Science.gov

Sample records for driven bipolar outflows

  1. DETECTION OF A BIPOLAR MOLECULAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY A CANDIDATE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Michael M.; Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Schnee, Scott; Enoch, Melissa L.

    2011-11-20

    We present new 230 GHz Submillimeter Array observations of the candidate first hydrostatic core Per-Bolo 58. We report the detection of a 1.3 mm continuum source and a bipolar molecular outflow, both centered on the position of the candidate first hydrostatic core. The continuum detection has a total flux density of 26.6 {+-} 4.0 mJy, from which we calculate a total (gas and dust) mass of 0.11 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} and a mean number density of 2.0 {+-} 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. There is some evidence for the existence of an unresolved component in the continuum detection, but longer-baseline observations are required in order to confirm the presence of this component and determine whether its origin lies in a circumstellar disk or in the dense inner envelope. The bipolar molecular outflow is observed along a nearly due east-west axis. The outflow is slow (characteristic velocity of 2.9 km s{sup -1}), shows a jet-like morphology (opening semi-angles {approx}8 Degree-Sign for both lobes), and extends to the edges of the primary beam. We calculate the kinematic and dynamic properties of the outflow in the standard manner and compare them to several other protostars and candidate first hydrostatic cores with similarly low luminosities. We discuss the evidence both in support of and against the possibility that Per-Bolo 58 is a first hydrostatic core, and we outline future work needed to further evaluate the evolutionary status of this object.

  2. A Well-Defined Bipolar Outflow Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Taoling; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Patel, Nimesh

    1992-12-01

    A well-defined "eggplant-shaped" thin shell is revealed in the Mon R2 central core region by CO and (13) CO J=1-0 maps obtained with QUARRY. This thin shell outlines the extended blue lobe of the massive bipolar outflow. The projected length and width of the shell are about 5.7 pc and 2.5 pc respectively, and the averaged projected thickness of the shell is ~ 0.3 pc. The shape of this shell can be satisfactorily accounted for quantitatively in terms of limb-brightening within the framework of the Shu et al shell model with radially directed wind, although the model seems to be oversimplified with respect to the complexity that our data reveal. The outflow shell's symmetry axis is estimated to be inclined by ~ 70(deg) with respect to the line of sight. We suggest that the coincident blue- and red-shifted emission and the bending of the red-shifted lobe are the result of the red-shifted shell being compressed, rather than having a second bipolar outflow aligned roughly perpendicular to the axis of the first bipolar outflow.

  3. (abstract) A Test of the Theoretical Models of Bipolar Outflows: The Bipolar Outflow in Mon R2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Taoling; Goldsmith, Paul; Patel, Nimesh

    1993-01-01

    We report some results of a study of the massive bipolar outflow in the central region of the relatively nearby giant molecular cloud Monoceros R2. We make a quantative comparison of our results with the Shu et al. outflow model which incorporates a radially directed wind sweeping up the ambient material into a shell. We find that this simple model naturally explains the shape of this thin shell. Although Shu's model in its simplest form predicts with reasonable parameters too much mass at very small polar angles, as previously pointed out by Masson and Chernin, it provides a reasonable good fit to the mass distribution at larger polar angles. It is possible that this discrepancy is due to inhomogeneities of the ambient molecular gas which is not considered by the model. We also discuss the constraints imposed by these results on recent jet-driven outflow models.

  4. Resolved Spectroscopy of a Gravitationally Lensed L^{*} Lyman Break Galaxy at z˜5: Evidence for a Starburst-Driven, Galactic-Scale Bi-Polar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, M.

    2007-12-01

    We exploit the gravitational potential of a massive, rich cluster as a natural magnifying glass to study the internal properties of the highly magnified galaxy at z=4.88. Using high resolution HST imaging we construct a detailed mass model and, together with optical (VIMOS) and near-infrared (SINFONI) Integral Field Spectroscopy, we have mapped the source-frame morphology of the lensed galaxy behind galaxy cluster RCS0224-002 on 200pc scales to find an ˜L^{*} Lyman-break galaxy with a dynamical mass of 1.0×10^{10} M_{⊙} within 2 kpc and infer an integrated star-formation rate of just 12±2 M_{⊙} yr^{-1}. By combing the spatially resolved velocities from the [O II] and Lyα emission and UV ISM absorption lines we suggest that this galaxy is surrounded by a galactic-scale bi-polar outflow which has recently burst out of the system and is escaping at a speed of ˜500 km s^{-1}. The geometry and velocity of the outflow suggests that the ejected material is travelling far faster than escape velocity and we estimate that it will travel at least 1 Mpc (comoving) before eventually stalling. The enriched, outflowing material is therefore efficient at expelling baryons which are likely to subsequently play no further part in the star-formation history of this galaxy, but rather will pollute the IGM in a volume of at least 3Mpc^{3}.

  5. Star formation and the nature of bipolar outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Ruden, Steven P.; Lada, Charles J.; Lizano, Susana

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a simple physical model for the bipolar molecular outflows that frequently accompany star formation. The model forges an intrinsic link between the bipolar flow phenomenon and the process of star formation, and it helps to explain many of the systematics known for existing sources.

  6. Magnetic field and spatial structure of bipolar outflow sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodapp, Klaus-Werner

    1990-01-01

    Deep K band images of three bipolar outflow sources (Cep A, GL 490, and R Mon) are presented. The polarization of background or embedded stars close to these star-forming regions has been measured in the I band to determine the local projected magnetic field direction. For Cep A the outflow direction and the magnetic field are almost parallel as is the case for most bipolar outflow sources. This alignment is poorer in the case of R Mon while GL 490 is a peculiar case with the outflow direction almost perpendicular to the local magnetic field. No indication was found for a distortion of the magnetic field close to the collimating disks of the outflows.

  7. TRACING THE BIPOLAR OUTFLOW FROM ORION SOURCE I

    SciTech Connect

    Plambeck, R. L.; Wright, M. C. H.; Friedel, D. N.; Widicus Weaver, S. L.; Bolatto, A. D.; Pound, M. W.; Woody, D. P.; Lamb, J. W.; Scott, S. L.

    2009-10-10

    Using CARMA, we imaged the 87 GHz SiO v = 0 J = 2-1 line toward Orion-KL with 0.''45 angular resolution. The maps indicate that radio source I drives a bipolar outflow into the surrounding molecular cloud along a NE-SW axis, in agreement with the model of Greenhill et al. The extended high-velocity outflow from Orion-KL appears to be a continuation of this compact outflow. High-velocity gas extends farthest along a NW-SE axis, suggesting that the outflow direction changes on timescales of a few hundred years.

  8. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Star Forming Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adam

    Setting young stellar object jets and outflows in their broadest context requires an understanding of outflows as “feedback” in the development of molecular cloud turbulence and the determination of star formation efficiencies. In this contribution I review our group’s recent studies exploring relationships between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. We first present studies of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by YSO outflows using numerical simulations which track the evolution of single transient jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. These studies demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Next we present simulations of multiple interacting jets. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. Comparing the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of an isotropically forced control we show that in outflow driven turbulence a power law of the form E(k) ∝ k - β is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum β ˜ 3 is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations β ˜ 2. 0. Taken together both studies provide broad support for the conclusion that fossil cavities driven by decaying jets can provide a source of turbulence and feedback which mediate star formation processes in molecular clouds. Whether this does obtain in real clouds remains a point which must be demonstrated

  9. THE CIRCUMBINARY OUTFLOW: A PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY A CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.j

    2009-10-10

    Protostellar outflow is a star's first cry at the moment of birth. The outflows have an indispensable role in the formation of single stars because they carry off the excess angular momentum from the center of the shrinking gas cloud, and permit further collapse to form a star. On the other hand, a significant fraction of stars is supposedly born as binaries with circumbinary disks that are frequently observed. Here, we investigate the evolution of a magnetized rotating cloud using a three-dimensional resistive MHD nested-grid code, and show that the outflow is driven by the circumbinary disk and has an important role even in the binary formation. After the adiabatic core formation in the collapsing cloud core, the magnetic flux is significantly removed from the center of the cloud by the Ohmic dissipation. Since this removal makes the magnetic braking ineffective, the adiabatic core continuously acquires the angular momentum to induce fragmentation and subsequent binary formation. The magnetic field accumulates in the circumbinary disk where the removal and accretion of magnetic field are balanced, and finally drives the circumbinary outflow. This result explains the spectacular morphology of some specific young stellar objects such as L1551 IRS5. We can infer that most of the bipolar molecular outflows observed by low density tracers (i.e., CO) would correspond to circumbinary or circum-multiple outflows found in this Letter, since most of the young stellar objects are supposed to be binaries or multiples.

  10. High resolution observations of the L1551 bipolar outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, R.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Strom, S.; Schloerb, P.; Strom, K.; Grasdalen, G.

    1986-01-01

    The nearby dark cloud Lynds 1551 contains one of the closest examples of a well-collimated bipolar molecular outflow. This source has the largest angular size of any known outflow and was the first bipolar outflow to be detected. The outflow originates from a low-luminosity young stellar object, IRS-5. Optical and radio continuum observations show the presence of a highly collimated, ionized stellar wind orginating from close to IRS-5 and aligned with the molecular outflow. However, we have little information on the actual mechanism that generates the stellar wind and collimates it into opposed jets. The Very Large Array (VLA) observations indicate that the winds originate within 10(15) cm of IRS-5, unfortunately at a size scale difficult to resolve. For these reasons, observations of the structure and dynamics of the hypersonic molecular gas may provide valuable information on the origin and evolution of these outflows. In addition, the study of the impact of the outflowing gas on the surrounding molecular material is essential to understand the consequence these outflows have on the evolution and star formation history of the entire cloud. Moriarty-Schieven et al. (1986) obtained a oversampled map of the CO emission of a portion of both the blueshifted and redshifted outflows in LI551 using Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14 m telescope. The oversampled maps have been reconstructed to an effective angular resolution of 20 arcsec using a maximum entropy algorithm. A continuation of the study of Moriarty-Schieven et al. is presented. The entire L1551 outflow has now been mapped at 12 arcsec sampling requiring roughly 4000 spectra. This data has been constructed to 20 arcsec resolution to provide the first high resolution picture of the entire L1551 outflow. This new data has shown that the blueshifted lobe is more extended than previously thought and has expanded downstream sufficiently to break out of the dense molecular cloud, but the redshifted outflow

  11. Shocked molecular hydrogen in the bipolar outflow NGC 2071

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Geballe, T. R.; Brand, P. W. J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Maps of the emission from the v = 1-0 S(1) line of molecular hydrogen in the bipolar outflow of NGC 2071 are presented. The line emission is shown to peak at six positions distributed irregularly along two lobes which are parallel to, but offset about 20 arcsec from, the lobes of the high-velocity CO-line emission. The energetics and composition of the high-velocity gas support a model in which the driving agent is a bipolar atomic wind which arises from the vicinity of the central IR sources and shocks the surrounding molecular cloud, evacuating a cavity within it.

  12. Bipolar Nuclear Outflow from the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.

    1994-12-01

    The S0/Sa galaxy NGC 5548 hosts a Seyfert 1 nucleus. Echo mapping of its broad optical-line-emitting region yields a radial extent R <~ 20 light days = (1)/(60) pc, or 70 h microarcseonds for H_0 = 100 h km s(-1) Mpc(-1) (Peterson 1993). Using data from larger radii, what boundary conditions can be imposed on the geometry and velocity field of the broad line region? R <~ 1400 h(-1) pc: Bipolar radio continuum lobes straddle a central radio component in NGC 5548. These lobes, which emit optically-thin synchrotron radiation with a 4-cm power of 10(21) h(-2) W Hz(-1) , trace bipolar outflow from the nucleus (Wilson & Ulvestad 1982; Wrobel 1994). R <~ 720 h(-1) pc: The radio lobes of NGC 5548 share the elongation position angle of the [OIII] narrow-line gas, with the broadest known line widths occuring NW of the nucleus at these radii (Wilson et al. 1989). This hints that some narrow-line gas receives additional mechanical energy from the bipolar outflow feeding the radio lobes, a situation analogous to the narrow-line superbubble in NGC 3079 (Veilleux et al. 1994). R <~ 10 h(-1) pc: Blueshifted absorption in the broad CIV lines proves that some gas is flowing out of the nucleus of NGC 5548, with observed speeds of 1200 km s(-1) relative to systemic (Shull & Sachs 1993). This absorption line outflow may have, or be able to achieve, a bipolar shape via the disk-focusing scheme proposed for NGC 3079 (Duric & Seaquist 1988; Veilleux et al. 1994).

  13. Bipolar Molecular Outflows from High-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Nung; Zhang, Qizhou; Lim, Jeremy

    2004-03-01

    We report observations of the bipolar molecular outflows associated with the luminous (~2×104 Lsolar) far-IR sources IRAS 21519+5613 and IRAS 22506+5944, as well the dust and molecular gas condensations on which these outflows appear to be centered. The observations were made in 12CO, 13CO, C18O, and continuum at 3 mm with the BIMA array and in 12CO and 13CO with the NRAO 12 m telescope to recover extended emission filtered out by the interferometric array. We find that the outflow associated with each IRAS source shows a clear bipolar morphology in 12CO, with properties (i.e., total mass of order 10-100 Msolar, mass-outflow rate >~10-3 Msolar, dynamical timescale 104-105 yr, and energetics) comparable with those of other massive outflows associated with luminous young stellar objects. Each outflow appears to be centered on a dust and gas condensation with a mass of 200-300 Msolar, likely marking the location of the driving source. The outflow lobes of both sources are fully resolved along their major but not minor axes, and they have collimation factors that may be comparable with young low-mass stars. The mass-velocity diagrams of both outflows change in slope at a velocity of ~10 km s-1, suggesting that the high-velocity component (HVC) may drive the low-velocity component (LVC). Although the HVC of IRAS 21519+5613 shows evidence for deceleration, no such signature is seen in the HVC of IRAS 22506+5944. Neither HVC has a momentum supply rate sufficient to drive their corresponding LVCs, although it is possible that the HVC is more highly excited and hence its thrust underestimated. Like for other molecular outflows the primary driving agent cannot be ionized gas, leaving atomic gas as the other remaining candidate. Neither IRAS 21519+5613 nor IRAS 22506+5944 exhibits detectable free-free emission, which together with the observed properties of their molecular outflows and surrounding condensations make them credible candidates for high-mass protostars. The mass

  14. The bipolar outflow from the rotating carbon star, V Hydrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahane, C.; Maizels, C.; Jura, M.

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution optical spectrum of the mass-losing red giant carbon star, V Hya, has been obtained, and the (C-12)O (J = 1-0) millimeter emission in the circumstellar envelope around this star has been mapped. It is found that the CO emission is extended, clearly anisotropic and can be interpreted as the superposition of an isotropic emission with that of a bipolar flow. The optical spectrum of the photosphere suggests that this star is rotating with v sin i between 10 and 20 km/s. These data are interpreted, together, to suggest that the bipolar nature of the outflow results from the flattening of the star induced by its rapid rotation.

  15. A Micro-Molecular Bipolar Outflow from HL Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Michihiro; Beck, Tracy L.; Pyo, Tae-Soo; McGregor, Peter; Davis, Christopher

    2007-11-01

    We present detailed geometry and kinematics of the inner outflow toward HL Tau observed using Near Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at the Gemini-North 8 m Observatory. We analyzed H2 2.122 μm emission and [Fe II] 1.644 μm line emission as well as the adjacent continuum observed at a <0.2" resolution. The H2 emission shows (1) a bubble-like geometry to the northeast of the star, as briefly reported in the previous paper, and (2) faint emission in the southwest counterflow, which has been revealed through careful analysis. The emission on both sides of the star shows an arc 1.0" away from the star, exhibiting a bipolar symmetry. Different brightnesses and morphologies in the northeast and southwest flows are attributed to absorption and obscuration of the latter by a flattened envelope and a circumstellar disk. The H2 emission shows a remarkably different morphology from the collimated jet seen in [Fe II] emission. The positions of some features coincide with scattering continuum, indicating that these are associated with cavities in the dusty envelope. Such properties are similar to millimeter CO outflows, although the spatial scale of the H2 outflow in our image (~150 AU) is strikingly smaller than the millimeter outflows, which often extend over 1000-10000 AU scales. The position-velocity diagrams of the H2 and [Fe II] emission do not show any evidence for kinematic interaction between these flows. All results described above support the scenario that the jet is surrounded by an unseen wide-angled wind, which interacts with the ambient gas and produces the bipolar cavity and shocked H2 emission. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (United Kingdom), the National

  16. Impacts of pure shocks in the BHR71 bipolar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, A.; Riquelme, D.; Anderl, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Codella, C.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Graf, U. U.; Kristensen, L. E.; Leurini, S.; Parise, B.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Ricken, O.; Güsten, R.

    2015-03-01

    Context. During the formation of a star, material is ejected along powerful jets that impact the ambient material. This outflow regulates star formation by e.g. inducing turbulence and heating the surrounding gas. Understanding the associated shocks is therefore essential to the study of star formation. Aims: We present comparisons of shock models with CO, H2, and SiO observations in a "pure" shock position in the BHR71 bipolar outflow. These comparisons provide an insight into the shock and pre-shock characteristics, and allow us to understand the energetic and chemical feedback of star formation on Galactic scales. Methods: New CO (Jup = 16, 11, 7, 6, 4, 3) observations from the shocked regions with the SOFIA and APEX telescopes are presented and combined with earlier H2 and SiO data (from the Spitzer and APEX telescopes). The integrated intensities are compared to a grid of models that were obtained from a magneto-hydrodynamical shock code, which calculates the dynamical and chemical structure of these regions combined with a radiative transfer module based on the "large velocity gradient" approximation. Results: The CO emission leads us to update the conclusions of our previous shock analysis: pre-shock densities of 104 cm-3 and shock velocities around 20-25 km s-1 are still constrained, but older ages are inferred (~4000 years). Conclusions: We evaluate the contribution of shocks to the excitation of CO around forming stars. The SiO observations are compatible with a scenario where less than 4% of the pre-shock SiO belongs to the grain mantles. We infer outflow parameters: a mass of 1.8 × 10-2 M⊙ was measured in our beam, in which a momentum of 0.4 M⊙ km s-1 is dissipated, corresponding to an energy of 4.2 × 1043 erg. We analyse the energetics of the outflow species by species. Comparing our results with previous studies highlights their dependence on the method: H2 observations only are not sufficient to evaluate the mass of outflows.

  17. Supernovae and AGN Driven Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B.

    2013-01-01

    We present analytical solutions for winds from galaxies with a Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) dark matter halo. We consider winds driven by energy and mass injection from multiple supernovae (SNe), as well as momentum injection due to radiation from a central black hole. We find that the wind dynamics depends on three velocity scales: (1) v_\\star ˜ (\\dot{E} / 2 \\dot{M})^{1/2} describes the effect of starburst activity, with \\dot{E} and \\dot{M} as energy and mass injection rate in a central region of radius R; (2) v • ~ (GM •/2R)1/2 for the effect of a central black hole of mass M • on gas at distance R; and (3) v_{s} =(GM_h / 2 {C}r_s)^{1/2}, which is closely related to the circular speed (vc ) for an NFW halo, where rs is the halo scale radius and {C} is a function of the halo concentration parameter. Our generalized formalism, in which we treat both energy and momentum injection from starbursts and radiation from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), allows us to estimate the wind terminal speed to be (4v 2 sstarf + 6(Γ - 1)v • 2 - 4v 2 s )1/2, where Γ is the ratio of force due to radiation pressure to gravity of the central black hole. Our dynamical model also predicts the following: (1) winds from quiescent star-forming galaxies cannot escape from 1011.5 M ⊙ <= Mh <= 1012.5 M ⊙ galaxies; (2) circumgalactic gas at large distances from galaxies should be present for galaxies in this mass range; (3) for an escaping wind, the wind speed in low- to intermediate-mass galaxies is ~400-1000 km s-1, consistent with observed X-ray temperatures; and (4) winds from massive galaxies with AGNs at Eddington limit have speeds >~ 1000 km s-1. We also find that the ratio [2v 2 sstarf - (1 - Γ)v • 2]/v 2 c dictates the amount of gas lost through winds. Used in conjunction with an appropriate relation between M • and Mh and an appropriate opacity of dust grains in infrared (K band), this ratio has the attractive property of being minimum at a certain halo

  18. SUPERNOVAE AND AGN DRIVEN GALACTIC OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B. E-mail: biman@rri.res.in

    2013-01-20

    We present analytical solutions for winds from galaxies with a Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) dark matter halo. We consider winds driven by energy and mass injection from multiple supernovae (SNe), as well as momentum injection due to radiation from a central black hole. We find that the wind dynamics depends on three velocity scales: (1) v{sub *}{approx}( E-dot / 2 M-dot ){sup 1/2} describes the effect of starburst activity, with E-dot and M-dot as energy and mass injection rate in a central region of radius R; (2) v {sub .} {approx} (GM {sub .}/2R){sup 1/2} for the effect of a central black hole of mass M {sub .} on gas at distance R; and (3) v{sub s}=(GM{sub h} / 2Cr{sub s}){sup 1/2}, which is closely related to the circular speed (v{sub c} ) for an NFW halo, where r{sub s} is the halo scale radius and C is a function of the halo concentration parameter. Our generalized formalism, in which we treat both energy and momentum injection from starbursts and radiation from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), allows us to estimate the wind terminal speed to be (4v {sup 2} {sub *} + 6({Gamma} - 1)v {sub .} {sup 2} - 4v {sup 2} {sub s}){sup 1/2}, where {Gamma} is the ratio of force due to radiation pressure to gravity of the central black hole. Our dynamical model also predicts the following: (1) winds from quiescent star-forming galaxies cannot escape from 10{sup 11.5} M {sub Sun} {<=} M{sub h} {<=} 10{sup 12.5} M {sub Sun} galaxies; (2) circumgalactic gas at large distances from galaxies should be present for galaxies in this mass range; (3) for an escaping wind, the wind speed in low- to intermediate-mass galaxies is {approx}400-1000 km s{sup -1}, consistent with observed X-ray temperatures; and (4) winds from massive galaxies with AGNs at Eddington limit have speeds {approx}> 1000 km s{sup -1}. We also find that the ratio [2v {sup 2} {sub *} - (1 - {Gamma})v {sub .} {sup 2}]/v {sup 2} {sub c} dictates the amount of gas lost through winds. Used in conjunction with

  19. A Massive Bipolar Outflow and a Dusty Torus with Large Grains in the Preplanetary Nebula IRAS 22036+5306

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Young, K.; Patel, N. A.; Sanchez Contreras, C.; Morris, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report high angular resolution (approx.1") CO J=3-2 interferometric mapping using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) of IRAS 22036+5306 (I22036), a bipolar preplanetary nebula (PPN) with knotty jets discovered in our HST snapshot survey of young PPNs. In addition, we have obtained supporting lower resolution (approx.10") CO and 13CO J=1-0 observations with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) interferometer, as well as optical long-slit echelle spectra at the Palomar Observatory. The CO J=3-2 observations show the presence of a very fast (approx.220 km/s), highly collimated, massive (0.03 Solar Mass) bipolar outflow with a very large scalar momentum (about 10(exp 39) g cm/s), and the characteristic spatiokinematic structure of bow shocks at the tips of this outflow. The H(alpha) line shows an absorption feature blueshifted from the systemic velocity by approx.100 km/s, which most likely arises in neutral interface material between the fast outflow and the dense walls of the bipolar lobes at low latitudes. The fast outflow in I22036, as in most PPNs, cannot be driven by radiation pressure. We find an unresolved source of submillimeter (and millimeter-wave) continuum emission in I22036, implying a very substantial mass (0.02-0.04 Solar Mass) of large (radius > or approx.1 mm), cold (< or approx.50 K) dust grains associated with I22036's toroidal waist. We also find that the C-13/C-12 ratio in I22036 is very high (0.16), close to the maximum value achieved in equilibrium CNO nucleosynthesis (0.33). The combination of the high circumstellar mass (i.e., in the extended dust shell and the torus) and the high C-13/C-12 ratio in I22036 provides strong support for this object having evolved from a massive (> or approx.4 Solar Mass) progenitor in which hot-bottom-burning has occurred.

  20. AN INFRARED-LUMINOUS MERGER WITH TWO BIPOLAR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS: ALMA AND SMA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 3256

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Aalto, Susanne; Combes, Francoise; Evans, Aaron; Peck, Alison

    2014-12-20

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array and Submillimeter Array observations of the infrared-luminous merger NGC 3256, the most luminous galaxy within z = 0.01. Both of the two merger nuclei separated by 5'' (0.8 kpc) have a molecular gas concentration, a nuclear disk, with Σ{sub mol} > 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}. The northern nucleus is more massive and is surrounded by molecular spiral arms. Its nuclear disk is face-on, while the southern nuclear disk is almost edge-on. The high-velocity molecular gas in the system can be resolved into two molecular outflows from the two nuclei. The one from the northern nucleus is part of a starburst-driven superwind seen nearly pole-on. Its maximum velocity is >750 km s{sup –1} and its mass outflow rate is >60 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for a conversion factor X{sub CO}=N{sub H{sub 2}}/I{sub CO(1−0)} of 1 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} (K km s{sup –1}){sup –1}. The molecular outflow from the southern nucleus is a highly collimated bipolar jet seen nearly edge-on. Its line-of-sight velocity increases with distance, out to 300 pc from the nucleus, to the maximum de-projected velocity of ∼2000 km s{sup –1} for the estimated inclination and ≳1000 km s{sup –1} taking into account the uncertainty. Its mass outflow rate is estimated to be >50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for the same X {sub CO}. This southern outflow has indications of being driven by a bipolar radio jet from an active galactic nucleus that recently weakened. The sum of these outflow rates, although subject to the uncertainty in the molecular mass estimate, either exceeds or compares to the total star formation rate. The feedback from nuclear activity through molecular outflows is therefore significant in the gas consumption, and hence evolution, of this system.

  1. A Study of PG Quasar-Driven Outflows with COS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Frederick

    2013-10-01

    Quasar outflows are an important part of the quasar phenomenon, but many questions remain about their energetics, physical properties and the role they might play in providing feedback to host galaxy evolution. We searched our own COS far-UV observations from the QUEST survey and other large COS programs to find a sample of 6 bright PG quasars with broad {FWHM > 400 km/s} high velocity {v > 1000 km/s} absorption lines that clearly form in quasar-driven winds. These quasars can fill an important gap in our understanding between local Seyferts with low-speed winds and high-redshift quasars with extreme BAL outflows. They are also well-studied at other wavelengths, with some evidence for the quasars driving galaxy-scale blowouts and shutting down star formation. But almost nothing is known about the quasar outflows themselves. We propose a detailed study of these 6 outflow quasars using new COS FUV observations to 1} expand the existing wavelength coverage across critical lines that are diagnostic of the outflow physical conditions, kinetic energies, and metallicities, and 2} check for line variability as an indicator of the outflow structure and locations. This quasar sample includes unusual cases with many low-abundance {PV 1118,1128 and SIV 1063} and excited-state lines {SIV 1073*, CIII* 1175, CII* 1335} that will provide unprecedented constraints on the outflow properties, plus the first known OVI-only mini-BAL outflow {no lower ions detected} for which we will cover NeVIII 770,780 to probe the highest ionization gas. The high FUV sensitivity of COS is uniquely able to measure this wide range of outflow lines in low-redshift quasars with no Lya forest contamination.

  2. Multiwavelength Spectroscopy of the Bipolar Outflow from Cepheus E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Froebrich, Dirk; Eislöffel, Jochen

    2003-07-01

    Cepheus E is the site of an exceptional example of a protostellar outflow with a very young dynamical age and extremely high near-infrared luminosity. We combine molecular spectroscopic data from the submillimeter to the near-infrared in order to interpret the rotational excitation of CO and the rovibrational excitation of H2. We conclude that C-type shocks with a paraboloidal bow shock geometry can simultaneously explain all the molecular excitations. Extinction accounts for the deviation of the column densities from local thermodynamic equilibrium. A difference in the extinction between the red- and blueshifted outflow lobes may account for the measured flux difference. The outflow is deeply embedded in a clump of density 105 cm-3, yet a good fraction of atomic hydrogen, about 40%, is required to explain the excitation and statistical equilibrium. We propose that this atomic component arises, self-consistently, from the dissociated gas at the apex of the leading bow shocks and the relatively long molecule reformation time. At least 20 bow shocks are required in each lobe, although these may be subdivided into smaller bows and turbulent shocked regions. The total outflow mechanical power and cooling amounts to over 30 Lsolar, almost half the source's bolometric luminosity. Nevertheless, only about 6% of the clump mass has been set in outward motion by the outflow, allowing a collapse to continue. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  3. A young bipolar outflow from IRAS15398-3359

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerkeli, Per; Jørgensen, Jes K.

    2015-08-01

    The Class 0 protostar IRAS 15398-3359 is located in the Lupus I cloud at a distance of 155 pc. The source is known to harbour a molecular outflow, but the region has not attracted much interest until recently. IRAS 15398 is known to show interesting chemical signatures and being one of the very nearby, young outflow sources makes it an excellent target for detailed studies of the gas kinematics of different species.We present observations of several molecular species, carried out with the Submillimeter Array and ALMA, towards the IRAS 15398 outflow. The analysis of CO emission show obvious signs of episodic mass ejections, with a dynamical time scale between the knots in the jet, of the order 100 years. This is consistent with recent ALMA results where luminosity outbursts are estimated to occur on similar time-scales. The physical properties of the outflow, such as mass, momentum, momentum rate, mechanical luminosity, kinetic energy and mass-loss rate are estimated at relatively low values. We argue that this source is of a very young age, possibly younger than ~1000 years. This is consistent with recent studies of the kinematics of the inner envelope/disk. The observed line profiles were compared to full 3D radiative transfer models of the source, constructed with the Line Modelling Engine (LIME). The observed line shapes can only be understood when considering several distinctly different physical components, viz. the outflow cavity, the infalling envelope and the surrounding cloud material. This allows us to put quantitative constraints on the kinematics of the material close to the central source.

  4. A young bipolar outflow from IRAS 15398-3359

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerkeli, P.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Brinch, C.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Changing physical conditions in the vicinity of protostars allow for a rich and interesting chemistry to occur. Heating and cooling of the gas allows molecules to be released from and frozen out on dust grains. These changes in physics, traced by chemistry as well as the kinematical information, allows us to distinguish between different scenarios describing the infall of matter and the launching of molecular outflows and jets. Aims: We aim to determine the spatial distribution of different species that are of different chemical origin. This is to examine the physical processes in play in the observed region. From the kinematical information of the emission lines we aim to determine the nature of the infalling and outflowing gas in the system. We also aim to determine the physical properties of the outflow. Methods: Maps from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) reveal the spatial distribution of the gaseous emission towards IRAS 15398-3359. The line radiative transfer code LIME is used to construct a full 3D model of the system taking all relevant components and scales into account. Results: CO, HCO+, and N2H+ are detected and shown to trace the motions of the outflow. For CO, the circumstellar envelope and the surrounding cloud also have a profound impact on the observed line profiles. N2H+ is detected in the outflow, but is suppressed towards the central region, perhaps because of the competing reaction between CO and H3+ in the densest regions as well as the destruction of N2H+ by CO. N2D+ is detected in a ridge south-west of the protostellar condensation and is not associated with the outflow. The morphology and kinematics of the CO emission suggests that the source is younger than ~1000 years. The mass, momentum, momentum rate, mechanical luminosity, kinetic energy, and mass-loss rate are also all estimated to be low. A full 3D radiative transfer model of the system can explain all the kinematical and morphological features in the system.

  5. ISOTROPICALLY DRIVEN VERSUS OUTFLOW DRIVEN TURBULENCE: OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-10

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  6. Discovery of an Extremely Wide-angle Bipolar Outflow in AFGL 5142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Zhang, Qizhou; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wu, Yuefang; Lee, Chang-Won; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Li, Di; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Chen, Huei-Ru; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Wang, Ke; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Qin, Sheng-Li; Mardones, Diego; Cho, Se-Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Most bipolar outflows are associated with individual young stellar objects and have small opening angles. Here we report the discovery of an extremely wide-angle (∼180°) bipolar outflow (“EWBO”) in a cluster forming region AFGL 5142 from low-velocity emission of the HCN (3–2) and HCO+ (3–2) lines. This bipolar outflow is along a north-west to south-east direction with a line of sight flow velocity of about 3 km s‑1 and is spatially connected to the high-velocity jet-like outflows. It seems to be a collection of low-velocity material entrained by the high-velocity outflows due to momentum feedback. The total ejected mass and mass loss rate due to both high-velocity jet-like outflows and the “EWBO” are ∼24.5 M ⊙ and ∼1.7 × 10‑3 M ⊙ yr‑1, respectively. Global collapse of the clump is revealed by the “blue profile” in the HCO+ (1–0) line. A hierarchical network of filaments was identified in NH3 (1, 1) emission. Clear velocity gradients of the order of 10 km s‑1 pc‑1 are found along filaments, indicating gas inflow along the filaments. The sum of the accretion rate along filaments and mass infall rate along the line of sight is ∼3.1 × 10‑3 M ⊙ yr‑1, which exceeds the total mass loss rate, indicating that the central cluster is probably still gaining mass. The central cluster is highly fragmented and 22 condensations are identified in 1.1 mm continuum emission. The fragmentation process seems to be determined by thermal pressure and turbulence. The magnetic field may not play an important role in fragmentation.

  7. Cluster Formation in Protostellar Outflow-driven Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2006-04-01

    Most, perhaps all, stars go through a phase of vigorous outflow during formation. We examine, through three-dimensional MHD simulation, the effects of protostellar outflows on cluster formation. We find that the initial turbulence in the cluster-forming region is quickly replaced by motions generated by outflows. The protostellar outflow-driven turbulence (``protostellar turbulence'' for short) can keep the region close to a virial equilibrium long after the initial turbulence has decayed away. We argue that there exist two types of turbulence in star-forming clouds: a primordial (or ``interstellar'') turbulence and a protostellar turbulence, with the former transformed into the latter mostly in embedded clusters such as NGC 1333. Since the majority of stars are thought to form in clusters, an implication is that the stellar initial mass function is determined to a large extent by the stars themselves, through outflows that individually limit the mass accretion onto forming stars and collectively shape the environments (density structure and velocity field) in which most cluster members form. We speculate that massive cluster-forming clumps supported by protostellar turbulence gradually evolve toward a highly centrally condensed ``pivotal'' state, culminating in rapid formation of massive stars in the densest part through accretion.

