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Sample records for driving transgene expression

  1. Tubulin superfamily genes in Tribolium castaneum, and use of a Tubulin promoter to drive transgene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of native promoters to drive transgene expression has facilitated overexpression studies in Drosophila and other insects. We identified twelve Tubulin family members from the genome sequence of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and used the promoter from one of these to drive cons...

  2. Rosa26 Locus Supports Tissue-Specific Promoter Driving Transgene Expression Specifically in Pig

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Huang, Tianqing; Jiang, Dandan; Xie, Bingteng; Wu, Meiling; Wang, Jiaqiang; Song, Yuran; Wang, Ying; He, Yilong; Sun, Jialu; Hu, Kui; Guo, Runfa; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi; Mu, Yanshuang; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs have become a popular model system in fundamental research, agricultural and biomedical applications. However, random integration often result in unstable expression of transgene and unpredictable phenotypes. The Rosa26 locus has been widely used to produce genetic modified animals with high and consistent expressing of transgene in mouse, human and rat, as it can be targeted efficiently and is not subject to gene-silencing effects. Recently, the first case of reporter gene targeting pigs in porcine Rosa26 (pRosa26) locus was reported. In the study, full sequence of pRosa26 locus was further characterized, and the pRosa26 promoter (pR26) was cloned and we evidenced that the new porcine endogenous promoter is suitable for driving transgene expression in a high and stable manner by avoiding DNA methylation. Furthermore, elongation factor 1a promoter (EF1a) -driven GFP reporter and Myostatin promoter (MyoP)-driven Follistatin (Fst) were successfully targeted into the pRosa26 locusby traditional homologous recombination (HR) strategy. EF1a showed high activity and hypomethylation at the locus. And, muscle-specific promoter MyoP was activated strictly in muscle of the pRosa26 targeted pigs, indicating Rosa26 locus supports tissue-specific promoter driving transgene expression in its own manner. The study provided further demonstration on biomedical and agricultural applications of porcine Rosa26 promoter and locus. PMID:25232950

  3. A promoter from sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus drives transgene expression in banana and other monocot and dicot plants.

    PubMed

    Schenk, P M; Sagi, L; Remans, T; Dietzgen, R G; Bernard, M J; Graham, M W; Manners, J M

    1999-04-01

    A 1369 bp DNA fragment (Sc) was isolated from a full-length clone of sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus (ScBV) and was shown to have promoter activity in transient expression assays using monocot (banana, maize, millet and sorghum) and dicot plant species (tobacco, sunflower, canola and Nicotiana benthamiana). This promoter was also tested for stable expression in transgenic banana and tobacco plants. These experiments showed that this promoter could drive high-level expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in most plant cells. The expression level was comparable to the maize ubiquitin promoter in standardised transient assays in maize. In transgenic banana plants the expression levels were variable for different transgenic lines but was generally comparable with the activities of both the maize ubiquitin promoter and the enhanced cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. The Sc promoter appears to express in a near-constitutive manner in transgenic banana and tobacco plants. The promoter from sugarcane bacilliform virus represents a useful tool for the high-level expression of foreign genes in both monocot and dicot transgenic plants that could be used similarly to the CaMV 35S or maize polyubiquitin promoter. PMID:10380808

  4. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  5. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  6. Evaluation of viral and mammalian promoters for driving transgene expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Zhang Guisheng; Knapp, Joseph E.; Liu Dexi . E-mail: dliu@pitt.edu

    2006-01-13

    Fifteen luciferase plasmid constructs driven by various promoters including cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), human serum albumin (SA), {alpha}-1 antitrypsin (AAT), cytochrome P450 CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, mouse CYP2b10, human amyloid precursor protein (APP), chicken {beta} actin (ACT), nuclear factor {kappa} B (NF{kappa}B), and heat shock protein 70 (HS) promoters were hydrodynamically introduced into mouse hepatocytes, and the level and persistence of luciferase gene expression were examined. Eight hours post-gene transfer, the CMV and AAT promoters showed the highest activity, followed by the CYP2D6, HS, and RSV promoters which were slightly less active. The human serum albumin promoter exhibited the lowest activity among the promoters examined. The time course of gene expression showed a two-phase decline in luciferase activity with a rapid phase within First 5-7 days and a slower decline thereafter. Results from Southern and Northern blot analyses revealed a good correlation between the decline of luciferase activity and the decrease in mRNA level, suggesting promoter silencing as the possible mechanism for the observed transient luciferase gene expression. Inclusion of EBN1 and oriP sequences of Epstein-Barr virus into the plasmid extended the period of active transcription for about one week. These results provide important information concerning the role of promoters in regulating transgene expression and for the proper design of plasmids for gene expression and gene therapy.

  7. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  8. Introducing Transgenes Into Insect Populations Using Combined Gene-drive Strategies: Modeling and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magori, Krisztian; Lloyd, Alun L.; Gould, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Engineered underdominance (EU), meiotic drive (MD) and Wolbachia have been proposed as mechanisms for driving anti-pathogen transgenes into natural populations of insect vectors of human diseases. EU can drive transgenes to high and stable frequencies but requires the release of sizeable numbers of engineered insects. MD and Wolbachia either cannot maintain high frequencies of transgenes or lack appropriate expression in critical tissues, but both can drive the transgenes to spread from very low initial frequencies. Here we use mathematical models to assess the utility of combining EU with MD or with Wolbachia. Under some conditions, the combination of EU and MD results in a more efficient transgene-drive strategy than either mechanism alone. This combined strategy could drive the transgenes to stable fixation and would require fewer released insects than EU alone, especially when only males are released. However, a combination of EU and Wolbachia does not work better than EU alone because it requires the release of even more engineered insects. PMID:17785193

  9. A high level of liver-specific expression of oncogenic Kras(V12) drives robust liver tumorigenesis in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Emelyanov, Alexander; Koh, Chor Hui Vivien; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Lam, Siew Hong; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan; Parinov, Serguei; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2011-11-01

    Human liver cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) being the most common type. Aberrant Ras signaling has been implicated in the development and progression of human HCC, but a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this protein in hepatocarcinogenesis remains elusive. In this study, a stable in vivo liver cancer model using transgenic zebrafish was generated to elucidate Ras-driven tumorigenesis in HCC. Using the liver-specific fabp10 (fatty acid binding protein 10) promoter, we overexpressed oncogenic kras(V12) specifically in the transgenic zebrafish liver. Only a high level of kras(V12) expression initiated liver tumorigenesis, which progressed from hyperplasia to benign and malignant tumors with activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and Wnt-β-catenin pathways. Histological diagnosis of zebrafish tumors identified HCC as the main lesion. The tumors were invasive and transplantable, indicating malignancy of these HCC cells. Oncogenic kras(V12) was also found to trigger p53-dependent senescence as a tumor suppressive barrier in the pre-neoplastic stage. Microarray analysis of zebrafish liver hyperplasia and HCC uncovered the deregulation of several stage-specific and common biological processes and signaling pathways responsible for kras(V12)-driven liver tumorigenesis that recapitulated the molecular hallmarks of human liver cancer. Cross-species comparisons of cancer transcriptomes further defined a HCC-specific gene signature as well as a liver cancer progression gene signature that are evolutionarily conserved between human and zebrafish. Collectively, our study presents a comprehensive portrait of molecular mechanisms during progressive Ras-induced HCC. These observations indicate the validity of our transgenic zebrafish to model human liver cancer, and this model might act as a useful platform for drug screening and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:21729876

  10. A high level of liver-specific expression of oncogenic KrasV12 drives robust liver tumorigenesis in transgenic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Emelyanov, Alexander; Koh, Chor Hui Vivien; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Lam, Siew Hong; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan; Parinov, Serguei; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Human liver cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) being the most common type. Aberrant Ras signaling has been implicated in the development and progression of human HCC, but a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this protein in hepatocarcinogenesis remains elusive. In this study, a stable in vivo liver cancer model using transgenic zebrafish was generated to elucidate Ras-driven tumorigenesis in HCC. Using the liver-specific fabp10 (fatty acid binding protein 10) promoter, we overexpressed oncogenic krasV12 specifically in the transgenic zebrafish liver. Only a high level of krasV12 expression initiated liver tumorigenesis, which progressed from hyperplasia to benign and malignant tumors with activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and Wnt–β-catenin pathways. Histological diagnosis of zebrafish tumors identified HCC as the main lesion. The tumors were invasive and transplantable, indicating malignancy of these HCC cells. Oncogenic krasV12 was also found to trigger p53-dependent senescence as a tumor suppressive barrier in the pre-neoplastic stage. Microarray analysis of zebrafish liver hyperplasia and HCC uncovered the deregulation of several stage-specific and common biological processes and signaling pathways responsible for krasV12-driven liver tumorigenesis that recapitulated the molecular hallmarks of human liver cancer. Cross-species comparisons of cancer transcriptomes further defined a HCC-specific gene signature as well as a liver cancer progression gene signature that are evolutionarily conserved between human and zebrafish. Collectively, our study presents a comprehensive portrait of molecular mechanisms during progressive Ras-induced HCC. These observations indicate the validity of our transgenic zebrafish to model human liver cancer, and this model might act as a useful platform for drug screening and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:21729876

  11. Transgene expression in the basidiomycete root pathogen Armillaria mellea.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toward development of a genetic transformation system for Armillaria mellea, we used particle bombardment to identify promoters for driving transgene expression. The plasmid tested was pYES-hph-004iGFP, on which the green fluorescence protein gene, gfp, is linked to the Agaricus bisporus gpdII promo...

  12. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Högemanny, Dagmar; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Tyminski, Edyta; Terada, Kinya; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Basilion, James P

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR) whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1) ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2) several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3) expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4) ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression. PMID:12407446

  13. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  14. Regulation of endothelial-specific transgene expression by the LacI repressor protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morton, Susan K; Chaston, Daniel J; Baillie, Brett K; Hill, Caryl E; Matthaei, Klaus I

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified mice have played an important part in elucidating gene function in vivo. However, conclusions from transgenic studies may be compromised by complications arising from the site of transgene integration into the genome and, in inducible systems, the non-innocuous nature of inducer molecules. The aim of the present study was to use the vascular system to validate a technique based on the bacterial lac operon system, in which transgene expression can be repressed and de-repressed by an innocuous lactose analogue, IPTG. We have modified an endothelium specific promoter (TIE2) with synthetic LacO sequences and made transgenic mouse lines with this modified promoter driving expression of mutant forms of connexin40 and an independently translated reporter, EGFP. We show that tissue specificity of this modified promoter is retained in the vasculature of transgenic mice in spite of the presence of LacO sequences, and that transgene expression is uniform throughout the endothelium of a range of adult systemic and cerebral arteries and arterioles. Moreover, transgene expression can be consistently down-regulated by crossing the transgenic mice with mice expressing an inhibitor protein LacI(R), and in one transgenic line, transgene expression could be de-repressed rapidly by the innocuous inducer, IPTG. We conclude that the modified bacterial lac operon system can be used successfully to validate transgenic phenotypes through a simple breeding schedule with mice homozygous for the LacI(R) protein. PMID:24755679

  15. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Transgene expression in regenerated roots.

    PubMed

    Malamy, Jocelyn

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis procedure, which uses a root transformation protocol, provides a rapid method for assessing gene expression in Arabidopsis roots. It is useful for testing promoter:reporter gene constructs, for expressing genes, the overexpression of which is lethal in whole plants, and for transforming the roots of plants that are recalcitrant to conventional transformation techniques. The protocol has been used successfully with Ws, No-0, and RLD ecotypes. PMID:21357026

  17. Efficient Generation of Mice with Consistent Transgene Expression by FEEST.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Jiang, Yonghua; Mu, Libing; Liu, Yanbin; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Aiqun; Tang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Luo, Minmin; Yu, Lei; Gao, Shaorong; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models are widely used in biomedical research; however, current techniques for producing transgenic mice are limited due to the unpredictable nature of transgene expression. Here, we report a novel, highly efficient technique for the generation of transgenic mice with single-copy integration of the transgene and guaranteed expression of the gene-of-interest (GOI). We refer to this technique as functionally enriched ES cell transgenics, or FEEST. ES cells harboring an inducible Cre gene enabled the efficient selection of transgenic ES cell clones using hygromycin before Cre-mediated recombination. Expression of the GOI was confirmed by assaying for the GFP after Cre recombination. As a proof-of-principle, we produced a transgenic mouse line containing Cre-activatable tTA (cl-tTA6). This tTA mouse model was able to induce tumor formation when crossed with a transgenic mouse line containing a doxycycline-inducible oncogene. We also showed that the cl-tTA6 mouse is a valuable tool for faithfully recapitulating the clinical course of tumor development. We showed that FEEST can be easily adapted for other genes by preparing a transgenic mouse model of conditionally activatable EGFR L858R. Thus, FEEST is a technique with the potential to generate transgenic mouse models at a genome-wide scale. PMID:26573149

  18. Oviduct-specific expression of human neutrophil defensin 4 in lentivirally generated transgenic chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxin; Wu, Hanyu; Cao, Dainan; Li, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yaqiong; Li, Ning; Hu, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    The expression of oviduct-specific recombinant proteins in transgenic chickens is a promising technology for the production of therapeutic biologics in eggs. In this study, we constructed a lentiviral vector encoding an expression cassette for human neutrophil defensin 4 (HNP4), a compound that displays high activity against Escherichia coli, and produced transgenic chickens that expressed the recombinant HNP4 protein in egg whites. After the antimicrobial activity of the recombinant HNP4 protein was tested at the cellular level, a 2.8-kb ovalbumin promoter was used to drive HNP4 expression specifically in oviduct tissues. From 669 injected eggs, 218 chickens were successfully hatched. Ten G0 roosters, with semens identified as positive for the transgene, were mated with wild-type hens to generate G1 chickens. From 1,274 total offspring, fifteen G1 transgenic chickens were positive for the transgene, which was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The results of the Southern blotting and genome walking indicated that a single copy of the HNP4 gene was integrated into chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 of the chickens. As expected, HNP4 expression was restricted to the oviduct tissues, and the levels of both transcriptional and translational HNP4 expression varied greatly in transgenic chickens with different transgene insertion sites. The amount of HNP4 protein expressed in the eggs of G1 and G2 heterozygous transgenic chickens ranged from 1.65 μg/ml to 10.18 μg/ml. These results indicated that the production of transgenic chickens that expressed HNP4 protein in egg whites was successful. PMID:26020529

  19. Transgenic APP expression during postnatal development causes persistent locomotor hyperactivity in the adult

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transgenic mice expressing disease-associated proteins have become standard tools for studying human neurological disorders. Transgenes are often expressed using promoters chosen to drive continuous high-level expression throughout life rather than temporal and spatial fidelity to the endogenous gene. This approach has allowed us to recapitulate diseases of aging within the two-year lifespan of the laboratory mouse, but has the potential for creating aberrant phenotypes by mechanisms unrelated to the human disorder. Results We show that overexpression of the Alzheimer’s-related amyloid precursor protein (APP) during early postnatal development leads to severe locomotor hyperactivity that can be significantly attenuated by delaying transgene onset until adulthood. Our data suggest that exposure to transgenic APP during maturation influences the development of neuronal circuits controlling motor activity. Both when matched for total duration of APP overexpression and when matched for cortical amyloid burden, animals exposed to transgenic APP as juveniles are more active in locomotor assays than animals in which APP overexpression was delayed until adulthood. In contrast to motor activity, the age of APP onset had no effect on thigmotaxis in the open field as a rough measure of anxiety, suggesting that the interaction between APP overexpression and brain development is not unilateral. Conclusions Our findings indicate that locomotor hyperactivity displayed by the tet-off APP transgenic mice and several other transgenic models of Alzheimer’s disease may result from overexpression of mutant APP during postnatal brain development. Our results serve as a reminder of the potential for unexpected interactions between foreign transgenes and brain development to cause long-lasting effects on neuronal function in the adult. The tet-off APP model provides an easy means of avoiding developmental confounds by allowing transgene expression to be delayed until the

  20. Transgenic expression of PML/RARalpha impairs myelopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Early, E; Moore, M A; Kakizuka, A; Nason-Burchenal, K; Martin, P; Evans, R M; Dmitrovsky, E

    1996-01-01

    The translocation found in acute promyelocytic leukemia rearranges the promyelocytic leukemia gene (PML) on chromosome 15 with the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) on chromosome 17. This yields a fusion transcript, PML/RARalpha, a transcription factor with reported dominant negative functions in the absence of hormone. Clinical remissions induced with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) treatment in acute promyelocytic leukemia are linked to PML/RARalpha expression in leukemic cells. To evaluate the PML/RARalpha role in myelopoiesis, transgenic mice expressing PML/RARalpha were engineered. A full-length PML/RARalpha cDNA driven by the CD11b promoter was expressed in transgenic mice. Expression was confirmed in the bone marrow with a reverse transcription PCR assay. Basal total white blood cell and granulocyte counts did not appreciably differ between PML/RARalpha transgenic and control mice. Cell sorter analysis of CD11b+ bone marrow cells revealed similar CD11b+ populations in transgenic and control mice. However, in vitro clonal growth assays performed on peripheral blood from transgenic versus control mice revealed a marked reduction of myeloid progenitors, especially in those responding to granulocyte/ macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and kit ligand cotreatment did not overcome this inhibition. Impaired myelopoiesis in vivo was shown by stressing these mice with sublethal irradiation. Following irradiation, PML/RARalpha transgenic mice, as compared with controls, more rapidly depressed peripheral white blood cell and granulocyte counts. As expected, nearly all control mice (94.4%) survived irradiation, yet this irradiation was lethal to 45.8% of PML/RARalpha transgenic mice. Lethality was associated with more severe leukopenia in transgenic versus control mice. Retinoic acid treatment of irradiated PML/RARalpha mice enhanced granulocyte recovery. These data suggest that abnormal myelopoiesis due to PML

  1. The arcelin-5 gene of Phaseolus vulgaris directs high seed-specific expression in transgenic Phaseolus acutifolius and Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Goossens, A; Dillen, W; De Clercq, J; Van Montagu, M; Angenon, G

    1999-08-01

    The regulatory sequences of many genes encoding seed storage proteins have been used to drive seed-specific expression of a variety of proteins in transgenic plants. Because the levels at which these transgene-derived proteins accumulate are generally quite low, we investigated the utility of the arcelin-5 regulatory sequences in obtaining high seed-specific expression in transgenic plants. Arcelin-5 is an abundant seed protein found in some wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes. Seeds of Arabidopsis and Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) plants transformed with arcelin-5 gene constructs synthesized arcelin-5 to levels of 15% and 25% of the total protein content, respectively. To our knowledge, such high expression levels directed by a transgene have not been reported before. The transgenic plants also showed low plant-to-plant variation in arcelin expression. Complex transgene integration patterns, which often result in gene silencing effects, were not associated with reduced arcelin-5 expression. High transgene expression was the result of high mRNA steady-state levels and was restricted to seeds. This indicates that all requirements for high seed-specific expression are cis elements present in the cloned genomic arcelin-5 sequence and trans-acting factors that are available in Arabidopsis and Phaseolus spp., and thus probably in most dicotyledonous plants. PMID:10444093

  2. Amino Acids Regulate Transgene Expression in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M. R.; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  3. Developing tTA transgenic rats for inducible and reversible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongxia; Huang, Cao; Yang, Min; Landel, Carlisle P; Xia, Pedro Yuxing; Liu, Yong-Jian; Xia, Xu Gang

    2009-01-01

    To develop transgenic lines for conditional expression of desired genes in rats, we generated several lines of the transgenic rats carrying the tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) gene. Using a vigorous, ubiquitous promoter to drive the tTA transgene, we obtained widespread expression of tTA in various tissues. Expression of tTA was sufficient to strongly activate its reporter gene, but was below the toxicity threshold. We examined the dynamics of Doxycycline (Dox)-regulated gene expression in transgenic rats. In the two transmittable lines, tTA-mediated activation of the reporter gene was fully subject to regulation by Dox. Dox dose-dependently suppressed tTA-activated gene expression. The washout time for the effects of Dox was dose-dependent. We tested a complex regime of Dox administration to determine the optimal effectiveness and washout duration. Dox was administered at a high dose (500 microg/ml in drinking water) for two days to reach the effective concentration, and then was given at a low dose (20 microg/ml) to maintain effectiveness. This regimen of Dox administration can achieve a quick switch between ON and OFF statuses of tTA-activated gene expression. In addition, administration of Dox to pregnant rats fully suppressed postnatal tTA-activated gene expression in their offspring. Sufficient levels of Dox are present in mother's milk to produce maximal efficacy in nursing neonates. Administration of Dox to pregnant or nursing rats can provide a continual suppression of tTA-dependent gene expression during embryonic and postnatal development. The tTA transgenic rat allows for inducible and reversible gene expression in the rat; this important tool will be valuable in the development of genetic rat models of human diseases. PMID:19214245

  4. Tetracycline-inducible system for regulation of skeletal muscle-specific gene expression in transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, Mischala A.; Bales, Mark A.; Fought, Amber N.; Rosburg, Kristopher C.; Munger, Stephanie J.; Antin, Parker B.

    2003-01-01

    Tightly regulated control of over-expression is often necessary to study one aspect or time point of gene function and, in transgenesis, may help to avoid lethal effects and complications caused by ubiquitous over-expression. We have utilized the benefits of an optimized tet-on system and a modified muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter to generate a skeletal muscle-specific, doxycycline (Dox) controlled over-expression system in transgenic mice. A DNA construct was generated in which the codon optimized reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA) was placed under control of a skeletal muscle-specific version of the mouse MCK promoter. Transgenic mice containing this construct expressed rtTA almost exclusively in skeletal muscles. These mice were crossed to a second transgenic line containing a bi-directional promoter centered on a tet responder element driving both a luciferase reporter gene and a tagged gene of interest; in this case the calpain inhibitor calpastatin. Compound hemizygous mice showed high level, Dox dependent muscle-specific luciferase activity often exceeding 10,000-fold over non-muscle tissues of the same mouse. Western and immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated similar Dox dependent muscle-specific induction of the tagged calpastatin protein. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness and flexibility of the tet-on system to provide a tightly regulated over-expression system in adult skeletal muscle. The MCKrtTA transgenic lines can be combined with other transgenic responder lines for skeletal muscle-specific over-expression of any target gene of interest.

  5. Viral vectors: from virology to transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouard, D; Alazard-Dany, N; Cosset, F-L

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1970s, it was predicted that gene therapy would be applied to humans within a decade. However, despite some success, gene therapy has still not become a routine practise in medicine. In this review, we will examine the problems, both experimental and clinical, associated with the use of viral material for transgenic insertion. We shall also discuss the development of viral vectors involving the most important vector types derived from retroviruses, adenoviruses, herpes simplex viruses and adeno-associated viruses. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:18776913

  6. Body composition of transgenic pigs expressing the myostatin pro domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous results have shown that male mice expressing a myostatin pro domain construct (MLC-Pro) have increased body weight, more total body lean mass, and lower percentage of total body fat. Founder transgenic (TG) pigs were generated by standard pronuclear microinjection techniques using the sam...

  7. TRANSGENIC PLANTS EXPRESSING BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS DELTA-ENDOTOXINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial varieties of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) plants have been developed in many countries to control target pests. Initially, the expression of native Bt genes in plants was low due to mRNA instability, improper splicing, and post-translation modifications. Subsequently, modificati...

