Hao, Runlong; Zhao, Yi; Yuan, Bo; Zhou, Sihan; Yang, Shuo

    2016-11-15

    SO2 and NO have caused serious haze in China. For coping with the terrible problem, this paper proposed a novel advanced oxidation process of ultraviolet (UV) catalyzing vaporized H2O2 for simultaneous removal of SO2 and NO. Effects of various factors on simultaneous removal of SO2 and NO were investigated, such as the mass concentration of H2O2, the UV energy density, the UV wavelength, the H2O2 pH, the temperatures of H2O2 vaporization and UV-catalysis, the flue gas residence time, the concentrations of SO2, NO and O2, and radical scavenger. The removal efficiencies of 100% for SO2 and 87.8% for NO were obtained under the optimal conditions. The proposed approach has some superiorities, i.e. less dosage and high utilization of oxidant, short flue gas residence time and inhibiting the competition between SO2 and NO for oxidants. The results indicated that the desulfurization process was dominated by the absorption by HA-Na, whereas the denitrification was primarily affected by the H2O2 dosage, UV energy density and H2O2 pH. Interestingly, an appropriate amount of SO2 was beneficial for NO removal. The reaction mechanism was speculated based on the characterizations of removal products by XRD, FT-IR and IC. PMID:27427889

  12. Recent advances in biosynthetic modeling of nitric oxide reductases and insights gained from nuclear resonance vibrational and other spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Reed, Julian; Sage, J Timothy; Branagan, Nicole C; Petrik, Igor D; Miner, Kyle D; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E Ercan; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    This Forum Article focuses on recent advances in structural and spectroscopic studies of biosynthetic models of nitric oxide reductases (NORs). NORs are complex metalloenzymes found in the denitrification pathway of Earth's nitrogen cycle where they catalyze the proton-dependent two-electron reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N2O). While much progress has been made in biochemical and biophysical studies of native NORs and their variants, a clear mechanistic understanding of this important metalloenzyme related to its function is still elusive. We report herein UV-vis and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) studies of mononitrosylated intermediates of the NOR reaction of a biosynthetic model. The ability to selectively substitute metals at either heme or nonheme metal sites allows the introduction of independent (57)Fe probe atoms at either site, as well as allowing the preparation of analogues of stable reaction intermediates by replacing either metal with a redox inactive metal. Together with previous structural and spectroscopic results, we summarize insights gained from studying these biosynthetic models toward understanding structural features responsible for the NOR activity and its mechanism. The outlook on NOR modeling is also discussed, with an emphasis on the design of models capable of catalytic turnovers designed based on close mimics of the secondary coordination sphere of native NORs. PMID:26274098

  13. mTORC1-Driven Tumor Cells Are Highly Sensitive to Therapeutic Targeting by Antagonists of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Shin, Sejeong; Sun, Yang; Yoon, Sang-Oh; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Erik; Yu, Jane; Zhang, Jianming; Blenis, John

    2016-08-15

    mTORC1 is a central signaling node in controlling cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism that is aberrantly activated in cancers and certain cancer-associated genetic disorders, such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis. However, while mTORC1-inhibitory compounds (rapamycin and rapalogs) attracted interest as candidate therapeutics, clinical trials have not replicated the promising findings in preclinical models, perhaps because these compounds tend to limit cell proliferation without inducing cell death. In seeking to address this issue, we performed a high-throughput screen for small molecules that could heighten the cytotoxicity of mTORC1 inhibitors. Here we report the discovery that combining inhibitors of mTORC1 and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) can selectively and efficiently trigger apoptosis in Tsc2-deficient cells but not wild-type cells. Mechanistic investigations revealed that coinhibition of mTORC1 and GCLC decreased the level of the intracellular thiol antioxidant glutathione (GSH), thereby increasing levels of reactive oxygen species, which we determined to mediate cell death in Tsc2-deficient cells. Our findings offer preclinical proof of concept for a strategy to selectively increase the cytotoxicity of mTORC1 inhibitors as a therapy to eradicate tumor cells marked by high mTORC1 signaling, based on cotargeting a GSH-controlled oxidative stress pathway. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4816-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197195

  14. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhiqian; Xu, Maonian; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Zhang, Yuetuan; Brynjolfsson, Sigurdur; Fu, Weiqi

    2015-01-01

    Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26426027

  15. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhiqian; Xu, Maonian; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Zhang, Yuetuan; Brynjolfsson, Sigurdur; Fu, Weiqi

    2015-10-01

    Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26426027

  16. Theoretical Study of Triboelectric-Potential Gated/Driven Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenbo; Yu, Ruomeng; He, Yongning; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Triboelectric nanogenerator has drawn considerable attentions as a potential candidate for harvesting mechanical energies in our daily life. By utilizing the triboelectric potential generated through the coupling of contact electrification and electrostatic induction, the "tribotronics" has been introduced to tune/control the charge carrier transport behavior of silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Here, we perform a theoretical study of the performances of tribotronic MOSFET gated by triboelectric potential in two working modes through finite element analysis. The drain-source current dependence on contact-electrification generated triboelectric charges, gap separation distance, and externally applied bias are investigated. The in-depth physical mechanism of the tribotronic MOSFET operations is thoroughly illustrated by calculating and analyzing the charge transfer process, voltage relationship to gap separation distance, and electric potential distribution. Moreover, a tribotronic MOSFET working concept is proposed, simulated and studied for performing self-powered FET and logic operations. This work provides a deep understanding of working mechanisms and design guidance of tribotronic MOSFET for potential applications in micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), human-machine interface, flexible electronics, and self-powered active sensors. PMID:27077327

  17. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and pattern

  18. Advances in diabetes for the millennium: vitamins and oxidant stress in diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Chertow, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Hyperinduced oxidant stress may have a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its micro- and macrovascular complications. Attaining euglycemia and the use of antioxidant vitamins could reduce oxidant stress and complications. In general, evidence does not support the use of supplements, and supplements are not recommended unless patients are deficient. Use of vitamins in excess may have adverse effects. Vitamin supplements are indicated in patients deficient in vitamins due to inadequate dietary intake or intestinal disease. Treatment with proper amounts of vitamins and antioxidants is best accomplished with a balanced diet including 3 servings of vegetables and 2 servings of fruits. Regarding supplementation of specific vitamins: carotene cannot be recommended in view of the possible harm and lack of benefit in clinical studies. Vitamin A (retinol) and Vitamin D should be repleted if deficient by laboratory assay. Excesses should be avoided. Vitamin A supplements, particularly in pregnancy, should not exceed 10,000 IU daily or a supplement should not exceed 25,000 units weekly. Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) alone in doses of 400 units is of questionable value, and larger doses may cause intracranial hemorrhage or interact negatively with lipid-lowering drugs. Vitamin E should not be used in patients who have bleeding disorders or patients on anticoagulants or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) losses in urine may be excessive in diabetic patients and may require repletion to 200 mg in nonsmokers and 250 mg in smokers. Further studies are needed testing: (1) vitamin supplementation in subgroups of patients at high risk for specific complications using tissue-specific indicators of oxidative stress; (2) the role of oxidative stress in nephropathy, diabetic myocardiopathy, dermopathy, joint limitation syndromes, peripheral edema, metabolic bone disease, and pregnancy; (3) the impact of renal failure on oxidative stress; and (4) the effects of

  19. The Urey Instrument: An Advanced In Situ Organic and Oxidant Detector for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, Andrew D.; Chalmers, John H.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Amashukeli, Xenia; Willis, Peter; Skelley, Alison M.; Mathies, Richard A.; Quinn, Richard C.; Zent, Aaron P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Amundson, Ron; Glavin Daniel P.; Botta, Oliver; Barron, Laurence; Blaney, Diana L.; Clark, Benton C.; Coleman, Max; Hofmann, Beda A.; Josset, Jean-Luc; Rettberg, Petra; Ride, Sally; Musée, François Robert; Sephton, Mark A.; Yen, Albert

    2008-06-01

    The Urey organic and oxidant detector consists of a suite of instruments designed to search for several classes of organic molecules in the martian regolith and ascertain whether these compounds were produced by biotic or abiotic processes using chirality measurements. These experiments will also determine the chemical stability of organic molecules within the host regolith based on the presence and chemical reactivity of surface and atmospheric oxidants. Urey has been selected for the Pasteur payload on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) upcoming 2013 ExoMars rover mission. The diverse and effective capabilities of Urey make it an integral part of the payload and will help to achieve a large portion of the mission's primary scientific objective: "to search for signs of past and present life on Mars." This instrument is named in honor of Harold Urey for his seminal contributions to the fields of cosmochemistry and the origin of life.

  20. Advances in Molten Oxide Electrolysis for the Production of Oxygen and Metals from Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, Donald R.; Sirk, Aislinn; Sibille, Laurent; Melendez, Orlando; Lueck, Dale; Curreri, Peter; Dominquez, Jesus; Whitlow, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    As part of an In-Situ Resource Utilization infrastructure to sustain long term-human presence on the lunar surface, the production of oxygen and metals by electrolysis of lunar regolith has been the subject of major scrutiny. There is a reasonably large body of literature characterizing the candidate solvent electrolytes, including ionic liquids, molten salts, fluxed oxides, and pure molten regolith itself. In the light of this information and in consideration of available electrolytic technologies, the authors have determined that direct molten oxide electrolysis at temperatures of approx 1600 C is the most promising avenue for further development. Results from ongoing studies as well as those of previous workers will be presented. Topics include materials selection and testing, electrode stability, gas capture and analysis, and cell operation during feeding and tapping.

  1. The Urey instrument: an advanced in situ organic and oxidant detector for Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Aubrey, Andrew D; Chalmers, John H; Bada, Jeffrey L; Grunthaner, Frank J; Amashukeli, Xenia; Willis, Peter; Skelley, Alison M; Mathies, Richard A; Quinn, Richard C; Zent, Aaron P; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Amundson, Ron; Glavin, Daniel P; Botta, Oliver; Barron, Laurence; Blaney, Diana L; Clark, Benton C; Coleman, Max; Hofmann, Beda A; Josset, Jean-Luc; Rettberg, Petra; Ride, Sally; Robert, François; Sephton, Mark A; Yen, Albert

    2008-06-01

    The Urey organic and oxidant detector consists of a suite of instruments designed to search for several classes of organic molecules in the martian regolith and ascertain whether these compounds were produced by biotic or abiotic processes using chirality measurements. These experiments will also determine the chemical stability of organic molecules within the host regolith based on the presence and chemical reactivity of surface and atmospheric oxidants. Urey has been selected for the Pasteur payload on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) upcoming 2013 ExoMars rover mission. The diverse and effective capabilities of Urey make it an integral part of the payload and will help to achieve a large portion of the mission's primary scientific objective: "to search for signs of past and present life on Mars." This instrument is named in honor of Harold Urey for his seminal contributions to the fields of cosmochemistry and the origin of life. PMID:18680409

  2. Advanced oxidation kinetics of aqueous tri alkyl phosphate flame retardants and plasticizers

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Michael J.; Linden, Karl G.

