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Sample records for driven vortex lattice

  1. The structure of a moving vortex lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.W.; Crabtree, G.W.; Kaper, H.G.; Leaf, G.K.; Levine, D.M.; Vinokur, V.M.; Koshelev, A.E.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations show a new mechanism for plastic motion of a driven vortex lattice in a clean superconductor. The mechanism, which involves the creation of a defect superstructure, is intrinsic to the moving vortex lattice and is independent of bulk pinning. Other structural features found in the solutions include a reorientation of the vortex lattice and a gradual healing of lattice defects under the influence of a transport current.

  2. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  3. Phase-locking of driven vortex lattices with transverse ac force and periodic pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Kolton, Alejandro B.; Dominguez, Daniel; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

    2001-10-01

    For a vortex lattice moving in a periodic array we show analytically and numerically that a new type of phase locking occurs in the presence of a longitudinal dc driving force and a transverse ac driving force. This phase locking is distinct from the Shapiro step phase locking found with longitudinal ac drives. We show that an increase in critical current and a fundamental phase-locked step width scale with the square of the driving ac amplitude. Our results should carry over to other systems such as vortex motion in Josephson-junction arrays.

  4. Vortex lattice of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzedolik, Igor V.; Lapayeva, Svetlana; Pereskokov, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the formation of a plasmon polariton vortex lattice on a metal surface following the interference of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The plasmon polariton vortex lattice is formed by the interference of the SPP transverse-magnetic mode (TM-mode) and electric mode (E-mode) in the presence of the inhomogeneity with a curvilinear boundary on the surface of the metal layer. The SPP vortex lattice can be controlled by changing the configuration of the boundary. Weak nonlinearity of the metal permittivity does not change the interference pattern, but it increases the propagation length of the SPPs and, therefore, the area of the vortex lattice too.

  5. Persistence of Metastable Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2 in the Presence of Vortex Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Rastovski, Catherine; Schlesinger, Kimberly; Gannon, William J; Dewhurst, Charles; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Karpinski, Janusz; Eskildsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

  6. The nature of long range order in the vortex lattice of high {Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, S.; Doniach, S.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1994-12-31

    Recent neutron data on the disappearance of long-range order in the vortex lattice of BSCCO at fields of order 1 kGauss is interpreted in terms of the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the thermodynamics of the vortex lattice in a pure system. The authors show that the neutron data is consistent with a disorder-driven phase transition from a vortex crystal at low fields to a vortex glass at higher fields.

  7. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Dodgson, M. J. W.

    2013-09-15

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  8. Vortex lattices in theory and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Capmbell, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    The formal simplicity of ideal point vortex systems in two dimensions has long attracted interest in both their exact solutions and in their capacity to simulate physical processes. Attention here is focused on infinite, two-fold periodic vortex arrays, including an expression for the energy density of an arbitrary vortex lattice (i.e., an arbitrary number of vortices with arbitrary strengths in a unit cell parallelogram of arbitrary shape). For the case of two vortices per unit cell, the morphology of stable lattices can be described completely. A non-trivial physical realization of such lattices is a rotating mixture of /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He at temperatures so low that both isotopic components are superfluid. The structure of the expected lattices is quite different from the usual triangular structure. Magnetic flux lines in high-temperature superconductors show a one-parameter family of degenerate ground state of the lattice due to the anisotropy of the vortex--vortex interaction. A final topic, closely related to Josephson-junction arrays, is the case of vortices confined to a grid. That is, the vortices interact pair-wise in the usual manner but are constrained to occupy only locations on an independent periodic grid. By using vortex relaxation methods in the continuum and then imposing the grid it is possible to find low-lying states extremely rapidly compared to previous Monte Carlo calculations. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Amit; Kumar, Manish; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby

    2016-04-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  10. Inverse Melting of Vortex Lattice in Layered Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. J.; He, Y. W.; Zhao, Z. G.; Liu, M.; Yang, Y. H.

    Using molecular dynamic simulations for the melting transition of a flux line lattice(FLL) with point disordered pinnings, thermal fluctuations and magnetic interactions between pancake vortices, we study the disorder-driven melting transition from a disentangled and ordered Bragg glass (BG) to an entangled amorphous vortex glass (VG) or a vortex liquid (VL) in the pinning strength-temperature phase diagram. A portion of the BG region is found to be sandwiched in between the VG phase at lower temperatures and VL phase at higher temperatures, exhibiting inverse melting behavior observed recently on BSCCO crystals.

  11. Experimental Study on Plasticity of Current-driven Vortex Lattices Interacting with Disorder in Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8 Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaidiuk, V.; Ammor, L.; Ruyter, A.

    From the I-V characteristics for as-grown and irradiated Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystals at T=5K (i.e. T → 0) in a magnetic field applied parallel to c axis, we have seen two types of vortex dynamics above the depinning threshold, depending on the vortex-vortex interaction strength (λab/a0). For the as-grown sample, at a low field, the I-V curves show steps that clearly indicate a "fingerprint phenomenon" since they reflex the current dependence of the differential resistance rd(I). This can be ascribed to vortices flowing through uncorrelated channels for the highly defective lattice. As field sufficiently increase, these peaks merge to become broader ones indicating a crossover from filament type to braid river type. In contrast, in the irradiated sample, the pinning is found to be individual at low fields and collective when the vortex-vortex interactions are involved.

  12. Energy of infinite vortex lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Doria, M.M.; Kadtke, J.B.

    1989-05-15

    An expression is derived for the energy density of a lattice of point vortices (or other logarithmic objects) having an arbitrary number of vortices of arbitrary strengths in an arbitrary unit cell. The result is expressed in the form of a rapidly convergent series well suited for numerical evaluation. The effects of separately changing the shape and dimensions of the unit cell are shown for simple cases, and the energy of the triangular lattice is calculated as a function of slip displacement.

  13. The Acoustically Driven Vortex Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Spencer B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    Vortex cannons have been used by physics teachers for years, mostly to teach the continuity principle. In its simplest form, a vortex cannon is an empty coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and the lid replaced. More elaborate models can be purchased through various scientific suppliers under names such as "Air Cannon" and…

  14. Simulating infinite vortex lattices in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingarelli, Luca; Keaveny, Eric E.; Barnett, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient framework to numerically treat infinite periodic vortex lattices in rotating superfluids described by the Gross–Pitaevskii theory. The commonly used split-step Fourier (SSF) spectral methods are inapplicable to such systems as the standard Fourier transform does not respect the boundary conditions mandated by the magnetic translation group. We present a generalisation of the SSF method which incorporates the correct boundary conditions by employing the so-called magnetic Fourier transform. We test the method and show that it reduces to known results in the lowest-Landau-level regime. While we focus on rotating scalar superfluids for simplicity, the framework can be naturally extended to treat multicomponent systems and systems under more general ‘synthetic’ gauge fields.

  15. Reconstruction of vortex lattices at low inductions

    SciTech Connect

    Sudbro, A.; Brandt, E.H. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Institut fuer Physik, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-7000 Stuttgart 80 )

    1992-03-16

    The nonlocal elasticity and the normal modes of an unpinned flux-line lattice (FLL) in a uniaxially anisotropic supeconductor are considered in the low-induction regime {ital b}={ital B}/{ital B}{sub {ital c}2}{much lt}1 at oblique angles {theta} between {bold B} and the {bold {cflx c}} axis. A novel feature of anisotropic superconductors is {ital strongly} {ital dispersive} {ital shear} {ital moduli} when {theta}{gt}0. Thus, the normal modes of the FLL may become soft away from the zone center, signaling a {bold k}{ne}{bold 0} {ital structural} instability of the distorted hexagonal FLL. Vortex structures of a novel type are thus possible in anisotropic superconductors.

  16. Simulating infinite vortex lattices in superfluids.

    PubMed

    Mingarelli, Luca; Keaveny, Eric E; Barnett, Ryan

    2016-07-20

    We present an efficient framework to numerically treat infinite periodic vortex lattices in rotating superfluids described by the Gross-Pitaevskii theory. The commonly used split-step Fourier (SSF) spectral methods are inapplicable to such systems as the standard Fourier transform does not respect the boundary conditions mandated by the magnetic translation group. We present a generalisation of the SSF method which incorporates the correct boundary conditions by employing the so-called magnetic Fourier transform. We test the method and show that it reduces to known results in the lowest-Landau-level regime. While we focus on rotating scalar superfluids for simplicity, the framework can be naturally extended to treat multicomponent systems and systems under more general 'synthetic' gauge fields. PMID:27219843

  17. Quasi-Long-Range Order and Vortex Lattice in the Three-State Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Soumyadeep; Ray, Purusattam

    2016-03-01

    We show that the order-disorder phase transition in the three-state Potts ferromagnet on a square lattice is driven by a coupled proliferation of domain walls and vortices. Raising the vortex core energy above a threshold value decouples the proliferation and splits the transition into two. The phase between the two transitions exhibits an emergent U(1) symmetry and quasi-long-range order. Lowering the core energy below a threshold value also splits the order-disorder transition but the system forms a vortex lattice in the intermediate phase.

  18. Dynamic Reorganization of Vortex Matter into Partially Disordered Lattices.

    PubMed

    Marziali Bermúdez, M; Eskildsen, M R; Bartkowiak, M; Nagy, G; Bekeris, V; Pasquini, G

    2015-08-01

    We report structural evidence of dynamic reorganization in vortex matter in clean NbSe(2) by joint small-angle neutron scattering and ac susceptibility measurements. The application of oscillatory forces in a transitional region near the order-disorder transition results in robust bulk vortex lattice configurations with an intermediate degree of disorder. These dynamically originated configurations correlate with intermediate pinning responses previously observed, resolving a long-standing debate regarding the origin of such responses. PMID:26296127

  19. Vortex configurations of bosons in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Congjun; Zhang Shoucheng; Chen Handong; Hu Jiangpiang

    2004-04-01

    The single-vortex problem in a strongly correlated bosonic system is investigated self-consistently within the mean-field theory of the Bose-Hubbard model. Near the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition, the vortex core has a tendency toward the Mott-insulating phase, with the core particle density approaching the nearest commensurate value. If the nearest-neighbor repulsion exists, the charge-density wave order may develop locally in the core. The evolution of the vortex configuration from the strong- to weak-coupling regions is studied. This phenomenon can be observed in systems of rotating ultracold atoms in optical lattices and Josephson-junction arrays.

  20. Quantum fluctuations of vortex lattices in ultracold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasigroch, M. P.; Cooper, N. R.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss the effects of quantum fluctuations on the properties of vortex lattices in rapidly rotating ultracold atomic gases. We develop a variational method that goes beyond the Bogoliubov theory by including the effects of interactions between the quasiparticle excitations. These interactions are found to have significant quantitative effects on physical properties even at relatively large filling factors. We use our theory to predict the expected experimental signatures of quantum fluctuations of vortices and to assess the competition of the triangular vortex lattice phase with other phases in finite-sized systems.

  1. Vortex-Antivortex Lattice in Ultracold Fermionic Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Botelho, S.S.; Melo, C.A.R. sa de

    2006-02-03

    We discuss ultracold Fermi gases in two dimensions, which could be realized in a strongly confining one-dimensional optical lattice. We obtain the temperature versus effective interaction phase diagram for an s-wave superfluid and show that, below a certain critical temperature T{sub c}, spontaneous vortex-antivortex pairs appear for all coupling strengths. In addition, we show that the evolution from weak-to-strong coupling is smooth, and that the system forms a square vortex-antivortex lattice at a lower critical temperature T{sub M}.

  2. Fluctuating pancake vortices revealed by dissipation of Josephson vortex lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Buzdin, A. I.; Kakeya, I.; Yamamoto, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-06-01

    In strongly anisotropic layered superconductors in tilted magnetic fields, the Josephson vortex lattice coexists with the lattice of pancake vortices. Due to the interaction between them, the dissipation of the Josephson vortex lattice is very sensitive to the presence of the pancake vortices. If the c-axis magnetic field is smaller than the corresponding lower critical field, the pancake stacks are not formed but the individual pancakes may exist in the fluctuational regime either near the surface in large-size samples or in the central region for small-size mesas. We calculate the contribution of such fluctuating pancake vortices to the c-axis conductivity of the Josephson vortex lattice and compare the theoretical results with measurements on small mesas fabricated out of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} crystals. A fingerprint of fluctuating pancakes is a characteristic exponential dependence of the c-axis conductivity observed experimentally. Our results provide strong evidence of the existence of the fluctuating pancakes and their influence on the Josephson vortex lattice dissipation.

  3. Imaging superconducting vortex cores and lattices with a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suderow, H.; Guillamón, I.; Rodrigo, J. G.; Vieira, S.

    2014-06-01

    The observation of vortices in superconductors was a major breakthrough in developing the conceptual background for superconducting applications. Each vortex carries a flux quantum, and the magnetic field decreases radially from the center. Techniques used to make magnetic field maps, such as magnetic decoration, give vortex lattice images in a variety of systems. However, strong type II superconductors allow penetration of the magnetic field over large distances, of the order of the magnetic penetration depth λ. Superconductivity survives up to magnetic fields where, for imaging purposes, there is no magnetic contrast at all. Static and dynamic properties of vortices are largely unknown at such high magnetic fields. Reciprocal space studies using neutron scattering have been employed to obtain insight into the collective behavior. But the microscopic details of vortex arrangements and their motion remain difficult to obtain. Direct real-space visualization can be made using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S). Instead of using magnetic contrast, the electronic density of states describes spatial variations of the quasiparticle and pair wavefunction properties. These are of the order of the superconducting coherence length ξ, which is much smaller than λ. In principle, individual vortices can be imaged using STM up to the upper critical field where vortex cores, of size ξ, overlap. In this review, we describe recent advances in vortex imaging made with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We introduce the technique and discuss vortex images that reveal the influence of the Fermi surface distribution of the superconducting gap on the internal structure of vortices, the collective behavior of the lattice in different materials and conditions, and the observation of vortex lattice melting. We consider challenging lines of work, which include imaging vortices in nanostructures, multiband and heavy fermion superconductors, single layers

  4. Beyond the simple hexagonal Abrikosov vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, D.; Ettouhami, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    In layered superconductors as high-Tc materials but also organic superconductors, chalcogenides and superlattices, the simple concept of an distorted hexagonal lattice of straight vortices becomes unsufficient. Due to anisotropy and short coherence lengths, quite new vortex structures may arise. Some of them, as staircase vortices, simply add a modulation in the direction of vortex lines. This phenomenon is reviewed, together with the resulting lock-in transition, especially when the effects of the layered structure are weak. More exotic structures like a decomposed vortex lattice can also occur in specific situations: they involve two perpendicular sublattices, one parallel and one normal to the layers. We propose that extended defects as twin boundaries or irradiation tracks can trigger such a structure even in moderately anisotropic compounds as Y:123.

  5. Vortex-Lattice Utilization. [in aeronautical engineering and aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The many novel, innovative, and unique implementations and applications of the vortex-lattice method to aerodynamic design and analysis which have been performed by Industry, Government, and Universities were presented. Although this analytical tool is not new, it continues to be utilized and refined in the aeronautical community.

  6. Dynamic Melting of Driven Abrikosov Lattices in an Amorphous MoxGe1-x Film in Tilted Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Aguri; Kawamura, Yasuki; Inoue, Toshiki; Kaji, Tetsuya; Mihaly, Dobroka; Kaneko, Shin-ichi; Kokubo, Nobuhito; Okuma, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We report a comparative study of the dynamic melting of driven vortex lattices in magnetic field tilted (by θ = 36°) from the normal to the film surface and that of a driven Abrikosov lattice in untilted field (θ = 0). From the mode-locking (ML) resonance, we confirm that vortex lattices in tilted field are stretched in the tilt direction and that, with increasing dc velocity at ML, the shape and orientation of the driven lattice change. Associated with this structural change, the dynamic melting field at which the driven lattice melts also changes. Our results show that, regardless of the lattice shape and orientation, dynamic melting occurs as the shorter side of the distorted lattices reaches close to the side at which the isotropic lattice melts dynamically.

  7. The Vortex Lattice Method for the Rotor-Vortex Interaction Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padakannaya, R.

    1974-01-01

    The rotor blade-vortex interaction problem and the resulting impulsive airloads which generate undesirable noise levels are discussed. A numerical lifting surface method to predict unsteady aerodynamic forces induced on a finite aspect ratio rectangular wing by a straight, free vortex placed at an arbitrary angle in a subsonic incompressible free stream is developed first. Using a rigid wake assumption, the wake vortices are assumed to move downsteam with the free steam velocity. Unsteady load distributions are obtained which compare favorably with the results of planar lifting surface theory. The vortex lattice method has been extended to a single bladed rotor operating at high advance ratios and encountering a free vortex from a fixed wing upstream of the rotor. The predicted unsteady load distributions on the model rotor blade are generally in agreement with the experimental results. This method has also been extended to full scale rotor flight cases in which vortex induced loads near the tip of a rotor blade were indicated. In both the model and the full scale rotor blade airload calculations a flat planar wake was assumed which is a good approximation at large advance ratios because the downwash is small in comparison to the free stream at large advance ratios. The large fluctuations in the measured airloads near the tip of the rotor blade on the advance side is predicted closely by the vortex lattice method.

  8. Vortex penetration depth of organic superconductors: Evidence for vortex lattice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Tea, N.H.; Giannetta, R.W.; Salamon, M.B.; Williams, J.M.; Wang, H.H.; Geiser, U.

    1997-07-01

    The authors observe a crossover field H* in the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the rf vortex penetration depth in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br for {rvec H}{sub dc}{parallel}{cflx b}-axis. They find that H* can be described quantitatively by the 3D Lindemann melting theory; thus, it corresponds to the melting of the vortex lattice in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br and lies very close to the irreversibility line. In the vortex-liquid state, they argue that the saturation of the vortex penetration depth in a magnetic field results from the finite size of the sample. The results do not have the scaling form predicted by the Coffey-Clem model in contrast to previous findings.

  9. Stabilization of active matter by flow-vortex lattices and defect ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Adamer, Michael F.; Thampi, Sumesh P.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-02-01

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like and chaotic patterns. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and through numerical simulations, that the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter. Moreover, we discover unexpected vortex ordering at this wet-dry crossover. We show that the self organization of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices, which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects, suggests potential applications in the design and control of active materials.

  10. Stabilization of active matter by flow-vortex lattices and defect ordering.

    PubMed

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Adamer, Michael F; Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like and chaotic patterns. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and through numerical simulations, that the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter. Moreover, we discover unexpected vortex ordering at this wet-dry crossover. We show that the self organization of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices, which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects, suggests potential applications in the design and control of active materials. PMID:26837846

  11. Stabilization of active matter by flow-vortex lattices and defect ordering

    PubMed Central

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Adamer, Michael F.; Thampi, Sumesh P.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like and chaotic patterns. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and through numerical simulations, that the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter. Moreover, we discover unexpected vortex ordering at this wet–dry crossover. We show that the self organization of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices, which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects, suggests potential applications in the design and control of active materials. PMID:26837846

  12. Quasiclassical analysis of vortex lattice states in Rashba noncentrosymmetric superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2015-10-01

    Vortex lattice states occurring in noncentrosymmetric superconductors with a spin-orbit coupling of Rashba type under a magnetic field parallel to the symmetry plane are examined by assuming the s -wave pairing case and in an approach combining the quasiclassical theory with the Landau level expansion of the superconducting order parameter. The resulting field-temperature phase diagrams include not only a discontinuous transition but a continuous crossover between different vortex lattice structures, and, further, a critical end point of a structural transition line is found at an intermediate field and a low temperature in the present approach. It is pointed out that the strange field dependence of the vortex lattice structure is a consequence of that of its anisotropy stemming from the Rashba spin-orbit coupling, and that the critical end point is related to the helical phase modulation peculiar to these materials in the ideal Pauli-limited case. Furthermore, calculation results on the local density of states detectable in STM experiments are also presented.

  13. Statistical Transmutation in Floquet Driven Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakyan, Tigran A.; Galitski, Victor M.; Kamenev, Alex

    2015-11-01

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state.

  14. Statistical Transmutation in Floquet Driven Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sedrakyan, Tigran A; Galitski, Victor M; Kamenev, Alex

    2015-11-01

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state. PMID:26588392

  15. Enhancement of long-range correlations in a 2D vortex lattice by an incommensurate 1D disorder potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillamon, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Cordoba, R.; Sese, J.; de Teresa, J. M.; Ibarra, R.

    In two dimensional (2D) systems, theory has proposed that random disorder destroys long range correlations driving a transition to a glassy state. Here, I will discuss new insights into this issue obtained through the direct visualization of the critical behaviour of a 2D superconducting vortex lattice formed in a thin film with a smooth 1D thickness modulation. Using scanning tunneling microscopy at 0.1K, we have tracked the modification in the 2D vortex arrangements induced by the 1D thickness modulation while increasing the vortex density by three orders of magnitude. Upon increasing the field, we observed a two-step order-disorder transition in the 2D vortex lattice mediated by the appearance of dislocations and disclinations and accompanied by an increase in the local vortex density fluctuations. Through a detailed analysis of correlation functions, we find that the transition is driven by the incommensurate 1D thickness modulation. We calculate the critical points and exponents and find that they are well above theoretical expectation for random disorder. Our results show that long range 1D correlations in random potentials enhance the stability range of the ordered phase in a 2D vortex lattice. Work supported by Spanish MINECO, CIG Marie Curie Grant, Axa Research Fund and FBBVA.

  16. Perturbed vortex lattices and the stability of nucleated topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahtinen, Ville; Ludwig, Andreas W. W.; Trebst, Simon

    2014-02-01

    We study the stability of nucleated topological phases that can emerge when interacting non-Abelian anyons form a regular array. The studies are carried out in the context of Kitaev's honeycomb model, where we consider three distinct types of perturbations in the presence of a lattice of Majorana mode binding vortices—spatial anisotropy of the vortices, dimerization of the vortex lattice, and local random disorder. While all the nucleated phases are stable with respect to weak perturbations of each kind, strong perturbations are found to result in very different behavior. Anisotropy of the vortices stabilizes the strong-pairing-like phases, while dimerization can recover the underlying non-Abelian phase. Local random disorder, on the other hand, can drive all the nucleated phases into a gapless thermal metal state. We show that all these distinct behaviors can be captured by an effective staggered tight-binding model for the Majorana modes. By studying the pairwise interactions between the vortices, i.e., the amplitudes for the Majorana modes to tunnel between vortex cores, the locations of phase transitions and the nature of the resulting states can be predicted. We also find that, due to oscillations in the Majorana tunneling amplitude, lattices of Majorana modes may exhibit a Peierls-like instability, where a dimerized configuration is favored over a uniform lattice. As the nature of the nucleated phases depends only on the Majorana tunneling, our results are expected to apply also to other system supporting localized Majorana mode arrays, such as Abrikosov lattices in p-wave superconductors, Wigner crystals in Moore-Read fractional quantum Hall states, or arrays of topological nanowires.

  17. Convectively Driven Vortex Flows in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet, J. A.; Márquez, I.; Sánchez Almeida, J.; Cabello, I.; Domingo, V.

    2008-11-01

    We have discovered small whirlpools in the Sun, with a size similar to terrestrial hurricanes (lesssim0.5 Mm). The theory of solar convection predicts them, but they had remained elusive so far. The vortex flows are created at the downdrafts where the plasma returns to the solar interior after cooling down, and we detect them because some magnetic bright points (BPs) follow a logarithmic spiral on their way to being engulfed by a downdraft. Our disk-center observations show 0.9 × 10-2 vortexes per Mm2, with a lifetime of the order of 5 minutes, and with no preferred sense of rotation. They are not evenly spread out over the surface, but they seem to trace the supergranulation and the mesogranulation. These observed properties are strongly biased by our type of measurement, unable to detect vortexes except when they are engulfing magnetic BPs.