  8. Bipolar Outflow Offset from the Nucleus of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Moody, J. W.; Hintz, M. L.; Wu, K.; Soria, R.

    2002-12-01

    Using long-slit spectra centered in wavelength about Hα , we have produced a velocity map of a 0.5' x 2' hourglass shaped object centered 38" southeast of the optical center of M33. The velocity resolution is 1.1 km/s. We have also produced electron temperature, electron density, and shock heating maps of the same region using the [NII](λ 6548), [NII](λ 6583), Hα , [SII](λ 6717), and [SII](λ 6731) lines. The data reveal that the gas is flowing away from the center of this hourglass shaped object and that the electron temperature and density of the region is relatively low. The shock heating maps indicate that very little of the gas in the region is shock heated. Using this new data and previously published UV, IR, and radio data we investigate possible scenarios that could explain this large scale, low velocity outflow.

  9. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Jet- and Wind-driven Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Stone, James M.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2001-08-01

    We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of both jet- and wind-driven models for protostellar outflows in order to make detailed comparisons to the kinematics of observed molecular outflows. The simulations are performed with the ZEUS-2D hydrodynamic code using a simplified equation of state, simplified cooling and no external heating, and no self-gravity. In simulations of steady jets, swept-up ambient gas forms a thin shell that can be identified as a molecular outflow. We find a simple ballistic bow shock model is able to reproduce the structure and transverse velocity of the shell. Position-velocity (PV) diagrams for the shell cut along the outflow axis show a convex spur structure with the highest velocity at the bow tip and low-velocity red and blue components at any viewing angle. The power-law index of the mass-velocity (MV) relationship ranges from 1.5 to 3.5, depending strongly on the inclination. If the jet is time-variable, the PV diagrams show multiple convex spur structures, and the power-law index becomes smaller than the steady jet simulation. In simulations of isothermal steady wide-angle winds, swept-up ambient gas forms a thin shell that at early stages has a similar shape to the shell in the jet-driven model; it becomes broader at later times. We find the structure and kinematics of the shell is well described by a momentum-conserving model similar to that of Shu et al. (1991). In contrast to the results from jet simulations, the PV diagrams for the shell cut along the outflow axis show a lobe structure tilted with source inclination, with components that are primarily either red or blue unless the inclination is nearly in the plane of sky. The power-law index of the MV relationship ranges from 1.3 to 1.8. If the wind is time-variable, the PV diagrams also show multiple structures, and the power-law index becomes smaller than the steady wind simulation. Comparing the different simulations with observations, we find that some outflows

  10. Coexisting conical bipolar and equatorial outflows from a high-mass protostar.

    PubMed

    Greenhill, L J; Gwinn, C R; Schwartz, C; Moran, J M; Diamond, P J

    1998-12-17

    The BN/KL region in the Orion molecular cloud is an archetype for the study of the formation of stars much more massive than the Sun. This region contains luminous young stars and protostars but, like most star-forming regions, is difficult to study in detail because of the obscuring effects of dust and gas. Our basic expectations are shaped to some extent by the present theoretical picture of star formation, the cornerstone of which is that protostars accrete gas from rotating equatorial disks and shed angular momentum by ejecting gas in bipolar outflows. The main source of the outflow in the BN/KL region may be an object known as radio source I, which is commonly believed to be surrounded by a rotating disk of molecular material. Here we report high-resolution observations of silicon monoxide (SiO) and water maser emission from the gas surrounding source I. We show that within 60 AU of the source (about the size of the Solar System), the region is dominated by a conical bipolar outflow, rather than the expected disk. A slower outflow, close to the equatorial plane of the protostellar system, extends to radii of 1,000 AU. PMID:9872312

  11. From bipolar to quadrupolar - The collimation processes of the Cepheus A outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    Results of new K-band observations of the (1, 1) and (2, 2) ammonia lines toward Cepheus A are reported. The lines are mapped with approximately 2 arcsec of angular resolution and 0.3 km/s of velocity resolution. A sensitivity of 10 mJy has been achieved. The observations reveal details of the spatial and kinematics structure of the ambient high-density gas. It is suggested that the interstellar high-density gas is diverting and redirecting the outflow in the sense that the quadrupolar structure of the molecular outflow is produced by the interaction with the ammonia condensationss, with Cep A-1 and Cep A-3 splitting in two halves, respectively the blue- and redshifted lobes of an east-west bipolar molecular outflow.

  12. A high-speed bipolar outflow from the archetypical pulsating star Mira A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meaburn, J.; López, J. A.; Boumis, P.; Lloyd, M.; Redman, M. P.

    2009-06-01

    Optical images and high-dispersion spectra have been obtained of the ejected material surrounding the pulsating AGB star Mira A. The two streams of knots on either side of the star, found in far-ultraviolet (FUV) GALEX images, have now been imaged clearly in the light of Hα. Spatially resolved profiles of the same line reveal that the bulk of these knots form a bipolar outflow with radial velocity extremes of ±150 km s-1 with respect to the central star. The south stream is approaching and the north stream receding from the observer. A displacement away from Mira A between the position of one of the south-stream knots in the new Hα image and its position in the previous Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS I) red plate was noted. If interpreted as a consequence of expansion proper motions, the bipolar outflow is tilted at 69° ± 15° to the plane of the sky, has an outflow velocity of 160 ± 10 km s-1 and is ≈1000 y old.

  13. Multiple outflows in the bipolar planetary nebula M1-16: A molecular line study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Wootten, Alwyn; Schwarz, Hugo E.; Wild, W.

    1994-01-01

    Extensive observations of the molecular gas in the young, compact planetary nebula M1-16 have been made, using the Swedish-ESO-Submillimeter Telescope. A map of the CO J = 2-1 emission shows that the molecular envelope contains both a slow and a fast outflow with expansion velocities of 19 km/s and greater than 34 km/s, respectively. The slow outflow is mildly elliptical, while the fast molecular outflow is bipolar. This fast outflow is roughly aligned with the very fast outflows recently found in the optical, while the long axis of the slow elliptical outflow is roughly orthogonal to the optical outflow axis. The kinematic timescales for the CO fast outflow and the optical very fast outflow agree closely, supporting the view that the former represents material in the slow outflow accelerated by the very fast outflow. The kinematic signature of a disk expanding with about 15.5 km/s can also be seen in the CO J = 2-1 data. The mass-loss rate (a) for the slow outflow is greater than or equal to 2.8 x 10(exp -5) solar mass/yr and possibly as large as 9 x 10(exp -5) solar mass/yr, (b) for the fast outflow is greater than or equal to 5 x 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr, and (c) for the very fast optically visible outflow is approximately equal 5 x 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr. The disk mass is approximately equal 6 x 10(exp -3) solar mass. Grain photoelectric heating results in temperatures of 20-70 K in molecular gas of the slow outflow. The (13)C/(12)C abundance ratio in M1-16 is found to be 0.33, quite possibly the highest found for any evolved object. Upper limits for the (18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O ratios were found to be consistent with the values found in AGB stars. A search for other molecular species in M1-16 resulted in the detection of the high-excitation species HCN, CN, (13)CN, HCO(+), and H(13)CO(+) and possibly N2H(+). Both the HCO(+)/HCN and CN/HCN line-intensity ratios are enhanced, the former by a very large factor, over the values found in the envelopes of AGB

  14. ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Klaassen, Pamela D.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-11-20

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  15. A BIPOLAR OUTFLOW FROM THE MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CORE W51e2-E

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Hui; Han, J. L.; Zhao Junhui E-mail: hil@nao.cas.c

    2010-08-01

    We present high-resolution images of the bipolar outflow from W51e2, which are produced from the Submillimeter Array archival data observed for CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) lines with angular resolutions of 0.''8 x 0.''6 and 0.''3 x 0.''2, respectively. The images show that the powerful outflow originates from the protostellar core W51e2-E rather than from the ultracompact H II region W51e2-W. The kinematic timescale of the outflow from W51e2-E is about 1000 yr, younger than the age ({approx}5000 yr) of the ultracompact H II region W51e2-W. A large mass-loss rate of {approx}1 x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a high mechanical power of 120 L{sub sun} are inferred, suggesting that an O star or a cluster of B stars are forming in W51e2-E. The observed outflow activity along with the inferred large accretion rate indicates that at present W51e2-E is in a rapid phase of star formation.

  16. An Ordered Bipolar Outflow from a Massive Early-stage Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Zhang, Yichen; Fontani, Francesco; Caselli, Paola; Butler, Michael J.

    2016-04-01

    We present ALMA follow-up observations of two massive, early-stage core candidates, C1-N and C1-S, in IRDC G028.37+00.07, that were previously identified by their {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) emission, and show high levels of deuteration of this species. The cores are also dark at far-infrared wavelengths up to ∼ 100 μ {{m}}. We detect 12CO(2-1) from a narrow, highly collimated bipolar outflow that is being launched from near the center of the C1-S core, which is also the location of the peak 1.3 mm dust continuum emission. This protostar, C1-Sa, has associated dense gas traced by {{{C}}}18{{O}}(2-1) and DCN(3-2), from which we estimate that it has a radial velocity that is near the center of the range exhibited by the C1-S massive core. A second outflow-driving source is also detected within the projected boundary of C1-S, but it appears to be at a different radial velocity. After considering the properties of the outflows, we conclude that C1-Sa is a promising candidate for an early-stage massive protostar and as such it shows that these early phases of massive star formation can involve highly ordered outflow, and thus accretion, processes, similar to models developed to explain low-mass protostars.

  17. An infrared study of the bi-polar outflow region GGD 12-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Wilking, B. A.; Joy, M.; Lester, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared observations from 1 to 100 microns are presented for the region associated with a bipolar CO outflow source near the nebulous objects GGD 12 to 15. A luminous far-infrared source was found associated with a radio-continuum source in the area. This object appears to be a compact HII region around a nearly main-sequence BO star. A faint 20 micron source was also discovered at the position of an H2O maser 3O deg northwest of the HII region. This object appears to be associated with but not coincident with a 2 micron reflection nebula. This structure serves as evidence for a non-spherically symmetric, possibly disk-like dust distribution around the exciting star for the maser. This object probably powers the bi-polar CO outflow although its luminosity is less than 10% that of the star which excites the compact HII region. A number of other 2 micron sources found in the area are probably members of a recently formed cluster.

  18. Hu 1-2: a metal-poor bipolar planetary nebula with fast collimated outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Guerrero, M. A.; Miranda, L. F.; Riera, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.

    2015-09-01

    We present narrow-band optical and near-IR imaging and optical long-slit spectroscopic observations of Hu 1-2, a Galactic planetary nebula (PN) with a pair of [N II]-bright, fast-moving (>340 km s-1) bipolar knots. Intermediate-dispersion spectra are used to derive physical conditions and abundances across the nebula, and high-dispersion spectra to study the spatio-kinematical structure. Generally, Hu 1-2 has high He/H (≈0.14) and N/O ratios (≈0.9), typical of Type I PNe. On the other hand, its abundances of O, Ne, S, and Ar are low as compared with the average abundances of Galactic bulge and disc PNe. The position-velocity maps can be generally described as an hour-glass shaped nebula with bipolar expansion, although the morphology and kinematics of the innermost regions cannot be satisfactorily explained with a simple, tilted equatorial torus. The spatio-kinematical study confines the inclination angle of its major axis to be within 10° of the plane of sky. As in the irradiated bow-shocks of IC 4634 and NGC 7009, there is a clear stratification in the emission peaks of [O III], Hα, and [N II] in the north-west (NW) knot of Hu 1-2. Fast collimated outflows in PNe exhibit higher excitation than other low-ionization structures. This is particularly the case for the bipolar knots of Hu 1-2, with He II emission levels above those of collimated outflows in other Galactic PNe. The excitation of the knots in Hu 1-2 is consistent with the combined effects of shocks and UV radiation from the central star. The mechanical energy and luminosity of the knots are similar to those observed in the PNe known to harbour a post-common envelope (post-CE) close binary central star.

  19. Near-infrared polarization in the bipolar outflow OH 0739-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, Mark; Sellgren, K.; Jones, T. J.; Klebe, D.

    1995-01-01

    We present linear polarization observations of the bipolar outlfow source OH 0739-14 from 1.2 to 3.6 micrometers. The high levels of polarization (approximatly 47% in the bipolar lobes) and the angles of the vectors in the outflow lobes imply that the 1.2-3.6 micrometer polarization is due to single scattering by dust grains of light from the central source or from its immediate vicinity. Our polarization measurements, combined with phase-lag measurements of variability in the nebula by Kastner et al. (1992), tightly constrain the inclination angle i between the bipolar axis and the plane of the sky to be 35 deg less than or = i less than or = 37 deg. We observe the percentage polarization of the bipolar lobes to be constant with wavelength from 1.2 to 3.6 micrometers, which rules out any significant contribution by unpolarized emission, such as tiny grain emission, to the 3.6 micrometer emission. We propose to explain the K-L' color of the nebula as due to illumination by both the central star and by thermal emission from dust in a surrounding circumstellar shell with a dust temperature of 600-1000 K. Using this model, we find a relatively high minimum scattering optical depth at 3.75 micrometers of tau omega greater than 0.1. This is difficult to reconcile with Rayleigh scattering, which would then imply optically thick scattering at wavelengths of 1.2 and 1.65 micrometers, in constrast to the observations. We also find that the albedo of the grains at 3.75 micrometers and probably at 2.2 micrometers is higher than predicted for normal interstellar grains.

  20. SPATIALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF THE BIPOLAR OPTICAL OUTFLOW FROM THE BROWN DWARF 2MASS J12073347-3932540

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E. T.; Ray, T. P.; Comeron, F.; Bacciotti, F.; Kavanagh, P. J.

    2012-12-20

    Studies of brown dwarf (BD) outflows provide information pertinent to questions on BD formation, as well as allowing outflow mechanisms to be investigated at the lowest masses. Here new observations of the bipolar outflow from the 24 M{sub JUP} BD 2MASS J12073347-3932540 are presented. The outflow was originally identified through the spectro-astrometric analysis of the [O I]{lambda}6300 emission line. Follow-up observations consisting of spectra and [S II], R-band and I-band images were obtained. The new spectra confirm the original results and are used to constrain the outflow position angle (P.A.) at {approx}65 Degree-Sign . The [O I]{lambda}6300 emission line region is spatially resolved and the outflow is detected in the [S II] images. The detection is firstly in the form of an elongation of the point-spread function (PSF) along the direction of the outflow P.A. Four faint knot-like features (labeled A-D) are also observed to the southwest of 2MASS J12073347-3932540 along the same P.A. suggested by the spectra and the elongation in the PSF. Interestingly, D, the feature furthest from the source, is bow shaped with the apex pointing away from 2MASS J12073347-3932540. A color-color analysis allows us to conclude that at least feature D is part of the outflow under investigation while A is likely a star or galaxy. Follow-up observations are needed to confirm the origin of B and C. This is a first for a BD, as BD optical outflows have to date only been detected using spectro-astrometry. This result also demonstrates for the first time that BD outflows can be collimated and episodic.

  1. Spiral-shells and nascent bipolar outflow in CIT 6: hints for an eccentric-orbit binary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyosun; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Zhao-Geisler, Ronny; Trejo, Alfonso; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Taam, Ronald E.; Kemper, Francisca; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Liu, Tie

    2016-07-01

    We present the essential results pointed out in a recently published paper, Kim et al. 2015, Astrophys. J., 814, 61. The carbon star CIT 6 reveals evidences for a binary in a high-resolution CO line emission map of its circumstellar envelope taken with the Submillimeter Array. The morphology of the outflow described by the spiral-shell pattern, bipolar (or possibly multipolar) outflow, one-sided interarm gaps, and double spiral feature point to a plausible scenario that CIT 6 is a binary system in an eccentric orbit with the mass losing star evolving from the AGB.

  2. Accretion driven outflows across the black hole mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ashley L.

    2016-04-01

    Pumping highly relativistic particles and radiation into their environment, accreting black holes co-evolve with their surroundings through their powerful outflows. These outflows are divided into highly collimated, relativistic jets and wide-angle winds, and are primarily associated with a particular accretion states. Understanding just how these outflows couple to the accretion flow will enable us to assess the amount of energy and feedback that is injected into the vicinity of a black hole. During this talk, I will discuss our studies of both stellar-mass and supermassive black hole outlfows, and how the similarities of these flows across the mass scale may point to common driving mechanisms.

  3. DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR TERMINATION OF OBSCURED STAR FORMATION BY RADIATIVELY DRIVEN OUTFLOWS IN REDDENED QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Farrah, Duncan; Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol; Efstathiou, Andreas; Afonso, Jose; Coppin, Kristen; Hall, Patrick B.; Jarrett, Tom; Borys, Colin; Bridge, Carrie; Petty, Sara

    2012-02-01

    We present optical to far-infrared photometry of 31 reddened QSOs that show evidence for radiatively driven outflows originating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in their rest-frame UV spectra. We use these data to study the relationships between the AGN-driven outflows, and the AGN and starburst infrared luminosities. We find that FeLoBAL QSOs are invariably IR-luminous, with IR luminosities exceeding 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun} in all cases. The AGN supplies 76% of the total IR emission, on average, but with a range from 20% to 100%. We find no evidence that the absolute luminosity of obscured star formation is affected by the AGN-driven outflows. Conversely, we find an anticorrelation between the strength of AGN-driven outflows, as measured from the range of outflow velocities over which absorption exceeds a minimal threshold, and the contribution from star formation to the total IR luminosity, with a much higher chance of seeing a starburst contribution in excess of 25% in systems with weak outflows than in systems with strong outflows. Moreover, we find no convincing evidence that this effect is driven by the IR luminosity of the AGN. We conclude that radiatively driven outflows from AGNs can have a dramatic, negative impact on luminous star formation in their host galaxies. We find that such outflows act to curtail star formation such that star formation contributes less than {approx}25% of the total IR luminosity. We also propose that the degree to which termination of star formation takes place is not deducible from the IR luminosity of the AGN.

  4. The physics and the structure of the quasar-driven outflow in Mrk 231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicone, C.; Feruglio, C.; Maiolino, R.; Fiore, F.; Piconcelli, E.; Menci, N.; Aussel, H.; Sturm, E.

    2012-07-01

    Massive AGN-driven outflows are invoked by AGN-galaxy co-evolutionary models to suppress both star formation and black hole accretion. Massive molecular outflows have been discovered in some AGN hosts. However, the physical properties and structures of these AGN-driven molecular outflows are still poorly constrained. Here we present new IRAM PdBI observations of Mrk 231, the closest quasar known, targeting both the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) transitions. We detect broad wings in both transitions, which trace a massive molecular outflow moving with velocities of up to 800 km s-1. The wings are spatially resolved at high significance levels (5-11σ), indicating that the molecular outflow extends to the kpc scale. The CO(2-1)/CO(1-0) ratio of the red broad wings is consistent with the ratio observed in the narrow core, while the blue broad wing is less excited than the core. The latter result suggests that quasar-driven outflow models invoking shocks (which would predict higher gas excitation) are inappropriate for describing the bulk of the outflow in Mrk 231. However, we note that within the central 700 pc the CO(2-1)/CO(1-0) ratio of the red wing is slightly, but significantly, higher than in the line core, suggesting that shocks may play a role in the central region. We also find that the average size of the outflow anticorrelates with the critical density of the transition used as a wind tracer. This indicates that, although diffuse and dense clumps coexist in the outflowing gas, dense outflowing clouds have shorter lifetimes and that they evaporate into the diffuse component along the outflow or, more simply, that diffuse clouds are more efficiently accelerated to larger distances by radiation pressure.

  5. SPITZER AND NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF A NEW BIPOLAR PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW IN THE ROSETTE MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Fleming, Scott W.; Balog, Zoltan; Phelps, Randy L.

    2010-05-01

    We present and discuss Spitzer and near-infrared H{sub 2} observations of a new bipolar protostellar outflow in the Rosette Molecular Cloud. The outflow is seen in all four InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) bands and partially as diffuse emission in the MIPS 24 {mu}m band. An embedded MIPS 24 {mu}m source bisects the outflow and appears to be the driving source. This source is coincident with a dark patch seen in absorption in the 8 {mu}m IRAC image. Spitzer IRAC color analysis of the shocked emission was performed from which thermal and column density maps of the outflow were constructed. Narrowband near-infrared (NIR) images of the flow reveal H{sub 2} emission features coincident with the high temperature regions of the outflow. This outflow has now been given the designation MHO 1321 due to the detection of NIR H{sub 2} features. We use these data and maps to probe the physical conditions and structure of the flow.

  6. HH 588: A giant bipolar outflow in the dark cloud BRC 37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movsessian, T. A.; Magakian, T. Yu.; Sargsyan, D. M.; Ogura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Results of 2D spectroscopy of the complex of Herbig-Haro objects HH 588 in the dark globule BRC 37 are presented. The multipupil spectrograph VAGR has been used to obtain spectra of four parts of this complex, including the objects NE2, NE1, center, and SW2. The kinematic characteristics of these components of the complex confirm the existence of a giant bipolar outflow from the central infrared source IRAS 21388+5622. Spectral studies also show that the central object has the very low excitation and strong [OI] and [SII] emission characteristic of jets emerging from young stellar objects. In terms of their physical parameters, the other objects are typical Herbig-Haro objects. On the other hand, it is found that the entire HH 588 complex is an irradiated Herbig-Haro flow. This is indicated by the comparatively high excitation of the object NE2, and by the fact that the entire HH 588 flow is an arc with its convex side facing the center of the HII region IC 1396.

  7. Shining a light on star formation driven outflows: the physical conditions within galactic outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John P.; Tremonti, Christina A.; Leitherer, Claus; Wofford, Aida; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-01-01

    Stellar feedback drives energy and momentum into the surrounding gas, which drives gas and metals out of galaxies through a galactic outflow. Unfortunately, galactic outflows are difficult to observe and characterize because they are extremely diffuse, and contain gas at many different temperatures. Here we present results from a sample of 37 nearby (z < 0.27) star forming galaxies observed in the ultraviolet with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample covers over three decades in stellar mass and star formation rate, probing different morphologies such as dwarf irregulars and high-mass merging systems. Using four different UV absorption lines (O I, Si II, Si III and Si IV) that trace a wide range of temperatures (ionization potentials between 13.6 eV and 45 eV), we find shallow correlations between the outflow velocity or the equivalent width of absorption lines with stellar mass or star formation rate. Absorption lines probing different temperature phases have similar centroid velocities and line widths, indicating that they are comoving. Using the equivalent width ratios of the four different transitions, we find the ratios to be consistent with photo-ionized outflows, with moderately strong ionization parameters. By constraining the ionization mechanism we model the ionization fractions for each transition, but find the ionization fractions depend crucially on input model parameters. The shallow velocity scalings imply that low-mass galaxies launch outflows capable of escaping their galactic potential, while higher mass galaxies retain all of their gas, unless they undergo a merger.

  8. Spitzer And Near-infrared Observations Of A Bi-polar Outflow In The Rosette Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, E. A.; Balog, Z.; Fleming, S. W.; Phelps, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We present and discuss Spitzer and near-infrared H2 observations of a bi-polar protostellar outflow in the Rosette Molecular Cloud. The outflow is seen in all four IRAC bands and partially in the MIP 24 micron band. A dark cloud seen in absorption in the 8 micron image bisects the outflow and contains an embedded Class 0 object that appears to be the outflow source. Near-infrared narrow-band H2 observations were obtained using the Infrared Side Port Imager (ISPI) on the CTIO 4 meter telescope. Spitzer IRAC color analysis of the shocked emission was performed from which thermal and density maps of the outflow were constructed. We use these data and maps to probe the physical conditions and structure of the flow. This work is based in part on archival data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by an award issued by JPL/Caltech, NASA LTSA Grant NNG05GD66G, and the Florida Space Grant Consortium

  9. The effects of ionospheric outflow on ICME and SIR driven sawtooth events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambles, O. J.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Ouellette, J.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetosphere sawtooth oscillations have been observed during interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events, when the solar wind conditions are relatively steady, and during periods when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) fluctuates between northward and southward, as during interplanetary stream interaction regions (SIR). The impact of ionospheric outflow on the ICME-driven 18 April 2002 and SIR-driven 24 October 2002 sawtooth events is investigated using a multifluid adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global simulation. The mechanisms that generate the sawtooth oscillations are investigated by comparing a baseline simulation without outflow and a simulation that includes an O+ outflow model. The ionospheric outflow is regulated by a statistical relationship between Alfvénic Poynting flux and O+ ion outflow flux. In the baseline simulation for the 18 April 2002 ICME-driven event, one substorm is observed that is generated by the southward turning of the IMF, after which the magnetosphere-ionosphere system settles into a quasi-steady convection mode. When outflow is included, quasi-periodic substorms are observed suggesting that the sawtooth oscillations are generated internally by the effects of the O+ ions. In contrast, during the 24 October 2002 SIR-driven event, quasi-periodic substorms are generated regardless of whether outflow is included or not. For this event, the generation and triggering of the substorms is controlled by the external driving of the solar wind. For both events, when outflow is included, the signatures of the substorms are more intense and are more noticeable across a wider range of local times than in the baseline simulations.

  10. Unraveling the Complex Structure of AGN-driven Outflows. I. Kinematics and Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin

    2016-03-01

    Outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are often invoked as agents of the long-sought AGN feedback. Yet, characterizing and quantifying the impact on their host galaxies has been challenging. We present Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph integral field unit data of six local (z \\lt 0.1) and luminous (L{}[{{O}{{III}}]}\\gt {10}42 erg s-1) type 2 AGNs. In the first of a series of papers, we investigate the kinematics and constrain the size of the outflows. The ionized gas kinematics can be described as a superposition of a gravitational component that follows the stellar motion and an outflow-driven component that shows large velocity (up to 600 km s-1) and large velocity dispersion (up to 800 km s-1). Using the spatially resolved measurements of the gas, we kinematically measure the size of the outflow, which is found to be between 1.3 and 2.1 kpc. Owing to the lack of a detailed kinematic analysis, previous outflow studies likely overestimate their size by up to more than a factor of two, depending on how the size is estimated and whether the [O iii] or Hα emission line is used. The relatively small size of the outflows for all six of our objects casts doubts on their potency as a mechanism for negative AGN feedback.

  11. Probing the gaseous halo of galaxies through non-thermal emission from AGN-driven outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiawei; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-10-01

    Feedback from outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) can affect the distribution and properties of the gaseous haloes of galaxies. We study the hydrodynamics and non-thermal emission from the forward outflow shock produced by an AGN-driven outflow. We consider a few possible profiles for the halo gas density, self-consistently constrained by the halo mass, redshift and the disc baryonic concentration of the galaxy. We show that the outflow velocity levels off at ˜ 103 km s- 1 within the scale of the galaxy disc. Typically, the outflow can reach the virial radius around the time when the AGN shuts off. We show that the outflows are energy-driven, consistent with observations and recent theoretical findings. The outflow shock lights up the haloes of massive galaxies across a broad wavelength range. For Milky Way mass haloes, radio observations by the Jansky Very Large Array and the Square Kilometre Array and infrared/optical observations by the James Webb Space Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope can detect the emission signal of angular size ˜8 arcsec from galaxies out to redshift z ˜ 5. Millimetre observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array are sensitive to non-thermal emission of angular size ˜18 arcsec from galaxies at redshift z ≲ 1, while X-ray observations by Chandra, XMM-Newton and the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics are limited to local galaxies (z ≲ 0.1) with an emission angular size of ˜2 arcmin. Overall, the extended non-thermal emission provides a new way of probing the gaseous haloes of galaxies at high redshifts.

  12. High-resolution CO Observation of the Carbon Star CIT 6 Revealing the Spiral Structure and a Nascent Bipolar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyosun; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Zhao-Geisler, Ronny; Trejo, Alfonso; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Taam, Ronald E.; Kemper, Francisca; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Liu, Tie

    2015-11-01

    CIT 6 is a carbon star in the transitional phase from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the protoplanetary nebulae (pPNs). Observational evidences of two point sources in the optical, circumstellar arc segments in an HC3N line emission, and a bipolar nebula in near-infrared provide strong support for the presence of a binary companion. Hence, CIT 6 is very attractive for studying the role of companions in the AGB-pPN transition. We have carried out high-resolution 12CO J = 2-1 and 13CO J = 2-1 observations of CIT 6 with the Submillimeter Array combined with the Submillimeter Telescope (single-dish) data. The 12CO channel maps reveal a spiral-shell pattern connecting the HC3N segments in a continuous form and an asymmetric outflow corresponding to the near-infrared bipolar nebula. Rotation of the 12CO channel peak position may be related to the inner spiral winding and/or the bipolar outflow. An eccentric orbit binary is suggested for the presence of an anisotropic mass loss to the west and a double spiral pattern. The lack of interarm emission to the west may indicate a feature corresponding to the periastron passage of a highly eccentric orbit of the binary. Spatially averaged radial and spectral profiles of 12CO J = 2-1 and 13CO J = 2-1 are compared with simple spherical radiative transfer models, suggesting a change of 12CO/13CO abundance ratio from ˜30 to ˜50 inward in the CSE of CIT 6. The millimeter continuum emission is decomposed into extended dust thermal emission (spectral index ˜ -2.4) and compact emission from radio photosphere (spectral index ˜ -2.0).

  13. Outflow-driven Cavities: Numerical Simulations of Intermediaries of Protostellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Quillen, Alice C.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of fossil cavities produced by extinct young stellar object (YSO) jets and wide-angle outflows. Fossil cavities are ellipsoidal or cylindrical shells of swept-up ambient (molecular cloud) material moving at low velocities. The cavities form when the momentum in a YSO jet or wide-angle outflow decays in time, allowing the bow shock or swept-up shell to decelerate to velocities near the turbulent speed in the cloud. It has been suggested in previous studies that cavities provide efficient coupling between the jets/outflows and the cloud and, as such, are the agents by which cloud turbulence can be re-energized. In this paper, we carry forward a series of numerical simulations of jets and outflows whose momentum flux decreases in time. We compare simulations with decaying momentum fluxes to those with constant flux. We show that decaying flux models exhibit deceleration of the outflow head and back-filling via expansion off of the cavity walls. They also have lower density contrast and are longer lived and wider than their continuously driven counterparts. The simulations recover the basic properties of observed fossil cavities. In addition, we provide synthetic observations in terms of position-velocity (PV) diagrams, which demonstrate that fossil cavities form both jets and wide-angle outflows and are characterized by linear ``Hubble law'' expansion patterns superimposed on ``spur'' patterns, indicative of the head of a bow shock.

  14. A Cosmic-Ray and Thermally Driven Kiloparsec-scale Outflow from the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, John; Schiller, Quintin; Zweibel, Ellen

    2009-05-01

    We review the importance of cosmic-ray pressure in helping to drive kpc-scale galactic outflows. In particular, we examine the case of the Milky Way, and outline a theory that the ``Galactic X-ray Bulge'' discovered by Snowden et al. (1997) is the signature of a large-scale outflow driven by combined thermal and cosmic-ray pressure. We confront this model with observations of the synchrotron halo from Haslam et al. (1981), and discuss the constraints that these observations place on the wind model and perhaps any model of the ``Galactic X-ray Bulge''. We also outline further advances to the model including a more detailed cosmic-ray diffusion model, and the possible role of clumping and mass loading in the outflow.

  15. The connection between AGN-driven dusty outflows and the surrounding environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, W.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Significant reservoirs of cool gas are observed in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding galaxies. The CGM is also found to contain substantial amounts of metals and dust, which require some transport mechanism. We consider AGN (active galactic nucleus) feedback-driven outflows based on radiation pressure on dust. Dusty gas is ejected when the central luminosity exceeds the effective Eddington luminosity for dust. We obtain that a higher dust-to-gas ratio leads to a lower critical luminosity, implying that the more dusty gas is more easily expelled. Dusty outflows can reach large radii with a range of velocities (depending on the outflowing shell configuration and the ambient density distribution) and may account for the observed CGM gas. In our picture, dust is required in order to drive AGN feedback, and the preferential expulsion of dusty gas in the outflows may naturally explain the presence of dust in the CGM. On the other hand, the most powerful AGN outflow events can potentially drive gas out of the local galaxy group. We further discuss the effects of radiation pressure of the central AGN on satellite galaxies. AGN radiative feedback may therefore have a significant impact on the evolution of the whole surrounding environment.

  16. Studies of Jet Outflow from Advanced Beam-Driven FRC Plasma on C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheftman, Daniel; Gupta, Deepak; Giammanco, Francesco; Conti, Fabio; Marsili, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Experiments demonstrating sustainment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma via neutral beam injection have been carried out on C-2U. Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy through open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven FRC plasma. Passive Doppler spectroscopy and microwave interferometry measurements provide an initial view of the behavior of the open-field-line plasmas on the C-2U device. These measurements and estimations of plasma density, flow velocity, excluded-magnetic flux, and ion temperature of the jet outflow plasmas are discussed. In addition, possible contributions from fast-ion losses from the advanced beam-driven FRC plasma to the jet will be explored and presented.

  17. A HOT MOLECULAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY THE IONIZED JET ASSOCIATED WITH IRAS 16562-3959

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, Andres E.; Garay, Guido; Rathborne, Jill; Brooks, Kate J.; Guesten, Rolf

    2011-08-01

    We report molecular line observations in the CO J = 3 {yields} 2, 6 {yields} 5, and 7 {yields} 6 transitions, made using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Telescope, toward the massive and dense core IRAS 16562-3959. This core harbors a string of radio sources thought to be powered by a central collimated jet of ionized gas. The molecular observations show the presence of high-velocity gas exhibiting a quadrupolar morphology, most likely produced by the presence of two collimated outflows. The southeast-northwest (SE-NW) molecular outflow is aligned with the string of radio continuum sources, suggesting it is driven by the jet. We find that the excitation temperature of the gas in the SE-NW outflow is high, with values of 145 and 120 K for the blueshifted and redshifted lobes, respectively. This outflow has a total mass of 1.92 M{sub sun}, a total momentum of {approx}89 M{sub sun} km s{sup -1}, and an averaged momentum rate of {approx}3.0 x 10{sup -2} M{sub sun} km s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, values characteristic of flows driven by young massive stellar objects with high luminosities (L{sub bol} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 4} L{sub sun}). Complementary data taken with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment in high density and shock tracers support the picture that IRAS 16562-3959 is an accreting young massive star associated with an ionized jet, which is the energy source of a molecular outflow.