  8. Stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) expression driven by a macrophage-specific promoter results in reduced viability in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P; Moore, K J; Libby, P; Freeman, M W

    2000-02-01

    Macrophage expression of matrix degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human atheroma has been found to occur in rupture-prone areas of plaques. To investigate the effect of metalloproteinase activity on plaque stability, we attempted to generate mice that expressed a stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) transgene specifically in macrophages. Promoter sequences taken from a macrophage-tropic lentivirus (visna) were used to drive transgene expression. The transgene construct was expressed in macrophages in vitro and its autoactivation was established by casein zymography. Transgenic mice generated with this construct died at or before birth. No gross anatomical changes were observed in these mice. Embryos arising from a second round of oocyte injections with the transgene were examined at day 16 of gestation. Of the products of conception, approximately 40% resulted in vacant conceptuses. Only one animal of 38 examined carried the transgene and its expression of MMP-3 mRNA at E16 was faintly detected by RT-PCR. When a non-toxic reporter gene, luciferase, was substituted for the MMP-3 cDNA, healthy transgenic mice were produced that expressed the reporter gene in a wide variety of tissue macrophages, including those located in the brain, testis, lung, and thymus. These studies suggest that constitutive expression of MMP-3 in diverse populations of tissue macrophages leads to prenatal or neonatal death in the mouse. It appears likely that more sophisticated transcriptional control of MMP-3 expression will be required in order to generate stromelysin-1 transgenic mice that could be useful models for studying overexpression of this metalloproteinase's activity in the lesional macrophages of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:10657574

  9. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  10. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R.; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  11. Transgenic Expression of Dentin Phosphoprotein Inhibits Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Liu, P.; Wang, S.; Liu, C.; Jani, P.; Lu, Y.; Qin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is proteolytically processed into an NH2-terminal fragment called dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and a COOH-terminal fragment known as dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). These two fragments are believed to perform distinct roles in formation of bone and dentin. To investigate the functions of DPP in skeletal development, we generated transgenic mice to overexpress hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged DPP under the control of a 3.6 kb type I collagen (Col1a1) promoter (designated as Col1a1-HA-DPP). The Col1a1-HA-DPP transgenic mice were significantly smaller by weight, had smaller skeletons and shorter long bones than their wild type littermates, as demonstrated by X-ray radiography. They displayed reduced trabecular bone formation and narrower zones of proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plates of the long bones. Histological analyses showed that the transgenic mice had reduced cell proliferation in the proliferating zone, but lacked obvious defects in the chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, the transgenic mice with a high level of transgene expression developed spontaneous long bone fractures. In conclusion, overexpressing DPP inhibited skeletal development, suggesting that the balanced actions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of DSPP may be required for normal skeletal development. PMID:26972716

  12. Transgenic expression of dentin phosphoprotein inhibits skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Liu, P; Wang, S; Liu, C; Jani, P; Lu, Y; Qin, C

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is proteolytically processed into an NH2-terminal fragment called dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and a COOH-terminal fragment known as dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). These two fragments are believed to perform distinct roles in formation of bone and dentin. To investigate the functions of DPP in skeletal development, we generated transgenic mice to overexpress hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged DPP under the control of a 3.6 kb type I collagen (Col1a1) promoter (designated as Col1a1-HA-DPP). The Col1a1-HA-DPP transgenic mice were significantly smaller by weight, had smaller skeletons and shorter long bones than their wild type littermates, as demonstrated by X-ray radiography. They displayed reduced trabecular bone formation and narrower zones of proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plates of the long bones. Histological analyses showed that the transgenic mice had reduced cell proliferation in the proliferating zone, but lacked obvious defects in the chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, the transgenic mice with a high level of transgene expression developed spontaneous long bone fractures. In conclusion, overexpressing DPP inhibited skeletal development, suggesting that the balanced actions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of DSPP may be required for normal skeletal development. PMID:26972716

  13. Transgene Expression and Bt Protein Content in Transgenic Bt Maize (MON810) under Optimal and Stressful Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Trtikova, Miluse; Wikmark, Odd Gunnar; Zemp, Niklaus; Widmer, Alex; Hilbeck, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Bt protein content in transgenic insect resistant (Bt) maize may vary between tissues within plants and between plants growing under different environmental conditions. However, it is unknown whether and how Bt protein content correlates with transgene expression, and whether this relationship is influenced by stressful environmental conditions. Two Bt maize varieties containing the same transgene cassette (MON 810) were grown under optimal and stressful conditions. Before and during stress exposure, the upper leaves were analysed for transgene expression using quantitative RT-PCR and for Bt content using ELISA. Under optimal conditions there was no significant difference in the transgene expression between the two investigated Bt maize varieties whereas Bt protein content differed significantly. Transgene expression was correlated with Bt protein content in only one of the varieties. Under stressful environmental conditions we found similar transgene expressions as under optimal conditions but Bt content responded differently. These results suggest that Bt content is not only controlled by the transgene expression but is also dependent on the genetic background of the maize variety. Under stressful conditions the concentration of Bt protein is even more difficult to predict. PMID:25853814

  14. Transgene expression and Bt protein content in transgenic Bt maize (MON810) under optimal and stressful environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Trtikova, Miluse; Wikmark, Odd Gunnar; Zemp, Niklaus; Widmer, Alex; Hilbeck, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Bt protein content in transgenic insect resistant (Bt) maize may vary between tissues within plants and between plants growing under different environmental conditions. However, it is unknown whether and how Bt protein content correlates with transgene expression, and whether this relationship is influenced by stressful environmental conditions. Two Bt maize varieties containing the same transgene cassette (MON 810) were grown under optimal and stressful conditions. Before and during stress exposure, the upper leaves were analysed for transgene expression using quantitative RT-PCR and for Bt content using ELISA. Under optimal conditions there was no significant difference in the transgene expression between the two investigated Bt maize varieties whereas Bt protein content differed significantly. Transgene expression was correlated with Bt protein content in only one of the varieties. Under stressful environmental conditions we found similar transgene expressions as under optimal conditions but Bt content responded differently. These results suggest that Bt content is not only controlled by the transgene expression but is also dependent on the genetic background of the maize variety. Under stressful conditions the concentration of Bt protein is even more difficult to predict. PMID:25853814

  15. Ectopic transgene expression in the retina of four transgenic mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Gábriel, Robert; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Szabó, Gábor; Lawrence, J Josh; Wilhelm, Márta

    2016-09-01

    Retinal expression of transgenes was examined in four mouse lines. Two constructs were driven by the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) promoter: green fluorescent protein conjugated to tau protein (tau-GFP) or cytosolic yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) generated through CRE recombinase-induced expression of Rosa26 (ChAT-CRE/Rosa26YFP). Two other constructs targeted inhibitory interneurons: GABAergic horizontal and amacrine cells identified by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65-GFP) or parvalbumin (PV) cells (PV-CRE/Rosa26YFP). Animals were transcardially perfused and retinal sections prepared. Antibodies against PV, calretinin (CALR), calbindin (CALB), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were used to counterstain transgene-expressing cells. In PVxRosa and ChAT-tauGFP constructs, staining appeared in vertically oriented row of processes resembling Müller cells. In the ChATxRosa construct, populations of amacrine cells and neurons in the ganglion cell layer were labeled. Some cones also exhibited GFP fluorescence. CALR, PV and TH were found in none of these cells. Occasionally, we found GFP/CALR and GFP/PV double-stained cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). In the GAD65-GFP construct, all layers of the neuroretina were labeled, except photoreceptors. Not all horizontal cells expressed GFP. We did not find GFP/TH double-labeled cells and GFP was rarely present in CALR- and CALB-containing cells. Many PV-positive neurons were also labeled for GFP, including small diameter amacrines. In the GCL, single labeling for GFP and PV was ascertained, as well as several CALR/PV double-stained neurons. In the GCL, cells triple labeled with GFP/CALR/CALB were sparse. In conclusion, only one of the four transgenic constructs exhibited an expression pattern consistent with endogenous retinal protein expression, while the others strongly suggested ectopic gene expression. PMID:26563404

  16. Multiple effects of genetic background on variegated transgene expression in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Margaret L; McClenaghan, Margaret; Springbett, Anthea; Reid, Sarah; Lathe, Richard; Colman, Alan; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2002-01-01

    BLG/7 transgenic mice express an ovine beta-lactoglobulin transgene during lactation. Unusually, transgene expression levels in milk differ between siblings. This variable expression is due to variegated transgene expression in the mammary gland and is reminiscent of position-effect variegation. The BLG/7 line was created and maintained on a mixed CBA x C57BL/6 background. We have investigated the effect on transgene expression of backcrossing for 13 generations into these backgrounds. Variable transgene expression was observed in all populations examined, confirming that it is an inherent property of the transgene array at its site of integration. There were also strain-specific effects on transgene expression that appear to be independent of the inherent variegation. The transgene, compared to endogenous milk protein genes, is specifically susceptible to inbreeding depression. Outcrossing restored transgene expression levels to that of the parental population; thus suppression was not inherited. Finally, no generation-dependent decrease in mean expression levels was observed in the parental population. Thus, although the BLG/7 transgene is expressed in a variegated manner, there was no generation-associated accumulated silencing of transgene expression. PMID:11901126

  17. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Halter, Roman; Kock, Michael A; Niemann, Heiner; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Paul, Dieter

    2002-10-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF), the anticomplementary protein in cobra venom, activates the alternative complement pathway, eventually leading to complement consumption. Here, we describe the development of a transgenic mouse model for CVF. We generated a DNA construct containing the full-length cDNA for single-chain pre-pro-CVF. Expression of CVF was controlled by the alpha(1)-antitrypsin promoter to achieve liver-specific expression. Linearized DNA was microinjected into murine ovary cells (strain CD(2)F(1) (BALB/cxDBA/2J)) and the newborn mice were analyzed for stable integration of CVF DNA. After establishing the transgene, mice were propagated in a BALB/c background. The CVF mRNA was detected in the liver and, in some animals, in the kidney. CVF protein was detected in small amounts in the serum. Serum complement hemolytic activity in CVF-transgenic mice was virtually absent. The concentration of plasma C3 was significantly reduced. The CVF-transgenic animals show no unusual phenotype. They provide an animal model to study the effect of long-term complement depletion by continued activation, as well as the role of complement in host immune response and pathogenesis of disease. PMID:12220893

  18. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies. PMID:26716454

  19. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  20. Expression of rice thaumatin-like protein gene in transgenic banana plants enhances resistance to fusarium wilt.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, F; Sariah, M; Maziah, M

    2012-02-01

    The possibility of controlling Fusarium wilt--caused by Fusarium oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4)--was investigated by genetic engineering of banana plants for constitutive expression of rice thaumatin-like protein (tlp) gene. Transgene was introduced to cauliflower-like bodies' cluster, induced from meristemic parts of male inflorescences, using particle bombardment with plasmid carrying a rice tlp gene driving by the CaMV 35S promoter. Hygromycin B was used as the selection reagent. The presence and integration of rice tlp gene in genomic DNA confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. RT-PCR revealed the expression of transgene in leaf and root tissues in transformants. Bioassay of transgenic banana plants challenged with Fusarium wilt pathogen showed that expression of TLP enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4) compared to control plants. PMID:22183565

  1. Transgenic nude mouse with ubiquitous green fluorescent protein expression as a host for human tumors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Jiang, Ping; Li, Lingna; Moossa, Abdool R; Hoffman, Robert M

    2004-12-01

    We report here the development of the transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous GFP expression. The GFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives GFP expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu GFP male mice and nu/+ GFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced green. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were GFP nude mice. Newborn mice and adult mice fluoresced very bright green and could be detected with a simple blue-light-emitting diode flashlight with a central peak of 470 nm and a bypass emission filter. In the adult mice, the organs all brightly expressed GFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. The following systems were dissected out and shown to have brilliant GFP fluorescence: the entire digestive system from tongue to anus; the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed GFP. Pancreatic islets showed GFP fluorescence. The spleen cells were also GFP positive. Red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing human cancer cell lines, including PC-3-RFP prostate cancer, HCT-116-RFP colon cancer, MDA-MB-435-RFP breast cancer, and HT1080-RFP fibrosarcoma were transplanted to the transgenic GFP nude mice. All of these human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic GFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh and frozen tissues. The GFP mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of human tumor-host interaction. PMID:15574773

  2. Selectivity and Efficiency of Late Transgene Expression by Transcriptionally Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses Are Dependent on the Transgene Insertion Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Quirin, Christina; Rohmer, Stanimira; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Behr, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Engelhardt, Sarah; Erbs, Philippe; Enk, Alexander H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Key challenges facing cancer therapy are the development of tumor-specific drugs and potent multimodal regimens. Oncolytic adenoviruses possess the potential to realize both aims by restricting virus replication to tumors and inserting therapeutic genes into the virus genome, respectively. A major effort in this regard is to express transgenes in a tumor-specific manner without affecting virus replication. Using both luciferase as a sensitive reporter and genetic prodrug activation, we show that promoter control of E1A facilitates highly selective expression of transgenes inserted into the late transcription unit. This, however, required multistep optimization of late transgene expression. Transgene insertion via internal ribosome entry site (IRES), splice acceptor (SA), or viral 2A sequences resulted in replication-dependent expression. Unexpectedly, analyses in appropriate substrates and with matching control viruses revealed that IRES and SA, but not 2A, facilitated indirect transgene targeting via tyrosinase promoter control of E1A. Transgene expression via SA was more selective (up to 1,500-fold) but less effective than via IRES. Notably, we also revealed transgene-dependent interference with splicing. Hence, the prodrug convertase FCU1 (a cytosine deaminase–uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fusion protein) was expressed only after optimizing the sequence surrounding the SA site and mutating a cryptic splice site within the transgene. The resulting tyrosinase promoter-regulated and FCU1-encoding adenovirus combined effective oncolysis with targeted prodrug activation therapy of melanoma. Thus, prodrug activation showed potent bystander killing and increased cytotoxicity of the virus up to 10-fold. We conclude that armed oncolytic viruses can be improved substantially by comparing and optimizing strategies for targeted transgene expression, thereby implementing selective and multimodal cancer therapies. PMID:20939692

  3. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  4. Severe iron deficiency anemia in transgenic mice expressing liver hepcidin

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Gaël; Bennoun, Myriam; Porteu, Arlette; Mativet, Sandrine; Beaumont, Carole; Grandchamp, Bernard; Sirito, Mario; Sawadogo, Michèle; Kahn, Axel; Vaulont, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    We recently reported the hemochromatosis-like phenotype observed in our Usf2 knockout mice. In these mice, as in murine models of hemochromatosis and patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, iron accumulates in parenchymal cells (in particular, liver and pancreas), whereas the reticuloendothelial system is spared from this iron loading. We suggested that this phenotypic trait could be attributed to the absence, in the Usf2 knockout mice, of a secreted liver-specific peptide, hepcidin. We conjectured that the reverse situation, namely overexpression of hepcidin, might result in phenotypic traits of iron deficiency. This question was addressed by generating transgenic mice expressing hepcidin under the control of the liver-specific transthyretin promoter. We found that the majority of the transgenic mice were born with a pale skin and died within a few hours after birth. These transgenic animals had decreased body iron levels and presented severe microcytic hypochromic anemia. So far, three mosaic transgenic animals have survived. They were unequivocally identified by physical features, including reduced body size, pallor, hairless and crumpled skin. These pleiotropic effects were found to be associated with erythrocyte abnormalities, with marked anisocytosis, poikylocytosis and hypochromia, which are features characteristic of iron-deficiency anemia. These results strongly support the proposed role of hepcidin as a putative iron-regulatory hormone. The animal models devoid of hepcidin (the Usf2 knockout mice) or overexpressing the peptide (the transgenic mice presented in this paper) represent valuable tools for investigating iron homeostasis in vivo and for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of hepcidin action. PMID:11930010

  5. Severe iron deficiency anemia in transgenic mice expressing liver hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gaël; Bennoun, Myriam; Porteu, Arlette; Mativet, Sandrine; Beaumont, Carole; Grandchamp, Bernard; Sirito, Mario; Sawadogo, Michèle; Kahn, Axel; Vaulont, Sophie

    2002-04-01

    We recently reported the hemochromatosis-like phenotype observed in our Usf2 knockout mice. In these mice, as in murine models of hemochromatosis and patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, iron accumulates in parenchymal cells (in particular, liver and pancreas), whereas the reticuloendothelial system is spared from this iron loading. We suggested that this phenotypic trait could be attributed to the absence, in the Usf2 knockout mice, of a secreted liver-specific peptide, hepcidin. We conjectured that the reverse situation, namely overexpression of hepcidin, might result in phenotypic traits of iron deficiency. This question was addressed by generating transgenic mice expressing hepcidin under the control of the liver-specific transthyretin promoter. We found that the majority of the transgenic mice were born with a pale skin and died within a few hours after birth. These transgenic animals had decreased body iron levels and presented severe microcytic hypochromic anemia. So far, three mosaic transgenic animals have survived. They were unequivocally identified by physical features, including reduced body size, pallor, hairless and crumpled skin. These pleiotropic effects were found to be associated with erythrocyte abnormalities, with marked anisocytosis, poikylocytosis and hypochromia, which are features characteristic of iron-deficiency anemia. These results strongly support the proposed role of hepcidin as a putative iron-regulatory hormone. The animal models devoid of hepcidin (the Usf2 knockout mice) or overexpressing the peptide (the transgenic mice presented in this paper) represent valuable tools for investigating iron homeostasis in vivo and for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of hepcidin action. PMID:11930010

  6. Characterization of Growth and Reproduction Performance, Transgene Integration, Expression, and Transmission Patterns in Transgenic Pigs Produced by piggyBac Transposition-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Cai, Gengyuan; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2016-10-01

    Previously we successfully produced a group of EGFP-expressing founder transgenic pigs by a newly developed efficient and simple pig transgenesis method based on cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac plasmids. In this study, we investigated the growth and reproduction performance and characterized the transgene insertion, transmission, and expression patterns in transgenic pigs generated by piggyBac transposition. Results showed that transgene has no injurious effect on the growth and reproduction of transgenic pigs. Multiple copies of monogenic EGFP transgene were inserted at noncoding sequences of host genome, and passed from founder transgenic pigs to their transgenic offspring in segregation or linkage manner. The EGFP transgene was ubiquitously expressed in transgenic pigs, and its expression intensity was associated with transgene copy number but not related to its promoter DNA methylation level. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that fully described the growth and reproduction performance, transgene insertion, expression, and transmission profiles in transgenic pigs produced by piggyBac system. It not only demonstrates that piggyBac transposition-mediated gene transfer is an effective and favorable approach for pig transgenesis, but also provides scientific information for understanding the transgene insertion, expression and transmission patterns in transgenic animals produced by piggyBac transposition. PMID:27565868

  7. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor in Multiple Leukocyte Lineages in Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Yong, Carmen S M; Westwood, Jennifer A; Schröder, Jan; Papenfuss, Anthony T; von Scheidt, Bianca; Moeller, Maria; Devaud, Christel; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified CD8+ T lymphocytes have shown significant anti-tumor effects in the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer, with recent studies highlighting a potential role for a combination of other immune subsets to enhance these results. However, limitations in present genetic modification techniques impose difficulties in our ability to fully explore the potential of various T cell subsets and assess the potential of other leukocytes armed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). To address this issue, we generated a transgenic mouse model using a pan-hematopoietic promoter (vav) to drive the expression of a CAR specific for a tumor antigen. Here we present a characterization of the immune cell compartment in two unique vav-CAR transgenic mice models, Founder 9 (F9) and Founder 38 (F38). We demonstrate the vav promoter is indeed capable of driving the expression of a CAR in cells from both myeloid and lymphoid lineage, however the highest level of expression was observed in T lymphocytes from F38 mice. Lymphoid organs in vav-CAR mice were smaller and had reduced cell numbers compared to the wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, the immune composition of F9 mice differed greatly with a significant reduction in lymphocytes found in the thymus, lymph node and spleen of these mice. To gain insight into the altered immune phenotype of F9 mice, we determined the chromosomal integration site of the transgene in both mouse strains using whole genome sequencing (WGS). We demonstrated that compared to the 7 copies found in F38 mice, F9 mice harbored almost 270 copies. These novel vav-CAR models provide a ready source of CAR expressing myeloid and lymphoid cells and will aid in facilitating future experiments to delineate the role for other leukocytes for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26505904

  8. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor in Multiple Leukocyte Lineages in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S. M.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Schröder, Jan; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; von Scheidt, Bianca; Moeller, Maria; Devaud, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified CD8+ T lymphocytes have shown significant anti-tumor effects in the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer, with recent studies highlighting a potential role for a combination of other immune subsets to enhance these results. However, limitations in present genetic modification techniques impose difficulties in our ability to fully explore the potential of various T cell subsets and assess the potential of other leukocytes armed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). To address this issue, we generated a transgenic mouse model using a pan-hematopoietic promoter (vav) to drive the expression of a CAR specific for a tumor antigen. Here we present a characterization of the immune cell compartment in two unique vav-CAR transgenic mice models, Founder 9 (F9) and Founder 38 (F38). We demonstrate the vav promoter is indeed capable of driving the expression of a CAR in cells from both myeloid and lymphoid lineage, however the highest level of expression was observed in T lymphocytes from F38 mice. Lymphoid organs in vav-CAR mice were smaller and had reduced cell numbers compared to the wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, the immune composition of F9 mice differed greatly with a significant reduction in lymphocytes found in the thymus, lymph node and spleen of these mice. To gain insight into the altered immune phenotype of F9 mice, we determined the chromosomal integration site of the transgene in both mouse strains using whole genome sequencing (WGS). We demonstrated that compared to the 7 copies found in F38 mice, F9 mice harbored almost 270 copies. These novel vav-CAR models provide a ready source of CAR expressing myeloid and lymphoid cells and will aid in facilitating future experiments to delineate the role for other leukocytes for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26505904

  9. Slow-growth phenotype of transgenic tomato expressing apoplastic invertase

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.D.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The growth of transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants that express in their apoplast yeast invertase under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter is severely inhibited. The higher the level of invertase, the greater the inhibition of growth. A second phenotypic characteristic of these transgenic plants is the development of yellow and necrotic spots on the leaves, and leaf curling. Again the severity of the symptoms is correlated with the level of invertase. These symptoms do not develop in shaded leaves indicating the need for photosynthesis. Keeping the plants in the dark for a prolonged period (24 hours) results in the disappearance of leaf starch from the control plants, but not from the plants with apoplastic invertase. These results are consistent with the interpretation that apoplastic invertase prevents photosynthate export from source leaves and that phloem loading includes an apoplastic step.

  10. Mutations in the pqe-1 Gene Enhance Transgene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchiya, Jun-ichi; Iino, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Although various genetic tools have been developed and used as transgenes, the expression of the transgenes often is hampered by negative regulators. Disrupting such negative regulators of gene expression is potentially a way to overcome the common problem of low expression of transgenes. To find such regulators whose mutations enhance transgene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans, we took advantage of a newly developed reporter transgene, lin-11pAΔ::venus. This transgene induces expression of a fluorescent protein, Venus, in specific neurons including AIZ, where the expression was stochastic. The frequency of reporter expression in AIZ seemed to be correlated with the strength of transgene expression. By using this system, in which a moderate increase of expression was converted to all-or-none expression states, we describe here a forward genetic screen for mutations that enhance the expression of transgenes. Through the screen, we found that mutations in the pqe-1 gene, which encodes a Q/P-rich nuclear protein with an exonuclease domain, increase the chance of reporter expression in AIZ. The fluorescence intensity in RIC, in which all lin-11pAΔ::venus animals show reporter expression, was increased in pqe-1 mutants, suggesting that pqe-1 reduces the expression level of the transgene. Expression of transgenes with other promoters, 3′UTR, or reporter genes was also enhanced by the pqe-1 mutation, suggesting that the effect was not specific to a particular type of transgenes, whereas the effect did not seem to extend to endogenous genes. We propose that pqe-1 mutants can be used to increase the expression of various useful transgenes. PMID:22870397

  11. Regulated expression of a vitellogenin fusion gene in transgenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Spieth, J; MacMorris, M; Broverman, S; Greenspoon, S; Blumenthal, T

    1988-11-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans the vitellogenin genes are expressed abundantly in the adult hermaphrodite intestine, but are otherwise silent. In order to begin to understand the mechanisms by which this developmental regulation occurs, we used the transformation procedure developed for C. elegans by A. Fire (EMBO. J., 1986, 5, 2673-2680) to obtain regulated expression of an introduced vitellogenin fusion gene. A plasmid with vit-2 upstream and coding sequences fused to coding and downstream sequences of vit-6 was injected into oocytes and stable transgenic strains were selected. We obtained seven independent strains, in which the plasmid DNA is integrated at a low copy number. All strains synthesize substantial amounts of a novel vitellogenin-like polypeptide of 155 kDa that accumulates in the intestine and pseudocoelom, but is not transported efficiently into oocytes. In two strains examined in detail the fusion gene is expressed with correct sex, tissue, and stage specificity. Thus we have demonstrated that the nematode transgenic system can give proper developmental expression of introduced genes and so can be used to identify DNA regulatory regions. PMID:3181632

  12. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D.

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plantmore » height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.« less

  13. Vitamin H-regulated transgene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Bacchus, William; Daoud-El Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Although adjustable transgene expression systems are considered essential for future therapeutic and biopharmaceutical manufacturing applications, the currently available transcription control modalities all require side-effect-prone inducers such as immunosupressants, hormones and antibiotics for fine-tuning. We have designed a novel mammalian transcription-control system, which is reversibly fine-tuned by non-toxic vitamin H (also referred to as biotin). Ligation of vitamin H, by engineered Escherichia coli biotin ligase (BirA), to a synthetic biotinylation signal fused to the tetracycline-dependent transactivator (tTA), enables heterodimerization of tTA to a streptavidin-linked transrepressor domain (KRAB), thereby abolishing tTA-mediated transactivation of specific target promoters. As heterodimerization of tTA to KRAB is ultimately conditional upon the presence of vitamin H, the system is vitamin H responsive. Transgenic Chinese hamster ovary cells, engineered for vitamin H-responsive gene expression, showed high-level, adjustable and reversible production of a human model glycoprotein in bench-scale culture systems, bioreactor-based biopharmaceutical manufacturing scenarios, and after implantation into mice. The vitamin H-responsive expression systems showed unique band pass filter-like regulation features characterized by high-level expression at low (0-2 nM biotin), maximum repression at intermediate (100-1000 nM biotin), and high-level expression at increased (>100 000 nM biotin) biotin concentrations. Sequential ON-to-OFF-to-ON, ON-to-OFF and OFF-to-ON expression profiles with graded expression transitions can all be achieved by simply increasing the level of a single inducer molecule without exchanging the culture medium. These novel expression characteristics mediated by an FDA-licensed inducer may foster advances in therapeutic cell engineering and manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein therapeutics. PMID:17827215

  14. AAVPG: A vigilant vector where transgene expression is induced by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Medrano, Ruan F.V.; Carvalho, Anna Carolina P.V.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2013-12-15

    Using p53 to drive transgene expression from viral vectors may provide on demand expression in response to physiologic stress, such as hypoxia or DNA damage. Here we introduce AAVPG, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector where a p53-responsive promoter, termed PG, is used to control transgene expression. In vitro assays show that expression from the AAVPG-luc vector was induced specifically in the presence of functional p53 (1038±202 fold increase, p<0.001). The AAVPG-luc vector was an effective biosensor of p53 activation in response to hypoxia (4.48±0.6 fold increase in the presence of 250 µM CoCl{sub 2}, p<0.001) and biomechanical stress (2.53±0.4 fold increase with stretching, p<0.05). In vivo, the vigilant nature of the AAVPG-luc vector was revealed after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with doxorubicin (pre-treatment, 3.4×10{sup 5}±0.43×10{sup 5} photons/s; post-treatment, 6.6×10{sup 5}±2.1×10{sup 5} photons/s, p<0.05). These results indicate that the AAVPG vector is an interesting option for detecting p53 activity both in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • AAV vector where transgene expression is controlled by the tumor suppressor p53. • The new vector, AAVPG, shown to function as a biosensor of p53 activity, in vitro and in vivo. • The p53 activity monitored by the AAVPG vector is relevant to cancer and other diseases. • AAVPG reporter gene expression was activated upon DNA damage, hypoxia and mechanical stress.