    2009-01-01

    Tri alkyl phosphate esters are a class of anthropogenic organics commonly found in surface waters of Europe and North America, due to their frequent application as flame retardants, plasticizers, and solvents. Four tri alkyl phosphate esters were evaluated to determine second-order rates of reaction with ultraviolet- and ozone-generated •OH in water. In competition with nitrobenzene in UV irradiated hydrogen peroxide solutions tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP) was fastest to react with •OH (kOH,TBEP=1.03×1010 M-1s-1), followed sequentially by tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) (kOH,TBEP=6.40×109, kOH,TBEP=5.60×108, & kOH,TBEP=1.98×10 M-1s-1). A two-stage process was used to test the validity of the determined kOH for TBEP and the fastest reacting halogenated alkyl phosphate, TCEP. First, •OH oxidation of TCEP and TBEP, in competition with nitrobenzene, was measured in ozonated hydrogen peroxide solutions. Applying multiple regression analysis, it was determined that the UV-H2O2 and O3-H2O2 data sets were statistically identical for each compound. The subsequent validated kOH were used to predict TCEP and TBEP photodegradation in neutral pH, model surface water after chemical oxidant addition and UV irradiation (up to 1000 mJ/cm2). The insignificant difference, between the predicted TBEP and TCEP photodegradation and a best-fit of the first-order exponential decay function to the observed TBEP and TCEP concentrations with increasing UV fluence, was further evidence of the validity of the determined kOH. TBEP oxidation rates were similar in the surface waters tested. Substantial TCEP oxidation in the model surface water required a significant increase in H2O2. PMID:19475974

  3. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel heterogeneous Fenton oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Ma, Wencheng; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Zhao, Qian

    2015-07-01

    Sewage sludge from a biological wastewater treatment plant was converted into sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) with ZnCl2 as activation agent, which was used as a support for ferric oxides to form a catalyst (FeOx/SBAC) by a simple impregnation method. The new material was then used to improve the performance of Fenton oxidation of real biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (CGW). The results indicated that the prepared FeOx/SBAC significantly enhanced the pollutant removal performance in the Fenton process, so that the treated wastewater was more biodegradable and less toxic. The best performance was obtained over a wide pH range from 2 to 7, temperature 30°C, 15 mg/L of H2O2 and 1g/L of catalyst, and the treated effluent concentrations of COD, total phenols, BOD5 and TOC all met the discharge limits in China. Meanwhile, on the basis of significant inhibition by a radical scavenger in the heterogeneous Fenton process as well as the evolution of FT-IR spectra of pollutant-saturated FeOx/BAC with and without H2O2, it was deduced that the catalytic activity was responsible for generating hydroxyl radicals, and a possible reaction pathway and interface mechanism were proposed. Moreover, FeOx/SBAC showed superior stability over five successive oxidation runs. Thus, heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of biologically pretreated CGW by FeOx/SBAC, with the advantages of being economical, efficient and sustainable, holds promise for engineering application. PMID:26141873

  4. Nitric oxide inhibits succinate dehydrogenase-driven oxygen consumption in potato tuber mitochondria in an oxygen tension-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Vagner; Galina, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    NO (nitric oxide) is described as an inhibitor of plant and mammalian respiratory chains owing to its high affinity for COX (cytochrome c oxidase), which hinders the reduction of oxygen to water. In the present study we show that in plant mitochondria NO may interfere with other respiratory complexes as well. We analysed oxygen consumption supported by complex I and/or complex II and/or external NADH dehydrogenase in Percoll-isolated potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria. When mitochondrial respiration was stimulated by succinate, adding the NO donors SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine) or DETA-NONOate caused a 70% reduction in oxygen consumption rate in state 3 (stimulated with 1 mM of ADP). This inhibition was followed by a significant increase in the Km value of SDH (succinate dehydrogenase) for succinate (Km of 0.77±0.19 to 34.3±5.9 mM, in the presence of NO). When mitochondrial respiration was stimulated by external NADH dehydrogenase or complex I, NO had no effect on respiration. NO itself and DETA-NONOate had similar effects to SNAP. No significant inhibition of respiration was observed in the absence of ADP. More importantly, SNAP inhibited PTM (potato tuber mitochondria) respiration independently of oxygen tensions, indicating a different kinetic mechanism from that observed in mammalian mitochondria. We also observed, in an FAD reduction assay, that SNAP blocked the intrinsic SDH electron flow in much the same way as TTFA (thenoyltrifluoroacetone), a non-competitive SDH inhibitor. We suggest that NO inhibits SDH in its ubiquinone site or its Fe-S centres. These data indicate that SDH has an alternative site of NO action in plant mitochondria. PMID:23039043

  5. Recent advances in graphene and its metal-oxide hybrid nanostructures for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Manish; Singh, Jay; Kuila, Tapas; Layek, Rama K.; Kim, Nam Hoon; Lee, Joong Hee

    2015-03-01

    Today, one of the major challenges is to provide green and powerful energy sources for a cleaner environment. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are promising candidates for energy storage devices, and have attracted considerable attention due to their high energy density, rapid response, and relatively low self-discharge rate. The performance of LIBs greatly depends on the electrode materials; therefore, attention has been focused on designing a variety of electrode materials. Graphene is a two-dimensional carbon nanostructure, which has a high specific surface area and high electrical conductivity. Thus, various studies have been performed to design graphene-based electrode materials by exploiting these properties. Metal-oxide nanoparticles anchored on graphene surfaces in a hybrid form have been used to increase the efficiency of electrode materials. This review highlights the recent progress in graphene and graphene-based metal-oxide hybrids for use as electrode materials in LIBs. In particular, emphasis has been placed on the synthesis methods, structural properties, and synergetic effects of metal-oxide/graphene hybrids towards producing enhanced electrochemical response. The use of hybrid materials has shown significant improvement in the performance of electrodes.

  6. Recent advances in mathematical modeling of nitrous oxides emissions from wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-12-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be emitted from wastewater treatment contributing to its greenhouse gas footprint significantly. Mathematical modeling of N2O emissions is of great importance toward the understanding and reduction of the environmental impact of wastewater treatment systems. This article reviews the current status of the modeling of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment. The existing mathematical models describing all the known microbial pathways for N2O production are reviewed and discussed. These included N2O production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) through the hydroxylamine oxidation pathway and the AOB denitrification pathway, N2O production by heterotrophic denitrifiers through the denitrification pathway, and the integration of these pathways in single N2O models. The calibration and validation of these models using lab-scale and full-scale experimental data is also reviewed. We conclude that the mathematical modeling of N2O production, while is still being enhanced supported by new knowledge development, has reached a maturity that facilitates the estimation of site-specific N2O emissions and the development of mitigation strategies for a wastewater treatment plant taking into the specific design and operational conditions of the plant. PMID:26451976

  7. Nitrous oxide and methane dynamics in a coral reef lagoon driven by pore water exchange: Insights from automated high-frequency observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Chiara; Santos, Isaac R.; Cyronak, Tyler; McMahon, Ashly; Maher, Damien T.

    2015-04-01

    Automated cavity ring down spectroscopy was used to make continuous measurements of dissolved methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide in a coral reef lagoon for 2 weeks (Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef). Radon (222Rn) was used to trace the influence of tidally driven pore water exchange on greenhouse gas dynamics. Clear tidal variation was observed for CH4, which correlated to 222Rn in lagoon waters. N2O correlated to 222Rn during the day only, which appears to be a response to coupled nitrification-denitrification in oxic sediments, fueled by nitrate derived from bird guano. The lagoon was a net source of CH4 and N2O to the atmosphere and a sink for atmospheric CO2. The estimated pore water-derived CH4 and N2O fluxes were 3.2-fold and 24.0-fold greater than the fluxes to the atmosphere. Overall, pore water and/or groundwater exchange were the only important sources of CH4 and major controls of N2O in the coral reef lagoon.

  8. Modelling the behaviour of oxide fuels containing minor actinides with urania, thoria and zirconia matrices in an accelerator-driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V.; Lemehov, S.; Messaoudi, N.; Van Uffelen, P.; Aı̈t Abderrahim, H.

    2003-06-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK • CEN, is currently working on the pre-design of the multipurpose accelerator-driven system (ADS) MYRRHA. A demonstration of the possibility of transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products with a realistic design of experimental fuel targets and prognosis of their behaviour under typical ADS conditions is an important task in the MYRRHA project. In the present article, the irradiation behaviour of three different oxide fuel mixtures, containing americium and plutonium - (Am,Pu,U)O 2- x with urania matrix, (Am,Pu,Th)O 2- x with thoria matrix and (Am,Y,Pu,Zr)O 2- x with inert zirconia matrix stabilised by yttria - were simulated with the new fuel performance code MACROS, which is under development and testing at the SCK • CEN. All the fuel rods were considered to be of the same design and sizes: annular fuel pellets, helium bounded with the stainless steel cladding, and a large gas plenum. The liquid lead-bismuth eutectic was used as coolant. Typical irradiation conditions of the hottest fuel assembly of the MYRRHA subcritical core were pre-calculated with the MCNPX code and used in the following calculations as the input data. The results of prediction of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the designed rods with the considered fuels during three irradiation cycles of 90 EFPD are presented and discussed.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of a new combined cooling, heat and power system driven by solid oxide fuel cell based on ammonia-water mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaolin; Wang, Jiangfeng; Yan, Zhequan; Dai, Yiping; Lu, Bingheng

    2011-10-01

    Although a solid oxide fuel cell combined with a gas turbine (SOFC-GT) has good performance, the temperature of exhaust from gas turbine is still relatively high. In order to recover the waste heat of exhaust from the SOFC-GT to enhance energy conversion efficiency as well as to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants, in this study a new combined cooling, heat and power (CCHP) system driven by the SOFC is proposed to perform the trigeneration by using ammonia-water mixture to recover the waste heat of exhaust from the SOFC-GT. The CCHP system, whose main fuel is methane, can generate electricity, cooling effect and heat effect simultaneously. The overall system performance has been evaluated by mathematical models and thermodynamic laws. A parametric analysis is also conducted to examine the effects of some key thermodynamic parameters on the system performance. Results indicate that the overall energy conversion efficiency exceeds 80% under the given conditions, and it is also found that the increasing the fuel flow rate can improve overall energy conversion efficiency, even though both the SOFC efficiency and electricity efficiency decrease. Moreover, with an increased compressor pressure ratio, the SOFC efficiency, electricity efficiency and overall energy conversion efficiency all increase. Ammonia concentration and pressure entering ammonia-water turbine can also affect the CCHP system performance.

  10. MoS2/reduced graphene oxide hybrid with CdS nanoparticles as a visible light-driven photocatalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-chao; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiao-yan

    2016-05-15

    Photocatalytic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds to aromatic amines using visible light is an attractive process that utilizes sunlight as the energy source for the chemical conversions. Herewith we synthesized a composite material consisting of CdS nanoparticles grown on the surface of MoS2/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid as a novel photocatalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). The CdS-MoS2/rGO composite is shown as a high-performance visible light-driven photocatalyst. Even without a noble-metal cocatalyst, the catalyst exhibited a great activity under visible light irradiation for the reduction of 4-NP to much less toxic 4-aminophenol (4-AP) with ammonium formate as the sacrificial agent. Composite CdS-0.03(MoS2/0.01rGO) was found to be the most effective photocatalyst for 4-NP reduction. The high photocatalytic performance is apparently resulted from the synergetic functions of MoS2 and graphene in the composite, i.e. the cocatalysts serve as both the active adsorption sites for 4-NP and electron collectors for the separation of electron-hole pairs generated by CdS nanoparticles. The laboratory results show that the CdS-MoS2/rGO composite is a low-cost and stable photocatalyst for effective reduction and detoxification of nitroaromatic compounds using solar energy. PMID:26894290

  11. Advancing the Chemistry of CuWO4 for Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lhermitte, Charles R; Bartlett, Bart M

    2016-06-21

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells are an ongoing area of exploration that provide a means of converting solar energy into a storable chemical form (molecular bonds). In particular, using PEC cells to drive the water splitting reaction to obtain H2 could provide a clean and sustainable route to convert solar energy into chemical fuels. Since the discovery of catalytic water splitting on TiO2 photoelectrodes by Fujishima and Honda, significant efforts have been directed toward developing high efficiency metal oxides to use as photocatalysts for this reaction. Improving the efficiency of PEC cells requires developing chemically stable, and highly catalytic anodes for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER). This water oxidation half reaction requires four protons and four electrons coupling in two bond making steps to form O2, which limits the rate. Our group has accelerated efforts in CuWO4 as a candidate for PEC OER chemistry. Its small band gap of 2.3 eV allows for using visible light to drive OER, and the reaction proceeds with a high degree of chemoselectivity, even in the presence of more kinetically accessible anions such as chloride, which is common to seawater. Furthermore, CuWO4 is a chemically robust material when subjected to the highly oxidizing conditions of PEC OER. The next steps for accelerating research using this (and other), ternary phase oxides, is to move beyond reporting the basic PEC measurements to understanding fundamental chemical reaction mechanisms operative during OER on semiconductor surfaces. In this Account, we outline the process for PEC OER on CuWO4 thin films with emphasis on the chemistry of this reaction, the reaction rate and selectivity (determined by controlled-potential coulometry and oxygen-detection experiments). We discuss key challenges with CuWO4 such as slow kinetics and the presence of an OER-mediating mid-gap state, probed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We propose that this mid-gap state imparts the observed

  12. Hierarchical porous nickel oxide-carbon nanotubes as advanced pseudocapacitor materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Aldwin D.; Zhang, Xiang; Rinaldi, Ali; Nguyen, Son T.; Liu, Huihui; Lei, Zhibin; Lu, Li; Duong, Hai M.