  18. Jet-driven outflows of ionized gas in the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C.; Bessiere, P.; Short, P.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fast outflows of gas, driven by the interaction between the radio jets and interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy, are being observed in an increasing number of galaxies. One such example is the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293. In this paper we present integral field unit observations taken with OASIS on the William Herschel Telescope, enabling us to map the spatial extent of the ionized gas outflows across the central regions of the galaxy. The jet-driven outflow in 3C 293 is detected along the inner radio lobes with a mass outflow rate ranging from ˜0.05 to 0.17 M⊙ yr-1 (in ionized gas) and corresponding kinetic power of ˜0.5-3.5 × 1040 erg s-1. Investigating the kinematics of the gas surrounding the radio jets (i.e. not directly associated with the outflow), we find linewidths broader than 300 km s-1 up to 5 kpc in the radial direction from the nucleus (corresponding to 3.5 kpc in the direction perpendicular to the radio axis at maximum extent). Along the axis of the radio jet linewidths >400 km s-1 are detected out to 7 kpc from the nucleus and linewidths of >500 km s-1 at a distance of 12 kpc from the nucleus, indicating that the disturbed kinematics clearly extend well beyond the high surface brightness radio structures of the jets. This is suggestive of the cocoon structure seen in simulations of jet-ISM interaction and implies that the radio jets are capable of disturbing the gas throughout the central regions of the host galaxy in all directions.

  19. Outflows Driven by a Potential Proto-Brown Dwarf Binary System IRAS 16253-2429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping; Belloche, Arnaud; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the molecular outflows driven by a potential proto-brown dwarf candidate IRAS 16253-2429 (hereafter IRAS 16253) with CO (2—1) using SMA and IRAM 30m telescope and CO (6—5) using APEX. Our SMA observations suggest that IRAS 16253 is hosting a binary system. The low mass of its envelope suggests that the central objects may eventually accrete only ~0.14 Msun of material (assuming the star formation efficiency is at most 0.3), which makes IRAS 16253 a potential proto brown dwarf binary system since the maximum mass of a brown dwarf is 0.08 Msun; one or two brown dwarfs may form depending on the current mass of the protostars and the future accretion process. The Position-Velocity diagrams of the outflows show sinusoidal structures which may be related to the outflow wiggling from the binary rotation. This allowed us to estimate the orbital period of the binary system. On the basis of Kepler's third law, we suggest that IRAS 16253 is very likely to contain at least one proto brown dwarf if the binary separation is less than ~0.5 arcsec. The large-scale outflows are further mapped with IRAM 30m telescope and APEX Champ+. We found that CO (6—5) traces high-excited gas around the precessing H2 jets and CO (2—1) likely probes the cold swept-up gas or entrained gas with cone-like structure.

  20. Launching Cosmic-Ray-driven Outflows from the Magnetized Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Hanasz, Michał; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Gatto, Andrea; Peters, Thomas; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical simulation of the turbulent, magnetized, supernova (SN)-driven interstellar medium (ISM) in a stratified box that dynamically couples the injection and evolution of cosmic rays (CRs) and a self-consistent evolution of the chemical composition. CRs are treated as a relativistic fluid in the advection-diffusion approximation. The thermodynamic evolution of the gas is computed using a chemical network that follows the abundances of H+, H, H2, CO, C+, and free electrons and includes (self-)shielding of the gas and dust. We find that CRs perceptibly thicken the disk with the heights of 90% (70%) enclosed mass reaching ≳ 1.5 {kpc} (≳ 0.2 {kpc}). The simulations indicate that CRs alone can launch and sustain strong outflows of atomic and ionized gas with mass loading factors of order unity, even in solar neighborhood conditions and with a CR energy injection per SN of {10}50 {erg}, 10% of the fiducial thermal energy of an SN. The CR-driven outflows have moderate launching velocities close to the midplane (≲ 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1) and are denser (ρ ˜ 10-24-10-26 g cm-3), smoother, and colder than the (thermal) SN-driven winds. The simulations support the importance of CRs for setting the vertical structure of the disk as well as the driving of winds.

  1. The three-dimensional properties and energetics of radio-jet-driven outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-05-01

    Extended emission-line regions (EELRs), found around radio-loud sources, are likely outflows driven by one form of powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback mechanism. We seek to constrain the three-dimensional gas properties and the outflow energetics of the EELRs in this study. We used an integral field unit to observe EELRs around two samples of radio-loud AGNs with similar radio properties, but different orientations: a sample of quasars and a sample of radio galaxies. A morphological comparison suggests a scenario where the three-dimensional EELR gas distribution follows rough biconical shapes with wide opening angles. The average extent of the EELRs is ∼18.5 kpc. The estimated average mass of the EELRs, with reasonable assumptions for gas densities, is ∼3 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}, and the average mass outflow rate is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The EELRs around quasars and radio galaxies share similar kinematic properties. Both samples have velocity structures that display a range of complexities, they do not appear to correlate with the jet orientations, and both span a similar range of velocity dispersions. Around 30% of the detected EELRs show large-scale rotational motions, which may have originated from recent mergers involving gas-rich disk galaxies.

  2. A Three Parsec-Scale Jet-Driven Outflow from Sgr A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Arendt, R.; Bushouse, H.; Cotton, W.; Haggard, D.; Pound, M. W.; Roberts, D. A.; Royster, M.; Wardle, M.

    2012-01-01

    The compact radio source Sgr A* is coincident with a 4x 10(exp 6) solar Mass black hole at the dynamical center of the Galaxy and is surrounded by dense orbiting ionized and molecular gas. We present high resolution radio continuum images of the central 3' and report a faint continuous linear structure centered on Sgr A*. This feature is rotated by 28 deg in PA with respect to the Galactic plane. A number of weak blobs of radio emission with X-ray counterparts are detected along the axis of the linear structure. In addition, the continuous linear feature appears to be terminated symmetrically by two linearly polarized structures at 8.4 GHz, approx 75" from Sgr A*. The linear structure is best characterized by a mildly relativistic jet-driven outflow from Sgr A*, and an outflow rate 10(exp 6) solar M / yr. The near and far-sides of the jet are interacting with orbiting ionized and molecular gas over the last 1-3 hundred years and are responsible for the origin of a 2" hole, the "minicavity", where disturbed kinematics, enhanced FeII/III line emission, and diffuse X-ray gas have been detected. The estimated kinetic luminosity of the outflow is approx 1.2 X 10(exp 41) erg/s which can produce the Galactic center X-ray flash that has recently been identified

  3. Magnetically Driven Accretion Disk Winds and Ultra-fast Outflows in PG 1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk winds in an effort to constrain the physics underlying the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) inferred by X-ray absorbers often detected in various sub classes of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our primary focus is to show that magnetically driven outflows are indeed physically plausible candidates for the observed outflows accounting for the AGN absorption properties of the present X-ray spectroscopic observations. Employing a stratified MHD wind launched across the entire AGN accretion disk, we calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption-line spectra. Assuming an appropriate ionizing AGN spectrum, we apply our MHD winds to model the absorption features in an XMM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log (ξc[erg cm s-1]) ≃ 5-6 and a column density on the order of NH ≃ 1023 cm-2 outflowing at a characteristic velocity of vc/c ≃ 0.1-0.2 (where c is the speed of light). The best-fit model favors its radial location at rc ≃ 200 Ro (Ro is the black hole’s innermost stable circular orbit), with an inner wind truncation radius at Rt ≃ 30 Ro. The overall K-shell feature in the data is suggested to be dominated by Fe xxv with very little contribution from Fe xxvi and weakly ionized iron, which is in good agreement with a series of earlier analyses of the UFOs in various AGNs, including PG 1211+143.

  4. X-ray properties of the starburst-driven outflow in NGC 253 .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, I.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.

    For a further understanding of a galactic-scale starburst-driven outflow, the X-ray properties of the hot interstellar gas in a well-studied nearby edge-on starburst galaxy, NGC 253, were investigated. Spectroscopic analysis was performed in three regions of the galaxy characterized by multiwavelength observations, i.e., the superwind region, the disk region and the halo region. The hot gas can be represented by two thin thermal plasmas (kT ˜0.2 and ˜0.6 keV) with various emission lines such as O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe, in all three regions. Abundance patterns, i.e., O/Fe, Ne/Fe, Mg/Fe and Si/Fe, are consistent among the three regions, which suggests a common origin of the hot gas. Abundance patterns are heavily contaminated by type II supernova, which supports an indication that the hot gas in the halo region originates from the central starburst activity. Energetics can also provide the same conclusion if 0.01-50 eta 1/2 % of the total emission in the nuclear region has been transported into the halo region. The obtained polytropic equation of state of the hot gas between the density and the temperature suggests that the hot gas expands adiabatically in the disk region while it moves as free expansion in the halo region towards the outer part of the halo region as the outflow. The outflow velocity of >100 km s-1 is required and it is indicated that the hot gas can escape from the gravitational potential of NGC 253 by combining the outflow velocity and the thermal velocity.

  5. Caught in the Act: Imaging the Disk and Outflows in V Hya, a carbon-rich AGB star in transition to a Bipolar Pre-Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Rajagopal, Jayadev; Morris, Mark; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon star V Hya is experiencing heavy mass loss as it undergoes the transition from AGB star to a bipolar pre-planetary nebula (PPN). V Hya is possibly the earliest object known in this brief phase, which is so short that few nearby stars are likely to be caught in the act. Using STIS/HST we discovered a high velocity (>200 km/s) blob that was ejected very recently from near (<0.3 arcsec) the star and measured its proper motion. We found time-variable high-velocity absorption features in the CO 4.6 micron vibration-rotation lines from a multi-epoch study - modelling shows that these are produced in compact clumps of outflowing gas with significant temperature gradients. Millimeter wave interferometry with 3.5 arcsec resolution shows that the high-velocity outflow is collimated and bipolar. The STIS data and recent mid-infrared interferometry also suggest the presence of a small (<0.55 arcsec size) circumstellar disk.We report new observations to investigate V Hya's high-velocity outflow and disk with STIS (HST) and GPI (Gemini South). Our STIS data show that the high-velocity outflow emission has weakened significantly over a 12-year period. Our Y-band coronagraphic polarimetric imaging with GPI reveals the presence of an inclined disk in scattered light, aligned roughly north-south, i.e., orthogonal to the high-velocity outflow. We discuss the implications of these results for the disk/outflow system in V Hya in particular, and in nascent PPNe, in general.

  6. Bipolar outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon — Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyambuya, Golden Gadzirayi

    2010-11-01

    This paper is part of a series on the Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (ASTG). This theory is built on Laplace-Poisson's well known equation and it has been shown that the ASTG is capable of explaining, from a purely classical physics standpoint, the precession of the perihelion of solar planets as a consequence of the azimuthal symmetry emerging from the spin of the Sun. This symmetry has and must have an influence on the emergent gravitational field. We show herein that the emergent equations from the ASTG, under some critical conditions determined by the spin, do possess repulsive gravitational fields in the polar regions of the gravitating body in question. This places the ASTG on an interesting pedestal to infer the origins of outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon. Outflows are a ubiquitous phenomenon found in star forming systems and their true origin is a question yet to be settled. Given the current thinking on their origin, the direction that the present paper takes is nothing short of an asymptotic break from conventional wisdom; at the very least, it is a complete paradigm shift because gravitation is not at all associated with this process, but rather it is thought to be an all-attractive force that only tries to squash matter together onto a single point. Additionally, we show that the emergent Azimuthally Symmetric Gravitational Field from the ASTG strongly suggests a solution to the supposed Radiation Problem that is thought to be faced by massive stars in their process of formation. That is, at ~ 8-10 , radiation from the nascent star is expected to halt the accretion of matter. We show that in-falling material will fall onto the equatorial disk and from there, this material will be channeled onto the forming star via the equatorial plane, thus accretion of mass continues well past the value of ~ 8-10 , albeit via the disk. Along the equatorial plane, the net force (with the radiation force included) on any material there

  7. The Three-dimensional Properties and Energetics of Radio-jet-driven Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Extended emission-line regions (EELRs), found around radio-loud sources, are likely outflows driven by one form of powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback mechanism. We seek to constrain the three-dimensional gas properties and the outflow energetics of the EELRs in this study. We used an integral field unit to observe EELRs around two samples of radio-loud AGNs with similar radio properties, but different orientations: a sample of quasars and a sample of radio galaxies. A morphological comparison suggests a scenario where the three-dimensional EELR gas distribution follows rough biconical shapes with wide opening angles. The average extent of the EELRs is ~18.5 kpc. The estimated average mass of the EELRs, with reasonable assumptions for gas densities, is ~3 × 108 M ⊙, and the average mass outflow rate is ~30 M ⊙ yr-1. The EELRs around quasars and radio galaxies share similar kinematic properties. Both samples have velocity structures that display a range of complexities, they do not appear to correlate with the jet orientations, and both span a similar range of velocity dispersions. Around 30% of the detected EELRs show large-scale rotational motions, which may have originated from recent mergers involving gas-rich disk galaxies. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G J

    2012-03-27

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs. PMID:22411827

  9. ANISOTROPIC METAL-ENRICHED OUTFLOWS DRIVEN BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Cavagnolo, K. W.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in 10 galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have experienced recent active galactic nucleus activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the BCG into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R{sub Fe} {proportional_to} P {sup 0.42}{sub jet}, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting that this is a long-lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal-enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses substantially exceed 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}.

  10. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations of line-driven disk winds for ultra-fast outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Mariko; Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Wada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Tessei

    2016-02-01

    Using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the origin of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) that are often observed in luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We found that the radiation force due to the spectral lines generates strong winds (line-driven disk winds) that are launched from the inner region of accretion disks (˜30 Schwarzschild radii). A wide range of black hole masses (MBH) and Eddington ratios (ε) was investigated to study the conditions causing the line-driven winds. For MBH = 106-109 M⊙ and ε = 0.1-0.7, funnel-shaped disk winds appear, in which dense matter is accelerated outward with an opening angle of 70°-80° and with 10% of the speed of light. If we observe the wind along its direction, the velocity, the column density, and the ionization state are consistent with those of the observed UFOs. As long as obscuration by the torus does not affect the observation of X-ray bands, the UFOs could be statistically observed in about 13%-28% of the luminous AGNs, which is not inconsistent with the observed ratio (˜40%). We also found that the results are insensitive to the X-ray luminosity and the density of the disk surface. Thus, we can conclude that UFOs could exist in any luminous AGNs, such as narrow-line Seyfert 1s and quasars with ε > 0.1, with which fast line-driven winds are associated.

  11. Jets at work: 3C 386, driven outflow or runaway feedback?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Diana

    2012-10-01

    A key ingredient of structure evolution at late times is the accretion energy that is redistributed into the external medium through radio sources, via poorly understood energy-exchange mechanisms. Many sources in group environments display prominent belt-like X-ray structures that are associated with the central narrowing of radio sources between their X-ray-filled lobes. The belts are not like cluster cavity features, and could either be a driven outflow of cooler gas from the centre, and a potential barrier to feedback, or displaced gas associated with fuelling the AGN, potentially causing runaway feedback. We propose to test which is the case in 3C 386, our best example of a nearby double-lobed radio source with a prominent X-ray belt in a poor environment.

  12. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the active-galactic-nucleus-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Wrobel, J. M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, Susana; Bureau, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P {sub rad} = 1.48 × 10{sup 20} W Hz{sup –1}, and a brightness temperature T {sub b} > 1.5 × 10{sup 7} K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  13. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the AGN-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, K.; Alatalo, K.; Wrobel, J. M.; Young, L. M.; Morganti, R.; Davis, T. A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, S.; Bureau, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Hi absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN)-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate reported in Alatalo et al. (2011) in NGC 1266 of 13 M⊙ year-1 exceeds star formation rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution Hi absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P rad = 1.48 × 1020 W Hz-1, and a brightness temperature T b > 1.5 × 107 K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs, with supermassive black hole masses similar to Sgr A*, may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  14. Detection of a High Brightness Temperature Radio Core in the Active-galactic-nucleus-driven Molecular Outflow Candidate NGC 1266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Kristina; Alatalo, Katherine; Wrobel, J. M.; Young, Lisa M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Deustua, Susana; Bureau, Martin

    2013-12-01

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M ⊙ yr-1 in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P rad = 1.48 × 1020 W Hz-1, and a brightness temperature T b > 1.5 × 107 K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  15. Cold-gas outflows in typical low-redshift galaxies are driven by star formation, not AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi, Marc; Kaviraj, Sugata; Nedelchev, Borislav; Tiffany, Joshua; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Deller, Adam T.; Middelberg, Enno

    2016-02-01

    Energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is an important ingredient for regulating the star formation history of galaxies in models of galaxy formation, which makes it important to study how AGN feedback actually occurs in practice. In order to catch AGNs in the act of quenching star formation, we have used the interstellar Na I λλ5890, 5895(NaD) absorption lines to look for cold-gas outflows in a sample of 456 nearby galaxies for which we could unambiguously ascertain the presence of radio-AGN activity, thanks to radio imaging at milli-arcsecond scales. While compact radio emission indicating a radio AGN was found in 103 galaxies (23 per cent of the sample), and 23 objects (5 per cent) exhibited NaD absorption-line kinematics suggestive of cold-gas outflows, not one object showed evidence of a radio AGN and of a cold-gas outflow simultaneously. Radio-AGN activity was found predominantly in early-type galaxies, while cold-gas outflows were mainly seen in spiral galaxies with central star formation or composite star formation/AGN activity. Optical AGNs also do not seem capable of driving galactic winds in our sample. Our work adds to a picture of the low-redshift Universe, where cold-gas outflows in massive galaxies are generally driven by star formation and where radio-AGN activity occurs most often in systems in which the gas reservoir has already been significantly depleted.

  16. Stochastic non-circular motion and outflows driven by magnetic activity in the Galactic bulge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2015-12-01

    By performing a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation for the Milky Way with an axisymmetric gravitational potential, we propose that spatially dependent amplification of magnetic fields possibly explains the observed noncircular motion of the gas in the Galactic centre region. The radial distribution of the rotation frequency in the bulge region is not monotonic in general. The amplification of the magnetic field is enhanced in regions with stronger differential rotation, because magnetorotational instability and field-line stretching are more effective. The strength of the amplified magnetic field reaches ≳0.5 mG, and radial flows of the gas are excited by the inhomogeneous transport of angular momentum through turbulent magnetic field that is amplified in a spatially dependent manner. In addition, the magnetic pressure-gradient force also drives radial flows in a similar manner. As a result, the simulated position-velocity diagram exhibits a time-dependent asymmetric parallelogram-shape owing to the intermittency of the magnetic turbulence; the present model provides a viable alternative to the bar-potential-driven model for the parallelogram shape of the central molecular zone. This is a natural extension into the central few 100 pc of the magnetic activity, which is observed as molecular loops at radii from a few 100 pc to 1 kpc. Furthermore, the time-averaged net gas flow is directed outward, whereas the flows are highly time dependent, which we discuss from a viewpoint of the outflow from the bulge.

  17. Jet rotation: Launching region, angular momentum balance and magnetic properties in the bipolar outflow from RW Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitas, J.; Bacciotti, F.; Ray, T. P.; Marconi, A.; Coffey, D.; Eislöffel, J.

    2005-03-01

    Using STIS on board the HST we have obtained a spectroscopic map of the bipolar jet from RW Aur with the slit parallel to the jet axis and moved across the jet in steps of 0.07 arcsec. After applying a velocity correction due to uneven slit illumination we find signatures of rotation within the first 300 AU of the jet (1.5 arcsec at the distance of RW Aur). Both lobes rotate in the same direction (i.e. with different helicities), with toroidal velocities in the range 5-30 km s-1 at 20 and 30 AU from the symmetry axis in the blueshifted and redshifted lobes, respectively. The sense of rotation is anti-clockwise looking from the tip of the blue lobe (PA 130° north to east) down to the star. Rotation is more evident in the [OI] and [NII] lines and at the largest sampled distance from the axis. These results are consistent with other STIS observations carried out with the slit perpendicular to the jet axis, and with theoretical simulations. Using current magneto-hydrodynamic models for the launch of the jets, we find that the mass ejected in the observed part of the outflow is accelerated from a region in the disk within about 0.5 AU from the star for the blue lobe, and within 1.6 AU from the star for the red lobe. Using also previous results we estimate upper and lower limits for the angular momentum transport rate of the jet. We find that this can be a large fraction (two thirds or more) of the estimated rate transported through the relevant portion of the disk. The magnetic lever arm (defined as the ratio rA/r0 between the Alfvèn and footpoint radii) is in the range 3.5-4.6 (with an accuracy of 20-25%), or, alternatively, the ejection index ξ = dln (dot{M}acc ) / d r is in the range 0.025-0.046 (with similar uncertainties). The derived values are in the range predicted by the models, but they also suggest that some heating must be provided at the base of the flow. Finally, using the general disk wind theory we derive the ratio Bφ / Bp of the toroidal and

  18. A Compact Group of Galaxies at z = 2.48 Hosting an AGN-driven Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 1011M⊙ and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass-metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The work is also based, in part, on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  19. Impact of eV-mass sterile neutrinos on neutrino-driven supernova outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg G.; Hüdepohl, Lorenz; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: raffelt@mpp.mpg.de E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent hints for sterile neutrinos from the reactor anomaly, we study active-sterile conversions in a three-flavor scenario (2 active + 1 sterile families) for three different representative times during the neutrino-cooling evolution of the proto-neutron star born in an electron-capture supernova. In our ''early model'' (0.5 s post bounce), the ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} MSW effect driven by Δm{sup 2} = 2.35eV{sup 2} is dominated by ordinary matter and leads to a complete ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} swap with little or no trace of collective flavor oscillations. In our ''intermediate'' (2.9 s p.b.) and ''late models'' (6.5 s p.b.), neutrinos themselves significantly modify the ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} matter effect, and, in particular in the late model, νν refraction strongly reduces the matter effect, largely suppressing the overall ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} MSW conversion. This phenomenon has not been reported in previous studies of active-sterile supernova neutrino oscillations. We always include the feedback effect on the electron fraction Y{sub e} due to neutrino oscillations. In all examples, Y{sub e} is reduced and therefore the presence of sterile neutrinos can affect the conditions for heavy-element formation in the supernova ejecta, even if probably not enabling the r-process in the investigated outflows of an electron-capture supernova. The impact of neutrino-neutrino refraction is strong but complicated, leaving open the possibility that with a more complete treatment, or for other supernova models, active-sterile neutrino oscillations could generate conditions suitable for the r-process.

  20. A bipolar outflow of ionized gas in K3-50A: H76 alpha radio recombination line and continuum observations of K3-50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depree, C. G.; Goss, W. M.; Palmer, Patrick; Rubin, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    The H II regions near K3-50 (G70.3 + 1.6) have been imaged at high angular resolution (approximately 1 sec .3) in the continuum and the recombination lines H76(sub alpha and He76(sub alpha) using the Very Large Array (VLA). The helium line is detected in only the brightest component K3-50A while the hydrogen line is detected in three components (K3-50A, B and C1). K3-50A shows a pronounced velocity gradient of approximately 150 km/sec/pc along its major axis (P.A. = 160 deg); in addition a wide range of line widths are observed, from 20 to 65 km/sec. Kinematics from the line data and the morphology of the continuum emission suggest that the ionized material associated with K3-50A is undergoing a high-velocity bipolar outflow.

  1. Multiple monopolar outflows driven by massive protostars in IRAS 18162-2048

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-López, M.; Girart, J. M.; Curiel, S.; Fonfría, J. P.; Zapata, L. A.; Qiu, K. E-mail: girart@ieec.cat

    2013-11-20

    In this article, we present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 3.5 mm observations and SubMillimeter Array (SMA) 870 μm observations toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 18162-2048, which is the core of the HH 80/81/80N system. Molecular emission from HCN, HCO{sup +}, and SiO traces two molecular outflows (the so-called northeast and northwest outflows). These outflows have their origin in a region close to the position of MM2, a millimeter source known to harbor two protostars. For the first time we estimate the physical characteristics of these molecular outflows, which are similar to those of 10{sup 3}-5 × 10{sup 3} L {sub ☉} protostars, and suggest that MM2 harbors high-mass protostars. High-angular resolution CO observations show an additional outflow due southeast. Also for the first time, we identify its driving source, MM2(E), and see evidence of precession. All three outflows have a monopolar appearance, but we link the NW and SE lobes, and explain their asymmetric shape as being a consequence of possible deflection.

  2. Raman-scattered O VI λ1032 and He II λ1025 and Bipolar Outflow in the Symbiotic Star V455 Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jeong-Eun; Angeloni, Rodolfo; Di Mille, Francesco; Palma, Tali; Chang, Seok-Jun; Hong, Chae-Lin; Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-07-01

    Raman-scattering by atomic hydrogen is a unique spectroscopic process that may probe the mass transfer and mass loss phenomena in symbiotic stars(SSs). In the optical high- resolution spectra of the S-type SS V455 Sco, we note the presence of two Raman-scattered features, one at around 6825 Å with a triple-peak profile formed from Raman-scattering of O VI λ1032 and the other Raman-scattered He II λ1025 at around 6545 Å. Adopting an accretion flow model with additional contribution from a collimated bipolar outflow, we propose that the blue and central peaks are contributed from the accretion flow and the bipolar flow is responsible for the remaining red peak. With the absence of [N II] λ6548, the Raman-scattered He II λ1025 at around 6545 Å is immersed in the broad Ha wings that appear to be formed by Raman-scattering of far-UV continuum near Lyman series.

  3. DISCOVERY OF AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS DRIVEN MOLECULAR OUTFLOW IN THE LOCAL EARLY-TYPE GALAXY NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, K.; Blitz, L.; Young, L. M.; Davis, T. A.; Bureau, M.; Cappellari, M.; Scott, N.; Davies, R. L.; Lopez, L. A.; Shapiro, K. L.; Crocker, A. F.; MartIn, S.; Bois, M.; Emsellem, E.; Bournaud, F.; Duc, P.-A.; Falcon-Barroso, J.

    2011-07-10

    We report the discovery of a powerful molecular wind from the nucleus of the non-interacting nearby S0 field galaxy NGC 1266. The single-dish CO profile exhibits emission to {+-}400 km s{sup -1} and requires a nested Gaussian fit to be properly described. Interferometric observations reveal a massive, centrally concentrated molecular component with a mass of 1.1 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} and a molecular outflow with a molecular mass of {approx}2.4 x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}. The molecular gas close to the systemic velocity consists of a rotating, compact nucleus with a mass of about 4.1 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} within a radius of {approx}60 pc. This compact molecular nucleus has a surface density of {approx}2.7 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}, more than two orders of magnitude larger than that of giant molecular clouds in the disk of the Milky Way, and it appears to sit on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation despite its extreme kinematics and energetic activity. We interpret this nucleus as a disk that confines the outflowing wind. A mass outflow rate of {approx}13 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} leads to a depletion timescale of {approx}<85 Myr. The star formation in NGC 1266 is insufficient to drive the outflow, and thus it is likely driven by the active galactic nucleus. The concentration of the majority of the molecular gas in the central 100 pc requires an extraordinary loss of angular momentum, but no obvious companion or interacting galaxy is present to enable the transfer. NGC 1266 is the first known outflowing molecular system that does not show any evidence of a recent interaction.

  4. A spectacular molecular outflow in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, Michael; Lada, Charles J.; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Hayashi, Masihiko

    1990-01-01

    Detailed observations of CO, CS, IR continuum, and H2 emission from a large, highly collimated, bipolar outflow in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud are presented. The CO observations suggest that molecular gas in the outflow is contained in a shell with higher velocity material situated interior to lower velocity material. The velocities of outflow emission are found to increase with increasing distance from the center of the outflow. Additional detections include shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission from the blueshifted lobe of the outflow and six 2-micron sources in the direction of the outflow. Near-IR and IRAS observations suggest that the driving source for the outflow must have a bolometric luminosity below about 4.5 solar luminosities. It is concluded that the flow is probably not driven by stellar radiation from a central source.

  5. An X-Ray Study of the Galactic-Scale Starburst-Driven Outflow in NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh

    2013-04-01

    The X-ray properties of hot interstellar gas in a bright, nearby edge-on starburst galaxy, NGC 253, were investigated so as to gain a further understanding of starburst-driven outflow activity by utilizing XMM-Newton and Suzaku. Spectroscopic analyses for three regions of the galaxy characterized by multiwavelength observations, i.e., the superwind region, the disk region, and the halo region, were conducted. Various emission lines from O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe were observed in the spectra of each region. The hot gas was represented by two thin thermal plasmas with temperatures of kT ˜ 0.2 and ˜0.6 keV. The abundance ratios, i.e., O/Fe, Ne/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Si/Fe, are consistent between the three regions, which suggests a common origin of the hot gas. The abundance patterns are consistent with those of type II supernova ejecta, indicating that the starburst activity in the central region provides metals toward the halo through a galactic-scale starburst-driven outflow. The energetics can also support this indication on the condition that 0.01-50 η1/2% of the total emission in the nuclear region has flowed to the halo region. To constrain the dynamics of hot interstellar gas, surface brightness, and hardness ratio profiles, which trace the density and temperature, were extracted. Assuming a simple polytropic equation of state for gas, Tρ1-γ = const, we constrained the physical condition; γ is consistent with 5/3 at a hot disk of < 3 kpc from the center along with the minor axis, and T is constant (γ = 1) in the halo, the distance of which is between 3 and 10 kpc from the center. It is suggested that the hot gas expands adiabatically from the central region towards the halo region while it moves as free expansion from the inner part of the halo towards the outer part of the halo as the outflow. We constrained the outflow velocity to be >100 km s-1 based on the observed temperature gradient in the halo. In comparison with the escape velocity of ˜ 220 km s-1 for NGC

  6. STRONG MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION AND KINEMATICS OF THE MULTIPHASE GAS IN RADIO GALAXIES WITH FAST JET-DRIVEN OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillard, P.; Ogle, P. M.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Appleton, P. N.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.; Tadhunter, C.; Evans, D. A.; Evans, A. S.

    2012-03-10

    Observations of ionized and neutral gas outflows in radio galaxies (RGs) suggest that active galactic nucleus (AGN) radio jet feedback has a galaxy-scale impact on the host interstellar medium, but it is still unclear how the molecular gas is affected. Thus, it is crucial to determine the physical conditions of the molecular gas in powerful RGs to understand how radio sources may regulate the star formation in their host galaxies. We present deep Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) high-resolution spectroscopy of eight nearby RGs that show fast H I outflows. Strikingly, all of these H I-outflow RGs have bright H{sub 2} mid-IR lines that cannot be accounted for by UV or X-ray heating. This strongly suggests that the radio jet, which drives the H I outflow, is also responsible for the shock excitation of the warm H{sub 2} gas. In addition, the warm H{sub 2} gas does not share the kinematics of the ionized/neutral gas. The mid-IR-ionized gas lines (with FWHM up to 1250 km s{sup -1} for [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m) are systematically broader than the H{sub 2} lines, which are resolved by the IRS in Almost-Equal-To 60% of the detected lines (with FWHM up to 900 km s{sup -1}). In five sources, 3C 236, 3C 293, 3C 459, 4C 12.50, and PKS 1549-79, the [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m line, and to a lesser extent the [Ne III] 15.5 {mu}m and [Ne V] 14.3 {mu}m lines, clearly exhibits blueshifted wings (up to -900 km s{sup -1} with respect to the systemic velocity) that match well the kinematics of the outflowing H I or ionized gas. The H{sub 2} lines do not show these broad wings, except tentative detections in 4C 12.50, 3C 459, and PKS 1549-79. This shows that, contrary to the H I gas, the H{sub 2} gas is inefficiently coupled to the AGN jet-driven outflow of ionized gas. While the dissipation of a small fraction (<10%) of the jet kinetic power can explain the turbulent heating of the molecular gas, our data show that the bulk of the warm molecular gas is not expelled from these galaxies.

  7. DIAGNOSTICS OF AGN-DRIVEN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN ULIRGs FROM HERSCHEL-PACS OBSERVATIONS OF OH AT 119 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Spoon, H. W. W.; Lebouteiller, V.; Farrah, D.; González-Alfonso, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Urrutia, T.; Rigopoulou, D.; Verma, A.; Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, H. A.; Afonso, J.; Pearson, C.; Cormier, D.; Efstathiou, A.; Borys, C.; Etxaluze, M.; Clements, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report on our observations of the 79 and 119 μm doublet transitions of OH for 24 local (z < 0.262) ULIRGs observed with Herschel-PACS as part of the Herschel ULIRG Survey (HERUS). Some OH 119 μm profiles display a clear P-Cygni shape and therefore imply outflowing OH gas, while other profiles are predominantly in absorption or are completely in emission. We find that the relative strength of the OH emission component decreases as the silicate absorption increases. This result locates the OH outflows inside the obscured nuclei. The maximum outflow velocities for our sources range from less than 100 to ∼2000 km s{sup –1}, with 15/24 (10/24) sources showing OH absorption at velocities exceeding 700 km s{sup –1} (1000 km s{sup –1}). Three sources show maximum OH outflow velocities exceeding that of Mrk231. Since outflow velocities above 500-700 km s{sup –1} are thought to require an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to drive them, about two-thirds of our ULIRG sample may host AGN-driven molecular outflows. This finding is supported by the correlation we find between the maximum OH outflow velocity and the IR-derived bolometric AGN luminosity. No such correlation is found with the IR-derived star formation rate. The highest outflow velocities are found among sources that are still deeply embedded. We speculate that the molecular outflows in these sources may be in an early phase of disrupting the nuclear dust veil before these sources evolve into less-obscured AGNs. Four of our sources show high-velocity wings in their [C II] fine-structure line profiles, implying neutral gas outflow masses of at least (2-4.5) × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉}.