  15. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  16. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  17. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  18. The arcelin-5 Gene of Phaseolus vulgaris Directs High Seed-Specific Expression in Transgenic Phaseolus acutifolius and Arabidopsis Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Alain; Dillen, Willy; De Clercq, Janniek; Van Montagu, Marc; Angenon, Geert

    1999-01-01

    The regulatory sequences of many genes encoding seed storage proteins have been used to drive seed-specific expression of a variety of proteins in transgenic plants. Because the levels at which these transgene-derived proteins accumulate are generally quite low, we investigated the utility of the arcelin-5 regulatory sequences in obtaining high seed-specific expression in transgenic plants. Arcelin-5 is an abundant seed protein found in some wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes. Seeds of Arabidopsis and Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) plants transformed with arcelin-5 gene constructs synthesized arcelin-5 to levels of 15% and 25% of the total protein content, respectively. To our knowledge, such high expression levels directed by a transgene have not been reported before. The transgenic plants also showed low plant-to-plant variation in arcelin expression. Complex transgene integration patterns, which often result in gene silencing effects, were not associated with reduced arcelin-5 expression. High transgene expression was the result of high mRNA steady-state levels and was restricted to seeds. This indicates that all requirements for high seed-specific expression are cis elements present in the cloned genomic arcelin-5 sequence and trans-acting factors that are available in Arabidopsis and Phaseolus spp., and thus probably in most dicotyledonous plants. PMID:10444093

  19. Gene expression profile in liver of hB1F transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shui-Liang; Yang, Hua; Xie, You-Hua; Wang, Yuan; Li, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhu-Gang; Fu, Ji-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the tissue morphologic phenotype and liver gene expression profile of hB1F transgenic mice. METHODS: Transgene expression was analyzed with RT-PCR and Western blotting. For one of the transgenic mouse lines, tissue expression pattern of the transgene was also examined with immunochemical methods. Pathological analysis was used to examine the tissue morphologic phenotype of established transgenic mice. The liver gene expression profile of transgenic mice was analyzed with microchip, and some of the differentially expressed genes were verified with RT-PCR. RESULTS: The expressions of hB1F were shown in livers from 6 of 7 transgenic mouse lines. The overexpression of hB1F transgene did not cause pathological changes. Expressions of three genes were up-regulated, while down-regulation was observed for 25 genes. CONCLUSION: The overexpression of hB1F transgene may cause changes of gene expression profiles in the liver of transgenic mice. PMID:15378783

  20. Lymphopoiesis in transgenic mice over-expressing Artemis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Munoz, P; Abramowski, V; Jacquot, S; André, P; Charrier, S; Lipson-Ruffert, K; Fischer, A; Galy, A; Cavazzana, M; de Villartay, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Artemis is a factor of the non-homologous end joining pathway involved in DNA double-strand break repair that has a critical role in V(D)J recombination. Mutations in DCLRE1C/ARTEMIS gene result in radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency in humans owing to a lack of mature T and B cells. Given the known drawbacks of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), gene therapy appears as a promising alternative for these patients. However, the safety of an unregulated expression of Artemis has to be established. We developed a transgenic mouse model expressing human Artemis under the control of the strong CMV early enhancer/chicken beta actin promoter through knock-in at the ROSA26 locus to analyze this issue. Transgenic mice present a normal development, maturation and function of T and B cells with no signs of lymphopoietic malignancies for up to 15 months. These results suggest that the over-expression of Artemis in mice (up to 40 times) has no deleterious effects in early and mature lymphoid cells and support the safety of gene therapy as a possible curative treatment for Artemis-deficient patients. PMID:26361272

  1. Characteristics of rabbit transgenic mammary gland expressing recombinant human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Chrenek, P; Makarevich, A V; Pivko, J; Massanyi, P; Lukac, N

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this research was to compare (i) the content of milk protein and recombinant human factor VIII (rhFVIII) in the milk of transgenic and non-transgenic rabbit females at three lactations and (ii) histological structure, ultrastructural morphology and occurrence of apoptosis in rabbit transgenic and non-transgenic mammary gland during third lactation and involution. Significant differences (t(0.05)) in milk protein content were found between transgenic and non-transgenic at all three lactations. The percentage of apoptotic cells was significantly higher (t(0.01)) in non-transgenic ones compared with transgenic mammary gland tissues (6.5% versus 2.4%) taken at the involution stage. Morphometrical analysis of histological preparations at the involution stage detected a significantly higher (t(0.05)) relative volume of lumen in transgenic animals compared with non-transgenic ones (60.00 versus 46.51%). Ultrastructural morphology of the transgenic mammary gland epithelium at the involution stage revealed an increased relative volume of protein globules (t(0.05)); at the lactation stage, a significantly higher volume of mitochondria (13.8%) compared with the non-transgenic (9.8%) ones was observed. These results, although revealing differences in some parameters of ultrastructure and histology, indicate no harmful effect of the mouse whey acid protein-hFVIII transgene expression on the state of mammary gland of transgenic rabbit females. PMID:19143684

  2. A transgenic red fluorescent protein-expressing nude mouse for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2009-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical for tumor growth and progression. We have previously developed color-coded imaging of the TME using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic nude mouse as a host. However, most donor sources of cell types appropriate for study in the TME are from mice expressing GFP. Therefore, a nude mouse expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) would be an appropriate host for transplantation of GFP-expressing stromal cells as well as double-labeled cancer cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, thereby creating a three-color imaging model of the TME. The RFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives RFP (DsRed2) expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu RFP male mice and nu/+ RFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced red. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were RFP nude mice. In the RFP nude mouse, the organs all brightly expressed RFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart, and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed RFP. The bone marrow and spleen cells were also RFP positive. GFP-expressing human cancer cell lines, including HCT-116-GFP colon cancer and MDA-MB-435-GFP breast cancer were orthotopically transplanted to the transgenic RFP nude mice. These human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic RFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction. The RFP nude mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of the TME. PMID:19097136

  3. Transgene Expression Levels Determine the Immunogenicity of Transduced Hematopoietic Grafts in Partially Myeloablated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eixarch, Herena; Gómez, Alba; Kádár, Elisabeth; George, Mónica; Martínez, Nuria; Espejo, Carmen; Pétriz, Jordi; Gimeno, Ramon; Barquinero, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether transgene expression levels influence the immunogenicity of transduced hematopoietic grafts upon transplantation into partially myeloablated mice. To this aim, bone marrow cells (BMCs) transduced with retroviral vectors driving green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression either at high (high-EGFP) or low levels (low-EGFP) were transplanted into congenic recipients conditioned with sublethal doses of total body irradiation (TBI) or busulfan. Virtually all recipients showed evidence of donor engraftment 4 weeks after transplantation. However, as opposed to recipients receiving low-EGFP transduced grafts, the risk of rejecting the EGFP+ cells by 30 days after transplantation was significantly higher in mice conditioned with busulfan and receiving high-EGFP transduced grafts. Anti-EGFP cellular immune responses were demonstrated in high-EGFP-treated mice conditioned with busulfan by interferon-γ (IFN-γ), enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assays, in contrast to that observed in mice transplanted with low-EGFP BMC. These results show for the first time that transgene expression levels can be critical for the immunogenicity of gene-modified hematopoietic grafts, especially in immunocompetent or in partially immunosuppressed recipients. These results have profound implications in vector choice and in the design of gene therapy (GT) protocols. PMID:19707185

  4. Inducible transgenic expression in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    PubMed

    Allard, J B; Kamei, H; Duan, C

    2013-05-01

    This study demonstrates inducible transgenic expression in the exceptionally short-lived turquoise killifish Nothobranchius furzeri, which is a useful vertebrate model for ageing research. Transgenic N. furzeri bearing a green fluorescent protein (Gfp) containing construct under the control of a heat shock protein 70 promoter were generated, heat shock-induced and reversible Gfp expression was demonstrated and germline transmission of the transgene to the F1 and F2 generations was achieved. The availability of this inducible transgenic expression system will make the study of ageing-related antagonistically pleiotropic genes possible using this unique vertebrate model organism. PMID:23639168

  5. Additive transgene expression and genetic introgression in multiple green-fluorescent protein transgenic crop x weed hybrid generations.

    PubMed

    Halfhill, M D; Millwood, R J; Weissinger, A K; Warwick, S I; Stewart, C N

    2003-11-01

    The level of transgene expression in crop x weed hybrids and the degree to which crop-specific genes are integrated into hybrid populations are important factors in assessing the potential ecological and agricultural risks of gene flow associated with genetic engineering. The average transgene zygosity and genetic structure of transgenic hybrid populations change with the progression of generations, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene is an ideal marker to quantify transgene expression in advancing populations. The homozygous T(1) single-locus insert GFP/ Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic canola ( Brassica napus, cv Westar) with two copies of the transgene fluoresced twice as much as hemizygous individuals with only one copy of the transgene. These data indicate that the expression of the GFP gene was additive, and fluorescence could be used to determine zygosity status. Several hybrid generations (BC(1)F(1), BC(2)F(1)) were produced by backcrossing various GFP/Bt transgenic canola ( B. napus, cv Westar) and birdseed rape ( Brassica rapa) hybrid generations onto B. rapa. Intercrossed generations (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) were generated by crossing BC(2)F(1) individuals in the presence of a pollinating insect ( Musca domestica L.). The ploidy of plants in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk hybrid generation was identical to the weedy parental species, B. rapa. AFLP analysis was used to quantify the degree of B. napus introgression into multiple backcross hybrid generations with B. rapa. The F(1) hybrid generations contained 95-97% of the B. napus-specific AFLP markers, and each successive backcross generation demonstrated a reduction of markers resulting in the 15-29% presence in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk population. Average fluorescence of each successive hybrid generation was analyzed, and homozygous canola lines and hybrid populations that contained individuals homozygous for GFP (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) demonstrated significantly higher fluorescence than hemizygous hybrid

  6. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  7. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving.

    PubMed

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  8. A transgenic rat with ubiquitous expression of firefly luciferase gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamata, Yoji; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2006-02-01

    In vivo imaging strategies provide cellular and molecular events in real time that helps us to understand biological processes in living animals. The development of molecular tags such as green fluorescent proteins and luciferase from the firefly Photinus pyralis has lead to a revolution in the visualization of complex biochemical processes. We developed a novel inbred transgenic rat strain containing firefly luciferase based on the transgenic (Tg) technique in rats. This Tg rat expressed the luciferase gene ubiquitously under control of the ROSA26 promoter. Cellular immune responsiveness against the luciferase protein was evaluated using conventional skin grafting and resulted in the long-term acceptance of Tg rat skin on wild-type rats. Strikingly, organ transplant with heart and small bowel demonstrated organ viability and graft survival, suggesting that cells from luciferase-Tg are transplantable to track their fate. Taking advantage of the less immunogenic luciferase, we also tested the role of hepatocyte-infusion in a liver injury model, and bone marrow-derived cells in a skin defect model. Employed in conjunction with modern advances in optical imaging, this luciferase-Tg rat system provides an innovative animal tool and a new means of facilitating biomedical research such as in the case of regeneration medicine.

  9. An adaptable system for improving transposon-based gene expression in vivo via transient transgene repression

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joseph E.; Woodard, Lauren E.; Bear, Adham S.; Foster, Aaron E.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Transposons permit permanent cellular genome engineering in vivo. However, transgene expression falls rapidly postdelivery due to a variety of mechanisms, including immune responses. We hypothesized that delaying initial transgene expression would improve long-term transgene expression by using an engineered piggyBac transposon system that can regulate expression. We found that a 2-part nonviral Tet-KRAB inducible expression system repressed expression of a luciferase reporter in vitro. However, we also observed nonspecific promoter-independent repression. Thus, to achieve temporary transgene repression after gene delivery in vivo, we utilized a nonintegrating version of the repressor plasmid while the gene of interest was delivered in an integrating piggyBac transposon vector. When we delivered the luciferase transposon and repressor to immunocompetent mice by hydrodynamic injection, initial luciferase expression was repressed by 2 orders of magnitude. When luciferase expression was followed long term in vivo, we found that expression was increased >200-fold compared to mice that received only the luciferase transposon and piggyBac transposase. We found that repression of early transgene expression could prevent the priming of luciferase-specific T cells in vivo. Therefore, transient transgene repression postgene delivery is an effective strategy for inhibiting the antitransgene immune response and improving long-term expression in vivo without using immunosuppression.—Doherty, J. E., Woodard, L. E., Bear, A. S., Foster, A. E., Wilson, M. H. An adaptable system for improving transposon-based gene expression in vivo via transient transgene repression. PMID:23752206

  10. Expression of Trichoderma reesei exo-cellobiohydrolase I transgenic tobacco leaves and calli

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu ); Hooker, Brian S. ); Quesenberry, Ryan D. ); Gao, Jianwei

    1998-12-01

    Expression of Trichoderma reesei exo-cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) gene in transgenic tobacco was under the control of CaMV 35S promoter. In transgenic leaf tissues, CBHI activity up to 66.1 mmol h{sup -1} g{sup -1} total protein was observed. In transgenic calli, the highest CBHI activity was 83.6 umol h{sup -1} g{sup -1} total protein. Protein immunoblot analysis confirms the presence of CBHI enzyme in both transgenic calli and leaf tissues. CBHI expression levels accounted for about 0.11% and 0.082% of total protein in transgenic leaf tissues and calli, respectively. Furthermore, expression of CBHI gene did not affect normal growth and development of transgenic plants.

  11. [Methods for construction of transgenic plant expression vector: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangpu; Yang, Shushen

    2015-03-01

    Construction of recombinant plasmid vector for gene expression is a key step in making transgenic plants and important to study gene function and plant genetic engineering. A right choice of gene construction method can be cost-effective and achieve more diverse recombinant plasmids. In addition to the traditional methods in construction of plant gene expression vectors, such as Gateway technology, three DNA method and one step cloning, a few novel methods have been developed in recent years. These methods include oligonucleotide synthesis-based construction of small fragment gene expression vectors via competitive connection; construction of small RNA expression vector using pre-microRNA; recombination-fusion PCR method which inserts DNA fragments of multiple restriction sites into the target vector; and insertion of a DNA fragment into any region of a linear vector via In-Fusion Kit. Construction of complex vectors with many fragments uses sequence and ligation-independent cloning method, Gibson isothermal assembly or Golden Gate assembly. This paper summarizes our working experience in the area of recombinant vector construction and reports from others with an intention to disseminate ideas about currently widely used DNA recombination methods for plant transformation. PMID:26204753

  12. Multipurpose modular lentiviral vectors for RNA interference and transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Kesireddy, Venu; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O

    2010-07-01

    We have created a multipurpose modular lentiviral vector system for expressing both transgenes and miRNA 30-based short hairpins (shRNAmirs) for RNAi. The core of the resulting vector system, pLVmir, allows a simple two step cloning procedure for expressing shRNAmirs under the control of a Pol II promoter in both a constitutive and conditional manner. The adapted cloning method includes a PCR-free method for transferring shRNAmir based RNAi clones from a publicly available library (Open Biosystems). The addition of a Pol II promoter-driven shRNAmir cassette and broadening the choice of Pol III promoters and silencing triggers offers great flexibility to this system. The combination of several preexisting and additional modules created here caters to common needs of researchers. Our modular vector system was validated regarding functionality of promoters, inducibility and reversibility. We successfully applied the system to knockdown Xirp2 mRNA expression in H2kb-tsA58 muscle cells and determined that this had no spurious effect on the expression of a closely related protein. Finally, our set of lentiviral vectors may be used to achieve synergistic effects, for simultaneous knockdown of two genes, as a rescue plasmid and for studying mutant proteins in a physiological context. PMID:19798586

  13. Effect of dual Bt-expression transformation vectors on transgene expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, L N; Dong, Y; Zhang, J; Wang, R X; Liu, H M; Yang, Q; Yang, M S

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of vector structure on dual Bt gene expression and establish an efficient expression vector using Cry1Ac and Cry3A genes. Four vectors (N4, N5, N10, and S23) were developed and used for genetic transformation of tobacco to obtain insect-resistant transgenic lines. The vectors were constructed using the MAR structure, applying different promoter and enhancer sequences, and changing the transgene open-reading frame sequence. The average Cry1Ac toxalbumin expression quantity was 67 times higher in N5 than in N4 transgenic lines (8.77 and 0.13 μg/g, respectively). In contrast, the average Cry3A toxalbumin expression quantity was 1.5 times higher in N4 than in N5 lines (12.70 and 8.21 μg/g, respectively). The sequences of both Bt genes significantly influenced toxalbumin expression, although upstream Bt genes presented lower expression levels. The average Cry1Ac toxalbumin content was 13 times higher in the transgenic lines of AtADH 5'-non-translated sequence N5 (8.77 mg/g) than in the omega N10 lines (0.67 mg/g). Furthermore, the average Cry1Ac toxalbumin content was 5 times higher in MAR N5 than in non-MAR S23 lines (8.77 and 1.63 mg/g, respectively). The average Cry3A toxalbumin content was 1.3 times higher in N5 than in S23 lines (8.21 and 6.48 mg/g, respectively). Moreover, toxalbumin expression levels differed significantly among the S23-transformed lines. The MAR structure applied on both ends of the genes increased both the level and stability of exogenous gene expression. In conclusion, N5 was the most optimal of the four tested vectors. PMID:27525887

  14. Tissue-specific and differentiation-specific expression of a human K14 keratin gene in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Vassar, R.; Rosenberg, M.; Tyner, A.; Fuchs, E. ); Ross, S. )

    1989-03-01

    A construct containing {approx}2,500 base pairs (bp) of 5{prime} upstream and {approx}700 bp of 3{prime} downstream sequence was used to drive the expression of an intronless human K14 gene in vitro and in vivo. To track the expression of the gene, a small sequence encoding the antigenic portion of neuropeptide substance P was inserted in frame 5{prime} to the TGA translation stop codon of the gene. Surprisingly, this gene was expressed promiscuously in a wide variety of cultured cells transiently transfected with the construct. In contrast, when introduced into the germ line of transgenic mice, the construct was expressed in a fashion analogous to the endogenous K14 gene--namely, in the basal layer of stratified squamous epithelia. The results suggest that some regulatory mechanism is overridden as a consequence of transient transfection but that sequences that can control proper K14 expression are present in the construct. The appropriate tissue-specific and differentiation-specific expression of K14{center dot}P in transgenic mice is an important first step in characterizing a promoter that could be employed to drive the foreign expression of drug-related genes in the epidermis of skin grafts.

  15. Viral Expression Cassette Elements to Enhance Transgene Target Specificity and Expression in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Sara Kathleen; Rivera-Soto, Ricardo; Gray, Steven James

    2015-01-01

    Over the last five years, the number of clinical trials involving AAV (adeno-associated virus) and lentiviral vectors continue to increase by about 150 trials each year. For continued success, AAV and lentiviral expression cassettes need to be designed to meet each disease's specific needs. This review discusses how viral vector expression cassettes can be engineered with elements to enhance target specificity and increase transgene expression. The key differences relating to target specificity between ubiquitous and tissue-specific promoters are discussed, as well as how endogenous miRNAs and their target sequences have been used to restrict transgene expression. Specifically, relevant studies indicating how cis-acting elements such as introns, WPRE, polyadenylation signals, and the CMV enhancer are highlighted to show their utility for enhancing transgene expression in gene therapy applications. All discussion bears in mind that expression cassettes have space constraints. In conclusion, this review can serve as a menu of vector genome design elements and their cost in terms of space to thoughtfully engineer viral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25636961

  16. Generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that express green fluorescent protein throughout the whole body.

    PubMed

    Seita, Yasunari; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Matsushita, Jun; Azami, Takuya; Okahara, Junko; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji; Itoh, Yasushi; Imamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Masaki; Tooyama, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Erika; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are valuable for human disease modelling, because rodents poorly recapitulate some human diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease amongst others. Here, we report for the first time, the generation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic cynomolgus monkeys by lentivirus infection. Our data show that the use of a human cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer and chicken beta actin promoter (CAG) directed the ubiquitous expression of the transgene in cynomolgus monkeys. We also found that injection into mature oocytes before fertilization achieved homogenous expression of GFP in each tissue, including the amnion, and fibroblasts, whereas injection into fertilized oocytes generated a transgenic cynomolgus monkey with mosaic GFP expression. Thus, the injection timing was important to create transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that expressed GFP homogenously in each of the various tissues. The strategy established in this work will be useful for the generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys for transplantation studies as well as biomedical research. PMID:27109065

  17. Generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that express green fluorescent protein throughout the whole body

    PubMed Central

    Seita, Yasunari; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Matsushita, Jun; Azami, Takuya; Okahara, Junko; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji; Itoh, Yasushi; Imamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Masaki; Tooyama, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Erika; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are valuable for human disease modelling, because rodents poorly recapitulate some human diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease amongst others. Here, we report for the first time, the generation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic cynomolgus monkeys by lentivirus infection. Our data show that the use of a human cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer and chicken beta actin promoter (CAG) directed the ubiquitous expression of the transgene in cynomolgus monkeys. We also found that injection into mature oocytes before fertilization achieved homogenous expression of GFP in each tissue, including the amnion, and fibroblasts, whereas injection into fertilized oocytes generated a transgenic cynomolgus monkey with mosaic GFP expression. Thus, the injection timing was important to create transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that expressed GFP homogenously in each of the various tissues. The strategy established in this work will be useful for the generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys for transplantation studies as well as biomedical research. PMID:27109065

  18. Transgenic silkworms expressing human insulin receptors for evaluation of therapeutically active insulin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Ishii, Kenichi; Miyaguchi, Wataru; Horie, Ryo; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-12-12

    We established a transgenic silkworm strain expressing the human insulin receptor (hIR) using the GAL4/UAS system. Administration of human insulin to transgenic silkworms expressing hIR decreased hemolymph sugar levels and facilitated Akt phosphorylation in the fat body. The decrease in hemolymph sugar levels induced by injection of human insulin in the transgenic silkworms expressing hIR was blocked by co-injection of wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. Administration of bovine insulin, an hIR ligand, also effectively decreased sugar levels in the transgenic silkworms. These findings indicate that functional hIRs that respond to human insulin were successfully induced in the transgenic silkworms. We propose that the humanized silkworm expressing hIR is useful for in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic activities of insulin receptor agonists. PMID:25449269

  19. Expression of complete metabolic pathways in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Krichevsky, Alexander; Zaltsman, Adi; King, Lisa; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering emerged as a methodology to introduce only few transgenes into the plant genome. Following fast-paced developments of the past few decades, engineering of much larger numbers of transgenes became a reality, allowing to introduce full metabolic pathways from other organisms into plants and generate transgenics with startling new traits. From the advent of the classical plant genetic engineering, the transgenes were introduced into the nuclear genome of the plant cell, and this strategy still is quite successful when applied to few transgenes. However, for introducing large number of transgenes, we advocate that the chloroplast genome is a superior choice, especially for engineering of new complete metabolic pathways into plants. The ability to genetically engineer plants with complex and fully functional metabolic pathways from other organisms bears a substantial promise in generation of pharmaceuticals, i.e., biopharming, and new agricultural crops with that traits never existed before, leading to enhancement in quality of human life. PMID:22616478

  20. Sex-linked behavioural differences in mice expressing a human insulin transgene in the medial habenula.

    PubMed

    Douhet, P; Bertaina, V; Durkin, T; Calas, A; Destrade, C

    1997-12-01

    We previously reported that a human insulin transgene was specifically expressed in the medial habenula of the adult mouse brain, and that this expression was ascribed to the delta-168 transgene. The present study analyses the possible behavioural consequences of this insulin transgene expression using measures of food intake, spontaneous activity, emotional reactivity, learning and extinction performance of an operant task. The delta-168 transgenic mice did not differ from the C57BL/6 control mice as concerns food intake, behaviour in the open field, or emotional response in an elevated plus maze. On the other hand, measures of locomotor activity in a circular corridor revealed a significantly faster decline of spontaneous locomotor activity in male as compared to female delta-168 transgenic mice. Moreover, as compared to female transgenic mice, male transgenic mice exhibited a deficit in the rate of acquisition and an acceleration of the rate of extinction of a bar press response in a Skinner box. In contrast, the behaviour of female transgenic mice did not differ from either male or female C57BL/6 control mice. The results of the present study demonstrate that the behavioural modifications observed in delta-168 transgenic mice are sex-linked and suggest that these behavioural differences result from changes in the interaction (interface) between motivational and motor mechanisms mediated via the striato-habenulo-mesencephalic system. PMID:9475633

  1. Transgene expression after rep-mediated site-specific integration into chromosome 19.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Nicola J; Gomos, Janette; Falck-Pedersen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    We have used a plasmid-based transfection model of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep-mediated site-specific integration (RMSSI) pathway to characterize the stability and expression of a site-specifically integrated transgene (either green fluorescent protein [GFP] or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase [CAT]). Three plasmids containing the AAV p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) have been used to study integration and transgene expression in HeLa cells: (1) pRepGFP(itr+) contains both AAV ITRs, rep, and p5IEE and can be used as either a plasmid or rAAV vehicle for integration; (2) pRepGFP(itr-) contains the AAV rep gene and the p5IEE; (3) pAd-p5CAT contains only the 138-bp p5IEE of AAV. The data presented demonstrate that in the absence of drug selection, all three constructs undergo site-specific integration (efficiencies of between 10 and 40% of transduced cell lines). At 6 weeks posttransfection most cell lines that underwent RMSSI also expressed the appropriate transgene product. By 18 weeks posttransfection cell lines that were established with rep in cis to the transgene showed a decline in transgene expression as well as a loss of transgene DNA. In many cell lines, there appears to be transgene-containing DNA that does not contribute to gene expression. Data support a model of gene expression and transgene instability through a Rep-mediated pathway. In contrast to rep-containing cell lines, clonal cell lines containing p5IEECAT (with Rep provided in trans) maintained both the integrated transgene and transgene expression throughout the entire experimental time course (18 weeks). PMID:14965377

  2. Temporal and spatial patterning of transgene expression by near-infrared irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Leyre; Lopez, Daniel; Arruebo, Manuel; Wilson, Christopher G; Franceschi, Renny T.; Voellmy, Richard; Santamaria, Jesus; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether near-infrared (NIR) light could be employed for patterning transgene expression in plasmonic cell constructs. Hollow gold nanoparticles with a plasmon surface band absorption peaking at ~750 nm, a wavelength within the so called “tissue optical window”, were used as fillers in fibrin-based hydrogels. These composites, which efficiently transduce NIR photon energy into heat, were loaded with genetically-modified cells that harbor a heat-activated and ligand-dependent gene switch for regulating transgene expression. NIR laser irradiation in the presence of ligand triggered 3-dimensional patterns of transgene expression faithfully matching the illuminated areas of plasmonic cell constructs. This noninvasive technology was proven useful for remotely controlling in vivo the spatiotemporal bioavailability of transgenic vascular endothelial growth factor. The combination of spatial control by means of NIR irradiation along with safe and timed transgene induction presents a high application potential for engineering tissues in regenerative medicine scenarios. PMID:24957294

  3. Transgenic plants expressing GLK1 and CCA1 having increased nitrogen assimilation capacity

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A.; Nero, Damion C.

    2012-04-10

    Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.

  4. Preservation and Faithful Expression of Transgene via Artificial Seeds in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenting; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Xinhua; Sibbald, Susan; Hunter, David; Tian, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Proper preservation of transgenes and transgenic materials is important for wider use of transgenic technology in plants. Here, we report stable preservation and faithful expression of a transgene via artificial seed technology in alfalfa. DNA constructs containing the uid reporter gene coding for β-glucuronidase (GUS) driven by a 35S promoter or a tCUP promoter were introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from transgenic alfalfa plants via in vitro technology. These embryos were treated with abscisic acid to induce desiccation tolerance and were subjected to a water loss process. After the desiccation procedure, the water content in dried embryos, or called artificial seeds, was about 12–15% which was equivalent to that in true seeds. Upon water rehydration, the dried somatic embryos showed high degrees of viability and exhibited normal germination. Full plants were subsequently developed and recovered in a greenhouse. The progeny plants developed from artificial seeds showed GUS enzyme activity and the GUS expression level was comparable to that of plants developed from somatic embryos without the desiccation process. Polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the transgene was well retained in the plants and Southern blot analysis showed that the transgene was stably integrated in plant genome. The research showed that the transgene and the new trait can be well preserved in artificial seeds and the progeny developed. The research provides a new method for transgenic germplasm preservation in different plant species. PMID:23690914

  5. Mono-allelic expression of variegating transgene locus in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Opsahl, Margaret L; Springbett, Anthea; Lathe, Richard; Colman, Alan; McClenaghan, Margaret; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2003-12-01

    We have generated transgenic mice which express an ovine beta-lactoglobulin transgene during lactation. In two transgenic lines, BLG/7 and BLG/45, beta-lactoglobulin protein levels vary between siblings, reflected at the cellular level by a mosaic transgene expression pattern in the mammary tissue that is reminiscent of position effect variegation. To investigate whether this variegating expression profile can be affected by the introduction of an identical variegating locus on the homologous chromosome, we compared the beta-lactoglobulin expression profiles in mice hemizygous or homozygous for the transgene locus. In BLG/45 mice, milk protein analysis revealed that transgene expression was effectively doubled in homozygous compared to hemizygous mice. In contrast, beta-lactoglobulin protein in hemizygous and homozygous BLG/7 mice displayed a similar range; although minimum expression levels were doubled in the homozygous population, the maximum level of expression was indistinguishable between the two populations. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for transgene mRNA indicated that for a given protein level, the extent of cellular expression is similar in both BLG/7 populations. In homozygous mice genomic DNA and nuclear RNA FISH demonstrated that only one of the two BLG/7 loci is active in expressing cells, while two transcription foci were present in BLG/45 homozygous mice. This mono-allelic transgene expression pattern is not inherited through the germline, as hemizygous mice bred from homozygous parents expressed at the expected hemizygous population level. We discuss these observations in the context of known epigenetic events such as imprinting and trans-inactivation. PMID:14713195

  6. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies. PMID:27511737

  7. Gene flow from transgenic common beans expressing the bar gene.

    PubMed

    Faria, Josias C; Carneiro, Geraldo E S; Aragão, Francisco J L

    2010-01-01

    Gene flow is a common phenomenon even in self-pollinated plant species. With the advent of genetically modified plants this subject has become of the utmost importance due to the need for controlling the spread of transgenes. This study was conducted to determine the occurrence and intensity of outcrossing in transgenic common beans. In order to evaluate the outcross rates, four experiments were conducted in Santo Antonio de Goiás (GO, Brazil) and one in Londrina (PR, Brazil), using transgenic cultivars resistant to the herbicide glufosinate ammonium and their conventional counterparts as recipients of the transgene. Experiments with cv. Olathe Pinto and the transgenic line Olathe M1/4 were conducted in a completely randomized design with ten replications for three years in one location, whereas the experiments with cv. Pérola and the transgenic line Pérola M1/4 were conducted at two locations for one year, with the transgenic cultivar surrounded on all sides by the conventional counterpart. The outcross occurred at a negligible rate of 0.00741% in cv. Pérola, while none was observed (0.0%) in cv. Olathe Pinto. The frequency of gene flow was cultivar dependent and most of the observed outcross was within 2.5 m from the edge of the pollen source. Index terms: Phaseolus vulgaris, outcross, glufosinate ammonium. PMID:21865877

  8. Copper transport during lactation in transgenic mice expressing the human ATP7A protein

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Roxana M.; Michalczyk, Agnes A.; Freestone, David J.; Currie, Scott; Linder, Maria C.; Ackland, M. Leigh; Mercer, Julian F.B.