    2013-03-01

    Hierarchical porous carbon anode and metal oxide cathode are promising for supercapacitor with both high energy density and high power density. This Letter uses NiO and commercial carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors with high energy storage capacities. Experimental results show that the specific capacitance of the electrode materials for 10%, 30% and 50% CNTs are 279, 242 and 112 F/g, respectively in an aqueous 1 M KOH electrolyte at a charge rate of 0.56 A/g. The maximum specific capacitance is 328 F/g at a charge rate of 0.33 A/g.

  13. Advanced oxidation of the antibiotic sulfapyridine by UV/H₂O₂: Characterization of its transformation products and ecotoxicological implications.

    PubMed

    García-Galán, Ma Jesús; Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Comas, Joaquim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate, under lab-scale conditions, the removal and transformation of the antibiotic sulfapyridine (SPY) upon advanced oxidation with UV/H2O2. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analyses by means of an ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-linear ion trap high resolution Orbitrap instrument (LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) were carried out in order to elucidate the different transformation products (TPs) generated. The abatement (>99%) of the antibiotic was only achieved after 180 min, highlighting its resilience to elimination and its potential persistence in the environment A total of 10 TPs for SPY were detected and their molecular structures elucidated by means of MS(2) and MS(3) scans. Finally, the combined ecotoxicity at different treatment times was evaluated by means of bioluminescence inhibition assays with the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri. PMID:26789837

  14. Giardia duodenalis: Number and Fluorescence Reduction Caused by the Advanced Oxidation Process (H2O2/UV)

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, José Roberto; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Guadagnini, Regiane Aparecida; dos Santos, Luciana Urbano

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of peroxidation assisted by ultraviolet radiation (H2O2/UV), which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP), on Giardia duodenalis cysts. The cysts were inoculated in synthetic and surface water using a concentration of 12 g H2O2 L−1 and a UV dose (λ = 254 nm) of 5,480 mJcm−2. The aqueous solutions were concentrated using membrane filtration, and the organisms were observed using a direct immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The AOP was effective in reducing the number of G. duodenalis cysts in synthetic and surface water and was most effective in reducing the fluorescence of the cyst walls that were present in the surface water. The AOP showed a higher deleterious potential for G. duodenalis cysts than either peroxidation (H2O2) or photolysis (UV) processes alone. PMID:27379301

  15. A review on advanced oxidation processes for the removal of taste and odor compounds from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, M; Evgenidou, E; Lambropoulou, D; Konstantinou, I

    2014-04-15

    In view of the global concern about the occurrence of taste and odor (T&O) compounds in waters for drinking water supply and the necessity for the development of more innovative and efficient technologies for water treatment and depuration, the focus of this study is to provide a state of the art overview on current knowledge for the application of advanced oxidation technologies for the treatment of T&O compounds in aquatic media. The most representative and newly emerging compounds belonging to the major groups of T&O compounds, such as geosmin, methylisoborneol, benzothiazoles, mercaptans and sulfides as well as aromatic and other miscellaneous T&O compounds, are included in the systematic overview. The current data has been compiled and extensively discussed in terms of the degree of degradation, reaction kinetics, effect of operational parameters and water quality, identity of intermediate and final products and possible transformation pathways. PMID:24525070

  16. Controlling the structure and rheology of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose in zinc chloride aqueous suspensions for fabricating advanced nanopaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sha; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Liangbing; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard; Zhong, Linxin

    Due to its abundance, low-cost, biocompatibility and renewability, cellulose has become an attractive candidate as a functional material for various advanced applications. A key to novel applications is the control of the structure and rheology of suspensions of fibrous cellulose. Among many different approaches of preparing cellulose suspensions, zinc chloride addition to aqueous suspensions is regarded an effective practice. In this study, effects of ZnCl2 concentration on TEMPO-oxidized cellulose (TOC) nanofiber suspensions have been investigated. Highly-transparent cellulose nanofiber suspension can be rapidly obtained by dissolving TOC in 65 wt.% zinc chloride aqueous solutions at room temperature, whereas a transparent zinc ion cross-linked TOC gel could be obtained with zinc chloride concentration as low as 10 wt. %. The structural and rheological characteristics of TOC/ZnCl2 suspensions have been measured to correlate to the performance of thetransparent and flexible nanocellulose paper subsequently produced via vacuum filtration or wet-casting processes.

  17. The application of advanced oxidation technologies to the treatment of effluents from the pulp and paper industry: a review.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Daphne; Merayo, Noemí; Gascó, Antonio; Blanco, Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    The paper industry is adopting zero liquid effluent technologies to reduce freshwater use and meet environmental regulations, which implies closure of water circuits and the progressive accumulation of pollutants that must be removed before water reuse and final wastewater discharge. The traditional water treatment technologies that are used in paper mills (such as dissolved air flotation or biological treatment) are not able to remove recalcitrant contaminants. Therefore, advanced water treatment technologies, such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), are being included in industrial wastewater treatment chains aiming to either improve water biodegradability or its final quality. A comprehensive review of the current state of the art regarding the use of AOPs for the treatment of the organic load of effluents from the paper industry is herein addressed considering mature and emerging treatments for a sustainable water use in this sector. Wastewater composition, which is highly dependent on the raw materials being used in the mills, the selected AOP itself, and its combination with other technologies, will determine the viability of the treatment. In general, all AOPs have been reported to achieve good organic removal efficiencies (COD removal >40%, and about an extra 20% if AOPs are combined with biological stages). Particularly, ozonation has been the most extensively reported and successfully implemented AOP at an industrial scale for effluent treatment or reuse within pulp and paper mills, although Fenton processes (photo-Fenton particularly) have actually addressed better oxidative results (COD removal ≈ 65-75%) at a lab scale, but still need further development at a large scale. PMID:25185495

  18. Recent advances in surface chemistry strategies for the fabrication of functional iron oxide based magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Kukhar, Valeriy P.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanostructures, especially iron-oxide based nanoparticles (IONPs), with appropriate surface functional groups has been intensively researched for many high-technological applications, including high density data storage, biosensing and biomedicine. In medicine, IONPs are nowadays widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in hyperthermia therapy, but are also exploited for drug and gene delivery, detoxification of biological fluids or immunoassays, as they are relatively non-toxic. The use of magnetic particles in vivo requires IONPs to have high magnetization values, diameters below 100 nm with overall narrow size distribution and long time stability in biological fluids. Due to the high surface energies of IONPs agglomeration over time is often encountered. It is thus of prime importance to modify their surface to prevent aggregation and to limit non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto their surface. Such chemical modifications result in IONPs being well-dispersed and biocompatible, and allow for targeted delivery and specific interactions. The chemical nature of IONPs thus determines not only the overall size of the colloid, but also plays a significant role for in vivo and in vitro applications. This review discusses the different concepts currently used for the surface functionalization and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles. The diverse strategies for the covalent linking of drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleotides will be discussed and the chemically relevant steps will be explained in detail.

  19. Development of Advanced ISS-WPA Catalysts for Organic Oxidation at Reduced Pressure/Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Ping; Nalette, Tim; Kayatin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) at International Space Station (ISS) processes a waste stream via multi-filtration beds, where inorganic and non-volatile organic contaminants are removed, and a catalytic reactor, where low molecular weight organics not removed by the adsorption process are oxidized at elevated pressure in the presence of oxygen and elevated temperature above the normal water boiling point. Operation at an elevated pressure requires a more complex system design compared to a reactor that could operate at ambient pressure. However, catalysts currently available have insufficient activity to achieve complete oxidation of the organic load at a temperature less than the water boiling point and ambient pressure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a more active and efficient catalyst at ambient pressure and a moderate temperature that is less than water boiling temperature. This paper describes our efforts in developing high efficiency water processing catalysts. Different catalyst support structures and coating metals were investigated in subscale reactors and results were compared against the flight WPA catalyst. Detailed improvements achieved on alternate metal catalysts at ambient pressure and 200 F will also be presented in the paper.

  20. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The

  1. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Supplementation Reduces Oxidative Stress and Prolongs Survival in Rats with Advanced Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mifuji-Moroka, Rumi; Hara, Nagisa; Miyachi, Hirohide; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Hideaki; Fujita, Naoki; Gabazza, Esteban C.; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Long-term supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with prolonged survival and decreased frequency of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the pharmaceutical mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. We investigated whether continuous BCAA supplementation increases survival rate of rats exposed to a fibrogenic agent and influences the iron accumulation, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Further, the effects of BCAA on gluconeogenesis in cultured cells were also investigated. A significant improvement in cumulative survival was observed in BCAA-supplemented rats with advanced cirrhosis compared to untreated rats with cirrhosis (P<0.05). The prolonged survival due to BCAA supplementation was associated with reduction of iron contents, reactive oxygen species production and attenuated fibrosis in the liver. In addition, BCAA ameliorated glucose metabolism by forkhead box protein O1 pathway in the liver. BCAA prolongs survival in cirrhotic rats and this was likely the consequences of reduced iron accumulation, oxidative stress and fibrosis and improved glucose metabolism in the liver. PMID:23936183

  2. Analysis and advanced oxidation treatment of a persistent pharmaceutical compound in wastewater and wastewater sludge-carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2014-02-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) are considered as emerging environmental problem due to their continuous input and persistence to the aquatic ecosystem even at low concentrations. Among them, carbamazepine (CBZ) has been detected at the highest frequency, which ends up in aquatic systems via wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) among other sources. The identification and quantification of CBZ in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) is of major interest to assess the toxicity of treated effluent discharged into the environment. Furthermore, WWS has been subjected for re-use either in agricultural application or for the production of value-added products through the route of bioconversion. However, this field application is disputable due to the presence of these organic compounds and in order to protect the ecosystem or end users, data concerning the concentration, fate, behavior as well as the perspective of simultaneous degradation of these compounds is urgently necessary. Many treatment technologies, including advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been developed in order to degrade CBZ in WW and WWS. AOPs are technologies based on the intermediacy of hydroxyl and other radicals to oxidize recalcitrant, toxic and non-biodegradable compounds to various by-products and eventually to inert end products. The purpose of this review is to provide information on persistent pharmaceutical compound, carbamazepine, its ecological effects and removal during various AOPs of WW and WWS. This review also reports the different analytical methods available for quantification of CBZ in different contaminated media including WW and WWS. PMID:24140682

  3. Advanced treatment of effluents from an industrial park wastewater treatment plant by ferrous ion activated persulfate oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Songmei; Zhou, Zhen; Jiang, Haitao; Ye, Jianfeng; Ren, Jiamin; Gu, Lingyun; Wang, Luochun

    2016-01-01

    The advanced oxidation technology, ferrous ion (Fe(II)) activated persulfate (PS) producing sulfate radicals, was used for the advanced treatment of effluent from an integrated wastewater treatment plant in a papermaking industrial park. Separate and interactive effects of PS dosage, Fe(II)/PS ratio and initial pH on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were analyzed by the response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that Fe(II)-PS system was effective in COD removal from the secondary effluent. PS dosage was the most dominant factor with positive influence on COD removal, followed by initial pH value. The optimum conditions with COD removal of 54.4% were obtained at PS/COD of 2.2, initial pH of 6.47 and Fe(II)/PS of 1.89. UV-visible spectrum analysis showed that after RSM optimization, Fe(II)-PS system effectively degraded large organic molecules into small ones, and decreased humification degree of the effluent. Three-dimensional fluorescence analysis demonstrated that aromatic protein and fulvic substances were fully decomposed by the Fe(II)-PS treatment. PMID:27438260