  8. Dynamics of dusty radiation-pressure-driven shells and clouds: fast outflows from galaxies, star clusters, massive stars, and AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-05-01

    It is typically assumed that radiation-pressure-driven winds are accelerated to an asymptotic velocity of v∞ ≃ vesc, where vesc is the escape velocity from the central source. We note that this is not the case for dusty shells and clouds. Instead, if the shell or cloud is initially optically thick to the UV emission from the source of luminosity L, then there is a significant boost in v∞ that reflects the integral of the momentum absorbed as it is accelerated. For shells reaching a generalized Eddington limit, we show that v∞ ≃ (4RUVL/Mshc)1/2, in both point-mass and isothermal-sphere potentials, where RUV is the radius where the shell becomes optically thin to UV photons, and Msh is the mass of the shell. The asymptotic velocity significantly exceeds vesc for typical parameters, and can explain the ˜1000-2000 km s-1 outflows observed from rapidly star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) if the surrounding halo has low gas density. Similarly fast outflows from massive stars can be accelerated on ˜few-103 yr time-scales. These results carry over to clouds that subtend only a small fraction of the solid angle from the source of radiation and that expand as a consequence of their internal sound speed. We further consider the dynamics of shells that sweep up a dense circumstellar or circumgalactic medium. We calculate the `momentum ratio' dot{M} v/(L/c) in the shell limit and show that it can only significantly exceed ˜2 if the effective optical depth of the shell to re-radiated far-infrared photons is much larger than unity. We discuss simple prescriptions for the properties of galactic outflows for use in large-scale cosmological simulations. We also briefly discuss applications to the dusty ejection episodes of massive stars, the disruption of giant molecular clouds, and AGN.

  9. The Discovery of a Photoevaporation-Driven Molecular Outflow from the T Tauri Transitional Disk GM Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbeck, Jeremy; Grady, C. A.; Brown, A.; Ayres, T.; Apai, D.; Brittain, S.; Brown, J. M.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henning, T.; Herczeg, G.; Kamp, I.; Perrin, M.; Petre, R.; Schneider, G.; Sitko, M.; Walter, F.; Williger, G.; Wisniewski, J.; Woodgate, B.

    2011-01-01

    Circumstellar disks are not only a byproduct of star formation, but are also the place where planets form and migrate. The dominant gas-phase constituent of disks early in their evolution is H2, and its lifetime in the disk limits the time available for gas giant planet formation and migration. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to remove gas, including photoevaporation in the presence of the stellar X-ray, EUV, and FUV radiation field, but the relative importance of these different components and the point in disk evolution where they become significant remain uncertain. Some models predict enhanced evaporation of gas in the outer disk once the inner portions of the disk have begun to clear. One such system is the T Tauri star GM Aur which hosts a large disk with an r=20 AU central cavity. We have carried out the first high-contrast FUV imaging of this star+disk using HST ACS/SBC and report the detection of the inner 1" (140 AU) of the disk in the FUV and the discovery of a roughly cylindrical structure 90 AU in radius and extending 200 AU orthogonal to the disk, aligned with the previously reported red, polar lobes. The structure is brightest at wavelengths where there are numerous fluorescent molecular hydrogen transitions, both in our imagery and in an archival HST/STIS long-slit spectrum. The cylinder is marginally detected in the ACS/SBC F165LP band indicating that there is some sub-0.2 micron-sized dust entrained in it, but is not detected in ACS/SBC F122M imagery. The radial scale of the footprint of the cylinder on the disk and the absence of atomic emission lines associated with the structure exclude a conventional jet, but are consistent with a photoevaporation-driven outflow. We compare the properties of this outflow with predictions of X-ray, EUV, and FUV-driven disk winds.

  10. LARGE-SCALE STAR-FORMATION-DRIVEN OUTFLOWS AT 1 < z < 2 IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Britt F.; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Bezanson, Rachel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon; Da Cunha, Elizabete; Rix, Hans Walter; Schmidt, Kasper; Erb, Dawn K.; Fan Xiaohui; Kriek, Mariska; Marchesini, Danilo; and others

    2012-11-20

    We present evidence of large-scale outflows from three low-mass (log(M {sub *}/M {sub Sun }) {approx} 9.75) star-forming (SFR > 4 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) galaxies observed at z = 1.24, z = 1.35, and z = 1.75 in the 3D-HST Survey. Each of these galaxies is located within a projected physical distance of 60 kpc around the sight line to the quasar SDSS J123622.93+621526.6, which exhibits well-separated strong (W {sup {lambda}2796} {sub r} {approx}> 0.8 A) Mg II absorption systems matching precisely to the redshifts of the three galaxies. We derive the star formation surface densities from the H{alpha} emission in the WFC3 G141 grism observations for the galaxies and find that in each case the star formation surface density well exceeds 0.1 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, the typical threshold for starburst galaxies in the local universe. From a small but complete parallel census of the 0.65 < z < 2.6 galaxies with H {sub 140} {approx}< 24 proximate to the quasar sight line, we detect Mg II absorption associated with galaxies extending to physical distances of 130 kpc. We determine that the W{sub r} > 0.8 A Mg II covering fraction of star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 2 may be as large as unity on scales extending to at least 60 kpc, providing early constraints on the typical extent of starburst-driven winds around galaxies at this redshift. Our observations additionally suggest that the azimuthal distribution of W{sub r} > 0.4 A Mg II absorbing gas around star-forming galaxies may evolve from z {approx} 2 to the present, consistent with recent observations of an increasing collimation of star-formation-driven outflows with time from z {approx} 3.

  11. A 3 pc SCALE JET-DRIVEN OUTFLOW FROM SGR A*

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Haggard, D.; Roberts, D. A.; Royster, M.; Arendt, R.; Cotton, W.; Pound, M. W.; Wardle, M.

    2012-10-10

    The compact radio source Sgr A* is coincident with a 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} black hole at the dynamical center of the Galaxy and is surrounded by dense orbiting ionized and molecular gas. We present high-resolution radio continuum images of the central 3' and report a faint continuous linear structure centered on Sgr A* with a P.A. {approx} 60 Degree-Sign . The extension of this feature appears to be terminated symmetrically by two linearly polarized structures at 8.4 GHz, {approx}75'' from Sgr A*. A number of weak blobs of radio emission with X-ray counterparts are detected along the axis of the linear structure. The linear structure is best characterized by a mildly relativistic jet from Sgr A* with an outflow rate 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The near and far sides of the jet are interacting with orbiting ionized and molecular gas over the last 1-3 hundred years and are responsible for a 2'' hole, the 'minicavity', characterized by disturbed kinematics, enhanced Fe II/III line emission, and diffuse X-ray gas. The estimated kinetic luminosity of the outflow is {approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}, so the interaction with the bar may be responsible for the Galactic center X-ray flash inferred to be responsible for much of the fluorescent Fe K{alpha} line emission from the inner 100 pc of the Galaxy.

  12. Discovery of a compact gas-rich damped Lyman-α galaxy at z = 2.2: evidence of a starburst-driven outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Laursen, P.; Petitjean, P.; Vergani, S. D.; Maureira, M. J.; Ledoux, C.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; López, S.; Srianand, R.

    2012-04-01

    We present the detection of Ly α, [O iii], and H α emission associated with an extremely strong damped Lyman-α (DLA) system (N(H i) = 1022.10 cm-2) at z = 2.207 towards the quasar SDSS J113520.39 - 001053.56. This is the largest H I column density ever measured along a quasi-stellar object (QSO) line of sight, though typical of those often found in DLAs associated to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). This absorption system can also be classified as an ultra-strong Mg II system with W_rλ2796≃3.6 Å. The mean metallicity of the gas ( [Zn/H] = -1.1) and dust depletion factors ( [Zn/Fe] = 0.72, [Zn/Cr] = 0.49) are consistent with (and only marginally larger than) the mean values found in the general QSO-DLA population. The [O iii]-Hα emitting region has a very small impact parameter with respect to the QSO line of sight, b ≈ 0.1'' (0.9 kpc proper distance), and is unresolved. From the H α line, we measure a significant star formation rate (SFR) ≈ 25 M⊙ yr-1 (uncorrected for dust). The shape of the Ly α line is double-peaked, which is the signature of a resonant scattering of Ly α photons, and the Ly α emission is spatially extended. More strikingly, the blue and red Ly α peaks arise from distinct regions extended over a few kpc on either side of the star-forming region. We propose that this is the consequence of a Ly α transfer in outflowing gas. The presence of starburst-driven outflows is also in agreement with the high SFR together with the small size and low mass of the galaxy (Mvir ~ 1010 M⊙). By placing constraints on the stellar UV continuum luminosity of the galaxy, we estimate an age of at most a few 107 yr, again consistent with a recent starburst scenario. We interpret these data as the observation of a young, gas-rich, compact starburst galaxy, from which material is expelled through collimated winds powered by the vigorous star formation activity. We substantiate this picture by modelling the radiative transfer of Ly α photons in the galactic

  13. Bulgeless dwarf galaxies and dark matter cores from supernova-driven outflows.

    PubMed

    Governato, F; Brook, C; Mayer, L; Brooks, A; Rhee, G; Wadsley, J; Jonsson, P; Willman, B; Stinson, G; Quinn, T; Madau, P

    2010-01-14

    For almost two decades the properties of 'dwarf' galaxies have challenged the cold dark matter (CDM) model of galaxy formation. Most observed dwarf galaxies consist of a rotating stellar disk embedded in a massive dark-matter halo with a near-constant-density core. Models based on the dominance of CDM, however, invariably form galaxies with dense spheroidal stellar bulges and steep central dark-matter profiles, because low-angular-momentum baryons and dark matter sink to the centres of galaxies through accretion and repeated mergers. Processes that decrease the central density of CDM halos have been identified, but have not yet reconciled theory with observations of present-day dwarfs. This failure is potentially catastrophic for the CDM model, possibly requiring a different dark-matter particle candidate. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations (in a framework assuming the presence of CDM and a cosmological constant) in which the inhomogeneous interstellar medium is resolved. Strong outflows from supernovae remove low-angular-momentum gas, which inhibits the formation of bulges and decreases the dark-matter density to less than half of what it would otherwise be within the central kiloparsec. The analogues of dwarf galaxies-bulgeless and with shallow central dark-matter profiles-arise naturally in these simulations. PMID:20075915

  14. Radiation-driven Outflows from and Radiative Support in Dusty Tori of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-Ho; Krolik, Julian H.

    2016-07-01

    Substantial evidence points to dusty, geometrically thick tori obscuring the central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but so far no mechanism satisfactorily explains why cool dust in the torus remains in a puffy geometry. Near-Eddington infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) luminosities coupled with high dust opacities at these frequencies suggest that radiation pressure on dust can play a significant role in shaping the torus. To explore the possible effects of radiation pressure, we perform three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics simulations of an initially smooth torus. Our code solves the hydrodynamics equations, the time-dependent multi–angle group IR radiative transfer (RT) equation, and the time-independent UV RT equation. We find a highly dynamic situation. IR radiation is anisotropic, leaving primarily through the central hole. The torus inner surface exhibits a break in axisymmetry under the influence of radiation and differential rotation; clumping follows. In addition, UV radiation pressure on dust launches a strong wind along the inner surface; when scaled to realistic AGN parameters, this outflow travels at ˜ 5000 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}1/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}1/4 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and carries ˜ 0.1 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}3/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}3/4 M ⊙ yr‑1, where M, {L}{UV}, and {L}{{E}} are the mass, UV luminosity, and Eddington luminosity of the central object respectively.

  15. Radiation-driven Outflows from and Radiative Support in Dusty Tori of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-Ho; Krolik, Julian H.

    2016-07-01

    Substantial evidence points to dusty, geometrically thick tori obscuring the central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but so far no mechanism satisfactorily explains why cool dust in the torus remains in a puffy geometry. Near-Eddington infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) luminosities coupled with high dust opacities at these frequencies suggest that radiation pressure on dust can play a significant role in shaping the torus. To explore the possible effects of radiation pressure, we perform three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics simulations of an initially smooth torus. Our code solves the hydrodynamics equations, the time-dependent multi–angle group IR radiative transfer (RT) equation, and the time-independent UV RT equation. We find a highly dynamic situation. IR radiation is anisotropic, leaving primarily through the central hole. The torus inner surface exhibits a break in axisymmetry under the influence of radiation and differential rotation; clumping follows. In addition, UV radiation pressure on dust launches a strong wind along the inner surface; when scaled to realistic AGN parameters, this outflow travels at ∼ 5000 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}1/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}1/4 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and carries ∼ 0.1 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}3/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}3/4 M ⊙ yr‑1, where M, {L}{UV}, and {L}{{E}} are the mass, UV luminosity, and Eddington luminosity of the central object respectively.

  16. Evidence for Active Galactic Nucleus Driven Outflows in Young Radio Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lacy, Mark; Blain, Andrew W.; Kimball, Amy E.

    2013-05-01

    We present near-infrared spectra of young radio quasars (P 1.4 GHz ≈ 26-27 W Hz-1) selected from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. The detected objects have typical redshifts of z ≈ 1.6-2.5 and bolometric luminosities ~1047 erg s-1. Based on the intensity ratios of narrow emission lines, we find that these objects are mainly powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), although star formation contribution cannot be completely ruled out. The host galaxies experience moderate levels of extinction, AV ≈ 0-1.3 mag. The observed [O III] λ5007 luminosities and rest-frame J-band magnitudes constrain the black hole masses to lie in the range ~108.9-109.7 M ⊙. From the empirical correlation between black hole mass and host galaxy mass, we infer stellar masses of ~1011.3-1012.2 M ⊙. The [O III] line is exceptionally broad, with FWHM ~1300-2100 km s-1, significantly larger than that of ordinary distant quasars. We argue that these large line widths can be explained by jet-induced outflows, as predicted by theoretical models of AGN feedback. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  17. EVIDENCE FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS DRIVEN OUTFLOWS IN YOUNG RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lacy, Mark; Kimball, Amy E.; Blain, Andrew W.

    2013-05-01

    We present near-infrared spectra of young radio quasars (P{sub 1.4GHz} Almost-Equal-To 26-27 W Hz{sup -1}) selected from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. The detected objects have typical redshifts of z Almost-Equal-To 1.6-2.5 and bolometric luminosities {approx}10{sup 47} erg s{sup -1}. Based on the intensity ratios of narrow emission lines, we find that these objects are mainly powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), although star formation contribution cannot be completely ruled out. The host galaxies experience moderate levels of extinction, A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0-1.3 mag. The observed [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosities and rest-frame J-band magnitudes constrain the black hole masses to lie in the range {approx}10{sup 8.9}-10{sup 9.7} M{sub Sun }. From the empirical correlation between black hole mass and host galaxy mass, we infer stellar masses of {approx}10{sup 11.3}-10{sup 12.2} M{sub Sun }. The [O III] line is exceptionally broad, with FWHM {approx}1300-2100 km s{sup -1}, significantly larger than that of ordinary distant quasars. We argue that these large line widths can be explained by jet-induced outflows, as predicted by theoretical models of AGN feedback.

  18. Outflows and Shock Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafalla, M.

    2016-05-01

    Bipolar outflows result from the supersonic ejection of material by a protostar, and constitute one of the most characteristic signposts of stellar birth. They also provide ideal targets to test chemical models, and can serve as templates for more complex systems of galactic and extragalactic astronomy where supersonic interactions between gas components take place.

  19. BIPOLAR MAGNETIC STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY STRATIFIED TURBULENCE WITH A CORONAL ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Warnecke, Jörn; Losada, Illa R.; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2013-11-10

    We report the spontaneous formation of bipolar magnetic structures in direct numerical simulations of stratified forced turbulence with an outer coronal envelope. The turbulence is forced with transverse random waves only in the lower (turbulent) part of the domain. Our initial magnetic field is either uniform in the entire domain or confined to the turbulent layer. After about 1-2 turbulent diffusion times, a bipolar magnetic region of vertical field develops with two coherent circular structures that live during one turbulent diffusion time, and then decay during 0.5 turbulent diffusion times. The resulting magnetic field strengths inside the bipolar region are comparable to the equipartition value with respect to the turbulent kinetic energy. The bipolar magnetic region forms a loop-like structure in the upper coronal layer. We associate the magnetic structure formation with the negative effective magnetic pressure instability in the two-layer model.

  20. Triggered star formation: Rotation, magnetic fields and outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Li, S.; Blackman, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Star formation can be triggered by compression from wind or supernova driven shock waves that sweep over molecular clouds. In a previous work we used Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation methods, including sink particles, to simulate the full collapse of a stable Bonnor-Ebert sphere subjected to a passing shock. We tracked the flow of cloud material after a star (a sink particle) had formed. For rotating clouds we observed the formation of disks which then interact with the post-shock flow. In this paper we take the next step forward in complexity, presenting first results of simulations that include a magnetized cloud. Our results show that after a disk is formed a collimated magneto-centrifugal outflow is launched. The outflow is bipolar but asymmetric, due to interactions with the shocked flow. We explore the influence of the outflows on the post-triggering collapse dynamics.

  1. Plasma outflows from wire-based z-pinch experiments driven at currents of hundreds of kiloamperes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, Felipe; Muñoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Donoso-Tapia, Luis; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund

    2016-05-01

    Preliminary results on the latest experiments regarding plasma outflows from different wire-based z-pinch configurations performed in the Llampudken generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns) are presented. These outflows are produced from three different experiments: cylindrical, conical and nested conical arrays. Our experiments show that it is indeed possible to produce plasma outflows from moderate size pulsed power drivers with currents of some hundreds of kiloamperes. Each one of the configurations studied here can produce a dense plasma outflow characterized by its own set of dimensionless parameters; such as Reynolds number, magnetic Reynolds number, amongst others. A dense magnetized, magneto-hydrodynamically unstable plasma outflow is produced using a modified cylindrical wire array, whereas strongly collimated jets are produced from the conical configurations. Moreover, it is possible to mimic the episodic emission of plasma outflow in a collimated jet by producing temporally separated implosions from the nested conical configuration. Finally, the characteristic and dynamics of each outflow are presented and discussed.

  2. The Sins/zC-Sinf Survey of z ~ 2 Galaxy Kinematics: Evidence for Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus-Driven Nuclear Outflows in Massive Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Newman, S. F.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Carollo, C. M.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Lang, P.; Lilly, S. J.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; Naab, T.; Peng, Y.; Renzini, A.; Rosario, D.; Shapiro Griffin, K.; Shapley, A. E.; Sternberg, A.; Tacchella, S.; Vergani, D.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, E.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (>=1011 M ⊙) z ~ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ~ 1500 km s-1, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ~60 M ⊙ yr-1 and mass loading of ~3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ~485 km s-1 and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs 074.A-0911, 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 078.A-0600, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 088.A-0202, 091.A-0126). Also based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  3. Algorithm-driven pharmacological management of bipolar disorder in Connecticut prisons.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Jayesh; Zhang, Wanli; Kesten, Karen; Wakai, Sara; Shelton, Deborah; Trestman, Robert

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess adaptation of the Texas Implementation of Medication Algorithm (TIMA) for bipolar disorder (BD) in the Connecticut Department of Correction. A nonrandomized sample of 20 males and 20 females, with diagnoses of BD Type I or II, was enrolled in the study. Two TIMA-trained psychiatrists treated the participants over a 12-week period following the TIMA protocol. The primary outcome measure was the Bipolar Disorder Symptom Scale. Secondary outcome measures evaluated global clinical status, comorbid symptomatology, and quality of life. Significant improvement was seen with the primary and secondary outcome measures (p < .001). Subanalyses showed differences in outcomes based on gender and whether a manic or depression algorithm was used. Antidepressant and antipsychotic medication use decreased, with increase in anticonvulsant and anxiolytic medication usage. This pilot study confirmed the effectiveness and benefits of TIMA for BD adaptation in the correctional setting. PMID:22116961

  4. Characterization of sub-cloud vertical velocity distributions and precipitation-driven outflow dynamics using a ship-based, scanning Doppler lidar during VOCALS-Rex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, A.; Feingold, G.; Tucker, S. C.; Covert, D. S.; Hardesty, R.

    2010-12-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment NOAA's High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) operated from the RV Ronald H. Brown and made continuous measurements of sub-cloud horizontal and vertical wind speed and aerosol backscatter signal strength. We will present averaged profiles of vertical velocity distributions and turbulence parameters, stratified by a range of conditions including diurnal variation, precipitation, and distance from shore. The results point to a strong diurnal dependence in the strength of turbulence with nighttime conditions exhibiting stronger subcloud variance. Skewness shows less diurnal sensitivity with a trend towards more negative skewness near cloud base. Combining HRDL’s scanning horizontal wind speed measurements with other ship based in-situ and remote sensing measurements, we investigate the dynamics of precipitation-driven outflows and their impact on surface thermodynamic and aerosol properties. Using a sample of over 150 airmass transitions over the course of the 5 week deployment, we observed that warmer outflow air is typically drier, has less aerosol scattering and tends to have higher ozone concentrations (indicating the transport of air from above the boundary layer top). Transitions to cooler air are generally moister, have more aerosol scattering and show no significant change in ozone concentration. We will present animations of combined lidar/radar/GOES imagery that were used to facilitate visualization and interpretation of the dynamics of the outflows.

  5. Dopamine modulation of rod pathway signaling by suppression of GABAC feedback to rod-driven depolarizing bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin J; Côté, Patrice D; Tremblay, François

    2015-09-01

    Reducing signal gain in the highly sensitive rod pathway prevents saturation as background light levels increase, allowing the dark-adapted retina to encode stimuli over a range of background luminances. Dopamine release is increased during light adaptation and is generally accepted to suppress rod signaling in light-adapted retinas. However, recent research has suggested that dopamine, acting through D1 receptors, could additionally produce a sensitization of the rod pathway in dim light conditions via gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type C receptors. Here, we evaluated the overall activity of the depolarizing bipolar cell (DBC) population in vivo to ensure the integrity of long-distance network interactions by quantifying the b-wave of the electroretinogram in mice. We showed that dopamine, acting through D1 receptors, reduced the amplitude and sensitivity of rod-driven DBCs during light adaptation by suppressing GABA type A receptor-mediated serial inhibition onto rod DBC GABA type C receptors. Block of D1 receptors did not suppress rod-driven DBC sensitivity when GABAA -mediated serial inhibition was blocked by gabazine, suggesting that the reduction in rod-driven DBC sensitivity in the absence of D1 receptors was due to disinhibition of serial inhibitory GABAergic circuitry rather than a direct facilitatory effect on GABA release onto rod-driven DBC GABA type C receptors. Finally, the large population of GABAergic A17 wide-field amacrine cells known to maintain reciprocal inhibition with rod DBCs could be excluded from the proposed disinhibitory circuit after treatment with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine. PMID:26080286

  6. Kiloparsec-scale outflows are prevalent among luminous AGN: outflows and feedback in the context of the overall AGN population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Swinbank, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    We present integral field unit observations covering the [O III]λλ4959, 5007 and Hβ emission lines of 16 z < 0.2 type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our targets are selected from a well-constrained parent sample of ≈24 000 AGN so that we can place our observations into the context of the overall AGN population. Our targets are radio quiet with star formation rates (SFRs; ≲[10-100] M⊙ yr-1) that are consistent with normal star-forming galaxies. We decouple the kinematics of galaxy dynamics and mergers from outflows. We find high-velocity ionized gas (velocity widths ≈600-1500 km s-1; maximum velocities ≤1700 km s-1) with observed spatial extents of ≳(6-16) kpc in all targets and observe signatures of spherical outflows and bi-polar superbubbles. We show that our targets are representative of z < 0.2, luminous (i.e. L[O III] > 1041.7 erg s-1) type 2 AGN and that ionized outflows are not only common but also in ≥70 per cent (3σ confidence) of cases, they are extended over kiloparsec scales. Our study demonstrates that galaxy-wide energetic outflows are not confined to the most extreme star-forming galaxies or radio-luminous AGN; however, there may be a higher incidence of the most extreme outflow velocities in quasars hosted in ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Both star formation and AGN activity appear to be energetically viable to drive the outflows and we find no definitive evidence that favours one process over the other. Although highly uncertain, we derive mass outflow rates (typically ≈10 times the SFRs), kinetic energies (≈0.5-10 per cent of LAGN) and momentum rates (typically ≳10-20 × LAGN/c) consistent with theoretical models that predict AGN-driven outflows play a significant role in shaping the evolution of galaxies.

  7. APEX CO (9-8) MAPPING OF AN EXTREMELY HIGH VELOCITY AND JET-LIKE OUTFLOW IN A HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Keping; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Leurini, Silvia; Leinz, Christian

    2011-12-10

    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) mapping observations in CO (9-8) and (4-3) toward a high-mass star-forming region, NGC 6334 I, are presented. The CO (9-8) map has a 6.''4 resolution, revealing a {approx}0.5 pc, jet-like, and bipolar outflow. This is the first map of a molecular outflow in a THz line. The CO (9-8) and (4-3) lines arising from the outflow lobes both show extremely high velocity line wings, and their ratios indicate a gas temperature greater than 100 K and a density higher than 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. The spatial-velocity structure of the CO (9-8) data is typical of a bow-shock-driven flow, which is consistent with the association between the bipolar outflow and the infrared bow-shaped tips. In short, the observations unveil a highly excited and collimated component in a bipolar outflow that is powered by a high-mass protostar, and provide insights into the driving mechanism of the outflow. Meanwhile, the observations demonstrate that high-quality mapping observations can be performed with the new THz receiver on APEX.

  8. Evidence for wide-spread active galactic nucleus-driven outflows in the most massive z ∼ 1-2 star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Genzel, R.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Rosario, D.; Lang, P.; Lutz, D.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, E.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Bender, R.; Berta, S.; Kurk, J.; Mendel, J. T.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wilman, D.; Beifiori, A.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Chan, J.; Brammer, G. E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2014-11-20

    In this paper, we follow up on our previous detection of nuclear ionized outflows in the most massive (log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≥ 10.9) z ∼ 1-3 star-forming galaxies by increasing the sample size by a factor of six (to 44 galaxies above log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≥ 10.9) from a combination of the SINS/zC-SINF, LUCI, GNIRS, and KMOS{sup 3D}spectroscopic surveys. We find a fairly sharp onset of the incidence of broad nuclear emission (FWHM in the Hα, [N II], and [S II] lines ∼450-5300 km s{sup –1}), with large [N II]/Hα ratios, above log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 10.9, with about two-thirds of the galaxies in this mass range exhibiting this component. Broad nuclear components near and above the Schechter mass are similarly prevalent above and below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and at z ∼ 1 and ∼2. The line ratios of the nuclear component are fit by excitation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or by a combination of shocks and photoionization. The incidence of the most massive galaxies with broad nuclear components is at least as large as that of AGNs identified by X-ray, optical, infrared, or radio indicators. The mass loading of the nuclear outflows is near unity. Our findings provide compelling evidence for powerful, high-duty cycle, AGN-driven outflows near the Schechter mass, and acting across the peak of cosmic galaxy formation.

  9. Episodic molecular outflow in the very young protostellar cluster Serpens South.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Adele L; Arce, Héctor G; Mardones, Diego; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunham, Michael M; Fernández-López, Manuel; Gallardo, José; Corder, Stuartt A

    2015-11-01

    The loss of mass from protostars, in the form of a jet or outflow, is a necessary counterpart to protostellar mass accretion. Outflow ejection events probably vary in their velocity and/or in the rate of mass loss. Such 'episodic' ejection events have been observed during the class 0 protostellar phase (the early accretion stage), and continue during the subsequent class I phase that marks the first one million years of star formation. Previously observed episodic-ejection sources were relatively isolated; however, the most common sites of star formation are clusters. Outflows link protostars with their environment and provide a viable source of the turbulence that is necessary for regulating star formation in clusters, but it is not known how an accretion-driven jet or outflow in a clustered environment manifests itself in its earliest stage. This early stage is important in establishing the initial conditions for momentum and energy transfer to the environment as the protostar and cluster evolve. Here we report that an outflow from a young, class 0 protostar, at the hub of the very active and filamentary Serpens South protostellar cluster, shows unambiguous episodic events. The (12)C(16)O (J = 2-1) emission from the protostar reveals 22 distinct features of outflow ejecta, the most recent having the highest velocity. The outflow forms bipolar lobes--one of the first detectable signs of star formation--which originate from the peak of 1-mm continuum emission. Emission from the surrounding C(18)O envelope shows kinematics consistent with rotation and an infall of material onto the protostar. The data suggest that episodic, accretion-driven outflow begins in the earliest phase of protostellar evolution, and that the outflow remains intact in a very clustered environment, probably providing efficient momentum transfer for driving turbulence. PMID:26536957

  10. Episodic molecular outflow in the very young protostellar cluster Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunkett, Adele L.; Arce, Héctor G.; Mardones, Diego; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunham, Michael M.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Gallardo, José; Corder, Stuartt A.

    2015-11-01

    The loss of mass from protostars, in the form of a jet or outflow, is a necessary counterpart to protostellar mass accretion. Outflow ejection events probably vary in their velocity and/or in the rate of mass loss. Such `episodic' ejection events have been observed during the Class 0 protostellar phase (the early accretion stage), and continue during the subsequent class I phase that marks the first one million years of star formation. Previously observed episodic-ejection sources were relatively isolated; however, the most common sites of star formation are clusters. Outflows link protostars with their environment and provide a viable source of turbulence that is necessary for regulating star formation in clusters, but it is not known how an accretion-driven jet or outflow in a clustered environment manifests itself in its earliest stage. This early stage is important in establishing the initial conditions for momentum and energy transfer to the environment as the protostar and cluster evolve. Here we report that an outflow from a very young class 0 protostar, at the hub of the very active and filamentary Serpens South protostellar cluster, shows unambiguous episodic events. The 12CO (J=2-1) emission from the protostar reveals 22 distinct features of outflow ejecta, the most recent having the highest velocity. The outflow forms bipolar lobes --- one of the first detectable signs of star formation --- which originate from the peak of 1-mm continuum emission. Emission from the surrounding C18O envelope shows kinematics consistent with rotation and an infall of material onto the protostar. The data suggest that episodic accretion-driven outflow begins in the earliest phase of protostellar evolution, and that the outflow remains intact in a very clustered environment, probably providing efficient momentum transfer for driving turbulence.

  11. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION OF PROTO-STELLAR COLLAPSE: TWO-COMPONENT MOLECULAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Ohsuga, Ken; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: masahiro.machida@nao.ac.jp E-mail: matsu@hosei.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We perform a three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) simulation with self-gravity to study the early phase of the low-mass star formation process from a rotating molecular cloud core to a first adiabatic core just before the second collapse begins. Radiation transfer is implemented with the flux-limited diffusion approximation, operator-splitting, and implicit time integrator. In the RMHD simulation, the outer region of the first core attains a higher entropy and its size is larger than that in the magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the barotropic approximation. Bipolar molecular outflow consisting of two components is driven by magnetic Lorentz force via different mechanisms, and shock heating by the outflow is observed. Using the RMHD simulation we can predict and interpret the observed properties of star-forming clouds, first cores, and outflows with millimeter/submillimeter radio interferometers, especially the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.

  12. Helical Magnetic Fields in the NGC 1333 IRAS 4A Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Tao-Chung; Lai, Shih-Ping; Zhang, Qizhou; Yang, Louis; Girart, Josep M.; Rao, Ramprasad

    2016-03-01

    We present Submillimeter Array polarization observations of the CO J = 3-2 line toward NGC 1333 IRAS 4A. The CO Stokes I maps at an angular resolution of ˜1″ reveal two bipolar outflows from the binary sources of NGC 1333 IRAS 4A. The kinematic features of the CO emission can be modeled by wind-driven outflows at ˜20° inclined from the plane of the sky. Close to the protostars the CO polarization, at an angular resolution of ˜2.″3, has a position angle approximately parallel to the magnetic field direction inferred from the dust polarizations. The CO polarization direction appears to vary smoothly from an hourglass field around the core to an arc-like morphology wrapping around the outflow, suggesting a helical structure of magnetic fields that inherits the poloidal fields at the launching point and consists of toroidal fields at a farther distance of outflow. The helical magnetic field is consistent with the theoretical expectations for launching and collimating outflows from a magnetized rotating disk. Considering that the CO polarized emission is mainly contributed from the low-velocity and low-resolution data, the helical magnetic field is likely a product of the wind-envelope interaction in the wind-driven outflows. The CO data reveal a PA of ˜30° deflection in the outflows. The variation in the CO polarization angle seems to correlate with the deflections. We speculate that the helical magnetic field contributes to ˜10° deflection of the outflows by means of Lorentz force.

  13. The SINS/zC-SINF survey of z ∼ 2 galaxy kinematics: Evidence for powerful active galactic nucleus-driven nuclear outflows in massive star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Buschkamp, P.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lang, P.; Newman, S. F.; Burkert, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (≥10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1}, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ∼60 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and mass loading of ∼3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ∼485 km s{sup –1} and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth.

  14. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Bipolar Disorder KidsHealth > For Teens > Bipolar Disorder Print A A ... Bipolar Disorder en español Trastorno bipolar What Is Bipolar Disorder? Bipolar disorders are one of several medical conditions ...

  15. Evidence for Wide-spread Active Galactic Nucleus-driven Outflows in the Most Massive z ~ 1-2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzel, R.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Rosario, D.; Lang, P.; Lutz, D.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, E.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Bender, R.; Berta, S.; Kurk, J.; Mendel, J. T.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wilman, D.; Beifiori, A.; Brammer, G.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Chan, J.; Carollo, C. M.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Fabricius, M.; Fossati, M.; Kriek, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Lilly, S. J.; Mancini, C.; Momcheva, I.; Naab, T.; Nelson, E. J.; Renzini, A.; Saglia, R.; Sharples, R. M.; Sternberg, A.; Tacchella, S.; van Dokkum, P.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we follow up on our previous detection of nuclear ionized outflows in the most massive (log(M */M ⊙) >= 10.9) z ~ 1-3 star-forming galaxies by increasing the sample size by a factor of six (to 44 galaxies above log(M */M ⊙) >= 10.9) from a combination of the SINS/zC-SINF, LUCI, GNIRS, and KMOS3Dspectroscopic surveys. We find a fairly sharp onset of the incidence of broad nuclear emission (FWHM in the Hα, [N II], and [S II] lines ~450-5300 km s-1), with large [N II]/Hα ratios, above log(M */M ⊙) ~ 10.9, with about two-thirds of the galaxies in this mass range exhibiting this component. Broad nuclear components near and above the Schechter mass are similarly prevalent above and below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and at z ~ 1 and ~2. The line ratios of the nuclear component are fit by excitation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or by a combination of shocks and photoionization. The incidence of the most massive galaxies with broad nuclear components is at least as large as that of AGNs identified by X-ray, optical, infrared, or radio indicators. The mass loading of the nuclear outflows is near unity. Our findings provide compelling evidence for powerful, high-duty cycle, AGN-driven outflows near the Schechter mass, and acting across the peak of cosmic galaxy formation. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs 073.B-9018, 074.A-9011, 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 078.A-0660, 079.A-0341, 080.A-0330, 080.A-0339, 080.A-0635, 081.A-0672, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 087.A-0081, 088.A-0202, 088.A-0209, 091.A-0126, 092.A-0082, 092.A-0091, 093.A-0079). Also based on observations at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham in Arizona.