  18. Vortex core-driven magnetization dynamics.

    PubMed

    Choe, S B; Acremann, Y; Scholl, A; Bauer, A; Doran, A; Stöhr, J; Padmore, H A

    2004-04-16

    Time-resolved x-ray imaging shows that the magnetization dynamics of a micron-sized pattern containing a ferromagnetic vortex is determined by its handedness, or chirality. The out-of-plane magnetization in the nanometer-scale vortex core induces a three-dimensional handedness in the planar magnetic structure, leading to a precessional motion of the core parallel to a subnanosecond field pulse. The core velocity was an order of magnitude higher than expected from the static susceptibility. These results demonstrate that handedness, already well known to be important in biological systems, plays an important role in the dynamics of microscopic magnets. PMID:15087545

  19. Dynamics of polarized vortex solitons in nonlocal media with Bessel optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingzhi; Chen, Zhifeng

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the formation of polarized vortex solitons in nonlocal media with Bessel optical lattices and show the various dynamics of these solitons. Particularly, the stable high-order polarized vortex solitons, which are not found in local media with Bessel optical lattices, are found in nonlocal media. It is found that the nonlocal nonlinearity plays an important role in the stability of these solitons which is similar to that of phase vortex solitons. However, we show that the dynamics of these polarized vortex solitons are quite different from the phase vortex solitons. PMID:26406632

  20. Vortex formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating deep optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Akira; Nakano, Yuki; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2011-11-15

    We study the dynamics of vortex nucleation and lattice formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating square optical lattice by numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Different dynamical regimes of vortex nucleation are found, depending on the depth and period of the optical lattice. We make an extensive comparison with the experiments by R. A. Williams et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 050404 (2010)], especially focusing on the issues of the critical rotation frequency for the first vortex nucleation and the vortex number as a function of rotation frequency.

  1. Melting of Vortex Lattice in Bose-Einstein Condensate in Presence of Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bishwajyoti

    We study the vortex lattice dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in presence of single impurity as well as random impurities or disorder. The single impurity is modeled by a Gaussian function while disorder is introduced in the system by a uniform random potential. Such potentials can be created experimentally by lasers. We solve the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation in two-dimensions using split-step Crank-Nicolson method. We first show that a single vortex can be pinned by an impurity. We then show that even a single impurity can distort the vortex lattice. For sufficiently strong impurity potential, the vortex lattice gets pinned to the impurity. We also show that a new type of giant hole with hidden vortices inside it can be created in the vortex lattice by a cluster of impurities. In presence of random impurity potential or disorder, the vortices get pinned at random positions leading to melting of the vortex lattice. We further show that the vortex lattice melting can also be induced by the pseudorandom potential generated by the superposition of two optical lattices. The absence of long-range order in the melted vortex lattice is demonstrated from the structure factor profile and the histogram of the distance between each pair of vortices. I would like to thank DST, India and BCUD SPPU, for financial assisance through research grants.

  2. Statistical Transmutation in Periodically Driven Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakyan, Tigran; Galitski, Victor; Kamenev, Alex

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state. This work was supported by the PFC-JQI (T.S.), USARO and Simons Foundation (V.G.), and DOE Contract DE-FG02-08ER46482 (A.K.).

  3. Transverse forces on a vortex in lattice models of superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    The paper derives the transverse forces (the Magnus and the Lorentz forces) in the lattice models of superfluids in the continuous approximation. The continuous approximation restores translational invariance absent in the original lattice model, but the theory is not Galilean invariant. As a result, calculation of the two transverse forces on the vortex, Magnus force and Lorentz force, requires the analysis of two balances, for the true momentum of particles in the lattice (Magnus force) and for the quasimomentum (Lorentz force) known from the Bloch theory of particles in the periodic potential. While the developed theory yields the same Lorentz force, which was well known before, a new general expression for the Magnus force was obtained. The theory demonstrates how a small Magnus force emerges in the Josephson-junction array if the particle-hole symmetry is broken. The continuous approximation for the Bose-Hubbard model close to the superfluid-insulator transition was developed, which was used for calculation of the Magnus force. The theory shows that there is an area in the phase diagram for the Bose-Hubbard model, where the Magnus force has an inverse sign with respect to that which is expected from the sign of velocity circulation.

  4. Vortex lattice phases in bosonic ladders in the presence of gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraud, Marie; Greschner, Sebastian; Kolley, Fabian; McCulloch, Ian P.; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian; Vekua, Temo

    2016-05-01

    We study vortex lattices in the interacting Bose-Hubbard model defined on two- and three-leg ladder geometries in the presence of a homogeneous flux. Our work is motivated by recent experiments using laser assisted-tunneling in optical lattices and lattices in synthetic dimensions, which studied the regime of weak interactions. We focus on the effects arising from stronger interactions, in both the real space optical lattice and the synthetic dimension schemes. Based on extensive density matrix renormalization group simulations and a bosonization analysis, we show that vortex lattices form at certain commensurate vortex densities. We identify the parameter space in which they emerge, and study their properties. Very interestingly, an enlarged unit cell forms in the vortex lattice phases, which can lead to the reversal of the current circulation-direction in both geometries. We demonstrate this effect in weak coupling and at sufficiently low temperature, and show that it is significant for intermediate interactions.

  5. Current-driven vortex formation in a magnetic multilayer ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Chunghee; Ng, B. G.; Castaño, F. J.; Mascaro, M. D.; Ross, C. A.

    2009-02-01

    Current-driven domain wall (DW) motion has been studied in the NiFe layer of a Co/Cu/NiFe thin film ring using giant-magnetoresistance measurements in a four-point contact geometry. The NiFe layer is initially in an onion state configuration with two 180° DWs. An electric current drives the walls around the ring so that they annihilate and the NiFe layer forms a DW-free vortex state. The direction of motion of the two DWs is determined by the current polarity, enabling the vortex chirality to be selected.

  6. Tornadolike gravity-driven vortex model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.; Boldman, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The buoyancy-induced vorticity concentration produced as the fluid in a vortex accelerates vertically was studied. The boiloff from liquid nitrogen, to which a small amount of initial vorticity was added, provided a source of cool, heavy gas in which a concentration of vorticity took place. Condensation streamers made the flow visible. It is shown that the presence of a surface boundary layer is not necessary for the effective concentration of vorticity. A simple theoretical analysis of the phenomenon was also made. A radial contraction of the flow with vertical position and a characteristic hook shape in the top view of the streamlines were observed in both theory and experiment. The vorticity concentration observed may be similar to that which occurs in tornadoes.

  7. Vortex lattices in strongly interacting Fermi gas with crossed-beam dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuping; Yao, Xingcan; Chen, Haoze; Liu, Xiangpei; Wang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    We have built an experiment system to explore the dynamic and vortex in quantum degenerate Li6 gas. By using UV MOT and crossed-beam dipole trap, we obtained BEC of 2* 105 molecules. With a tightly focused 532nm laser beam as rotating bucket wall, We observed vortex formation in strongly interacting fermi superfluid. At suitable stirring frequency we produced the condensate of fermi pairs for which up to 10 vortices were simultaneously present. We produced vortex lattices in different magnetic fields (from BEC side to BCS side). Also we measured the lifetime of vortex lattices in different interaction region. This work was funded by CAS and USTC.

  8. Observation of Vortex Nucleation in a Rotating Two-Dimensional Lattice of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R. A.; Al-Assam, S.; Foot, C. J.

    2010-02-05

    We report the observation of vortex nucleation in a rotating optical lattice. A {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate was loaded into a static two-dimensional lattice and the rotation frequency of the lattice was then increased from zero. We studied how vortex nucleation depended on optical lattice depth and rotation frequency. For deep lattices above the chemical potential of the condensate we observed a linear dependence of the number of vortices created with the rotation frequency, even below the thermodynamic critical frequency required for vortex nucleation. At these lattice depths the system formed an array of Josephson-coupled condensates. The effective magnetic field produced by rotation introduced characteristic relative phases between neighboring condensates, such that vortices were observed upon ramping down the lattice depth and recombining the condensates.

  9. Dynamic and Structural Studies of Metastable Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waard, E. R.; Kuhn, S. J.; Rastovski, C.; Eskildsen, M. R.; Leishman, A.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Debeer-Schmitt, L.; Littrell, K.; Karpinski, J.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in the type-II superconductor MgB2 have revealed an unprecedented degree of metastability that is demonstrably not due to vortex pinning, [C. Rastovski et al . , Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 107002 (2013)]. The VL can be driven to the GS through successive application of an AC magnetic field. Here we report on detailed studies of the transition kinetics and structure of the VL domains. Stroboscopic studies of the transition revealed a stretched exponential decrease of the metastable volume fraction as a function of the number of applied AC cycles, with subtle differences depending on whether the AC field is oriented parallel or perpendicular to the DC field used to create the VL. We speculate the slower transition kinetics for the transverse AC field may be due to vortex cutting. Spatial studies include scanning SANS measurements showing the VL domain distribution within the MgB2 single crystal as well as measurements of VL correlation lengths. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award DE-FG02-10ER46783.

  10. Ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order in bacterial vortex lattices

    PubMed Central

    Wioland, Hugo; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their inherent non-equilibrium nature1, living systems can self-organize in highly ordered collective states2,3 that share striking similarities with the thermodynamic equilibrium phases4,5 of conventional condensed matter and fluid systems. Examples range from the liquid-crystal-like arrangements of bacterial colonies6,7, microbial suspensions8,9 and tissues10 to the coherent macro-scale dynamics in schools of fish11 and flocks of birds12. Yet, the generic mathematical principles that govern the emergence of structure in such artificial13 and biological6–9,14 systems are elusive. It is not clear when, or even whether, well-established theoretical concepts describing universal thermostatistics of equilibrium systems can capture and classify ordered states of living matter. Here, we connect these two previously disparate regimes: Through microfluidic experiments and mathematical modelling, we demonstrate that lattices of hydrodynamically coupled bacterial vortices can spontaneously organize into distinct phases of ferro- and antiferromagnetic order. The preferred phase can be controlled by tuning the vortex coupling through changes of the inter-cavity gap widths. The emergence of opposing order regimes is tightly linked to the existence of geometry-induced edge currents15,16, reminiscent of those in quantum systems17–19. Our experimental observations can be rationalized in terms of a generic lattice field theory, suggesting that bacterial spin networks belong to the same universality class as a wide range of equilibrium systems. PMID:27213004

  11. Entanglement of Vortex Lattices for Ultracold Bose Gases in a Non-Abelian Gauge Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Jiang, T. F.; Jheng, Shih-Da; Atomic; Molecular Physics Team; Atomic; Molecular Physics Team

    We develop a theory, referred to as the von Neumann lattice in a higher Landau level, for vortex lattices labelled by an integral number of flux quantums per unit cell in a higher Landau level. Using this lattice theory, we study the vortex lattice states of a pseudospin-1/2 ultracold Bose gas with contact interactions in a non-Abelian gauge potential. In addition to a uniform magnetic field, the Bose gas is also subjected to a non-Abelian gauge field, which creates an effect of the spin-orbit coupling to lift the spin degeneracy of the Landau levels. Because of interactions from the spin-orbit coupling, there are new degenerate points of the single particle spectrum due to the crossings of two Landau levels at certain coupling strengths. We show that interactions from the spin-orbit coupling force the nature and structure of the vortex lattice changing dramatically if the strength of the non-Abelian gauge field is increasing. We also find that the ground state of the vortex lattice at a degenerate point exhibits strong correlation and entanglement involving vortex lattices from different Landau levels. This entangled state builds the connection between two phases of vortex lattices during the first order phase transition of the adiabatic evolution.

  12. Observation of the vortex lattice melting by NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the mixed state

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L.N.; Hammel, P.C.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    For anisotropic layered superconductors the effect of moving vortices on the nuclear spin magnetization is calculated. Current is supposed to flow along layers, and applied magnetic field is tilted with respect to c-axis. In the solid phase the motion of the vortex lattice produces an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the applied field which causes the decay of the spin-echo amplitude. This decay rate will display an array of peaks as a function of frequency. In the liquid phase this alternating field contribute to the longitudinal relaxation rate W{sub 1} which has a single peak.

  13. UBIQUITOUS SOLAR ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2013-06-10

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

  14. Ubiquitous Solar Eruptions Driven by Magnetized Vortex Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

  15. Vortex lattices generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, A.; Kashiwa, R.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2010-11-15

    Vortex streets are formed from sheared initial conditions in classical fluids even without viscosity, which is called the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We demonstrate that similar vortex streets are generated from sheared initial conditions by the direct numerical simulation of the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation which describes the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensates. Furthermore, we show the vortex-lattice formation from sheared initial conditions analogous to the rigid-body rotation in the GP equation under a rotating harmonic potential. The vortex-lattice formation by the dynamical instability in the system without energy dissipation differs from the vortex-lattice formation process by the imaginary time evolution of the GP equation where the lowest energy state is obtained.

  16. An interferometric patchwork to generate high-order quasi-nondiffracting vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Hanping; Liu, Huilan; Xu, Shicai; Ma, Li; Cheng, Chuanfu; Wang, Li; Mingzhen, Li

    2016-06-01

    We propose an novel kind of interferometer to generate various quasinondiffracting vortex lattices with high topological charges. The wave vectors of the interfering beams distribute spatial-symmetrically on the surface patchwork of two concentric cones of different opening angles, and their transverse components site at the vertices of two mutual-inscribed common regular polygons. With certain beam number and particular initial phase distribution at the beams, novel vortex lattices such as Kagome type lattice with unusual vortex distribution are obtained. We further extend such interferometric scheme to multipoint interferometers for easier experimental realization, where the generated vortex lattices lose nondiffracting property. Such interferometric method have potential applications in fields such as direct nanostructure writings and multichannel optical manipulations.

  17. Orientational coupling between the vortex lattice and the crystalline lattice in a weakly pinned Co0.0075NbSe2 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Singh, Harkirat; Ganguly, Rini; Bagwe, Vivas; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2016-04-01

    We report experimental evidence of strong orientational coupling between the crystal lattice and the vortex lattice in a weakly pinned Co-doped NbSe2 single crystal through direct imaging using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. When the magnetic field is applied along the six-fold symmetric c-axis of the NbSe2 crystal, the basis vectors of the vortex lattice are preferentially aligned along the basis vectors of the crystal lattice. The orientational coupling between the vortex lattice and crystal lattice becomes more pronounced as the magnetic field is increased. This orientational coupling enhances the stability of the orientational order of the vortex lattice, which persists even in the disordered state at high fields where dislocations and disclinations have destroyed the topological order. Our results underpin the importance of crystal lattice symmetry on the vortex state phase diagram of weakly pinned type II superconductors.

  18. Formation flying benefits based on vortex lattice calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1977-01-01

    A quadrilateral vortex-lattice method was applied to a formation of three wings to calculate force and moment data for use in estimating potential benefits of flying aircraft in formation on extended range missions, and of anticipating the control problems which may exist. The investigation led to two types of formation having virtually the same overall benefits for the formation as a whole, i.e., a V or echelon formation and a double row formation (with two staggered rows of aircraft). These formations have unequal savings on aircraft within the formation, but this allows large longitudinal spacings between aircraft which is preferable to the small spacing required in formations having equal benefits for all aircraft. A reasonable trade-off between a practical formation size and range benefit seems to lie at about three to five aircraft with corresponding maximum potential range increases of about 46 percent to 67 percent. At this time it is not known what fraction of this potential range increase is achievable in practice.

  19. Vortex-lattice melting in magnesium diboride in terms of the elastic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Qing-Miao; Lv, Jian-Ping; Chen, Qing-Hu

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of elastic theory, we study the vortex-lattice melting transitions in magnesium diboride for magnetic fields both parallel and perpendicular to the anisotropy axis. Using the parameters from experiments, the vortex-lattice melting lines in the H- T diagram are located systematically by various groups of Lindemann numbers. It is observed that the theoretical result for the vortex melting with parallel and perpendicular fields agrees well with the experimental data. Therefore, it is suggested that the phenomenological elastic theory is universal to various type-II superconductors, including two- and multi-band superconductors.

  20. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L E

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics. PMID:27078351

  1. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L. E.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics.

  2. Application of lattice Boltzmann method for analysis of underwater vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraiman, Dian; Viridi, Sparisoma; Purqon, Acep

    2015-09-01

    Vortex dynamics is one of problems arising in fluid dynamics. Vortices are a major characteristic of turbulent flow. We perform the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation to analyze the underwater vortex dynamics close to the shoreline. Additionally, the Smagorinsky tubulence model is applied to treat turbulent flow and a special method for free surface treatment is applied to overcome free surface. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of the turbulence factor and the seabed profile to vortex dynamics. The results show a smaller turbulence factor affected to more turbulent flow and coral reefs reduced movement of vortex towards the shoreline.

  3. Azimuthal-spin-wave-mode-driven vortex-core reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-01-14

    We studied, by micromagnetic numerical calculations, asymmetric vortex-core reversals driven by the m = −1 and m = +1 azimuthal spin-wave modes' excitations in soft magnetic circular nano-disks. We addressed the similarities and differences between the asymmetric core reversals in terms of the temporal evolutions of the correlated core-motion speed, locally concentrated perpendicular gyrofield, and magnetization dip near the original vortex core. The criterion for the core reversals was found to be the magnetization dip that must reach the out-of-plane magnetization component, m{sub z} = −p, with the initial polarization p, where p = +1 (−1) for the upward (downward) core magnetization. The core-motion speed and the associated perpendicular gyrofield, variable and controllable with static perpendicular field, H{sub z}, applied perpendicularly to the disk plane, must reach their threshold values to meet the ultimate core-reversal criterion. Also, we determined the H{sub z} strength and direction dependence of the core-switching time and threshold exciting field strength required for the core reversals, whose parameters are essential in the application aspect. This work offers deeper insights into the azimuthal spin-wave-driven core-reversal dynamics as well as an efficient means of controlling the azimuthal-modes-driven core reversals.

  4. Critical frequency for vortex nucleation in Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilleumas, M.; Centelles, M.; Barranco, M.; Mayol, R.; Pi, M.

    2005-11-01

    We investigate within mean-field theory the influence of a one-dimensional optical lattice and of trapped degenerate fermions on the critical rotational frequency for vortex line creation in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We consider laser intensities of the lattice such that quantum coherence across the condensate is ensured. We find a sizable decrease of the thermodynamic critical frequency for vortex nucleation with increasing applied laser strength and suggest suitable parameters for experimental observation. Since Rb87-K40 mixtures may undergo collapse, we analyze the related question of how the optical lattice affects the mechanical stability of the system.

  5. Solitons and Vortex Lattices in the Gross–Pitaevskii Equation with Spin–Orbit Coupling under Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Umeda, Kanji

    2016-06-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation for two-component rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with the Rashba-type spin-orbit (SO) coupling is studied with numerical simulations and variational analyses. A multiquantum vortex state becomes a ground state in a harmonic potential when mutual interaction is absent. When the attractive interaction is strong, the multiquantum vortex state exhibits modulational instability in the azimuthal direction, and a soliton-like state appears. When the repulsive interaction is strong, a vortex lattice state with a multiquantum vortex at the center is created. We find that the vortex lattice state is approximated at a linear combination of multiquantum vortex states.

  6. A vortex-lattice method for the mean camber shapes of trimmed noncoplanar planforms with minimum vortex drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A new subsonic method has been developed by which the mean camber surface can be determined for trimmed noncoplanar planforms with minimum vortex drag. This method uses a vortex lattice and overcomes previous difficulties with chord loading specification. A Trefftz plane analysis is utilized to determine the optimum span loading for minimum drag, then solved for the mean camber surface of the wing, which provides the required loading. Sensitivity studies, comparisons with other theories, and applications to configurations which include a tandem wing and a wing winglet combination have been made and are presented.

  7. A generalized vortex lattice method for subsonic and supersonic flow applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, L. R.; Elliot, R. D.; Baker, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    If the discrete vortex lattice is considered as an approximation to the surface-distributed vorticity, then the concept of the generalized principal part of an integral yields a residual term to the vorticity-induced velocity field. The proper incorporation of this term to the velocity field generated by the discrete vortex lines renders the present vortex lattice method valid for supersonic flow. Special techniques for simulating nonzero thickness lifting surfaces and fusiform bodies with vortex lattice elements are included. Thickness effects of wing-like components are simulated by a double (biplanar) vortex lattice layer, and fusiform bodies are represented by a vortex grid arranged on a series of concentrical cylindrical surfaces. The analysis of sideslip effects by the subject method is described. Numerical considerations peculiar to the application of these techniques are also discussed. The method has been implemented in a digital computer code. A users manual is included along with a complete FORTRAN compilation, an executed case, and conversion programs for transforming input for the NASA wave drag program.

  8. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  9. Formation of Vortex Lattices in Superfluid Bose Gases at Finite Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahata, E.; Nikuni, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) at finite temperatures. Using the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin formalism, based on a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate coupled to a semiclassical kinetic equation for a thermal cloud, we numerically simulate vortex lattice formation in the presence of a time-dependent rotating trap potential. At low rotation frequency, the thermal cloud undergoes rigid body rotation, while the condensate exhibits irrotational flow. Above a certain threshold rotation frequency, vortices penetrate into the condensate and form a vortex lattice. Our simulation result clearly indicates a crucial role for the thermal cloud, which triggers vortex lattice formation in the rotating BEC.

  10. Chaotic and ballistic dynamics in time-driven quasiperiodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of classical particles in a driven quasiperiodic lattice based on the Fibonacci sequence. An intricate transient dynamics of extraordinarily long ballistic flights at distinct velocities is found. We argue how these transients are caused and can be understood by a hierarchy of block decompositions of the quasiperiodic lattice. A comparison to the cases of periodic and fully randomized lattices is performed.

  11. Chaotic and ballistic dynamics in time-driven quasiperiodic lattices.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of classical particles in a driven quasiperiodic lattice based on the Fibonacci sequence. An intricate transient dynamics of extraordinarily long ballistic flights at distinct velocities is found. We argue how these transients are caused and can be understood by a hierarchy of block decompositions of the quasiperiodic lattice. A comparison to the cases of periodic and fully randomized lattices is performed. PMID:27176301

  12. Validation of Vortex-Lattice Method for loads on wings in lift-generated wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, J.

    1994-01-01

    A study is described that evaluates the accuracy of vortex-lattice methods when they are used to compute the loads induced on aircraft as they encounter lift-generated wakes. The evaluation is accomplished by use of measurements made in the 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel of the lift, rolling-moment, and downwash in the wake of three configurations of a model of a subsonic transport aircraft. The downwash measurements are used as input for a vortex-lattice code in order to compute the lift and rolling moment induced on wings that have a span of 0.186, 0.510, or 1.022 times the span of the wake-generating model. Comparison of the computed results with the measured lift and rolling moment distributions are used to determine the accuracy of the vortex-lattice code. It was found that the vortex-lattice method is very reliable as long as the span of the encountering of following wing is less than about 0.2 of the generator span. As the span of the following wing increases above 0.2, the vortex-lattice method continues to correctly predict the trends and nature of the induced loads, but it overpredicts the magnitude of the loads by increasing amounts. The increase in deviation of the computed from the measured loads with size of the following wing is attributed to the increase in distortion of the structure of the vortex wake as it approaches and passes the larger following wings.

  13. Vortex lattices in a rotating Fermi superfluid in the BCS-BEC crossover with many Landau levels

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tie-ling; Ma, C.R.; Ma, Yong-li

    2012-08-15

    We present an explicit analytical analysis of the ground state of vortex lattice structure, based on a minimization of the generalized Gross-Pitaevskii energy functional in a trapped rotating Fermi superfluid gas. By a Bogoliubov-like transformation we find that the coarse-grained average of the atomic density varies as inverted parabola in three dimensional cases; the Fermi superfluid in the BEC regime enters into the lowest Landau level at fast rotation, in which the vortices form an almost regular triangular lattice over a central region and the vortex lattice is expanded along the radial direction in the outer region; the fluid in the unitarity and BCS regimes occupies many low-lying Landau levels, in which a trapped gas with a triangular vortex lattice has a superfluid core surrounded by a normal gas. The calculation is qualitatively consistent with recent numerical and experimental data both in the vortex lattice structure and vortex numbers and in the density profiles versus the stirring frequency in the whole BCS-BEC crossover. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present an analysis of vortex lattice in an interacting trapped rotating Fermi superfluid gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposing the vortex from the condensate, we can explain the vortex lattice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculation is consistent with numerical and experimental data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can characterize experimentally properties in different regimes of the BCS-BEC crossover.