  4. Anodic composite deposition of RuO2/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube for advanced supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chi-Chang; Wang, Chia-Wei; Chang, Kuo-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Guan

    2015-07-01

    Anodic composite deposition is demonstrated to be a unique method for fabricating a ternary ruthenium dioxide/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (RuO2 · xH2O/rGO/CNT, denoted as RGC) nanocomposite onto Ti as an advanced electrode material for supercapacitors. The rGO/CNT composite in RGCs acts as a conductive backbone to facilitate the electron transport between current collector and RuO2 · xH2O nanoparticles (NPs), revealed by the high total specific capacitance (CS,T = 808 F g-1) of RGC without annealing. The contact resistance among RuO2 · xH2O NPs is improved by low-temperature annealing at 150 °C (RGC-150), which renders slight sintering and enhances the specific capacitance of RuO2 · xH2O to achieve 1200 F g-1. The desirable nanocomposite microstructure of RGC-150 builds up the smooth pathways of both protons and electrons to access the active oxy-ruthenium species. This nanocomposite exhibits an extremely high CS,T of 973 F g-1 at 25 mV s-1 (much higher than 435 F g-1 of an annealed RuO2 · xH2O deposit) and good capacitance retention (60.5% with scan rate varying from 5 to 500 mV s-1), revealing an advanced electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  5. Performance of combined sodium persulfate/H2O2 based advanced oxidation process in stabilized landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Hilles, Ahmed H; Abu Amr, Salem S; Hussein, Rim A; El-Sebaie, Olfat D; Arafa, Anwaar I

    2016-01-15

    A combination of persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) was used to oxidizelandfill leachate. The reaction was performed under varying S2O8(2-)/H2O2 ratio (g/g), S2O8(2-)/H2O2 dosages (g/g), pH, and reaction time (minutes), so as to determine the optimum operational conditions. Results indicated that under optimum operational conditions (i.e. 120 min of oxidation using a S2O8(2-)/H2O2 ratio of 1 g/1.47 g at a persulfate and hydrogen peroxide dosage of 5.88 g/50 ml and8.63 g/50 ml respectively, at pH 11) removal of 81% COD and 83% NH3-N was achieved. In addition, the biodegradability (BOD5/COD ratio) of the leachate was improved from 0.09 to 0.17. The results obtained from the combined use of (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) were compared with those obtained with sodium persulfate only, hydrogen peroxide only and sodium persulfate followed by hydrogen peroxide. The combined method (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD and NH3-N compared with the other methods using a single oxidizing agent. Additionally, the study has proved that the combination of S2O8(2-)/H2O2 is more efficient than the sequential use of sodium persulfate followed by hydrogen peroxide in advanced oxidation processes aiming at treatingstabilizedlandfill leachate. PMID:26580899

  6. Enhancing disinfection by advanced oxidation under UV irradiation in polyphosphate-containing wastewater flocs.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Y; Allen, D G; Farnood, R R

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the role of naturally occurring polyphosphate in enhancing the ultraviolet disinfection of wastewater flocs is examined. It was found that polyphosphate, which accumulates naturally within the wastewater flocs in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal process, is capable of producing hydroxyl radicals under UV irradiation and hence causing the photoreactive disinfection of microorganisms embedded within flocs. This phenomenon is likely responsible for the improved UV disinfection of the biological nutrient removal (BNR) effluent compared to that of conventional activated sludge effluent by as much as 1 log. A mathematical model is developed that combines the chemical disinfection by hydroxyl radical formation within flocs, together with the direct inactivation of microorganisms by UV irradiation. The proposed model is able to quantitatively explain the observed improvement in the UV disinfection of the BNR effluents. This study shows that the chemical composition of wastewater flocs could have a significant positive impact on their UV disinfection by inducing the production of oxidative species. PMID:24568787

  7. 4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

  8. Investigation of Hafnium oxide/Copper resistive memory for advanced encryption applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beland, Laurent Karim

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a widely used encryption algorithm to protect data and communications in today's digital age. Modern AES CMOS implementations require large amounts of dedicated logic and must be tuned for either performance or power consumption. A high throughput, low power, and low die area AES implementation is required in the growing mobile sector. An emerging non-volatile memory device known as resistive memory (ReRAM) is a simple metal-insulator-metal capacitor device structure with the ability to switch between two stable resistance states. Currently, ReRAM is targeted as a non-volatile memory replacement technology to eventually replace flash. Its advantages over flash include ease of fabrication, speed, and lower power consumption. In addition to memory, ReRAM can also be used in advanced logic implementations given its purely resistive behavior. The combination of a new non-volatile memory element ReRAM along with high performance, low power CMOS opens new avenues for logic implementations. This dissertation will cover the design and process implementation of a ReRAM-CMOS hybrid circuit, built using IBM's 10LPe process, for the improvement of hardware AES implementations. Further the device characteristics of ReRAM, specifically the HfO2/Cu memory system, and mechanisms for operation are not fully correlated. Of particular interest to this work is the role of material properties such as the stoichiometry, crystallinity, and doping of the HfO2 layer and their effect on the switching characteristics of resistive memory. Material properties were varied by a combination of atomic layer deposition and reactive sputtering of the HfO2 layer. Several studies will be discussed on how the above mentioned material properties influence switching parameters, and change the underlying physics of device operation.

  9. Treated Nanolayered Mn Oxide by Oxidizable Compounds: A Strategy To Improve the Catalytic Activity toward Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mahdi Najafpour, Mohammad; Jafarian Sedigh, Davood; Maedeh Hosseini, Seyedeh; Zaharieva, Ivelina

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we investigate the effect of post-treatment of nanolayered manganese oxide by different inorganic and organic compounds. We use the fact that nanolayered manganese oxides are among the strongest naturally occurring oxidants, capable of oxidizing a wide range of organic molecules. Post-treatment of the synthetic Mn oxides with oxidizable compounds increases the cerium(IV)-driven water oxidation catalyzed by treated layered manganese oxides more than 25 times. On the basis of X-ray absorption investigations, we attribute this effect to the increased amount of manganese(III) ions. This finding can explain some puzzles in water oxidation by manganese oxides and may help to advance toward an efficient design strategy of water-oxidizing catalyst in artificial photosynthetic systems. PMID:27537432

  10. Advanced Characterization and Optical Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Anton Viatcheslavovich

    Photophysical, electronic, and compositional properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and bulk nanotube samples were investigated together with graphene oxide photoluminescence. First, we studied the effect of external electric fields on SWCNT photoluminescence. Fields of up to 107 V/m caused dramatic, reversible decreases in emission intensity. Quenching efficiency was proportional to the projection of the field on the SWCNT axis, and showed inverse correlation with optical band gap. The magnitude of the effect was experimentally related to exciton binding energy, as consistent with a proposed field-induced exciton dissociation model. Further, the electronic composition of various SWCNT samples was studied. A new method was developed to measure the fraction of semiconducting nanotubes in as- grown or processed samples. SWCNT number densities were compared in images from near-IR photoluminescence (semiconducting species) and AFM (all species) to compute the semiconducting fraction. The results provide important information about SWCNT sample compositions that can guide controlled growth methods and help calibrate bulk characterization techniques. The nature of absorption backgrounds in SWCNT samples was also studied. A number of extrinsic perturbations such as extensive ultrasonication, sidewall functionalization, amorphous carbon impurities, and SWCNT aggregation were applied and their background contributions quantified. Spectral congestion backgrounds from overlapping absorption bands were assessed with spectral modeling. Unlike semiconducting nanotubes, metallic SWCNTs gave broad intrinsic absorption backgrounds. The shape of the metallic background component and its absorptivity coefficient were determined. These results can be used to minimize and evaluate SWCNT absorption backgrounds. Length dependence of SWCNT optical properties was investigated. Samples were dispersed by ultrasonication or shear processing, and then length-fractionated by gel

  11. The diurnal variability of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) above the Antarctic Plateau driven by atmospheric stability and snow emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Brough, N.; France, J. L.; Traulle, O.; Anderson, P. S.; King, M. D.; Jones, A. E.; Wolff, E. W.; Savarino, J.

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) were observed at Dome C, East Antarctica (75.1° S, 123.3° E, 3233 m) during austral summer 2009-2010. Average (±1σ) mixing ratios at 1.0 m of NO and NO2, the latter measured for the first time on the East Antarctic Plateau, were 111 (±89) and 102 (±88) pptv, respectively. Atmospheric mixing ratios are on average comparable to those observed previously at South Pole, but in contrast show strong diurnal variability, with a minimum around local noon and a maximum in the early evening. The asymmetry in the diel cycle of NOx concentrations and likely any other chemical tracer with a photolytic surface source is driven by the diffusivity and height of the atmospheric boundary layer, with the former controlling the magnitude of the vertical flux and the latter the size of the volume snow emissions are diffusing into. In particular, the NOx emission flux estimated from concentration gradients was on average (±1σ) of 6.9 (±7.2) ×1012 molecule m-2 s-2 and is consistent with the 3-fold increase in mixing ratios in the early evening when the atmospheric boundary layer becomes very shallow. Dome C is likely not representative for the entire East Antarctic Plateau but illustrates the need of accurate descriptions for atmospheric boundary layer physics in atmospheric chemistry models. Calculated mean potential NO2 production rates from nitrate (NO3-) photolysis are only about 62% of the observed NOx flux and highlight uncertainties in the parameterization of the photolytic NOx snow source above Antarctica. A steady-state analysis of the NO2:NO ratios indicates high concentrations of peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) in the air above the snow and confirms the existence of a strongly oxidising canopy enveloping the East Antarctic Plateau in summer.

  12. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films for application in advanced energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gullapalli, S. K.; Vemuri, R. S.; Manciu, F. S.; Enriquez, J. L.; Ramana, C. V.

    2010-07-15

    Inherent processes in coal gasification plants produce hazardous hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which must be continuously and efficiently detected and removed before the fuel is used for power generation. An attempt has been made in this work to fabricate tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films by radio-frequency reactive magnetron-sputter deposition. The impetus being the use of WO{sub 3} films for H{sub 2}S sensors in coal gasification plants. The effect of growth temperature, which is varied in the range of 30-500 deg. C, on the growth and microstructure of WO{sub 3} thin films is investigated. Characterizations made using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the effect of temperature is significant on the microstructure of WO{sub 3} films. XRD and SEM results indicate that the WO{sub 3} films grown at room temperature are amorphous, whereas films grown at higher temperatures are nanocrystalline. The average grain-size increases with increasing temperature. WO{sub 3} films exhibit smooth morphology at growth temperatures {<=}300 deg. C while relatively rough at >300 deg. C. The analyses indicate that the nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} films grown at 100-300 deg. C could be the potential candidates for H{sub 2}S sensor development for application in coal gasification systems.