  16. Galaxy Outflows Without Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2016-02-01

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have ≈50-100 km s-1 line of sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds ≈35 km s-1, as occurs in the dense disks that have star-formation rate (SFR) densities above ≈0.1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the SFR density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.

  17. Characterization of plasma formation and outflow emission from different wire-based z-pinch experiments driven at the 350kA, 1kA/ns Llampudken pulsed power driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, Felipe; Muñoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Vescovi, Milenko; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund

    2015-11-01

    We present results on tungsten and aluminium wire-based z-pinch plasma experiments driven by the 350kA, 1kA/ns Llampudken generator at P Universidad Catolica de Chile. Our experiments are concentrated in the formation and subsequent emission of plasma from two different configurations: conical arrays and modified cylindrical arrays using different wire diameters within the load. The former produce collimated jet-like outflows by the zippering effect at the axis of the conical array, whereas the latter produce emission of an unstructured dense plasma object by the temporal variations on the global magnetic field topology of the cylindrical array. We present measurements of the ablation process in both configurations and the main features of the outflows obtained, such as plasma densities and propagation velocities. It is found that an appropriate mass per unit length in the load is particularly important for producing outflows from modified cylindrical arrays, and that high pressure background gas embedding the load hampers the emission of plasma outflows in conical arrays. In addition, the analysis of the dimensionless parameters that characterize each outflow will be presented. This work has been funded by FONDECYT 11121621. G Munoz is funded by a doctorate scholarship awarded by CONICYT.

  18. Nature or Nurture: the peculiar HH 900 jet and outflow system in the Carina nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Kiminki, Megan M.; Bally, John

    2015-01-01

    We present new optical and IR spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope imaging of HH 900, a peculiar protostellar outflow in the Carina nebula. Previous Hα imaging from HST revealed an unusually broad, bipolar outflow emerging from a small, tadpole-shaped globule that is illuminated by the many O-type stars in nearby Trumpler 16. Near-IR narrowband [Fe II] images reveal a symmetric, collimated jet that bisects the broad outflow traced by Hα. In a giant H II region like Carina, [Fe II] emission traces dense gas that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars, but is excited by non-ionizing FUV photons that penetrate the ionization front within the jet. New Gemini AO images of near-IR H2 emission show that molecules survive in the outflow, and follow the Hα morphology. Position-velocity diagrams of the three lines also reveal very different kinematics. [Fe II] traces steady, jet-like velocities that are faster than those observed in H2 emission. Most strikingly, Hα velocities resemble the Hubble wedges seen in the position-velocity diagrams of some molecular outflows, but few other protostellar jets. We propose that [Fe II] emission traces the protostellar jet itself while H2 emission reveals the molecules that (briefly) survive in the outflow, and Hα traces the ionized skin of the outflow sheath entrained by the jet. The high estimated mass-loss rate of the jet requires a high accretion rate, implying that the unseen driving source is an intermediate-mass (~2-8 Msun) protostar. We propose that HH 900 provides a bridge between molecular outflows driven by deeply embedded sources, and jets from unobscured low-mass protostars because external irradiation from nearby O-type stars illuminates both the collimated atomic jet core and the material it sweeps up.

  19. Bipolar disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Manic depression; Bipolar affective disorder; Mood disorder - bipolar; Manic depressive disorder ... Bipolar disorder affects men and women equally. It most often starts between ages 15 and 25. The exact ...

  20. The radio source and bipolar nebulosity in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Wilson, Andrew S.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael

    1992-01-01

    Results of radio continuum and optical emission-line observations of the type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 are presented. The radio maps reveal an elongated one-sided curved structure, which comprises a series of small-scale 'blobs' and extends up to 4 kpc from the nucleus. This radio structure is aligned and cospatial with one side of the double-sided and highly symmetric Z-shaped emission-line structure. It is argued that these morphological features are associated with a bipolar gaseous outflow from the nucleus of NGC 3516. The radio 'blobs' are elongated roughly perpendicular to the apparent local direction of the outflow, a result which is interpreted in terms of synchrotron emission from outflow-driven shock waves.

  1. Bipolar disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Manic depression; Bipolar affective disorder; Mood disorder - bipolar; Manic depressive disorder ... happiness and high activity or energy (mania) or depression and low activity or energy (depression). The following ...

  2. THE JET-DRIVEN OUTFLOW IN THE RADIO GALAXY SDSS J1517+3353: IMPLICATIONS FOR DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Taylor, G. B. E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.ed E-mail: krista@mail.utexas.ed

    2010-06-10

    We report on the study of an intriguing active galaxy that was selected as a potential multiple supermassive black hole merger in the early-type host SDSS J151709.20+335324.7 (z = 0.135) from a complete search for double-peaked [O III] lines from the SDSS spectroscopic quasi-stellar object (QSO) database. Ground-based SDSS imaging reveals two blue structures on either side of the photometric center of the host galaxy, separated from each other by about 5.7 kpc. From a combination of SDSS fiber and Keck/HIRES long-slit spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that, in addition to these two features, a third distinct structure surrounds the nucleus of the host galaxy. All three structures exhibit highly ionized line emission with line ratios characteristic of Seyfert II active galactic nuclei. The analysis of spatially resolved emission-line profiles from the HIRES spectrum reveal three distinct kinematic subcomponents, one at rest and the other two moving at -350 km s{sup -1} and 500 km s{sup -1} with respect to the systemic velocity of the host galaxy. A comparison of imaging and spectral data confirm a strong association between the kinematic components and the spatial knots, which implies a highly disturbed and complex active region in this object. A comparative analysis of the broadband positions, colors, kinematics, and spectral properties of the knots in this system lead to two plausible explanations: (1) a multiple active galactic nucleus (AGN) produced due to a massive dry merger, or (2) a very powerful radio jet-driven outflow. Subsequent VLA radio imaging reveals a clear jet aligned with the emission-line gas, confirming the latter explanation. We use the broadband radio measurements to examine the impact of the jet on the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, and find that the energy in the radio lobes can heat a significant fraction of the gas to the virial temperature. Finally, we discuss tests that may help future surveys distinguish between jet-driven

  3. Identification of a jet-driven supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Possible evidence for the enhancement of bipolar explosions at low metallicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Badenes, Carles

    2014-06-10

    Recent evidence has suggested that the supernova remnant (SNR) 0104–72.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) may be the result of a 'prompt' Type Ia SN on the basis of enhanced iron abundances and its association with a star-forming region. In this paper, we present evidence that SNR 0104–72.3 arose from a jet-driven bipolar core-collapse (CC) SN. Specifically, we use serendipitous Chandra data of SNR 0104–72.3 taken because of its proximity to the calibration source SNR E0102–72.3. We analyze 56 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of SNR 0104–72.3 to produce imaging and spectra with an effective exposure of 528.6 ks. We demonstrate that SNR 0104–72.3 is highly elliptical relative to other nearby young SNRs, suggesting a CC SN origin. Furthermore, we compare ejecta abundances derived from spectral fits to nucleosynthetic yields of Type Ia and CC SNe, and we find that the iron, neon, and silicon abundances are consistent with either a spherical CC SN of a 18-20 M {sub ☉} progenitor or an aspherical CC SN of a 25 M {sub ☉} progenitor. We show that the star formation history at the site of SNR 0104–72.3 is also consistent with a CC origin. Given the bipolar morphology of the SNR, we favor the aspherical CC SN scenario. This result may suggest jet-driven SNe occur frequently in the low-metallicity environment of the SMC, consistent with the observational and theoretical work on broad-line Type Ic SNe and long-duration gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Molecular Outflows in Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nichol

    2015-11-01

    This thesis presents millimetre continuum and molecular line observations exploring the properties of molecular outflows towards massive star forming regions. Massive stars produce some of the most energetic phenomena in the Galaxy, yet we still do not have a comprehensive understanding of how they actually form. Outflows are known to play a key role in this formation process and their properties, particularly how they change depending on the mass, luminosity and evolution of the driving source can shed light on how massive stars actually form. This thesis presents observations at both high (SMA 3 arcsecond) and low (JCMT 15 arcsecond) spatial resolution of the known jet/outflow tracers, SiO and 12CO, towards a sample massive star forming region drawn from the RMS survey. Furthermore, the presence of infall signatures is explored through observations of HCO+ and H13CO+, and the hot core nature of the regions is probed using tracers such as CH3CN, HC3N and CH3OH. SiO is detected towards approximately 50% of the massive young stellar objects and HII regions in the JCMT sample. The detection of SiO appears to be linked to the age of the RMS source, with the likely younger sources showing a stronger dependence with SiO. The presence of SiO also appears to be linked to the CO velocity, with SiO more efficiently tracing sources with higher velocity dispersions. In the MOPRA observations towards a sample of 33 RMS sources, CH3CN is detected towards 66% of the sources, with the redder likely younger sources having the largest rotational temperatures. This thesis presents the first interferometric SiO (5-4) and 12CO (2-1) observations, taken with the SMA, towards the massive star forming region G203.3166/NGC 2264-C. In this intermediate/massive star forming cluster, SiO is again tracing the youngest sources. Both the SiO and 12CO emission trace two bipolar, high velocity outflows towards the mm brightest, IR-dark, likely youngest sources in this reg! ion. In contrast the IR

  5. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  6. Submillimeter array observations of NGC 2264-C: molecular outflows and driving sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nichol; Lumsden, Stuart L.; Cyganowski, Claudia J.; Maud, Luke T.; Purcell, Cormac

    2016-05-01

    We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at ˜3 arcsec resolution towards the brightest section of the intermediate/massive star-forming cluster NGC 2264-C. The millimetre continuum emission reveals ten 1.3 mm continuum peaks, of which four are new detections. The observed frequency range includes the known molecular jet/outflow tracer SiO (5-4), thus providing the first high-resolution observations of SiO towards NGC 2264-C. We also detect molecular lines of 12 additional species towards this region, including CH3CN, CH3OH, SO, H2CO, DCN, HC3N, and 12CO. The SiO (5-4) emission reveals the presence of two collimated, high-velocity (up to 30 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity) bipolar outflows in NGC 2264-C. In addition, the outflows are traced by emission from 12CO, SO, H2CO, and CH3OH. We find an evolutionary spread between cores residing in the same parent cloud. The two unambiguous outflows are driven by the brightest mm continuum cores, which are IR-dark, molecular line weak, and likely the youngest cores in the region. Furthermore, towards the Red MSX Source AFGL 989-IRS1, the IR-bright and most evolved source in NGC 2264-C, we observe no molecular outflow emission. A molecular line rich ridge feature, with no obvious directly associated continuum source, lies on the edge of a low-density cavity and may be formed from a wind driven by AFGL 989-IRS1. In addition, 229 GHz class I maser emission is detected towards this feature.

  7. Mapping the dynamics of a giant Ly α halo at z = 4.1 with MUSE: the energetics of a large-scale AGN-driven outflow around a massive, high-redshift galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, A. M.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Smail, Ian; De Breuck, C.; Bacon, R.; Contini, T.; Richard, J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Urrutia, T.; Venemans, B.

    2015-05-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field unit spectroscopic observations of the ˜150 kpc Lyα halo around the z = 4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942. This 9-h observation maps the full two-dimensional kinematics of the Lyα emission across the halo, which shows a velocity gradient of Δv ˜ 700 km s-1 across 150 kpc in projection, and also identified two absorption systems associated with the Lyα emission from the radio galaxy. Both absorbers have high covering fractions (˜1) spanning the full ˜150 × 80 kpc2 extent of the halo. The stronger and more blueshifted absorber (Δv ˜ -1200 km s-1 from the systemic) has dynamics that mirror that of the underlying halo emission and we suggest that this high column material (n(H I) ˜ 1019.4 cm-2), which is also seen in C IV absorption, represents an outflowing shell that has been driven by the active galactic nuclei (AGN) or the star formation within the galaxy. The weaker (n(H I) ˜ 1014 cm-2) and less blueshifted (Δv ˜ -500 km s-1) absorber most likely represents material in the cavity between the outflowing shell and the Lyα halo. We estimate that the mass in the shell must be ˜1010 M⊙ - a significant fraction of the interstellar medium from a galaxy at z = 4. The large scales of these coherent structures illustrate the potentially powerful influence of AGN feedback on the distribution and energetics of material in their surroundings. Indeed, the discovery of high-velocity (˜1000 km s-1), group-halo-scale (i.e. >150 kpc) and mass-loaded winds in the vicinity of the central radio source is in agreement with the requirements of models that invoke AGN-driven outflows to regulate star formation and black hole growth in massive galaxies.

  8. The SILCC (SImulating the LifeCycle of molecular Clouds) project - II. Dynamical evolution of the supernova-driven ISM and the launching of outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp; Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten; Gatto, Andrea; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Peters, Thomas; Derigs, Dominik; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The SILCC project (SImulating the Life-Cycle of molecular Clouds) aims at a more self-consistent understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales and its link to galaxy evolution. We present three-dimensional (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations of the ISM in a vertically stratified box including self-gravity, an external potential due to the stellar component of the galactic disc, and stellar feedback in the form of an interstellar radiation field and supernovae (SNe). The cooling of the gas is based on a chemical network that follows the abundances of H+, H, H2, C+, and CO and takes shielding into account consistently. We vary the SN feedback by comparing different SN rates, clustering and different positioning, in particular SNe in density peaks and at random positions, which has a major impact on the dynamics. Only for random SN positions the energy is injected in sufficiently low-density environments to reduce energy losses and enhance the effective kinetic coupling of the SNe with the gas. This leads to more realistic velocity dispersions (σ _H I≈ 0.8σ _{300{-}8000 K}˜ 10-20 km s^{-1}, σ _H α ≈ 0.6σ _{8000-3× 10^5 K}˜ 20-30 km s^{-1}), and strong outflows with mass loading factors (ratio of outflow to star formation rate) of up to 10 even for solar neighbourhood conditions. Clustered SNe abet the onset of outflows compared to individual SNe but do not influence the net outflow rate. The outflows do not contain any molecular gas and are mainly composed of atomic hydrogen. The bulk of the outflowing mass is dense (ρ ˜ 10-25-10-24 g cm-3) and slow (v ˜ 20-40 km s-1) but there is a high-velocity tail of up to v ˜ 500 km s-1 with ρ ˜ 10-28-10-27 g cm-3.

  9. Light-evoked lateral GABAergic inhibition at single bipolar cell synaptic terminals is driven by distinct retinal microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Vigh, Jozsef; Vickers, Evan; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory amacrine cells (ACs) filter visual signals crossing the retina by modulating the excitatory, glutamatergic output of bipolar cells (BCs) on multiple temporal and spatial scales. Reciprocal feedback from ACs provides focal inhibition that is temporally locked to the activity of presynaptic BC activity, whereas lateral feedback originates from ACs excited by distant BCs. These distinct feedback mechanisms permit temporal and spatial computation at BC terminals. Here, we used a unique preparation to study light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded from axotomized terminals of ON-type mixed rod/cone BCs (Mb) in goldfish retinal slices. In this preparation, light-evoked IPSCs could only reach axotomized BC terminals via the lateral feedback pathway, allowing us to study lateral feedback in the absence of overlapping reciprocal feedback components. We found that light evokes ON and OFF lateral IPSCs (L-IPSCs) in Mb terminals having different temporal patterns and conveyed via distinct retinal pathways. The relative contribution of rods versus cones to ON and OFF L-IPSCs was light intensity dependent. ACs presynaptic to Mb BC terminals received inputs via AMPA/KA and NMDA type receptors in both the ON and OFF pathways, and employed TTX-sensitive sodium channels to boost signal transfer along their processes. ON and OFF L-IPSCs, like reciprocal feedback IPSCs, were mediated by both GABAA and GABAC receptors. However, our results suggest that lateral and reciprocal feedback do not cross-depress each other, and are therefore mediated by distinct populations of ACs. These findings demonstrate that retinal inhibitory circuits are highly specialized to modulate BC output at different light intensities. PMID:22049431

  10. Origin of outflows and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenigl, Arieh; Ruden, Steven P.

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments concerning the accretion-outflow connection and the role of magnetic fields are examined. It is argued that the weakly ionized wind most likely represents an MHD outflow driven centrifugally from the disk surfaces or from the boundary between the disk and the star. Specific wind models for each of these alternatives are presented, and it is contended that both provide a natural explanation of the observed correlation between accretion and outflow. The kinematic, thermal, and chemical wind properties predicted by these models are described and their observational implications are considered. It is suggested that the wind characteristics may be reflected in the observed forbidden line and IR continuum emission of T Tauri stars and in the measured abundances of various molecular species.

  11. Wind influence on a coastal buoyant outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Garvine, Richard W.

    2005-03-01

    This paper investigates the interplay between river discharge and winds in forcing coastal buoyant outflows. During light winds a plume influenced by the Earth's rotation will flow down shelf (in the direction of Kelvin wave propagation) as a slender buoyancy-driven coastal current. Downwelling favorable winds augment this down-shelf flow, narrow the plume, and mix the water column. Upwelling favorable winds drive currents that counter the buoyancy-driven flow, spread plume waters offshore, and rapidly mix buoyant waters. Two criteria are developed to assess the wind influence on a buoyant outflow. The wind strength index (Ws) determines whether a plume's along-shelf flow is in a wind-driven or buoyancy-driven state. Ws is the ratio of the wind-driven and buoyancy-driven along-shelf velocities. Wind influence on across-shelf plume structure is rated with a timescale (ttilt) for the isopycnal tilting caused by wind-driven Ekman circulation. These criteria are used to characterize wind influence on the Delaware Coastal Current and can be applied to other coastal buoyant outflows. The Delaware buoyant outflow is simulated for springtime high-river discharge conditions. Simulation results and Ws values reveal that the coastal current is buoyancy-driven most of the time (∣Ws∣ < 1 on average). Wind events, however, overwhelm the buoyancy-driven flow (∣Ws∣ > 1) several times during the high-discharge period. Strong upwelling events reverse the buoyant outflow; they constitute an important mechanism for transporting fresh water up shelf. Across-shelf plume structure is more sensitive to wind influence than the along-shelf flow. Values of ttilt indicate that moderate or strong winds persisting throughout a day can modify plume width significantly. Plume widening during upwelling events is accompanied by mixing that can erase the buoyant outflow.

  12. Tracing outflows in the AGN forbidden region with SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakkad, D.; Mainieri, V.; Padovani, P.; Cresci, G.; Husemann, B.; Carniani, S.; Brusa, M.; Lamastra, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Piconcelli, E.; Schramm, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Active galactic nucleus (AGN) driven outflows are invoked in numerical simulations to reproduce several observed properties of local galaxies. The z > 1 epoch is of particular interest as it was during this time that the volume averaged star formation and the accretion rate of black holes were at their maximum. Radiatively driven outflows are therefore believed to be common during this epoch. Aims: We aim to trace and characterize outflows in AGN hosts with high mass accretion rates at z > 1 using integral field spectroscopy. We obtain spatially resolved kinematics of the [O iii] λ5007 line in two targets which reveal the morphology and spatial extension of the outflows. Methods: We present SINFONI observations in the J band and the H + K band of five AGNs at 1.2 < z < 2.2. To maximize the chance of observing radiatively driven outflows, our sample was pre-selected based on peculiar values of the Eddington ratio and the hydrogen column density of the surrounding interstellar medium. We observe high velocity (~600-1900 km s-1) and kiloparsec scale extended ionized outflows in at least three of our targets, using [O iii] λ5007 line kinematics tracing the AGN narrow line region. We estimate the total mass of the outflow, the mass outflow rate, and the kinetic power of the outflows based on theoretical models and report on the uncertainties associated with them. Results: We find mass outflow rates of ~1-10 M⊙/yr for the sample presented in this paper. Based on the high star formation rates of the host galaxies, the observed outflow kinetic power, and the expected power due to the AGN, we infer that both star formation and AGN radiation could be the dominant source for the outflows. The outflow models suffer from large uncertainties, hence we call for further detailed observations for an accurate determination of the outflow properties to confirm the exact source of these outflows.

  13. Bipolar Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearing, Melissa

    Bipolar disorder, a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, affects approximately one percent of the population. It commonly occurs in late adolescence and is often unrecognized. The diagnosis of bipolar disorder is made on the basis of symptoms, course of illness, and when possible, family history. Thoughts of suicide are…

  14. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... or digestive problems Problems sleeping, or wanting to sleep all of the time Feeling tired all of the time Thoughts about death and suicide Causes & Risk Factors What causes bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder may be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. It sometimes runs in ...

  15. Bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Grande, Iria; Berk, Michael; Birmaher, Boris; Vieta, Eduard

    2016-04-01

    Bipolar disorder is a recurrent chronic disorder characterised by fluctuations in mood state and energy. It affects more than 1% of the world's population irrespective of nationality, ethnic origin, or socioeconomic status. Bipolar disorder is one of the main causes of disability among young people, leading to cognitive and functional impairment and raised mortality, particularly death by suicide. A high prevalence of psychiatric and medical comorbidities is typical in affected individuals. Accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorder is difficult in clinical practice because onset is most commonly a depressive episode and looks similar to unipolar depression. Moreover, there are currently no valid biomarkers for the disorder. Therefore, the role of clinical assessment remains key. Detection of hypomanic periods and longitudinal assessment are crucial to differentiate bipolar disorder from other conditions. Current knowledge of the evolving pharmacological and psychological strategies in bipolar disorder is of utmost importance. PMID:26388529

  16. SIO Emission in the Multilobe Outflow Associated with IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Naomi; Mikami, Hitomi; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2001-02-01

    We have mapped the thermal emission line of SiO (v=0; J=2-1) associated with the quadrupolar molecular outflow driven by the very cold far-infrared source IRAS 16293-2422. The SiO emission is significantly enhanced in the northeastern red lobe and at the position ~50" east of the IRAS source. Strong SiO emission observed at ~50" east of the IRAS source presents evidence for a dynamical interaction between a part of the eastern blue lobe and the dense ambient gas condensation; however, such an interaction is unlikely to be responsible for producing the quadrupolar morphology. The SiO emission in the northeastern red lobe shows spatial and velocity structure similar to those of the CO outflow, suggesting that the SiO emission comes from the molecular outflow in the northeastern red lobe itself. The observed velocity structure is reproduced by a simple spatiokinematic model of bow shock with a shock velocity of 19-24 km s-1 inclined by 30°-45° from the plane of the sky. This implies that the northeastern red lobe is independent of the eastern blue lobe and that the quadrupolar structure is due to two separate bipolar outflows. The SiO emission observed in the western red lobe has a broad pedestal shape with low intensity. Unlike the SiO emission in the northeastern red lobe, the spatial extent of the SiO emission in the western red lobe is restricted to its central region. The spatial and velocity structures and the line profiles suggest that three different types of SiO emission are observed in this outflow: the SiO emission arising from the interface between the outflowing gas and the dense ambient gas clump, the SiO emission coming from the outflow lobe itself, and the broad SiO emission with low intensity observed at the central region of the outflow lobe. Based on observations made at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO). Nobeyama Radio Observatory is a branch of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, an interuniversity research institute operated by

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF MOLECULAR OUTFLOW IN CAR 291.6-01.9

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, M.; Saul, L. E-mail: luke.saul@space.unibe.ch

    2012-01-20

    We report the first observations of a dense molecular gas nebula and bipolar outflow in Car 291.6-01.9, showing characteristics of an embedded young stellar object (YSO). Using the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabaran, Australia, we image the kinematic structure of several emission features to examine physical properties within a molecular clump of mass {approx}3.2 {+-} 0.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} in which a stellar cluster may be forming. Motivated by acquiring a more thorough understanding of star formation we ask what may have initiated collapse in the clump; observed outflow alignment is suggestive of {approx}1.0 pc distant massive star HD 308280 radiative-driven compression as a formation trigger for the dense core. An outflow derived age of <10{sup 6} years, together with significant C{sup 18}O and SO core depletion, support the case for the core as the host of an extremely YSO cluster.

  18. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE MASSIVE MOLECULAR OUTFLOW G331.512-0.103

    SciTech Connect

    Merello, Manuel; Bronfman, Leonardo; Garay, Guido; Lo, Nadia; Evans, Neal J. II; Nyman, Lars-Ake; Cortes, Juan R.; Cunningham, Maria R.

    2013-09-01

    The object of this study is one of the most energetic and luminous molecular outflows known in the Galaxy, G331.512-0.103. Observations with ALMA Band 7 (350 GHz; 0.86 mm) reveal a very compact, extremely young bipolar outflow and a more symmetric outflowing shocked shell surrounding a very small region of ionized gas. The velocities of the bipolar outflow are about 70 km s{sup -1} on either side of the systemic velocity. The expansion velocity of the shocked shell is {approx}24 km s{sup -1}, implying a crossing time of about 2000 yr. Along the symmetry axis of the outflow, there is a velocity feature, which could be a molecular ''bullet'' of high-velocity dense material. The source is one of the youngest examples of massive molecular outflow found associated with a high-mass star.

  19. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... health professional before making a commitment. Learn More Free Booklets and Brochures Bipolar Disorder: A brochure on ... in the public domain and available for use free of charge. Citation of the NIMH is appreciated. ...

  20. Bipolar battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    A bipolar battery having a plurality of cells. The bipolar battery includes: a negative electrode; a positive electrode and a separator element disposed between the negative electrode and the positive electrode, the separator element electrically insulating the electrodes from one another; an electrolyte disposed within at least one of the negative electrode, the positive electrode and the separator element; and an electrode containment structure including a cup-like electrode holder.

  1. The resolved outflow from 3C 48

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, the mass is ∼6 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow.

  2. Bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Frederick K.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder's unique combination of three characteristics - clear genetic diathesis, distinctive clinical features, early availability of an effective treatment (lithium) - explains its special place in the history of psychiatry and its contribution to the current explosive growth of neuroscience. This article looks at the state of the art in bipolar disorder from the vantage point of: (i) genetics (possible linkages on chromosomes 18 and 21q, polygenic hypothesis, research into genetic markers); (ii) diagnosis (new focus on the subjective aspects of bipolar disorder to offset the current trend of underdiagnosis due to overreliance on standardized interviews and rating scales); (iii) outcome (increase in treatment-resistant forms signaling a change in the natural history of bipolar disorder); (iv) pathophysiology (research into circadian biological rhythms and the kindling hypothesis to explain recurrence); (v) treatment (emergence of the anticonvulsants, suggested role of chronic antidepressant treatment in the development of treatment resistance); (vi) neurobiology (evaluation of regulatory function in relation to affective disturbances, role of postsynaptic second-messenger mechanisms, advances in functional neuroimaging); and (vii) psychosocial research (shedding overly dualistic theories of the past to understand the mind and brain as an entity, thus emphasizing the importance of balancing the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches). Future progress in the understanding and treatment of bipolar disorder will rely on successful integration of the biological and psychosocial lines of investigation. PMID:22033232

  3. A Robust Measurement of the Mass Outflow Rate of the Galactic Outflow from NGC 6090

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti, Christy A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of stellar feedback, it is critical to estimate the mass outflow rates of galaxies. Past estimates have been plagued by uncertain assumptions about the outflow geometry, metallicity, and ionization fraction. Here we use Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the nearby starburst NGC 6090 to demonstrate that many of these quantities can be constrained by the data. We use the Si IV absorption lines to calculate the scaling of velocity (v), covering fraction (Cf), and density with distance from the starburst (r), assuming the Sobolev optical depth and a velocity law of the form: v~∝(1 - Ri/r)β (where Ri is the inner outflow radius). We find that the velocity (β=0.43) is consistent with an outflow driven by an r-2 force with the outflow radially accelerated, while the scaling of the covering fraction (Cf∝r-0.82) suggests that cool clouds in the outflow are in pressure equilibrium with an adiabatically expanding medium. We use the column densities of four weak metal lines and CLOUDY photoionization models to determine the outflow metallicity, the ionization correction, and the initial density of the outflow. Combining these values with the profile fitting, we find Ri = 63 pc, with most of the mass within 300 pc of the starburst. Finally, we find that the maximum mass outflow rate is 2.3 M⊙ yr-1 and the mass loading factor (outflow divided by the star formation rate) is 0.09, a factor of 10 lower than the value calculated using common assumptions for the geometry, metallicity and ionization structure of the outflow.

  4. SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE MOLECULAR OUTFLOW IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION G240.31+0.07

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Keping; Zhang Qizhou; Wu Jingwen; Chen, H.-R.

    2009-05-01

    We present Submillimeter Array observations toward the 10{sup 4.7} L {sub sun} star-forming region G240.31+0.07, in the J = 2-1 transition of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO and at 1.3 mm continuum, as well as the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO observations from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory to recover the extended emission filtered out by the interferometer. Maps of the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO emission show a bipolar, wide-angle, quasi-parabolic molecular outflow, roughly coincident with an infrared nebula revealed by the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m emission. The outflow has {approx}98 M {sub sun} molecular gas, making it one of the most massive molecular outflows known, and resulting in a very high mass-loss rate of 4.1 x 10{sup -3} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} over a dynamical timescale of 2.4 x 10{sup 4} yr. The 1.3 mm continuum observations with a 4'' x 3'' beam reveal a flattened dusty envelope of {approx}150 M {sub sun}, which is further resolved with a 1.''2 x 1'' beam into three dense cores with a total mass of {approx}40 M {sub sun}. The central mm core, showing evidence of active star formation, approximately coincides with the geometric center of the bipolar outflow thus most likely harbors the powering source of the outflow. Overall, our observations provide the best case to date of a well defined wide-angle molecular outflow in a higher than 10{sup 4} L {sub sun} star-forming region. The outflow is morphologically and kinematically similar to low-mass protostellar outflows but has two to three orders of magnitude greater mass, momentum, and energy, and is apparently driven by an underlying wide-angle wind, hence further supports that high-mass stars up to late-O types, even in a crowded clustering environment, can form as a scaled-up version of low-mass star formation.

  5. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... might cause your mood changes. If not treated, bipolar disorder can lead to damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. However, there are effective treatments to control symptoms: medicine and talk therapy. A combination usually works best. NIH: National Institute ...

  6. CARMA OBSERVATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS IN NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, Adele L.; Arce, Hector G.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Mardones, Diego; Sargent, Anneila I.; Schnee, Scott L.

    2013-09-01

    We present observations of outflows in the star-forming region NGC 1333 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA). We combined the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (1-0) CARMA mosaics with data from the 14 m Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory to probe the central, most dense, and active region of this protostellar cluster at scales from 5'' to 7' (or 1000 AU to 0.5 pc at a distance of 235 pc). We map and identify {sup 12}CO outflows, and along with {sup 13}CO data we estimate their mass, momentum, and energy. Within the 7' Multiplication-Sign 7' map, the 5'' resolution allows for a detailed study of morphology and kinematics of outflows and outflow candidates, some of which were previously confused with other outflow emission in the region. In total, we identify 22 outflow lobes, as well as 9 dense circumstellar envelopes marked by continuum emission, of which 6 drive outflows. We calculate a total outflow mass, momentum, and energy within the mapped region of 6 M{sub Sun }, 19 M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1}, and 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg, respectively. Within this same region, we compare outflow kinematics with turbulence and gravitational energy, and we suggest that outflows are likely important agents for the maintenance of turbulence in this region. In the earliest stages of star formation, outflows do not yet contribute enough energy to totally disrupt the clustered region where most star formation is happening, but have the potential to do so as the protostellar sources evolve. Our results can be used to constrain outflow properties, such as outflow strength, in numerical simulations of outflow-driven turbulence in clusters.

  7. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION, OUTFLOWS, AND ANOMALOUS H{sub 2} EMISSION IN Mol 121 (IRAS 20188+3928)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf-Chase, Grace; Arvidsson, Kim; Smutko, Michael; Sherman, Reid

    2013-01-10

    We have discovered 12 new molecular hydrogen emission-line objects (MHOs) in the vicinity of the candidate massive young stellar object Mol 121, in addition to five that were previously known. H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.25 {mu}m flux ratios indicate another region dominated by fluorescence from a photodissociation region, and one region that displays an anomalously low H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.25 {mu}m flux ratio (<1) and coincides with a previously reported deeply embedded source (DES). Continuum observations at 3 mm reveal five dense cores; the brightest core is coincident with the DES. The next brightest cores are both associated with centimeter continuum emission. One of these is coincident with the IRAS source; the other lies at the centroid of a compact outflow defined by bipolar MHOs. The brighter of these bipolar MHOs exhibits [Fe II] emission and both MHOs are associated with CH{sub 3}OH maser emission observed at 95 GHz and 44 GHz. Masses and column densities of all five cores are consistent with theoretical predictions for massive star formation. Although it is impossible to associate all MHOs with driving sources in this region, it is evident that there are several outflows along different position angles, and some unambiguous associations can be made. We discuss implications of observed H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.25 {mu}m and [Fe II] 1.64 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m flux ratios and compare the estimated total H{sub 2} luminosity with the bolometric luminosity of the region. We conclude that the outflows are driven by massive young stellar objects embedded in cores that are likely to be in different evolutionary stages.

  8. Episodic High-velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Philip, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon, during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from ‑722 to ‑425 km s‑1) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the timescale of a few days, and vary over the timescale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetospheric accretion. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  9. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS AND RADIATIVE FEEDBACK FROM MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2015-02-20

    We carry out radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of massive stars in the super-Eddington regime including both their radiative feedback and protostellar outflows. The calculations start from a prestellar core of dusty gas and continue until the star stops growing. The accretion ends when the remnants of the core are ejected, mostly by the force of the direct stellar radiation in the polar direction and elsewhere by the reradiated thermal infrared radiation. How long the accretion persists depends on whether the protostellar outflows are present. We set the mass outflow rate to 1% of the stellar sink particle's accretion rate. The outflows open a bipolar cavity extending to the core's outer edge, through which the thermal radiation readily escapes. The radiative flux is funneled into the polar directions while the core's collapse proceeds near the equator. The outflow thus extends the ''flashlight effect'', or anisotropic radiation field, found in previous studies from the few hundred AU scale of the circumstellar disk up to the 0.1 parsec scale of the core. The core's flashlight effect allows core gas to accrete on the disk for longer, in the same way that the disk's flashlight effect allows disk gas to accrete on the star for longer. Thus although the protostellar outflows remove material near the core's poles, causing slower stellar growth over the first few free-fall times, they also enable accretion to go on longer in our calculations. The outflows ultimately lead to stars of somewhat higher mass.