  14. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor.

    PubMed

    Reimann, T; Mühlbauer, S; Schulz, M; Betz, B; Kaestner, A; Pipich, V; Böni, P; Grünzweig, C

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice. PMID:26522610

  15. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, T.; Mühlbauer, S.; Schulz, M.; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Pipich, V.; Böni, P.; Grünzweig, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice. PMID:26522610

  16. Validation of Vortex-Lattice Method for Loads on Wings in Lift-Generated Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1995-01-01

    A study is described that evaluates the accuracy of vortex-lattice methods when they are used to compute the loads induced on aircraft as they encounter lift-generated wakes. The evaluation is accomplished by the use of measurements made in the 80 by 120 ft Wind Tunnel of the lift, rolling moment, and downwash in the wake of three configurations of a model of a subsonic transport aircraft. The downwash measurements are used as input for a vortex-lattice code in order to compute the lift and rolling moment induced on wings that have a span of 0.186, 0.510, or 1.022 times the span of the wake-generating model. Comparison of the computed results with the measured lift and rolling-moment distributions the vortex-lattice method is very reliable as long as the span of the encountering or following wing is less than about 0.2 of the generator span. As the span of the following wing increases above 0.2, the vortex-lattice method continues to correctly predict the trends and nature of the induced loads, but it overpredicts the magnitude of the loads by increasing amounts.

  17. Topological triple-vortex lattice stabilized by mixed frustration in expanded honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shuai

    2016-05-01

    The expanded classical Kitaev-Heisenberg model on a honeycomb lattice is investigated with the next-nearest-neighboring Heisenberg interaction considered. The simulation shows a rich phase diagram with periodic behavior in a wide parameter range. Beside the double 120° ordered phase, an inhomogeneous phase is uncovered to exhibit a topological triple-vortex lattice, corresponding to the hexagonal domain structure of vector chirality, which is stabilized by the mixed frustration of two sources: the geometrical frustration arising from the lattice structure as well as the frustration from the Kitaev couplings.

  18. Topological triple-vortex lattice stabilized by mixed frustration in expanded honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    The expanded classical Kitaev-Heisenberg model on a honeycomb lattice is investigated with the next-nearest-neighboring Heisenberg interaction considered. The simulation shows a rich phase diagram with periodic behavior in a wide parameter range. Beside the double 120° ordered phase, an inhomogeneous phase is uncovered to exhibit a topological triple-vortex lattice, corresponding to the hexagonal domain structure of vector chirality, which is stabilized by the mixed frustration of two sources: the geometrical frustration arising from the lattice structure as well as the frustration from the Kitaev couplings. PMID:27229486

  19. Z2-vortex lattice in the ground state of the triangular Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghofer, Maria; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Roessler, Ulrich K.; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the classical Kitaev-Heisenberg Hamiltonian on a triangular lattice, we establish the presence of an incommensurate non-coplanar magnetic phase, which is identified as a lattice of Z2 vortices. The vortices, topological point defects in the SO(3) order parameter of the nearby Heisenberg antiferromagnet, are not thermally excited but due to the spin-orbit coupling and arise at temperature T --> 0 . This Z2-vortex lattice is stable in a parameter regime relevant to iridates. We show that in the other, strongly anisotropic, limit a robust nematic phase emerges. Sponsored by the DFG (Emmy-Noether program).

  20. Vortex Formation of Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates in Synthetic Magnetic Field with Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by recent experiments carried out by Spielman's group at NIST, we study the vortex formation in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate in synthetic magnetic field confined in a harmonic potential combined with an optical lattice. We obtain numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation and compare the vortex formation by synthetic magnetic field method with those by rotating frame method. We conclude that a large angular momentum indeed can be created in the presence of the optical lattice. However, it is still more difficult to rotate the condensate by the synthetic magnetic field than by the rotating frame even if the optical lattice is added, and the chemical potential and energy remain almost unchanged by increasing rotational frequency.

  1. A method of studying the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for the superconducting vortex lattice state.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiang

    2010-01-27

    In this paper, we present a method to construct the eigenspace of the tight-binding electrons moving on a 2D square lattice with nearest-neighbor hopping in the presence of a perpendicular uniform magnetic field which imposes (quasi-)periodic boundary conditions for the wavefunctions in the magnetic unit cell. Exact unitary transformations are put forward to correlate the discrete eigenvectors of the 2D electrons with those of the Harper equation. The cyclic tridiagonal matrix associated with the Harper equation is then tridiagonalized by another unitary transformation. The obtained truncated eigenbasis is utilized to expand the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for the superconducting vortex lattice state, which shows the merit of our method in studying large-sized systems. To test our method, we have applied our results to study the vortex lattice state of an s-wave superconductor. PMID:21386295

  2. Dynamic coupling-decoupling crossover in the current-driven vortex-state in Tl[sub 2]Ba[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8]studied using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsmølle, V. K.; Averitt, R. D.; Aranson, I. S.; Maley, M. P.; Bulaevskiĭ, L. N.; Taylor, Antoinette J.,

    2004-01-01

    Employing terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in transmission, they have measured the Josephson plasma resonance in Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} high-T{sub c} thin films, and studied the current-driven coupling-decoupling crossover in the driven vortex lattice.

  3. Fractionalizing the vortex lattice in multiband superconductors in the flux flow region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng

    2014-03-01

    Because of the discovery of MgB2 and iron-based superconductors, multiband superconductors have attracted considerable attention recently. Multiband superconductors are not always straightforward extensions of the single-band counterpart, and novel features may arise. In multiband superconductors, electrons in different bands form distinct superfluid condensates, which are coupled to the same gauge field. Each condensate thus supports vortex excitation with fractional flux quantum. However the energy of a fractional vortex diverges logarithmically in the thermodynamic limit. In the ground state vortices in different bands are bounded and their normal cores are locked together to form a composite vortex with the standard integer quantum flux. It is interesting to ask whether the vortices in different condensates can decouple under certain conditions. In this talk, I will discuss the dissociation of the composite vortex lattice in the flux flow region when the disparity of superfluid density and coherence length between different bands is large. The fractional vortex lattice in different bands move with different velocities after the dissociation transition, and the dissociation transition shows up as an increase of flux flow resistivity. In the dissociated phase, the Shapiro steps are developed when an ac current is superimposed with a dc current. We also propose to stabilize the fractional vortices by periodic pinning arrays. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering.

  4. Temperature effects in excitonic condensation driven by the lattice distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Thi-Hong-Hai; Nguyen, Huu-Nha; Nguyen, Thi-Giang; Phan, Van-Nham

    2016-06-01

    The stability of the excitonic condensation at low temperature driven by a coupling of electrons to vibrational degrees of freedom in semimetal two-dimensional electronic system is discussed. In the framework of the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation, we derive a set of equations to determine both the excitonic condensate order parameter and lattice displacement self-consistently. By lowering temperature we find out a semimetal-insulator transition in the system if the coupling is large enough. The insulating state typifies an excitonic condensation accompanied by a finite lattice distortion. Increasing temperature, both excitonic condensate order parameter and the lattice distortion decrease and then disappear in the same manner. Microscopic analysis in momentum space strongly specifies that the excitonic condensate driven by the lattice distortion favours the BCS type.

  5. VLMD - VORTEX-LATTICE CODE FOR DETERMINATION OF MEAN CAMBER SURFACE FOR TRIMMED NONCOPLANER PLANFORMS WITH MINIMUM VORTEX DRAG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    This program represents a subsonic aerodynamic method for determining the mean camber surface of trimmed noncoplaner planforms with minimum vortex drag. With this program, multiple surfaces can be designed together to yield a trimmed configuration with minimum induced drag at some specified lift coefficient. The method uses a vortex-lattice and overcomes previous difficulties with chord loading specification. A Trefftz plane analysis is used to determine the optimum span loading for minimum drag. The program then solves for the mean camber surface of the wing associated with this loading. Pitching-moment or root-bending-moment constraints can be employed at the design lift coefficient. Sensitivity studies of vortex-lattice arrangements have been made with this program and comparisons with other theories show generally good agreement. The program is very versatile and has been applied to isolated wings, wing-canard configurations, a tandem wing, and a wing-winglet configuration. The design problem solved with this code is essentially an optimization one. A subsonic vortex-lattice is used to determine the span load distribution(s) on bent lifting line(s) in the Trefftz plane. A Lagrange multiplier technique determines the required loading which is used to calculate the mean camber slopes, which are then integrated to yield the local elevation surface. The problem of determining the necessary circulation matrix is simplified by having the chordwise shape of the bound circulation remain unchanged across each span, though the chordwise shape may vary from one planform to another. The circulation matrix is obtained by calculating the spanwise scaling of the chordwise shapes. A chordwise summation of the lift and pitching-moment is utilized in the Trefftz plane solution on the assumption that the trailing wake does not roll up and that the general configuration has specifiable chord loading shapes. VLMD is written in FORTRAN for IBM PC series and compatible computers

  6. Applications of the unsteady vortex-lattice method in aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murua, Joseba; Palacios, Rafael; Graham, J. Michael R.

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady vortex-lattice method provides a medium-fidelity tool for the prediction of non-stationary aerodynamic loads in low-speed, but high-Reynolds-number, attached flow conditions. Despite a proven track record in applications where free-wake modelling is critical, other less-computationally expensive potential-flow models, such as the doublet-lattice method and strip theory, have long been favoured in fixed-wing aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics. This paper presents how the unsteady vortex-lattice method can be implemented as an enhanced alternative to those techniques for diverse situations that arise in flexible-aircraft dynamics. A historical review of the methodology is included, with latest developments and practical applications. Different formulations of the aerodynamic equations are outlined, and they are integrated with a nonlinear beam model for the full description of the dynamics of a free-flying flexible vehicle. Nonlinear time-marching solutions capture large wing excursions and wake roll-up, and the linearisation of the equations lends itself to a seamless, monolithic state-space assembly, particularly convenient for stability analysis and flight control system design. The numerical studies emphasise scenarios where the unsteady vortex-lattice method can provide an advantage over other state-of-the-art approaches. Examples of this include unsteady aerodynamics in vehicles with coupled aeroelasticity and flight dynamics, and in lifting surfaces undergoing complex kinematics, large deformations, or in-plane motions. Geometric nonlinearities are shown to play an instrumental, and often counter-intuitive, role in the aircraft dynamics. The unsteady vortex-lattice method is unveiled as a remarkable tool that can successfully incorporate all those effects in the unsteady aerodynamics modelling.

  7. How the vortex lattice of a superconductor becomes disordered: a study by scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zehetmayer, M

    2015-01-01

    Order-disorder transitions take place in many physical systems, but observing them in detail in real materials is difficult. In two- or quasi-two-dimensional systems, the transition has been studied by computer simulations and experimentally in electron sheets, dusty plasmas, colloidal and other systems. Here I show the different stages of defect formation in the vortex lattice of a superconductor while it undergoes an order-disorder transition by presenting real-space images of the lattice from scanning tunneling spectroscopy. When the system evolves from the ordered to the disordered state, the predominant kind of defect changes from dislocation pairs to single dislocations, and finally to defect clusters forming grain boundaries. Correlation functions indicate a hexatic-like state preceding the disordered state. The transition in the microscopic vortex distribution is mirrored by the well-known spectacular second peak effect observed in the macroscopic current density of the superconductor. PMID:25784605

  8. Quantum fluctuations of the vortex-lattice state in an ultrafast rotating Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qiong; Feng Bo; Li Dingping

    2011-04-15

    Quantum fluctuations in an ultrafast rotating Bose gas at zero temperature are investigated. We calculate the condensate density perturbatively to show that no condensate is present in the thermodynamic limit. The excitation from Gaussian fluctuations around the mean-field solution causes infrared divergences in loop diagrams, nevertheless, in calculating the atom number density, the correlation functions and the free energy, we find that the sum of the divergences in the same loop order vanishes and we obtain finite physical quantities. The long-range correlation is explored and the algebraic decay exponent for the single-particle correlation function is obtained. The atom number density distribution is obtained at the one-loop level, which illustrates the quantum fluctuation effects to melt the mean-field vortex lattice. By the nonperturbative Gaussian variational method, we locate the spinodal point of the vortex-lattice state.

  9. Quantum fluctuations of the vortex-lattice state in an ultrafast rotating Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiong; Feng, Bo; Li, Dingping

    2011-04-01

    Quantum fluctuations in an ultrafast rotating Bose gas at zero temperature are investigated. We calculate the condensate density perturbatively to show that no condensate is present in the thermodynamic limit. The excitation from Gaussian fluctuations around the mean-field solution causes infrared divergences in loop diagrams, nevertheless, in calculating the atom number density, the correlation functions and the free energy, we find that the sum of the divergences in the same loop order vanishes and we obtain finite physical quantities. The long-range correlation is explored and the algebraic decay exponent for the single-particle correlation function is obtained. The atom number density distribution is obtained at the one-loop level, which illustrates the quantum fluctuation effects to melt the mean-field vortex lattice. By the nonperturbative Gaussian variational method, we locate the spinodal point of the vortex-lattice state.

  10. Rotating superfluids in anharmonic traps: From vortex lattices to giant vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Correggi, Michele; Pinsker, Florian; Rougerie, Nicolas; Yngvason, Jakob

    2011-11-15

    We study a superfluid in a rotating anharmonic trap and explicate a rigorous proof of a transition from a vortex lattice to a giant vortex state as the rotation is increased beyond a limiting speed determined by the interaction strength. The transition is characterized by the disappearance of the vortices from the annulus where the bulk of the superfluid is concentrated due to centrifugal forces while a macroscopic phase circulation remains. The analysis is carried out within two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii theory at large coupling constant and reveals significant differences between ''soft'' anharmonic traps (like a quartic plus quadratic trapping potential) and traps with a fixed boundary: in the latter case the transition takes place in a parameter regime where the size of vortices is very small relative to the width of the annulus, whereas in soft traps the vortex lattice persists until the width of the annulus becomes comparable to the vortex cores. Moreover, the density profile in the annulus where the bulk is concentrated is, in the soft case, approximately Gaussian with long tails and not of the Thomas-Fermi type like in a trap with a fixed boundary.

  11. Morphology of the Superconducting Vortex Lattice in Ultrapure Niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, S.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.; Laver, M.; Forgan, E. M.; Fort, D.; Keiderling, U.; Behr, G.

    2009-04-01

    The morphology of the superconducting flux line lattice (FLL) of Nb comprises gradual variations with various lock-in transitions and symmetry breaking rotations. We report a comprehensive small-angle neutron scattering study of the FLL in an ultrapure single crystal of Nb as a function of the orientation of the applied magnetic field. We attribute the general morphology of the FLL and its orientation to three dominant mechanisms; first, nonlocal contributions, second, the transition between open and closed Fermi surface sheets and, third, the intermediate mixed state between the Meissner and the Shubnikov phase.

  12. Ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order in bacterial vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wioland, Hugo; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-04-01

    Despite their inherently non-equilibrium nature, living systems can self-organize in highly ordered collective states that share striking similarities with the thermodynamic equilibrium phases of conventional condensed-matter and fluid systems. Examples range from the liquid-crystal-like arrangements of bacterial colonies, microbial suspensions and tissues to the coherent macro-scale dynamics in schools of fish and flocks of birds. Yet, the generic mathematical principles that govern the emergence of structure in such artificial and biological systems are elusive. It is not clear when, or even whether, well-established theoretical concepts describing universal thermostatistics of equilibrium systems can capture and classify ordered states of living matter. Here, we connect these two previously disparate regimes: through microfluidic experiments and mathematical modelling, we demonstrate that lattices of hydrodynamically coupled bacterial vortices can spontaneously organize into distinct patterns characterized by ferro- and antiferromagnetic order. The coupling between adjacent vortices can be controlled by tuning the inter-cavity gap widths. The emergence of opposing order regimes is tightly linked to the existence of geometry-induced edge currents, reminiscent of those in quantum systems. Our experimental observations can be rationalized in terms of a generic lattice field theory, suggesting that bacterial spin networks belong to the same universality class as a wide range of equilibrium systems.

  13. Skyrmionic vortex lattices in coherently coupled three-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Natalia V.; Kuopanportti, Pekko; Milošević, Milorad V.

    2016-08-01

    We show numerically that a harmonically trapped and coherently Rabi-coupled three-component Bose-Einstein condensate can host unconventional vortex lattices in its rotating ground state. The discovered lattices incorporate square and zig-zag patterns, vortex dimers and chains, and doubly quantized vortices, and they can be quantitatively classified in terms of a skyrmionic topological index, which takes into account the multicomponent nature of the system. The exotic ground-state lattices arise due to the intricate interplay of the repulsive density-density interactions and the Rabi couplings as well as the ubiquitous phase frustration between the components. In the frustrated state, domain walls in the relative phases can persist between some components even at strong Rabi coupling, while vanishing between others. Consequently, in this limit the three-component condensate effectively approaches a two-component condensate with only density-density interactions. At intermediate Rabi coupling strengths, however, we face unique vortex physics that occurs neither in the two-component counterpart nor in the purely density-density-coupled three-component system.

  14. Dissipation-Induced Symmetry Breaking in a Driven Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gommers, R.; Bergamini, S.; Renzoni, F.

    2005-08-12

    We analyze the atomic dynamics in an ac driven periodic optical potential which is symmetric in both time and space. We experimentally demonstrate that in the presence of dissipation the symmetry is broken, and a current of atoms through the optical lattice is generated as a result.

  15. Vortex lattices in the superconducting phases of doped topological insulators and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Hsiang-Hsuan; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Hughes, Taylor L.; Gilbert, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Majorana fermions are predicted to play a crucial role in condensed matter realizations of topological quantum computation. These heretofore undiscovered quasiparticles have been predicted to exist at the cores of vortex excitations in topological superconductors and in heterostructures of superconductors and materials with strong spin-orbit coupling. In this work, we examine topological insulators with bulk s-wave superconductivity in the presence of a vortex lattice generated by a perpendicular magnetic field. Using self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes calculations, we confirm that beyond the semiclassical, weak-pairing limit the Majorana vortex states appear as the chemical potential is tuned from either side of the band edge so long as the density of states is sufficient for superconductivity to form. Further, we demonstrate that the previously predicted vortex phase transition survives beyond the semiclassical limit. At chemical potential values smaller than the critical chemical potential, the vortex lattice modes hybridize within the top and bottom surfaces, giving rise to a dispersive low-energy mid-gap band. As the chemical potential is increased, the Majorana states become more localized within a single surface but spread into the bulk toward the opposite surface. Eventually, when the chemical potential is sufficiently high in the bulk bands, the Majorana modes can tunnel between surfaces and eventually a critical point is reached at which modes on opposite surfaces can freely tunnel and annihilate leading to the topological phase transition previously studied in the work of Hosur [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.097001 107, 097001 (2011)].

  16. Vortex Lattice Formation in High Magnetic Fields in an Underdoped Single Crystal of Hg1201 from 17O NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongseop; Xin, Yizhou; Halperin, W. P.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    The vortex lattice in HgBa2CuO4+δ forms at a vortex melting temperature, Tv, typically ~40K for underdoped crystals with a hole doping ~ 0.11. We present our results from 17O NMR for investigation of the vortex lattice as a function of external magnetic field up to 30 T and temperature as low as 5 K. The vortex contribution to the NMR linewidth can be separated from inhomogeneous broadening by deconvolution of the normal state spectra which was measured separately above, Tv. The vortex melting temperature was measured for two underdoped samples marked by the onset of extra linewidth broadening due to the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution from the solid vortex lattice consistent with transverse relaxation measurements. We have found evidence for a change in the vortex lattice symmetry as a function of external fields. This work was supported by the DOE BES under Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER46248 and the NHMFL through the NSF and State of Florida.

  17. Lennard-Jones and lattice models of driven fluids.

    PubMed

    Díez-Minguito, M; Garrido, P L; Marro, J

    2005-08-01

    We introduce a nonequilibrium off-lattice model for anisotropic phenomena in fluids. This is a Lennard-Jones generalization of the driven lattice-gas model in which the particles' spatial coordinates vary continuously. A comparison between the two models allows us to discuss some exceptional, hardly realistic features of the original discrete system--which has been considered a prototype for nonequilibrium anisotropic phase transitions. We thus help to clarify open issues, and discuss on the implications of our observations for future investigation of anisotropic phase transitions. PMID:16196640

  18. Vortex lattice structures in YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect

    Yethiraj, M.; Paul, D.M.; Tomy, C.V.; Forgan, E.M.

    1997-12-01

    The authors observe a flux lattice with square symmetry in the superconductor YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C when the applied field is parallel to the c-axis of the crystal. A square lattice observed previously in the isostructural magnetic analog ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C was attributed to the interaction between magnetic order in that system and the flux lattice. Since the Y-based compound does not order magnetically, it is clear that the structure of the flux lattice is unrelated to magnetic order. In fact, they show that the flux lines have a square cross-section when the applied field is parallel to the c-axis of the crystal, since the measured penetration depth along the 100 crystal direction is larger than the penetration depth along the 110 by approximately 60%. This is the likely reason for the square symmetry of the lattice. Although they find considerable disorder in the arrangement of the flux lines at 2.5T, no melting of the vortex lattice was observed.

  19. Vortex-Loop Unbinding and Flux-Line Lattice Melting in Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.K.; Sudbo Hetzel, R. |

    1996-08-01

    We study the interplay between a novel vortex-loop unbinding in finite magnetic field at {ital T}={ital T}{sub {ital V}} and flux-line-lattice (FLL) melting at {ital T}={ital T}{sub {ital M}} in type-II superconductors. The FLL melts due to nucleation of vortex loops parallel to the {ital {cflx c}} axis, connected to flux lines. For moderate anisotropy, phase coherence parallel to {ital {cflx c}} is lost at {ital T}{sub {ital V}}{approx_gt}{ital T}{sub {ital M}} due to an {ital ab}-plane vortex-loop unbinding with loops located close to thermal FLL fluctuations. For large anisotropy, phase coherence parallel to {ital {cflx c}} is lost at {ital T}{sub {ital V}}{lt}{ital T}{sub {ital M}} due to nucleation of vortex loops uncorrelated to flux lines, predominantly in the {ital ab} plane. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Vortex-Driven Sound in a Cylindrical Cavity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatau, Alison

    1990-08-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow induced acoustic response of a cylindrical cavity to variations in the stiffness of baffles that cause flow separation and vortex shedding is presented. Vortex shedding in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors (SRMs) contributes to undesirable combustion instabilities or oscillations in the propellant burn rate that can introduce detrimental vibratory loads to the shuttle and its cargo, including astronauts who complain of a "rough ride." This study presents a cold flow simulation of the conditions that produce vortex shedding in the SRMs using a cylindrical cavity with annular protrusions or baffles extending from the cavity walls into the flow path. This work provides quantification of the frequency and relative amplitude of this flow induced acoustic response, called a hole tone response. Specifically investigated are the effects of variable baffle stiffness and of baffle resonance excitation on the acoustic frequency and amplitude of the cavity response.

  1. Convergence characteristics of nonlinear vortex-lattice methods for configuration aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Rusak, Z.; Wasserstrom, E.

    1983-01-01

    Nonlinear panel methods have no proof for the existence and uniqueness of their solutions. The convergence characteristics of an iterative, nonlinear vortex-lattice method are, therefore, carefully investigated. The effects of several parameters, including (1) the surface-paneling method, (2) an integration method of the trajectories of the wake vortices, (3) vortex-grid refinement, and (4) the initial conditions for the first iteration on the computed aerodynamic coefficients and on the flow-field details are presented. The convergence of the iterative-solution procedure is usually rapid. The solution converges with grid refinement to a constant value, but the final value is not unique and varies with the wing surface-paneling and wake-discretization methods within some range in the vicinity of the experimental result.