    2008-01-01

    Both copper transporting ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, are expressed in mammary epithelial cells but their role in copper delivery to milk has not been clarified. We investigated the role of ATP7A in delivery of copper to milk using transgenic mice that over-express human ATP7A. In mammary gland of transgenic mice, human ATP7A protein was 10- to 20-fold higher than in control mice, and was localized to the basolateral membrane of mammary epithelial cells in lactating mice. The copper concentration in the mammary gland of transgenic dams and stomach contents of transgenic pups was significantly reduced compared to non-transgenic mice. The mRNA levels of endogenous Atp7a, Atp7b, and Ctr1 copper transporters in the mammary gland were not altered by the expression of the ATP7A transgene, and the protein levels of Atp7b and ceruloplasmin were similar in transgenic and non-transgenic mice. These data suggest that ATP7A plays a role in removing excess copper from the mammary epithelial cells rather than supplying copper to milk. PMID:18515074

  9. Molecular characterization of a human matrix attachment region that improves transgene expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiu-Li; Zhao, Chun-Peng; Chen, Shao-Nan; Wang, Li; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2016-05-15

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells offer many advantages for recombinant gene expression, including proper folding and post-translational modification of the recombinant protein. However, due to positional effects resulting from the neighboring chromatin, transgenes are often expressed at low levels in these cells. While previous studies demonstrated that matrix attachment regions (MARs) can be utilized to increase transgene expression by buffering transgene silencing, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. We therefore performed a deletion analysis of the human β-globin MAR sequence to characterize the regions that are necessary to enhance transgene expression in CHO cells. Our results indicate that of the six β-globin MAR fragments tested (MAR-1-6; nucleotides 1-540, 420-1020, 900-1500, 1380-1980, 1860-2460, and 2340-2999, respectively), MAR-2, followed by MAR-3, was the most effective region for promoting stable and elevated transgene expression. Meanwhile, bioinformatic analyses demonstrated that these fragments encode a MAR-like motif and several transcription factor binding sites, including special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1), CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP), CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), and Glutathione (GSH) binding motifs, indicating that these elements may contribute to the MAR-mediated enhancement of transgene expression. In addition, we found that truncated MAR derivatives yield more stable transgene expression levels than transgenes lacking the MAR. We concluded that the MAR-mediated transcriptional activation of transgenes requires a specific AT-rich sequence, as well as specific transcription factor-binding motifs. PMID:26869318

  10. Recurrent selection for transgene expression levels in maize results in proxy selection for a native gene with the same promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High expression levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High expression levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurre...

  11. Transgenic mouse model for estrogen-regulated lipoprotein metabolism: studies on apoVLDL-II expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zsigmond, E; Nakanishi, M K; Ghiselli, F E; Chan, L

    1995-07-01

    We have produced transgenic mice that express an estrogen-responsive avian apolipoprotein, apoVLDL-II. An apoVLDL-II natural gene construct containing 4.7 kb of 5' flanking and 19 bp of 3' flanking sequences together with the 4 exon/3 intron structural gene was expressed in a liver-specific manner in transgenic mice. A single injection of estrogen caused a 5.9- to 7.5-fold stimulation of apoVLDL-II mRNA in the liver. The transgene mRNA had the same initiation sites of transcription as the native mRNA isolated from laying hen liver, and the same sites were used before and after estrogen treatment. The number of hepatocytes that stain positive for immunoreactive apoVLDL-II increased from < 1% to 40-60% in 24 h after estrogen treatment. Thus, in trangenic mice as in the cockerel, hepatocytes are biochemically heterogeneous and induction of apoVLDL-II synthesis occurs by recruitment of hepatocytes. In the plamsa compartment, compared to controls, transgenic mice have a 3- to 5-fold higher basal total plasma triglyceride which was accounted for by a 5.4-fold high basal VLDL triglyceride. Estrogen treatment results in a approximately 2-fold increase in the VLDL triglycerides over basal levels and 8.5-fold increase over nontransgenic mice, which did not show any change in VLDL in response to estrogen. Transgenic mice with the integrated apoVLDL-II gene provide a useful model for the study of the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism by estrogen. PMID:7595069

  12. Transgene Expression in Microalgae—From Tools to Applications

    PubMed Central

    Doron, Lior; Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae comprise a biodiverse group of photosynthetic organisms that reside in water sources and sediments. The green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was adopted as a useful model organism for studying various physiological systems. Its ability to grow under both photosynthetic and heterotrophic conditions allows efficient growth of non-photosynthetic mutants, making Chlamydomonas a useful genetic tool to study photosynthesis. In addition, this green alga can grow as haploid or diploid cells, similar to yeast, providing a powerful genetic system. As a result, easy and efficient transformation systems have been developed for Chlamydomonas, targeting both the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Since microalgae comprise a rich repertoire of species that offer variable advantages for biotech and biomed industries, gene transfer technologies were further developed for many microalgae to allow for the expression of foreign proteins of interest. Expressing foreign genes in the chloroplast enables the targeting of foreign DNA to specific sites by homologous recombination. Chloroplast transformation also allows for the introduction of genes encoding several enzymes from a complex pathway, possibly as an operon. Expressing foreign proteins in the chloroplast can also be achieved by introducing the target gene into the nuclear genome, with the protein product bearing a targeting signal that directs import of the transgene-product into the chloroplast, like other endogenous chloroplast proteins. Integration of foreign genes into the nuclear genome is mostly random, resulting in large variability between different clones, such that extensive screening is required. The use of different selection modalities is also described, with special emphasis on the use of herbicides and metabolic markers which are considered to be friendly to the environment, as compared to drug-resistance genes that are commonly used. Finally, despite the development of a wide range of transformation

  13. Transgene Expression in Microalgae-From Tools to Applications.

    PubMed

    Doron, Lior; Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae comprise a biodiverse group of photosynthetic organisms that reside in water sources and sediments. The green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was adopted as a useful model organism for studying various physiological systems. Its ability to grow under both photosynthetic and heterotrophic conditions allows efficient growth of non-photosynthetic mutants, making Chlamydomonas a useful genetic tool to study photosynthesis. In addition, this green alga can grow as haploid or diploid cells, similar to yeast, providing a powerful genetic system. As a result, easy and efficient transformation systems have been developed for Chlamydomonas, targeting both the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Since microalgae comprise a rich repertoire of species that offer variable advantages for biotech and biomed industries, gene transfer technologies were further developed for many microalgae to allow for the expression of foreign proteins of interest. Expressing foreign genes in the chloroplast enables the targeting of foreign DNA to specific sites by homologous recombination. Chloroplast transformation also allows for the introduction of genes encoding several enzymes from a complex pathway, possibly as an operon. Expressing foreign proteins in the chloroplast can also be achieved by introducing the target gene into the nuclear genome, with the protein product bearing a targeting signal that directs import of the transgene-product into the chloroplast, like other endogenous chloroplast proteins. Integration of foreign genes into the nuclear genome is mostly random, resulting in large variability between different clones, such that extensive screening is required. The use of different selection modalities is also described, with special emphasis on the use of herbicides and metabolic markers which are considered to be friendly to the environment, as compared to drug-resistance genes that are commonly used. Finally, despite the development of a wide range of transformation

  14. Transgenic Anopheles gambiae Expressing an Antimalarial Peptide Suffer No Significant Fitness Cost

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases present some of the greatest health challenges faced by the world today. In many cases, existing control measures are compromised by insecticide resistance, pathogen tolerance to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines. In light of these difficulties, new genetic tools for disease control programmes, based on the deployment of genetically modified mosquitoes, are seen as having great promise. Transgenic strains may be used to control disease transmission either by suppressing vector populations or by replacing susceptible with refractory genotypes. In practice, the fitness of the transgenic strain relative to natural mosquitoes will be a critical determinant of success. We previously described a transgenic strain of Anopheles gambiae expressing the Vida3 peptide into the female midgut following a blood-meal, which exhibited significant protection against malaria parasites. Here, we investigated the fitness of this strain relative to non-transgenic controls through comparisons of various life history traits. Experiments were designed, as far as possible, to equalize genetic backgrounds and heterogeneity such that fitness comparisons focussed on the presence and expression of the transgene cassette. We also employed reciprocal crosses to identify any fitness disturbance associated with inheritance of the transgene from either the male or female parent. We found no evidence that the presence or expression of the effector transgene or associated fluorescence markers caused any significant fitness cost in relation to larval mortality, pupal sex ratio, fecundity, hatch rate or longevity of blood-fed females. In fact, fecundity was increased in transgenic strains. We did, however, observe some fitness disturbances associated with the route of inheritance of the transgene. Maternal inheritance delayed male pupation whilst paternal inheritance increased adult longevity for both males and unfed females. Overall, in comparison to controls, there was

  15. Cytochrome P450 1A1 promoter as a genetic switch for the regulatable and physiological expression of a plasma protein in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Wong, E; Ginsberg, M

    1995-12-01

    Transgenic and gene knockout techniques allow for in vivo study of the consequences of adding or subtracting specific genes. However, in some instances, such as the study of lethal mutations or of the physiological consequences of changing gene expression, turning on and off an introduced gene at will would be advantageous. We have used cytochrome p450 1A1 promoter to drive expression of the human apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene in transgenic mice. In six independent lines, robust expression of the transgene depended upon injection of the inducer beta-naphthoflavone, whereas the seventh line had high basal expression that was augmented further by the inducer. The low level of basal expression in an inducer-dependent line was confirmed upon breeding the transgene onto the hypercholesterolemic apoE-deficient background. In the basal state transgene expression was physiologically insignificant, as these mice were as hypercholesterolemic as their nontransgenic apoE-deficient littermates. When injected with the inducer, plasma cholesterol levels of the transgenic mice decreased dramatically as apoE expression was induced to yield greater than physiological levels in plasma. The inducer could pass transplacentally from an injected mother to her fetuses with concomitant induction of fetal transgene mRNA. Inducer could also pass via breast milk from an injected mother to her suckling neonatal pups, giving rise to the induction of human apoE in neonate plasma. These finding suggest a strategy to temporarily ameliorate genetic deficiencies that would otherwise lead to fetal or neonatal lethality. PMID:8524876

  16. Mushroom body miscellanea: transgenic Drosophila strains expressing anatomical and physiological sensor proteins in Kenyon cells

    PubMed Central

    Pech, Ulrike; Dipt, Shubham; Barth, Jonas; Singh, Priyanka; Jauch, Mandy; Thum, Andreas S.; Fiala, André; Riemensperger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for analyzing how neuronal circuits regulate behavior. The mushroom body in the central brain is a particularly prominent brain region that has been intensely studied in several insect species and been implicated in a variety of behaviors, e.g., associative learning, locomotor activity, and sleep. Drosophila melanogaster offers the advantage that transgenes can be easily expressed in neuronal subpopulations, e.g., in intrinsic mushroom body neurons (Kenyon cells). A number of transgenes has been described and engineered to visualize the anatomy of neurons, to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity, and to manipulate neuronal function artificially. To target the expression of these transgenes selectively to specific neurons several sophisticated bi- or even multipartite transcription systems have been invented. However, the number of transgenes that can be combined in the genome of an individual fly is limited in practice. To facilitate the analysis of the mushroom body we provide a compilation of transgenic fruit flies that express transgenes under direct control of the Kenyon-cell specific promoter, mb247. The transgenes expressed are fluorescence reporters to analyze neuroanatomical aspects of the mushroom body, proteins to restrict ectopic gene expression to mushroom bodies, or fluorescent sensors to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity of Kenyon cells. Some of the transgenic animals compiled here have been published already, whereas others are novel and characterized here for the first time. Overall, the collection of transgenic flies expressing sensor and reporter genes in Kenyon cells facilitates combinations with binary transcription systems and might, ultimately, advance the physiological analysis of mushroom body function. PMID:24065891

  17. Transgenic expression of Lactoferrin imparts resistance to a soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi) and Arabidopsis (A. thaliana) plants expressing an antimicrobial bovine lactoferrin (BLF) gene were developed and evaluated for resistance against an economically important fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of damping off diseases....

  18. Targeted expression of IGF-1 transgene to skeletal muscle accelerates muscle and motor neuron regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rabinovsky, Eric D; Gelir, Ethem; Gelir, Seda; Lui, Hui; Kattash, Maan; DeMayo, Francesco J; Shenaq, Saleh M; Schwartz, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Currently, there is no known medical treatment that hastens the repair of damaged nerve and muscle. Using IGF-1 transgenic mice that specifically express human recombinant IGF-1 in skeletal muscle, we test the hypotheses that targeted gene expression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle enhances motor nerve regeneration after a nerve crush injury. The IGF-1 transgene affects the initiation of the muscle repair process after nerve injury as shown by increased activation of SCA-1positive myogenic stem cells. Increased satellite cell differentiation and proliferation are observed in IGF-1 transgenic mice, shown by increased expression of Cyclin D1, MyoD, and myogenin. Expression of myogenin and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, initially increased in both wild-type and IGF-1 transgenic mice, are restored to normal levels at a faster rate in IGF-1 transgenic mice, which indicates a rescue of nerve-evoked muscle activity. Expression of the IGF-1 transgene in skeletal muscle results in accelerated recovery of saltatory nerve conduction, increased innervation as detected by neurofilament expression, and faster recovery of muscle mass. These studies demonstrate that local expression of IGF-1 augments the repair of injured nerve and muscle. PMID:12424223

  19. Novel CXCL13 transgenic mouse: inflammation drives pathogenic effect of CXCL13 in experimental myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Julia Miriam; Robinet, Marieke; Aricha, Revital; Cufi, Perrine; Villeret, Bérengère; Lantner, Frida; Shachar, Idit; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal overexpression of CXCL13 is observed in many inflamed tissues and in particular in autoimmune diseases. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disease mainly mediated by anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies. Thymic hyperplasia characterized by ectopic germinal centers (GCs) is a common feature in MG and is correlated with high levels of anti-AChR antibodies. We previously showed that the B-cell chemoattractant, CXCL13 is overexpressed by thymic epithelial cells in MG patients. We hypothesized that abnormal CXCL13 expression by the thymic epithelium triggered B-cell recruitment in MG. We therefore created a novel transgenic (Tg) mouse with a keratin 5 driven CXCL13 expression. The thymus of Tg mice overexpressed CXCL13 but did not trigger B-cell recruitment. However, in inflammatory conditions, induced by Poly(I:C), B cells strongly migrated to the thymus. Tg mice were also more susceptible to experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) with stronger clinical signs, higher titers of anti-AChR antibodies, increased thymic B cells, and the development of germinal center-like structures. Consequently, this mouse model finally mimics the thymic pathology observed in human MG. Our data also demonstrated that inflammation is mandatory to reveal CXCL13 ability to recruit B cells and to induce tertiary lymphoid organ development. PMID:26771137

  20. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X.; Anderson, G.

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  1. Transgenic banana expressing Pflp gene confers enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Namukwaya, B; Tripathi, L; Tripathi, J N; Arinaitwe, G; Mukasa, S B; Tushemereirwe, W K

    2012-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum, is one of the most important diseases of banana (Musa sp.) and currently considered as the biggest threat to banana production in Great Lakes region of East and Central Africa. The pathogen is highly contagious and its spread has endangered the livelihood of millions of farmers who rely on banana for food and income. The development of disease resistant banana cultivars remains a high priority since farmers are reluctant to employ labor-intensive disease control measures and there is no host plant resistance among banana cultivars. In this study, we demonstrate that BXW can be efficiently controlled using transgenic technology. Transgenic bananas expressing the plant ferredoxin-like protein (Pflp) gene under the regulation of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter were generated using embryogenic cell suspensions of banana. These transgenic lines were characterized by molecular analysis. After challenge with X. campestris pv. musacearum transgenic lines showed high resistance. About 67% of transgenic lines evaluated were completely resistant to BXW. These transgenic lines did not show any disease symptoms after artificial inoculation of in vitro plants under laboratory conditions as well as potted plants in the screen-house, whereas non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms resulting in complete wilting. This study confirms that expression of the Pflp gene in banana results in enhanced resistance to BXW. This transgenic technology can provide a timely solution to the BXW pandemic. PMID:22101927

  2. A regulatory toolbox of MiniPromoters to drive selective expression in the brain.

    PubMed

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Swanson, Douglas J; Liu, Li; de Leeuw, Charles N; Banks, Kathleen G; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Fulton, Debra L; Ali, Johar; Amirabbasi, Mahsa; Arenillas, David J; Babyak, Nazar; Black, Sonia F; Bonaguro, Russell J; Brauer, Erich; Candido, Tara R; Castellarin, Mauro; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Jason C Y; Chopra, Vik; Docking, T Roderick; Dreolini, Lisa; D'Souza, Cletus A; Flynn, Erin K; Glenn, Randy; Hatakka, Kristi; Hearty, Taryn G; Imanian, Behzad; Jiang, Steven; Khorasan-zadeh, Shadi; Komljenovic, Ivana; Laprise, Stéphanie; Liao, Nancy Y; Lim, Jonathan S; Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Flora; Liu, Jun; Lu, Meifen; McConechy, Melissa; McLeod, Andrea J; Milisavljevic, Marko; Mis, Jacek; O'Connor, Katie; Palma, Betty; Palmquist, Diana L; Schmouth, Jean-François; Swanson, Magdalena I; Tam, Bonny; Ticoll, Amy; Turner, Jenna L; Varhol, Richard; Vermeulen, Jenny; Watkins, Russell F; Wilson, Gary; Wong, Bibiana K Y; Wong, Siaw H; Wong, Tony Y T; Yang, George S; Ypsilanti, Athena R; Jones, Steven J M; Holt, Robert A; Goldowitz, Daniel; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2010-09-21

    The Pleiades Promoter Project integrates genomewide bioinformatics with large-scale knockin mouse production and histological examination of expression patterns to develop MiniPromoters and related tools designed to study and treat the brain by directed gene expression. Genes with brain expression patterns of interest are subjected to bioinformatic analysis to delineate candidate regulatory regions, which are then incorporated into a panel of compact human MiniPromoters to drive expression to brain regions and cell types of interest. Using single-copy, homologous-recombination "knockins" in embryonic stem cells, each MiniPromoter reporter is integrated immediately 5' of the Hprt locus in the mouse genome. MiniPromoter expression profiles are characterized in differentiation assays of the transgenic cells or in mouse brains following transgenic mouse production. Histological examination of adult brains, eyes, and spinal cords for reporter gene activity is coupled to costaining with cell-type-specific markers to define expression. The publicly available Pleiades MiniPromoter Project is a key resource to facilitate research on brain development and therapies. PMID:20807748

  3. A regulatory toolbox of MiniPromoters to drive selective expression in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Swanson, Douglas J.; Liu, Li; de Leeuw, Charles N.; Banks, Kathleen G.; Ho Sui, Shannan J.; Fulton, Debra L.; Ali, Johar; Amirabbasi, Mahsa; Arenillas, David J.; Babyak, Nazar; Black, Sonia F.; Bonaguro, Russell J.; Brauer, Erich; Candido, Tara R.; Castellarin, Mauro; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Jason C. Y.; Chopra, Vik; Docking, T. Roderick; Dreolini, Lisa; D'Souza, Cletus A.; Flynn, Erin K.; Glenn, Randy; Hatakka, Kristi; Hearty, Taryn G.; Imanian, Behzad; Jiang, Steven; Khorasan-zadeh, Shadi; Komljenovic, Ivana; Laprise, Stéphanie; Liao, Nancy Y.; Lim, Jonathan S.; Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Flora; Liu, Jun; Lu, Meifen; McConechy, Melissa; McLeod, Andrea J.; Milisavljevic, Marko; Mis, Jacek; O'Connor, Katie; Palma, Betty; Palmquist, Diana L.; Schmouth, Jean-François; Swanson, Magdalena I.; Tam, Bonny; Ticoll, Amy; Turner, Jenna L.; Varhol, Richard; Vermeulen, Jenny; Watkins, Russell F.; Wilson, Gary; Wong, Bibiana K. Y.; Wong, Siaw H.; Wong, Tony Y. T.; Yang, George S.; Ypsilanti, Athena R.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Holt, Robert A.; Goldowitz, Daniel; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Simpson, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The Pleiades Promoter Project integrates genomewide bioinformatics with large-scale knockin mouse production and histological examination of expression patterns to develop MiniPromoters and related tools designed to study and treat the brain by directed gene expression. Genes with brain expression patterns of interest are subjected to bioinformatic analysis to delineate candidate regulatory regions, which are then incorporated into a panel of compact human MiniPromoters to drive expression to brain regions and cell types of interest. Using single-copy, homologous-recombination “knockins” in embryonic stem cells, each MiniPromoter reporter is integrated immediately 5′ of the Hprt locus in the mouse genome. MiniPromoter expression profiles are characterized in differentiation assays of the transgenic cells or in mouse brains following transgenic mouse production. Histological examination of adult brains, eyes, and spinal cords for reporter gene activity is coupled to costaining with cell-type–specific markers to define expression. The publicly available Pleiades MiniPromoter Project is a key resource to facilitate research on brain development and therapies. PMID:20807748

  4. Oral immunization of animals with transgenic cherry tomatillo expressing HBsAg

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Ma, Ying; Li, Mei; Cheng, Tong; Li, Shao-Wei; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of recombinant HBsAg (rHBsAg) in transgenic cherry tomatillo in order to explore the feasibility of producing HBV oral vaccine with cherry tomatillo by animal immune tests. METHODS: The recombinant plant expression vector containing HBsAg gene was constructed. Mediated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, HBsAg gene was transferred into cotyledons of cherry tomatillo. Transformed cherry tomatillos were obtained through hygromycin delay-selection. Integrated DNA in transgenic cherry tomatillo was confirmed by hygromycin resistance selection, Gus detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blotting analysis. Antigenicity of rHBsAg was examined by ELISA and the immunogenicity of rHBsAg derived from transgenic cherry tomatillo tissues was confirmed by oral feed of transformed tissues to BALB/c mice primed with commercial HBV vaccines. Specific antibody titers in mice’s serum were examined by ELISA every week. RESULTS: By far, 10 positive lines of transgenic cherry tomatillos containing HBsAg gene were obtained. Among different organs of the same transgenic cherry tomatillo, level of rHBsAg expressed in leaves was the highest with the yield up to 300 ng/g fresh weight. And the rHBsAg expression level in fruits was about 10 ng/g fresh weight. In animal immune tests, oral delivery with transgenic tissues to mice primed with commercial vaccine instead of naive mice resulted in significant immune response. CONCLUSION: The result of this animal immune test indicated the rHBsAg derived from transgenic cherry tomatillo possessed normal immunogenicity. This work demonstrated the feasibility to generate oral immunogenic rHBsAg in transgenic cherry tomatillo, and would provide some experimental approach for the production of low-cost oral vaccines using transgenic cherry tomatillo in large scale. PMID:12717845

  5. Knockdown of myostatin expression by RNAi enhances muscle growth in transgenic sheep.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengwei; Ni, Wei; Sai, Wujiafu; Zi, Ha; Qiao, Jun; Wang, Pengyang; Sheng, Jinliang; Chen, Chuangfu

    2013-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) has been shown to be a negative regulator of skeletal muscle development and growth. MSTN dysfunction therefore offers a strategy for promoting animal growth performance in livestock production. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using RNAi-based technology to generate transgenic sheep with a double-muscle phenotype. A shRNA expression cassette targeting sheep MSTN was used to generate stable shRNA-expressing fibroblast clones. Transgenic sheep were further produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Five lambs developed to term and three live lambs were obtained. Integration of shRNA expression cassette in three live lambs was confirmed by PCR. RNase protection assay showed that the shRNAs targeting MSTN were expressed in muscle tissues of three transgenic sheep. MSTN expression was significantly inhibited in muscle tissues of transgenic sheep when compared with control sheep. Moreover, transgenic sheep showed a tendency to faster increase in body weight than control sheep. Histological analysis showed that myofiber diameter of transgenic sheep M17 were bigger than that of control sheep. Our findings demonstrate a promising approach to promoting muscle growth in livestock production. PMID:23526994

  6. INCREASED LIVER PATHOLOGY IN HEPATITIS C VIRUS TRANSGENIC MICE EXPRESSING THE HEPATITIS B VIRUS X PROTEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was id...