  10. A distance-limited sample of massive molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Moore, T. J. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Hoare, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    We have observed 99 mid-infrared-bright, massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions drawn from the Red MSX source survey in the J = 3-2 transition of 12CO and 13CO, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. 89 targets are within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a representative range of luminosities and core masses. These constitute a relatively unbiased sample of bipolar molecular outflows associated with massive star formation. Of these, 59, 17 and 13 sources (66, 19 and 15 per cent) are found to have outflows, show some evidence of outflow, and have no evidence of outflow, respectively. The time-dependent parameters of the high-velocity molecular flows are calculated using a spatially variable dynamic time-scale. The canonical correlations between the outflow parameters and source luminosity are recovered and shown to scale with those of low-mass sources. For coeval star formation, we find the scaling is consistent with all the protostars in an embedded cluster providing the outflow force, with massive stars up to ˜30 M⊙ generating outflows. Taken at face value, the results support the model of a scaled-up version of the accretion-related outflow-generation mechanism associated with discs and jets in low-mass objects with time-averaged accretion rates of ˜10-3 M⊙ yr-1 on to the cores. However, we also suggest an alternative model, in which the molecular outflow dynamics are dominated by the entrained mass and are unrelated to the details of the acceleration mechanism. We find no evidence that outflows contribute significantly to the turbulent kinetic energy of the surrounding dense cores.

  11. Bipolar electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fosdick, Stephen E; Knust, Kyle N; Scida, Karen; Crooks, Richard M

    2013-09-27

    A bipolar electrode (BPE) is an electrically conductive material that promotes electrochemical reactions at its extremities (poles) even in the absence of a direct ohmic contact. More specifically, when sufficient voltage is applied to an electrolyte solution in which a BPE is immersed, the potential difference between the BPE and the solution drives oxidation and reduction reactions. Because no direct electrical connection is required to activate redox reactions, large arrays of electrodes can be controlled with just a single DC power supply or even a battery. The wireless aspect of BPEs also makes it possible to electrosynthesize and screen novel materials for a wide variety of applications. Finally, bipolar electrochemistry enables mobile electrodes, dubbed microswimmers, that are able to move freely in solution. PMID:23843205

  12. Types of Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Studies Peer Support Research WeSearchTogether Types of Bipolar Disorder There are several kinds of bipolar disorder. Each ... like an illness. What is the difference between bipolar disorder and ordinary mood swings? The three main things ...

  13. Bipolar-Battery Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.; Edwards, Dean B.

    1988-01-01

    Bipolar batteries fabricated in continuous quasi-automated process. Components of battery configured so processing steps run sequentially. Key components of battery, bipolar plate and bipolar separator, fabricated separately and later joined together.

  14. Starburst outflows from nearby galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Starburst outflows from NGC 5461, 1569 and M82 are discussed. The Sc I galaxy, M101, is reknowned for the kpc-size superassociations of star clusters and HII regions that dominate its spiral arms. NGC 5461 is one of the brightest of these superassociations, rivaling the Large Magellanic Cloud in H alpha luminosity. The NGC 5461 superassociation is dominated by a single unresolved HII region of outstanding luminosity (approx. 1000 Orion nebulae). Detailed examination of corresponding continuum images indicates that only the southern plume has any sort of stellar counterpart. The other plumes are clearly diffuse with no underlying hot stars. An image of NGC 1569 is discussed. Besides showing the peculiar arm noted by Zwicky (1971) and the filamentary extensions to the North and South (as noted by Hodge 1974), this image also reveals two arc-like features of diffuse ionized gas to the South. Both arcs are concentric with the bright center of the galaxy - where the super star clusters, A and B are located. The inner arc (Arc 1) appears to follow the same curve as the SW arm thus suggesting that the two features represent limb-brightened fragments of vast superbubble that was blown out by a central starburst sometime in the past. As the classic starburst galaxy, M82 displays all the luminous hallmarks of intense high-mass star formation and outflow activity. The diffuse H alpha and x ray emitting gas along the minor axis provides especially good evidence for a bipolar outflow of hot gas which is shock heating the swept-up interstellar medium (ISM) to temperatures of approx. 10(exp 4) K. An image shows the H alpha emission within the disk and along the minor axis. Another image shows the same field in the light of near-infrared. Both figures are based on charge coupled device images taken with the McGraw-Hill 1.3 m telescope (Waller 1989). The longer wavelength emission clearly shows a more extended morphology along the major axis. The morphological discrepancy is most

  15. Cirrus outflow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    In the present analyses of cirrus clouds' deep-convection outflow plumes as dynamically and thermodynamically active systems, the initial outflow is considered as an analog to wake collapse: after a neutrally-buoyant flow intrusion is flattened and stretched by its stratified environment, the initially isotropic turbulence within it is converted to other forms. Dugan et al.'s (1976) analytic and numerical calculations are used to predict the early spread of the outflow. Strong radiative heat flux curvature then leads to maintenance or regeneration of buoyant turbulence in the collapsed outflow plume. The rise of narrow plumes is sufficiently rapid that their mean temperature does not significantly differ from that of their environment.

  16. The ionospheric outflow feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Fok, M.-C.; Garcia-Sage, K.

    2014-08-01

    Following a long period of observation and investigation beginning in the early 1970s, it has been firmly established that Earth's magnetosphere is defined as much by the geogenic plasma within it as by the geomagnetic field. This plasma is not confined to the ionosphere proper, defined as the region within a few density scale heights of the F-region plasma density peak. Rather, it fills the flux tubes on which it is created, and circulates throughout the magnetosphere in a pattern driven by solar wind plasma that becomes magnetically connected to the ionosphere by reconnection through the dayside magnetopause. Under certain solar wind conditions, plasma and field energy is stored in the magnetotail rather than being smoothly recirculated back to the dayside. Its release into the downstream solar wind is produced by magnetotail disconnection of stored plasma and fields both continuously and in the form of discrete plasmoids, with associated generation of energetic Earthward-moving bursty bulk flows and injection fronts. A new generation of global circulation models is showing us that outflowing ionospheric plasmas, especially O+, load the system in a different way than the resistive F-region load of currents dissipating energy in the plasma and atmospheric neutral gas. The extended ionospheric load is reactive to the primary dissipation, forming a time-delayed feedback loop within the system. That sets up or intensifies bursty transient behaviors that would be weaker or absent if the ionosphere did not “strike back” when stimulated. Understanding this response appears to be a necessary, if not sufficient, condition for us to gain accurate predictive capability for space weather. However, full predictive understanding of outflow and incorporation into global simulations requires a clear observational and theoretical identification of the causal mechanisms of the outflows. This remains elusive and requires a dedicated mission effort.

  17. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  18. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Carroll, Jonathan; Blackman, Eric G.; Quillen, Alice C.

    2009-02-01

    The link between turbulence in star-forming environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows, we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers'-type turbulence and produces a driving scale length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star-forming environments. In the last section, we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets cannot be the source of turbulence.

  19. Outflow Propagation in Collapsars: Collimated Jets And Expanding Outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A.; Yamasaki, T.; Nagataki, S.; Mineshige, S.; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-06-08

    We investigate the outflow propagation in the collapsar in the context of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with 2D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. We vary the specific internal energy and bulk Lorentz factor of the injected outflow from non-relativistic regime to relativistic one, fixing the power of the outflow to be 10{sup 51}erg s{sup -1}. We observed the collimated outflow, when the Lorentz factor of the injected outflow is roughly greater than 2. To the contrary, when the velocity of the injected outflow is slower, the expanding outflow is observed. The transition from collimated jet to expanding outflow continuously occurs by decreasing the injected velocity. Different features of the dynamics of the outflows would cause the difference between the GRBs and similar phenomena, such as, X-ray flashes.

  20. Compact objects at the heart of outflows in large and small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Paul Harrison

    2013-12-01

    This thesis focuses on studying and assessing high-energy feedback generated by both stellar mass and supermassive compact objects. From these two perspectives, I help bridge the gap in understanding how jets and winds can transform their much larger environments in thousands to millions of years, astronomically short timescales. I have acquired X-ray and optical data that aim to elucidate the role these objects play in powering parsec-scale shockwaves in the ISM and in driving kiloparsec-scale outflows in galaxies. I present Chandra X-ray imaging, Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and WIYN Hydra multi-object optical spectroscopic observations. The data reveal the morphologies of the systems and constrain on a range of interesting parameters: power, outflow velocity, density, accretion efficiency, and timescale. My analysis provides perspective on the importance of black holes, both large and small, and neutron stars for driving outflows into the interstellar and intergalactic medium. On kiloparsec scales, I explore the nature of what appear to be merging or recently merging post-starburst galaxies with very high-velocity winds. This work is part of a multiwavelength effort to characterize the niche these galaxies fill in the larger scheme of galaxy evolution. My focus is on the accretion activity of the coalescing supermassive black holes in their cores. This work leads us to compare the relative importance of a massive starburst to the supermassive black holes in the cores of the galaxies. On parsec scales, I present case studies of two prominent microquasars, Galactic X-ray binaries with jets, Circinus X-1 and Cygnus X-1. In the case of Circinus X-1, I present very deep follow-up observations of parsec-scale shock plumes driven by a powerful, bipolar jet. In the case of Cygnus X-1, I present follow-up observations to probe a recently discovered outflow near the binary. I calculate robust, physically motivated limits on the total power needed to drive the outflows

  1. Ionised outflows in z ~ 2.4 quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked by galaxy evolutionary models to quench star formation and to explain the origin of the relations observed locally between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. We here aim to detect extended ionised outflows in luminous quasars, where we expect the highest activity both in star formation and in black-hole accretion. Currently, there are only a few studies based on spatially resolved observations of outflows at high redshift, z > 2. Methods: We analysed a sample of six luminous (L > 1047 erg/s) quasars at z ~ 2.4, observed in H-band using the near-IR integral field spectrometer SINFONI at the VLT. We performed a kinematic analysis of the [Oiii] emission line at λ = 5007 Å. Results: We detect fast, spatially extended outflows in five out of six targets. [Oiii]λ5007 has a complex gas kinematic, with blue-shifted velocities of a few hundreds of km s-1 and line widths up to 1500 km s-1. Using the spectroastrometric method, we infer a size of the ionised outflows of up to ~2 kpc. The properties of the ionised outflows, mass outflow rate, momentum rate, and kinetic power, are correlated with the AGN luminosity. The increase in outflow rate with increasing AGN luminosity is consistent with the idea that a luminous AGN pushes away the surrounding gas through fast outflows that are driven by radiation pressure, which depends on the emitted luminosity. Conclusions: We derive mass outflow rates of about 6-700 M⊙ yr-1 for our sample, which are lower than those observed in molecular outflows. The physical properties of ionised outflows show dependences on AGN luminosity that are similar to those of molecular outflows, but indicate that the mass of ionised gas is lower than that of molecular outflows. Alternatively, this discrepancy between ionised and molecular outflows could be explained with different acceleration mechanisms. Based on Observations collected at the European Organisation for

  2. AN ENVELOPE DISRUPTED BY A QUADRUPOLAR OUTFLOW IN THE PRE-PLANETARY NEBULA IRAS 19475+3119

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ming-Chien; Lee, Chin-Fei E-mail: cflee@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2011-07-20

    IRAS 19475+3119 is a quadrupolar pre-planetary nebula (PPN), with two bipolar lobes, one in the east-west (E-W) direction and one in the southeast-northwest (SE-NW) direction. We have observed it in CO J = 2-1 with the Submillimeter Array at {approx}1'' resolution. The E-W bipolar lobe is known to trace a bipolar outflow and it is detected at high velocity. The SE-NW bipolar lobe appears at low velocity, and could trace a bipolar outflow moving in the plane of the sky. Two compact clumps are seen at low velocity around the common waist of the two bipolar lobes, spatially coincident with the two emission peaks in the NIR, tracing dense envelope material. They are found to trace the two limb-brightened edges of a slowly expanding torus-like circumstellar envelope produced in the late asymptotic giant branch phase. This torus-like envelope originally could be either a torus or a spherical shell, and it appears as it is now because of the two pairs of cavities along the two bipolar lobes. Thus, the envelope appears to be disrupted by the two bipolar outflows in the PPN phase.

  3. Studying the outflow-core interaction with ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the HH 46/47 molecular outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Arce, Hector G.; Mardones, Diego; Dunham, Michael; Garay, Guido; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Corder, Stuartt; Offner, Stella; Cabrit, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the HH 46/47 molecular outflow which is driven by a low-mass Class 0/I protostar. Previous ALMA Cycle 0 12CO observation showed outflow cavities produced by the entrainment of ambient gas by the protostellar jet and wide-angle wind. Here we present analysis of observation of 12CO, 13CO, C18O and other species using combined 12m array and ACA observations. The improved angular resolution and sensitivity allow us to detect details of the outflow structure. Specially, we see that the outflow cavity wall is composed of two or more layers of outflowing gas, which separately connect to different shocked regions along the outflow axis inside the cavity, suggesting the outflow cavity wall is composed of multiple shells entrained by a series of jet bow-shock events. The new 13CO and C18O data also allow us to trace relatively denser and slower outflow material than that traced by the 12CO. These species are only detected within about 1 to 2 km/s from the cloud velocity, tracing the outflow to lower velocities than what is possible using only the 12CO emission. Interestingly, the cavity wall of the red lobe appears at very low outflow velocities (as low as ~0.2 km/s). In addition, 13CO and C18O allow us to correct for the CO optical depth, allowing us to obtain more accurate estimates of the outflow mass, momentum and kinetic energy. Applying the optical depth correction significantly increases the previous mass estimate by a factor of 14. The outflow kinetic energy distribution shows that even though the red lobe is mainly entrained by jet bow-shocks, most of the outflow energy is being deposited into the cloud at the base of the outflow cavity rather than around the heads of the bow shocks. The estimated total mass, momentum, and energy of the outflow indicate that the outflow has the ability to disperse the parent core. We found possible evidence for a slowly moving rotating outflow in CS. Our 13CO and C18O observations also trace a

  4. Studies of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arav, Nahum

    2002-01-01

    The main aim of this research program is to determine the ionization equilibrium and abundances in quasar outflows. Especially in the broad absorption line QSO PG 0946+301. We find that the outflow's metalicity is consistent with being solar, while the abundance ratio of phosphorus to other metals is at least ten times solar. These findings are based on diagnostics that are not sensitive to saturation and partial covering effects in the BALs (Broad Adsorption Lines), which considerably weakened previous claims for enhanced metalicity. Ample evidence for these effects is seen in the spectrum.

  5. Characterization of Molecular Outflows in the Substellar Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan-Bao, Ngoc; Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Dang-Duc, Cuong; Li, Di

    2014-11-01

    We report here our latest search for molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars in nearby star-forming regions. We have observed three sources in Taurus with the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at 230 GHz frequency to search for CO J = 2 → 1 outflows. We obtain a tentative detection of a redshifted and extended gas lobe at about 10 arcsec from the source GM Tau, a young brown dwarf in Taurus with an estimated mass of 73 M J , which is right below the hydrogen-burning limit. No blueshifted emission around the brown dwarf position is detected. The redshifted gas lobe that is elongated in the northeast direction suggests a possible bipolar outflow from the source with a position angle of about 36°. Assuming that the redshifted emission is outflow emission from GM Tau, we then estimate a molecular outflow mass in the range from 1.9 × 10-6 M ⊙ to 2.9 × 10-5 M ⊙ and an outflow mass-loss rate from 2.7 × 10-9 M ⊙ yr-1 to 4.1 × 10-8 M ⊙ yr-1. These values are comparable to those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M J in ρ Ophiuchi and the very low-mass star MHO 5 of 90 M J in Taurus. Our results suggest that the outflow process in very low-mass objects is episodic with a duration of a few thousand years and the outflow rate of active episodes does not significantly change for different stages of the formation process of very low-mass objects. This may provide us with important implications that clarify the formation process of brown dwarfs.

  6. Characterization of molecular outflows in the substellar domain

    SciTech Connect

    Phan-Bao, Ngoc; Dang-Duc, Cuong; Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Li, Di E-mail: pbngoc@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-11-01

    We report here our latest search for molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars in nearby star-forming regions. We have observed three sources in Taurus with the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at 230 GHz frequency to search for CO J = 2 → 1 outflows. We obtain a tentative detection of a redshifted and extended gas lobe at about 10 arcsec from the source GM Tau, a young brown dwarf in Taurus with an estimated mass of 73 M {sub J}, which is right below the hydrogen-burning limit. No blueshifted emission around the brown dwarf position is detected. The redshifted gas lobe that is elongated in the northeast direction suggests a possible bipolar outflow from the source with a position angle of about 36°. Assuming that the redshifted emission is outflow emission from GM Tau, we then estimate a molecular outflow mass in the range from 1.9 × 10{sup –6} M {sub ☉} to 2.9 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} and an outflow mass-loss rate from 2.7 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} to 4.1 × 10{sup –8} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. These values are comparable to those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M {sub J} in ρ Ophiuchi and the very low-mass star MHO 5 of 90 M {sub J} in Taurus. Our results suggest that the outflow process in very low-mass objects is episodic with a duration of a few thousand years and the outflow rate of active episodes does not significantly change for different stages of the formation process of very low-mass objects. This may provide us with important implications that clarify the formation process of brown dwarfs.

  7. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-06-01

    Correlations of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the C IV line, with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, are investigated. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to C IV increase prominently with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of the dominant coolant, C IV line, decreases, and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using Si IV+O IV]/C IV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicity and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7-6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely by affecting outflow acceleration. This effect may have a profound impact on galaxy evolution via momentum feedback and chemical enrichment.

  8. METALLICITY AND QUASAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Tinggui; Yuan, Weimin

    2012-06-01

    Correlations of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the C IV line, with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, are investigated. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to C IV increase prominently with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of the dominant coolant, C IV line, decreases, and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using Si IV+O IV]/C IV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicity and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7-6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely by affecting outflow acceleration. This effect may have a profound impact on galaxy evolution via momentum feedback and chemical enrichment.

  9. Bipolar gas outflow from the nova V458 Vul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranskij, V. P.; Barsukova, E. A.; Fatkhullin, T. A.

    2010-06-01

    Classical nova V458 Vul (N Vul 2007 No.1) was detected as a supersoft X-ray source by the Swift XRT (ATel#1246, #1603). This star is interesting with its spectral class change: features of Fe II class nova completely changed by features of He/N class in the SSS phase (T.N. Tarasova, IBVS No.5807). We performed spectral observations of V458 Vul with the Russian 6-m telescope BTA and spectral camera SCORPIO on 2010 June 9.84 UT.

  10. Modeling the Causal Regulation of Transversely Accelerated Ion (TAI) Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Zhang, B.; Schmitt, P.; Lotko, W.

    2013-12-01

    TAIs are generated by wave particle interactions driven by waves at temporal and spatial scales which are inaccessible in global coupled geospace models. So far attempts to include TAI outflows in global models have focused on the use of empirical correlations between observed outflow fluxes and various inputs such as DC Poynting flux, Alfvénic Poynting flux, and electron precipitation fluxes. These treatments ignore feedbacks between the outflow and the state of the ionosphere and assume the spatial and temporal distributions of the outflows are identical to those of their drivers. This work presents an alternative approach which can overcome these deficiencies while still being sufficiently computationally efficient to couple into a global modeling framework. TAIs are incorporated into a 3-D fluid model of the ionosphere and polar wind by modeling them as a separate fluid which obeys transport equations appropriate for monoenergetic conic distributions. The characteristics of the TAI outflow produced depend on the assumed transverse heating rates and the 'promotion rate' which connects the TAI fluid to the thermal O+ fluid. Using drivers extracted from runs of the Coupled Magnetosphere Ionosphere Thermosphere (CMIT) model, different strategies for causally regulating these free parameters are explored. The model can reproduce many of the observed features of TAI outflows but also exhibits physical attributes that empirical relationships alone miss. These characteristics include flux limiting of the outflow from below when intense outflow creates high-altitude cavities, time delays between the onset of transverse heating and the appearance of outflow, and spatial distributions of outflow which are different from the spatial distributions of the applied transverse heating and which depend on the ionospheric convection pattern.

  11. Bipolar offspring: a window into bipolar disorder evolution.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kiki; Steiner, Hans; Dienes, Kimberly; Adleman, Nancy; Ketter, Terence

    2003-06-01

    Children of parents with bipolar disorder (bipolar offspring) represent a rich cohort for study with potential for illumination of prodromal forms of bipolar disorder. Due to their high-risk nature, bipolar offspring may present phenomenological, temperamental, and biological clues to early presentations of bipolar disorder. This article reviews the evidence for establishing bipolar offspring as a high-risk cohort, the studies which point to possible prodromal states in bipolar offspring, biological findings in bipolar offspring which may be indicators of even higher risk for bipolar disorder, initial attempts at early intervention in prodromal pediatric bipolar disorder, and implications for future research. PMID:12788239

  12. Help With Bipolar Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Psychiatrist Patients & Families All Topics Help With Bipolar Disorders Curated and updated for the community by APA Topic Information Bipolar disorders are brain disorders that cause changes in a ...

  13. Bipolar disorder dynamics: affective instabilities, relaxation oscillations and noise

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, John R.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Holmes, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic, recurrent mental illness characterized by extreme episodes of depressed and manic mood, interspersed with less severe but highly variable mood fluctuations. Here, we develop a novel mathematical approach for exploring the dynamics of bipolar disorder. We investigate how the dynamics of subjective experience of mood in bipolar disorder can be understood using a relaxation oscillator (RO) framework and test the model against mood time-series fluctuations from a set of individuals with bipolar disorder. We show that variable mood fluctuations in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder can be driven by the coupled effects of deterministic dynamics (captured by ROs) and noise. Using a statistical likelihood-based approach, we show that, in general, mood dynamics are described by two independent ROs with differing levels of endogenous variability among individuals. We suggest that this sort of nonlinear approach to bipolar disorder has neurobiological, cognitive and clinical implications for understanding this mental illness through a mechacognitive framework. PMID:26577592

  14. HOT ELECTROMAGNETIC OUTFLOWS. I. ACCELERATION AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2013-04-20

    The theory of cold, relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic outflows is generalized by the inclusion of an intense radiation source. In some contexts, such as the breakout of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet from a star, the outflow is heated to a high temperature at a large optical depth. Eventually it becomes transparent and is pushed to a higher Lorentz factor by a combination of the Lorentz force and radiation pressure. We obtain its profile, both inside and outside the fast magnetosonic critical point, when the poloidal magnetic field is radial and monopolar. Most of the energy flux is carried by the radiation field and the toroidal magnetic field that is wound up close to the rapidly rotating engine. Although the entrained matter carries little energy, it couples the radiation field to the magnetic field. Then the fast critical point is pulled inward from infinity and, above a critical radiation intensity, the outflow is accelerated mainly by radiation pressure. We identify a distinct observational signature of this hybrid outflow: a hardening of the radiation spectrum above the peak of the seed photon distribution, driven by bulk Compton scattering. The non-thermal spectrum-obtained by a Monte Carlo method-is most extended when the Lorentz force dominates the acceleration, and the seed photon beam is wider than the Lorentz cone of the MHD fluid. This effect is a generic feature of hot, magnetized outflows interacting with slower relativistic material. It may explain why some GRB spectra appear to peak at photon energies above the original Amati et al. scaling. A companion paper addresses the case of jet breakout, where diverging magnetic flux surfaces yield strong MHD acceleration over a wider range of Lorentz factor.

  15. Hot Electromagnetic Outflows. I. Acceleration and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    The theory of cold, relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic outflows is generalized by the inclusion of an intense radiation source. In some contexts, such as the breakout of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet from a star, the outflow is heated to a high temperature at a large optical depth. Eventually it becomes transparent and is pushed to a higher Lorentz factor by a combination of the Lorentz force and radiation pressure. We obtain its profile, both inside and outside the fast magnetosonic critical point, when the poloidal magnetic field is radial and monopolar. Most of the energy flux is carried by the radiation field and the toroidal magnetic field that is wound up close to the rapidly rotating engine. Although the entrained matter carries little energy, it couples the radiation field to the magnetic field. Then the fast critical point is pulled inward from infinity and, above a critical radiation intensity, the outflow is accelerated mainly by radiation pressure. We identify a distinct observational signature of this hybrid outflow: a hardening of the radiation spectrum above the peak of the seed photon distribution, driven by bulk Compton scattering. The non-thermal spectrum—obtained by a Monte Carlo method—is most extended when the Lorentz force dominates the acceleration, and the seed photon beam is wider than the Lorentz cone of the MHD fluid. This effect is a generic feature of hot, magnetized outflows interacting with slower relativistic material. It may explain why some GRB spectra appear to peak at photon energies above the original Amati et al. scaling. A companion paper addresses the case of jet breakout, where diverging magnetic flux surfaces yield strong MHD acceleration over a wider range of Lorentz factor.

  16. Simulation of California's Major Reservoirs Outflow Using Data Mining Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    The reservoir's outflow is controlled by reservoir operators, which is different from the upstream inflow. The outflow is more important than the reservoir's inflow for the downstream water users. In order to simulate the complicated reservoir operation and extract the outflow decision making patterns for California's 12 major reservoirs, we build a data-driven, computer-based ("artificial intelligent") reservoir decision making tool, using decision regression and classification tree approach. This is a well-developed statistical and graphical modeling methodology in the field of data mining. A shuffled cross validation approach is also employed to extract the outflow decision making patterns and rules based on the selected decision variables (inflow amount, precipitation, timing, water type year etc.). To show the accuracy of the model, a verification study is carried out comparing the model-generated outflow decisions ("artificial intelligent" decisions) with that made by reservoir operators (human decisions). The simulation results show that the machine-generated outflow decisions are very similar to the real reservoir operators' decisions. This conclusion is based on statistical evaluations using the Nash-Sutcliffe test. The proposed model is able to detect the most influential variables and their weights when the reservoir operators make an outflow decision. While the proposed approach was firstly applied and tested on California's 12 major reservoirs, the method is universally adaptable to other reservoir systems.

  17. Stormtime Ionospheric Outflow Effects in Global Multi-Fluid MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sage, K.; Moore, T. E.; Eccles, V.; Merkin, V. G.; Welling, D. T.; Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present work detailing the effects of ionospheric outflow in the magnetosphere during the Sept 27- Oct 4, 2002 and Oct 22- Oct 29, 2002 GEM storms. The Multi-Fluid LFM global MHD code is driven by OMNI solar wind and IMF data and by outflow from the Generalized Polar Wind (GPW) model. The GPW input results in a realistic and dynamic, although not self-consistent, outflow of O+, H+, and He+ from the ionosphere. The validity of this outflow and its entry into the magnetosphere is tested through comparisons to Cluster and geosynchronous spacecraft observations. We show the access of these various populations to the magnetosphere, and we examine their effects on plasma sheet structure and storm time dynamics.

  18. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  19. The physics of galactic winds driven by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) drive fast winds in the interstellar medium of their host galaxies. It is commonly assumed that the high ambient densities and intense radiation fields in galactic nuclei imply short cooling times, thus making the outflows momentum conserving. We show that cooling of high-velocity shocked winds in AGN is in fact inefficient in a wide range of circumstances, including conditions relevant to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), resulting in energy-conserving outflows. We further show that fast energy-conserving outflows can tolerate a large amount of mixing with cooler gas before radiative losses become important. For winds with initial velocity vin ≳ 10 000 km s-1, as observed in ultraviolet and X-ray absorption, the shocked wind develops a two-temperature structure. While most of the thermal pressure support is provided by the protons, the cooling processes operate directly only on the electrons. This significantly slows down inverse Compton cooling, while free-free cooling is negligible. Slower winds with vin ˜ 1000 km s-1, such as may be driven by radiation pressure on dust, can also experience energy-conserving phases but under more restrictive conditions. During the energy-conserving phase, the momentum flux of an outflow is boosted by a factor ˜vin/2vs by work done by the hot post-shock gas, where vs is the velocity of the swept-up material. Energy-conserving outflows driven by fast AGN winds (vin ˜ 0.1c) may therefore explain the momentum fluxes Ṗ≫LAGN/c of galaxy-scale outflows recently measured in luminous quasars and ULIRGs. Shocked wind bubbles expanding normal to galactic discs may also explain the large-scale bipolar structures observed in some systems, including around the Galactic Centre, and can produce significant radio, X-ray and γ-ray emission. The analytic solutions presented here will inform implementations of AGN feedback in numerical simulations, which typically do not include all the important

  20. Nutrition and Bipolar Depression.

    PubMed

    Beyer, John L; Payne, Martha E

    2016-03-01

    As with physical conditions, bipolar disorder is likely to be impacted by diet and nutrition. Patients with bipolar disorder have been noted to have relatively unhealthy diets, which may in part be the reason they also have an elevated risk of metabolic syndrome and obesity. An improvement in the quality of the diet should improve a bipolar patient's overall health risk profile, but it may also improve their psychiatric outcomes. New insights into biological dysfunctions that may be present in bipolar disorder have presented new theoretic frameworks for understanding the relationship between diet and bipolar disorder. PMID:26876319

  1. Outflows of stars due to quasar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Nayakshin, Sergei; Sazonov, Sergey; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-05-01

    Quasar feedback outflows are commonly invoked to drive gas out of galaxies in the early gas-rich epoch to terminate growth of galaxies. Here we present simulations that show that AGN feedback may drive not only gas but also stars out of their host galaxies under certain conditions. The mechanics of this process is as follows: (1) AGN-driven outflows accelerate and compress gas filling the host galaxy; (2) the accelerated dense shells become gravitationally unstable and form stars on radial trajectories. For the spherically symmetric initial conditions explored here, the black hole needs to exceed the host's Mσ mass by a factor of a few to accelerate the shells and the new stars to escape velocities. We discuss potential implications of these effects for the host galaxies: (i) radial mixing of bulge stars with the rest of the host; (ii) contribution of quasar outflows to galactic fountains as sources of high-velocity clouds; (iii) wholesale ejection of hypervelocity stars out of their hosts, giving rise to Type II supernovae on galactic outskirts, and contributing to reionization and metal enrichment of the Universe; (iv) bulge erosion and even complete destruction in extreme cases resulting in overweight or bulgeless SMBHs.

  2. Estimation of the mass outflow rates around rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktar, Ramiz; Das, Santabrata

    We consider steady, advective, rotating, inviscid accretion disc around the spinning black holes to compute the mass outflow rate (R_{dot{m}}) defined as the ratio of mass flux of outflowing to the inflowing matter. Due to centrifugal barrier, accreting matter suffers discontinuous shock transition and because of shock compression, the post-shock matter becomes hot and denser than the pre-shock matter. We call the post-shock disc as Post Shock Corona (PSC). During accretion, a part of the inflowing matter deflects as bipolar outflows due to the presence of excess thermal gradient force at PSC. We find that R_{dot{m}}is directly correlated with the spin of the black hole (a_{k}) for the same set of inflow parameter, namely specific energy (E) and specific angular momentum (λ). We observe that the maximum outflow rate(R_{dot{m}}^{max}) weakly depends on spin (a_{k}) that lies in the range˜ 17% - 18% of the inflow rate.

  3. Effects of stellar outflows on interstellar sulfur oxide chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, W. J.; Vogel, S.; Terebey, S.; Dreher, J.; Jackson, J.; Carlstrom, J.

    1986-01-01

    Interferometer Maps with 2" to 6" resolution of a number of regions with active star formation (Orion A, W49, W51, SGRB2) show that the distribution of the molecule SO is very compact around stellar outflow sources. Both SO and SO2 were studied near three outflows, OrionA/IRc2 and two sources in W49. The two molecules have similar distributions and abundances. More than 95% of the emission comes from regions whose extents are only .05 to .2 pc., being larger around the more energetic sources. Their spectra are broad, 30 km/sec or more, suggesting that the oxide production is associated with the flows. The outflows are identified by water masers and by extended bipolar flows in SiO. Maps in other molecules, such as HCO+ and CS, which have similar collisional excitation requirements, have much greater spatial extent. Thus it appears that the SO and SO2 abundances are truly compact and are closely associated with the outflows.

  4. Accretion, winds and outflows in young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    Young stars and planetary systems form in molecular clouds. After the initial radial infall an accretion disk develops. For classical T Tauri stars (CTTS, F-K type precursors) the accretion disk does not reach down to the central star, but it is truncated near the co-rotation radius by the stellar magnetic field. The inner edge of the disk is ionized by the stellar radiation, so that the accretion stream is funneled along the magnetic field lines. On the stellar surface an accretion shock develops, which is observed over a wide wavelength range as X-ray emission, UV excess, optical veiling and optical and IR emission lines. Some of the accretion tracers, e.g. Hα, can be calibrated to measure the accretion rate. This accretion process is variable on time scales of hours to years due to changing accretion rates, stellar rotation and reconfiguration of the magnetic field. Furthermore, many (if not all) accreting systems also drive strong outflows which are ultimately powered by accretion. However, the exact driving mechanism is still unclear. Several components could contribute to the outflows: slow, wide-angle disk winds, X-winds launched close to the inner disk rim, and thermally driven stellar winds. In any case, the outflows contain material of very different temperatures and speeds. The disk wind is cool and can have a molecular component with just a few tens of km s-1, while the central component of the outflow can reach a few 100 km s-1. In some cases the inner part of the outflow is collimated to a small-angle jet. These jets have an onion-like structure, where the inner components are consecutively hotter and faster. The jets can contain working surfaces, which show up as Herbig-Haro knots. Accretion and outflows in the CTTS phase do not only determine stellar parameters like the rotation rate on the main-sequence, they also can have a profound impact on the environment of young stars. This review concentrates on CTTS in near-by star forming regions where

  5. High Velocity Outflows in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Fred; Rodriguez Hidalgo, Paola; Nestor, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    High velocity (HV) outflows are important components of SMBH growth and evolution. The ability of SMBHs to accrete matter and light up as AGN probably requires that outflows are present to carry away angular momentum. Outflows during the luminous AGN phase might also play a critical role in ``unveiling" young dust-enshrouded AGN and in ``polluting" the intergalactic medium with metals at high redshifts. Nonetheless, AGN outflows remain poorly understood. We have begun a program to study a nearly unexplored realm of AGN outflow parameter space: HV winds with v> 10,000 km/s up to v~ 0.2c but small velocity dispersions (narrow absorption lines), such that v/(Delta) v ≫ 1. These extreme outflows have been detected so far in just a few quasars, but they might be ubiquitous if, as expected, the flows subtend a small solid angle as seen from the central engine. Narrow-line HV flows merit specific attention because they pose unique challenges for theoretical models of the wind acceleration, mass loss rates, launch radii, etc. They might also comprise a significant fraction of absorbers previously attributed to unrelated (interveinng) gas or galaxies. We have compiled a list of bright quasars with candidate HV outflow lines (CIV 1550 A) in existing SDSS spectra. We now propose to observe ~50 of these candidates with the 2.1m GoldCam to i) identify/confirm some of the true outflow systems (based on line variability), ii) place a firm lower limit on the fraction of quasars with narrow-line HV outflows, iii) compile a short list of confirmed HV outflow sources for future study, and iv) use the combined SDSS and GoldCam data to measure or constrain basic outflow properties, such as the kinematics, locations, and physical conditions.