  13. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Coronary Flow Regulation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Noboru; Tanabe, Shinichi; Nakanishi, Sadanobu

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) formed via endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays crucial roles in the regulation of coronary blood flow through vasodilatation and decreased vascular resistance, and in inhibition of platelet aggregation and adhesion, leading to the prevention of coronary circulatory failure, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. Endothelial function is impaired by several pathogenic factors including smoking, chronic alcohol intake, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. The mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction include reduced NO synthase (NOS) expression and activity, decreased NO bioavailability, and increased production of oxygen radicals and endogenous NOS inhibitors. Atrial fibrillation appears to be a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is an important predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD) in humans. Penile erectile dysfunction, associated with impaired bioavailability of NO produced by eNOS and neuronal NOS, is also considered to be highly predictive of ischemic heart disease. There is evidence suggesting an important role of nitrergic innervation in coronary blood flow regulation. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures to eliminate pathogenic factors inducing endothelial and nitrergic nerve dysfunction would be quite important in preventing the genesis and development of CAD. PMID:22942627

  14. Advanced UV/H₂O₂ oxidation of deca-bromo diphenyl ether in sediments.

    PubMed

    Feo, M L; Gonzalez, O; Baron, E; Casado, M; Piña, B; Esplugas, S; Eljarrat, E; Barceló, D

    2014-05-01

    Removal of BDE-209 from contaminated sediments by UV/H2O2 treatment was investigated under different reaction conditions (different UV irradiance and H2O2 concentrations). After 10h of UV/H2O2 treatment, 90% of BDE-209 was removed with a half-life time (t1/2) of 3.5h and a kinetic constant (k) of 0.22 h(-1). Possible formation of OH-PBDEs and debrominated polybromodiphenyl ethers was investigated by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS. None of the abovementioned BDE-209 by-products was found after 2.5, 5.5 and 10h of UV/H2O2 treatment. Toxicity experiments carried out with zebrafish embryos exposed to the sediment before and after the UV/H2O2 treatment did not show any morphological or behavioural alterations, suggesting that no putative debrominated or oxidation products were originated by the treatment in concentrations high enough to elicit significant toxic effects in zebrafish embryos. PMID:24534697

  15. Phase I study of indicine N-oxide in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, T; Sridhar, K S; Ratner, L H; Holland, J F

    1982-07-01

    Indicine N-oxide is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid isolated from Heliotropium indicum, one of the widely used herbs in Ayurvedic medicine. Thirty-seven patients with solid tumors received the drug: 15 men and 22 women (mean age, 53 years). All had had prior chemotherapy, and 25 had had prior radiotherapy. Eighty-four percent had a performance status of 0-3 (Cancer and Leukemia Group B criteria). The drug was given as a short infusion over 15 minutes and repeated with a median interval of 4 weeks. Doses were escalated from 1 to 9 g/m2. A total of 55 courses were evaluable. Dose-limiting toxic effects were leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, and the toxicity was cumulative with repeated doses. Other toxic effects included nausea and vomiting, anemia, and hepatic dysfunction. The hematologic toxicity tended to be more pronounced in patients with hepatic dysfunction, poor marrow reserve, and heavy prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There were no complete or partial responses. One patient with skin melanoma and another with ovarian carcinoma had improvement lasting 2 months. The maximally tolerated dose is 9 g/m2 in our population. A recommended dose for therapeutic study is 7 g/m2. High-risk patients should be started at a dose of 5 g/m2. The treatment may be repeated at 4-week intervals with close monitoring of wbc and platelet counts. Dose reductions may be necessary for repeated courses. PMID:7093966

  16. An investigation into reservoir NOM reduction by UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Goslan, Emma H; Gurses, Filiz; Banks, Jenny; Parsons, Simon A

    2006-11-01

    A comparison of four treatment technologies for reduction of natural organic matter (NOM) in a reservoir water was made. The work presented here is a laboratory based evaluation of NOM treatment by UV-C photolysis, UV/H(2)O(2), Fenton's reagent (FR) and photo-Fenton's reagent (PFR). The work investigated ways of reducing the organic load on water treatment works (WTWs) with a view to treating 'in-reservoir' or 'in-pipe' before the water reaches the WTW. The efficiency of each process in terms of NOM removal was determined by measuring UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV(254)) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In terms of DOC reduction PFR was the most effective (88% removal after 1 min) however there were interferences when measuring UV(254) which was reduced to a lesser extent (31% after 1 min). In the literature, pH 3 is reported to be the optimal pH for oxidation with FR but here the reduction of UV(254) and DOC was found to be insensitive to pH in the range 3-7. The treatment that was identified as the most effective in terms of NOM reduction and cost effectiveness was PFR. PMID:16765416

  17. A new class of solid oxide metal-air redox batteries for advanced stationary energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuan

    Cost-effective and large-scale energy storage technologies are a key enabler of grid modernization. Among energy storage technologies currently being researched, developed and deployed, rechargeable batteries are unique and important that can offer a myriad of advantages over the conventional large scale siting- and geography- constrained pumped-hydro and compressed-air energy storage systems. However, current rechargeable batteries still need many breakthroughs in material optimization and system design to become commercially viable for stationary energy storage. This PhD research project investigates the energy storage characteristics of a new class of rechargeable solid oxide metal-air redox batteries (SOMARBs) that combines a regenerative solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) and hydrogen chemical-looping component. The RSOFC serves as the "electrical functioning unit", alternating between the fuel cell and electrolysis mode to realize discharge and charge cycles, respectively, while the hydrogen chemical-looping component functions as an energy storage unit (ESU), performing electrical-chemical energy conversion in situ via a H2/H2O-mediated metal/metal oxide redox reaction. One of the distinctive features of the new battery from conventional storage batteries is the ESU that is physically separated from the electrodes of RSOFC, allowing it to freely expand and contract without impacting the mechanical integrity of the entire battery structure. This feature also allows an easy switch in the chemistry of this battery. The materials selection for ESU is critical to energy capacity, round-trip efficiency and cost effectiveness of the new battery. Me-MeOx redox couples with favorable thermodynamics and kinetics are highly preferable. The preliminary theoretical analysis suggests that Fe-based redox couples can be a promising candidate for operating at both high and low temperatures. Therefore, the Fe-based redox-couple systems have been selected as the baseline for this

  18. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of tri-layer rare-earth oxide superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Patrick; Disa, Ankit; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Klie, Robert; University of Illinois-Chicago Team; Yale University Team

    2015-03-01

    Rare-earth nickelates are known to display complex electronic and magnetic behaviors owed to a very localized and sensitive Ni-site atomic and electronic structure. Toward realizing the goal of manipulating of the energetic ordering of Ni d orbitals and 2D conduction, the present work focuses on the experimental characterization of thin film superlattice structures consisting of alternating layers of LaTiO3 and LaNiO3 sandwiched between a dull insulator, LaAlO3. Using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)-based methods, properties such as interfacial sharpness, electron transfer, O presence, and local electronic structure can be probed at the atomic scale, and will be discussed at length. By combining both energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and electronic energy loss (EEL) spectroscopies in an aberration-corrected STEM, it is possible to attain energy and spatial resolutions of 0.35 eV and 100 pm, respectively. Focus of the talk will remain not only on the aforementioned properties, but will also include details and parameters of the acquisitions to facilitate future characterization at this level.

  19. May serum levels of advanced oxidized protein products serve as a prognostic marker of disease duration in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, José-Manuel; Martín de Pablos, Angel; García-Sánchez, María-Isabel; Méndez-Lucena, Carolina; Damas-Hermoso, Fátima; Rus, Macarena; Chacón, José; Fernández, Emilio

    2013-04-10

    Protein and amine halogenation is a type of oxidative stress induced by phagocytic overstimulation, and its role in Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been discerned. We have detected that advanced oxidized protein products, markers of protein halogenation, are reliably enhanced in serum of patients with PD (n=60) relative to control subjects (n=45, p<0.012), and to a lesser extent in the cerebrospinal fluid. Amine halogenation, as evaluated through 3-chlorotyrosine, is not affected. Mieloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide levels, halogenative factors of phagocytes, are devoid of changes. Levels of advanced oxidized protein products are progressively reduced over time, and the duration of PD is larger in the Hoehn-Yahr-stage-2/3 patients (n=34) with low serum levels (R(2)=0.0145, p<0.003). Levodopa treatment contributes to this reduction (R(2)=0.259, p<0.001). These protein products are not cytotoxic, unlike 3-chlorotyrosine, but they are known to form inflammatory mediators after conjugation with serum albumin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that the serum level of advanced oxidized protein products is a prognostic marker of PD duration, and these oxidized proteins could participate in the development of parkinsonian neurodegeneration. PMID:23121480

  20. Mixed oxide fuels testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Chang, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    An intense worldwide effort is now under way to find means of reducing the stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium. One of the most attractive solutions would be to use WGPu as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PUO{sub 2}) mixed with urania (UO{sub 2}). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification, (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania, (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition, (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight, (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu, (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu, (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure, (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity, (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products, (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies, and (11) Fuel performance code validation. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified.

  1. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  2. Opportunities for mixed oxide fuel testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W.K.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification; (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania; (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition; (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight; (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu; (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu; (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure; (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity; (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products; (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies; and (11) Fuel performance code validation. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory possesses many advantages for performing tests to resolve most of the issues identified above. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified. The facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-West can meet all potential needs for pre- and post-irradiation examination that might arise in a MOX fuel qualification program.

  3. Presence of dopa and amino acid hydroperoxides in proteins modified with advanced glycation end products (AGEs): amino acid oxidation products as a possible source of oxidative stress induced by AGE proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, S; Fu, M X; Baynes, J W; Thorpe, S R; Dean, R T

    1998-02-15

    Glycation and subsequent Maillard or browning reactions of glycated proteins, leading to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), are involved in the chemical modification of proteins during normal aging and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Oxidative conditions accelerate the browning of proteins by glucose, and AGE proteins also induce oxidative stress responses in cells bearing AGE receptors. These observations have led to the hypothesis that glycation-induced pathology results from a cycle of oxidative stress, increased chemical modification of proteins via the Maillard reaction, and further AGE-dependent oxidative stress. Here we show that the preparation of AGE-collagen by incubation with glucose under oxidative conditions in vitro leads not only to glycation and formation of the glycoxidation product Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), but also to the formation of amino acid oxidation products on protein, including m-tyrosine, dityrosine, dopa, and valine and leucine hydroperoxides. The formation of both CML and amino acid oxidation products was prevented by anaerobic, anti-oxidative conditions. Amino acid oxidation products were also formed when glycated collagen, prepared under anti-oxidative conditions, was allowed to incubate under aerobic conditions that led to the formation of CML. These experiments demonstrate that amino acid oxidation products are formed in proteins during glycoxidation reactions and suggest that reactive oxygen species formed by redox cycling of dopa or by the metal-catalysed decomposition of amino acid hydroperoxides, rather than by redox activity or reactive oxygen production by AGEs on protein, might contribute to the induction of oxidative stress by AGE proteins. PMID:9461515

  4. Advanced oxidation of bromide-containing drinking water: a balance between bromate and trihalomethane formation control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjing; Yu, Jianwei; Han, Po; Sha, Jing; An, Tao; Li, Wei; Liu, Juan; Yang, Min

    2013-11-01

    Addition of H202 has been employed to repress bromate formation during ozonation of bromide-containing source water. However, the addition of H2O2 will change the oxidation pathways of organic compounds due to the generation of abundant hydroxyl radicals, which could affect the removal efficacy of trihalomethane precursors via the combination of ozone and biological activated carbon (O3-BAC). In this study, we evaluated the effects of H2O2 addition on bromate formation and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) reduction during treatment of bromide-containing (97.6-129.1 microg/L) source water by the O3-BAC process. At an ozone dose of 4.2 mg/L, an H2O2/O3 (g/g) ratio of over 1.0 was required to maintain the bromate concentration below 10.0 microg/L, while a much lower H2O2/O3 ratio was sufficient for a lower ozone dose. An H2O2/O3 (g/g) ratio below 0.3 should be avoided since the bromate concentration will increase with increasing H2O2 dose below this ratio. However, the addition of H202 at an ozone dose of 3.2 mg/L and an H2O2/O3 ratio of 1.0 resulted in a 43% decrease in THMFP removal when comparedwith the O3-BAC process. The optimum H2O2/O3 (g/g) ratio for balancing bromate and trihalomethane control was about 0.7-1.0. Fractionation of organic materials showed that the addition of H2O2 decreased the removal efficacy of the hydrophilic matter fraction of DOC by ozonation and increased the reactivity of the hydrophobic fractions during formation of trihalomethane, which may be the two main reasons responsible for the decrease in THMFP reduction efficacy. Overall, this study clearly demonstrated that it is necessary to balance bromate reduction and THMFP control when adopting an H2O2 addition strategy. PMID:24552044