  2. Interaction of vortex lattice with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R. |

    1995-03-27

    The interaction of sound with the vortex lattice is considered for high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. At low temperatures the Magnus force results in the acoustic Faraday effect; the velocity of sound propagating along the magnetic field depends on the polarization. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. In the thermally activated flux flow regime, the Faraday effect is caused by electric and magnetic fields induced by vortices and acting on ions.

  3. Cooperative ring exchange and quantum melting of vortex lattices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tarun Kanti; Baskaran, G.

    2004-02-01

    Cooperative ring exchange is suggested as a mechanism of quantum melting of vortex lattices in a rapidly rotating quasi-two-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Using an approach pioneered by Kivelson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 873 (1986)] for the fractional quantized Hall effect, we calculate the condition for quantum melting instability by considering large-correlated ring exchanges in a two-dimensional Wigner crystal of vortices in a strong 'pseudomagnetic field' generated by the background superfluid Bose particles. BEC may be profitably used to address issues of quantum melting of a pristine Wigner solid devoid of complications of real solids.

  4. Effect of Rolling Massage on the Vortex Flow in Blood Vessels with Lattice Boltzmann Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou Hui

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese Medical Massage, which is a nature therapy in eliminating many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on the cavity flows in blood vessel under the rolling manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that the vortex flows are fully disturbed by the rolling massage. The flow behavior depends on the rolling velocity and the rolling depth. Rolling massage has a better effect on the flows in the cavity than that of the flows in a planar blood vessel. The result is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the rolling techniques.

  5. A dilation-driven vortex flow in sheared granular materials explains a rheometric anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaraj, K. P.; Nott, Prabhu R.

    2016-02-01

    Granular flows occur widely in nature and industry, yet a continuum description that captures their important features is yet not at hand. Recent experiments on granular materials sheared in a cylindrical Couette device revealed a puzzling anomaly, wherein all components of the stress rise nearly exponentially with depth. Here we show, using particle dynamics simulations and imaging experiments, that the stress anomaly arises from a remarkable vortex flow. For the entire range of fill heights explored, we observe a single toroidal vortex that spans the entire Couette cell and whose sense is opposite to the uppermost Taylor vortex in a fluid. We show that the vortex is driven by a combination of shear-induced dilation, a phenomenon that has no analogue in fluids, and gravity flow. Dilatancy is an important feature of granular mechanics, but not adequately incorporated in existing models.

  6. A dilation-driven vortex flow in sheared granular materials explains a rheometric anomaly.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, K P; Nott, Prabhu R

    2016-01-01

    Granular flows occur widely in nature and industry, yet a continuum description that captures their important features is yet not at hand. Recent experiments on granular materials sheared in a cylindrical Couette device revealed a puzzling anomaly, wherein all components of the stress rise nearly exponentially with depth. Here we show, using particle dynamics simulations and imaging experiments, that the stress anomaly arises from a remarkable vortex flow. For the entire range of fill heights explored, we observe a single toroidal vortex that spans the entire Couette cell and whose sense is opposite to the uppermost Taylor vortex in a fluid. We show that the vortex is driven by a combination of shear-induced dilation, a phenomenon that has no analogue in fluids, and gravity flow. Dilatancy is an important feature of granular mechanics, but not adequately incorporated in existing models. PMID:26864086

  7. A dilation-driven vortex flow in sheared granular materials explains a rheometric anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaraj, K. P.; Nott, Prabhu R.

    2016-01-01

    Granular flows occur widely in nature and industry, yet a continuum description that captures their important features is yet not at hand. Recent experiments on granular materials sheared in a cylindrical Couette device revealed a puzzling anomaly, wherein all components of the stress rise nearly exponentially with depth. Here we show, using particle dynamics simulations and imaging experiments, that the stress anomaly arises from a remarkable vortex flow. For the entire range of fill heights explored, we observe a single toroidal vortex that spans the entire Couette cell and whose sense is opposite to the uppermost Taylor vortex in a fluid. We show that the vortex is driven by a combination of shear-induced dilation, a phenomenon that has no analogue in fluids, and gravity flow. Dilatancy is an important feature of granular mechanics, but not adequately incorporated in existing models. PMID:26864086

  8. Rossby vortex simulation on a paraboloidal coordinate system using the lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Zhao, K

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we apply our compressible lattice Boltzmann model to a rotating parabolic coordinate system to simulate Rossby vortices emerging in a layer of shallow water flowing zonally in a rotating paraboloidal vessel. By introducing a scaling factor, nonuniform curvilinear mesh can be mapped to a flat uniform mesh and then normal lattice Boltzmann method works. Since the mass per unit area on the two-dimensional (2D) surface varies with the thickness of the water layer, the 2D flow seems to be "compressible" and our compressible model is applied. Simulation solutions meet with the experimental observations qualitatively. Based on this research, quantitative solutions and many natural phenomena simulations in planetary atmospheres, oceans, and magnetized plasma, such as the famous Jovian Giant Red Spot, the Galactic Spiral-vortex, the Gulf Stream, and the Kuroshio Current, etc., can be expected. PMID:11736137

  9. Driven cavity simulation of turbomachine blade flows with vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the three-dimensional flows in a rotating cavity with clearance between cavity walls and lid wall. The objectives of this study is to understand the interaction mechanism between tip leakage and blade passage flows and to assess the means to control the flow pattern and pressure losses. The classes of problems addressed include: passage geometry, passage loading including lid velocity and anti-vortex strength, and placement necessary to provide flow control. The computational model is first validated on generic flow problems and then applied to a specific blade passage configuration. Results of parametric studies for secondary flow pattern control are analyzed, and practical means of vortex control are discussed.

  10. Production version of the extended NASA-Langley Vortex Lattice FORTRAN computer program. Volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Herbert, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    The latest production version, MARK IV, of the NASA-Langley vortex lattice computer program is summarized. All viable subcritical aerodynamic features of previous versions were retained. This version extends the previously documented program capabilities to four planforms, 400 panels, and enables the user to obtain vortex-flow aerodynamics on cambered planforms, flowfield properties off the configuration in attached flow, and planform longitudinal load distributions.

  11. Production version of the extended NASA-Langley vortex lattice FORTRAN computer program. Volume 2: Source code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, H. E.; Lamar, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The source code for the latest production version, MARK IV, of the NASA-Langley Vortex Lattice Computer Program is presented. All viable subcritical aerodynamic features of previous versions were retained. This version extends the previously documented program capabilities to four planforms, 400 panels, and enables the user to obtain vortex-flow aerodynamics on cambered planforms, flowfield properties off the configuration in attached flow, and planform longitudinal load distributions.

  12. Exploratory experiments on acoustic oscillations driven by periodic vortex shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, R.; Brown, R. S.

    1981-03-01

    Periodic vortex shedding is investigated as a mechanism by which low-amplitude pressure oscillations can be generated in segmented solid propellant rocket engines. Acoustic responses were monitored in an acoustically isolated flow chamber with two flow restrictors in the flow path as a function of resistor spacing and flow Mach number. At Mach 0.042, the maximum acoustic response is observed with a marked increase in the amplitude of the wave corresponding to the third acoustic mode of the chamber. Reduction of the Mach number by a factor of three is found to excite the first longitudinal mode of the chamber at the same restrictor spacing. Attempts to produce the second axial mode are unsuccessful when the restrictors were kept at the center of the chamber, indicating the importance of restrictor position relative to the acoustic mode structure. The restrictor spacing at which maximum response is obtained indicates a Strouhal number of 0.8 characterizing the vortex shedding frequency, in agreement with calculations. The results thus demonstrate that a significant (5-10%) pressure oscillation can be generated by coupling from periodic vortex shedding

  13. Driven diffusion in the two-dimensional lattice Coulomb gas: A model for flux flow in superconducting networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. ); Teitel, S. )

    1994-08-01

    We carry out driven-diffusion Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional classical lattice Coulomb gas in an applied uniform electric field, as a model for vortex motion due to an applied dc current in a periodic superconducting network. A finite-size version of dynamic scaling is used to extract the dynamic critical exponent [ital z], and infer the nonlinear response at the transition temperature. We consider the Coulomb gases [ital f]=0 and [ital f]=1/2, corresponding to a superconducting network with an applied transverse magnetic field of zero, and one-half flux quantum per unit cell, respectively.

  14. Floquet engineering with quasienergy bands of periodically driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthaus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A primer on the Floquet theory of periodically time-dependent quantum systems is provided, and it is shown how to apply this framework for computing the quasienergy band structure governing the dynamics of ultracold atoms in driven optical cosine lattices. Such systems are viewed here as spatially and temporally periodic structures living in an extended Hilbert space, giving rise to spatio-temporal Bloch waves whose dispersion relations can be manipulated at will by exploiting ac-Stark shifts and multiphoton resonances. The elements required for numerical calculations are introduced in a tutorial manner, and some example calculations are discussed in detail, thereby illustrating future prospects of Floquet engineering.

  15. Photonic currents in driven and dissipative resonator lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Thomas; Vasić, Ivana; Hartmann, Michael J.; Hofstetter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Arrays of coupled photonic cavities driven by external lasers represent a highly controllable setup to explore photonic transport. In this paper we address (quasi)-steady states of this system that exhibit photonic currents introduced by engineering driving and dissipation. We investigate two approaches: in the first one, photonic currents arise as a consequence of a phase difference of applied lasers and, in the second one, photons are injected locally and currents develop as they redistribute over the lattice. Effects of interactions are taken into account within a mean-field framework. In the first approach, we find that the current exhibits a resonant behavior with respect to the driving frequency. Weak interactions shift the resonant frequency toward higher values, while in the strongly interacting regime in our mean-field treatment the effect stems from multiphotonic resonances of a single driven cavity. For the second approach, we show that the overall lattice current can be controlled by incorporating few cavities with stronger dissipation rates into the system. These cavities serve as sinks for photonic currents and their effect is maximal at the onset of quantum Zeno dynamics.

  16. Lattice-Polarity-Driven Epitaxy of Hexagonal Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Yuan, Ying; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xinqiang; Zheng, Xiantong; Rong, Xin; Wang, Tao; Sheng, Bowen; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Bian, Lifeng; Yang, Xuelin; Xu, Fujun; Qin, Zhixin; Li, Xinzheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is demonstrated on InN NWs. In-polarity InN NWs form typical hexagonal structure with pyramidal growth front, whereas N-polarity InN NWs slowly turn to the shape of hexagonal pyramid and then convert to an inverted pyramid growth, forming diagonal pyramids with flat surfaces and finally coalescence with each other. This contrary growth behavior driven by lattice-polarity is most likely due to the relatively lower growth rate of the (0001̅) plane, which results from the fact that the diffusion barriers of In and N adatoms on the (0001) plane (0.18 and 1.0 eV, respectively) are about 2-fold larger in magnitude than those on the (0001̅) plane (0.07 and 0.52 eV), as calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The formation of diagonal pyramids for the N-polarity hexagonal NWs affords a novel way to locate quantum dot in the kink position, suggesting a new recipe for the fabrication of dot-based devices. PMID:26694227

  17. Evolution of a superfluid vortex filament tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

    PubMed

    Villois, Alberto; Proment, Davide; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    The development and decay of a turbulent vortex tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is studied. Using a recently developed accurate and robust tracking algorithm, all quantized vortices are extracted from the fields. The Vinen's decay law for the total vortex length with a coefficient that is in quantitative agreement with the values measured in helium II is observed. The topology of the tangle is then investigated showing that linked rings may appear during the evolution. The tracking also allows for determining the statistics of small-scale quantities of vortex lines, exhibiting large fluctuations of curvature and torsion. Finally, the temporal evolution of the Kelvin wave spectrum is obtained providing evidence of the development of a weak-wave turbulence cascade. PMID:27415198

  18. Evolution of a superfluid vortex filament tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villois, Alberto; Proment, Davide; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    The development and decay of a turbulent vortex tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is studied. Using a recently developed accurate and robust tracking algorithm, all quantized vortices are extracted from the fields. The Vinen's decay law for the total vortex length with a coefficient that is in quantitative agreement with the values measured in helium II is observed. The topology of the tangle is then investigated showing that linked rings may appear during the evolution. The tracking also allows for determining the statistics of small-scale quantities of vortex lines, exhibiting large fluctuations of curvature and torsion. Finally, the temporal evolution of the Kelvin wave spectrum is obtained providing evidence of the development of a weak-wave turbulence cascade.

  19. Vortex Lattice Studies in CeCoIn₅ with H⊥c

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, P.; White, J. S.; Holmes, A. T.; Gerber, S.; Forgan, E. M.; Bianchi, A. D.; Kenzelmann, M.; Zolliker, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; et al

    2012-02-23

    We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn₅ with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H II 100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90° reorientation transition is found for H II [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, Γ=2.0±0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H II [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition,more » an increased disordering of the VL is observed.« less

  20. Vortex Lattice Studies in CeCoIn₅ with H⊥c

    SciTech Connect

    Das, P.; White, J. S.; Holmes, A. T.; Gerber, S.; Forgan, E. M.; Bianchi, A. D.; Kenzelmann, M.; Zolliker, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Petrovic, C.; Eskildsen, M. R.

    2012-02-23

    We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn₅ with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H II 100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90° reorientation transition is found for H II [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, Γ=2.0±0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H II [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition, an increased disordering of the VL is observed.

  1. Quantum melting of a two-dimensional vortex lattice at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkov, A.; Stroud, D.

    1996-11-01

    We consider the quantum melting of a two-dimensional flux lattice at temperature {ital T} = 0 in the {open_quote}{open_quote}superclean limit.{close_quote}{close_quote} In this regime, we find that vortex motion is dominated by the Magnus force. A Lindemann criterion predicts melting when {ital n}{sub {ital v}}/{ital n}{sub {ital p}}{ge}{beta}, where {ital n}{sub {ital v}} and {ital n}{sub {ital p}} are the areal number densities of vortex pancakes and Cooper pairs, and {beta}{approx_equal}0.1. A second criterion is derived by using Wigner-crystal and Laughlin wave functions for the solid and liquid phases respectively, and setting the two energies equal. This gives a melting value similar to the Lindemann result. We discuss the numerical value of the {ital T}=0 melting field for thin layers of a low-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductor, such as {ital a}-MoGe, and single layers of high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} materials. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Current driven vortex-antivortex pair breaking and vortex explosion in the Bi2Te3/FeTe interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, C. L.; Kunchur, M. N.; He, Q. L.; Liu, H.; Wang, J.; Lortz, R.; Sou, I. K.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the dissipative regime of the Bi2Te3/FeTe topological insulator-chalcogenide interface superconductor at temperatures well below the Berezinski-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. We observe a transition in the current-resistance and temperature-resistance curves that quantitatively agrees with the Likharev vortex-explosion phenomenon. In the limit of low temperatures and high current densities, we were able to demonstrate the regime of complete vortex-antivortex dissociation arising from current driven vortex-antivortex pair breaking.

  3. Effects of parallel dynamics on vortex structures in electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    2011-01-15

    Vortex structures and related heat transport properties in slab electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are comprehensively investigated by means of nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations, with the aim of elucidating the underlying physical mechanisms of the transition from turbulent to coherent states. Numerical results show three different types of vortex structures, i.e., coherent vortex streets accompanied with the transport reduction, turbulent vortices with steady transport, and a zonal-flow-dominated state, depending on the relative magnitude of the parallel compression to the diamagnetic drift. In particular, the formation of coherent vortex streets is correlated with the strong generation of zonal flows for the cases with weak parallel compression, even though the maximum growth rate of linear ETG modes is relatively large. The zonal flow generation in the ETG turbulence is investigated by the modulational instability analysis with a truncated fluid model, where the parallel dynamics such as acoustic modes for electrons is incorporated. The modulational instability for zonal flows is found to be stabilized by the effect of the finite parallel compression. The theoretical analysis qualitatively agrees with secondary growth of zonal flows found in the slab ETG turbulence simulations, where the transition of vortex structures is observed.

  4. Explosive-driven shock wave and vortex ring interaction with a propane flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, P. M.; Hargather, M. J.; Doig, G. C.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments were performed to analyze the interaction of an explosively driven shock wave and a propane flame. A 30 g explosive charge was detonated at one end of a 3-m-long, 0.6-m-diameter shock tube to produce a shock wave which propagated into the atmosphere. A propane flame source was positioned at various locations outside of the shock tube to investigate the effect of different strength shock waves. High-speed retroreflective shadowgraph imaging visualized the shock wave motion and flame response, while a synchronized color camera imaged the flame directly. The explosively driven shock tube was shown to produce a repeatable shock wave and vortex ring. Digital streak images show the shock wave and vortex ring propagation and expansion. The shadowgrams show that the shock wave extinguishes the propane flame by pushing it off of the fuel source. Even a weak shock wave was found to be capable of extinguishing the flame.

  5. Gradient-Driven Vortex Motion in Nonneutral Plasmas and Ideal 2D Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schecter, David A.

    2000-10-01

    gradient exceeds a critical level, gradient-driven vortex motion is suppressed. An estimate of this critical shear compares favorably to vortex-in-cell simulations.

  6. Calculation of lateral-directional stability derivatives of wings by a nonplanar quasi-vortex-lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    The nonplanar quasi-vortex-lattice method is applied to the calculation of lateral-directional stability derivatives of wings with and without vortex-lift effect. Results for conventional configurations and those with winglets, V-tail, etc. are compared with available data. All rolling moment derivatives are found to be accurately predicted. The prediction of side force and yawing moment derivatives for some configurations is not as accurate. Causes of the discrepancy are discussed. A user's manual for the program and the program listing are also included.

  7. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of interacting lifting surfaces with separated flow around sharp edges predicted by a vortex-lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Gloss, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    Because the potential flow suction along the leading and side edges of a planform can be used to determine both leading- and side-edge vortex lift, the present investigation was undertaken to apply the vortex-lattice method to computing side-edge suction force for isolated or interacting planforms. Although there is a small effect of bound vortex sweep on the computation of the side-edge suction force, the results obtained for a number of different isolated planforms produced acceptable agreement with results obtained from a method employing continuous induced-velocity distributions. By using the method outlined, better agreement between theory and experiment was noted for a wing in the presence of a canard than was previously obtained.

  8. Superconducting gap and vortex lattice of the heavy-fermion compound CeCu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayat, Mostafa; Sun, Zhixiang; Maldonado, Ana; Suderow, Hermann; Seiro, Silvia; Geibel, Christoph; Wirth, Steffen; Steglich, Frank; Wahl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The order parameter and pairing mechanism for superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds are still poorly understood. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at ultralow temperatures can yield important information about the superconducting order parameter and the gap structure. Here, we study the first heavy-fermion superconductor, CeCu2Si2 . Our data show the superconducting gap which is not fully formed and exhibits features that point to a multigap order parameter. Spatial mapping of the zero-bias conductance in magnetic field reveals the vortex lattice, which allows us to unequivocally link the observed conductance gap to superconductivity in CeCu2Si2 . The vortex lattice is found to be predominantly triangular with distortions at fields close to ˜0.7 Hc 2 .

  9. Localization of a Bose-Einstein-condensate vortex in a bichromatic optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, S. K.

    2010-04-15

    By numerical simulation of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation we show that a weakly interacting or noninteracting Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) vortex can be localized in a three-dimensional bichromatic quasiperiodic optical-lattice (OL) potential generated by the superposition of two standing-wave polarized laser beams with incommensurate wavelengths. We also study the localization of a (nonrotating) BEC in two and three dimensions by bichromatic OL potentials along orthogonal directions. This is a generalization of the localization of a BEC in a one-dimensional bichromatic OL as studied in a recent experiment [Roati et al., Nature 453, 895 (2008)]. We demonstrate the stability of the localized state by considering its time evolution in the form of a stable breathing oscillation in a slightly altered potential for a large period of time. Finally, we consider the localization of a BEC in a random one-dimensional potential in the form of several identical repulsive spikes arbitrarily distributed in space.

  10. Unsteady vortex lattice techniques applied to wake formation and performance of the statically thrusting propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The application is considered of vortex lattice techniques to the problem of describing the aerodynamics and performance of statically thrusting propellers. A numerical lifting surface theory to predict the aerodynamic forces and power is performed. The chordwise and spanwise loading is modelled by bound vortices fixed to a twisted flat plate surface. In order to eliminate any apriori assumptions regarding the wake shape, it is assumed the propeller starts from rest. The wake is generated in time and allowed to deform under its own self-induced velocity field as the motion of the propeller progresses. The bound circulation distribution is then determined with time by applying the flow tangency boundary condition at certain selected control points on the blades. The aerodynamics of the infinite wing and finite wing are also considered. The details of wake formation and roll-up are investigated, particularly the localized induction effect. It is concluded that proper wake roll-up and roll-up rates can be established by considering the details of motion at the instant of start.

  11. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  12. Effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic vortex oscillator driven by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Senfu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Liu, Xianyin; Jin, Chendong; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2015-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the dynamic of magnetic vortex driven by spin-polarized current in Permalloy nanodisks in the presence of interfacial/superficial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI). It is found that spin-polarized current can drive the vortex precession. In the presence of DMI, the oscillation frequency of the vortex is about 3 times higher than that of without DMI for the same nanodisk. Moreover, the linewidth is more narrow than that of without DMI when the radius of nanodisk is 50 nm. In addition, the vortex can support a higher current density than that of without DMI. Introduction of DMI in this system can provide a new way to design magnetic vortex oscillator.

  13. Description, Usage, and Validation of the MVL-15 Modified Vortex Lattice Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    MVL-15 is the most recent version of the Modified Vortex-Lattice (MVL) code developed within the Aerodynamics Systems Analysis Branch (ASAB) at NASA LaRC. The term "modified" refers to the primary modification of the core vortex-lattice methodology: inclusion of viscous aerodynamics tables that are linked to the linear solution via iterative processes. The inclusion of the viscous aerodynamics inherently converts the MVL-15 from a purely analytic linearized method to a semi-empirical blend which retains the rapid execution speed of the linearized method while empirically characterizing the section aerodynamics at all spanwise lattice points. The modification provides a means to assess non-linear effects on lift that occur at angles of attack near stall, and provides a means to determine the drag associated with the application of design strategies for lift augmentation such as the use of flaps or blowing. The MVL-15 code is applicable to the analyses of aircraft aerodynamics during cruise, but it is most advantageously applied to the analysis of aircraft operating in various high-lift configurations. The MVL methodology has been previously conceived and implemented; the initial concept version was delivered to the ASAB in 2001 (van Dam, C.), subsequently revised (Gelhausen, P. and Ozoroski, T. 2002 / AVID Inc., Gelhausen, P., and Roberts, M. 2004), and then overhauled (Ozoroski, T., Hahn, A. 2008). The latest version, MVL-15 has been refined to provide analysis transparency and enhanced to meet the analysis requirements of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. Each revision has been implemented with reasonable success. Separate applications of the methodology are in use, including a similar in-house capability, developed by Olson, E. that is tailored for structural and acoustics analyses. A central premise of the methodology is that viscous aerodynamic data can be associated with analytic inviscid aerodynamic results at each spanwise wing section

  14. Magnetic field dependence of the density of states and tilted vortex lattice in the superconductor β-Bi2Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Vasco, Edwin; Guillamon, Isabel; Fente, Anton; Galvis, Jose; Correa, Alexandre; Luccas, Roberto; Mompean, Federico; Garcia Hernandez, Mar; Brison, Jean P.; Vieira, Sebastian; Suderow, Hermann

    We present very low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments on the superconductor β-Bi2 Pd. We find a single superconducting gap from the zero-field tunneling conductance. We also find that the hexagonal vortex lattice is locked to the square atomic lattice. The magnetic field dependence of the intervortex tunneling conductance is higher than the one expected in a single-gap superconductor. Such an increase in the intervortex tunneling conductance has been found in superconductors with multiple superconducting gaps. We fit the upper critical field Hc2(T) and show that multiband Fermi surface is needed to explain the observed behavior. We propose that β-Bi2Pd is a single-gap multiband superconductor. We have measured the tilted vortex lattice (TVL) using a three axis superconducting magnet. Our results give first real space imaging of the TVL in a nearly isotropic s-wave BCS superconductor. From a detailed study of the TVL varying polar and azimuthal angles, we find correlations between the square atomic lattice and the TVL.