  6. The Implications of Extreme Outflows from Extreme Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-05-01

    Interstellar ultraviolet absorption lines provide crucial information about the properties of galactic outflows. In this paper, we augment our previous analysis of the systematic properties of starburst-driven galactic outflows by expanding our sample to include a rare population of starbursts with exceptionally high outflow velocities. In principle, these could be a qualitatively different phenomenon from more typical outflows. However, we find that instead these starbursts lie on, or along the extrapolation of, the trends defined by the more typical systems studied previously by us. We exploit the wide dynamic range provided by this new sample to determine scaling relations of outflow velocity with galaxy stellar mass (M *), circular velocity, star formation rate (SFR), SFR/M *, and SFR/area. We argue that these results can be accommodated within the general interpretational framework we previously advocated, in which a population of ambient interstellar or circumgalactic clouds is accelerated by the combined forces of gravity and the momentum flux from the starburst. We show that this simple physical picture is consistent with both the strong cosmological evolution of galactic outflows in typical star-forming galaxies and the paucity of such galaxies with spectra showing inflows. We also present simple parameterizations of these results that can be implemented in theoretical models and numerical simulations of galaxy evolution.

  7. On the physical origin of AGN outflow driving mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Wako

    2016-07-01

    Super-massive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) respond to the accretion process by feeding back energy and momentum into the surrounding environment. Galaxy-scale outflows are thought to provide the physical link connecting the small scales of the central black hole to the large scales of the host galaxy. Such powerful outflows are now starting to be commonly observed, and have been considered as a proof of AGN feedback in action. However, the physical origin of the mechanism driving the observed outflows is still unclear, and whether it is due to energy-driving or radiation-driving is a source of much debate in the literature. We consider AGN feedback driven by radiation pressure on dust, and show that AGN radiative feedback is capable of driving powerful outflows on galactic scales. In particular, we can obtain outflowing shells with high velocity and large momentum flux, by properly taking into account the effects of radiation trapping. Alternatively, the observed outflow characteristics may be significantly biased by AGN variability. I will discuss the resulting implications in the global context of black hole accretion-AGN feedback coupling.

  8. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  9. Zephyria Outflow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    1 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows streamlined islands and a small cataract in an outflow channel system in the Zephyria region of Mars, south of Cerberus. The fluids responsible for creating these landforms flowed from the lower left (southwest) toward upper right (northeast). The fluids may have been water and mud or, some Mars scientists have argued, extremely fluid lava. The presence of a small cataract probably argues more strongly for a water and mud origin. This image is located near 3.8oN, 204.7oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from upper left.

  10. Driving Mechanisms for Molecular Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Turlough P.

    Molecular outflows are observed to be closely associated with star formation. The cumulative momentum and the momentum injection rate in these outflows are important parameters in theories of star formation. The cumulative momentum in an outflow is a measure of the feed-back from star formation on molecular cloud turbulence. The level of turbulence in a cloud also effects the formation of further stars and, indeed, the survival of the cloud itself (e.g. [15]). In addition the rate of injection of momentum is an important constraint for theoretical models of outflows from young stars [10, 18]. Hence, while these outflows are interesting in themselves, it is also critical to understand their origin and behaviour as part of the general study of how stars themselves form.

  11. Quasars Outflows As A Function of SED - An Empirical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph M.; Ganguly, Rajib

    2015-08-01

    Feedback from quasars (jets, outflows, and luminosity) is now recognized as a vital phase in describing galaxy evolution, growth, and star formation efficiency. Regarding outflows, roughly 60% are observed to have outflowing gas appearing at large velocities and with a variety of velocity dispersions. The most extreme observed form of these outflows appears in the ultraviolet spectrum of 15-20% of objects. Understanding the physics of these outflows is important for both astrophysical and cosmological reasons. Establishing empirical relationships to test the theoretical models of how these outflows are driven (and hence, how they impact their surroundings) is currently plagued by having too few objects, where other parameters like the black hole mass or accretion rate, may add to the scatter. We aim to fix this by using a systematic study of a large sample of objects. As a follow up to a previous study, we have identified a sample of nearly 11000 z=1.7-2 quasars using archived data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 7), of which roughly 4400 appear to show outflows according to the visual inspection. The specific redshift range is chosen to feature both the Mg II 2800 emission line as well as wavelengths extending to nearly 20,000 km/s blueward of the C IV 1549 emission line. Our goals for this study are: (1) To temper our visual inspection schemes with a more automated, computer-driven scheme; (2) To measure the properties of the outflows (velocity, velocity dispersion, equivalent width, ionization); (3) To supplement the SDSS spectra with photometric measurements from GALEX, 2MASS, and WISE to further characterize the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and dust content; (4) To form spectral composites to investigate possible SED changes with outflow properties; and (5) To use published estimates of the quasar physical properties (black hole mass, accretion rate, etc.) to fully establish in an empirical way the complex dependencies between the

  12. The dependence of galactic outflows on the properties and orientation of zCOSMOS galaxies at z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Hardmeier, E.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Fevre, O. Le; Garilli, B.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; De la Torre, S.; De Ravel, L.; Iovino, A.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present an analysis of cool outflowing gas around galaxies, traced by Mg II absorption lines in the coadded spectra of a sample of 486 zCOSMOS galaxies at 1 ≤ z ≤ 1.5. These galaxies span a range of stellar masses (9.45 ≤ log{sub 10}[M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}] ≤ 10.7) and star formation rates (0.14 ≤ log{sub 10}[SFR/M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}] ≤ 2.35). We identify the cool outflowing component in the Mg II absorption and find that the equivalent width of the outflowing component increases with stellar mass. The outflow equivalent width also increases steadily with the increasing star formation rate of the galaxies. At similar stellar masses, the blue galaxies exhibit a significantly higher outflow equivalent width as compared to red galaxies. The outflow equivalent width shows strong correlation with the star formation surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) of the sample. For the disk galaxies, the outflow equivalent width is higher for the face-on systems as compared to the edge-on ones, indicating that for the disk galaxies, the outflowing gas is primarily bipolar in geometry. Galaxies typically exhibit outflow velocities ranging from –150 km s{sup –1} ∼–200 km s{sup –1} and, on average, the face-on galaxies exhibit higher outflow velocity as compared to the edge-on ones. Galaxies with irregular morphologies exhibit outflow equivalent width as well as outflow velocities comparable to face on disk galaxies. These galaxies exhibit mass outflow rates >5-7 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and a mass loading factor (η = M-dot {sub out}/SFR) comparable to the star formation rates of the galaxies.

  13. Treatment of bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Musetti, Laura; Del Grande, Claudia; Marazziti, Donatella; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2013-08-01

    Depressive symptoms and episodes dominate the long-term course of bipolar disorder and are associated with high levels of disability and an increased risk of suicide. However, the treatment of bipolar depression has been poorly investigated in comparison with that of manic episodes and unipolar major depressive disorder. The goal of treatment in bipolar depression is not only to achieve full remission of acute symptoms, but also to avoid long-term mood destabilization and to prevent relapses. A depressive presentation of bipolar disorder may often delay the appropriate management and, thus, worsen the long-term outcome. In these cases, an accurate screening for diagnostic indicators of a possible bipolar course of the illness should guide the therapeutic choices, and lead to prognostic improvement. Antidepressant use is still the most controversial issue in the treatment of bipolar depression. Despite inconclusive evidence of efficacy and tolerability, this class of agents is commonly prescribed in acute and long-term treatment, often in combination with mood stabilizers. In this article, we review available treatment options for bipolar depression, and we shall provide some suggestions for the management of the different presentations of depression in the course of bipolar disorder. PMID:23391164

  14. Auroral arcs and ion outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiolo, Romain

    2016-04-01

    This presentation provides an overwiew of the chapter "Auroral Arcs and Ion Outflow" from the AGU book "Auroral Dynamics and Space Weather" (eds Y. Zhang and L. J. Paxton). This topic covers a wide range of domains, from auroral acceleration processes, auroral arc morphology and dynamics to global magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and atmospheric erosion. This presentation mainly focuses on the observational properties of auroral ion outflow. Recent observations about their large-scale spatial distribution and link with auroral forms will be presented. Auroral ion outflow statistical dependence on solar and geomagnetic activity and its modulation by auroral dynamics at the timescale of substorms will also be discussed.

  15. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, C.; Maiolino, R.; Piconcelli, E.; Menci, N.; Aussel, H.; Lamastra, A.; Fiore, F.

    2010-07-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution young star-forming galaxies transform into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched. To explain this transformation, a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole is often invoked. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead the black hole to “suicide” by starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, because outflows previously observed in quasars are generally associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occurrs in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdB Interferometer to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. Thanks to the wide band we detected broad wings of the CO line, with velocities of up to 750 km s-1 and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. These broad CO wings trace a giant molecular outflow of about 700 M_⊙/year, far larger than the ongoing star-formation rate (~200 M_⊙/year) observed in the host galaxy. This wind will totally expel the cold gas reservoir in Mrk 231 in about 107 yrs, therefore halting the star-formation activity on the same timescale. The inferred kinetic energy in the molecular outflow is ~1.2 × 1044 erg/s, corresponding to a few percent of the AGN bolometric luminosity, which is very close to the fraction expected by models ascribing quasar feedback to highly supersonic shocks generated by radiatively accelerated nuclear winds. Instead, the contribution by the SNe associated with the starburst fall short by several orders of magnitude to account for the kinetic energy observed in the outflow. The direct observational evidence for quasar feedback reported here provides solid support to the scenarios ascribing the observed properties of local massive

  16. Insight in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Látalová, Klára

    2012-09-01

    Although there has been interest in insight in bipolar disorder, research has not been as developed as in schizophrenia. The Medline, Embase, and PsychInfo data bases were searched. The key words used in the search were "bipolar", "mania", "manic", "awareness", and "insight". Books, editorials, letters, and reports on pediatric subjects were excluded. Abstracts or full texts were screened for relevance. Better insight is associated with better adherence to treatment and better outcomes. Impairments of executive functions and memory, as well as higher severity of psychotic symptoms, are associated with impairments of insight. Insight is more impaired during an illness episode than during remission, in mixed than in pure manic episodes, in bipolar II than in bipolar I patients, in pure mania than in bipolar or unipolar depression. Psychosocial treatments improve insight and outcomes. There is a need for integration of quantitative assessment methods and their introduction into research and clinical practice. PMID:22101737

  17. Kinematics of the Envelope and Two Bipolar Jets in the Class 0 Protostellar System L1157

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woojin; Fernández-López, Manuel; Stephens, Ian W.; Looney, Leslie W.

    2015-11-01

    A massive envelope and a strong bipolar outflow are the two main structures characterizing the youngest protostellar systems. In order to understand the physical properties of a bipolar outflow and the relationship with those of the envelope, we obtained a mosaic map covering the whole bipolar outflow of the youngest protostellar system L1157 with about 5″ angular resolution in CO J = 2-1 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. By utilizing these observations of the whole bipolar outflow, we estimate its physical properties and show that they are consistent with multiple jets. We also constrain a preferred precession direction. In addition, we observed the central envelope structure with 2″ resolution in the λ =1.3 and 3 mm continua and various molecular lines: C17O, C18O, 13CO, CS, CN, N2H+, CH3OH, H2O, SO, and SO2. All of the CO isotopes and CS, CN, and N2H+ have been detected and imaged. We marginally detected the features that can be interpreted as a rotating inner envelope in C17O and C18O and as an infalling outer envelope in N2H+. We also estimated the envelope and central protostellar masses and found that the dust-opacity spectral index changes with radius.

  18. Dominant Nuclear Outflow Driving Mechanisms in Powerful Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batcheldor, Dan; Tadhunter, Clive; Holt, Joanna; Morganti, Raffaella; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Axon, David J.; Koekemoer, Anton

    2007-05-01

    In order to identify the dominant nuclear outflow mechanisms in active galactic nuclei, we have undertaken deep, high-resolution observations of two compact radio sources (PKS 1549-79 and PKS 1345+12) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Not only are these targets known to have powerful emission-line outflows, but they also contain all the potential drivers for the outflows: relativistic jets, quasar nuclei, and starbursts. ACS allows the compact nature (<0.15") of these radio sources to be optically resolved for the first time. Through comparison with existing radio maps, we have seen consistency in the nuclear position angles of both the optical emission-line and radio data. There is no evidence for biconical emission-line features on the large scale, and there is a divergence in the relative position angles of the optical and radio structure. This enables us to exclude starburst-driven outflows. However, we are unable to clearly distinguish between radiative AGN wind-driven outflows and outflows powered by relativistic radio jets. The small-scale biconical features, indicative of such mechanisms, could be below the resolution limit of ACS, especially if aligned close to the line of sight. In addition, there may be offsets between the radio and optical nuclei induced by heavy dust obscuration, nebular continuum, or scattered light from the AGN. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 10206.

  19. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005). Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered. PMID:24800202

  20. Shining a light on galactic outflows: photoionized outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti, Christy A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei; Wofford, Aida

    2016-04-01

    We study the ionization structure of galactic outflows in 37 nearby, star-forming galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the O I, Si II, Si III, and Si IV ultraviolet absorption lines to characterize the different ionization states of outflowing gas. We measure the equivalent widths, line widths, and outflow velocities of the four transitions, and find shallow scaling relations between them and galactic stellar mass and star formation rate. Regardless of the ionization potential, lines of similar strength have similar velocities and line widths, indicating that the four transitions can be modelled as a comoving phase. The Si equivalent width ratios (e.g. Si IV/Si II) have low dispersion, and little variation with stellar mass; while ratios with O I and Si vary by a factor of 2 for a given stellar mass. Photoionization models reproduce these equivalent width ratios, while shock models under predict the relative amount of high ionization gas. The photoionization models constrain the ionization parameter (U) between -2.25 < log (U) < -1.5, and require that the outflow metallicities are greater than 0.5 Z⊙. We derive ionization fractions for the transitions, and show that the range of ionization parameters and stellar metallicities leads to a factor of 1.15-10 variation in the ionization fractions. Historically, mass outflow rates are calculated by converting a column density measurement from a single metal ion into a total hydrogen column density using an ionization fraction, thus mass outflow rates are sensitive to the assumed ionization structure of the outflow.

  1. Plasma outflows at the border of active regions and the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, F. A.; Mandrini, C. H.; Vásquez, A. M.; Deumoulin, P.; Van Driel-Gesztely, L.; Baker, D.; Cristiani, G. D.; Pick, M.; Culhane, J. L.

    We present a detailed topological analysis of active region (AR) 10978; based on a Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model. AR 10978 is a standard bipolar region which appears fully covered by the magnetic field lines of a coronal streamer. Despite this simple magnetic configuration; our analysis shows that it is possible for the AR plasma; contained in the outflows observed at the AR borders; to be released into the solar wind via magnetic reconnection.

  2. Evidence for Collimated Outflow from Sgr A*?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Arendt, R.; Bushouse, H.; Cotton, W.; Haggard, D.; Heinke, C.; Roberts, D. A.; Royster, M.; Wardle, M.

    2012-05-01

    The compact radio source Sgr A* is considered to be coincident with a 4 million solar mass black hole at the dynamical center of the Galaxy. There has been a considerable debate as to whether the jet or the accretion flow model can explain the broad band spectrum of the emission. Here, we present high resolution radio, X-ray continuum and FeII line images showing new structural details within the inner arcminute (2.4pc) of Sgr A*. On a small scale, we find a chain of radio blobs which appear to be emanating from Sgr A*. These blobs are detected beyond the inner 1" of Sgr A* and are distributed along a continuous linear feature that is tilted by 28 degrees with respect to the Galactic plane. In linear polarization images at 3.6cm, three blobs of emission have been detected symmetrically about 1' from Sgr A*. The morphology and polarization of the linear feature suggest a jet outflow from Sgr A*, punching through the orbiting ionized gas and producing X-ray emission as well as a hot bubble of FeIII/FeII line emission. On a scale of about 15pc, we also note a collection of large-scale radio and X-ray "streamers" in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This complex structure consists of nonthermal and thermal continuum features as well as molecular clouds traced at infrared wavelengths. The base of the outflowing gas appears to be confined by the 2-pc molecular ring, within which a cluster of massive stars lie. These features suggest star-burst driven outflow may be responsible for this energetic activity.

  3. Bipolar fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    McElroy, James F.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses an improved fuel cell utilizing an ion transporting membrane having a catalytic anode and a catalytic cathode bonded to opposite sides of the membrane, a wet-proofed carbon sheet in contact with the cathode surface opposite that bonded to the membrane and a bipolar separator positioned in electrical contact with the carbon sheet and the anode of the adjacent fuel cell. Said bipolar separator and carbon sheet forming an oxidant flowpath, wherein the improvement comprises an electrically conductive screen between and in contact with the wet-proofed carbon sheet and the bipolar separator improving the product water removal system of the fuel cell.

  4. Mediterranean outflow mixing and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Price, J F; Baringer, M O; Lueck, R G; Johnson, G C; Ambar, I; Parrilla, G; Cantos, A; Kennelly, M A; Sanford, T B

    1993-02-26

    The Mediterranean Sea produces a salty, dense outflow that is strongly modified by entrainment as it first begins to descend the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz. The current accelerates to 1.3 meters per second, which raises the internal Froude number above 1, and is intensely turbulent through its full thickness. The outflow loses about half of its density anomaly and roughly doubles its volume transport as it entrains less saline North Atlantic Central water. Within 100 kilometers downstream, the current is turned by the Coriolis force until it flows nearly parallel to topography in a damped geostrophic balance. The mixed Mediterranean outflow continues westward, slowly descending the continental slope until it becomes neutrally buoyant in the thermocline where it becomes an important water mass. PMID:17732247

  5. Mediterranean Outflow Mixing and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, James F.; O'Neil Baringer, Molly; Lueck, Rolf G.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Ambar, Isabel; Parrilla, Gregorio; Cantos, Alain; Kennelly, Maureen A.; Sanford, Thomas B.

    1993-02-01

    The Mediterranean Sea produces a salty, dense outflow that is strongly modified by entrainment as it first begins to descend the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz. The current accelerates to 1.3 meters per second, which raises the internal Froude number above 1, and is intensely turbulent through its full thickness. The outflow loses about half of its density anomaly and roughly doubles its volume transport as it entrains less saline North Atlantic Central water. Within 100 kilometers downstream, the current is turned by the Coriolis force until it flows nearly parallel to topography in a damped geostrophic balance. The mixed Mediterranean outflow continues westward, slowly descending the continental slope until it becomes neutrally buoyant in the thermocline where it becomes an important water mass.

  6. The Role of Cosmic-Ray Pressure in Accelerating Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-08-01

    We study the formation of galactic outflows from supernova (SN) explosions with the moving-mesh code AREPO in a stratified column of gas with a surface density similar to the Milky Way disk at the solar circle. We compare different simulation models for SN placement and energy feedback, including cosmic rays (CRs), and find that models that place SNe in dense gas and account for CR diffusion are able to drive outflows with similar mass loading as obtained from a random placement of SNe with no CRs. Despite this similarity, CR-driven outflows differ in several other key properties including their overall clumpiness and velocity. Moreover, the forces driving these outflows originate in different sources of pressure, with the CR diffusion model relying on non-thermal pressure gradients to create an outflow driven by internal pressure and the random-placement model depending on kinetic pressure gradients to propel a ballistic outflow. CRs therefore appear to be non-negligible physics in the formation of outflows from the interstellar medium.

  7. The collimated outflows of the planetary nebula Hu 1-2: proper motion and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, L. F.; Blanco, M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Riera, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hu 1-2 is a planetary nebula that contains an isolated knot located north-west of the main nebula, which could be related to a collimated outflow. We present a subarcsecond Hα+[N II] image and a high-resolution, long-slit spectrum of Hu 1-2 that allow us to identify the south-eastern counterpart of the north-western knot and to establish their high-velocity (>340 km s-1), collimated bipolar outflow nature. The detection of the north-western knot in Palomar Observatory Sky Atlas (POSS) red plates allows us to carry out a proper motion analysis by combining three POSS red plates and two narrow-band Hα+[N II] CCD images, with a time baseline of ≃57 yr. A proper motion of 20 ± 6 mas yr-1 along position angle 312°± 15° and a dynamical age of 1375? yr are obtained for the bipolar outflow. The measured proper motion and the spatio-kinematical properties of the bipolar outflow yield a lower limit of 2.7 kpc for the distance to Hu 1-2. The Andalucia Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (ALFOSC) is provided by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA) under a joint agreement with the University of Copenhagen and NOTSA. The IACUB uncrossed echelle spectrograph was built in a collaboration between the IAC and the Queen's University of Belfast.

  8. Formation of Hydrocarbons in the Outflows from Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne; Kress, Monika; Tielens, Alexander G.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of hydrocarbons in the oxygen-rich outflows from red giants was studied. The existence of organic molecules in such outflows has been known for several years; however, their surprisingly high abundances has been a mystery since all of the carbon had been thought to be irretrievably locked up in CO, the most strongly bound molecule. CO is the first molecule to form from the atoms present in the star's extended atmosphere, and as strong stellar winds drive a cooling outflow, dust grains condense out. In oxygen-rich outflows, the dust is thought to be composed mainly of silicates and other metal oxides. Perhaps the noble metals can condense out in metallic form, in particular the relatively abundant transition metals iron and nickel. We proposed that perhaps the carbon reservoir held as CO can be accessed through a catalytic process involving the chemisorption of CO and H2 onto grains rich in metallic iron. CO and H2 are the two most abundant molecules in circumstellar outflows, and they both are known to dissociate on transition metal surfaces at elevated temperatures, freeing carbon to form organic molecules such as methane. We believe methane is a precursor molecule to the organics observed in oxygen-rich red giants. We have developed a nonequilibrium numerical model of a surface chemical (catalytic) process. Based on this model, we believe that methane can be formed under the conditions present in circumstellar outflows. Although the methane formation rates are exceptionally low under these conditions, over dynamical timescales, a significant amount of CO can be converted to methane and driven further out in the envelope, explaining the presence of organics there.

  9. Mass Outflows from Dissipative Shocks in Hot Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-11-01

    We consider stationary, axisymmetric hydrodynamic accretion flows in Kerr geometry. As a plausible means of efficiently separating a small population of nonthermal particles from the bulk accretion flows, we investigate the formation of standing dissipative shocks, i.e., shocks at which fraction of the energy, angular momentum, and mass fluxes do not participate in the shock transition of the flow that accretes onto the compact object but are lost into collimated (jets) or uncollimated (winds) outflows. The mass-loss fraction (at a shock front) is found to vary over a wide range (0%-95%), depending on flow's angular momentum and energy. On the other hand, the associated energy-loss fraction appears to be relatively low (<~1%) for a flow onto a nonrotating black hole case, whereas the fraction could be an order of magnitude higher (<~10%) for a flow onto a rapidly rotating black hole. By estimating the escape velocity of the outflowing particles with a mass-accretion rate relevant for typical active galactic nuclei, we find that nearly 10% of the accreting mass could escape to form an outflow in a disk around a nonrotating black hole, while as much as 50% of the matter may contribute to outflows in a disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. In the context of disk-jet paradigm, our model suggests that shock-driven outflows from accretion can occur in regions not too far from a central engine. Our results imply that a shock front under some conditions could serve as a plausible site where (nonthermal) seed particles of the outflows (jets/winds) are efficiently decoupled from bulk accretion.

  10. Mass Outflows from Dissipative Shocks in Hot Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.

    2007-05-01

    We consider stationary, axisymmetric hydrodynamic accretion flows in Kerr geometry. As a plausible means of efficiently separating small population of nonthermal particles from the bulk accretion flows, we investigate the formation of dissipative standing shocks where energy, angular momentum and mass are partially lost into collimated (jets) or uncollimated (winds) outflows subsequently. Mass loss fraction (at a shock front) is found to vary over a wide range (0% - 95%) depending on flow's angular momentum and energy. On the other hand, energy loss fraction appears to be relatively low (<1%) for a non-rotating black hole case, whereas the fraction could be an order of magnitude higher (<10%) for a rapidly-rotating black hole case. By estimating the escape velocity of the outflowing particles, we find that nearly 10% of the accreting mass (decoupled from the bulk accretion flows) could participate in forming the outflows around a non-rotating black hole, while as much as 50% of the matter may contribute to the outflows around a rapidly-rotating black hole. In the context of disk-jet paradigm, our model suggests that shock-driven outflows from accretion can occur in regions not too far from a central engine (within 2-40 gravitational radii), as observed in some active galaxies (e.g., M87 and 3C120). Slope of radial density profile for upstream flows is found to be -3/2 as in advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) solution while that for downstream flows is as steep as -5/2. Our results imply that a shock front under some conditions could serve as a plausible site where seed particles of the outflows (jets/winds) are efficiently decoupled from bulk accretion.

  11. Exploring the engines of molecular outflows. Radio continuum and H_2_O maser observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofani, G.; Felli, M.; Taylor, G. B.; Hunter, T. R.

    1995-09-01

    We present A-configuration VLA observations of the 22GHz H_2_O maser line and 8.4GHz continuum emission of 22 selected CO bipolar outflows associated with water masers. These observations allow us to study the region within 10^4^AU of the engine powering the outflow. The positions of the maser spots are compared with those of ultra-compact (UC) continuum sources found in our observations, with IRAS data and with data from the literature on the molecular outflows. Weak unresolved continuum sources are found in several cases associated with the maser. Most probably they represent the ionized envelope surrounding the young stellar object (YSO) which powers the maser and the outflow. These weak radio continuum sources are not necessarily associated with the IRAS sources, which are more representative of the global emission from the star forming region. A comparison of the velocity pattern of the CO outflow with those of the maser spots detected with the VLA is also made. Asymmetries in the H_2_O velocities are found on opposite sides of the YSO, suggesting that the outflow acceleration begins from the YSO itself. In a few cases we find evidence for two outflows in different evolutionary stages. The H_2_O masers in these sources are always found at the centre of the younger outflow. The degree of variability of each maser is derived from single dish observations obtained with the Medicina radiotelescope before and after the VLA observations. Velocity drifts of some features are interpreted as acceleration of the maser.

  12. MASSIVE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AND NEGATIVE FEEDBACK IN ULIRGs OBSERVED BY HERSCHEL-PACS

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, E.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Contursi, A.; Poglitsch, A.; Davies, R.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; De Jong, J. A.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E.; Veilleux, S.; Fischer, J.; Sternberg, A.; Verma, A.; Maiolino, R.

    2011-05-20

    Mass outflows driven by stars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are a key element in many current models of galaxy evolution. They may produce the observed black-hole-galaxy mass relation and regulate and quench both star formation in the host galaxy and black hole accretion. However, observational evidence of such feedback processes through outflows of the bulk of the star-forming molecular gas is still scarce. Here we report the detection of massive molecular outflows, traced by the hydroxyl molecule (OH), in far-infrared spectra of ULIRGs obtained with Herschel-PACS as part of the SHINING key project. In some of these objects the (terminal) outflow velocities exceed 1000 km s{sup -1}, and their outflow rates (up to {approx}1200 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) are several times larger than their star formation rates. We compare the outflow signatures in different types of ULIRGs and in starburst galaxies to address the issue of the energy source (AGN or starburst) of these outflows. We report preliminary evidence that ULIRGs with a higher AGN luminosity (and higher AGN contribution to L{sub IR}) have higher terminal velocities and shorter gas depletion timescales. The outflows in the observed ULIRGs are able to expel the cold gas reservoirs from the centers of these objects within {approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} years.

  13. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... events Visit the podcast archive Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/Disorders Related ... for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies ...

  14. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Engmann, Birk

    2012-01-01

    This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet. PMID:22649454

  15. Lightweight bipolar storage battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus [10] is disclosed for a lightweight bipolar battery of the end-plate cell stack design. Current flow through a bipolar cell stack [12] is collected by a pair of copper end-plates [16a,16b] and transferred edgewise out of the battery by a pair of lightweight, low resistance copper terminals [28a,28b]. The copper terminals parallel the surface of a corresponding copper end-plate [16a,16b] to maximize battery throughput. The bipolar cell stack [12], copper end-plates [16a,16b] and copper terminals [28a,28b] are rigidly sandwiched between a pair of nonconductive rigid end-plates [20] having a lightweight fiber honeycomb core which eliminates distortion of individual plates within the bipolar cell stack due to internal pressures. Insulating foam [30] is injected into the fiber honeycomb core to reduce heat transfer into and out of the bipolar cell stack and to maintain uniform cell performance. A sealed battery enclosure [ 22] exposes a pair of terminal ends [26a,26b] for connection with an external circuit.

  16. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  17. XMM Observations of Two Quadrupolar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    X-ray images of two small dark clouds, L1455 and L723, have been obtained with the EPIC cameras on board the XMM-Newton telescope. Both regions contain multiple independent but overlapping bipolar flows in high-velocity CO, a collection of Herbig-Haro objects, and a number of filaments and knots of H2 emission. The field of view in each cloud was centered on the confluence of the nearly orthogonal CO flows. More than three dozen compact X-ray sources were detected. However, the Class 0/I protostars thought to be the driving sources of the flows in both clouds were not detected. Strong emission was observed from RNO 15, an optically visible, nebulous T Tauri star in the dense core of L1455. A thermal plasma model for the X-ray spectrum of RNO 15 gave a luminosity of L X ~ 1031.2 erg s-1. The heavily reddened Class II star L1455 IRS 5 in the same region was detected as a weak X-ray source. No emission was detected from IRS 1 or IRS 4, which have been suggested as the launch sites for separate outflows in L1455. X-ray emission was observed from IRAS 19156+1906 in L723. The thermal radio source VLA 2, which is offset ~10'' east of the IRAS position and is considered the most likely energy source for the strong east-west flow in L723, was not detected. The source of the more narrowly collimated north-south flow in L723 is unknown but may be an embedded infrared object at the X-ray and IRAS position.

  18. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  19. Hot outflows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analysed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the `iron radius') and jet power is found with the form R_Fe ∝ P_jet^{0.45}. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed 100 M⊙ yr- 1 in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10-20 per cent of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at regulating star formation and AGN activity in BCGs and presumably in giant elliptical galaxies. The metallicity distribution overall can be complex, perhaps due to metal-rich gas returning in circulation flows or being blown around in the hot atmospheres. Roughly 15 per cent of the work done by the cavities is expended lifting the metal-enriched gas, implying their nuclear black holes have increased in mass by at least ˜107-109 M⊙. Finally, we show that hot outflows can account for the broad, gas-phase metallicity distribution compared to the stellar light profiles of BCGs, and we consider a possible connection between hot outflows and cold molecular gas flows discovered in recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations.

  20. Bipolar battery construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor); Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A lightweight, bipolar battery construction for lead acid batteries in which a plurality of thin, rigid, biplates each comprise a graphite fiber thermoplastic composition in conductive relation to lead stripes plated on opposite flat surfaces of the plates, and wherein a plurality of nonconductive thermoplastic separator plates support resilient yieldable porous glass mats in which active material is carried, the biplates and separator plates with active material being contained and maintained in stacked assembly by axial compression of the stacked assembly. A method of assembling such a bipolar battery construction.

  1. Disentangling the outflow and protostars in HH 900 in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Kiminki, Megan M.; Bally, John; Anderson, Jay

    2015-04-01

    HH 900 is a peculiar protostellar outflow emerging from a small, tadpole-shaped globule in the Carina Nebula. Previous Hα imaging with Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys showed an ionized outflow with a wide opening angle that is distinct from the highly collimated structures typically seen in protostellar jets. We present new narrowband near-IR [Fe II] images taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the HST that reveal a remarkably different structure than Hα. In contrast to the unusual broad Hα outflow, the [Fe II] emission traces a symmetric, collimated bipolar jet with the morphology and kinematics that are more typical of protostellar jets. In addition, new Gemini adaptive optics images reveal near-IR H2 emission coincident with the Hα emission, but not the [Fe II]. Spectra of these three components trace three separate and distinct velocity components: (1) H2 from the slow, entrained molecular gas, (2) Hα from the ionized skin of the accelerating outflow sheath, and (3) [Fe II] from the fast, dense, and collimated protostellar jet itself. Together, these data require a driving source inside the dark globule that remains undetected behind a large column density of material. In contrast, Hα and H2 emission trace the broad outflow of material entrained by the jet, which is irradiated outside the globule. As it get dissociated and ionized, it remains visible for only a short time after it is dragged into the H II region.