  5. Nature of Catalytic Active Sites Present on the Surface of Advanced Bulk Tantalum Mixed Oxide Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    The most active photocatalyst system for water splitting under UV irradiation (270 nm) is the promoted 0.2%NiO/NaTaO3:2%La photocatalyst with optimized photonic efficiency (P.E.) of 56%, but fundamental issues about the nature of the surface catalytic active sites and their involvement in the photocatalytic process still need to be clarified. This is the first study to apply cutting edge surface spectroscopic analyses to determine the surface nature of tantalum mixed oxide photocatalysts. Surface analysis with HR-XPS (1-3nm) and HS-LEIS (0.3nm) spectroscopy indicates that the NiO and La2O3 promoters are concentrated in the surface region of the bulk NaTaO3 phase. The La2O3 is concentrated on the NaTaO3 outermost surface layers while NiO is distributed throughout the NaTaO3 surface region (1-3nm). Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of NaTaO3 were not modified by the addition of the La2O3 and NiO promoters, with La2O3 resulting in a slightly more ordered structure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy reveals that the addition of La2O3 and NiO produces a greater number of electron traps resulting in the suppression of the recombination of excited electrons/holes. In contrast to earlier reports, the La2O3 is only a textural promoter (increasing the BET surface area ~7x by stabilizing smaller NaTaO3 particles), but causes a ~3x decrease in the specific photocatalytic TORs ( mol H2/m2/h) rate because surface La2O3 blocks exposed catalytic active NaTaO3 sites. The NiO promoter was found to be a potent electronic promoter that enhances the NaTaO3 surface normalized TORs by a factor of ~10-50 and TOF by a factor of ~10. The level of NiO promotion is the same in the absence and presence of La2O3 demonstrating that there is no promotional synergistic interaction between the NiO and La2O3 promoters. This study demonstrates the important contributions of the photocatalyst surface properties to the fundamental

  6. Degradation of xenobiotics originating from the textile preparation, dyeing, and finishing industry using ozonation and advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Alaton, Izzet

    2007-09-01

    Effluents from textile preparation, dyeing, and finishing processes contain high concentrations of biologically difficult-to-degrade or even inert auxiliaries. Under these circumstances, it most often becomes inevitable to apply energy-intense and hence "imperative" treatment technologies (so-called advanced oxidation processes, AOPs) to achieve an acceptable reduction in the organic content of the effluent, thereby improving the biocompatibility of the originally refractory wastewater. The present experimental study focused on three problematic dyehouse effluent streams in order to alleviate the problem of toxicity and recalcitrance arising from the use of certain textile chemicals at source. For that purpose, the textile preparation stage was simulated by a nonionic surfactant (NS), the polyamide dyeing stage by a synthetic tannin (syntan; ST), and an aqueous biocidal finishing (BF) solution was employed to mimic typical textile finishing effluent. Synthetic effluent streams bearing NS, ST, or BF were subjected to treatment with different, well-established AOPs (ozonation at varying pH; advanced oxidation with H(2)O(2)/UV-C at varying H(2)O(2) concentrations) in order to degrade the active ingredients of the auxiliary formulations, thereby eliminating their toxicity and recalcitrance. Baseline experiments were conducted in order to optimize AOP conditions that were consecutively applied to observe changes in the originally poor effluent biodegradability and high toxicity. Obtained experimental findings revealed that (i) the COD content of NS could be reduced by at least 50% after H(2)O(2)/UV-C treatment at pH 9.0 accompanied by a nearly twofold improvement in its already fair biodegradability; (ii) the inhibitory effect of the biochemically reluctant ST on heterotrophic biomass was completely eliminated upon ozonation (dose=900 mg h(-1)) at pH 3.5; and (iii) the microbial toxicity exerted by BF totally disappeared after ozonation (dose=600 mg h(-1)) at pH 7

  7. Advanced electron microscopy of novel ferromagnetic materials and ferromagnet/oxide interfaces in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fengyuan

    We have studied novel ferromagnetic (FM) materials and FM electrode/tunnel barrier interfaces in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) by advanced electron microscopy including scanning transmission electron microscopy (HRSTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). MTJs are one of the prototypical spintronic devices, with applications in magnetic random access memory, sensors and read heads. The performance of MTJs depends on several factors, including the FM electrodes and the FM/tunnel barrier interfaces. Therefore, to realize the high performance of MTJs, we first need high quality ferromagnetic electrodes with high spin polarization. High-quality Fe3O4 and Fe4N electrodes with theoretically predicted -100% spin polarization were fabricated by various methods and investigated by HRSTEM and STEM EELS. The Fe3O4 and Fe4N thin films have low defect density and good crystallinity, but when integrated as electrodes in a MTJ, problems emerged. In a Fe4N/AlOx/Fe MTJ, the magnetoresistance was negative, but relatively small, due to a defective Fe 3O4 reaction layer formed at the Fe4N/tunnel barrier interface revealed by HRSTEM and EELS. The interfacial reaction layer was thin and discontinuous which made direct imaging difficult. Therefore, STEM EELS was used to map out the reaction layer. A Fe3O4 reaction layer was also found in a nominally symmetric CoFe/AlOx/CoFe MTJs after annealing, which also exhibited inverse TMR and a non-symmetric bias dependence. We also investigated the MTJs with the Heusler alloy Co2MnSi as one or both electrode and crystalline MgO as the tunnel barrier, which exhibit quite high TMR due to coherent tunneling. We showed that the Co2MnSi/MgO interface in these junctions is dominated by a configuration of a pure Mn plane bonded across the interface to O. This was the first observation of that interface termination. HRSTEM images also show that the fraction of MnMn/O interface termination increases with increasing Mn concentration in the CMS

  8. Degradation mechanism of alachlor during direct ozonation and O(3)/H(2)O(2) advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zhimin; Liu, Chao; Dong, Bingzhi; Zhang, Yalei

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of alachlor by direct ozonation and advanced oxidation process O(3)/H(2)O(2) was investigated in this study with focus on identification of degradation byproducts. The second-order reaction rate constant between ozone and alachlor was determined to be 2.5+/-0.1M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 20 degrees C. Twelve and eight high-molecular-weight byproducts (with the benzene ring intact) from alachlor degradation were identified during direct ozonation and O(3)/H(2)O(2), respectively. The common degradation byproducts included N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-methyleneamine, 8-ethyl-3,4-dihydro-quinoline, 8-ethyl-quinoline, 1-chloroacetyl-2-hydro-3-ketone-7-acetyl-indole, 2-chloro-2',6'-diacetyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide, 2-chloro-2'-acetyl-6'-ethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide, and two hydroxylated alachlor isomers. In direct ozonation, four more byproducts were also identified including 1-chloroacetyl-2,3-dihydro-7-ethyl-indole, 2-chloro-2',6'-ethyl-acetanilide, 2-chloro-2',6'-acetyl-acetanilide and 2-chloro-2'-ethyl-6'-acetyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide. Degradation of alachlor by O(3) and O(3)/H(2)O(2) also led to the formation of low-molecular-weight byproducts including formic, acetic, propionic, monochloroacetic and oxalic acids as well as chloride ion (only detected in O(3)/H(2)O(2)). Nitrite and nitrate formation was negligible. Alachlor degradation occurred via oxidation of the arylethyl group, N-dealkylation, cyclization and cleavage of benzene ring. After O(3) or O(3)/H(2)O(2) treatment, the toxicity of alachlor solution examined by the Daphnia magna bioassay was slightly reduced. PMID:20022076

  9. Genotoxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products: Involvement of Oxidative Stress and of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schupp, Nicole; Schinzel, Reinhard; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2005-06-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure, cancer incidence is increased. This may be related to an elevated level of genomic damage, which has been demonstrated by micronuclei formation as well as by comet assay analysis. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are markedly elevated in renal failure. In the comet assay, the model AGEs methylglyoxal- and carboxy(methyl)lysine-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced significant DNA damage in colon, kidney, and liver cells. The addition of antioxidants prevented AGE-induced DNA damage, suggesting enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The coincubation with dimethylfumarate (DMF), an inhibitor of NF-κB translocation, reduced the genotoxic effect, thereby underscoring the key role of NF-κB in this process. One of the genes induced by NF-κB is angiotensinogen. The ensuing proteolytic activity yields angiotensin II, which evokes oxidative stress as well as proinflammatory responses. A modulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor 1 antagonist, candesartan, yielded a reduction of the AGE-induced DNA damage, connecting the two signal pathways, RAS and AGE signaling. We were able to identify important participants in AGE-induced DNA damage: ROS, NF-κB, and Ang II, as well as modulators to prevent this DNA damage: antioxidants, DMF, and AT1 antagonists.

  10. The impact of groundwater quality on the removal of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) using advanced oxidation technology.

    PubMed

    Tawabini, B; Fayad, N; Morsy, M

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the removal of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) from contaminated groundwater using advanced oxidation technology was investigated. The UV/H(2)O(2) treatment process was applied to remove MTBE from two Saudi groundwater sources that have different quality characteristics with regard to their contents of inorganic species such as chloride, bromide, sulfates and alkalinity. MTBE was spiked into water samples collected from the two sources to a concentration level of about 250 microg/L. A 500 mL bench-scale forced-liquid circulation photoreactor was used to conduct the experiments. Two different UV lamps were utilized: 15 Watt low pressure (LP) and 150 Watt medium pressure (MP). Results of the study showed that the UV/H(2)O(2) process removed more than 90% of MTBE in 20 minutes when the MP lamp was used at an MTBE/H(2)O(2) molar ratio of 1:200. The results also showed that groundwater sources with higher levels of radical scavengers such as alkalinity, bromide, nitrate and sulfate showed lower rate of MTBE removal. PMID:19844063

  11. Application of a solar UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to oil sands process-affected water remediation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zengquan; Li, Chao; Belosevic, Miodrag; Bolton, James R; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2014-08-19

    The solar UV/chlorine process has emerged as a novel advanced oxidation process for industrial and municipal wastewaters. Currently, its practical application to oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) remediation has been studied to treat fresh OSPW retained in large tailings ponds, which can cause significant adverse environmental impacts on ground and surface waters in Northern Alberta, Canada. Degradation of naphthenic acids (NAs) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW was investigated. In a laboratory-scale UV/chlorine treatment, the NAs degradation was clearly structure-dependent and hydroxyl radical-based. In terms of the NAs degradation rate, the raw OSPW (pH ∼ 8.3) rates were higher than those at an alkaline condition (pH = 10). Under actual sunlight, direct solar photolysis partially degraded fluorophore organic compounds, as indicated by the qualitative synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) of the OSPW, but did not impact NAs degradation. The solar/chlorine process effectively removed NAs (75-84% removal) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW in the presence of 200 or 300 mg L(-1) OCl(-). The acute toxicity of OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was reduced after the solar/chlorine treatment. However, the OSPW toxicity toward goldfish primary kidney macrophages after solar/chlorine treatment showed no obvious toxicity reduction versus that of untreated OSPW, which warrants further study for process optimization. PMID:25051215

  12. Channel Strain in Advanced Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors Measured Using Nano-Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Nakamura, Hidetatsu; Fukai, Toshinori; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki

    2008-04-01

    Using high-precision nano-beam electron diffraction (NBD), we clarified the influences of stress liner and the stress of shallow trench isolation on channel strain in advanced metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). For systematic strain measurements, we improved the precision of NBD by observing large reciprocal lattice vectors under appropriate diffraction conditions. The absolute value of the channel strain increases by stress liner as gate length decreases, although the drive current increase due to stress liner saturates at a shorter channel length. The normal strain in the gate length direction is inversely proportional to the distance from the gate electrode to the shallow trench isolation (STI). Furthermore, the relationship between measured channel strain induced by STI and drive current change was shown. The drive current of n- and p-MOSFET changes about 5% with 2×10-3 channel strain variation. This result suggests that reducing the shallow trench isolation stress is effective for controlling the drive current change, depending on the active region layout. We conclude that the experimental measurement of channel strain is necessary for device and circuit design.