  7. Quantitative analysis of lentiviral transgene expression in mice over seven generations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Song, Yong-tao; Liu, Qin; Liu, Cang'e; Wang, Lu-lu; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Xiao-yang; Wu, Jun; Wei, Hong

    2010-10-01

    Lentiviral transgenesis is now recognized as an extremely efficient and cost-effective method to produce transgenic animals. Transgenes delivered by lentiviral vectors exhibited inheritable expression in many species including those which are refractory to genetic modification such as non-human primates. However, epigenetic modification was frequently observed in lentiviral integrants, and transgene expression found to be inversely correlated with methylation density. Recent data showed that about one-third lentiviral integrants exhibited hypermethylation and low expression, but did not demonstrate whether those integrants with high expression could remain constant expression and hypomethylated during long term germline transmission. In this study, using lentiviral eGFP transgenic mice as the experimental animals, lentiviral eGFP expression levels and its integrant numbers in genome were quantitatively analyzed by fluorescent quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (FQ-PCR), using the house-keeping gene ribosomal protein S18 (Rps18) and the single copy gene fatty acid binding protein of the intestine (Fabpi) as the internal controls respectively. The methylation densities of the integrants were quantitatively analyzed by bisulfite sequencing. We found that the lentiviral integrants with high expression exhibited a relative constant expression level per integrant over at least seven generations. Besides, the individuals containing these integrants exhibited eGFP expression levels which were positively and almost linearly correlated with the integrant numbers in their genomes, suggesting that no remarkable position effect on transgene expression of the integrants analyzed was observed. In addition, over seven generations the methylation density of these integrants did not increase, but rather decreased remarkably, indicating that these high expressing integrants were not subjected to de novo methylation during at least seven generations of germline transmission. Taken

  8. Construction of a novel expression cassette for increasing transgene expression in vivo in endothelial cells of large blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Dronadula, Nagadhara; Du, Liang; Flynn, Rowan; Buckler, Joshua; Kho, Jordan; Jiang, Zhilong; Tanaka, Shinji; Dichek, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The success of gene therapy hinges on achievement of adequate transgene expression. To ensure high transgene expression, many gene-therapy vectors include highly active virus-derived transcriptional elements. Other vectors include tissue-specific eukaryotic transcriptional elements, intended to limit transgene expression to specific cell types, avoid toxicity, and prevent immune responses. Unfortunately, tissue specificity is often accompanied by lower transgene expression. Here we use eukaryotic (murine) transcriptional elements and a virus-derived posttranscriptional element to build cassettes designed to express a potentially therapeutic gene (interleukin-10) in large vessel endothelial cells (EC) at levels as high as obtained with the CMV immediate-early promoter, while retaining EC-specificity. The cassettes were tested by incorporation into helper-dependent adenoviral vectors, and transduction into bovine aortic EC in vitro and rabbit carotid EC in vivo. The murine endothelin-1 promoter showed EC-specificity, but expressed only 3% as much IL-10 mRNA as CMV. Inclusion of precisely 4 copies of an EC-specific enhancer and a posttranscriptional regulatory element increased IL-10 expression to a level at or above the CMV promoter in vivo, while retaining—and possibly enhancing—EC specificity, as measured in vitro. The cassette reported here will likely be useful for maximizing transgene expression in large vessel EC, while minimizing systemic effects. PMID:21179172

  9. Expression of Cartilage Developmental Genes in Hoxc8- and Hoxd4-Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Claudia; Kappen, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors, which regulate skeletal patterning and chondrocyte differentiation during the development of cartilage, the precursor to mature bone. Overexpression of the homeobox transcription factors Hoxc8 and Hoxd4 causes severe cartilage defects due to delay in cartilage maturation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and fibroblastic growth factors (FGFs) are known to play important roles in skeletal development and endochondral bone formation and remodeling. In order to investigate whether these molecules are aberrantly expressed in Hoxc8- and/or Hoxd4-transgenic cartilage, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on chondrocytes from Hox-transgenic mice. Gene expression levels of Bmp4, Fgf8, Fgf10, Mmp9, Mmp13, Nos3, Timp3, Wnt3a and Wnt5a were altered in Hoxc8-transgenic chondrocytes, and Fgfr3, Ihh, Mmp8, and Wnt3a expression levels were altered in Hoxd4-transgenic chondrocytes, respectively. Notably, Wnt3a expression was elevated in Hoxc8- and reduced in Hoxd4-transgenic cartilage. These results suggest that both transcription factors affect cartilage maturation through different molecular mechanisms, and provide the basis for future studies into the role of these genes and possible interactions in pathogenesis of cartilage defects in Hoxc8- and Hoxd4-transgenic mice. PMID:20126390

  10. Tissue-specific expression of human CD4 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, F P; Doros, L; Vitale, J; Blackwell, C; Gosselin, J; Snyder, B W; Wadsworth, S C

    1993-05-01

    The gene for the human CD4 glycoprotein, which serves as the receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1, along with approximately 23 kb of sequence upstream of the translational start site, was cloned. The ability of 5' flanking sequences to direct tissue-specific expression was tested in cell culture and in transgenic mice. A 5' flanking region of 6 kb was able to direct transcription of the CD4 gene in NIH 3T3 cells but did not result in detectable expression in the murine T-cell line EL4 or in four lines of transgenic mice. A larger 5' flanking region of approximately 23 kb directed high-level CD4 transcription in the murine T-cell line EL4 and in three independent lines of transgenic mice. Human CD4 expression in all tissues analyzed was tightly correlated with murine CD4 expression; the highest levels of human CD4 RNA expression were found in the thymus and spleen, with relatively low levels detected in other tissues. Expression of human CD4 protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was examined by flow cytometry in these transgenic animals and found to be restricted to the murine CD4+ subset of lymphocytes. Human CD4 protein, detected with an anti-human CD4 monoclonal antibody, was present on the surface of 45 to 50% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all transgenic lines. PMID:8474453

  11. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-08-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  12. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such important crops as Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lactuca sativa and Solanum tuberosum. Our results demonstrate that the lox site sequence adjacent to the RB can be used to control bar gene expression in transgenic plants. PMID:23821951

  13. Minicircle DNA Provides Enhanced and Prolonged Transgene Expression Following Airway Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Munye, Mustafa M; Tagalakis, Aristides D; Barnes, Josephine L; Brown, Rachel E; McAnulty, Robin J; Howe, Steven J; Hart, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis using non-viral, plasmid-based formulations has been the subject of intensive research for over two decades but a clinically viable product has yet to materialise in large part due to inefficient transgene expression. Minicircle DNA give enhanced and more persistent transgene expression compared to plasmid DNA in a number of organ systems but has not been assessed in the lung. In this study we compared minicircle DNA with plasmid DNA in transfections of airway epithelial cells. In vitro, luciferase gene expression from minicircles was 5-10-fold higher than with plasmid DNA. In eGFP transfections in vitro both the mean fluorescence intensity and percentage of cells transfected was 2-4-fold higher with minicircle DNA. Administration of equimolar amounts of DNA to mouse lungs resulted in a reduced inflammatory response and more persistent transgene expression, with luciferase activity persisting for 2 weeks from minicircle DNA compared to plasmid formulations. Transfection of equal mass amounts of DNA in mouse lungs resulted in a 6-fold increase in transgene expression in addition to more persistent transgene expression. Our findings have clear implications for gene therapy of airway disorders where plasmid DNA transfections have so far proven inefficient in clinical trials. PMID:26975732

  14. Minicircle DNA Provides Enhanced and Prolonged Transgene Expression Following Airway Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Munye, Mustafa M.; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Barnes, Josephine L.; Brown, Rachel E.; McAnulty, Robin J.; Howe, Steven J.; Hart, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis using non-viral, plasmid-based formulations has been the subject of intensive research for over two decades but a clinically viable product has yet to materialise in large part due to inefficient transgene expression. Minicircle DNA give enhanced and more persistent transgene expression compared to plasmid DNA in a number of organ systems but has not been assessed in the lung. In this study we compared minicircle DNA with plasmid DNA in transfections of airway epithelial cells. In vitro, luciferase gene expression from minicircles was 5–10-fold higher than with plasmid DNA. In eGFP transfections in vitro both the mean fluorescence intensity and percentage of cells transfected was 2–4-fold higher with minicircle DNA. Administration of equimolar amounts of DNA to mouse lungs resulted in a reduced inflammatory response and more persistent transgene expression, with luciferase activity persisting for 2 weeks from minicircle DNA compared to plasmid formulations. Transfection of equal mass amounts of DNA in mouse lungs resulted in a 6-fold increase in transgene expression in addition to more persistent transgene expression. Our findings have clear implications for gene therapy of airway disorders where plasmid DNA transfections have so far proven inefficient in clinical trials. PMID:26975732

  15. Identification of a promoter motif involved in Curtovirus sense-gene expression in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jingyung; Choi, Eunseok; Buckley, Kenneth J; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R

    2008-08-31

    Expression of the seven open reading frames (ORFs) of single-stranded DNA Curtoviruses such as Beet curly top virus (BCTV) and Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) is driven by a bi-directional promoter. To investigate this bi-directional promoter activity with respect to viral late gene expression, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a GUS reporter gene under the control of either the BCTV or BSCTV bi-directional promoter were constructed. Transgenic plants harboring constructs showed higher expression levels when the promoter of the less virulent BCTV was used than when the promoter of the more virulent BSCTV was used. In transgenic seedlings, the reporter gene constructs were expressed primarily in actively dividing tissues such as root tips and apical meristems. As the transgenic plants matured, reporter gene expression diminished but viral infection of mature transgenic plants restored reporter gene expression, particularly in transgenic plants containing BCTV virion-sense gene promoter constructs. A 30 base pair conserved late element (CLE) motif was identified that was present three times in tandem in the BCTV promoter and once in that of BSCTV. Progressive deletion of these repeats from the BCTV promoter resulted in decreased reporter gene expression, but BSCTV promoters in which one or two extra copies of this motif were inserted did not exhibit increased late gene promoter activity. These results demonstrate that Curtovirus late gene expression by virion-sense promoters depends on the developmental stage of the host plant as well as on the number of CLE motifs present in the promoter. PMID:18596416

  16. Expression and Chloroplast Targeting of Cholesterol Oxidase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, David R.; Grebenok, Robert J.; Ohnmeiss, Thomas E.; Greenplate, John T.; Purcell, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase represents a novel type of insecticidal protein with potent activity against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the cholesterol oxidase choM gene and expressed cytosolic and chloroplast-targeted versions of the ChoM protein. Transgenic leaf tissues expressing cholesterol oxidase exerted insecticidal activity against boll weevil larvae. Our results indicate that cholesterol oxidase can metabolize phytosterols in vivo when produced cytosolically or when targeted to chloroplasts. The transgenic plants exhibiting cytosolic expression accumulated low levels of saturated sterols known as stanols, and displayed severe developmental aberrations. In contrast, the transgenic plants expressing chloroplast-targeted cholesterol oxidase maintained a greater accumulation of stanols, and appeared phenotypically and developmentally normal. These results are discussed within the context of plant sterol distribution and metabolism. PMID:11457962

  17. Hydrodynamic Tail Vein Injection as a Simple Tool for Yielding Extended Transgene Expression in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Takuma; Ukawa, Masami; Kanazawa, Yuki; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamic tail vein injection was considered an in vivo transfection method that yields a higher level of gene expression mainly in the liver. This method has been applied to cancer gene therapy targeting both hepatic and non-hepatic cancers. However, intratumor transgene expression in non-hepatic tumors has not been well studied. In this study, we showed an extended transgene expression of β-galactosidase (LacZ), a nonsecretory protein, in a subcutaneously implanted murine solid tumor following the hydrodynamic injection of plasmid DNA (LacZ pDNA). Our result may indicate that the hydrodynamic injection method is a powerful tool that can be used to gain transgene expression not only in the liver but also in solid tumors. PMID:27582335

  18. Transgenic tobacco expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin exhibits enhanced growth and altered metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, N; Lilius, G; Bailey, J E; Bülow, L

    1997-03-01

    The gene for Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has been introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabaccum (tobacco). Transgenic tobacco plants expressing VHb exhibited enhanced growth, on average 80-100% more dry weight after 35 days of growth compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, germination time is reduced from 6-8 days for wild-type tobacco to 3-4 days and the growth phase from germination to flowering was 3-5 days shorter for the VHb-expressing transgenes. Transgenic plants contained, on average, 30-40% more chlorophyll and 34% more nicotine than controls. VHb expression also resulted in an altered distribution of secondary metabolites: In the trangenic tobacco plants anabasine content was decreased 80% relative to control plants. PMID:9062923

  19. [Construction of transgenic tobacco expressing popW and analysis of its biological phenotype].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Liu, Hongxia; Cao, Jing; Wang, Chao; Guo, Jianhua

    2014-04-01

    In a previous study, we cloned popW from Ralstonia solanacearum strain ZJ3721, coding PopW, a new harpin protein. The procaryotically expressed PopW can induce resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), enhance growth and improve quality of tobacco, when sprayed onto tobacco leaves. Here, we constructed an expression vector pB- popW by cloning popW into the bionary vector pBI121 and transformed it into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 via freeze-thaw method. Tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum cv. Xanthi nc.) transformation was conducted by infection of tobacco leaf discs with recombinant A. tumefaciens. After screening on MS medium containing kanamycin, PCR and RT-PCR analysis, 21 T3 lines were identified as positive transgenic. Genomic intergration and expression of the transferred gene were determined by PCR and RT-PCR. And GUS staining analysis indicated that the protein expressed in transgenic tobacco was bioactive and exhibited different expression levels among lines. Disease bioassays showed that the transgenic tobacco had enhanced resistance to TMV with biocontrol efficiency up to 54.25%. Transgenic tobacco also exhibited enhanced plant growth, the root length of 15 d old seedlings was 1.7 times longer than that of wild type tobacco. 60 d after transplanting to pots, the height, fresh weight and dry weight of transgenic tobacco were 1.4, 1.7, 1.8 times larger than that of wild type tobacco, respectively. PMID:25195247

  20. Expressing the sweet potato orange gene in transgenic potato improves drought tolerance and marketable tuber production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Han, Eun-Heui; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Hong, Su-Young; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is generally considered to be sensitive to drought stress. Even short periods of water shortage can result in reduced tuber production and quality. We previously reported that transgenic potato plants expressing the sweet potato orange gene (IbOr) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SOR plants) showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen-mediated oxidative stress and high salinity, along with increased carotenoid contents. In this study, in an effort to improve the productivity and environmental stress tolerance of potato, we subjected transgenic potato plants expressing IbOr to water-deficient conditions in the greenhouse. The SOR plants exhibited increased tolerance to drought stress under greenhouse conditions. IbOr expression was associated with slightly negative phenotypes, including reduced tuber production. Controlling IbOr expression imparted the same degree of drought tolerance while ameliorating these negative phenotypic effects, leading to levels of tuber production similar to or better than those of wild-type plants under drought stress conditions. In particular, under drought stress, drought tolerance and the production of marketable tubers (over 80g) were improved in transgenic plants compared with non-transgenic plants. These results suggest that expressing the IbOr transgene can lead to significant gains in drought tolerance and tuber production in potato, thereby improving these agronomically important traits. PMID:27212605

  1. Transgenic potato plants expressing cry3A gene confer resistance to Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    Mi, Xiaoxiao; Ji, Xiangzhuo; Yang, Jiangwei; Liang, Lina; Si, Huaijun; Wu, Jiahe; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Di

    2015-07-01

    The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, CPB) is a fatal pest, which is a quarantine pest in China. The CPB has now invaded the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and is constantly spreading eastward in China. In this study, we developed transgenic potato plants expressing cry3A gene. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the cry3A gene expressed in leaves, stems and roots of the transgenic plants under the control of CaMV 35S promoter, while they expressed only in leaves and stems under the control of potato leaf and stem-specific promoter ST-LS1. The mortality of the larvae was higher (28% and 36%) on the transgenic plant line 35S1 on the 3rd and 4th days, and on ST3 (48%) on the 5th day after inoculation with instar larvae. Insect biomass accumulation on the foliage of the transgenic plant lines 35S1, 35S2 and ST3 was significantly lower (0.42%, 0.43% and 0.42%). Foliage consumption was lowest on transgenic lines 35S8 and ST2 among all plant foliage (7.47 mg/larvae/day and 12.46 mg/larvae/day). The different transgenic plant foliages had varied inhibition to larval growth. The survivors on the transgenic lines obviously were smaller than their original size and extremely weak. The transgenic potato plants with CPB resistance could be used to develop germplasms or varieties for controlling CPB damage and halting its spread in China. PMID:26025753

  2. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  3. Relationship between expression levels and atherogenesis in scavenger receptor Class B, Type I Transgenics

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yukihiko; Gong, Elaine; Royer, Lori; Cooper, Philip N.; Francone, Omar L; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-03-15

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies of SR-BI have implicated it as a likely participant in the metabolism of HDL cholesterol. To investigate SR-BI's effect on atherogenesis we examined two lines of SR-BI transgenic mice with high (10-fold increases) and low (2-fold increases) in SR-BI expression in an inbred mouse background hemizygous for a human apo B transgene. Unlike non-HDL cholesterol levels which minimally differed in the various groups of animals, HDL cholesterol levels were inversely related to SR-BI expression. Mice with the low expression SR-BI transgene had a 50% reduction in HDL cholesterol while the high expression SR-BI transgene was associated with two-fold decreases in HDL as well as dramatic alterations in HDL composition and size including the near absence of a-migrating particles as determined by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. The low expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had more than a two-fold decrease in the development of diet induced fatty streak lesions compared t o the apo B transgenics (4448{+-}1908 {mu}m2/aorta to 10133 {+-} 4035 {mu}m2/aorta; p<0.001), while the high expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had an atherogenic response similar to that of the apo B transgenics (14692{+-}7238 {mu}m2/aorta) but three-fold greater than the low SR-BI/apo B mice (p<0.001). The prominent anti-atherogenic effect of moderate SR-BI expression provides in vivo support for the hypothesis that HDL functions to inhibit atherogenesis through its interactions with SR-BI in facilitating reverse cholesterol transport. The failure of the high SR-BI/apo B transgenics to have similar or even greater reductions in atherogenesis suggests that the changes resulting from extremely high SR-BI expression including dramatic changes in lipoproteins may have both pro- and anti-atherogenic consequences illustrating the complexity of the relationship between SR-BI and atherogenesis.

  4. Transgene expression for Gladiolus plants grown outdoors and in the greenhouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgene expression was evaluated for Gladiolus plants transformed with either the CaMV 35S, double CaMV 35S, rolD, or Arabidopsis UBQ3 promoter controlling the uidA or bean yellow mosaic virus coat protein gene in either the sense or antisense orientation to determine differences in expression for...

  5. Human extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) expression in transgenic chicken

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung June; Ji, Mi-Ran; Jang, Ye-Jin; Hwang, A-In; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Jeom Sun; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Chung, Hak-Jae; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Jeon, Iksoo; Park, Jin-Ki; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is a metalloprotein and functions as an antioxidant enzyme. In this study, we used lentiviral vectors to generate transgenic chickens that express the human EC-SOD gene. The recombinant lentiviruses were injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid eggs. Subsequently, the embryos were incubated to hatch using phases II and III of the surrogate shell ex vivo culture system. Of 158 injected embryos, 16 chicks (G0) hatched and were screened for the hEC-SOD by PCR. Only 1 chick was identified as a transgenic bird containing the transgene in its germline. This founder (G0) bird was mated with wild-type hens to produce transgenic progeny, and 2 transgenic chicks (G1) were produced. In the generated transgenic hens (G2), the hEC-SOD protein was expressed in the egg white and showed antioxidant activity. These results highlight the potential of the chicken for production of biologically active proteins in egg white. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8): 404-409] PMID:23977988

  6. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-06-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  7. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  8. Enhanced water stress tolerance of transgenic maize plants over-expressing LEA Rab28 gene.

    PubMed

    Amara, Imen; Capellades, Montserrat; Ludevid, M Dolors; Pagès, Montserrat; Goday, Adela

    2013-06-15

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins participate in plant stress responses and contribute to the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. In this report Rab28 LEA gene has been over-expressed in maize plants under a constitutive maize promoter. The expression of Rab28 transcripts led to the accumulation and stability of Rab28 protein in the transgenic plants. Native Rab28 protein is localized to nucleoli in wild type maize embryo cells; here we find by whole-mount immunocytochemistry that in root cells of Rab28 transgenic and wild-type plants the protein is also associated to nucleolar structures. Transgenic plants were tested for stress tolerance and resulted in sustained growth under polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-mediated dehydration compared to wild-type controls. Under osmotic stress transgenic seedlings showed increased leaf and root areas, higher relative water content (RWC), reduced chlorophyll loss and lower Malondialdehyde (MDA) production in relation to wild-type plants. Moreover, transgenic seeds exhibited higher germination rates than wild-type seeds under water deficit. Overall, our results highlight the presence of transgenic Rab28 protein in nucleolar structures and point to the potential of group 5 LEA Rab28 gene as candidate to enhance stress tolerance in maize plants. PMID:23384757

  9. Impaired growth of pancreatic exocrine cells in transgenic mice expressing human activin {beta}E subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu . E-mail: ohashim@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Ushiro, Yuuki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-03-10

    Activins, TGF-{beta} superfamily members, have multiple functions in a variety of cells and tissues. Recently, additional activin {beta} subunit genes, {beta}C and {beta}E, have been identified. To explore the role of activin E, we created transgenic mice overexpressing human activin {beta}E subunit. There were pronounced differences in the pancreata of the transgenic animals as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Pancreatic weight, expressed relative to total body weight, was significantly reduced. Histologically, adipose replacement of acini in the exocrine pancreas was observed. There was a significant decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells in the acinar cells, indicating reduced proliferation in the exocrine pancreas of the transgenic mice. However, quantitative pancreatic morphometry showed that the total number and mass of the islets of the transgenic mice were comparable with those of the nontransgenic control mice. Our findings suggest a role for activin E in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic exocrine cells.

  10. Iron Biofortification and Homeostasis in Transgenic Cassava Roots Expressing the Algal Iron Assimilatory Gene, FEA1

    PubMed Central

    Ihemere, Uzoma E.; Narayanan, Narayanan N.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory gene, FEA1, in its storage roots with the objective of enhancing the root nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 g meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 gene in storage roots did not alter iron levels in leaves. Transgenic plants also had normal levels of zinc in leaves and roots consistent with the specific uptake of ferrous iron mediated by the FEA1 protein. Relative to wild-type plants, fibrous roots of FEA1 expressing plants had reduced Fe (III) chelate reductase activity consistent with the more efficient uptake of iron in the transgenic plants. We also show that multiple cassava genes involved in iron homeostasis have altered tissue-specific patterns of expression in leaves, stems, and roots of transgenic plants consistent with increased iron sink strength in transgenic roots. These results are discussed in terms of strategies for the iron biofortification of plants. PMID:22993514

  11. Mifepristone-inducible transgene expression in neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hjelm, BE; Grunseich, C; Gowing, G; Avalos, P; Tian, J; Shelley, BC; Mooney, M; Narwani, K; Shi, Y; Svendsen, CN; Wolfe, JH; Fischbeck, KH; Pierson, TM

    2016-01-01

    Numerous gene and cell therapy strategies are being developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these strategies use constitutive expression of therapeutic transgenic proteins, and although functional in animal models of disease, this method is less likely to provide adequate flexibility for delivering therapy to humans. Ligand-inducible gene expression systems may be more appropriate for these conditions, especially within the central nervous system (CNS). Mifepristone’s ability to cross the blood–brain barrier makes it an especially attractive ligand for this purpose. We describe the production of a mifepristone-inducible vector system for regulated expression of transgenes within the CNS. Our inducible system used a lentivirus-based vector platform for the ex vivo production of mifepristone-inducible murine neural progenitor cells that express our transgenes of interest. These cells were processed through a series of selection steps to ensure that the cells exhibited appropriate transgene expression in a dose-dependent and temporally controlled manner with minimal background activity. Inducible cells were then transplanted into the brains of rodents, where they exhibited appropriate mifepristone-inducible expression. These studies detail a strategy for regulated expression in the CNS for use in the development of safe and efficient gene therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:26863047

  12. Mifepristone-inducible transgene expression in neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, B E; Grunseich, C; Gowing, G; Avalos, P; Tian, J; Shelley, B C; Mooney, M; Narwani, K; Shi, Y; Svendsen, C N; Wolfe, J H; Fischbeck, K H; Pierson, T M

    2016-05-01

    Numerous gene and cell therapy strategies are being developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these strategies use constitutive expression of therapeutic transgenic proteins, and although functional in animal models of disease, this method is less likely to provide adequate flexibility for delivering therapy to humans. Ligand-inducible gene expression systems may be more appropriate for these conditions, especially within the central nervous system (CNS). Mifepristone's ability to cross the blood-brain barrier makes it an especially attractive ligand for this purpose. We describe the production of a mifepristone-inducible vector system for regulated expression of transgenes within the CNS. Our inducible system used a lentivirus-based vector platform for the ex vivo production of mifepristone-inducible murine neural progenitor cells that express our transgenes of interest. These cells were processed through a series of selection steps to ensure that the cells exhibited appropriate transgene expression in a dose-dependent and temporally controlled manner with minimal background activity. Inducible cells were then transplanted into the brains of rodents, where they exhibited appropriate mifepristone-inducible expression. These studies detail a strategy for regulated expression in the CNS for use in the development of safe and efficient gene therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:26863047

  13. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV) in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants. PMID:21985646

  14. GAL4 enhancer traps that can be used to drive gene expression in developing Drosophila spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Stephanie M; Monk, Adrian C; Siddall, Nicole A; Johnston, Neisha L; Hime, Gary R

    2012-12-01

    The Drosophila testis has proven to be a valuable model organ for investigation of germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance and differentiation as well as elucidation of the genetic programs that regulate differentiation of daughter spermatogonia. Development of germ cell specific GAL4 driver transgenes has facilitated investigation of gene function in GSCs and spermatogonia but specific GAL4 tools are not available for analysis of postmitotic spermatogonial differentiation into spermatocytes. We have screened publically available pGT1 strains, a GAL4-encoding gene trap collection, to identify lines that can drive gene expression in late spermatogonia and early spermatocytes. While we were unable to identify any germline-specific drivers, we did identify an insertion in the chiffon locus, which drove expression specifically in early spermatocytes within the germline along with the somatic cyst cells of the testis. PMID:22926963

  15. Feasible Introgression of an Anti-pathogen Transgene into an Urban Mosquito Population without Using Gene-Drive

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kenichi W.; Robert, Michael A.; Gould, Fred; Lloyd, Alun L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Introgressing anti-pathogen constructs into wild vector populations could reduce disease transmission. It is generally assumed that such introgression would require linking an anti-pathogen gene with a selfish genetic element or similar technologies. Yet none of the proposed transgenic anti-pathogen gene-drive mechanisms are likely to be implemented as public health measures in the near future. Thus, much attention now focuses instead on transgenic strategies aimed at mosquito population suppression, an approach generally perceived to be practical. By contrast, aiming to replace vector competent mosquito populations with vector incompetent populations by releasing mosquitoes carrying a single anti-pathogen gene without a gene-drive mechanism is widely considered impractical. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we use Skeeter Buster, a previously published stochastic, spatially explicit model of Aedes aegypti to investigate whether a number of approaches for releasing mosquitoes with only an anti-pathogen construct would be efficient and effective in the tropical city of Iquitos, Peru. To assess the performance of such releases using realistic release numbers, we compare the transient and long-term effects of this strategy with two other genetic control strategies that have been developed in Ae. aegypti: release of a strain with female-specific lethality, and a strain with both female-specific lethality and an anti-pathogen gene. We find that releasing mosquitoes carrying only an anti-pathogen construct can substantially decrease vector competence of a natural population, even at release ratios well below that required for the two currently feasible alternatives that rely on population reduction. Finally, although current genetic control strategies based on population reduction are compromised by immigration of wild-type mosquitoes, releasing mosquitoes carrying only an anti-pathogen gene is considerably more robust to such immigration. Conclusions

  16. Transgenic rice plants expressing a Bacillus subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene are resistant to diphenyl ether herbicide oxyfluorfen.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Lee, S B; Chung, J S; Han, S U; Han, O; Guh, J O; Jeon, J S; An, G; Back, K

    2000-06-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (Protox), the penultimate step enzyme of the branch point for the biosynthetic pathway of Chl and hemes, is the target site of action of diphenyl ether (DPE) herbicides. However, Bacillus subtilis Protox is known to be resistant to the herbicides. In order to develop the herbicide-resistant plants, the transgenic rice plants were generated via expression of B. subtilis Protox gene under ubiquitin promoter targeted to the cytoplasm or to the plastid using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transformation. The integration and expression of the transgene were investigated at T0 generation by DNA and RNA blots. Most transgenic rice plants revealed one copy transgene insertion into the rice genome, but some with 3 copies. The expression levels of B. subtilis Protox mRNA appeared to correlate with the copy number. Furthermore, the plastidal transgenic lines exhibited much higher expression of the Protox mRNA than the cytoplasmic transgenic lines. The transgenic plants expressing the B. subtilis Protox gene at T0 generation were found to be resistant to oxyfluorfen when judged by cellular damage with respect to cellular leakage, Chl loss, and lipid peroxidation. The transgenic rice plants targeted to the plastid exhibited higher resistance to the herbicide than the transgenic plants targeted to the cytoplasm. In addition, possible resistance mechanisms in the transgenic plants to DPE herbicides are discussed. PMID:10945344