  2. Rotating molecular outflows: the young T Tauri star in CB 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launhardt, R.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Gueth, F.; Chen, X.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.; Henning, Th.; Piétu, V.; Schreyer, K.; Semenov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The disk-outflow connection is thought to play a key role in extracting excess angular momentum from a forming proto-star. Although jet rotation has been observed in a few objects, no rotation of molecular outflows has been unambiguously reported so far. Aims: We report new millimeter-interferometric observations of the edge-on T Tauri star - disk system in the isolated Bok globule CB 26. The aim of these observations was to study the disk-outflow relation in this 1 Myr old low-mass young stellar object. Methods: The IRAM PdBI array was used to observe 12CO(2-1) at 1.3 mm in two configurations, resulting in spectral line maps with 1.5´´ resolution. We use an empirical parameterized steady-state outflow model combined with 2-D line radiative transfer calculations and χ^2-minimization in parameter space to derive a best-fit model and constrain parameters of the outflow. Results: The data reveal a previously undiscovered collimated bipolar molecular outflow of total length ≈2000 AU, escaping perpendicular to the plane of the disk. We find peculiar kinematic signatures that suggest that the outflow is rotating with the same orientation as the disk. However, we could not ultimately exclude jet precession or two misaligned flows as possible origins of the observed peculiar velocity field. There is indirect indication that the embedded driving source is a binary system, which, together with the youth of the source, could provide a clue to the observed kinematic features of the outflow. Conclusions: CB 26 is so far the most promising source in which to study the rotation of a molecular outflow. Assuming that the outflow is rotating, we compute and compare masses, mass flux, angular momenta, and angular momentum flux of the disk and outflow and derive disk dispersal timescales of 0.5 ldots 1 Myr, comparable to the age of the system. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG

  3. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN THE OUTFLOWS ASSOCIATED WITH ACCRETION DISKS OF TYPE II COLLAPSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Indrani; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2013-11-20

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside the outflows from gamma-ray burst (GRB) accretion disks formed by the Type II collapsars. In these collapsars, massive stars undergo core collapse to form a proto-neutron star initially, and a mild supernova (SN) explosion is driven. The SN ejecta lack momentum, and subsequently this newly formed neutron star gets transformed to a stellar mass black hole via massive fallback. The hydrodynamics and the nucleosynthesis in these accretion disks have been studied extensively in the past. Several heavy elements are synthesized in the disk, and much of these heavy elements are ejected from the disk via winds and outflows. We study nucleosynthesis in the outflows launched from these disks by using an adiabatic, spherically expanding outflow model, to understand which of these elements thus synthesized in the disk survive in the outflow. While studying this, we find that many new elements like isotopes of titanium, copper, zinc, etc., are present in the outflows. {sup 56}Ni is abundantly synthesized in most of the cases in the outflow, which implies that the outflows from these disks in a majority of cases will lead to an observable SN explosion. It is mainly present when outflow is considered from the He-rich, {sup 56}Ni/{sup 54}Fe-rich zones of the disks. However, outflow from the Si-rich zone of the disk remains rich in silicon. Although emission lines of many of these heavy elements have been observed in the X-ray afterglows of several GRBs by Chandra, BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton, etc., Swift seems to have not yet detected these lines.

  4. Endophenotypes in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lenox, Robert H; Gould, Todd D; Manji, Husseini K

    2002-05-01

    The search for genes in bipolar disorder has provided numerous genetic loci that have been linked to susceptibility to developing the disorder. However, because of the genetic heterogeneity inherent in bipolar disorder, additional strategies may need to be employed to fully dissect the genetic underpinnings. One such strategy involves reducing complex behaviors into their component parts (endophenotypes). Abnormal neurophysiological, biochemical, endocrinological, neuroanatomical, cognitive, and neuropsychological findings are characteristics that often accompany psychiatric illness. It is possible that some of these may eventually be useful in subdefining complex genetic disorders, allowing for improvements in diagnostic assessment, genetic linkage studies, and development of animal models. Findings in patients with bipolar disorder that may eventually be useful as endophenotypes include abnormal regulation of circadian rhythms (the sleep/wake cycle, hormonal rhythms, etc.), response to sleep deprivation, P300 event-related potentials, behavioral responses to psychostimulants and other medications, response to cholinergics, increase in white matter hyperintensities (WHIs), and biochemical observations in peripheral mononuclear cells. Targeting circadian rhythm abnormalities may be a particularly useful strategy because circadian cycles appear to be an inherent evolutionarily conserved function in all organisms and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Furthermore, lithium has been shown to regulate circadian cycles in diverse species, including humans, possibly through inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK-3beta), a known target of lithium. PMID:11992561

  5. Incidence of galactic outflows: EAGLE simulations vs SAMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tescari, E.

    2016-06-01

    I presented the results of the joint SAMI-EAGLE project on outflows I lead at the University of Melbourne. We use the highest resolution EAGLE cosmological simulations to study the incidence of supernova driven winds ejected from galaxies on the main sequence. We produce synthetic SAMI observations of outflows that we compare directly with real data. While winds are observed in only a fraction of SAMI galaxies, they appear ubiquitous among simulated star forming objects. Moreover, the velocity dispersion distribution is only weakly dependent on stellar mass (M*) and sSFR (SFR/M*). I presented additional analyses and discuss the implications of these results and how they provide important constraints to ongoing and future IFS surveys.

  6. Bipolar polygenic loading and bipolar spectrum features in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wiste, Anna; Robinson, Elise B; Milaneschi, Yuri; Meier, Sandra; Ripke, Stephan; Clements, Caitlin C; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Rietschel, Marcella; Penninx, Brenda W; Smoller, Jordan W; Perlis, Roy H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Family and genetic studies indicate overlapping liability for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this shared genetic liability influences clinical presentation. Methods A polygenic risk score for bipolar disorder, derived from a large genome-wide association meta-analysis, was generated for each subject of European–American ancestry (n = 1,274) in the Sequential Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study (STAR*D) outpatient major depressive disorder cohort. A hypothesis-driven approach was used to test for association between bipolar disorder risk score and features of depression associated with bipolar disorder in the literature. Follow-up analyses were performed in two additional cohorts. Results A generalized linear mixed model including seven features hypothesized to be associated with bipolar spectrum illness was significantly associated with bipolar polygenic risk score [F = 2.07, degrees of freedom (df) = 7, p = 0.04). Features included early onset, suicide attempt, recurrent depression, atypical depression, subclinical mania, subclinical psychosis, and severity. Post-hoc univariate analyses demonstrated that the major contributors to this omnibus association were onset of illness at age ≤ 18 years [odds ratio (OR) = 1.2, p = 0.003], history of suicide attempt (OR = 1.21, p = 0.03), and presence of at least one manic symptom (OR = 1.16, p = 0.02). The maximal variance in these traits explained by polygenic score ranged from 0.8–1.1%. However, analyses in two replication cohorts testing a five feature model did not support this association. Conclusions Bipolar genetic loading appeared to be associated with bipolar-like presentation in major depressive disorder in the primary analysis. However, results are at most inconclusive because of lack of replication. Replication efforts are challenged by different ascertainment and assessment strategies in the different cohorts

  7. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Tortorelli, Peter F; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Vitek, John Michael; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Wilson, Mahlon; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Connors, Dan; Rakowski, Jim; Gervasio, Don

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  8. MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN THE SUBSTELLAR DOMAIN: MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG VERY LOW MASS OBJECTS IN TAURUS AND {rho} OPHIUCHI

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoc Phan-Bao; Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen E-mail: pbngoc@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2011-07-01

    We report here our search for molecular outflows from young very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in Taurus and {rho} Ophiuchi. Using the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, we have observed four targets at 1.3 mm wavelength (230 GHz) to search for CO J = 2 {yields} 1 outflows. A young very low mass star MHO 5 (in Taurus) with an estimated mass of 90 M{sub J}, which is just above the hydrogen-burning limit, shows two gas lobes that are likely outflows. While the CO map of MHO 5 does not show a clear structure of outflow, possibly due to environment gas, its position-velocity diagram indicates two distinct blue- and redshifted components. We therefore conclude that they are components of a bipolar molecular outflow from MHO 5. We estimate an outflow mass of 7.0 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} and a mass-loss rate of 9.0 x 10{sup -10} M{sub sun}. These values are over two orders of magnitude smaller than the typical ones for T Tauri stars and somewhat weaker than those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M{sub J} in {rho} Ophiuchi. This makes MHO 5 the first young very low mass star showing a bipolar molecular outflow in Taurus. The detection boosts the scenario that very low mass objects form like low-mass stars but in a version scaled down by a factor of over 100.

  9. Thermospheric Wind Impacts on Ionospheric Upflow and Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, M.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Significant amounts of thermal ionospheric plasma can be transported to high altitudes in response to magnetospheric and atmospheric forcing. Soft electron precipitation serves as a heat source for the ambient F-region ionospheric electrons, which enhances the ambipolar electric field and induces upflowing ions. Frictional heating of ions from fast convection through the neutral atmosphere creates pressure-driven ion upflows. Finally, large neutral winds along the geomagnetic field may effectively lift or lower the F-region density peak. At regions above where ion upflows are typically initiated, transverse ion acceleration is thought to give upflowing ions sufficient energy to escape to the magnetosphere. This study examines how low-altitude upflow processes affect ion outflow, focusing particularly on the impacts of neutral winds. A new multi-fluid ionospheric model, which solves conservation equations for mass, momentum, and parallel and perpendicular energy is developed for this study. These fluid equations are solved for all species relevant to the E, F, and topside ionospheric regions and the system is closed through an electrostatic treatment of the auroral currents. This model is driven by the specification of field-aligned currents and a resonant transverse heating term. The model therefore encapsulates the basic ionospheric upflow processes and provides a simple way to approximate the effects of transverse heating and ion outflow. Using this model, individual species responses to electron precipitation, frictional heating, neutral winds, and transverse heating are examined to determine the effects of these low-altitude upflow processes on ion outflow. Results suggest that upflows, including those induced by neutral winds, can have a significant impact on the types and amounts of outflowing ions.

  10. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. II. EFFECTS OF THE OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2013-04-01

    We present radiation transfer simulations of a massive (8 M{sub Sun }) protostar forming from a massive (M{sub c} = 60 M{sub Sun }) protostellar core, extending the model developed by Zhang and Tan. The two principal improvements are (1) developing a model for the density and velocity structure of a disk wind that fills the bipolar outflow cavities, based in part on the disk-wind model of Blandford and Payne; and (2) solving for the radially varying accretion rate in the disk due to a supply of mass and angular momentum from the infall envelope and their loss to the disk wind. One consequence of the launching of the disk wind is a reduction in the amount of accretion power that is radiated by the disk. We also include a non-Keplerian potential appropriate for a growing, massive disk. For the transition from dusty to dust-free conditions where gas opacities dominate, we now implement a gradual change as a more realistic approximation of dust destruction. We study how the above effects, especially the outflow, influence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and the synthetic images of the protostar. Dust in the outflow cavity significantly affects the SEDs at most viewing angles. It further attenuates the short-wavelength flux from the protostar, controlling how the accretion disk may be viewed, and contributes a significant part of the near- and mid-IR fluxes. These fluxes warm the disk, boosting the mid- and far-IR emission. We find that for near face-on views, i.e., looking down the outflow cavity (although not too close to the axis), the SED from the near-IR to about 60 {mu}m is very flat, which may be used to identify such systems. We show that the near-facing outflow cavity and its walls are still the most significant features in images up to 70 {mu}m, dominating the mid-IR emission and determining its morphology. The thermal emission from the dusty outflow itself dominates the flux at {approx}20 {mu}m. The detailed distribution of the dust in the outflow

  11. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM ACCRETION DISKS. II. THE FORMATION OF ASYMMETRIC JETS AND COUNTER JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: nezami@mpia.de

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the jet launching from accretion disks, in particular the formation of intrinsically asymmetric jet/counter jet systems. We perform axisymmetric MHD simulations of the disk-jet structure on a bipolar computational domain covering both hemispheres. We apply various models such as asymmetric disks with (initially) different scale heights in each hemisphere, symmetric disks into which a local disturbance is injected, and jets launched into an asymmetric disk corona. We consider both a standard global magnetic diffusivity distribution and a novel local diffusivity model. Typical disk evolution first shows substantial disk warping and then results in asymmetric outflows with a 10%-30% mass flux difference. We find that the magnetic diffusivity profile is essential for establishing a long-term outflow asymmetry. We conclude that bipolar asymmetry in protostellar and extragalactic jets can indeed be generated intrinsically and maintained over a long time by disk asymmetries and the standard jet launching mechanism.

  12. Pleated metal bipolar assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A thin low-cost bipolar plate for an electrochemical cell is formed from a polymer support plate with first flow channels on a first side of the support plate and second flow channels on a second side of the support plate, where the first flow channels and second flow channels have intersecting locations and have a depth effective to form openings through the support plate at the intersecting locations. A first foil of electrically conductive material is pressed into the first flow channels. A second foil of electrically conductive material pressed into the second flow channels so that electrical contact is made between the first and second foils at the openings through the support plate. A particular application of the bipolar plate is in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

  13. Coronal Pseudo-Streamer and Bipolar Streamer Observed by SOHO/UVCS in March 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbo, L.; Lionello, R.; Riley, P.; Wang, Y.-M.

    2015-07-01

    The past solar minimum is characterized by several peculiar aspects and by a complex magnetic topology with two different types of coronal streamers: pseudo-streamers and bipolar streamers. Pseudo-streamers or unipolar streamer are coronal structures that separate coronal holes of the same polarity, without a current sheet in the outer corona; unlike bipolar streamers, which separate coronal holes of opposite magnetic polarity. In this study, two examples of these structures have been identified in the period of Carrington rotation 2067 by applying a potential-field source-surface extrapolation of the photospheric field measurements. We present a spectroscopic analysis of a pseudo-streamer and a bipolar streamer observed in the period 12 - 17 March 2008 at high spectral and spatial resolution by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS; Kohl et al., Solar Phys. 162, 313, 1995) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The solar wind plasma parameters, such as kinetic temperature, electron density, and outflow velocity, were inferred in the extended corona (from 1.7 to ) by analyzing the O vi doublet and H i Ly line spectra. The coronal magnetic topology was taken into account and was extrapolated with a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic model of the global corona. The results of the analysis show some peculiarities of the pseudo-streamer physical parameters in comparison with those obtained for bipolar streamers: in particular, we have found a higher kinetic temperature and higher outflow velocities of O vi ions and lower electron density values. In conclusion, we point out that pseudo-streamers produce a hybrid type of outflow that is intermediate between the slow and fast solar winds. These outflows are a possible source of slow/fast wind in a non-dipolar solar magnetic field configuration.

  14. Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in crisis. What do I do? Share Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens Download PDF Download ePub ... brochure will give you more information. What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness. It ...

  15. Astrophysical outflows simulated by laser-driven plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Ravasio, A.; Dizière, A.; Vinci, T.; Koenig, M.; Bouquet, S.

    2011-02-01

    Within the framework of laboratory astrophysics, we form a qualified multidisciplinary group in radiative hydrodynamics. Since 10 years, we have developed laboratory experiments as radiative shocks and plasma jets in connection to astrophysics. Such laboratory experiments provide a unique opportunity to validate models and numerical schemes introduced in radiative hydrodynamics codes. Here we summarize our experimental researches about plasma jets. Laboratory astrophysical experiments have been performed using LULI2000 (France), VULCAN (UK) and GEKKO XII (Japan) intense lasers. The goal of these experiments is to investigate some of the complex features of jets from Young Stellar Objects (YSO), and in particular its interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM).

  16. [Antipsychotics in bipolar disorders].

    PubMed

    Vacheron-Trystram, M-N; Braitman, A; Cheref, S; Auffray, L

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of the various treatments that are currently available, in particular in France, for the treatment of bipolar disorders. This article specifically addresses the use of novel antipsychotic agents as alternative therapy to a lithium therapy and/or the use of conventional antipsychotics. The prevalence of bipolar disorder over a lifetime is around 1% of the general population. Bipolar disorder consists of alternating depressive and manic episodes. It mainly affects younger subjects, and is often associated with alcohol and drug addictions. There are two main subtypes of bipolar disorder. According to the DSM IV-R, type 1 of bipolar disorder is characterised when at least one manic episode (or a mixed episode) has been diagnosed. Type 2 of bipolar disorder is related to patients enduring recurrent depressive episodes but no manic episode. Type 2 affects women more frequently as opposed to type 1 affecting individuals of both sexes. Manic-depressive disorder (or cyclo-thymic disorder) appears in relation to patients who has never suffered manic episode, mixed episode or severe depressive episode but have undergone numerous periods with some symptoms of depression and hypomanic symptoms over a two-year period during which any asymptomatic periods last no longer than two months. The average age of the person going through a first episode (often a depressive one) is 20 years-old. Untreated bipolar patients may endure more than ten manic or depressive episodes. Finally, in relation to 10 to 20% of patients, the bipolar disorder will turn into a fast cycle form, either spontaneously or as a result of certain medical treatments. Psychiatrists are now able to initiate various treating strategies which are most likely to be effective as a result of the identification of clinical subtypes of the bipolar disorder. Lithium therapy has been effectively and acutely used for patients with pure or elated mania and its prophylaxis. However, lithium medication

  17. First Direct Measurement of Acceleration in the Outflow of a Nova: U Scorpii (1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, Sébastien; Shara, Michael M.; Livio, Mario; Zurek, David

    1999-09-01

    We report the first direct measurement of acceleration in the outflow of a nova, U Sco, observed 5 days after the start of an outburst. Spectroscopic time series of the intense Hα emission line, obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope, shows a bright emission component moving across the spectrum at a rate of +0.16+/-0.02 Å in 30 minutes. This is consistent with a clump of emitting material having a line-of-sight acceleration ar=+4.1+/-0.5 m s-2. The data suggest that this clump resides within a moderately collimated bipolar outflow. Due to projection effects, this implies an actual acceleration of the clump relative to the star of a>~+25 m s-2. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  18. The cometary cavity created by an aligned streaming environment/collimated outflow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Cámara, D.; Esquivel, A.; Cantó, J.; Raga, A. C.; Velázquez, P. F.; Rodríguez-González, A.

    2011-10-01

    We present a ``thin shell'' model of the interaction of a biconical outflow and a streaming environment (aligned with the direction of the flow), as well as numerical (axisymmetric) simulations of such an interaction. A similar situation, although in a more complex setup, takes place at the head of the cometary structure of Mira. Thus, for most of the numerical simulations we explore parameters consistent with the observed bipolar outflow from Mira. For these parameters, the interaction is non-radiative, so that a rather broad jet/streaming environment interaction region is formed. In spite of this, a reasonable agreement between the thin-shell analytic model and the numerical simulations is obtained.

  19. The Structure and Environmental Impacts of Protostellar Outflows in DR 21 and Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, J. J.; Ho, P. T. P.; Brown, R.

    1997-12-01

    Regions of high-mass star formation are considerably more complicated than their low-mass counterparts. Recent HST NICMOS images of Orion-KL (Thompson et al. 1997) as well as sensitive ground-based infrared images of H_2 shock emission in the Orion outflow region (Chrysostomou et al. 1997, McCaughrean & Mac Low 1997, Schild et al. 1997) reveal intricate clumpy shock structures extending in nearly all radial directions from the source. The one radial direction in which the shock emission is particularly diminished is to the northeast, and it is precisely here that a molecular gas filament is present and highly heated, as though blocking the path of outflowing material from Orion-KL. We present our latest NH_3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) VLA MEM mosaics of the Orion-KL region. We present evidence from temperature and chemical excitation gradients that the molecular gas cores along the filament extending to the northeast of Orion-KL are strongly heated by impacts from protostellar ejecta. These effects are seen in the core ``CS1'' 30'' northeast of IRc2 and also in cores at least twice as distant (1.5 pc). The DR 21 outflow region is also quite complex, with multiple molecular outflows extending from a multiple-component HII region. We present sensitive VLA maps of hydrogen recombination line emission, and we report the detection of bipolar ionized gas within the molecular outflow lobes. This detection gives observational evidence for the initial ionized inner structure of high mass protostellar outflows. Chrysostomou, A. et al. 1997, MNRAS, 289, 605 McCaughrean, M., & Mac Low, M.-M. 1997, AJ, 113, 391 Schild, H., Miller, S., & Tennyson, J. 1997, A&A, 319, 1037 Thompson, R., Rieke, M., Schneider, G., Stolovy, S., Erickson, E., & Axon, D. 1997, STSCI Early Release Observation PRC97-13

  20. Outflows in Sodium Excess Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongwon; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2015-08-01

    Van Dokkum and Conroy revisited the unexpectedly strong Na i lines at 8200 Å found in some giant elliptical galaxies and interpreted them as evidence for an unusually bottom-heavy initial mass function. Jeong et al. later found a large population of galaxies showing equally extraordinary Na D doublet absorption lines at 5900 Å (Na D excess objects: NEOs) and showed that their origins can be different for different types of galaxies. While a Na D excess seems to be related to the interstellar medium (ISM) in late-type galaxies, smooth-looking early-type NEOs show little or no dust extinction and hence no compelling signs of ISM contributions. To further test this finding, we measured the Doppler components in the Na D lines. We hypothesized that the ISM would have a better (albeit not definite) chance of showing a blueshift Doppler departure from the bulk of the stellar population due to outflow caused by either star formation or AGN activities. Many of the late-type NEOs clearly show blueshift in their Na D lines, which is consistent with the former interpretation that the Na D excess found in them is related to gas outflow caused by star formation. On the contrary, smooth-looking early-type NEOs do not show any notable Doppler components, which is also consistent with the interpretation of Jeong et al. that the Na D excess in early-type NEOs is likely not related to ISM activities but is purely stellar in origin.

  1. Physical Processes for Driving Ionospheric Outflows in Global Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Strangeway, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    We review and assess the importance of processes thought to drive ionospheric outflows, linking them as appropriate to the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field, and to the spatial and temporal distribution of their magnetospheric internal responses. These begin with the diffuse effects of photoionization and thermal equilibrium of the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Auroral outflows begin with dayside reconnexion and resultant field-aligned currents and driven convection. These produce plasmaspheric plumes, collisional heating and wave-particle interactions, centrifugal acceleration, and auroral acceleration by parallel electric fields, including enhanced ambipolar fields from electron heating by precipitating particles. Observations and simulations show that solar wind energy dissipation into the atmosphere is concentrated by the geomagnetic field into auroral regions with an amplification factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Internal plasmas thus enable electromagnetic driving via coupling to the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body " We assess the Importance of each of these processes in terms of local escape flux production as well as global outflow, and suggest methods for their implementation within multispecies global simulation codes. We complete 'he survey with an assessment of outstanding obstacles to this objective.

  2. Hot Jupiter breezes: time-dependent outflows from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Adams, Fred C.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the dynamics of magnetically controlled outflows from hot Jupiters, where these flows are driven by UV heating from the central star. In these systems, some of the open field lines do not allow the flow to pass smoothly through the sonic point, so that steady-state solutions do not exist in general. This paper focuses on this type of magnetic field configuration, where the resulting flow becomes manifestly time-dependent. We consider the case of both steady heating and time-variable heating, and find the time-scales for the corresponding time variations of the outflow. Because the flow cannot pass through the sonic transition, it remains subsonic and leads to so-called breeze solutions. One manifestation of the time variability is that the flow samples a collection of different breeze solutions over time, and the mass outflow rate varies in quasi-periodic fashion. Because the flow is subsonic, information can propagate inwards from the outer boundary, which determines, in part, the time-scale of the flow variability. This work finds the relationship between the outer boundary scale and the time-scale of flow variations. In practice, the location of the outer boundary is set by the extent of the sphere of influence of the planet. The measured time variability can be used, in principle, to constrain the parameters of the system (e.g. the strengths of the surface magnetic fields).

  3. OUTFLOW, INFALL, AND PROTOSTARS IN THE STAR-FORMING CORE W3-SE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lei; Zhao Junhui; Wright, M. C. H. E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-10-20

    We report new results on outflow and infall in the star-forming cores W3-SE SMA-1 and SMA-2 based on analysis of {approx}2.''5 resolution observations of the molecular lines HCN(3-2), HCO{sup +}(3-2), N{sub 2}H{sup +}(3-2), and CH{sub 3}OH(5{sub 2,3}-4{sub 1,3}) with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A high-velocity bipolar outflow originating from the protostellar core SMA-1 was observed in the HCN(3-2) line, with a projected outflow axis at a position angle of 48{sup 0}. The detection of the outflow is confirmed from other molecular lines. An inverse P-Cygni profile in the HCN(3-2) line toward SMA-1 suggests that at least one of the double cores accretes matter from the molecular core. A filamentary structure in the molecular gas surrounds SMA-1 and SMA-2. Based on the SMA observations, our analysis suggests that the double pre-stellar cores SMA-1 and SMA-2 result from fragmentation in the collapsing massive molecular core W3-SE, and it is likely that they are forming intermediate- to high-mass stars which will be new members of a star cluster in the W3-SE region.

  4. Chebyshev-Fourier spectral methods in bipolar coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhu; Boyd, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Bipolar coordinates provide an efficient cartography for a variety of geometries: the exterior of two disks or cylinders, a half-plane containing a disk, an eccentric annulus with a small disk offset from the center of an outer boundary that is a large circle, and so on. A pseudospectral method that employs a tensor product basis of Fourier functions in the cyclic coordinate η and Chebyshev polynomials in the quasi-radial coordinate ξ gives easy-to-program spectral accuracy. We show, however, that as the inner disk becomes more and more offset from the center of the outer boundary circle, the grid is increasingly non-uniform, and the rate of exponential convergence increasingly slow. One-dimensional coordinate mappings significantly reduce the non-uniformity. In spite of this non-uniformity, the Chebyshev-Fourier method is quite effective in an idealized model of the wind-driven ocean circulation, resolving both internal and boundary layers. Bipolar coordinates are also a good starting point for solving problems in a domain which is not one of the "bipolar-compatible" domains listed above, but is a sufficiently small perturbation of such. This is illustrated by applying boundary collocation with bipolar harmonics to solve Laplace's equation in a perturbed eccentric annulus in which the disk-shaped island has been replaced by an island bounded by an ellipse. Similarly a perturbed bipolar domain can be mapped to an eccentric annulus by a smooth change of coordinates.

  5. Grain formation around carbon stars. 1: Stationary outflow models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Michael P.; Leung, Chun Ming

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are known to be sites of dust formation and undergo significant mass loss. The outflow is believed to be driven by radiation pressure on grains and momentum coupling between the grains and gas. While the physics of shell dynamics and grain formation are closely coupled, most previous models of circumstellar shells have treated the problem separately. Studies of shell dynamics typically assume the existence of grains needed to drive the outflow, while most grain formation models assume a constant veolcity wind in which grains form. Furthermore, models of grain formation have relied primarily on classical nucleation theory instead of using a more realistic approach based on chemical kinetics. To model grain formation in carbon-rich AGB stars, we have coupled the kinetic equations governing small cluster growth to moment equations which determine the growth of large particles. Phenomenological models assuming stationary outflow are presented to demonstrate the differences between the classical nucleation approach and the kinetic equation method. It is found that classical nucleation theory predicts nucleation at a lower supersaturation ratio than is predicted by the kinetic equations, resulting in significant differences in grain properties. Coagulation of clusters larger than monomers is unimportant for grain formation in high mass-loss models but becomes more important to grain growth in low mass-loss situations. The properties of the dust grains are altered considerably if differential drift velocities are ignored in modeling grain formation. The effect of stellar temperature, stellar luminosity, and different outflow velocities are investigated. The models indicate that changing the stellar temperature while keeping the stellar luminosity constant has little effect on the physical parameters of the dust shell formed. Increasing the stellar luminosity while keeping the stellar temperature constant results in large differences in

  6. Massive molecular outflows and evidence for AGN feedback from CO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicone, C.; Maiolino, R.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Feruglio, C.; Neri, R.; Aalto, S.; Davies, R.; Fiore, F.; Fischer, J.; García-Burillo, S.; González-Alfonso, E.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Piconcelli, E.; Veilleux, S.

    2014-02-01

    We study the properties of massive, galactic-scale outflows of molecular gas and investigate their impact on galaxy evolution. We present new IRAM PdBI CO(1-0) observations of local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and quasar-hosts: a clear signature of massive and energetic molecular outflows, extending on kpc scales, is found in the CO(1-0) kinematics of four out of seven sources, with measured outflow rates of several 100 M⊙ yr-1. We combine these new observations with data from the literature, and explore the nature and origin of massive molecular outflows within an extended sample of 19 local galaxies. We find that starburst-dominated galaxies have an outflow rate comparable to their star formation rate (SFR), or even higher by a factor of ~2-4, implying that starbursts can indeed be effective in removing cold gas from galaxies. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) can boost the outflow rate by a large factor, which is found to increase with the LAGN/Lbol ratio. The gas depletion time scales due to molecular outflows are anti-correlated with the presence and luminosity of an AGN in these galaxies, and range from a few hundred million years in starburst galaxies down to just a few million years in galaxies hosting powerful AGNs. In quasar hosts, the depletion time scales due to the outflow are much shorter than the depletion time scales due to star formation. We estimate the outflow kinetic power and find that, for galaxies hosting powerful AGNs, it corresponds to about 5% of the AGN luminosity, as expected by models of AGN feedback. Moreover, we find that momentum rates of about 20 LAGN/c are common among the AGN-dominated sources in our sample. For "pure" starburst galaxies, our data tentatively support models in which outflows are mostly momentum-driven by the radiation pressure from young stars onto dusty clouds. Overall, our results indicate that, although starbursts are effective in powering

  7. Testing the Radiative-Driving Hypothesis of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Michele A.; Ganguly, R.; Gallagher, S. C.; Gibson, R.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Outflows are seen prominently in the UV spectra of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) QSOs. Models of radiatively-driven outflows predict that the velocity should scale with UV luminosity. Observations show that the UV luminosity only provides a cap to the velocity. One explanation is that the X-ray absorbing gas in an individual quasar provides a shield that improves its radiative-driving efficiency. That is, quasars with thick shields can accelerate gas to higher velocity. X-ray observations of BALQSOs support this in the sense that BALQSOs with more soft X-ray absorption tend to have higher velocity outflows. But there is much scatter in this trend, making the underlying physics difficult to extract. To combat this, we conducted an experiment using exploratory Chandra-ACIS observations of 12 carefully-selected z=1.7-2.0 BALQSOs. These BALQSOs were chosen to have very narrow ranges in (1) UV luminosity, (2) UV spectral shape, and (3) absorption velocity width. Within this otherwise uniform sample, the outflow velocities range from 4500km/s to 18000km/s, a factor of four. All objects are detected in the full band (0.5-8keV), with count rates in the range (0.5-5)e-3 cps, and have hardness ratios in the range -0.6 to 0.3. We compare the X-ray brightnesses and spectral shapes of our sample with those of more diverse samples of BALQSOs. We gratefully acknowledge support through Chandra grant GO9-0120X.

  8. CLASSICAL T TAURI-LIKE OUTFLOW ACTIVITY IN THE BROWN DWARF MASS REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E. T.; Ray, T. P.; Podio, L.; Bacciotti, F.; Randich, S.

    2009-12-01

    Over the last number of years, spectroscopic studies have strongly supported the assertion that protostellar accretion and outflow activity persist to the lowest masses. Indeed, previous to this work, the existence of three brown dwarf (BD) outflows had been confirmed by us. In this paper, we present the results of our latest investigation of BD outflow activity and report on the discovery of two new outflows. Observations to date have concentrated on studying the forbidden emission line (FEL) regions of young BDs and in all cases data have been collected using the UV-Visual Echelle Spectrometer (UVES) on the ESO Very Large Telescope. Offsets in the FEL regions are recovered using spectro-astrometry. Here, ISO-Oph 32 is shown to drive a blueshifted outflow with a radial velocity of 10-20 km s{sup -1} and spectro-astrometric analysis constrains the position angle of this outflow to 240{sup 0} +- 7{sup 0}. The BD candidate, ISO-ChaI 217 is found to have a bipolar outflow bright in several key forbidden lines (V{sub RAD} = -20 km s{sup -1}, +40 km s{sup -1}) and with a P.A. of 193{sup 0}-209{sup 0}. A striking feature of the ISO-ChaI 217 outflow is the strong asymmetry between the red- and blueshifted lobes. This asymmetry is revealed in the relative brightness of the two lobes (redshifted lobe is brighter), the factor of 2 difference in radial velocity (the redshifted lobe is faster) and the difference in the electron density (again higher in the red lobe). Such asymmetries are common in jets from low-mass protostars and the observation of a marked asymmetry at such a low mass (<0.1 M{sub sun}) supports the idea that BD outflow activity is scaled down from low-mass protostellar activity. Also note that although asymmetries are unexceptional, it is uncommon for the redshifted lobe to be the brightest as some obscuration by the accretion disk is assumed. This phenomenon has only been observed in one other source, the classical T Tauri (CTTS) star RW Aur. The physical

  9. Martian outflow channels: How did their source aquifers form, and why did they drain so rapidly?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Baker, Victor R.; Gulick, Virginia C.; Berman, Daniel C.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Linares, Rogelio; Zarroca, Mario; Yan, Jianguo; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Glines, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Catastrophic floods generated ~3.2 Ga by rapid groundwater evacuation scoured the Solar System’s most voluminous channels, the southern circum-Chryse outflow channels. Based on Viking Orbiter data analysis, it was hypothesized that these outflows emanated from a global Hesperian cryosphere-confined aquifer that was infused by south polar meltwater infiltration into the planet’s upper crust. In this model, the outflow channels formed along zones of superlithostatic pressure generated by pronounced elevation differences around the Highland-Lowland Dichotomy Boundary. However, the restricted geographic location of the channels indicates that these conditions were not uniform Boundary. Furthermore, some outflow channel sources are too high to have been fed by south polar basal melting. Using more recent mission data, we argue that during the Late Noachian fluvial and glacial sediments were deposited into a clastic wedge within a paleo-basin located in the southern circum-Chryse region, which was then completely submerged under a primordial northern plains ocean. Subsequent Late Hesperian outflow channels were sourced from within these geologic materials and formed by gigantic groundwater outbursts driven by an elevated hydraulic head from the Valles Marineris region. Thus, our findings link the formation of the southern circum-Chryse outflow channels to ancient marine, glacial, and fluvial erosion and sedimentation. PMID:26346067

  10. Martian outflow channels: How did their source aquifers form, and why did they drain so rapidly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Baker, Victor R.; Gulick, Virginia C.; Berman, Daniel C.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Linares, Rogelio; Zarroca, Mario; Yan, Jianguo; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Glines, Natalie

    2015-09-01

    Catastrophic floods generated ~3.2 Ga by rapid groundwater evacuation scoured the Solar System’s most voluminous channels, the southern circum-Chryse outflow channels. Based on Viking Orbiter data analysis, it was hypothesized that these outflows emanated from a global Hesperian cryosphere-confined aquifer that was infused by south polar meltwater infiltration into the planet’s upper crust. In this model, the outflow channels formed along zones of superlithostatic pressure generated by pronounced elevation differences around the Highland-Lowland Dichotomy Boundary. However, the restricted geographic location of the channels indicates that these conditions were not uniform Boundary. Furthermore, some outflow channel sources are too high to have been fed by south polar basal melting. Using more recent mission data, we argue that during the Late Noachian fluvial and glacial sediments were deposited into a clastic wedge within a paleo-basin located in the southern circum-Chryse region, which was then completely submerged under a primordial northern plains ocean. Subsequent Late Hesperian outflow channels were sourced from within these geologic materials and formed by gigantic groundwater outbursts driven by an elevated hydraulic head from the Valles Marineris region. Thus, our findings link the formation of the southern circum-Chryse outflow channels to ancient marine, glacial, and fluvial erosion and sedimentation.