  13. Assessment and optimisation of VOC mass transfer enhancement by advanced oxidation process in a compact wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Biard, Pierre-François; Couvert, Annabelle; Renner, Christophe; Levasseur, Jean-Pierre

    2009-09-01

    Dimethyl disulphide (DMDS) removal was investigated in a compact scrubber (hydraulic residence time approximately 20ms), composed of a wire mesh packing structure where liquid and gas flow at co-current and high gas superficial velocity (>12m s(-1)). In order to regenerate the scrubbing liquid and to maintain a driving force in the scrubber, ozone and hydrogen peroxide were added to water since they allow the generation of nonselective and highly reactive species, hydroxyl radicals HO(). Three ways of reagent distribution were tested. The influence of several parameters (liquid flow rate(s), ozone flow rate, pH and reagent concentrations) was investigated. The best configuration was obtained when ozone is transferred in the scrubbing liquid before introduction at the top of the scrubber simultaneously with the hydrogen peroxide solution, allowing to generate hydroxyl radical in the scrubber. With this configuration, DMDS removal could be increased from 16% with water to 34% at the same gas and liquid flow rates in the scrubber showing the potentiality of advanced oxidation process. PMID:19695665

  14. Advanced glycosylation endproducts block the antiproliferative effect of nitric oxide. Role in the vascular and renal complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M; Cerami, A; Bucala, R

    1992-09-01

    Advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate on long-lived tissue proteins such as basement membrane collagen and have been implicated in many of the long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. These products originate from glucose-derived Schiff base and Amadori products but undergo a series of complex rearrangement reactions to form ultimately protein-bound, fluorescent heterocycles. AGEs can react with and chemically inactivate nitric oxide (NO), a potent endothelial cell-derived vasodilator and antiproliferative factor. Since mesenchymal cell proliferation is an early and characteristic lesion of diabetic vasculopathy and glomerulopathy, we investigated the possibility that collagen-bound AGEs functionally inactivate the antiproliferative effect of NO. In model cell culture systems, AGEs were found to block the cytostatic effect of NO on aortic smooth muscle and renal mesangial cells. The inactivation of endothelial cell-derived NO by basement membrane AGEs may represent a common pathway in the development of the accelerated vascular and renal disease that accompany long-term diabetes mellitus. PMID:1522220

  15. Evaluation of Ischemia-Modified Albumin, Malondialdehyde, and Advanced Oxidative Protein Products as Markers of Vascular Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Afzal; Manjrekar, Poornima; Yadav, Charu; Agarwal, Ashish; Srikantiah, Rukmini Mysore; Hegde, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    AIM This study aimed at evaluation of ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), malondialdehyde (MDA), and advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP) as markers of vascular injury in diabetic nephropathy (DN) with derivation of cutoff values for the same. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study population comprised 60 diabetes patients and 30 controls, with diabetes patients further categorized into three groups based on urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) of <30 mg/g (diabetes without microalbuminuria), 30–300 mg/g (early DN), and >300 mg/g of creatinine (overt DN). Serum IMA, MDA, and AOPP were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; HbA1c, serum creatinine, urine albumin, and urine creatinine were estimated using automated analyzers. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and receiver-operating characteristic curve. RESULTS A statistically significant difference was found in the levels of IMA among patients with early DN (154 ng/mL), diabetes without nephropathy (109.4 ng/mL), and healthy controls (45.7 ng/mL), with highest levels in early DN cases. Similar increase was seen in AOPP as well. A significant correlation was observed between IMA and UACR in diabetes without nephropathy (r = 0.448). CONCLUSION The present study postulates serum IMA as a novel biomarker for the assessment of disease progression in diabetes even before microalbuminuria, and a cutoff point ≥99 ng/mL can be used for detection of early DN. PMID:27158221

  16. An evaluation of a pilot-scale nonthermal plasma advanced oxidation process for trace organic compound degradation.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, Daniel; Stanford, Benjamin D; Trenholm, Rebecca A; Snyder, Shane A

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated a pilot-scale nonthermal plasma (NTP) advanced oxidation process (AOP) for the degradation of trace organic compounds such as pharmaceuticals and potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The degradation of seven indicator compounds was monitored in tertiary-treated wastewater and spiked surface water to evaluate the effects of differing water qualities on process efficiency. The tests were also conducted in batch and single-pass modes to examine contaminant degradation rates and the remediation capabilities of the technology, respectively. Values for electrical energy per order (EEO) of magnitude degradation ranged from <0.3 kWh/m(3)-log for easily degraded compounds (e.g., carbamazepine) in surface water to 14 kWh/m(3)-log for more recalcitrant compounds (e.g., meprobamate) in wastewater. Changes in the bulk organic matter based on UV(254) absorbance and excitation-emission matrices (EEM) were also monitored and correlated to contaminant degradation. These results indicate that NTP may be a viable alternative to more common AOPs due to its comparable energy requirements for contaminant degradation and its ability to operate without any additional feed chemicals. PMID:19822343

  17. 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Sorge, J.N.; Larrimore, C.L.; Slatsky, M.D.; Menzies, W.R.; Smouse, S.M.; Stallings, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy Innovative Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The primary objectives of the demonstration is to determine the long-term NOx reduction performance of advanced overfire air (AOFA), low NOx burners (LNB), and advanced digital control optimization methodologies applied in a stepwise fashion to a 500 MW boiler. The focus of this paper is to report (1) on the installation of three on-line carbon-in-ash monitors and (2) the design and results to date from the advanced digital control/optimization phase of the project.

  18. The diurnal variability of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) above the Antarctic Plateau driven by atmospheric stability and snow emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Brough, N.; France, J. L.; Anderson, P. S.; Traulle, O.; King, M. D.; Jones, A. E.; Wolff, E. W.; Savarino, J.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) were observed at Dome C, East Antarctica (75.1° S, 123.3° E, 3233 m), for a total of 50 days, from 10 December 2009 to 28 January 2010. Average (±1σ) mixing ratios at 1.0 m of NO and NO2, the latter measured for the first time on the East Antarctic Plateau, were 111 (±89) and 98 (±89) pptv, respectively. Atmospheric mixing ratios are on average comparable to those observed previously at South Pole, but in contrast show strong diurnal variability: a minimum around local noon and a maximum in the early evening coincide with the development and collapse of a convective boundary layer. The asymmetric diurnal cycle of NOx concentrations and likely any other chemical tracer with a photolytic surface source is driven by the turbulent diffusivity and height of the atmospheric boundary layer, with the former controlling the magnitude of the vertical flux and the latter the size of the volume into which snow emissions are transported. In particular, the average (±1σ) NOx emission flux from 22 December 2009 to 28 January 2010, estimated from atmospheric concentration gradients, was 8.2 (±7.4) × 1012 molecule m-2 s-1 belongs to the largest values measured so far in the polar regions and explains the 3-fold increase in mixing ratios in the early evening when the boundary layer becomes very shallow. Dome C is likely not representative for the entire East Antarctic Plateau but illustrates the need of an accurate description of the boundary layer above snow in atmospheric chemistry models. A simple nitrate photolysis model matches the observed median diurnal NOx flux during the day but has significant low bias during the night. The difference is significant taking into account the total random error in flux observations and model uncertainties due to the variability of NO3- concentrations in snow and potential contributions from NO2- photolysis. This highlights uncertainties in the parameterization of the photolytic NOx source in

  19. Sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane as the origin of extremely 13C-depleted calcite in the Doushantuo cap carbonates in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Bao, H.; Jiang, G.; Kaufman, A. J.; Xiao, S.; Zhou, C.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The cap carbonate in Doushantuo Formation (ca. 635 Ma) has been extensively studied for Earth systems change following the Marinoan 'snowball Earth' glaciation. An important feature of this cap carbonate is the local occurrence of extremely negative δ13Ccarb values (down to -50‰) from dark-colored calcite cements. These calcites have been interpreted as carbonate cements precipitated from cold methane seeps or as hydrothermally induced diagenetic carbonates. To test these contrasting interpretations, we mechanically separated the calcite cements from host dolostones and analyzed stable isotope compositions of pyrite, carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS), and organic carbon in both components of the Doushantuo cap carbonate in the Yangtze Gorges area, South China. The data show that δ34Spyrtie of extremely 13C-depleted calcite (22.8-73.9‰) are up to 34‰ higher than those of the dolomite (14.7-39.9‰). Similarly, δ34SCAS of calcite (37.1-80.1‰) are up to 40‰ higher than those of the dolomite (24.5-41.5‰). The δ18OCAS of calcite (12.9-22.2‰; VSMOW) are also systematically higher than those of dolomite (13.3-16.8‰; VSMOW). In contrast, δ13Corg of calcite cements (-27.2 ‰ to -46.1‰) are lower than those of the dolostones (-26.5‰ to -31.7‰). In addition, there is a strong positive correlation between δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS and a negative correlation between δ13Corg and δ34Spyrtie of the calcite (Figure 1). The data demonstrated convincingly that the 13C-depleted calcites were formed in a environment facilitated by sulfate-driven anaeorobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The co-occurrence of unusually low δ13Corg and high δ34S values requires presence of active flow of both methane and sulfate, a condition not far away from conducive seawater sulfate supply. Figure 1: Cross plots of δ34SCAS vs. δ18OCAS and δ13Corg vs δ34Spyrtie in host dolomite and in the extremely 13C-depleted calcite cements.

  20. Optimum condition to fabricate 5-10 nm SiO2/Si structure using advanced nitric acid oxidation of Si method with Si source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2012-12-01

    A low temperature (≦120 °C) fabrication method to form relatively thick SiO2/Si structure with a Si source has been developed using the advanced nitric acid oxidation of Si (NAOS) method, and the formation mechanism has been investigated. The reaction mechanism consists of direct oxidation of Si, dissolution of Si sources, and surface reaction of the dissolved Si species. The dissolved Si species is present in HNO3 solutions as mono-silicic acid and reacts with oxidizing species formed by decomposition of HNO3 on an ultrathin SiO2 layer (i.e., 1.4 nm) produced by the direct oxidation of Si substrates with HNO3 solutions. To achieve a uniform thickness of SiO2 layer with a smooth surface, HNO3 solutions with concentrations higher than 60 wt. % are needed because the dissolved Si species polymerizes in HNO3 solutions when the concentration is below 60 wt. %, resulting in the formation of SiO2 particles in HNO3, which are deposited afterwards on the SiO2 layer. In spite of the low temperature formation at 120 °C, the electrical characteristics of the advanced NAOS SiO2 layer formed with 68 wt. % HNO3 and subsequent post-metallization anneal at 250 °C are nearly identical to those of thermal oxide formed at 900 °C.

  1. Electrokinetic treatment of polluted soil at pilot level coupled to an advanced oxidation process of its wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, B.; Ramos, L.; Garibay, A.; Pérez-Corona, M.; Cuevas, M. C.; Cárdenas, J.; Teutli, M.; Bustos, E.

    2016-02-01

    Soil contaminated with hydrocarbons is a current problem of great importance. These contaminants may be toxic, can retain water and block gas exchange with the atmosphere, which produces a poor-quality soil unsuitable for ecological health. Electroremediation is among the treatments for the removal of such contaminants. In this research, a pilot-level electroremediation test was applied using a circular arrangement of electrodes with a Ti cathode at the middle of the cell surrounded by six IrO2-Ta2O5 | Ti anodes. The presence of an NaOH electrolyte helps to develop the electromigration and electro-osmosis of gasoline molecules (at 1126 mg kg-1) surrounded by Na+ ions. The hydrocarbons are directed towards the cathode and subsequently removed in an aqueous Na+ - hydrocarbon solution, and the -OH migrates to the anode. During electrokinetic treatment, the physicochemical characteristics of the soil close to either the cathode or anode and at the half-cell were evaluated during the three weeks of treatment. During that time, more than 80% of hydrocarbons were removed. Hydrocarbons removed by the electrokinetic treatment of gasoline-polluted soil were collected in a central wastewater compartment and subsequently treated with a Fenton-type advanced oxidation process. This achieved more than 70% mineralization of the hydrocarbons to CO2 and H2O within 1.5 h; its low toxicity status was verified using the Deltatox® kit test. With this approach, the residual water complied with the permissible limits of COD, pH, and electrical conductivity for being discharged into water bodies, according to Mexican norm NOM-001-SEMARNAT-1996.