  17. Neuron-specific expression and physiological regulation of bovine vasopressin transgenes in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ang, H L; Carter, D A; Murphy, D

    1993-01-01

    We have used transgenic mice to analyse the regulation of the bovine vasopressin (BVP) gene. We find that the restriction of BVP gene expression to anatomically and functionally distinct hypothalamic neuronal groups is achieved, in part, by selective repression. The expression of a 1.25 kb BVP proximal promoter, which on its own confers general expression of a reporter to most peripheral and brain tissues, was limited by sequences in the BVP structural gene to neural cells in the adrenal medulla and brain. Transgene expression in the hypothalamus was shown to be regulated by the physiological stimulus of dehydration in parallel with the endogenous gene. The expression of a larger 13.4 kb BVP transgene, containing 9 kb of 5' upstream sequence, the VP structural gene and 1.5 kb 3' of the transcription unit, was even more restricted and resembles that of the endogenous mouse gene. Hypothalamic expression of the 13.4 kb BVP transgene was regulated appropriately in response to an osmotic challenge. Images PMID:7685275

  18. Improved detection of lacZ reporter gene expression in transgenic epithelia by immunofluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahony, Donna; Karunaratne, Seetha; Rothnagel, Joseph A

    2002-04-01

    The bacterial lacZ gene is commonly used as a reporter for the in vivo analysis of gene regulation in transgenic mice. However, several laboratories have reported poor detection of beta-galactosidase (the lacZ gene product) using histochemical techniques, particularly in skin. Here we report the difficulties we encountered in assessing lacZ expression in transgenic keratinocytes using classic X-gal histochemical protocols in tissues shown to express the transgene by mRNA in situ hybridization. We found that lacZ reporter gene expression could be reliably detected in frozen tissue sections by immunofluorescence analysis using a beta-galactosidase-specific antibody. Moreover, we were able to localize both transgene and endogenous gene products simultaneously using double-label immunofluorescence. Our results suggest that antibody detection of beta-galactosidase should be used to verify other assays of lacZ expression, particularly where low expression levels are suspected or patchy expression is observed. PMID:11994142

  19. Production of Transgenic Calves Expressing an shRNA Targeting Myostatin

    PubMed Central

    Tessanne, K; Golding, MC; Long, CR; Peoples, MD; Hannon, G; Westhusin, ME

    2012-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a well-known negative regulator of muscle growth. Animals that possess mutations within this gene display an enhanced muscling phenotype, a desirable agricultural trait. Increased neonatal morbidity is common, however, resulting from complications arising from the birth of offspring with increased fetal muscle mass. The objective of the current research was to generate an attenuated MSTN-null phenotype in a large-animal model using RNA interference to enhance muscle development without the detrimental consequences of an inactivating mutation. To this end, we identified a series of short interfering RNAs that demonstrated effective suppression of MSTN mRNA and protein levels. To produce transgenic offspring capable of stable MSTN suppression in vivo, a recombinant lentiviral vector expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting MSTN for silencing was introduced into bovine fetal fibroblasts. These cells were used as nucleus donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Twenty blastocysts were transferred into seven recipient cows resulting in five pregnancies. One transgenic calf developed to term, but died following delivery by Caesarean-section. As an alternative strategy, microinjection of recombinant lentiviral particles into the perivitelline space of in vitro-produced bovine zygotes was utilized to produce 40 transgenic blastocysts that were transferred into 14 recipient cows, resulting in 7 pregnancies. Five transgenic calves were produced, of which three expressed the transgene. This is the first report of transgenic livestock produced by direct injection of a recombinant lentivirus, and expressing transgenes encoding shRNAs targeting an endogenous gene (myostatin) for silencing. PMID:22139943

  20. Microarray Analysis of the Gene Expression Profile and Lipid Metabolism in Fat-1 Transgenic Cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Chunling; Ding, Xiangbin; Wei, Zhuying; Guo, Hong; Li, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are beneficial for human health. However, humans and mammals are unable to synthesize n-3 PUFAs because they lack the n-3 desaturase gene fat-1 and must therefore obtain this type of fatty acid through their diet. Through the production of fat-1 transgenic animals, it is possible to obtain animal products that are rich in n-3 PUFAs, such as meat and milk. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression profile and the mechanism of lipid metabolism in fat-1 transgenic cattle and to accumulate important basic data that are required to obtain more efficient fat-1 transgenic cattle. Transcriptome profiling of fat-1 transgenic and wild-type cattle identified differentially expressed genes that are involved in 90 biological pathways, eight pathways of which were related to lipid metabolism processes 36 genes of which were related to lipid metabolism. This analysis also identified 11 significantly enriched genes that were involved in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway. These findings were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The information obtained in this study indicated that the introduction of an exogenous fat-1 gene into cattle affects the gene expression profile and the process of lipid metabolism in these animals. These results may provide important insights into how an exogenous fat-1 gene synthesizes n-3 PUFAs in transgenic cattle and other mammals. PMID:26426396

  1. BCL-B (BCL2L10) is overexpressed in patients suffering from multiple myeloma (MM) and drives an MM-like disease in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Jacquel, Arnaud; Robert, Guillaume; Puissant, Alexandre; Richez, Valentine; Cassel, Romeo; Fenouille, Nina; Roulland, Sandrine; Gilleron, Jerome; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Dubois, Alix; Bailly-Maitre, Beatrice; Goncalves, Diogo; Mallavialle, Aude; Colosetti, Pascal; Marchetti, Sandrine; Amiot, Martine; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Rochet, Nathalie; Deckert, Marcel; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Hofman, Paul; Karsenti, Jean-Michel; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Nadel, Bertrand; Cluzeau, Thomas; Anderson, Kenneth C; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Luciano, Frederic

    2016-08-22

    Multiple myeloma (MM) evolves from a premalignant condition known as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, the factors underlying the malignant transformation of plasmocytes in MM are not fully characterized. We report here that Eµ-directed expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-B protein in mice drives an MM phenotype that reproduces accurately the human disease. Indeed, with age, Eµ-bcl-b transgenic mice develop the characteristic features of human MM, including bone malignant plasma cell infiltration, a monoclonal immunoglobulin peak, immunoglobulin deposit in renal tubules, and highly characteristic bone lytic lesions. In addition, the tumors are serially transplantable in irradiated wild-type mice, underlying the tumoral origin of the disease. Eµ-bcl-b plasmocytes show increased expression of a panel of genes known to be dysregulated in human MM pathogenesis. Treatment of Eµ-bcl-b mice with drugs currently used to treat patients such as melphalan and VELCADE efficiently kills malignant plasmocytes in vivo. Finally, we find that Bcl-B is overexpressed in plasmocytes from MM patients but neither in MGUS patients nor in healthy individuals, suggesting that Bcl-B may drive MM. These findings suggest that Bcl-B could be an important factor in MM disease and pinpoint Eµ-bcl-b mice as a pertinent model to validate new therapies in MM. PMID:27455953

  2. Amplification of transgene expression in vitro and in vivo using a novel inhibitor of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Yamano, T; Ura, K; Morishita, R; Nakajima, H; Monden, M; Kaneda, Y

    2000-06-01

    Enhancement of transgene expression is an important issue in human gene therapy. Here we describe a novel system for enhancing transgene expression by cointroduction of plasmid DNA with FR901228, a water-soluble histone deacetylase inhibitor. When a luciferase expression vector was cointroduced into cells with FR901228, luciferase gene expression was enhanced 50-fold in the mouse melanoma cell line B16-F1 and 5200-fold in NIH3T3 cells in comparison to cells without the drug. Luciferase gene expression enhancement was dependent on both drug dose and treatment time. Acetylated histones increased in accordance with drug dose, and the activation of gene expression occurred at the transcriptional level. The stimulation of luciferase gene expression by FR901228 was also observed in a B16-F1 clone stably expressing luciferase. Cointroduction of the luciferase plasmid with FR901228 into a B16-F1 tumor mass activated luciferase gene expression 3- to 4-fold. Thus, activation of transgene expression by FR901228 may serve as a new tool for gene therapy. PMID:10933982

  3. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls. PMID:26202070

  4. Intracerebral transplants of primary muscle cells: a potential 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    After the transplantation of rat primary muscle cells into the caudate or cortex of recipient rats, the muscle cells were able to persist for at least 6 months. Muscle cells transfected with expression plasmids prior to transplantation were able to express reporter genes in the brains for at least 2 months. These results suggest that muscle cells might be a useful 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain.

  5. A fast-evolving human NPAS3 enhancer gained reporter expression in the developing forebrain of transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Gretel B.; López-Leal, Rodrigo; Lorenzo, Juan R.; Franchini, Lucía F.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental brain gene NPAS3 stands out as a hot spot in human evolution because it contains the largest number of human-specific, fast-evolving, conserved, non-coding elements. In this paper we studied 2xHAR142, one of these elements that is located in the fifth intron of NPAS3. Using transgenic mice, we show that the mouse and chimp 2xHAR142 orthologues behave as transcriptional enhancers driving expression of the reporter gene lacZ to a similar NPAS3 expression subdomain in the mouse central nervous system. Interestingly, the human 2xHAR142 orthologue drives lacZ expression to an extended expression pattern in the nervous system. Thus, molecular evolution of 2xHAR142 provides the first documented example of human-specific heterotopy in the forebrain promoted by a transcriptional enhancer and suggests that it may have contributed to assemble the unique properties of the human brain. PMID:24218632

  6. Genetically stable expression of functional miraculin, a new type of alternative sweetener, in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2007-11-01

    Miraculin is a taste-modifying protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica, a shrub native to West Africa. Miraculin by itself is not sweet, but it is able to turn a sour taste into a sweet taste. This unique property has led to increasing interest in this protein. In this article, we report the high-yield production of miraculin in transgenic tomato plants. High and genetically stable expression of miraculin was confirmed by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant miraculin accumulated to high levels in leaves and fruits, up to 102.5 and 90.7 microg/g fresh weight, respectively. Purified recombinant miraculin expressed in transgenic tomato plants showed strong sweetness-inducing activity, similar to that of native miraculin. These results demonstrate that recombinant miraculin was correctly processed in transgenic tomato plants, and that this production system could be a good alternative to production from the native plant. PMID:17692073

  7. Transactivation of dianthin transgene expression by African cassava mosaic virus AC2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Saunders, K; Stanley, J

    1997-02-17

    We have recently described a novel strategy for engineering resistance to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a virus-inducible promoter to control the expression of a plant ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) transgene (Y. Hong et al., Virology 220, 119-127, 1996). Here, we have used a potato virus X (PVX) vector to express the ACMV transactivator protein, AC2, in planta. We confirm that amplification of RIP activity in transgenic plants is mediated by AC2; disruption of AC2 expression by either the introduction of an in-frame stop codon or the deletion of 5'-terminal or 3'-terminal coding sequences reduced RIP expression to the basal level associated with PVX-infected plants. AC2 expression from the PVX vector induced necrosis in nontransformed plants as well as in plants containing the RIP transgene, suggesting that the protein can functionally interact with PVX and/or host factors. The potential of this system to provide a direct and sensitive assay to investigate AC2 function in planta is discussed. PMID:9123846

  8. Reduced Susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in Transgenic Citrus Expressing the FLS2 Receptor From Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Pitino, Marco; Duan, Yongping; Stover, Ed

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. Citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the most important diseases damaging citrus production worldwide. In this study, we cloned the FLS2 gene from Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA and inserted it into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS to transform Hamlin sweet orange and Carrizo citrange. Transgene presence was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene expression of NbFLS2 was compared by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to flg22Xcc was detected in transgenic Hamlin but not in nontransformed controls. Low or no ROS production was detected from nontransformed Hamlin seedlings challenged with flg22Xcc. Transgenic plants highly expressing NbFLS2 were selected and were evaluated for resistance to canker incited by X. citri 3213. Our results showed that the integration and expression of the NbFLS2 gene in citrus can increase canker resistance and defense-associated gene expression when challenged with X. citri. These results suggest that canker-susceptible Citrus genotypes lack strong basal defense induced by X. citri flagellin and the resistance of these genotypes can be enhanced by transgenic expression of the flagellin receptor from a resistant species. PMID:26554734

  9. Development of Transgenic Minipigs with Expression of Antimorphic Human Cryptochrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunxin; Bolund, Lars; Vajta, Gábor; Dou, Hongwei; Yang, Wenxian; Xu, Ying; Luan, Jing; Wang, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Du, Yutao

    2013-01-01

    Minipigs have become important biomedical models for human ailments due to similarities in organ anatomy, physiology, and circadian rhythms relative to humans. The homeostasis of circadian rhythms in both central and peripheral tissues is pivotal for numerous biological processes. Hence, biological rhythm disorders may contribute to the onset of cancers and metabolic disorders including obesity and type II diabetes, amongst others. A tight regulation of circadian clock effectors ensures a rhythmic expression profile of output genes which, depending on cell type, constitute about 3–20% of the transcribed mammalian genome. Central to this system is the negative regulator protein Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) of which the dysfunction or absence has been linked to the pathogenesis of rhythm disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic Bama-minipigs featuring expression of the Cys414-Ala antimorphic human Cryptochrome 1 mutant (hCRY1AP). Using transgenic donor fibroblasts as nuclear donors, the method of handmade cloning (HMC) was used to produce reconstructed embryos, subsequently transferred to surrogate sows. A total of 23 viable piglets were delivered. All were transgenic and seemingly healthy. However, two pigs with high transgene expression succumbed during the first two months. Molecular analyzes in epidermal fibroblasts demonstrated disturbances to the expression profile of core circadian clock genes and elevated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, known to be risk factors in cancer and metabolic disorders. PMID:24146819

  10. Building an atlas of gene expression driving kidney development: pushing the limits of resolution.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2014-04-01

    Changing gene expression patterns is the essential driver of developmental processes. Growth factors, micro-RNAs, long intergenic noncoding RNAs, and epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, all work by impacting gene expression. The key features of developing cells, including their ability to communicate with others, are defined primarily by their gene-expression profiles. It is therefore clear that a gene-expression atlas of the developing kidney can provide a useful tool for the developmental nephrology research community. Toward this end, the GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) consortium has worked to create an atlas of the changing gene-expression patterns that drive kidney development. In this article, the global gene-expression profiling strategies of GUDMAP are reviewed. The initial work used laser-capture microdissection to purify multiple compartments of the developing kidney, including cap mesenchyme, renal vesicle, S-shaped bodies, proximal tubules, and more, which were then gene-expression profiled using microarrays. Resolution of the atlas was then improved by using transgenic mice with specific cell types labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing their purification and profiling. In addition, RNA-Seq replaced microarrays. Currently, the atlas is being pushed to the single-cell resolution using microfluidic approaches that allow high-throughput RNA-Seq analysis of hundreds of individual cells. Results can identify novel types of cells and define interesting heterogeneities present within cell populations. PMID:23996451

  11. Epidermal Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 is Not a Primary Inducer of Cutaneous Inflammation in Transgenic Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ifor R.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    1994-10-01

    Keratinocytes at sites of cutaneous inflammation have increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), a cytokine-inducible adhesion molecule which binds the leukocyte integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. Transgenic mice were prepared in which the expression of mouse ICAM-1 was targeted to basal keratinocytes by using the human K14 keratin promoter. The level of constitutive expression attained in the transgenic mice exceeded the peak level of ICAM-1 expression induced on nontransgenic mouse keratinocytes in vitro by optimal combinations of interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α or in vivo by proinflammatory stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. In vitro adhesion assays demonstrated that cultured transgenic keratinocytes were superior to normal keratinocytes as a substrate for the LFA-1-dependent binding of mouse T cells, confirming that the transgene-encoded ICAM-1 was expressed in a functional form. However, the high level of constitutive ICAM-1 expression achieved on keratinocytes in vivo in these transgenic mice did not result in additional recruitment of CD45^+ leukocytes into transgenic epidermis, nor did it elicit dermal inflammation. Keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression also did not potentiate contact-hypersensitivity reactions to epicutaneous application of haptens. The absence of a spontaneous phenotype in these transgenic mice was not the result of increased levels of soluble ICAM-1, since serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 were equal in transgenic mice and controls. We conclude that elevated ICAM-1 expression on keratinocytes cannot act independently to influence leukocyte trafficking and elicit cutaneous inflammation.

  12. Transgenesis and neuroendocrine physiology: a transgenic rat model expressing growth hormone in vasopressin neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sara E; Flavell, David M; Bisset, Gordon W; Houston, Pamela A; Christian, Helen; Fairhall, Keith M; Robinson, Iain C A F

    2003-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and bovine neurophysin (bNP) DNA reporter fragments were inserted into the rat vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) genes in a 44 kb cosmid construct used to generate two lines of transgenic rats, termed JP17 and JP59. Both lines showed specific hGH expression in magnocellular VP cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON). hGH was also expressed in parvocellular neurones in suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), medial amygdala and habenular nuclei in JP17 rats; the rat OT-bNP (rOT-bNP) transgene was not expressed in either line. Immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay showed hGH protein in the hypothalamus from where it was transported in varicose fibres via the median eminence to the posterior pituitary gland. Immunogold electron microscopy showed hGH co-stored with VP-NP in the same granules. The VP-hGH transgene did not affect water balance, VP storage or release in vivo. Drinking 2 % saline for 72 h increased hypothalamic transgene hGH mRNA expression, and depleted posterior pituitary hGH and VP stores in parallel. In anaesthetised, water-loaded JP17 rats, hGH was released with VP in response to an acute hypovolumic stimulus (sodium nitrosopentacyano, 400 μg I.V.). JP17 rats had a reduced growth rate, lower anterior pituitary rGH contents, and a reduced amplitude of endogenous pulsatile rGH secretion assessed by automated blood microsampling in conscious rats, consistent with a short-loop feedback of the VP-hGH on the endogenous GH axis. This transgenic rat model enables us to study physiological regulation of hypothalamic transgene protein production, transport and secretion, as well as its effects on other neuroendocrine systems in vivo. PMID:12813157

  13. Production of transgenic dairy goat expressing human α-lactalbumin by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiujing; Cao, Shaoxian; Wang, Huili; Meng, Chunhua; Li, Jingxin; Jiang, Jin; Qian, Yong; Su, Lei; He, Qiang; Zhang, Qingxiao

    2015-02-01

    Production of human α-lactalbumin (hα-LA) transgenic cloned dairy goats has great potential in improving the nutritional value and perhaps increasing the yield of dairy goat milk. Here, a mammary-specific expression vector 5A, harboring goat β-lactoglobulin (βLG) promoter, the hα-LA gene, neo(r) and EGFP dual markers, was constructed. Then, it was effectively transfected into goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) and the expression of hα-LA was investigated. Both the hα-LA transcript and protein were detected in the transfected GMECs after the induction of hormonal signals. In addition, the 5A vector was introduced into dairy goat fetal fibroblasts (transfection efficiency ≈60-70%) to prepare competent transgenic donor cells. A total of 121 transgenic fibroblast clones were isolated by 96-well cell culture plates and screened with nested-PCR amplification and EGFP fluorescence. After being frozen for 8 months, the transgenic cells still showed high viabilities, verifying their ability as donor cells. Dairy goat cloned embryos were produced from these hα-LA transgenic donor cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the rates of fusion, cleavage, and the development to blastocyst stages were 81.8, 84.4, and 20.0%, respectively. A total of 726 reconstructed embryos derived from the transgenic cells were transferred to 74 recipients and pregnancy was confirmed at 90 days in 12 goats. Of six female kids born, two carried hα-LA and the hα-LA protein was detected in their milk. This study provides an effective system to prepare SCNT donor cells and transgenic animals for human recombinant proteins. PMID:25139669

  14. MMTV/LTR Promoter-Driven Transgenic Expression of EpCAM Leads to the Development of Large Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Vercollone, Jeffrey R; Balzar, Maarten; Litvinov, Sergey V; Yang, Wendy; Cirulli, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    Our previous work demonstrated an important role of EpCAM in the regulation of pancreatic cell adhesion, growth and differentiation. Here we investigated the consequences of human EpCAM (hEpCAM) overexpression under the control of the MMTV-LTR promoter, known to drive robust gene expression in a number of ductal epithelia, including the pancreas. In this animal model (MMTV-hEpCAM) we uncovered a striking pancreatic phenotype exhibiting a 12-fold increase in the islet cell mass, with normal expression patterns of insulin and the transcription factor PDX-1. Intriguingly, these large islet clusters revealed an altered architectural organization of α- and δ-cells that appeared interspersed with β-cells in the islet cores. This suggests an effect of the hEpCAM transgene on the function of other cell adhesion molecules that we have previously shown to regulate islet cell type segregation. Consistent with this finding, we show that the pancreatic epithelium in MMTV-hEpCAM transgenic mice exhibits a redistribution of β-catenin, a known regulator of E-cadherin-mediated adhesions. Collectively, these results provide an important in vivo validation of hEpCAM signaling properties in normal epithelia and offer unique opportunities to further explore the function of this glycoprotein in select pancreatic cell lineages to elicit islet cell expansion, and/or regeneration in diabetes. PMID:26216137

  15. Enhanced Myogenesis in adult skeletal muscle by transgenic expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle growth and maintenance are essential for human health. One of the muscle regulatory genes, namely myostatin, a member of transforming growth factor-ß, plays a dominant role in the genetic control of muscle mass. Transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide in skeletal muscle showed ...

  16. Increased liver pathology in hepatitis C virus transgenic mice expressing the hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, Victor V.; Lerat, Herve; Madden, Charles R.; Finegold, Milton J.; McGarvey, Michael J.; Mohammed, Essam M.A.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Grona, Shala J.; Hollinger, F. Blaine; Slagle, Betty L. . E-mail: bslagle@bcm.edu

    2006-04-10

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was identified in 21% of HCV/ATX mice, but in none of the single transgenic animals. Analysis of 8-mo animals revealed that, relative to HCV/WT mice, HCV/ATX mice had more severe steatosis, greater liver-to-body weight ratios, and a significant increase in the percentage of hepatocytes staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Furthermore, primary hepatocytes from HCV, ATX, and HCV/ATX transgenic mice were more resistant to fas-mediated apoptosis than hepatocytes from nontransgenic littermates. These results indicate that HBx expression contributes to increased liver pathogenesis in HCV transgenic mice by a mechanism that involves an imbalance in hepatocyte death and regeneration within the context of severe steatosis.

  17. Technical advance: stringent control of transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana using the Top10 promoter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J.; Scott, A. C.; Thompson, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We show that the tightly regulated tetracycline-sensitive Top10 promoter system (Weinmann et al. Plant J. 1994, 5, 559-569) is functional in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pure breeding A. thaliana line (JL-tTA/8) was generated which expressed a chimeric fusion of the tetracycline repressor and the activation domain of Herpes simplex virus (tTA), from a single transgenic locus. Plants from this line were crossed with transgenics carrying the ER-targeted green fluorescent protein coding sequence (mGFP5) under control of the Top10 promoter sequence. Progeny from this cross displayed ER-targeted GFP fluorescence throughout the plant, indicating that the tTA-Top10 promoter interaction was functional in A. thaliana. GFP expression was repressed by 100 ng ml-1 tetracycline, an order of magnitude lower than the concentration used previously to repress expression in Nicotiana tabacum. Moreover, the level of GFP expression was controlled by varying the concentration of tetracycline in the medium, allowing a titred regulation of transgenic activity that was previously unavailable in A. thaliana. The kinetics of GFP activity were determined following de-repression of the Top10:mGFP5 transgene, with a visible ER-targeted GFP signal appearing from 24 to 48 h after de-repression.

  18. Minimizing the unpredictability of transgene expression in plants: the role of genetic insulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic transformation of plants has become a necessary tool for fundamental plant biology research, as well as the generation of engineered plants exhibiting improved agronomic and industrial traits. However, this technology is significantly hindered by the fact that transgene expression is hi...

  19. The food additive vanillic acid controls transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice

    PubMed Central

    Gitzinger, Marc; Kemmer, Christian; Fluri, David A.; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Trigger-inducible transcription-control devices that reversibly fine-tune transgene expression in response to molecular cues have significantly advanced the rational reprogramming of mammalian cells. When designed for use in future gene- and cell-based therapies the trigger molecules have to be carefully chosen in order to provide maximum specificity, minimal side-effects and optimal pharmacokinetics in a mammalian organism. Capitalizing on control components that enable Caulobacter crescentus to metabolize vanillic acid originating from lignin degradation that occurs in its oligotrophic freshwater habitat, we have designed synthetic devices that specifically adjust transgene expression in mammalian cells when exposed to vanillic acid. Even in mice transgene expression was robust, precise and tunable in response to vanillic acid. As a licensed food additive that is regularly consumed by humans via flavoured convenience food and specific fresh vegetable and fruits, vanillic acid can be considered as a safe trigger molecule that could be used for diet-controlled transgene expression in future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:22187155

  20. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, w...

  1. Transgene expression in pear (Pyrus communis L.) driven by a phloem-specific promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene expression cassette carrying ß-glucuronidase (uidA) reporter gene under the control of the promoter of the Arabidopsis sucrose-H+ symporter gene (AtSUC2) was introduced to pear plants via an Agrobacterium-mediated leaf-explant transformation procedure. Transgenic shoots were regenerated from...