  15. Dynamic visualization of nanoscale vortex orbits.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Matias; Samuely, Tomas; Raes, Bart; Van de Vondel, Joris; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2014-03-25

    Due to the atomic-scale resolution, scanning tunneling microscopy is an ideal technique to observe the smallest objects. Nevertheless, it suffers from very long capturing times in order to investigate dynamic processes at the nanoscale. We address this issue, for vortex matter in NbSe2, by driving the vortices using an ac magnetic field and probing the induced periodic tunnel current modulations. Our results reveal different dynamical modes of the driven vortex lattices. In addition, by recording and synchronizing the time evolution of the tunneling current at each pixel, we visualize the overall dynamics of the vortex lattice with submillisecond time resolution and subnanometer spatial resolution. PMID:24460428

  16. Mode-locking transitions and vortex flows in current-driven Josephson-junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shantilal; Sahdev, Deshdeep; Mehrotra, Ravi

    1997-03-01

    The dynamical behavior of overdamped dc-driven Josephson-junction arrays is studied numerically in two dimensions. Currents varying linearly along an edge are injected into the array and drawn out at the opposite edge either uniformly or through a busbar. The system is found to undergo a series of dynamical transitions as the gradient of the current drive is increased. We show that, for ladder arrays, these transitions mark the loss of mode locking across specific bonds. The transitions can, alternatively, be associated with the onset of well-defined vortex flows. Spatial localization of vortices in individual plaquettes of a ladder, driven in the direction of its length, is seen to stablize quasiperiodicity of order N>3 in a certain region of the underlying parameter space. We also discuss the extension of each of these features to full-fledged rectangular arrays.

  17. Active suppression of vortex-driven combustion instability using controlled liquid-fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bin

    Combustion instabilities remain one of the most challenging problems encountered in developing propulsion and power systems. Large amplitude pressure oscillations, driven by unsteady heat release, can produce numerous detrimental effects. Most previous active control studies utilized gaseous fuels to suppress combustion instabilities. However, using liquid fuel to suppress combustion instabilities is more realistic for propulsion applications. Active instability suppression in vortex-driven combustors using a direct liquid fuel injection strategy was theoretically established and experimentally demonstrated in this dissertation work. Droplet size measurements revealed that with pulsed fuel injection management, fuel droplet size could be modulated periodically. Consequently, desired heat release fluctuation could be created. If this oscillatory heat release is coupled with the natural pressure oscillation in an out of phase manner, combustion instabilities can be suppressed. To identify proper locations of supplying additional liquid fuel for the purpose of achieving control, the natural heat release pattern in a vortex-driven combustor was characterized in this study. It was found that at high Damkohler number oscillatory heat release pattern closely followed the evolving vortex front. However, when Damkohler number became close to unity, heat release fluctuation wave no longer coincided with the coherent structures. A heat release deficit area was found near the dump plane when combustor was operated in lean premixed conditions. Active combustion instability suppression experiments were performed in a dump combustor using a controlled liquid fuel injection strategy. High-speed Schlieren results illustrated that vortex shedding plays an important role in maintaining self-sustained combustion instabilities. Complete combustion instability control requires total suppression of these large-scale coherent structures. The sound pressure level at the excited dominant

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulations for the vortex tori pattern in the three-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu; Wang, Moran

    2016-02-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for solving the three-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CQCGLE) is proposed. Differently from the classic lattice Boltzmann models, this lattice Boltzmann model is based on uniformly distributed lattice points in a three-dimensional space, and the evolution of the model is about a spatial axis rather than time. The algorithm provides advantages similar to the lattice Boltzmann method in that it is easily adapted to complex Ginzburg-Landau equations. Examples show that the model accurately reproduces the vortex tori pattern in the CQCGLE.

  19. Coupling a driven magnetic vortex to individual nitrogen-vacancy spins for fast, nanoscale addressability and coherent manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Michael; Badea, Robert; Berezovsky, Jesse

    The core of a ferromagnetic (FM) vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales using small magnetic fields, or electrical currents. These capabilities present opportunities for nanoscale spin-based devices. Here, we demonstrate how these FM vortex properties can be used in a room temperature, integrated device by coupling a FM vortex to nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond. Measurements are carried out using a combined magneto-optical microscopy and optically-detected spin resonance technique. We show that the FM vortex can be driven into proximity with an NV, inducing significant NV spin splitting and sufficiently large magnetic field gradient to address spins separated by nanometer length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the NV spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Finally we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on 100 ns timescales, while driving on faster timescales results in non-trivial coherent dynamics of the coupled vortex/NV system. We acknowledge the DOE Award #DE-SC008148.

  20. Hubbard Model for Atomic Impurities Bound by the Vortex Lattice of a Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. H.; Yuan, Y.; Bao, W.; Clark, S. R.; Foot, C.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate cold bosonic impurity atoms trapped in a vortex lattice formed by condensed bosons of another species. We describe the dynamics of the impurities by a bosonic Hubbard model containing occupation-dependent parameters to capture the effects of strong impurity-impurity interactions. These include both a repulsive direct interaction and an attractive effective interaction mediated by the Bose-Einstein condensate. The occupation dependence of these two competing interactions drastically affects the Hubbard model phase diagram, including causing the disappearance of some Mott lobes.

  1. Hubbard Model for Atomic Impurities Bound by the Vortex Lattice of a Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T H; Yuan, Y; Bao, W; Clark, S R; Foot, C; Jaksch, D

    2016-06-17

    We investigate cold bosonic impurity atoms trapped in a vortex lattice formed by condensed bosons of another species. We describe the dynamics of the impurities by a bosonic Hubbard model containing occupation-dependent parameters to capture the effects of strong impurity-impurity interactions. These include both a repulsive direct interaction and an attractive effective interaction mediated by the Bose-Einstein condensate. The occupation dependence of these two competing interactions drastically affects the Hubbard model phase diagram, including causing the disappearance of some Mott lobes. PMID:27367366

  2. Model independent approach to studies of the confining dual Abrikosov vortex in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haymaker, Richard W.; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    We address the problem of determining the type I, type II or borderline dual superconductor behavior in maximal Abelian gauge SU(2) through the study of the dual Abrikosov vortex. We find that significant electric currents in the simulation data call into question the use of the dual Ginzburg-Landau Higgs model in interpreting the data. Further, two definitions of the penetration depth parameter take two different values. The splitting of this parameter into two is intricately connected to the existence of electric currents. It is important in our approach that we employ definitions of flux and electric and magnetic currents that respect Maxwell equations exactly for lattice averages independent of lattice spacings. Applied to specific Wilson loop sizes, our conclusions differ from those that use the dual GLH model.

  3. Numerical investigations on the vortex-induced vibration of moving rigid body by using the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaohai; Lee, Taehun; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Wang, Zhexuan

    2013-11-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) phenomena related to self-excited energy harvesters consisting of circular or square cylinders have been investigated numerically by using the BGK or MRT Lattice Boltzmann Method. In the present work such a harvester is placed inside a channel flow and is allowed to oscillate without a structural restoring force in a direction normal to the flow. Currently the half-way bounce-back boundary scheme and interpolations are being used to model the moving boundary. The numerical results were compared to the ones by classical CFD methods and experiments. A good agreement was obtained. The vortex dynamics and the development of the flow patterns for different flow parameters such as Reynolds number, blockage and aspect ratios will be presented. Particular emphasis is given to the dynamics of vortex pairing observed in several of the simulations. The present approach will be extended to simulate the flexible beam with the Immersed Boundary Method. Sponsored by the National Science Foundation (CBET #1033117) and a fellowship support from China Scholarship Council.

  4. Aerodynamic Analysis of the Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft Using Vortex-Lattice Superposition Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric Bi-Wen; Reynolds, Kevin Wayne; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Totah, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The SUGAR Truss-BracedWing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeing-developed N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD FixedWing Project. This future generation transport aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing a high aspect ratio wing design. The aspect ratio of the TBW is on the order of 14 which is significantly greater than those of current generation transport aircraft. This paper presents a recent aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX and an aerodynamic superposition approach. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the principle of aerodynamic superposition is leveraged to deal with the complex aerodynamic configuration of the TBW. By decomposing the full configuration of the TBW into individual aerodynamic lifting components, the total aerodynamic characteristics of the full configuration can be estimated from the contributions of the individual components. The aerodynamic superposition approach shows excellent agreement with CFD results computed by FUN3D, USM3D, and STAR-CCM+. XXXXX Demand for green aviation is expected to increase with the need for reduced environmental impact. Most large transports today operate within the best cruise L/D range of 18-20 using the conventional tube-and-wing design. This configuration has led to marginal improvements in aerodynamic efficiency over this past century, as aerodynamic improvements tend to be incremental. A big opportunity has been shown in recent years to significantly reduce structural weight or trim drag, hence improved energy efficiency, with the use of lightweight materials such as composites. The Boeing 787 transport is an example of a modern airframe design that employs lightweight structures. High aspect ratio wing design can provide another opportunity for further improvements in energy efficiency. Historically, the study of high aspect ratio wings has been intimately tied to the study of

  5. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of coalescence-driven island coarsening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basagaoglu, H.; Green, C.T.; Meakin, P.; McCoy, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The first-order phase separation in a thin fluid film was simulated using a two-dimensional lattice-Boltzman model (LBM) with fluid-fluid interactions. The effects of the domain size on the intermediate asymptotic island size distribution were also discussed. It was observed that the overall process is dominated by coalescence which is independent of island mass. The results show that the combined effects of growth, coalescence, and Ostwald ripening control the phase transition process in the LBM simulations.

  6. Quantum lattice gas algorithm for quantum turbulence and vortex reconnection in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahala, George; Yepez, Jeffrey; Vahala, Linda

    2008-04-01

    The ground state wave function for a Bose Einstein condensate is well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. A Type-II quantum algorithm is devised that is ideally parallelized even on a classical computer. Only 2 qubits are required per spatial node. With unitary local collisions, streaming of entangled states and a spatially inhomogeneous unitary gauge rotation one recovers the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Quantum vortex reconnection is simulated - even without any viscosity or resistivity (which are needed in classical vortex reconnection).

  7. Producing directed migration with correlated atoms in a tilted ac-driven lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Shi-Jie

    2016-06-01

    The correlated atoms in a tilted optical lattice driven by an ac field are studied within the Hubbard model. By making use of both photon-assisted tunneling and coherent destructive tunneling effects, we can move a pair of strongly correlated atoms in the lattice via manipulating the global amplitude of the driving field. We propose a scheme for creating entanglement between the particle pair and a single particle through interacting oscillations. Our model may provide a new building block for investigating quantum computing and quantum information processing with ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  8. Freezing, accelerating, and slowing directed currents in real time with superimposed driven lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aritra K.; Liebchen, Benno; Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We provide a generic scheme offering real-time control of directed particle transport using superimposed driven lattices. This scheme allows one to accelerate, slow, and freeze the transport on demand by switching one of the lattices subsequently on and off. The underlying physical mechanism hinges on a systematic opening and closing of channels between transporting and nontransporting phase space structures upon switching and exploits cantori structures which generate memory effects in the population of these structures. Our results should allow for real-time control of cold thermal atomic ensembles in optical lattices but might also be useful as a design principle for targeted delivery of molecules or colloids in optical devices.

  9. Exotic vortex lattices in a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wen, Lin; Dai, Cai-Qing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of dipolar quantum gases. Previous theoretical investigations of a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, where only one component possesses dipole moment, were mainly focused on two special orientations of the dipoles: perpendicular or parallel to the plane of motion. Here we study the ground-state and rotational properties of such a system for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles. We demonstrate the ground-state vortex structures depend strongly on the relative strength between dipolar and contact interactions and the rotation frequency, as well as on the orientation of the dipoles. In the absence of rotation, the tunable dipolar interaction can be used to induce the squeezing or expansion of the cloud, and to derive the phase transition between phase coexistence and separation. Under finite rotation, the system is found to exhibit exotic ground-state vortex configurations, such as kernel-shell, vortex necklace, and compensating stripe vortex structures. We also check the validity of the Feynman relation, and find no significant deviations from it. The obtained results open up alternate ways for the quantum control of dipolar quantum gases. PMID:26778736

  10. Exotic vortex lattices in a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wen, Lin; Dai, Cai-Qing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of dipolar quantum gases. Previous theoretical investigations of a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, where only one component possesses dipole moment, were mainly focused on two special orientations of the dipoles: perpendicular or parallel to the plane of motion. Here we study the ground-state and rotational properties of such a system for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles. We demonstrate the ground-state vortex structures depend strongly on the relative strength between dipolar and contact interactions and the rotation frequency, as well as on the orientation of the dipoles. In the absence of rotation, the tunable dipolar interaction can be used to induce the squeezing or expansion of the cloud, and to derive the phase transition between phase coexistence and separation. Under finite rotation, the system is found to exhibit exotic ground-state vortex configurations, such as kernel-shell, vortex necklace, and compensating stripe vortex structures. We also check the validity of the Feynman relation, and find no significant deviations from it. The obtained results open up alternate ways for the quantum control of dipolar quantum gases. PMID:26778736

  11. Exotic vortex lattices in a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wen, Lin; Dai, Cai-Qing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of dipolar quantum gases. Previous theoretical investigations of a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, where only one component possesses dipole moment, were mainly focused on two special orientations of the dipoles: perpendicular or parallel to the plane of motion. Here we study the ground-state and rotational properties of such a system for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles. We demonstrate the ground-state vortex structures depend strongly on the relative strength between dipolar and contact interactions and the rotation frequency, as well as on the orientation of the dipoles. In the absence of rotation, the tunable dipolar interaction can be used to induce the squeezing or expansion of the cloud, and to derive the phase transition between phase coexistence and separation. Under finite rotation, the system is found to exhibit exotic ground-state vortex configurations, such as kernel-shell, vortex necklace, and compensating stripe vortex structures. We also check the validity of the Feynman relation, and find no significant deviations from it. The obtained results open up alternate ways for the quantum control of dipolar quantum gases.

  12. Multiphoton interband excitations of quantum gases in driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Ölschläger, C.; Sträter, C.; Prelle, S.; Eckardt, A.; Sengstock, K.; Simonet, J.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of multiphoton interband absorption processes for quantum gases in shaken light crystals. Periodic inertial forcing, induced by a spatial motion of the lattice potential, drives multiphoton interband excitations of up to the ninth order. The occurrence of such excitation features is systematically investigated with respect to the potential depth and the driving amplitude. Ab initio calculations of resonance positions as well as numerical evaluation of their strengths exhibit good agreement with experimental data. In addition our findings could make it possible to reach novel phases of quantum matter by tailoring appropriate driving schemes.

  13. Disordering of the vortex lattice through successive destruction of positional and orientational order in a weakly pinned Co0.0075NbSe2 single crystal

    PubMed Central

    Chandra Ganguli, Somesh; Singh, Harkirat; Saraswat, Garima; Ganguly, Rini; Bagwe, Vivas; Shirage, Parasharam; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The vortex lattice in a Type II superconductor provides a versatile model system to investigate the order-disorder transition in a periodic medium in the presence of random pinning. Here, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy in a weakly pinned Co0.0075NbSe2 single crystal, we show that the vortex lattice in a 3-dimensional superconductor disorders through successive destruction of positional and orientational order, as the magnetic field is increased across the peak effect. At the onset of the peak effect, the equilibrium quasi-long range ordered state transforms into an orientational glass through the proliferation of dislocations. At a higher field, the dislocations dissociate into isolated disclination giving rise to an amorphous vortex glass. We also show the existence of a variety of additional non-equilibrium metastable states, which can be accessed through different thermomagnetic cycling. PMID:26039699

  14. Simultaneous evidence for Pauli paramagnetic effects and multiband superconductivity in KFe2As2 by small-angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, S. J.; Kawano-Furukawa, H.; Jellyman, E.; Riyat, R.; Forgan, E. M.; Ono, M.; Kihou, K.; Lee, C. H.; Hardy, F.; Adelmann, P.; Wolf, Th.; Meingast, C.; Gavilano, J.; Eskildsen, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    We study the intrinsic anisotropy of the superconducting state in KFe2As2 by using small-angle neutron scattering to image the vortex lattice as the applied magnetic field is rotated towards the FeAs crystalline planes. The anisotropy is found to be strongly field dependent, indicating multiband superconductivity. Furthermore, the high-field anisotropy significantly exceeds that of the upper critical field, providing further support for Pauli limiting in KFe2As2 for fields applied in the basal plane. The effect of Pauli paramagnetism on the unpaired quasiparticles in the vortex cores is directly evident from the ratio of scattered intensities due to the longitudinal and transverse vortex lattice field modulation.

  15. Observation of Well-ordered Metastable Vortex Lattice Phases in Superconducting MgB2 Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Pinaki; Rastovski, Catherine; O'Brien, Timothy; Schlesinger, Kimberly; Dewhurst, Charles; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Karpinski, Janusz; Eskildsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The vortex lattice (VL) symmetry and orientation in clean type-II superconductors depends sensitively on the host material anisotropy, vortex density and temperature, frequently leading to rich phase diagrams. Typically, a well-ordered VL is taken to imply a ground-state configuration for the vortex-vortex interaction. Using neutron scattering we studied the VL in MgB2 for a number of field-temperature histories, discovering an unprecedented degree of metastability in connection with a known, second-order rotation transition. This allows, for the first time, structural studies of a well-ordered, nonequilibrium VL. While the mechanism responsible for the longevity of the metastable states is not resolved, we speculate it is due to a jamming of VL domains, preventing a rotation to the ground-state orientation.

  16. Origin of Spontaneous Broken Mirror Symmetry of Vortex Lattices in Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroki M.; Ishikawa, Masaki; Hirano, Tomoya; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2011-11-01

    Combining the microscopic Eilenberger theory with the first-principles band calculation, we investigate the stable flux line lattice (FLL) for a field applied to the fourfold axis, i.e., H\\parallel [001] in cubic Nb. The observed FLL transformation along Hc2 is almost perfectly explained without using adjustable parameter, including the tilted square, scalene triangle with broken mirror symmetry, and isosceles triangle lattices upon increasing T. We construct a minimum Fermi surface model to understand such morphologies, particularly the stability of the scalene triangle lattice attributed to the lack of mirror symmetry about the Fermi velocity maximum direction in k-space.

  17. Lattice-Boltzmann Simulation of Coalescence-Driven Island Coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Hakan Basagaoglu; Christopher T. Green; Paul Meakin; Benjamin J. McCoy

    2004-10-01

    A two-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann model (LBM) with fluid-fluid interactions was used to simulate first-order phase separation in a thin fluid film. The intermediate asymptotic time dependence of the mean island size, island number concentration, and polydispersity were determined and compared with the predictions of the distribution-kinetics model. The comparison revealed that the combined effects of growth, coalescence, and Ostwald ripening control the phase transition process in the LBM simulations. However, the overall process is dominated by coalescence, which is independent of island mass. As the phase transition advances, the mean island size increases, the number of islands decrease, and the polydispersity approaches unity, which conforms to the predictions of the distribution-kinetics model. The effects of the domain size on the intermediate asymptotic island size distribution, scaling form of the island size distribution, and the crossover to the long-term asymptotic behavior were elucidated. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  18. SUNRISE/IMaX Observations of Convectively Driven Vortex Flows in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet, J. A.; Márquez, I.; Sánchez Almeida, J.; Palacios, J.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Solanki, S. K.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Gandorfer, A.; Barthol, P.; Knölker, M.

    2010-11-01

    We characterize the observational properties of the convectively driven vortex flows recently discovered on the quiet Sun, using magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and images obtained with the 1 m balloon-borne SUNRISE telescope. By visual inspection of time series, we find some 3.1 × 10-3 vortices Mm-2 minute-1, which is a factor of ~1.7 larger than previous estimates. The mean duration of the individual events turns out to be 7.9 minutes, with a standard deviation of 3.2 minutes. In addition, we find several events appearing at the same locations along the duration of the time series (31.6 minutes). Such recurrent vortices show up in the proper motion flow field map averaged over the time series. The typical vertical vorticities are lsim6 × 10-3 s-1, which corresponds to a period of rotation of some 35 minutes. The vortices show a preferred counterclockwise sense of rotation, which we conjecture may have to do with the preferred vorticity impinged by the solar differential rotation.

  19. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  20. SUNRISE/IMaX OBSERVATIONS OF CONVECTIVELY DRIVEN VORTEX FLOWS IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Bonet, J. A.; Marquez, I.; Almeida, J. Sanchez; Pillet, V. MartInez; Palacios, J.; Domingo, V.; Solanki, S. K.; Gandorfer, A.; Barthol, P.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Knoelker, M.

    2010-11-10

    We characterize the observational properties of the convectively driven vortex flows recently discovered on the quiet Sun, using magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and images obtained with the 1 m balloon-borne SUNRISE telescope. By visual inspection of time series, we find some 3.1 x 10{sup -3} vortices Mm{sup -2} minute{sup -1}, which is a factor of {approx}1.7 larger than previous estimates. The mean duration of the individual events turns out to be 7.9 minutes, with a standard deviation of 3.2 minutes. In addition, we find several events appearing at the same locations along the duration of the time series (31.6 minutes). Such recurrent vortices show up in the proper motion flow field map averaged over the time series. The typical vertical vorticities are {approx_lt}6 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}, which corresponds to a period of rotation of some 35 minutes. The vortices show a preferred counterclockwise sense of rotation, which we conjecture may have to do with the preferred vorticity impinged by the solar differential rotation.

  1. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  2. Anomalous magnetization due to the vortex lattice melting transition in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, Terukazu; Onodera, Yasuaki; Naito, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Norio

    1996-12-01

    Magnetization measurements in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} single crystals are performed as a function of the temperature T and the magnetic field H. It is found that an anomalous magnetization step which provides the thermodynamic evidence of the first-order vortex lattice melting transition and the resistive kink with the hysteresis are observed in the same phase boundary in H-T plane. For samples with a small value of the irreversibility field H{sub irr}(T) as compared with the vortex lattice melting line H{sub m}(T), the vortex lattice melting is observed in the reversible magnetization region and the entropy change per vortex per CuO{sub 2} layer at the transition is estimated to be {Delta}s {approx_equal} 0.5 - 1.0 k{sub B}. For samples with a slightly larger value of H{sub irr}(T) comparable to H{sub m}(T), on the other hand, the jump height and the value of {Delta}s is enhanced. Thus, the value of {Delta}s is affected significantly by the relation between H{sub irr}(T) which varies from sample to sample and H{sub m}(T) which is an universal line.

  3. Anisotropic vortex lattice in YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7

    SciTech Connect

    Yethiraj, M.; Mook, H.A.; Wignall, G.D.; Cubitt, R.; Forgan, E.M.; Lee, S.L.; Paul, D.M.; Armstrong, T. Superconductivity Research Group, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Schoenberggasse 9, CH 8001, Zuerich Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL Allied Signal Research Laboratories, Torrance, California 90509 )

    1993-11-01

    We report on small angle neutron scattering observations of the flux line lattice (FLL) in a single crystal of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7]. To probe the mass anisotropy ratio, [ital m][sub 3]/[ital m][sub 1], measurements were made as a function of angle, [Theta], between the 8 kOe applied field and the crystallographic (001) axis for 0[degree][le][Theta][le]80[degree]. With the rotation about an [ital a]/[ital b] (or [ital y]) axis, two symmetry-related distorted hexagonal FLL domains formed. Contrary to theoretical prediction, the lattices formed are consistent with a rotation of the short basis vector, [bold a][sub 1], from the [ital x] axis by 15[degree], after the effects of anisotropy are removed. The mass ratio is 20[plus minus]2, which is slightly lower than published values. The temperature dependence of the intensity is not conventional.