  2. Surface water disinfection by chlorination and advanced oxidation processes: Inactivation of an antibiotic resistant E. coli strain and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Andreza Costa; Lepretti, Marilena; Rizzo, Luigi; Caputo, Ivana; Vaiano, Vincenzo; Sacco, Olga; Lopes, Wilton Silva; Sannino, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The release of antibiotics into the environment can result in antibiotic resistance (AR) spread, which in turn can seriously affect human health. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in different aquatic environments used as drinking water source. Water disinfection may be a possible solution to minimize AR spread but conventional processes, such as chlorination, result in the formation of dangerous disinfection by-products. In this study advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely H2O2/UV, TiO2/UV and N-TiO2/UV, have been compared with chlorination in the inactivation of an AR Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain in surface water. TiO2 P25 and nitrogen doped TiO2 (N-TiO2), prepared by sol-gel method at two different synthesis temperatures (0 and -20°C), were investigated in heterogeneous photocatalysis experiments. Under the investigated conditions, chlorination (1.0mgL(-1)) was the faster process (2.5min) to achieve total inactivation (6 Log). Among AOPs, H2O2/UV resulted in the best inactivation rate: total inactivation (6 Log) was achieved in 45min treatment. Total inactivation was not observed (4.5 Log), also after 120min treatment, only for N-doped TiO2 synthesized at 0°C. Moreover, H2O2/UV and chlorination processes were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity potential by means of 3-(4,5-dime-thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium colorimetric test on a human-derived cell line and they similarly affected HepG2 cells viability. PMID:26945469

  3. Assessing the application of advanced oxidation processes, and their combination with biological treatment, to effluents from pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Merayo, Noemí; Hermosilla, Daphne; Blanco, Laura; Cortijo, Luis; Blanco, Angeles

    2013-11-15

    The closure of water circuits within pulp and paper mills has resulted in a higher contamination load of the final mill effluent, which must consequently be further treated in many cases to meet the standards imposed by the legislation in force. Different treatment strategies based on advanced oxidation processes (ozonation and TiO2-photocatalysis), and their combination with biological treatment (MBR), are herein assessed for effluents of a recycled paper mill and a kraft pulp mill. Ozone treatment achieved the highest efficiency of all. The consumption of 2.4 g O3 L(-1) resulted in about a 60% COD reduction treating the effluent from the kraft pulp mill at an initial pH=7; although it only reached about a 35% COD removal for the effluent of the recycled paper mill. Otherwise, photocatalysis achieved about a 20-30% reduction of the COD for both type of effluents. In addition, the effluent from the recycled paper mill showed a higher biodegradability, so combinations of these AOPs with biological treatment were tested. As a result, photocatalysis did not report any significant COD reduction improvement whether being performed as pre- or post-treatment of the biological process; whereas the use of ozonation as post-biological treatment enhanced COD removal a further 10%, summing up a total 90% reduction of the COD for the combined treatment, as well as it also supposed an increase of the presence of volatile fatty acids, which might ultimately enable the resultant wastewater to be recirculated back to further biological treatment. PMID:24076569

  4. Degradation of chlorophenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates, two representative textile chemicals, in water by advanced oxidation processes: the state of the art on transformation products and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Karci, Akin

    2014-03-01

    Advanced oxidation processes based on the generation of reactive species including hydroxyl radicals are viable options in eliminating a wide array of refractory organic contaminants in industrial effluents. The assessment of transformation products and toxicity should be, however, the critical point that would allow the overall efficiency of advanced oxidation processes to be better understood and evaluated since some transformation products could have an inhibitory effect on certain organisms. This article reviews the most recent studies on transformation products and toxicity for evaluating advanced oxidation processes in eliminating classes of compounds described as "textile chemicals" from aqueous matrices and poses questions in need of further investigation. The scope of this paper is limited to the scientific studies with two classes of textile chemicals, namely chlorophenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates, whose use in textile industry is a matter of debate due to health risks to humans and harm to the environment. The article also raises the critical question: What is the state of the art knowledge on relationships between transformation products and toxicity? PMID:24216260

  5. Performance of Thorium-Based Mixed Oxide Fuels for the Consumption of Plutonium in Current and Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

    2003-07-01

    A renewed interest in thorium-based fuels has arisen lately based on the need for proliferation resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup, and improved waste form characteristics. Recent studies have been directed toward homogeneously mixed, heterogeneously mixed, and seed-and-blanket thorium-uranium oxide fuel cycles that rely on "in situ" use of the bred-in 233U. However, due to the higher initial enrichment required to achieve acceptable burnups, these fuels are encountering economic constraints. Thorium can nevertheless play a large role in the nuclear fuel cycle, particularly in the reduction of plutonium inventories. While uranium-based mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel will decrease the amount of plutonium in discharged fuel, the reduction is limited due to the breeding of more plutonium (and higher actinides) from the 238U. Here, we present calculational results and a comparison of the potential burnup of a thorium-based and uranium-based mixed-oxide fuel in a light water reactor. Although the uranium-based fuels outperformed the thorium-based fuels in achievable burnup, a depletion comparison of the initially charged plutonium (both reactor and weapons grade) showed that the thorium-based fuels outperformed the uranium-based fuels by more that a factor of 2, where >70% of the total plutonium in the thorium-based fuel is consumed during the cycle. This is significant considering that the achievable burnups of the thorium-based fuels were 1.4 to 4.6 times less than the uranium-based fuels for similar plutonium enrichments. For equal specific burnups of ~60 MWd/kg (i.e., using variable plutonium weight percentages to give the desired burnup), the thorium-based fuels still outperform the uranium-based fuels by more than a factor of 2, where the total plutonium consumption in a three-batch, 18-month cycle was 60 to 70%. This is fairly significant considering that 10 to 15% (by weight) more plutonium is needed in the thorium-based fuels as compared to the uranium

  6. Mineralization of salicylic acid in acidic aqueous medium by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes using platinum and boron-doped diamond as anode and cathodically generated hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Guinea, Elena; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Centellas, Francesc; Brillas, Enric

    2008-01-01

    Solutions containing 164 mg L(-1) salicylic acid of pH 3.0 have been degraded by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes such as anodic oxidation, anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H(2)O(2), electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton and solar photoelectro-Fenton at constant current density. Their oxidation power has been comparatively studied in a one-compartment cell with a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a graphite or O(2)-diffusion cathode. In the three latter procedures, 0.5mM Fe(2+) is added to the solution to form hydroxyl radical (()OH) from Fenton's reaction between Fe(2+) and H(2)O(2) generated at the O(2)-diffusion cathode. Total mineralization is attained for all methods with BDD and for photoelectro-Fenton and solar photoelectro-Fenton with Pt. The poor decontamination achieved in anodic oxidation and electro-Fenton with Pt is explained by the slow removal of most pollutants by ()OH formed from water oxidation at the Pt anode in comparison to their quick destruction with ()OH produced at BDD. ()OH generated from Fenton's reaction oxidizes rapidly all aromatic pollutants, but it cannot destroy final Fe(III)-oxalate complexes. Solar photoelectro-Fenton treatments always yield quicker degradation rate due to the very fast photodecarboxylation of these complexes by UVA irradiation supplied by solar light. The effect of current density on the degradation rate, efficiency and energy cost of all methods is examined. The salicylic acid decay always follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic, 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic, alpha-ketoglutaric, glycolic, glyoxylic, maleic, fumaric, malic, tartronic and oxalic acids are detected as oxidation products. A general reaction sequence for salicylic acid mineralization considering all these intermediates is proposed. PMID:17692891

  7. Short-Term Oxidation Studies on Nicrofer-6025HT in Air at Elevated Temperatures for Advanced Coal Based Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet; Meier, Alan M.; Darsell, Jens T.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Bowden, Mark; Weil, K. Scott

    2013-01-26

    Isothermal oxidation studies were conducted on Nicrofer-6025HT alloy in the temperature range of 700°C to 900°C up to 24 hours. Surface analysis using SEM revealed that the growth of chromia occurred along the grain and twin boundaries. The surface also contained reactive element oxides along the twin and grain boundaries. XRD analysis of the oxide scale indicated the presence of Al2O3, Cr2O3 and NiCr2O4. Cross sectional SEM analysis revealed a composite oxide scale formation on Nicrofer-6025HT, consisting of an outer rich chromia scale and an inner oxide scale of alumina. Traces of titanium and silicon were also identified in the oxide scale while NiCr2O4 spinel phase was located at the interface for the longer times at high temperatures evaluated. Establishment of compact layer of Cr2O3 resulted in a decrease in its own thickening rate but accelerated the formation of Al2O3 at the interface. XPS analysis revealed the presence of iron oxide and nickel oxide in minor quantities on the oxide surface.

  8. Advanced glycation end products inhibit testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Qi, Ya-Wei; Hu, Chuan-Yin; Chen, Shao-Hong; Liu, You

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes severely impairs male reproduction. The present study assessed the effects and mechanisms of action of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play an important role in the development of diabetes complications, on testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells. Primary rat Leydig cells were cultured and treated with AGEs (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml). Testosterone production induced by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was determined by ELISA. The mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), which are involved in testosterone biosynthesis, were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analyssi, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Leydig cells was measured using the dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) probe. The expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins [C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78)] in the Leydig cells were measured by western blot analysis. We found that the AGEs markedly suppressed testosterone production by rat Leydig cells which was induced by hCG in a concentration-dependent manner compared with the control (P<0.01). The mRNA and protein expression levels of StAR, 3β-HSD and P450scc were downregulated by the AGEs in a dose-dependent manner compared with the control (P<0.01). The antioxidant agent, N-acetyl‑L‑cysteine (NAC), and the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), reversed the inhibitory effects of AGEs. In addition, the content of ROS in Leydig cells treated with AGEs increased significantly. The expression levels of CHOP and GRP78 were markedly upregulated by the AGEs in the Leydig cells. From these findings, it can be concluded that AGEs inhibit testosterone production by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and

  9. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) involving ultrasound for waste water treatment: a review with emphasis on cost estimation.

    PubMed

    Mahamuni, Naresh N; Adewuyi, Yusuf G

    2010-08-01

    Two things are needed for any technology to be suitable for use in the industry, viz. 1. Technical feasibility and 2. Economical feasibility. The use of ultrasound for waste water treatment has been shown to be technically feasible by numerous reports in the literature over the years. But there are hardly any exhaustive reports which address the issue of economical feasibility of the use of ultrasound for waste water treatment on industrial scale. Hence an attempt was made to estimate the cost for the waste water treatment using ultrasound. The costs have been calculated for 1000 L/min capacity treatment plant. The costs were calculated based upon the rate constants for pollutant degradation. The pollutants considered were phenol, trichloroethylene (TCE) and reactive azo dyes. Time required for ninety percent degradation of pollutant was taken as the residence time. The amount of energy required to achieve the target degradation was calculated from the energy density (watt/ml) used in the treatability study. The cost of treatment was calculated by considering capital cost and operating cost involved for the waste water treatment. Quotations were invited from vendors to ascertain the capital cost of equipments involved and operating costs were calculated based on annual energy usage. The cost was expressed in dollars per 1000 gallons of waste water treated. These treatment costs were compared with other established Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) technologies. The cost of waste water treatment for phenol was in the range of $89 per 1000 gallons for UV/US/O(3) to $15,536 per 1000 gallons for US alone. These costs for TCE were in the range of $25 per 1000 gallons to $91 for US+UV treatment and US alone, respectively. The cost of waste water treatment for reactive azo dyes was in the range of $65 per 1000 gallon for US+UV+H(2)O(2) to $14,203 per 1000 gallon for US alone. This study should help in quantifying the economics of waste water treatment using ultrasound on

  10. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing. PMID:24783482

  11. Test-driven programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, are presented some possibilities concerning the implementation of a test-