  2. Transgenic Expression of ZBP1 in Neurons Suppresses Cocaine-Associated Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapidus, Kyle A. B.; Nwokafor, Chiso; Scott, Daniel; Baroni, Timothy E.; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Hiroi, Noboru; Singer, Robert H.; Czaplinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    To directly address whether regulating mRNA localization can influence animal behavior, we created transgenic mice that conditionally express Zipcode Binding Protein 1 (ZBP1) in a subset of neurons in the brain. ZBP1 is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the localization, as well as translation and stability of target mRNAs in the cytoplasm. We…

  3. Use of Lentiviral Vectors to Deliver and Express Bicistronic Transgenes in Developing Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Semple-Rowland, Susan L; Berry, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The abilities of lentiviral vectors to carry large transgenes (~ 8Kb) and to efficiently infect and integrate these genes into the genomes of both dividing and non-dividing cells make them ideal candidates for transport of genetic material into cells and tissues. Given the properties of these vectors, it is somewhat surprising that they have seen only limited use in studies of developing tissues and in particular of the developing nervous system. Over the past several years, we have taken advantage of the large capacity of these vectors to explore the expression characteristics of several dual promoter and 2A peptide bicistronic transgenes in developing chick neural retina, with the goal of identifying transgene designs that reliably express multiple proteins in infected cells. Here we summarize the activities of several of these transgenes in neural retina and provide detailed methodologies for packaging lentivirus and delivering the virus into the developing neural tubes of chicken embryos in ovo, procedures that have been optimized over the course of several years of use in our laboratory. Conditions to hatch injected embryos are also discussed. The chicken-specific techniques will be of highest interest to investigators using avian embryos, development and packaging of lentiviral vectors that reliably express multiple proteins in infected cells should be of interest to all investigators whose experiments demand manipulation and expression of multiple proteins in developing cells and tissues. PMID:23816789

  4. Expression of spearmint limonene synthase in transgenic spike lavender results in an altered monoterpene composition in developing leaves.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2008-01-01

    We generated transgenic spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) plants constitutively expressing the limonene synthase (LS) gene from spearmint (Mentha spicata), encoding the LS enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of limonene from geranyl diphosphate. Overexpression of the LS transgene did not consistently affect monoterpene profile in pooled leaves or flowers from transgenic T(0) plants. Analyses from cohorts of leaves sampled at different developmental stages showed that essential oil accumulation in transgenic and control plants was higher in developing than in mature leaves. Furthermore, developing leaves of transgenic plants contained increased limonene contents (more than 450% increase compared to controls) that correlated with the highest transcript accumulation of the LS gene. The levels of other monoterpene pathway components were also significantly altered. T(0) transgenic plants were grown for 2 years, self-pollinated, and the T(1) seeds obtained. The increased limonene phenotype was maintained in the progenies that inherited the LS transgene. PMID:18514005

  5. How Changes in Extracellular Matrix Mechanics and Gene Expression Variability Might Combine to Drive Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Ashley G.; Mannix, Robert J.; Tobin, Heather; Bar-Yam, Yaneer; Bellin, Robert M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) structure or mechanics can actively drive cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we explore whether this process could be mediated by changes in cell shape that lead to increases in genetic noise, given that both factors have been independently shown to alter gene expression and induce cell fate switching. We do this using a computer simulation model that explores the impact of physical changes in the tissue microenvironment under conditions in which physical deformation of cells increases gene expression variability among genetically identical cells. The model reveals that cancerous tissue growth can be driven by physical changes in the microenvironment: when increases in cell shape variability due to growth-dependent increases in cell packing density enhance gene expression variation, heterogeneous autonomous growth and further structural disorganization can result, thereby driving cancer progression via positive feedback. The model parameters that led to this prediction are consistent with experimental measurements of mammary tissues that spontaneously undergo cancer progression in transgenic C3(1)-SV40Tag female mice, which exhibit enhanced stiffness of mammary ducts, as well as progressive increases in variability of cell-cell relations and associated cell shape changes. These results demonstrate the potential for physical changes in the tissue microenvironment (e.g., altered ECM mechanics) to induce a cancerous phenotype or accelerate cancer progression in a clonal population through local changes in cell geometry and increased phenotypic variability, even in the absence of gene mutation. PMID:24098430

  6. Mechanisms of disease: motoneuron disease aggravated by transgenic expression of a functionally modified AMPA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini; Groom, Anthony J; Müller, Gerald; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Stefovska, Vanya; Bresink, Iris; Hartmann, Bettina; Tschauner, Karsten; Waibel, Stefan; Ludolph, Albert C; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Seeburg, Peter H; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2005-08-01

    To reveal whether increased Ca2+ permeability of glutamate AMPA channels triggered by the transgene for GluR-B(N) induces decline in motor functions and neurodegeneration in the spinal cord, we evaluated growth, motor coordination, and spinal reflexes in transgenic GluR-B(N) and wild-type (wt) mice. To reveal whether the transgenic GluR-B(N) expression aggravates the course of motoneuron disease in SOD1 mice, we mated heterozygous GluR-B(N) and SOD1 [C57BL6Ico-TgN(hSOD1-G93A)1Gur] mice to generate double-transgenic progeny. The phenotypic sequelae in mice carrying mutations were evaluated by monitoring growth, motor coordination, and survival. Neuronal degeneration was assessed by morphological and stereological analysis of spinal cord and brain. We found that transgenic expression in mice of GluR-B(N)-containing glutamate AMPA receptors with increased Ca2+ permeability leads to a late-onset degeneration of neurons in the spinal cord and decline of motor functions. Neuronal death progressed over the entire life span, but manifested clinically in late adulthood, resembling the course of a slow neurodegenerative disorder. Additional transgenic expression of mutated human SOD1 accelerated disease progression, aggravated severity of motor decline, and decreased survival. These observations reveal that moderate, but persistently elevated Ca2+ influx via glutamate AMPA channels causes degeneration of spinal motoneurons and motor decline over the span of life. These features resemble the course of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in humans and suggest that modified function of glutamate AMPA channels may be causally linked to pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:16179532

  7. Regulatory sequences of Arabidopsis drive reporter gene expression in nematode feeding structures.

    PubMed Central

    Barthels, N; van der Lee, F M; Klap, J; Goddijn, O J; Karimi, M; Puzio, P; Grundler, F M; Ohl, S A; Lindsey, K; Robertson, L; Robertson, W M; Van Montagu, M; Gheysen, G; Sijmons, P C

    1997-01-01

    In the quest for plant regulatory sequences capable of driving nematode-triggered effector gene expression in feeding structures, we show that promoter tagging is a valuable tool. A large collection of transgenic Arabidopsis plants was generated. They were transformed with a beta-glucuronidase gene functioning as a promoter tag. Three T-DNA constructs, pGV1047, p delta gusBin19, and pMOG553, were used. Early responses to nematode invasion were of primary interest. Six lines exhibiting beta-glucuronidase activity in syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode were studied. Reporter gene activation was also identified in galls induced by root knot and ectoparasitic nematodes. Time-course studies revealed that all six tags were differentially activated during the development of the feeding structure. T-DNA-flanking regions responsible for the observed responses after nematode infection were isolated and characterized for promoter activity. PMID:9437858

  8. Transgenic poplar expressing the pine GS1a show alterations in nitrogen homeostasis during drought.

    PubMed

    Molina-Rueda, Juan Jesús; Kirby, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    Transgenic hybrid poplars engineered to express ectopically the heterologous pine cytosolic GS1a display a number of significant pleiotropic phenotypes including enhanced growth, enhanced nitrogen use efficiency, and resistance to drought stress. The present study was undertaken in order to assess mechanisms whereby ectopic expression of pine GS1a in transgenic poplars results in enhanced agronomic phenotypes. Microarray analysis using the Agilent Populus whole genome array has allowed identification of genes differentially expressed between wild type (WT) and GS transgenics in four tissues (sink leaves, source leaves, stems, and roots) under three growth conditions (well-watered, drought, and recovery). Analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes in functional categories related to nitrogen metabolism show a trend of significant down-regulation in GS poplars compared to the WT, including genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases. The down-regulation of these genes was verified using qPCR, and downstream effects were further tested using NR activity assays. Results suggest that higher glutamine levels in GS transgenics regulate nitrate uptake and reduction. Transcript levels of nitrogen-related genes in leaves, including GS/GOGAT cycle enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase, GABA shunt enzymes, photorespiration enzymes, asparagine synthetase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and PII, were also assessed using qPCR revealing significant differences between GS poplars and the WT. Moreover, metabolites related to these differentially expressed genes showed alterations in levels, including higher levels of GABA, hydroxyproline, and putrescine in the GS transgenic. These alterations in nitrogen homeostasis offer insights into mechanisms accounting for drought tolerance observed in GS poplars. PMID:26113157

  9. Expression profile of IGF paralog genes in liver and muscle of a GH-transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nornberg, Bruna Felix; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between IGFs produced in the liver and skeletal muscle with muscle hypertrophy previously observed in a line of GH-transgenic zebrafish. In this sense, we evaluated the expression of genes related to the IGF system in liver and muscle of transgenics, as well as the main intracellular signaling pathways used by GH/IGF axis. Our results showed an increase in expression of igf1a, igf2a, and igf2b genes in the liver. Moreover, there was a decrease in the expression of igf1ra and an increase in muscle igf2r of transgenics, indicating a negative response of muscle tissue with respect to excess circulating IGFs. Muscle IGFs expression analyses revealed a significant increase only for igf2b, accompanied by a parallel induction of igfbp5a gene. The presence of IGFBP5a may potentiate the IGF2 action in muscle cells differentiation. Regarding JAK/STAT-related genes, we observed an alteration in the expression profile of both stat3 and stat5a in transgenic fish liver. No changes were observed in the muscle, suggesting that both tissues respond differently to GH-transgenesis. Western blotting analyses indicated an imbalance between the phosphorylation levels of the proliferative (MEK/ERK) and hypertrophic (PI3K/Akt) pathways, in favor of the latter. In summary, the results of this study suggest that the hypertrophy caused by GH-transgenesis in zebrafish may be due to circulating IGFs produced by the liver, with an important participation of muscle IGF2b. This group of IGFs appears to be favoring the hypertrophic intracellular pathway in muscle tissue of transgenic zebrafish. PMID:26718079

  10. Spatial and developmental profiling of miraculin accumulation in transgenic tomato fruits expressing the miraculin gene constitutively.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Wang; Kato, Kazuhisa; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-13

    We previously developed a transgenic tomato that expresses the miraculin gene using a constitutive promoter. In this study, we profiled the developmental and spatial accumulation of the miraculin protein and mRNA in transgenic tomato fruits. Miraculin mRNA expression was almost constant up to orange stage, and then the expression increased at red stage. The miraculin protein accumulated gradually during fruit development and reached its highest level at the overripe stage. At the red stage of fruit, miraculin protein was accumulated at the highest level in the exocarp, and similar in other fruit tissues: mesocarp, dissepiment, upper placenta, lower placenta and jelly. Moreover, the pattern of miraculin accumulation in fruit tissues was the same regardless of genetic background and position at which the miraculin gene was inserted in the genome. We also discuss suitable tomato types expressing miraculin for their commercial use. PMID:20014854

  11. Expression of active hBMP2 in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Suo, Guangli; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Jingyu; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Xia; He, Zhengquan; Dai, Jianwu

    2006-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is important for bone tissue repair. The goal of this research is to construct a high level human BMP2 (hBMP2) expression system using transgenic tobacco plants as a bioreactor. Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) enhancer, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) enhancer, matrix attachment regions (MARs) sequence, and "Kozak" sequence were used to construct recombinant expression vectors and the high-expression vectors were screened out through GUS-fusions assay. The promoter is the most important factor; double-CaMV 35S promoter is more effective than single promoter. The AMV or TMV enhancer is able to promote the foreign protein expression. After four-step purification, the activated hBMP2 (0.02% total soluble protein) was obtained. Our results suggested that the transgenic tobacco has great potential to be used as a bioreactor to produce hBMP2. PMID:16819603

  12. Transgenic LacZ under control of Hec-6st regulatory sequences recapitulates endogenous gene expression on high endothelial venules

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shan; Bentley, Kevin; Lebrun, Marielle; Lesslauer, Werner; Ruddle, Frank H.; Ruddle, Nancy H.

    2007-01-01

    Hec-6st is a highly specific high endothelial venule (HEV) gene that is crucial for regulating lymphocyte homing to lymph nodes (LN). The enzyme is also expressed in HEV-like vessels in tertiary lymphoid organs that form in chronic inflammation in autoimmunity, graft rejection, and microbial infection. Understanding the molecular nature of Hec-6st regulation is crucial for elucidating its function in development and disease. However, studies of HEV are limited because of the difficulties in isolating and maintaining the unique characteristics of these vessels in vitro. The novel pClasper yeast homologous recombination technique was used to isolate from a BAC clone a 60-kb DNA fragment that included the Hec-6st (Chst4) gene with flanking sequences. Transgenic mice were generated with the β-galactosidase (LacZ) reporter gene inserted in-frame in the exon II of Hec-6st within the isolated BAC DNA fragment. LacZ was expressed specifically on HEV in LN, as indicated by its colocalization with peripheral node vascular addressin. LacZ was increased in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue during development and was reduced in LN and nasal-associated lymphoid tissue by LTβR-Ig (lymphotoxin-β receptor human Ig fusion protein) treatment in a manner identical to the endogenous gene. The transgene was expressed at high levels in lymphoid accumulations with characteristics of tertiary lymphoid organs in the salivary glands of aged mice. Thus, the Hec-6s-LacZ construct faithfully reproduces Hec-6st tissue-specific expression and can be used in further studies to drive expression of reporter or effector genes, which could visualize or inhibit HEV in autoimmunity. PMID:17360566

  13. Regulation of expression of a sheep metallothionein 1a-sheep growth hormone fusion gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, C M; Rigby, N W; Murray, J D; Marshall, J T; Townrow, C A; Nancarrow, C D; Ward, K A

    1989-01-01

    Transgenic mice containing a sheep metallothionein 1a-sheep growth hormone fusion gene exhibited low, tissue-specific basal levels of transgene mRNA expression, resulting in slightly elevated levels of circulating growth hormone that did not lead to a detectable increase in growth. After zinc stimulation, high levels of transgene mRNA expression were induced in a number of tissues; these levels correlated with increased levels of circulating growth hormone, resulting in growth increases of up to 1.5 times the levels of controls and unstimulated transgenic mice. After removal of the zinc stimulus, transgene expression and circulating growth hormone concentrations returned to basal levels. Additional evidence from the pattern of developmental expression of the transgene suggests that zinc is the main regulator of this promoter in mice. The demonstrated regulation and low basal level of expression of the sheep metallothionein 1a promoter make it a candidate for use in other mouse transgenic studies and for use in transgenic livestock, in which regulation of expression is essential. Images PMID:2479830

  14. Microdissection of the gene expression codes driving nephrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W; Patterson, Larry T

    2010-01-01

    The kidney represents an excellent model system for learning the principles of organogenesis. It is intermediate in complexity, and employs many commonly used developmental processes. As such, kidney development has been the subject of intensive study, using a variety of techniques, including in situ hybridization, organ culture and gene targeting, revealing many critical genes and pathways. Nevertheless, proper organogenesis requires precise patterns of cell type specific differential gene expression, involving very large numbers of genes. This review is focused on the use of global profiling technologies to create an atlas of gene expression codes driving development of different mammalian kidney compartments. Such an atlas allows one to select a gene of interest, and to determine its expression level in each element of the developing kidney, or to select a structure of interest, such as the renal vesicle, and to examine its complete gene expression state. Novel component specific molecular markers are identified, and the changing waves of gene expression that drive nephrogenesis are defined. As the tools continue to improve for the purification of specific cell types and expression profiling of even individual cells it is possible to predict an atlas of gene expression during kidney development that extends to single cell resolution. PMID:21220959

  15. Microdissection of the gene expression codes driving nephrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W; Patterson, Larry T

    2010-01-01

    The kidney represents an excellent model system for learning the principles of organogenesis. It is intermediate in complexity, and employs many commonly used developmental processes. As such, kidney development has been the subject of intensive study, using a variety of techniques, including in situ hybridization, organ culture and gene targeting, revealing many critical genes and pathways. Nevertheless, proper organogenesis requires precise patterns of cell type specific differential gene expression, involving very large numbers of genes. This review is focused on the use of global profiling technologies to create an atlas of gene expression codes driving development of different mammalian kidney compartments. Such an atlas allows one to select a gene of interest, and to determine its expression level in each element of the developing kidney, or to select a structure of interest, such as the renal vesicle, and to examine its complete gene expression state. Novel component specific molecular markers are identified, and the changing waves of gene expression that drive nephrogenesis are defined. As the tools continue to improve for the purification of specific cell types and expression profiling of even individual cells it is possible to predict an atlas of gene expression during kidney development that extends to single cell resolution. PMID:21220959

  16. Optogenetic in vivo cell manipulation in KillerRed-expressing zebrafish transgenics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background KillerRed (KR) is a novel photosensitizer that efficiently generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in KR-expressing cells upon intense green or white light illumination in vitro, resulting in damage to their plasma membrane and cell death. Results We report an in vivo modification of this technique using a fluorescent microscope and membrane-tagged KR (mem-KR)-expressing transgenic zebrafish. We generated several stable zebrafish Tol2 transposon-mediated enhancer-trap (ET) transgenic lines expressing mem-KR (SqKR series), and mapped the transposon insertion sites. As mem-KR accumulates on the cell membrane and/or Golgi, it highlights cell bodies and extensions, and reveals details of cellular morphology. The photodynamic property of KR made it possible to damage cells expressing this protein in a dose-dependent manner. As a proof-of-principle, two zebrafish transgenic lines were used to affect cell viability and function: SqKR2 expresses mem-KR in the hindbrain rhombomeres 3 and 5, and elsewhere; SqKR15 expresses mem-KR in the heart and elsewhere. Photobleaching of KR by intense light in the heart of SqKR15 embryos at lower levels caused a reduction in pumping efficiency of the heart and pericardial edema and at higher levels - in cell death in the hindbrain of SqKR2 and in the heart of SqKR15 embryos. Conclusions An intense illumination of tissues expressing mem-KR affects cell viability and function in living zebrafish embryos. Hence, the zebrafish transgenics expressing mem-KR in a tissue-specific manner are useful tools for studying the biological effects of ROS. PMID:21040591

  17. Expression and Purification of Recombinant Mouse Interleukin-4 and -6 from Transgenic Rice Seeds.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Yang, Lijun; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sekikawa, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic rice seed can be utilized as a bioreactor to produce high-value recombinant proteins. Mouse interleukin 4 (mIL-4) and mIL-6 were specifically expressed as secretory proteins in rice endosperm by ligating the N-terminal glutelin B-1 (GluB-1) signal peptide and the C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal under control of the endosperm-specific GluB-1 promoter. In the transgenic rice seed, mIL-4 and mIL-6 accumulated in levels up to 0.43 mg/g grain and 0.16 mg/g grain, respectively. The reducing agents and detergents required for extraction from the transgenic rice seeds differed between the two proteins, indicating differences in their intracellular localization within the endosperm cell. Purified mIL-4 and mIL-6 exhibited high activity and very low endotoxin contamination. PMID:26876890

  18. Creation of transgenic Brassica napus L. plants expressing human alpha 2b interferon gene.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, L O; Kvasko, O Y; Olevinska, Z M; Spivak, M Y; Kuchuk, M V

    2012-01-01

    Spring rapeseed transgenic lines expressing human interferon alpha 2b were created by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of aseptic plant leaf explants. The maximum antiviral activity of the leaf extracts reached 4500 IU/g fresh weight. It was determined that the antioxidant activity and the activity of an enzyme of plant antioxidant system--superoxide dismutase (SOD)--in the leaf tissues of transgenic plants increased compared to controls. There were no correlations between the interferon and antioxidant activities, as well as between SOD and interferon activities. Using the obtained transgenic rapeseed plants with high interferon and antioxidant activities as a feed additive for animals might have preventive effect on their body, increasing resistance to infections of various origins. PMID:23285745

  19. Transgenic mice expressing human glucocerebrosidase variants: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Angela; Hemmelgarn, Harmony; Melrose, Heather L; Hein, Leanne; Fuller, Maria; Clarke, Lorne A

    2013-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessively inherited storage disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, acid β-glucosidase. The disease manifestations seen in Gaucher patients are highly heterogeneous as is the responsiveness to therapy. The elucidation of the precise factors responsible for this heterogeneity has been challenging as the development of clinically relevant animal models of Gaucher disease has been problematic. Although numerous murine models for Gaucher disease have been described each has limitations in their specific utility. We describe here, transgenic murine models of Gaucher disease that will be particularly useful for the study of pharmacological chaperones. We have produced stable transgenic mouse strains that individually express wild type, N370S and L444P containing human acid β-glucosidase and show that each of these transgenic lines rescues the lethal phenotype characteristic of acid β-glucosidase null mice. Both the N370S and L444P transgenic models show early and progressive elevations of tissue sphingolipids with L444P mice developing progressive splenic Gaucher cell infiltration. We demonstrate the potential utility of these new transgenic models for the study of Gaucher disease pathogenesis. In addition, since these mice produce only human enzyme, they are particularly relevant for the study of pharmacological chaperones that are specifically targeted to human acid β-glucosidase and the common mutations underlying Gaucher disease. PMID:23642305

  20. Sustained high level transgene expression in mammalian cells mediated by the optimized piggyBac transposon system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Cui, Jing; Yan, Zhengjian; Zhang, Hongmei; Chen, Xian; Wang, Ning; Shah, Palak; Deng, Fang; Zhao, Chen; Geng, Nisha; Li, Melissa; Denduluri, Sahitya K.; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; Reid, Russell R.; He, Tong-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Sustained, high level transgene expression in mammalian cells, especially stem cells, may be desired in many cases for studying gene functions. Traditionally, stable transgene expression has been accomplished by using retroviral or lentiviral vectors. However, such viral vector-mediated transgene expression is often at low levels and can be reduced over time due to low copy numbers and/or chromatin remodeling repression. The piggyBac transposon has emerged as a promising non-viral vector system for efficient gene transfer into mammalian cells. Despite its inherent advantages over lentiviral and retroviral systems, piggyBac system has not been widely used, at least in part due to the limited availability of piggyBac vectors with manipulation flexibilities. Here, we seek to optimize piggyBac-mediated transgene expression and generate a more efficient, user-friendly piggyBac system. By engineering a panel of versatile piggyBac vectors and constructing recombinant adenoviruses expressing piggyBac transposase (PBase), we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated PBase expression significantly enhances the integration efficiency and expression level of transgenes in mesenchymal stem cells and osteosarcoma cells, compared to that obtained from co-transfection of the CMV-PBase plasmid. We further determine the drug selection timeline to achieve optimal stable transgene expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the transgene copy number of piggyBac-mediated integration is approximately 10 times higher than that mediated by retroviral vectors. Using the engineered tandem expression vector, we show that three transgenes can be simultaneously expressed in a single vector with high efficiency. Thus, these results strongly suggest that the optimized piggyBac system is a valuable tool for making stable cell lines with sustained, high transgene expression. PMID:25815368

  1. Muscle-specific transgenic expression of porcine myostatin propeptide enhances muscle growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiyun; Li, Zicong; Li, Yang; Zeng, Jinyong; He, Chang; Yang, Jinzeng; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-10-01

    Myostatin is a well-known negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Inhibition of myostatin activity results in increased muscle mass. Myostatin propeptide, as a myostatin antagonist, could be applied to promote meat production in livestock such as pigs. In this study, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing porcine myostatin propeptide under the control of muscle-specific regulatory elements. The mean body weight of transgenic mice from a line expressing the highest level of porcine myostatin propeptide was increased by 5.4 % (P = 0.023) and 3.2 % (P = 0.031) in males and females, respectively, at 8 weeks of age. Weight of carcass, fore limb and hind limb was respectively increased by 6.0 % (P = 0.038), 9.0 % (P = 0.014), 8.7 % (P = 0.036) in transgenic male mice, compared to wild-type male controls at the age of 9 weeks. Similarly, carcass, fore limb and hind limb of transgenic female mice was 11.4 % (P = 0.002), 14.5 % (P = 0.006) and 14.5 % (P = 0.03) respectively heavier than that of wild-type female mice. The mean cross-section area of muscle fiber was increased by 17 % (P = 0.002) in transgenic mice, in comparison with wild-type controls. These results demonstrated that porcine myostatin propeptide is effective in enhancement of muscle growth. The present study provided useful information for future study on generation of transgenic pigs overexpressing porcine myostatin propeptide for improvement of muscle mass. PMID:23543410

  2. A comparison of constitutive promoters for expression of transgenes in alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed

    Samac, Deborah A; Tesfaye, Mesfin; Dornbusch, Melinda; Saruul, Purev; Temple, Stephen J

    2004-08-01

    The activity of constitutive promoters was compared in transgenic alfalfa plants using two marker genes. Three promoters, the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), the cassava vein mosaic virus (CsVMV) promoter, and the sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus (ScBV) promoter were each fused to the beta-glucuronidase (gusA) gene. The highest GUS enzyme activity was obtained using the CsVMV promoter and all alfalfa cells assayed by in situ staining had high levels of enzyme activity. The 35S promoter was expressed in leaves, roots, and stems at moderate levels, but the promoter was not active in stem pith cells, root cortical cells, or in the symbiotic zones of nodules. The ScBV promoter was active primarily in vascular tissues throughout the plant. In leaves, GUS activity driven by the CsVMV promoter was approximately 24-fold greater than the activity from the 35S promoter and 38-fold greater than the activity from the ScBV promoter. Five promoters, the double 35S promoter, figwort mosaic virus (FMV) promoter, CsVMV promoter, ScBV promoter, and alfalfa small subunit Rubisco (RbcS) promoter were used to control expression of a cDNA from Trichoderma atroviride encoding an endochitinase (ech42). Highest chitinase activity in leaves, roots, and root nodules was obtained in plants containing the CsVMV:ech42 transgene. Plants expressing the endochitinase were challenged with Phoma medicaginis var. medicaginis, the causal agent of spring black stem and leaf spot of alfalfa. Although endochitinase activity in leaves of transgenic plants was 50- to 2650-fold greater than activity in control plants, none of the transgenic plants showed a consistent increase in disease resistance compared to controls. The high constitutive levels of both GUS and endochitinase activity obtained demonstrate that the CsVMV promoter is useful for high-level transgene expression in alfalfa. PMID:15517994

  3. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing a barley UDP-glucosyltransferase exhibit resistance to the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sanghyun; Torres-Acosta, Juan Antonio; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of small grain cereal crops. FHB causes yield reductions and contamination of grain with trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). DON inhibits protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells and acts as a virulence factor during fungal pathogenesis, therefore resistance to DON is considered an important component of resistance against FHB. One mechanism of resistance to DON is conversion of DON to DON-3-O-glucoside (D3G). Previous studies showed that expression of the UDP-glucosyltransferase genes HvUGT13248 from barley and AtUGt73C5 (DOGT1) from Arabidopsis thaliana conferred DON resistance to yeast. Over-expression of AtUGt73C5 in Arabidopsis led to increased DON resistance of seedlings but also to dwarfing of transgenic plants due to the formation of brassinosteroid-glucosides. The objectives of this study were to develop transgenic Arabidopsis expressing HvUGT13248, to test for phenotypic changes in growth habit, and the response to DON. Transgenic lines that constitutively expressed the epitope-tagged HvUGT13248 protein exhibited increased resistance to DON in a seed germination assay and converted DON to D3G to a higher extent than the untransformed wild-type. By contrast to the over-expression of DOGT1 in Arabidopsis, which conjugated the brassinosteriod castasterone with a glucoside group resulting in a dwarf phenotype, expression of the barley HvUGT13248 gene did not lead to drastic morphological changes. Consistent with this observation, no castasterone-glucoside formation was detectable in yeast expressing the barley HvUGT13248 gene. This barley UGT is therefore a promising candidate for transgenic approaches aiming to increase DON and Fusarium resistance of crop plants without undesired collateral effects. PMID:22922639

  4. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  5. Expression of Growth Hormone Genes in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Palmiter, Richard D.; Hammer, Robert E.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2016-01-01

    OVERVIEW Human or rat growth hormone (GH) genes have been introduced into all cells of a mouse by microinjection of fertilized eggs but they were not expressed under their own promoters. However, substitution of a mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter allowed expression and regulation comparable to that of the endogenous MT genes. These fusion genes have been used to stimulate the growth of both normal mice and dwarf mice that lack sufficient GH. Substitution of a rat elastase-I promoter directed expression of GH exclusively to the acinar cells of the pancreas. Progress has been made towards developing the hGH gene into a vector that is not expressed in vivo unless an enhancer element is inserted. Recombination between overlapping DNA fragments derived from a MThGH gene, each of which is nonfunctional, has been observed when they are coinjected into mouse eggs. In some cases, functional hGH was produced as evidenced by enhanced growth of the mice.