  4. Singularimetry of local phase gradients using vortex lattices and in-line holography.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Timothy C; Bishop, Alexis I; Eastwood, Samuel A; Paganin, David M; Morgan, Kaye S; Morgan, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a differential form of singularimetry, which utilizes phase vortices or intensity gradient singularities as topological fiducial markers in a structured illumination context. This approach analytically measures phase gradients imparted by refracting specimens, yielding quantitative information that is both local and deterministic. We have quantified our phase gradient experiments to demonstrate that lattices of wave field singularities can be used to detect subtle phase gradients imparted by a spherical specimen and fiber optic cylinders. PMID:26906802

  5. Existence and non-existence of breather solutions in damped and driven nonlinear lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, D.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the existence of spatially localised solutions, in the form of discrete breathers, in general damped and driven nonlinear lattice systems of coupled oscillators. Conditions for the exponential decay of the difference between the maximal and minimal amplitudes of the oscillators are provided which proves that initial non-uniform spatial patterns representing breathers attain exponentially fast a spatially uniform state preventing the formation and/or preservation of any breather solution at all. Strikingly our results are generic in the sense that they hold for arbitrary dimension of the system, any attractive interaction, coupling strength and on-site potential and general driving fields. Furthermore, our rigorous quantitative results establish conditions under which discrete breathers in general damped and driven nonlinear lattices can exist at all and open the way for further research on the emergent dynamical scenarios, in particular features of pattern formation, localisation and synchronisation, in coupled cell networks.

  6. Comparison of vortex lattice predicted forces with wind tunnel experiments for the F-4E(CCV) airplane with a closely coupled canard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    The F-4E (CCV) wind tunnel model with closely coupled canard control surfaces was analyzed by means of a version of a vortex lattice program that included the effects of nonlinear leading edge or side edge vortex lift on as many as four individual planforms. The results were compared with experimental data from wind tunnel tests of a 5% scale model tested at a Mach number M = 0.6. They indicated that a nonlinear vortex lift developed on the side edges due to tip vortices, but did not appear to develop on the leading edges within the range of angles of attack that were studied. Instead, substantial leading edge thrust was developed on the lifting surfaces. A configuration buildup illustrated the mutual interference between the wing and control surfaces. On the configuration studied, addition of the wing increased the loading on the canard, but the additional load on the canard due to adding the stabilator was small.

  7. Hierarchy of gaps and magnetic minibands in graphene in the presence of the Abrikosov vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    We determine the bands and gaps in graphene subjected to the magnetic field of an Abrikosov lattice of vortices in the underlying superconducting film. The spectrum features one nondispersive magnetic miniband at zero energy, separated by the largest gaps in the miniband spectrum from a pair of minibands resembling a slightly broadened first Landau level in graphene, suggesting the persistence of ν =±2 and ±6 quantum Hall effect states. Also, we identify an occasional merging point of magnetic minibands with a Dirac-type dispersion at the miniband edges.

  8. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  9. Effect of magnetic impurities on the vortex lattice properties in NbSe{sub 2} single crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Iavarone, M.; Di Capua, R.; Karapetrov, G.; Koshelev, A. E.; Rosenmann, D.; Claus, H.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Nishizaki, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Materials Science Division; Univ. degli Studi del Molise; CNR-INFM Coherentia; Northwestern Univ.; Tohoku Univ.

    2008-11-01

    We report a pronounced peak effect in the magnetization of Co{sub x}NbSe{sub 2} single crystals with critical temperatures T{sub c} ranging between 7.1 and 5.0 K, and Mn{sub x}NbSe{sub 2} single crystals with critical temperatures down to 3.4 K. We correlate the peak effect in magnetization with the structure of the vortex lattice across the peak-effect region using scanning-tunneling microscopy. Magnetization measurements show that the amplitude of the peak effect in the case of Co{sub x}NbSe{sub 2} exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the Co content, reaching a maximum for concentration of Co of about 0.4 at. % (corresponding to a T{sub c} of 5.7 K) and after that gradually decreasing in amplitude with the increase in the Co content. The normalized value of the peak position H{sub p}/H{sub c2} has weak dependence on Co concentration. In the case of Mn{sub x}NbSe{sub 2} the features of the peak effect as a function of the Mn content are different and they can be understood in terms of strong pinning.

  10. History Dependence of the Vortex Lattice Rotation in the B-phase of UPt3 with H ∥ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avers, K. E.; Eskildsen, M. R.; Halperin, W. P.; Gannon, W. J.; Gavilano, J. L.; Nagy, G.; Gasser, U.

    The unconventional superconductor UPt3 is widely believed to be a triplet superconductor, where the low temperature superconducting B-phase is a chiral state. We have performed small angle neutron scattering (SANS) from the vortex lattice (VL) in UPt3 at the Paul Scherrer Institute with the magnetic field parallel to the hexagonal c-axis in the 0.5 T to 0.9 T range. The diffraction pattern of the VL rotates away from a high symmetry direction producing two domains of different orientation. Our field dependent measurements show a subtle magnetic field history dependence of this orientation; VLs prepared with the magnetic field parallel or anti-parallel with respect to the angular momentum from the circulating screening currents show different field-history dependence. These results suggest a coupling of a chiral superconducting order parameter with the applied magnetic field. US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Awards DE-FG02-10ER46783 (University of Notre Dame; neutron scattering) and DE-FG02-05ER46248 (Northwestern University; crystal growth, characterization, neutron.

  11. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  12. SANS study of vortex lattice structural transition in optimally doped (Ba1-x K x )Fe2As2.

    PubMed

    Demirdiş, S; van der Beek, C J; Mühlbauer, S; Su, Y; Wolf, Th

    2016-10-26

    Small-angle neutron scattering on high quality single crystalline Ba1-x K x Fe2As2 reveals the transition from a low-field vortex solid phase with orientational order to a vortex polycrystal at high magnetic field. The vortex order-disorder transition is correlated with the second-peak feature in isothermal hysteresis loops, and is interpreted in terms of the generation of supplementary vortex solid dislocations. The sharp drop of the structure factor above the second peak field is explained by the dynamics of freezing of the vortex ensemble in the high field phase. PMID:27541966

  13. Interaction-Driven Spontaneous Quantum Hall Effect on a Kagome Lattice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Gong, Shou-Shu; Zeng, Tian-Sheng; Fu, Liang; Sheng, D N

    2016-08-26

    Topological states of matter have been widely studied as being driven by an external magnetic field, intrinsic spin-orbital coupling, or magnetic doping. Here, we unveil an interaction-driven spontaneous quantum Hall effect (a Chern insulator) emerging in an extended fermion-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, based on a state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group on cylinder geometry and an exact diagonalization in torus geometry. We first demonstrate that the proposed model exhibits an incompressible liquid phase with doublet degenerate ground states as time-reversal partners. The explicit spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking is determined by emergent uniform circulating loop currents between nearest neighbors. Importantly, the fingerprint topological nature of the ground state is characterized by quantized Hall conductance. Thus, we identify the liquid phase as a quantum Hall phase, which provides a "proof-of-principle" demonstration of the interaction-driven topological phase in a topologically trivial noninteracting band. PMID:27610866

  14. Stabilization of buoyancy-driven unstable vortex flow in mixed convection of air in a rectangular duct by tapering its top plate

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, W.S.; Lin, W.L.; Yin, C.P.; Lin, C.L.; Lin, T.F.

    2000-02-01

    At high buoyancy-to-inertia ratio frequently encountered in various heat transfer equipment, the buoyancy-driven secondary vortex flow in a forced laminar flow through a bottom heated rectangular duct is rather unstable. Heat transfer augmentation associated with the buoyancy-driven vortex flow is desirable and welcome in many technological applications in which the efficient energy transport is of major concern. Here, stabilization of the buoyancy-driven unstable mixed convective vortex air flow in a bottom heated rectangular duct by tapering its top plate is investigated experimentally. Specifically, the duct is tapered so that its aspect ratio at the duct inlet is 4 and gradually raised to 12 at the exit of the duct. In the study the secondary flow in the duct is visualized and the steady and transient thermal characteristics of the flow are examined by measuring the spanwise distributions of the time-average temperature. The effects of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers on the vortex flow structure are studied in detail. Moreover, the spanwise-averaged Nusselt numbers for the horizontal rectangular and tapering ducts are also measured and compared. Furthermore, the time records of the air temperature are obtained to further detect the temporal stability of the flow. Over the ranges of the Re and Gr investigated for 5 {le} Re {le} 102 and 1.0 x 10{sup 4} {le} Gr {le} 1.7 x 10{sup 5}, the vortex flow induced in the rectangular duct exhibits temporal transition from a steady laminar to time periodic and then to chaotic state at increasing buoyancy-to-inertia ratio. Substantial change in the spatial structure of the vortex flow is also noted to accompany this temporal transition. The results for the tapering duct indicate that more vortex rolls can be induced due to the increase in the aspect ratio of the duct with the axial distance. But the vortex rolls are weaker and are completely stabilized by the tapering of the top plate.

  15. An unsteady vortex lattice method model of a horizontal axis wind turbine operating in an upstream rotor wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, D.; Graham, J. M. R.

    2014-12-01

    An unsteady formulation of the vortex lattice method, VLM, is presented that uses a force- free representation of the wake behind a horizontal axis wind turbine, HAWT, to calculate the aerodynamic loading on a turbine operating in the wake of an upstream rotor. A Cartesian velocity grid is superimposed over the computational domain to facilitate the representation of the atmospheric turbulence surrounding the turbine and wind shear. The wake of an upstream rotor is modelled using two methods: a mean velocity deficit with superimposed turbulence, based on experimental observations, and a purely numeric periodic boundary condition. Both methods are treated as frozen and propagated with the velocity grid. Measurements of the mean thrust and blade root bending moment on a three bladed horizontal axis rotor modelling a 5 MW HAWT at 1:250 scale were carried out in a wind tunnel. Comparisons are made between operation in uniform flow and in the wake of a similarly loaded rotor approximately 6.5 diameters upstream. The measurements were used to validate the output from the VLM simulations, assuming a completely rigid rotor. The trends in the simulation thrust predictions are found to compare well with the uniform flow case, except at low tip speed ratios where there are losses due to stall which are yet to be included in the model. The simple wake model predicts the mean deficit, whilst the periodic boundary condition captures more of the frequency content of the loading in an upstream wake. However, all the thrust loads are over-predicted. The simulation results severely overestimate the bending moment, which needs addressing. However, the reduction in bending due to the simple wake model is found to reflect the experimental data reasonably well.

  16. Investigation of Oxygen Transfer Enhancement in Thermally Driven Cavities By Lattice Boltzmann Simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan; Zhang, Jinsuo; Li, Ning

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the enhancement of mass transfer in 2D thermally driven cavities using lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method. The computational technique integrates three coupled LBEs for solving velocity, temperature, and concentration fields simultaneously. Simulation is performed for oxygen transfer in lead/lead-bismuth eutectic with variations of temperature boundary, Schmidt number, and field aspect ratio to investigate the effects on enhancement of oxygen transfer. Interested characteristics include oxygen concentration, Sherwood number, and velocity profiles, etc. Our results clearly indicate that oxygen transfer is dominated by convection while diffusion also plays a role on it. Comparative studies demonstrate that side heating and top cooling device is more efficient to transfer oxygen than side heating and cooling device and oxygen transfers more rapidly in square cavity than in rectangular cavity. This work establishes a reliable thermal LBE model for thermally driven heat and mass transfer.

  17. Driven dynamic mode-splitting of the magnetic vortex translational resonance.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, K. S.; Grimsditch, M.; Fradin, F. Y.; Bader, S. D.; Novosad, V.

    2007-12-31

    A magnetic vortex in a restricted geometry possesses a nondegenerate translational excitation that corresponds to circular motion of its core at a characteristic frequency. For 40-nm thick, micron-sized permalloy elements, we find that the translational-mode microwave absorption peak splits into two peaks that differ in frequency by up to 25% as the driving field is increased. An analysis of micromagnetic equations shows that for large driving fields two stable solutions emerge.

  18. Competition of coarsening and shredding of clusters in a driven diffusive lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2006-06-01

    We investigate a driven diffusive lattice gas model with two oppositely moving species of particle. The model is motivated by bidirectional traffic of ants on a pre-existing trail. A third species, corresponding to pheromones used by the ants for communication, is not conserved and mediates interactions between the particles. Here we study the spatio-temporal organization of the particles. In the unidirectional variant of this model it is known to be determined by the formation and coarsening of 'loose clusters'. For our bidirectional model, we show that the interaction of oppositely moving clusters is essential. In the late stages of evolution the cluster size oscillates because of a competition between their 'shredding' during encounters with oppositely moving counterparts and subsequent 'coarsening' during collision-free evolution. We also establish a nontrivial dependence of the spatio-temporal organization on the system size.

  19. Observing artificial-field-driven vortex nucleation in a BEC via bulk response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, L. J.; Jiménez-García, K.; Williams, R. A.; Beeler, M. C.; Perry, A. R.; Spielman, I. B.

    2014-05-01

    By exploiting the quantum mechanical phase's relationship to velocity, we extracted information about a Bose-Einstein condensate's (BEC's) order parameter through time-of-flight (TOF) imaging. In these experiments, trapped BECs were equilibrated in Raman-induced artificial gauge fields, then released and imaged. The removal of the artificial field at the moment of release caused a shearing of the atomic distribution as the BEC evolved in field-free TOF. The quantitative measure of the cloud's shear increased suddenly at magnetic fields sufficient to nucleate vortices. Using superfluid hydrodynamics and Gross-Pitaevskii equation calculations, we confirmed the critical field for this structural phase transition from the vortex-free state. We discuss the relationship between the apparatus and the vector potential's ``natural gauge'' in quantum gas experiments with artificial magnetic fields. Current address: University of Alberta.

  20. Vortex Phase Diagram as a Function of Oxygen Deficiency in Untwinned YBa_2Cu_3O_y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizaki, Terukazu

    2000-03-01

    This talk will present recent results of the vortex phase diagram of untwinned YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO) single crystals with a different oxygen content under high magnetic fields up to 30T. We show that the first-order vortex lattice melting line T_m(H) and the second-order vortex glass transition line T_g(H) terminate at the critical point H_cp and the field-driven disordering transition line separates the vortex solid phase into the Bragg glass and the vortex glass phases(T. Nishizaki et al., Phys. Rev. B 58, 11169 (1998).). The value of H_cp strongly depends on the oxygen content and the vortex lattice melting transition is observed up to 30 T for fully oxidized YBCO (y~=7, T_c~=87.5 K). For optimally doped YBCO (T_c~= 93 K), on the other hand, T_g(H) decreases with increasing temperature and approaches to the vortex lattice melting line well below the critical point of T_m(H), indicating the existence of the new vortex state such as a vortex slush regime between T_g(H) and T_m(H). Thermodynamic properties are also examined above and below the terminal point of T_g(H). We find that the entropy change at the first-order melting transition becomes considerably small above the terminal field of T_g(H). The novel vortex phase diagram is discussed.

  1. Characterization of oscillatory instability in lid driven cavity flows using lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Anupindi, Kameswararao; Lai, Weichen; Frankel, Steven

    2014-03-20

    In the present work, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied for simulating flow in a three-dimensional lid driven cubic and deep cavities. The developed code is first validated by simulating flow in a cubic lid driven cavity at 1000 and 12000 Reynolds numbers following which we study the effect of cavity depth on the steady-oscillatory transition Reynolds number in cavities with depth aspect ratio equal to 1, 2 and 3. Turbulence modeling is performed through large eddy simulation (LES) using the classical Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model to arrive at an optimum mesh size for all the simulations. The simulation results indicate that the first Hopf bifurcation Reynolds number correlates negatively with the cavity depth which is consistent with the observations from two-dimensional deep cavity flow data available in the literature. Cubic cavity displays a steady flow field up to a Reynolds number of 2100, a delayed anti-symmetry breaking oscillatory field at a Reynolds number of 2300, which further gets restored to a symmetry preserving oscillatory flow field at 2350. Deep cavities on the other hand only attain an anti-symmetry breaking flow field from a steady flow field upon increase of the Reynolds number in the range explored. As the present work involved performing a set of time-dependent calculations for several Reynolds numbers and cavity depths, the parallel performance of the code is evaluated a priori by running the code on up to 4096 cores. The computational time required for these runs shows a close to linear speed up over a wide range of processor counts depending on the problem size, which establishes the feasibility of performing a thorough search process such as the one presently undertaken. PMID:24587561

  2. Characterization of oscillatory instability in lid driven cavity flows using lattice Boltzmann method

    PubMed Central

    Anupindi, Kameswararao; Lai, Weichen; Frankel, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied for simulating flow in a three-dimensional lid driven cubic and deep cavities. The developed code is first validated by simulating flow in a cubic lid driven cavity at 1000 and 12000 Reynolds numbers following which we study the effect of cavity depth on the steady-oscillatory transition Reynolds number in cavities with depth aspect ratio equal to 1, 2 and 3. Turbulence modeling is performed through large eddy simulation (LES) using the classical Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model to arrive at an optimum mesh size for all the simulations. The simulation results indicate that the first Hopf bifurcation Reynolds number correlates negatively with the cavity depth which is consistent with the observations from two-dimensional deep cavity flow data available in the literature. Cubic cavity displays a steady flow field up to a Reynolds number of 2100, a delayed anti-symmetry breaking oscillatory field at a Reynolds number of 2300, which further gets restored to a symmetry preserving oscillatory flow field at 2350. Deep cavities on the other hand only attain an anti-symmetry breaking flow field from a steady flow field upon increase of the Reynolds number in the range explored. As the present work involved performing a set of time-dependent calculations for several Reynolds numbers and cavity depths, the parallel performance of the code is evaluated a priori by running the code on up to 4096 cores. The computational time required for these runs shows a close to linear speed up over a wide range of processor counts depending on the problem size, which establishes the feasibility of performing a thorough search process such as the one presently undertaken. PMID:24587561

  3. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  4. Angular dependence of the disorder crossover in the vortex lattice of Bi{sub 2.15}Sr{sub 1.85}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} by muon spin rotation and torque magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Aegerter, C.M.; Hofer, J.; Savic, I.M.; Keller, H.; Lee, S.L.; Ager, C.; Lloyd, S.H.; Forgan, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Using the techniques of muon spin rotation and torque magnetometry, we investigate the crossover field B{sub cr} in Bi{sub 2.15}Sr{sub 1.85}Ca{sub 1}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} at which the vortex lattice becomes disordered along the field direction. It is found that B{sub cr} scales as the projection of the applied field along the perpendicular to the superconducting planes. This has the implication that a field large enough to give a disordered lattice when applied perpendicular to the planes, can give a well-ordered vortex-line lattice for angles of the field to the c axis greater than a critical value. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Mathematical aspects of vortex dynamics; Proceedings of the Workshop, Leesburg, VA, Apr. 25-27, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Caflisch, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on the mathematical aspects of vortex dynamics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: mathematical analysis of vortex dynamics, improved vortex methods for three-dimensional flows, the relation between thin vortex layer and vortex sheets, computations of broadband instabilities in a class of closed-streamline flows, vortex-sheet dynamics and hyperfunction theory, free surface vortex method with weak viscous effects, iterative method for computing steady vortex flow systems, invariant measures for the two-dimensional Euler flow, similarity flows containing two-branched vortex sheets, strain-induced vortex stripping, convergence of the vortex method for vortex sheets, boundary conditions and deterministic vortex methods for the Navier-Stokes equations, vorticity creation boundary conditions, vortex dynamics of stratified flows, vortex breakdown, numerical studies of vortex reconnection, vortex lattices in theory and practice, dynamics of vortex structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer, and energy of a vortex lattice configuration.

  6. Antiferromagnetic order driven chiral topological spin density waves on the repulsive Haldane-Hubbard model on square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Jie; Li, Ning; He, Jing; Kou, Su-Peng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, based on mean-field approach and random-phase-approximation, we study the magnetic properties of the repulsive Haldane-Hubbard model on a square lattice. We find antiferromagnetic order driven topological spin density waves beyond Landau’s symmetry-breaking paradigm, for which the effective low energy physics is determined by Chern-Simons-Hopf gauge field theories with different K matrices.

  7. Patterns beyond Faraday waves: observation of parametric crossover from Faraday instabilities to the formation of vortex lattices in open dual fluid strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlin, Kjell; Berggren, Karl Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Faraday first characterised the behaviour of a fluid in a container subjected to vertical periodic oscillations. His study pertaining to hydrodynamic instability, the ‘Faraday instability’, has catalysed a myriad of experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for the transition of a system at rest to a new state of well-ordered vibrational patterns at fixed frequencies. Here we study dual strata in a shallow vessel containing distilled water and high-viscosity lubrication oil on top of it. At elevated driving power, beyond the Faraday instability, the top stratum is found to ‘freeze’ into a rigid pattern with maxima and minima. At the same time there is a dynamic crossover into a new state in the form of a lattice of recirculating vortices in the lower layer containing the water. Instrumentation and the physics behind are analysed in a phenomenological way together with a basic heuristic modelling of the wave field. The study, which is based on relatively low-budget equipment, stems from related art projects that have evolved over the years. The study is of value within basic research as well as in education, especially as more advanced collective project work in e.g. engineering physics, where it invites further studies of pattern formation, the emergence of vortex lattices and complexity.

  8. Vortex Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, Albert; Garcia-March, Miguel-Angel

    2005-09-16

    Using group theory arguments and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility of changing the vorticity or topological charge of an individual vortex by means of the action of a system possessing a discrete rotational symmetry of finite order. We establish on theoretical grounds a 'transmutation pass rule' determining the conditions for this phenomenon to occur and numerically analyze it in the context of two-dimensional optical lattices. An analogous approach is applicable to the problems of Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials.

  9. Magnetic Radial Vortex Stabilization and Efficient Manipulation Driven by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Spin-Transfer Torque.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, G; Tomasello, R; Giordano, A; Puliafito, V; Azzerboni, B; Ozatay, O; Carpentieri, M; Finocchio, G

    2016-08-19

    Solitons are very promising for the design of the next generation of ultralow power devices for storage and computation. The key ingredient to achieving this goal is the fundamental understanding of their stabilization and manipulation. Here, we show how the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction (IDMI) is able to lift the energy degeneracy of a magnetic vortex state by stabilizing a topological soliton with radial chirality, hereafter called radial vortex. It has a noninteger Skyrmion number S (0.5<|S|<1) due to both the vortex core polarity and the magnetization tilting induced by the IDMI boundary conditions. Micromagnetic simulations predict that a magnetoresistive memory based on the radial vortex state in both free and polarizer layers can be efficiently switched by a threshold current density smaller than 10^{6}  A/cm^{2}. The switching processes occur via the nucleation of topologically connected vortices and vortex-antivortex pairs, followed by spin-wave emissions due to vortex-antivortex annihilations. PMID:27588879

  10. THz-Driven Ultrafast Spin-Lattice Scattering in Amorphous Metallic Ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, S; Hoffmann, M C; Sher, M-J; Chen, Z; Yang, S-H; Samant, M G; Parkin, S S P; Dürr, H A

    2016-08-19

    We use single-cycle THz fields and the femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr effect to, respectively, excite and probe the magnetization dynamics in two thin-film ferromagnets with different lattice structures: crystalline Fe and amorphous CoFeB. We observe Landau-Lifshitz-torque magnetization dynamics of comparable magnitude in both systems, but only the amorphous sample shows ultrafast demagnetization caused by the spin-lattice depolarization of the THz-induced ultrafast spin current. Quantitative modeling shows that such spin-lattice scattering events occur on similar time scales than the conventional spin conserving electronic scattering (∼30  fs). This is significantly faster than optical laser-induced demagnetization. THz conductivity measurements point towards the influence of lattice disorder in amorphous CoFeB as the driving force for enhanced spin-lattice scattering. PMID:27588880

  11. Vortex-antivortex pair in a Bose-Einstein condensate. Type-II quantum lattice gas as a nonlinear φ4 theory of a complex field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepez, J.; Vahala, G.; Vahala, L.

    2009-04-01

    Presented is a type-II quantum algorithm for superfluid dynamics, used to numerically predict solutions of the GP equation for a complex scalar field (spinless bosons) in φ4 theory. The GP equation is a long wavelength effective field theory of a microscopic quantum lattice gas with nonlinear state reduction. The quantum lattice gas algorithm for modeling the dynamics of the one-body BEC state in 3+1 dimensions is presented. To demonstrate the method's strength as a computational physics tool, a difficult situation of filamentary singularities is simulated, the dynamics of solitary vortex-antivortex pairs, which are a basic building block of morphologies of quantum turbulence.

  12. Phase transitions and connectivity in three-dimensional vortex equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Akao, J.H.

    1994-05-01

    The statistical mechanics of collections of closed self avoiding vortex loops on a lattice are studied. The system is related to the vortex form of the three dimensional XY model and to lattice vortex equilibrium models of turbulence. The system exhibits vortex connectivity and screening effects, and models in vorticity variables the superfluid transition. The equilibrium states of the system are simulated by a grand canonical Monte Carlo method. A set of geometric transformations for self-avoiding loops is developed. The numerical method employs histogram sampling techniques and utilizes a modification to the Metropolis flow which enhances efficiency. Results are given for a region in the temperature-chemical potential plane, where the chemical potential is related to the vortex fugacity. A line of second order transitions is identified at low temperature. The transition is shown to be a percolation threshold at which connected vortex loops of infinite size appear in the system. The nature of the transition supports the assumption that the lambda transition in bulk superfluid helium is driven by vortices. An asymptotic analysis is performed for the energy and entropy scaling of the system as functions of the system size and the lattice spacing. These estimates indicate that the infinite temperature line is a phase boundary between small scale fractal vortices and large scale smooth vortices. A suggestion is made that quantum vortices have uniform structure on the scale of the lattice spacing and lie in the positive temperature regime, while classical vortices have uniform structure on the scale of the domain and lie in the negative temperature regime.

  13. Tilt-modulus enhancement of the vortex lattice in the layered superconductor 2 H -NbSe sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Koorevaar, P.; Aarts, J.; Berghuis, P.; Kes, P.H. )

    1990-07-01

    The field dependence of the pinning force has been studied in thin single crystals of the layered superconductor 2{ital H}-NbSe{sub 2} in fields directed perpendicular to the layers. At high fields a peak effect is observed which sets in at about {ital B}{sub co}{approx}0.8{ital B}{sub {ital c}2}. Below this field the pinning force agrees well with the theory of two-dimensional collective pinning. The onset of the peak is triggered by the transition to three-dimensional flux-line lattice (FLL) disorder at the field {ital B}{sub co}. Comparison of the crossover field with the criterion set by the collective-pinning theory reveals that the tilt modulus of the FLL in a layered superconductor is considerably reduced. The reduction factor corresponds very well to recent theoretical predictions. These results are of importance for the prediction of depinning and flux-line lattice melting in all kinds of anisotropic superconductors.

  14. Avalanche-like vortex penetration driven by pulsed microwave fields in an epitaxial LaSrCuO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadra-Solís, P.-de-J.; Hernandez, J. M.; García-Santiago, A.; Tejada, J.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    Different vortex penetration regimes have been registered in the output voltage signal of a magnetometer when single microwave pulses are applied to an epitaxial overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 thin film in a perpendicular dc magnetic field. The onset of a significant variation in the sample magnetization which exists below threshold values of temperature, dc magnetic field, and pulse duration is interpreted as an avalanche-type flux penetration. The microwave contribution to the background electric field suggests that the nucleation of this fast vortex motion is of electric origin, which also guarantees the occurrence of vortex instabilities under adiabatic conditions via the enhancement of the flux flow resistivity. Flux creep phenomena and heat transfer effects act as stabilizing factors against the microwave-pulse-induced fast flux diffusion.

  15. A multi-element vortex lattice method for calculating the geometry and effects of a helicopter rotor wake in forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for the analysis of the unsteady, incompressible potential flow associated with a helicopter rotor and it's wake in forward flight. This method is particularly useful in low advance ratio flight due to the major contribution, in the near field, of the deformed wake. The rotor geometry is prescribed and the unsteady wake geometry is computed from the local flow perturbation velocities. The wake is modeled as a full vortex lattice. The rotor geometry is arbitrary and several rotor blades can be represented. The unsteady airloads on the rotor blades are computed in the presence of the deformed rotor wake by a time-stepping technique. Solution for the load distribution on the blade surfaces is found by prescribing boundary conditions in a reference system which rotates with the blade tips. Transformation tensors are used to describe the contribution of the wake in the inertial system to the rotor in the rotating reference system. The effects of blade cyclic pitch variation are computed using a rotation tensor. The deformation of the wake is computed in the inertial frame. The wake is started impulsively from rest, allowing a natural convection of the wake with time.

  16. Self-similar roll-up of a vortex sheet driven by a shear flow: Hyperbolic double spiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the roll-up of an infinite vortex sheet and investigate its self-similar behavior. We address the question of whether the unsteady double spiral produced by the curvature singularity in finite time exhibits self-similar behavior. We find a self-similar solution of the double-spiral vortex sheet, which in fact, is a hyperbolic spiral. The radius of the spiral asymptotically grows with time and is proportional to the inverse of the angle from the spiral center. The curvature singularity plays the role of triggering spiral formation, but the source of vorticity for forming the spiral is the initial vorticity of the sheet. We show analytically that the self-similar solution satisfies the Birkhoff-Rott equation asymptotically. Numerical validation is also given by applying the blob-regularization model to the vortex sheet with a periodic perturbation. We examine various asymptotic relations among primitive variables for the spiral turns and find agreement of numerical results of the inner turns of the vortex sheet with the analytic solution. Our study clarifies contrasting results on the existence of the self-similar double-spiral of a large structure in the previous studies. Our solution also suggests the possibility of bifurcation of the self-similar solution of the double-spiral as the sheet strength varies.

  17. Fulde-Ferrell Superfluids without Spin Imbalance in Driven Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Qu, Chunlei; Zou, Xubo; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2016-03-25

    Spin-imbalanced ultracold Fermi gases have been widely studied recently as a platform for exploring the long-sought Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov superfluid phases, but so far conclusive evidence has not been found. Here we propose to realize an Fulde-Ferrell (FF) superfluid without spin imbalance in a three-dimensional fermionic cold atom optical lattice, where s- and p-orbital bands of the lattice are coupled by another weak moving optical lattice. Such coupling leads to a spin-independent asymmetric Fermi surface, which, together with the s-wave scattering interaction between two spins, yields an FF type of superfluid pairing. Unlike traditional schemes, our proposal does not rely on the spin imbalance (or an equivalent Zeeman field) to induce the Fermi surface mismatch and provides a completely new route for realizing FF superfluids. PMID:27058062

  18. Lattice Boltzmann model for Coulomb-driven flows in dielectric liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kang; Wu, Jian; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we developed a unified lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) to simulate electroconvection in a dielectric liquid induced by unipolar charge injection. Instead of solving the complex set of coupled Navier-Stokes equations, the charge conservation equation, and the Poisson equation of electric potential, three consistent lattice Boltzmann equations are formulated. Numerical results are presented for both strong and weak injection regimes, and different scenarios for the onset and evolution of instability, bifurcation, and chaos are tracked. All LBM results are found to be highly consistent with the analytical solutions and other numerical work.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann model for Coulomb-driven flows in dielectric liquids.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kang; Wu, Jian; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we developed a unified lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) to simulate electroconvection in a dielectric liquid induced by unipolar charge injection. Instead of solving the complex set of coupled Navier-Stokes equations, the charge conservation equation, and the Poisson equation of electric potential, three consistent lattice Boltzmann equations are formulated. Numerical results are presented for both strong and weak injection regimes, and different scenarios for the onset and evolution of instability, bifurcation, and chaos are tracked. All LBM results are found to be highly consistent with the analytical solutions and other numerical work. PMID:26986441

  20. Equilibrium and Dynamic Vortex States near Absolute Zero in a Weak Pinning Amorphous Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Aguri; Sohara, Naoya; Kaneko, Shin-ichi; Kokubo, Nobuhito; Okuma, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    By developing and employing a mode-locking measurement with pulsed currents, we successfully determine the dynamic melting field B{c,dyn}∞ (T) for a driven vortex lattice of an amorphous MoxGe1-x film in the limit of zero temperature (T → 0) and complete a dynamic as well as a static vortex phase diagram. At T = 0, the mixed state in the absence of pinning comprises vortex-lattice and quantum-vortex-liquid (QVL) phases, and the melting field separating the two phases is identified as B{c,dyn}∞ (0). Comparison of the dynamic and static phase diagrams reveals that, when the weak pinning is introduced into the pin-free system, a disordered phase emerges just above the vortex-lattice phase and a threshold field separating the two phases is slightly suppressed from B{c,dyn}∞ (0), indicative of defect-induced disordering of the lattice. By contrast, a melting field into QVL is much enhanced from B{c,dyn}∞ (0) up to a point near the upper critical field, resulting in a significant suppression of the QVL phase. This is attributed to the stronger effective pinning at lower T, which survives quantum fluctuations.

  1. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  2. Boundary-field-driven control of discontinuous phase transitions on hyperbolic lattices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoju; Verstraete, Frank; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    The multistate Potts models on two-dimensional hyperbolic lattices are studied with respect to various boundary effects. The free energy is numerically calculated using the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. We analyze phase transitions of the Potts models in the thermodynamic limit with respect to contracted boundary layers. A false phase transition is present even if a couple of the boundary layers are contracted. Its significance weakens, as the number of the contracted boundary layers increases, until the correct phase transition (deep inside the bulk) prevails over the false one. For this purpose, we derive a thermodynamic quantity, the so-called bulk excess free energy, which depends on the contracted boundary layers and memorizes additional boundary effects. In particular, the magnetic field is imposed on the outermost boundary layer. While the boundary magnetic field does not affect the second-order phase transition in the bulk if suppressing all the boundary effects on the hyperbolic lattices, the first-order (discontinuous) phase transition is significantly sensitive to the boundary magnetic field. Contrary to the phase transition on the Euclidean lattices, the discontinuous phase transition on the hyperbolic lattices can be continuously controlled (within a certain temperature coexistence region) by varying the boundary magnetic field. PMID:27627272

  3. Cassini observations of a vortex structure in Saturn’s dayside magnetosphere driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Achilleos, N. A.; Sergis, N.; Dougherty, M. K.; Kivelson, M. G.; Arridge, C. S.; Krimigis, S. M.; McAndrews, H. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Kanani, S. J.; Krupp, N.; Coates, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    We present the first observations of a vortex structure in Saturn’s dayside, outer magnetosphere. The identification of the structure provides conclusive evidence of the operation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability at Saturn’s magnetospheric boundaries. Cassini observations taken during the inbound pass of the spacecraft’s Revolution B orbit in Decmber 2004 are analysed. Magnetic field conditions during the magnetopause crossings that occurred on this orbital pass suggest that the boundary was highly K-H unstable. Following multiple magnetopause crossings the spacecraft encountered the low-latitude boundary layer. Magnetic field, thermal plasma, and superthermal plasma observations made by Cassini during the spacecraft transition between the boundary layer and magnetosphere proper are consistent with an encounter with a vortex structure on the edge of the boundary layer - this interface is also anticipated to be K-H unstable. High-energy (>20 keV) electrons observed while the spacecraft was within the vortex suggest that the structure was associated with auroral emissions. A model of the coupling between an outer magnetospheric vortex and Saturn’s ionsphere via field-aligned currents is proposed. Estimates based on Knight’s theory imply that field-aligned potentials of a few kV were associated with the region of upward-directed field-aligned current in the northern ionosphere, and that the resulting precipitation of accelerated electrons produced UV auroral emissions with an intensity of a few kR. We propose that K-H vortices in Saturn’s outer magnetosphere produce bright spots of UV aurora. This discovery has implications for our understanding of the interaction between the solar wind and Saturn’s magnetosphere.

  4. Spin-Chirality-Driven Ferroelectricity on a Perfect Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mitamura, H.; Watanuki, R.; Kaneko, Koji; Onozaki, N.; Amou, Y.; Kittaka, S.; Kobayashi, Riki; Shimura, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Suzuki, K.; Chi, Songxue; Sakakibara, T.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic field (B) variation of the electrical polarization Pc ( ∥c) of the perfect triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO4)2 is examined up to the saturation point of the magnetization for B⊥c. Pc is observed only in phases for which chirality is predicted in the in-plane magnetic structures. No strong anomaly is observed in Pc at the field at which the spin modulation along the c axis, and hence the spin helicity, exhibits a discontinuity to the commensurate state. These results indicate that the ferroelectricity in this compound originates predominantly from the spin chirality, the explanation of which would require a new mechanism for magnetoferroelectricity. Lastly, the obtained field-temperature phase diagrams of ferroelectricity well agree with those theoretically predicted for the spin chirality of a Heisenberg spin triangular lattice antiferromagnet.

  5. Spin-Chirality-Driven Ferroelectricity on a Perfect Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mitamura, H.; Watanuki, R.; Kaneko, Koji; Onozaki, N.; Amou, Y.; Kittaka, S.; Kobayashi, Riki; Shimura, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Suzuki, K.; et al

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic field (B) variation of the electrical polarization Pc ( ∥c) of the perfect triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO4)2 is examined up to the saturation point of the magnetization for B⊥c. Pc is observed only in phases for which chirality is predicted in the in-plane magnetic structures. No strong anomaly is observed in Pc at the field at which the spin modulation along the c axis, and hence the spin helicity, exhibits a discontinuity to the commensurate state. These results indicate that the ferroelectricity in this compound originates predominantly from the spin chirality, the explanation of which would require a newmore » mechanism for magnetoferroelectricity. Lastly, the obtained field-temperature phase diagrams of ferroelectricity well agree with those theoretically predicted for the spin chirality of a Heisenberg spin triangular lattice antiferromagnet.« less

  6. User's manual for interfacing a leading edge, vortex rollup program with two linear panel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Sufficient instructions are provided for interfacing the Mangler-Smith, leading edge vortex rollup program with a vortex lattice (POTFAN) method and an advanced higher order, singularity linear analysis for computing the vortex effects for simple canard wing combinations.

  7. Bright solitons and self-trapping with a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms in driven tilted optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kolovsky, Andrey R.

    2010-07-15

    We discuss a method for creating bright matter solitons by loading a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms in a driven tilted optical lattice. It is shown that one can realize the self-focusing regime for the wave-packet dynamics by properly adjusting the phase of the driving field with respect to the phase of Bloch oscillations. If atom-atom interactions are larger than some critical value g{sub min}, this self-focusing regime is followed by the formation of bright solitons. Increasing the interactions above another critical value g{sub max} makes this process unstable. Instead of soliton formation one now meets the phenomenon of incoherent self-trapping. In this regime a fraction of atoms is trapped in incoherent localized wave packets, while the remaining atoms spread ballistically.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of self-driven bubble transport in a micro-channel with a virtual check valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rou; Diao, Wei; Cheng, Yongguang; Zhu, Likun; Yu, Huidan (Whitney)

    2014-11-01

    An innovative self-circulation, self-regulation mechanism has recently been proposed to experimentally generate gaseous species from liquid reactants with little or zero parasitic power consumption. When a bubble grows at a location close to a virtual check valve, expansion of the left meniscus of the bubble is hindered due to its capability to provide a higher capillary pressure than the right meniscus does. We perform numerical simulation of bubble transport in a channel with a virtual check valve using lattice Boltzmann method to provide benchmarks for the experiments. A stable discretized lattice Boltzmann equation is employed to simulate incompressible bubble-liquid flows with density ratio above 1000. Polynomial wall free energy boundary condition is introduced and examined for static cases with a bubble sitting on solid surfaces for a triple contact among bubble, liquid, and solid surface. In this work, we focus on the effects of channel ratio between with and without check valve on the dynamics of bubble-driven liquid circulation. This work is supported by NSF Collabrotive Research (1264739).

  9. Driven-dissipative many-body pairing states for cold fermionic atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, W.; Diehl, S.; Daley, A. J.; Zoller, P.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the preparation of many-body states of cold fermionic atoms in an optical lattice via controlled dissipative processes induced by coupling the system to a reservoir. Based on a mechanism combining Pauli blocking and phase locking between adjacent sites, we construct complete sets of jump operators describing coupling to a reservoir that leads to dissipative preparation of pairing states for fermions with various symmetries in the absence of direct inter-particle interactions. We discuss the uniqueness of these states, and demonstrate it with small-scale numerical simulations. In the late-time dissipative dynamics, we identify a ‘dissipative gap’ that persists in the thermodynamic limit. This gap implies exponential convergence of all many-body observables to their steady-state values. We then investigate how these pairing states can be used as a starting point for the preparation of the ground state of the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian via an adiabatic state preparation process also involving the parent Hamiltonian of the pairing state. We also provide a proof-of-principle example for implementing these dissipative processes and the parent Hamiltonians of the pairing states, based on 171Yb atoms in optical lattice potentials.

  10. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation for pressure driven microscale gas flows in transition regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiang-Ji; Wu, Ze-Huan; Ba, Yao-Shuai; Lu, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Peng; Ba, De-Chun

    2015-09-01

    This paper carries out numerical simulation for pressure driven microscale gas flows in transition flow regime. The relaxation time of LBM model was modified with the application of near wall effective mean free path combined with a combination of Bounce-back and Specular Reflection (BSR) boundary condition. The results in this paper are more close to those of DSCM and IP-DSCM compared with the results obtained by other LBM models. The calculation results show that in transition regime, with the increase of Knudsen number, the dimensionless slip velocity at the wall significantly increases, but the maximum linear deviation of nonlinear pressure distribution gradually decreases.

  11. Hierarchy of Floquet gaps and edge states for driven honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Piskunow, P. M.; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Usaj, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    Electromagnetic driving in a honeycomb lattice can induce gaps and topological edge states with a structure of increasing complexity as the frequency of the driving lowers. While the high-frequency case is the most simple to analyze we focus on the multiple photon processes allowed in the low-frequency regime to unveil the hierarchy of Floquet edge states. In the case of low intensities an analytical approach allows us to derive effective Hamiltonians and address the topological character of each gap in a constructive manner. At high intensities we obtain the net number of edge states, given by the winding number, with a numerical calculation of the Chern numbers of each Floquet band. Using these methods, we find a hierarchy that resembles that of a Russian nesting doll. This hierarchy classifies the gaps and the associated edge states in different orders according to the electron-photon coupling strength. For large driving intensities, we rely on the numerical calculation of the winding number, illustrated in a map of topological phase transitions. The hierarchy unveiled with the low-energy effective Hamiltonians, along with the map of topological phase transitions, discloses the complexity of the Floquet band structure in the low-frequency regime. The proposed method for obtaining the effective Hamiltonian can be easily adapted to other Dirac Hamiltonians of two-dimensional materials and even the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator.

  12. Magnetic vortex oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrkac, Gino; Keatley, Paul S.; Bryan, Matthew T.; Butler, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic vortex has sparked the interest of the academic and industrial communities over the last few decades. From their discovery in the 1970s for bubble memory devices to their modern application as radio frequency oscillators, magnetic vortices have been adopted to modern telecommunication and sensor applications. Basic properties of vortex structures in the static and dynamic regime, from a theoretical and experimental point of view, are presented as well as their application in spin torque driven nano-pillar and magnetic tunnel junction devices. Single vortex excitations and phase locking phenomena of coupled oscillators are discussed with an outlook of vortex oscillators in magnetic hybrid structures with imprinted domain confinement and dynamic encryption devices.

  13. Superconducting vortex avalanches, voltage bursts, and vortex plastic flow: Effect of the microscopic pinning landscape on the macroscopic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.J.; Reichhardt, C.; Nori, F.

    1997-09-01

    Using large-scale simulations on parallel processors, we analyze in detail the dynamical behavior of superconducting vortices undergoing avalanches. In particular, we quantify the effect of the pinning landscape on the macroscopic properties of vortex avalanches and vortex plastic flow. These dynamical instabilities are triggered when the external magnetic field is increased slightly, and are thus driven by a flux gradient rather than by thermal effects. The flux profiles, composed of rigid flux lines that interact with 100 or more vortices, are maintained in the Bean critical state and do not decay away from it. By directly determining vortex positions during avalanches in the plastically moving lattice, we find that experimentally observable voltage bursts correspond to the pulsing movement of vortices along branched channels or winding chains in a manner reminiscent of lightning strikes. This kind of motion cannot be described by elastic theories. We relate the velocity field and cumulative patterns of vortex flow channels with statistical quantities, such as distributions of avalanche sizes. Samples with a high density of strong pinning sites produce very broad avalanche distributions. Easy-flow vortex channels appear in samples with a low pinning density, and typical avalanche sizes emerge in an otherwise broad distribution of sizes. We observe a crossover from interstitial motion in narrow channels to pin-to-pin motion in broad channels as pin density is increased. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. The physicist's companion to current fluctuations: one-dimensional bulk-driven lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarescu, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    One of the main features of statistical systems out of equilibrium is the currents they exhibit in their stationary state: microscopic currents of probability between configurations, which translate into macroscopic currents of mass, charge, etc. Understanding the general behaviour of these currents is an important step towards building a universal framework for non-equilibrium steady states akin to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution for equilibrium systems. In this review, we consider one-dimensional bulk-driven particle gases, and in particular the asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) with open boundaries, which is one of the most popular models of one-dimensional transport. We focus, in particular, on the current of particles flowing through the system in its steady state, and on its fluctuations. We show how one can obtain the complete statistics of that current, through its large deviation function, by combining results from various methods: exact calculation of the cumulants of the current, using the integrability of the model; direct diagonalization of a biased process in the limits of very high or low current; hydrodynamic description of the model in the continuous limit using the macroscopic fluctuation theory. We give a pedagogical account of these techniques, starting with a quick introduction to the necessary mathematical tools, as well as a short overview of the existing works relating to the ASEP. We conclude by drawing the complete dynamical phase diagram of the current. We also remark on a few possible generalizations of these results.

  15. Interaction-driven fractional quantum Hall state of hard-core bosons on kagome lattice at one-third filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gong, S. S.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-07-01

    There has been a growing interest in realizing topologically nontrivial states of matter in band insulators, where a quantum Hall effect can appear as an intrinsic property of the band structure. While ongoing progress is under way with a number of directions, the possibility of realizing novel interaction-generated topological phases, without the requirement of a nontrivial invariant encoded in single-particle wave function or band structure, can significantly extend the class of topological materials and is thus of great importance. Here, we show an interaction-driven topological phase emerging in an extended Bose-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, where the noninteracting band structure is topological trivial with zero Berry curvature in the Brillouin zone. By means of an unbiased state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group technique, we identify that the ground state in a broad parameter region is equivalent to a bosonic fractional quantum Hall Laughlin state, based on the characterization of universal properties including ground-state degeneracy, edge excitations, and anyonic quasiparticle statistics. Our work paves a way to finding an interaction-induced topological phase at the phase boundary of conventionally ordered solid phases.

  16. A study of pressure-driven displacement flow of two immiscible liquids using a multiphase lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redapangu, Prasanna; Vanka, Pratap; Sahu, Kirti

    2012-11-01

    The pressure-driven displacement of two immiscible fluids in an inclined channel in the presence of viscosity and density gradients is investigated using a multiphase lattice Boltzmann approach. The effects of viscosity ratio, Atwood number, Froude number, capillary number and channel inclination are investigated through flow structures, front velocities and fluid displacement rates. Our results indicate that increasing viscosity ratio between the fluids decreases the displacement rate. We observe that increasing the viscosity ratio has a non-monotonic effect on the velocity of the leading front; however, the velocity of the trailing edge decreases with increasing the viscosity ratio. The displacement rate of the thin-layers formed at the later times of the displacement process increases with increasing the angle of inclination because of the increase in the intensity of the interfacial instabilities. Our results also predict the front velocity of the lock-exchange flow of two immiscible fluids in the exchange flow dominated regime. Department of Science and Technology, India.

  17. Superior magnetic and mechanical property of MnFe3N driven by electron correlation and lattice anharmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Sun, Hong; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-02-01

    Manganese-substitution-doped iron nitride MnFe3N holds great promise for applications in high-density magnetic recording and spintronic devices. However, existing theory contradicts experimental results on the structural and magnetic stability of MnFe3N , and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate by first-principles calculations that the ferromagnetic state with enhanced magnetization in MnFe3N is driven by the electron correlation effect not previously considered. We further reveal a large nonlinear shear plasticity, which produces an unexpectedly high shear strength in MnFe3N despite its initial ductile nature near the equilibrium structure. Moreover, we identify strong lattice anharmonicity that plays a pivotal role in stabilizing MnFe3N under high pressures at room temperature. These remarkable properties stem from the intriguing bonding nature of the parent compound Fe4N . Our results explain experimental results and offer insights into the fundamental mechanisms for the superior magnetic and mechanical properties of MnFe3N .

  18. Vortex dynamics and scalar transport in the wake of a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poussou, Stephane B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-09-01

    The air ventilation system in wide-body aircraft cabins provides passengers with a healthy breathing environment. In recent years, the increase in global air traffic has amplified contamination risks by airborne flu-like diseases and terrorist threats involving the onboard release of noxious materials. In particular, passengers moving through a ventilated cabin may transport infectious pathogens in their wake. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the wake produced by a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow. Data were obtained in a water facility using particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence. Ventilation attenuated the downward convection of counter-rotating vortices produced near the free-end corners of the body and decoupled the downwash mechanism from forward entrainment, creating stagnant contaminant regions.

  19. Quantum vortices in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Vignolo, P.; Fazio, R.; Tosi, M. P.

    2007-08-15

    A vortex in a superfluid gas inside an optical lattice can behave as a massive particle moving in a periodic potential and exhibiting quantum properties. In this paper we discuss these properties and show that the excitation of vortex dynamics in a two-dimensional lattice can lead to striking measurable changes in its dynamic response. It would be possible by means of Bragg spectroscopy to carry out the first direct measurement of the effective vortex mass. In addition, the experiments proposed here provide an alternative way to study the pinning to the underlying lattice and the dissipative damping.

  20. Static property and current-driven precession of 2π-vortex in nano-disk with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xianyin; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zhang, Senfu; Liu, Qingfang E-mail: wangjb@lzu.edu.cn; Wang, Jianbo E-mail: wangjb@lzu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    An interesting type of skyrmion-like spin texture, 2π-vortex, is obtained in a thin nano-disk with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We have simulated the existence of 2π-vortex by micromagnetic method. Furthermore, the spin polarized current is introduced in order to drive the motion of 2π-vortex in a nano-disk with diameter 2 R = 140 nm. When the current density matches with the current injection area, 2π-vortex soon reaches a stable precession (3∼4 ns). The relationship between the precession frequency of 2π-vortex and the current density is almost linear. It may have potential use in spin torque nano-oscillators.

  1. Vulcanized vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-15

    We investigate vortex configurations with the 'vulcanization' term inspired by the renormalization of {phi}{sub *}{sup 4} theory in the canonical {theta}-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  2. Vulcanized vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-01

    We investigate vortex configurations with the “vulcanization” term inspired by the renormalization of ϕ⋆4 theory in the canonical θ-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  3. Vortex induced strain effects in anisotropic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Miranovic, P.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.; Kogan, V.G.

    1996-12-31

    Strain in a superconductor, produced by the normal vortex core, can affect both static and dynamic properties of vortices. It causes an additional vortex-vortex interaction which is long-ranged ({approximately} 1/r{sup 2}) as compared with finite but much stronger London interaction in the fields far below H{sub c2}. The energy of this magneto-elastic interaction is calculated within London model. The role of strain effects in forming vortex lattice structure is demonstrated for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Mixed Convection Heat Transfer in a Driven Cavity with Non-uniform Heating of the Bottom Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soufiene, Bettaibi; Ezeddine, Sediki; Frédéric, Kuznik; Sauro, Succi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to study numerically the mixed convection in a differentially heated lid-driven cavity with non-uniform heating of the bottom wall. The velocity field is solved by a hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time Lattice Boltzmann (MRT-LBM) model, while the temperature field is obtained by resolution of the energy balance equation using the finite difference method (FDM). First, the model is checked and validated using data from the literature. Validation of the present results with those available in the literature shows a good agreement. A good efficiency in time simulation is confirmed. Thereafter, the model has been applied to mixed convection in a driven cavity with non-uniform heating wall at the fixed Grashof number Gr = 106. It is found that, the heat transfer is weakened as the Richardson number is augmented. For Gr = 106, we note the appearance of secondary vortices at different positions of the cavity corners.

  5. Programmable lattices of optical vortices in nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, R.; Assanto, G.; Bortolozzo, U.; Clerc, M. G.; Residori, S.; Vidal-Henriquez, E.

    2015-09-01

    Using self-induced vortex-like defects in the nematic liquid crystal layer of a light valve with photo-sensible wall, we demonstrate the realization of programable optical vortices lattices with arbitrary configuration in space. On each lattice site, every matter vortex acts as a photonic spin-to-orbital momentum coupler and an array of circularly polarized input beams is converted into an output array of vortex beams with topological charges consistent with the vortex matter lattice. The vortex arrangements are explained the basis of light-induced matter defects and topological rules.

  6. Vortex methods and vortex statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, A.J.

    1993-05-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible, inviscid, isentropic flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus if the vorticity is known at time t = 0, one can deduce the flow at a later time by simply following it around. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that makes use of this observation. Even more generally, the analysis of vortex methods leads, to problems that are closely related to problems in quantum physics and field theory, as well as in harmonic analysis. A broad enough definition of vortex methods ends up by encompassing much of science. Even the purely computational aspects of vortex methods encompass a range of ideas for which vorticity may not be the best unifying theme. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (``blobs``) and those whose understanding contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Vortex methods for inviscid flow lead to systems of ordinary differential equations that can be readily clothed in Hamiltonian form, both in three and two space dimensions, and they can preserve exactly a number of invariants of the Euler equations, including topological invariants. Their viscous versions resemble Langevin equations. As a result, they provide a very useful cartoon of statistical hydrodynamics, i.e., of turbulence, one that can to some extent be analyzed analytically and more importantly, explored numerically, with important implications also for superfluids, superconductors, and even polymers. In the authors view, vortex ``blob`` methods provide the most promising path to the understanding of these phenomena.

  7. Electromagnetic Radiation from Vortex Flow in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2006-11-10

    We show that a moving vortex lattice, as it comes to a crystal edge, radiates into a free space the harmonics of the washboard frequency, {omega}{sub 0}=2{pi}v/a, up to a superconducting gap, {delta}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Here v is the velocity of the vortex lattice and a is the intervortex spacing. We compute radiation power and show that this effect can be used for the generation of terahertz radiation and for characterization of moving vortex lattices.

  8. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M. Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-15

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem,” Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid,” Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  9. Arctic Vortex

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-26

    ... within the cloud layer downwind of the obstacle. These turbulence patterns are known as von Karman vortex streets. In these images ... was the first to derive the conditions under which these turbulence patterns occur. von Karman was a professor of aeronautics at the ...

  10. Effective Hamiltonians for Rapidly Driven Many-Body Lattice Systems: Induced Exchange Interactions and Density-Dependent Hoppings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, A. P.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2015-08-01

    We consider 1D lattices described by Hubbard or Bose-Hubbard models, in the presence of periodic high-frequency perturbations, such as uniform ac force or modulation of hopping coefficients. Effective Hamiltonians for interacting particles are derived using an averaging method resembling classical canonical perturbation theory. As is known, a high-frequency force may renormalize hopping coefficients, causing interesting phenomena such as coherent destruction of tunneling and creation of artificial gauge fields. We find explicitly additional corrections to the effective Hamiltonians due to interactions, corresponding to nontrivial processes such as single-particle density-dependent tunneling, correlated pair hoppings, nearest neighbor interactions, etc. Some of these processes arise also in multiband lattice models, and are capable of giving rise to a rich variety of quantum phases. The apparent contradiction with other methods, e.g., Floquet-Magnus expansion, is explained. The results may be useful for designing effective Hamiltonian models in experiments with ultracold atoms, as well as in the field of ultrafast nonequilibrium magnetism. An example of manipulating exchange interaction in a Mott-Hubbard insulator is considered, where our corrections play an essential role.

  11. Broadband terahertz spectroscopy of the insulator-metal transition driven by coherent lattice deformation at the SmNi O3/LaAl O3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Catalano, S.; Gibert, M.; Triscone, J.-M.; Cavalleri, A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium insulator-metal transition driven in a SmNi O3 thin film by coherent optical excitation of the LaAl O3 substrate lattice. By probing the transient optical properties over a broad frequency range (100 -800 c m-1 ), we analyze both the time-dependent metallic plasma and the infrared optical phonon line shapes. We show that the light-induced metallic phase in SmNi O3 has the same carrier density as the equilibrium metallic phase. We also report that the LaAl O3 substrate acts as a transducer only at the earlier time delays, as the vibrations are driven coherently. No long-lived structural rearrangement takes place in the substrate. Finally, we show that the transient insulator-metal transition occurs both below and above the Néel temperature. We conclude that the supersonic melting of magnetic order measured with ultrafast x rays is not the driving force of the formation of the metallic phase. We posit that the insulator-metal transition may origin from the rearrangement of ordered charges at the interface propagating into the film.

  12. The vortex flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerge, Brandon T.

    The Vortex Flap is a new type of mechanically driven high-lift device consisting of a rotating cylinder placed underneath and near the trailing edge of an airfoil. Wind tunnel tests were designed and conducted in the Washington University Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Wind tunnel tests indicate that the Vortex Flap produces notable lift coefficient increments and increases maximum lift coefficients, particularly for the low Reynolds number range tested. The best configurations of the configurations investigated (not necessarily optimal) produce lift increments of 300-900% at low-to-moderate angles of attack, and increase the maximum lift coefficient on the order of 200%. The large lift increments found, particularly at low angles of attack, underscore the ability to drive the airfoil to high lift coefficients even at low angles of attack, a potentially useful characteristic for certain flight maneuvers. Regions of fairly high L/D (on the order of 10) as well as low L/D performance were identified. The nondimensional cylinder rotation speed was found to be the most important experimental parameter. Methods for correcting wind tunnel data were developed and outlined, and a Response Surface Method was applied to the corrected data for ease of interpretation. Performance comparisons between the Vortex Flap and other trailing-edge high-lift devices are included. To demonstrate the potential of the device, a Navy mission specification for a VTOL ship-borne UAV, currently filled by a rotary-wing aircraft, is analyzed using a hypothetical fixed wing aircraft and the Vortex Flap. It is demonstrated that, under certain reasonable wind-over-deck conditions, such an aircraft could hypothetically fill a VTOL mission.

  13. Optimum lattice arrangement developed from a rigorous analytical basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1976-01-01

    The spanwise vortex-lattice arrangement is mathematically established by lattice solutions of the slender wing which are shown to be analogous to the chordwise vortex-lattice thin wing solution. Solutions for any number N of panels wing theory lift and induced drag and thin wing theory lift and moment are predicted exactly. As N approaches infinity, the slender wing elliptic spanwise loading and thin wing cotangent chordwise loading are predicted, which proves there is mathematical convergence of the vortex-lattice method to the exact answer. Based on this planform spanwise lattice arrangement, an A-vortex-lattice spanwise system is developed for an arbitrary aspect ratio A. This A-lattice has the optimum characteristic of predicting lift accurately for any value of N.

  14. Vortex phase diagram as a function of oxygen deficiency in untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, Terukazu; Shibata, Kenji; Naito, Tomoyuki; Maki, Makoto; Kobayashi, Norio

    1999-12-01

    Magnetization and resistivity measurements were performed in untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (YBCO) single crystals with different oxygen content. The authors find that the vortex phase diagram is a strong function of the oxygen deficiency: (1) For fully oxidized YBCO (y {approx{underscore}equal} 7, {Tc} {approx{underscore}equal} 87.5 K), the first-order vortex lattice melting line T{sub m}(H) is observed up to 30 T. (2) For slightly overdoped YBCO ({Tc} {approx{underscore}equal} 92 K), T{sub m}(H) and the vortex glass transition line T{sub g}(H) terminate at the multicritical point and the field-driven disordering transition line separates the vortex solid phase into the Bragg glass and the vortex glass phases. (3) For slightly underdoped YBCO ({Tc} {approx{underscore}equal} 92.3 K), T{sub g}(H) terminates well below the critical point of T{sub m}(H), indicating the existence of the vortex slush regime by the introduced oxygen deficiency.

  15. Hexatic vortex glass in disordered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, E.M. )

    1989-12-01

    It is shown that interaction of the flux-line lattice with randomly arranged pinning centers should destroy the long-range positional order in the lattice, but not the long-range orientational order. A new phase: hexatic vortex glass, is suggested for the mixed state of disordered, type-II superconductors. Relevance to amorphous and high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors is discussed.

  16. Experimental studies on coaxial vortex loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, R.; Kontis, K.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on the formation and propagation of coaxial vortex loops using a shock tube facility. The study aimed at evaluating the flow characteristics of pairs of corotating vortex rings that generate the leapfrogging phenomenon. The driver and driven gas of the shock tube were air. Three driver pressures were used (4, 8, and 12 bars) with the driven gas being at ambient conditions. The Mach numbers of the shock wave generated inside the shock tube were 1.34, 1.54, and 1.66, respectively. The sudden expansion present at the diaphragm location effectively decreased the Mach number value of the traveling shock wave. Results showed that a pair of vortex rings staggered with respect to time and with the same direction rotation lead to leapfrogging. Results also indicated that the number of leapfrogging occurrences is related to the Reynolds number of the vortex ring pairs with a decrease in leapfrogs at higher Reynolds numbers.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann method and channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensholt, Sigvat; Mongstad Hope, Sigmund

    2016-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are presented at an introductory level with a focus on fairly simple simulations that can be used to test and illustrate the model’s capabilities. Two scenarios are presented. The first is a simple laminar flow in a straight channel driven by a pressure gradient (Poiseuille flow). The second is a more complex, including a wedge where Moffatt vortices may be induced if the wedge is deep enough. Simulations of the Poiseuille flow scenario accurately capture the theoretical velocity profile. The experiment shows the location of the fluid-wall boundary and the effects viscosity has on the velocity and convergence time. The numerical capabilities of the lattice Boltzmann model are tested further by simulating the more complex Moffatt vortex scenario. The method reproduces with high accuracy the theoretical predction that Moffat vortices will not form in a wedge if the vertex angle exceeds 146°. Practical issues limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method are discussed. In particular the accuracy of the bounce-back boundary condition is first order dependent on the grid resolution.

  18. Mean flow development of a longitudinal vortex embedded in an attached, three-dimensional, turbulent boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shizawa, T.; Eaton, J.K.

    1990-12-31

    The interaction of a longitudinal vortex with a pressure-driven, three dimensional turbulent boundary layer was investigated experimentally. The vortex was attenuated much more rapidly in the three dimensional layer than in a two-dimensional boundary layer. The persistence for the vortex-induced perturbation was strongly dependent on the sign of the vortex.

  19. Confining bond rearrangement in the random center vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarawneh, Derar; Höllwieser, Roman; Engelhardt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We present static meson-meson and baryon-antibaryon potentials in Z (2 ) and Z (3 ) random center vortex models for the infrared sector of Yang-Mills theory, i.e., hypercubic lattice models of random vortex world surfaces. In particular, we calculate multiple Polyakov loop correlators corresponding to static meson-meson or baryon-antibaryon configurations in a center vortex background and observe that their expectation values follow the minimal area law, displaying bond rearrangement behavior, a characteristic expected for the confining dynamics of the strong interaction. The static meson-meson and baryon-antibaryon potentials are compared with theoretical predictions and lattice QCD simulations.

  20. Fractionalized gapless quantum vortex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2015-05-01

    The standard theoretical approach to gapless spin liquid phases of two-dimensional frustrated quantum antiferromagnets invokes the concept of fermionic slave particles into which the spin fractionalizes. As an alternate we explore different kinds of gapless spin liquid phases in frustrated quantum magnets with X Y anisotropy where the vortex of the spin fractionalizes into gapless itinerant fermions. The resulting gapless fractionalized vortex liquid phases are studied within a slave particle framework that is dual to the usual one. We demonstrate the stability of some such phases and describe their properties. We give an explicit construction in an X Y -spin-1 system on triangular lattice, and interpret it as a critical phase in the vicinity of spin-nematic states.

  1. Doping driven small-to-large Fermi surface transition and d-wave superconductivity in a two-dimensional Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, R.; Wróbel, P.

    2011-07-01

    We study the two-dimensional Kondo lattice model with an additional Heisenberg exchange between localized spins. In a first step, we use mean-field theory with two order parameters. The first order parameter is a complex pairing amplitude between conduction electrons and localized spins that describes condensation of Kondo (or Zhang-Rice) singlets. A nonvanishing value implies that the localized spins contribute to the Fermi surface volume. The second-order parameter describes singlet pairing between the localized spins and competes with the Kondo-pairing order parameter. Reduction of the carrier density in the conduction band reduces the energy gain due to the formation of the large Fermi surface and induces a phase transition to a state with strong singlet correlations between the localized spins and a Fermi surface that comprises only the conduction electrons. The model thus shows a doping driven change of its Fermi surface volume. At intermediate doping and low temperature, there is a phase where both order parameters coexist, which has a gapped large Fermi surface and dx2-y2 superconductivity. The theory thus qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram of cuprate superconductors. In the second part of this paper, we show how the two phases with different Fermi surface volume emerge in a strong-coupling theory applicable in the limit of large Kondo exchange. The large Fermi surface phase corresponds to a “vacuum” of localized Kondo singlets with uniform phase, and the quasiparticles are spin-1/2 charge fluctuations around this fully paired state. In the small Fermi surface phase, the quasiparticles correspond to propagating Kondo singlets or triplets whereby the phase of a given Kondo singlet corresponds to its momentum. In this picture, a phase transition occurs for low filling of the conduction band as well.

  2. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.F.; Osborn, R.F.; Foughner, J.T. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  3. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  4. Interaction of magnetoacoustic waves with flux-line lattice in superconducting-ferrite layered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sayko, G.V.; Bugaev, A.S.; Popkov, A.F.

    1994-12-31

    The authors consider vortex lattice interaction with transverse surface magnetoacoustic wave in high-{Tc} superconductor-ferrite structure. It has been found that the magnetoacoustic waves excited in the ferrite can be efficiently coupled with vortex structure in superconducting film. The nonlinear effect of vortex drift as well as the possibility of the wave amplification are discussed.

  5. Critical Capacitance and Charge-Vortex Duality Near the Superfluid-to-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Snir; Podolsky, Daniel; Auerbach, Assa

    2014-12-01

    Using a generalized reciprocity relation between charge and vortex conductivities at complex frequencies in two space dimensions, we identify the capacitance in the insulating phase as a measure of vortex condensate stiffness. We compute the ratio of boson superfluid stiffness to vortex condensate stiffness at mirror points to be 0.21(1) for the relativistic O(2) model. The product of dynamical conductivities at mirror points is used as a quantitative measure of deviations from self-duality between charge and vortex theories. We propose the finite wave vector compressibility as an experimental measure of the vortex condensate stiffness for neutral lattice bosons.

  6. Observation of a Field-Driven Structural Phase Transition in the Flux Line Lattice in ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect

    Eskildsen, M.; Andersen, N.; Mortensen, K.; Bolle, C.; Lieber, C.; Oxx, S.; Sridhar, S.; Canfield, P.

    1997-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and magnetic decoration both demonstrate a topological transition in the flux line lattice (FLL) in ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. The high-field square lattice slowly transforms into a hexagonal lattice via an area preserving [100] rhombohedral distortion below roughly 500Oe. The square FLL is aligned with the [110] direction of the tetragonal crystal, while the two domains of the hexagonal FLL are aligned with [100] and [010]. The differences in pinning for the two FLL topologies are reflected in the rf kinetic inductance. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Crossover from crossing to tilted vortex phase in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystals near ab-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkovic, Jovan; Buzdin, Alexandre; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In extremely anisotropic layered superconductors of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ the stacks of vortex pancakes (PV) and the Josephson vortex (JV) interpenetrate, and due to PV-JV mutual pinning energy, weakly interact and form various tilted and crossing lattice structures including vortex chains, stripes, mixed chain + lattice phases, etc. In order to study these phenomena, it is decisive to have excellent quality of samples and the ideal experimental techniques. The vortex phases in high-quality Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystals were studied by in-plane resistivity measurement and local ac magnetic permeability. The sharp crossover was shown by both techniques, deep in the vortex solid state separating the Abrikosov dominant ‘strong pinning’ phase from the Josephson dominant ‘weak pinning’ phase. Those two vortex states were recognized as the mixed chain + lattice vortex phase and chains (tilted) vortex phase, respectively.

  8. Reconfigurable large-area magnetic vortex circulation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Kronast, Florian; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic vortices in nanodots own a switchable circulation sense. These nontrivial magnetization configurations can be arranged into extended and interacting patterns. We have experimentally created large arrays of magnetically reconfigurable vortex patterns in nonplanar honeycomb lattices using particle lithography. Optimizing height asymmetry of the vertices and applying an in-plane magnetic field provide means to switch between homocircular and staggered vortex patterns with a potentially high impact on magnonics and spintronics relying on chiral noncollinear spin textures. To this end, exchange coupling of extended vortex lattices with an out-of-plane magnetized layer allows one to realize artificial skyrmionic core textures with controllable circulation and topological properties in extended exchange coupled honeycomb lattices that may pave the way towards magnetic memory and logic devices based on artificial skyrmions.

  9. Quantum vortex dynamics in two-dimensional neutral superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-C. Joseph; Duine, R. A.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2010-01-15

    We derive an effective action for the vortex-position degree of freedom in a superfluid by integrating out condensate phase- and density-fluctuation environmental modes. When the quantum dynamics of environmental fluctuations is neglected, we confirm the occurrence of the vortex Magnus force and obtain an expression for the vortex mass. We find that this adiabatic approximation is valid only when the superfluid droplet radius R, or the typical distance between vortices, is very much larger than the coherence length xi. We go beyond the adiabatic approximation numerically, accounting for the quantum dynamics of environmental modes and capturing their dissipative coupling to condensate dynamics. For the case of an optical-lattice superfluid, we demonstrate that vortex motion damping can be adjusted by tuning the ratio between the tunneling energy J and the on-site interaction energy U. We comment on the possibility of realizing vortex-Landau-level physics.

  10. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificial magnetic nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, M.; Martin, J. I.; Villegas, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.; Schuller, I. K.; Univ. de Oviedo-CINN; Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS Univ. Paris-Sud; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Univ. California at San Diego

    2008-11-01

    This review is dedicated to summarizing the recent research on vortex dynamics and pinning effects in superconducting films with artificial magnetic structures. The fabrication of hybrid superconducting/magnetic systems is presented together with the wide variety of properties that arise from the interaction between the superconducting vortex lattice and the artificial magnetic nanostructures. Specifically, we review the role that the most important parameters in the vortex dynamics of films with regular array of dots play. In particular, we discuss the phenomena that appear when the symmetry of a regular dot array is distorted from regularity towards complete disorder including rectangular, asymmetric, and aperiodic arrays. The interesting phenomena that appear include vortex-lattice reconfigurations, anisotropic dynamics, channeling, and guided motion as well as ratchet effects. The different regimes are summarized in a phase diagram indicating the transitions that take place as the characteristic distances of the array are modified respect to the superconducting coherence length. Future directions are sketched out indicating the vast open area of research in this field.