  6. Generation of transgenic mice with liver-specific expression of human nuclear receptor nr5a2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shui-Liang; Yang, Hua; Xie, You-Hua; Wang, Yuan; Li, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhu-Gang; Fu, Ji-Liang

    2005-12-01

    Human nuclear receptor hb1 f(nr5a2) was cloned and characterized as a novel member of the Ftz-F1 (nr5a) nuclear receptor subfamily,whose its biological function remained largely unidentified. The aim of this study was to establish transgenic mouse model that specifically expressed hB1F in the liver to faciliate the functional study of hB1F. hb1f cDNA was placed downstream of mouse albumin gene enhancer/promoter to construct a liver-specific hb1f expression vector. Transgene fragments were microinjected into fertilized eggs of mice. The manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudopregnant female mice. Four offspring were identified as carrying the transgenes by PCR,from which one was also verified by Southern blotting. RT-PCR and Western blotting results showed that the transgene was expressed in the liver of the transgenic mice. Transgenic founder mice were used to establish transgenic mouse lineages. The F1 mice were identified by PCR analysis. Genetic analysis of the transgenic mice demonstrated that the transgene had been integrated into the chromosome at a single site and could be stably transmitted. PMID:16459652

  7. Expression of a calpastatin transgene slows muscle wasting and obviates changes in myosin isoform expression during murine muscle disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, James G.; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Muscle wasting is a prominent feature of several systemic diseases, neurological damage and muscle disuse. The contribution of calpain proteases to muscle wasting in any instance of muscle injury or disease has remained unknown because of the inability to specifically perturb calpain activity in vivo. We have generated a transgenic mouse with muscle-specific overexpression of calpastatin, which is the endogenous inhibitor of calpains, and induced muscle atrophy by unloading hindlimb musculature for 10 days. Expression of the transgene resulted in increases in calpastatin concentration in muscle by 30- to 50-fold, and eliminated all calpain activity that was detectable on zymograms. Muscle fibres in ambulatory, transgenic mice were smaller in diameter, but more numerous, so that muscle mass did not differ between transgenic and non-transgenic mice. This is consistent with the role of the calpain-calpastatin system in muscle cell fusion that has been observed in vitro. Overexpression of calpastatin reduced muscle atrophy by 30 % during the 10 day unloading period. In addition, calpastatin overexpression completely prevented the shift in myofibrillar myosin content from slow to fast isoforms, which normally occurs in muscle unloading. These findings indicate that therapeutics directed toward regulating the calpain-calpastatin system may be beneficial in preventing muscle mass loss in muscle injury and disease.

  8. Expression of kenaf mitochondrial chimeric genes HM184 causes male sterility in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanhong; Liao, Xiaofang; Huang, Zhipeng; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Bujin; Liu, Dongmei; Kong, Xiangjun; Zhou, Ruiyang

    2015-08-01

    Chimeric genes resulting from the rearrangement of a mitochondrial genome were generally thought to be a causal factor in the occurrence of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). In the study, earlier we reported that identifying a 47 bp deletion at 3'- flanking of atp9 that was linked to male sterile cytoplasm in kenaf. The truncated fragment was fused with atp9, a mitochondrial transit signal (MTS) and/or GFP, comprised two chimeric genes MTS-HM184-GFP and MTS-HM184. The plant expression vector pBI121 containing chimeric genes were then introduced to tobacco plants by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA transformation. The result showed that certain transgenic plants were male sterility or semi-sterility, while some were not. The expression analysis further demonstrated that higher level of expression were showed in the sterility plants, while no expression or less expression in fertility plants, the levels of expression of semi-sterility were in between. And the sterile plant (containing MTS-HM184-GFP) had abnormal anther produced malformed/shriveled pollen grains stained negative that failed to germinate (0%), the corresponding fruits was shrunken, the semi-sterile plants having normal anther shape produced about 10-50% normal pollen grains, the corresponding fruits were not full, and the germination rate was 58%. Meanwhile these transgenic plants which altered on fertility were further analyzed in phenotype. As a result, the metamorphosis leaves were observed in the seedling stage, the plant height of transgenic plants was shorter than wild type. The growth duration of transgenic tobacco was delayed 30-45 days compared to the wild type. The copy numbers of target genes of transgenic tobacco were analyzed using the real-time quantitative method. The results showed that these transgenic plants targeting-expression in mitochondrial containing MTS-HM184-GFP had 1 copy and 2 copies, the other two plants containing MTS-HM184 both had 3 copies, but 0 copy in wild type. In

  9. Transgenic strategies for combinatorial expression of fluorescent proteins in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Livet, Jean; Weissman, Tamily A; Kang, Hyuno; Draft, Ryan W; Lu, Ju; Bennis, Robyn A; Sanes, Joshua R; Lichtman, Jeff W

    2007-11-01

    Detailed analysis of neuronal network architecture requires the development of new methods. Here we present strategies to visualize synaptic circuits by genetically labelling neurons with multiple, distinct colours. In Brainbow transgenes, Cre/lox recombination is used to create a stochastic choice of expression between three or more fluorescent proteins (XFPs). Integration of tandem Brainbow copies in transgenic mice yielded combinatorial XFP expression, and thus many colours, thereby providing a way to distinguish adjacent neurons and visualize other cellular interactions. As a demonstration, we reconstructed hundreds of neighbouring axons and multiple synaptic contacts in one small volume of a cerebellar lobe exhibiting approximately 90 colours. The expression in some lines also allowed us to map glial territories and follow glial cells and neurons over time in vivo. The ability of the Brainbow system to label uniquely many individual cells within a population may facilitate the analysis of neuronal circuitry on a large scale. PMID:17972876

  10. Expression of the human growth hormone variant gene in cultured fibroblasts and transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.F.; Wagner, T.E.; Blethen, S.; Yun, J.S.; Rowe, M.E.; Goodman, H.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone variant gene, one of the five members of the growth hormone gene family, predicts that it encodes a growth hormone-like protein. As a first step in determining whether this gene is functional in humans, the authors have expressed a mouse methallothionein I/human growth hormone variant fusion gene in mouse L cells and in transgenic mice. The growth hormone variant protein expressed in transiently transfected L cells is distinct from growth hormone itself with respect to reactivity with anti-growth hormone monoclonal antibodies, behavior during column chromatography, and isoelectric point. Transgenic mice expressing the growth hormone variant protein are 1.4- to 1.9-fold larger than nontransgenic controls, suggesting that the protein has growth-promoting properties.

  11. Functional expression of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin, in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Cui, Min-Long; Ma, Biao; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-23

    Taste-modifying proteins are a natural alternative to artificial sweeteners and flavor enhancers and have been used in some cultures for centuries. The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of being able to modify a sour taste into a sweet taste. Here, we report the use of a plant expression system for the production of miraculin. A synthetic gene encoding miraculin was placed under the control of constitutive promoters and transferred to lettuce. Expression of this gene in transgenic lettuce resulted in the accumulation of significant amounts of miraculin protein in the leaves. The miraculin expressed in transgenic lettuce possessed sweetness-inducing activity. These results demonstrate that the production of miraculin in edible plants can be a good alternative strategy to enhance the availability of this protein. PMID:16406368

  12. Expression and Cellular Immunogenicity of a Transgenic Antigen Driven by Endogenous Poxviral Early Promoters at Their Authentic Loci in MVA

    PubMed Central

    Orubu, Toritse; Alharbi, Naif Khalaf; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Cottingham, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses to vaccinia virus are directed almost exclusively against early gene products. The attenuated strain modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is under evaluation in clinical trials of new vaccines designed to elicit cellular immune responses against pathogens including Plasmodium spp., M. tuberculosis and HIV-1. All of these recombinant MVAs (rMVA) utilize the well-established method of linking the gene of interest to a cloned poxviral promoter prior to insertion into the viral genome at a suitable locus by homologous recombination in infected cells. Using BAC recombineering, we show that potent early promoters that drive expression of non-functional or non-essential MVA open reading frames (ORFs) can be harnessed for immunogenic expression of recombinant antigen. Precise replacement of the MVA orthologs of C11R, F11L, A44L and B8R with a model antigen positioned to use the same translation initiation codon allowed early transgene expression similar to or slightly greater than that achieved by the commonly-used p7.5 or short synthetic promoters. The frequency of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced in mice by single shot or adenovirus-prime, rMVA-boost vaccination were similarly equal or marginally enhanced using endogenous promoters at their authentic genomic loci compared to the traditional constructs. The enhancement in immunogenicity observed using the C11R or F11L promoters compared with p7.5 was similar to that obtained with the mH5 promoter compared with p7.5. Furthermore, the growth rates of the viruses were unimpaired and the insertions were genetically stable. Insertion of a transgenic ORF in place of a viral ORF by BAC recombineering can thus provide not only a potent promoter, but also, concomitantly, a suitable insertion site, potentially facilitating development of MVA vaccines expressing multiple recombinant antigens. PMID:22761956

  13. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment. PMID:25432082

  14. Expression of a Cystatin Transgene in Eggplant Provides Resistance to Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Papolu, Pradeep K; Dutta, Tushar K; Tyagi, Nidhi; Urwin, Peter E; Lilley, Catherine J; Rao, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) cause substantial yield decline in eggplant and sustainable management options to minimize crop damage due to nematodes are still limited. A number of genetic engineering strategies have been developed to disrupt the successful plant-nematode interactions. Among them, delivery of proteinase inhibitors from the plant to perturb nematode development and reproduction is arguably the most effective strategy. In the present study, transgenic eggplant expressing a modified rice cystatin (OC-IΔD86) gene under the control of the root-specific promoter, TUB-1, was generated to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. Five putative transformants were selected through PCR and genomic Southern blot analysis. Expression of the cystatin transgene was confirmed in all the events using western blotting, ELISA and qPCR assay. Upon challenge inoculation, all the transgenic events exhibited a detrimental effect on RKN development and reproduction. The best transgenic line (a single copy event) showed 78.3% inhibition in reproductive success of RKN. Our results suggest that cystatins can play an important role for improving nematode resistance in eggplant and their deployment in gene pyramiding strategies with other proteinase inhibitors could ultimately enhance crop yield. PMID:27516765

  15. Does pea lectin expressed transgenically in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) influence honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae?

    PubMed

    Lehrman, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is important both for pollination and for honey production. Pollen is the major protein source for bees, which exposes them directly to changes in pollen quality e.g. through genetic engineering. In order to create a worst case scenario regarding pea lectin (PSL) expressed transgenically in oilseed rape anthers and pollen, the maximum amount of dried pollen that could be mixed in an artificial diet without negatively affecting larval performance (1.5% w/w) was fed to bee larvae. Pollen from two transgenic plant lines expressing PSL up to 1.2% of total soluble protein and pollen from one non-transgenic line was added to the same diet and used as a pollen control. When these three pollen diets and the control diet (without added pollen) were compared, no negative effect from the pollen of the transgenic plants could be detected on larval mortality, weight, or development time. An increased weight and a reduced developmental time were recorded for larvae on all diets containing pollen when compared to the diet without pollen. PMID:18289502

  16. High levan accumulation in transgenic tobacco plants expressing the Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus levansucrase gene.

    PubMed

    Banguela, Alexander; Arrieta, Juan G; Rodríguez, Raisa; Trujillo, Luis E; Menéndez, Carmen; Hernández, Lázaro

    2011-06-10

    Bacterial levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) converts sucrose into non-linear levan consisting of long β(2,6)-linked fructosyl chains with β(2,1) branches. Bacterial levan has wide food and non-food applications, but its production in industrial reactors is costly and low yielding. Here, we report the constitutive expression of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus levansucrase (LsdA) fused to the vacuolar targeting pre-pro-peptide of onion sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST) in tobacco, a crop that does not naturally produce fructans. In the transgenic plants, levan with degree of polymerization above 10(4) fructosyl units was detected in leaves, stem, root, and flowers, but not in seeds. High levan accumulation in leaves led to gradual phenotypic alterations that increased with plant age through the flowering stage. In the transgenic lines, the fructan content in mature leaves varied from 10 to 70% of total dry weight. No oligofructans were stored in the plant organs, although the in vitro reaction of transgenic LsdA with sucrose yielded β(2,1)-linked FOS and levan. Transgenic lines with levan representing up to 30mgg(-1) of fresh leaf weight produced viable seeds and the polymer accumulation remained stable in the tested T1 and T2 progenies. The lsdA-expressing tobacco represents an alternative source of highly polymerized levan. PMID:21540065

  17. High-Toughness Silk Produced by a Transgenic Silkworm Expressing Spider (Araneus ventricosus) Dragline Silk Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kuwana, Yoshihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Tamada, Yasushi; Kojima, Katsura

    2014-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a natural fiber that has excellent tensile properties; however, it is difficult to produce artificially as a long, strong fiber. Here, the spider (Araneus ventricosus) dragline protein gene was cloned and a transgenic silkworm was generated, that expressed the fusion protein of the fibroin heavy chain and spider dragline protein in cocoon silk. The spider silk protein content ranged from 0.37 to 0.61% w/w (1.4–2.4 mol%) native silkworm fibroin. Using a good silk-producing strain, C515, as the transgenic silkworm can make the raw silk from its cocoons for the first time. The tensile characteristics (toughness) of the raw silk improved by 53% after the introduction of spider dragline silk protein; the improvement depended on the quantity of the expressed spider dragline protein. To demonstrate the commercial feasibility for machine reeling, weaving, and sewing, we used the transgenic spider silk to weave a vest and scarf; this was the first application of spider silk fibers from transgenic silkworms. PMID:25162624

  18. Pathogenesis of axonal dystrophy and demyelination in αA-crystallin-expressing transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Rijk, AF; Sweers, MAM; Merkx, GFM; Lammens, M; Bloemendal, H

    2003-01-01

    We recently described a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing hamster αA-crystallin, a small heat shock protein, under direction of the hamster vimentin promoter. As a result myelin was degraded and axonal dystrophy in both central nervous system (especially spinal cord) and peripheral nervous system occurred. Homozygous transgenic mice developed hind limb paralysis after 8 weeks of age and displayed progressive loss of myelin and axonal dystrophy in both the central and peripheral nervous system with ongoing age. Pathologically the phenotype resembled, to a certain extent, neuroaxonal dystrophy. The biochemical findings presented in this paper (activity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and transglutamase, myelin protein zero expression levels and blood sugar levels) confirm this pathology and exclude other putative pathologies like Amyothrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy. Consequently, an excessive cytoplasmic accumulation of the transgenic protein or a disturbance of the normal metabolism are considered to cause the observed neuropathology. Therefore, extra-ocular αA-crystallin-expressing transgenic mice may serve as a useful animal model to study neuroaxonal dystrophy. PMID:12801283

  19. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  20. Expression of a Cystatin Transgene in Eggplant Provides Resistance to Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Papolu, Pradeep K.; Dutta, Tushar K.; Tyagi, Nidhi; Urwin, Peter E.; Lilley, Catherine J.; Rao, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) cause substantial yield decline in eggplant and sustainable management options to minimize crop damage due to nematodes are still limited. A number of genetic engineering strategies have been developed to disrupt the successful plant–nematode interactions. Among them, delivery of proteinase inhibitors from the plant to perturb nematode development and reproduction is arguably the most effective strategy. In the present study, transgenic eggplant expressing a modified rice cystatin (OC-IΔD86) gene under the control of the root-specific promoter, TUB-1, was generated to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. Five putative transformants were selected through PCR and genomic Southern blot analysis. Expression of the cystatin transgene was confirmed in all the events using western blotting, ELISA and qPCR assay. Upon challenge inoculation, all the transgenic events exhibited a detrimental effect on RKN development and reproduction. The best transgenic line (a single copy event) showed 78.3% inhibition in reproductive success of RKN. Our results suggest that cystatins can play an important role for improving nematode resistance in eggplant and their deployment in gene pyramiding strategies with other proteinase inhibitors could ultimately enhance crop yield. PMID:27516765

  1. Dipel-selected Ostrinia nubilalis larvae are not resistant to transgenic corn expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The survival of KS-SC DipelTM-resistant and -susceptible European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner, was evaluated on different tissues from corn hybrids, including a non-transgenic and two transgenic corn plants (events MON810 and Bt11) expressing high doses of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) delta...

  2. Short-lived recombinant adeno-associated virus transgene expression in dystrophic muscle is associated with oxidative damage to transgene mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Tournaire, Benoit; Georger, Christophe; Marolleau, Béatrice; Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Ledevin, Mireille; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Lecomte, Emilie; Cogné, Benjamin; Dubreil, Laurence; Larcher, Thibaut; Gjata, Bernard; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Le Guiner, Caroline; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Snyder, Richard O; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical gene therapy strategies using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have shown dramatic phenotype improvements, but long-lasting efficacy remains questionable. It is believed that in dystrophic muscles, transgene persistence is hampered, notably by the progressive loss of therapeutic vector genomes resulting from muscle fibers degeneration. Intracellular metabolic perturbations resulting from dystrophin deficiency could also be additional factors impacting on rAAV genomes and transgene mRNA molecular fate. In this study, we showed that rAAV genome loss is not the only cause of reduced transgene mRNA level and we assessed the contribution of transcriptional and post-transcriptional factors. We ruled out the implication of transgene silencing by epigenetic mechanisms and demonstrated that rAAV inhibition occurred mostly at the post-transcriptional level. Since Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) physiopathology involves an elevated oxidative stress, we hypothesized that in dystrophic muscles, transgene mRNA could be damaged by oxidative stress. In the mouse and dog dystrophic models, we found that rAAV-derived mRNA oxidation was increased. Interestingly, when a high expression level of a therapeutic transgene is achieved, oxidation is less pronounced. These findings provide new insights into rAAV transductions in dystrophic muscles, which ultimately may help in the design of more effective clinical trials. PMID:26029721

  3. Microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in melatonin-rich transgenic rice expressing a sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Young Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2013-11-01

    Transgenic rice plants overexpressing a sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase led to an enhanced production of melatonin with various physiological effects, including seminal root elongation and resistance against cold and oxidative stress, which raises the possibility that melatonin may alter gene expression profiles in the transgenic rice. Therefore, we performed a microarray analysis to investigate the regulatory role of melatonin using the melatonin-rich transgenic rice. We identified 260 and 204 genes that were up- or downregulated in the melatonin-rich transgenic rice when compared with the wild type. Of these, 20 upregulated genes were identified in the seedlings of melatonin-rich rice at more than twice the levels in the wild type (P < 0.05), while 23 downregulated genes were also detected. The representative upregulated genes included caleosin, a Ca(2+) -binding oil-body surface protein involved in the degradation of lipids stored in oil bodies and various signaling proteins such as a cyclin F-box protein and leucine-rich repeat protein. In contrast, jasmonate-induced protein, senescence-associated protein, and polygalacturonase were included in the downregulated gene group. These results suggest that melatonin has an important role in modulating a wide range of gene expression, reflecting its pleiotropic physiological roles in plant growth and development. PMID:23889160

  4. Efficient gene transfer and durable transgene expression in grafted rabbit veins.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; Clowes, Alexander W; Dichek, David A

    2015-01-01

    Venous bypass grafts are useful treatments for obstructive coronary artery disease. However, their usefulness is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Genetic engineering of venous bypass grafts that prevented atherosclerosis could improve long-term graft patency and clinical outcomes. We used a rabbit model of jugular vein-to-carotid interposition grafting to develop gene therapy for vein-graft atherosclerosis. Rabbit veins were easily transduced in situ with a first-generation adenoviral vector; however, most transgene expression (∼80%) was lost within 3 days after arterial grafting. This rapid loss of transgene expression was not prevented by transducing veins after grafting or by prolonged ex vivo transduction. However, delaying vein-graft transduction for 28 days (after the vein had adapted to the arterial circulation) prevented this early loss of transgene expression. We used the delayed transduction approach to test the durability of expression of a therapeutic transgene (apolipoprotein A-I) expressed from a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector. HDAd DNA and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA were easily detectable in transduced vein grafts. Vector DNA and mRNA declined by 4 weeks, and then persisted stably for at least 6 months. Delaying transduction for 28 days after grafting permitted initiation of vein-graft neointimal growth and medial thickening before gene transfer. However, vein-graft lumen diameter was not compromised, because of gradual outward remodeling of grafted veins. Our data highlight the promise of HDAd-mediated gene therapy, delivered to arterialized vein grafts, for preventing vein-graft atherosclerosis. PMID:25383597

  5. Efficient Gene Transfer and Durable Transgene Expression in Grafted Rabbit Veins

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; Clowes, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Venous bypass grafts are useful treatments for obstructive coronary artery disease. However, their usefulness is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Genetic engineering of venous bypass grafts that prevented atherosclerosis could improve long-term graft patency and clinical outcomes. We used a rabbit model of jugular vein-to-carotid interposition grafting to develop gene therapy for vein-graft atherosclerosis. Rabbit veins were easily transduced in situ with a first-generation adenoviral vector; however, most transgene expression (∼80%) was lost within 3 days after arterial grafting. This rapid loss of transgene expression was not prevented by transducing veins after grafting or by prolonged ex vivo transduction. However, delaying vein-graft transduction for 28 days (after the vein had adapted to the arterial circulation) prevented this early loss of transgene expression. We used the delayed transduction approach to test the durability of expression of a therapeutic transgene (apolipoprotein A-I) expressed from a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector. HDAd DNA and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA were easily detectable in transduced vein grafts. Vector DNA and mRNA declined by 4 weeks, and then persisted stably for at least 6 months. Delaying transduction for 28 days after grafting permitted initiation of vein-graft neointimal growth and medial thickening before gene transfer. However, vein-graft lumen diameter was not compromised, because of gradual outward remodeling of grafted veins. Our data highlight the promise of HDAd-mediated gene therapy, delivered to arterialized vein grafts, for preventing vein-graft atherosclerosis. PMID:25383597

  6. Resistance to geminivirus infection by virus-induced expression of dianthin in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Saunders, K; Hartley, M R; Stanley, J

    1996-06-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are naturally occurring plant toxins that exhibit antiviral activity against a diverse range of plant and animal viruses. Here, the action of dianthin, a potent RIP isolated from Dianthus caryophyllus, has been exploited to engineer resistance to a plant DNA virus, African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana. To achieve this, dianthin has been expressed from the ACMV virion-sense promoter that is transactivated by the product of viral gene AC2. This avoids the need for constitutive expression of the RIP, facilitating the regeneration of phenotypically normal plants, and ensures transgene expression is localized to virus-infected cells. When challenged with ACMV, transgenic plants produce atypical necrotic lesions on inoculated leaves, indicative of dianthin expression, viral DNA accumulation is significantly reduced in these tissues, and plants exhibit attenuated systemic symptoms from which they recover. This phenotype holds for isolates of ACMV but not for other geminiviruses, suggesting that AC2 homologues from the latter are unable to efficiently transactivate the ACMV promoter. PMID:8659104

  7. Controlling transgene expression in subcutaneous implants using a skin lotion containing the apple metabolite phloretin

    PubMed Central

    Gitzinger, Marc; Kemmer, Christian; El-Baba, Marie Daoud; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Adjustable control of therapeutic transgenes in engineered cell implants after transdermal and topical delivery of nontoxic trigger molecules would increase convenience, patient compliance, and elimination of hepatic first-pass effect in future therapies. Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E has evolved the flavonoid-triggered TtgR operon, which controls expression of a multisubstrate-specific efflux pump (TtgABC) to resist plant-derived defense metabolites in its rhizosphere habitat. Taking advantage of the TtgR operon, we have engineered a hybrid P. putida–mammalian genetic unit responsive to phloretin. This flavonoid is contained in apples, and, as such, or as dietary supplement, regularly consumed by humans. The engineered mammalian phloretin-adjustable control element (PEACE) enabled adjustable and reversible transgene expression in different mammalian cell lines and primary cells. Due to the short half-life of phloretin in culture, PEACE could also be used to program expression of difficult-to-produce protein therapeutics during standard bioreactor operation. When formulated in skin lotions and applied to the skin of mice harboring transgenic cell implants, phloretin was able to fine-tune target genes and adjust heterologous protein levels in the bloodstream of treated mice. PEACE-controlled target gene expression could foster advances in biopharmaceutical manufacturing as well as gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:19549857

  8. Biodegradation of atrazine in transgenic plants expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase (atzA) gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Samac, Deborah A; Shapir, Nir; Wackett, Lawrence P; Vance, Carroll P; Olszewski, Neil E; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2005-09-01

    Atrazine is one of the most widely used herbicides in the USA. Atrazine chlorohydrolase (AtzA), the first enzyme in a six-step pathway leading to the mineralization of atrazine in Gram-negative soil bacteria, catalyses the hydrolytic dechlorination and detoxification of atrazine to hydroxyatrazine. In this study, we investigated the potential use of transgenic plants expressing atzA to take up, dechlorinate and detoxify atrazine. Alfalfa, Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco were transformed with a modified bacterial atzA gene, p-atzA, under the control of the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. All transgenic plant species actively expressed p-atzA and grew over a wide range of atrazine concentrations. Thin layer chromatography analyses indicated that in planta expression of p-atzA resulted in the production of hydroxyatrazine. Hydroponically grown transgenic tobacco and alfalfa dechlorinated atrazine to hydroxyatrazine in leaves, stems and roots. Moreover, p-atzA was found to be useful as a conditional-positive selection system to isolate alfalfa and Arabidopsis transformants following Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Our work suggests that the in planta expression of p-atzA may be useful for the development of plants for the phytoremediation of atrazine-contaminated soils and soil water, and as a marker gene to select for the integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. PMID:17173634

  9. Transgene expression in Penaeus monodon cells: evaluation of recombinant baculoviral vectors with shrimp specific hybrid promoters.

    PubMed

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2016-08-01

    It has been realized that shrimp cell immortalization may not be accomplished without in vitro transformation by expressing immortalizing gene in cells. In this process, efficiency of transgene expression is confined to the ability of vectors to transmit gene of interests to the genome. Over the years, unavailability of such vectors has been hampering application of such a strategy in shrimp cells. We report the use of recombinant baculovirus mediated transduction using hybrid promoter system for transgene expression in lymphoid cells of Penaeus monodon. Two recombinant baculovirus vectors with shrimp viral promoters (WSSV-Ie1 and IHHNV-P2) were constructed (BacIe1-GFP and BacP2-GFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) used as the transgene. The GFP expression in cells under the control of hybrid promoters, PH-Ie1 or PH-P2, were analyzed and confirmed in shrimp cells. The results indicate that the recombinant baculovirus with shrimp specific viral promoters (hybrid) can be employed for delivery of foreign genes to shrimp cells for in vitro transformation. PMID:25982944

  10. Expression of tobacco mosaic virus RNA in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, J; Yoshioka, M; Meshi, T; Okada, Y; Ohno, T

    1988-03-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a message-sense, single-stranded RNA virus that infects many Solanaceae plants. A full-length cDNA copy of TMV genomic RNA was constructed and introduced into the genomic DNA of tobacco plants using a disarmed Ti plasmid vector. Transformed plants showed typical symptoms of TMV infection, and their leaves contained infectious TMV particles. This is the first example of the expression of RNA virus genomic RNAs in plants. PMID:2835637

  11. Imaging Transgene Expression with Radionuclide Imaging Technologies1

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, SS; Herschman, HR; Cherry, SR; Barrio, JR; Satyamurthy, N; Toyokuni, T; Phelps, ME; Larson, SM; Balaton, J; Finn, R; Sadelain, M; Tjuvajev, J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract A variety of imaging technologies are being investigated as tools for studying gene expression in living subjects. Noninvasive, repetitive and quantitative imaging of gene expression will help both to facilitate human gene therapy trials and to allow for the study of animal models of molecular and cellular therapy. Radionuclide approaches using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are the most mature of the current imaging technologies and offer many advantages for imaging gene expression compared to optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based approaches. These advantages include relatively high sensitivity, full quantitative capability (for PET), and the ability to extend small animal assays directly into clinical human applications. We describe a PET scanner (micro PET) designed specifically for studies of small animals. We review “marker/reporter gene” imaging approaches using the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and the dopamine type 2 receptor (D2R) genes. We describe and contrast several radiolabeled probes that can be used with the HSV1-tk reporter gene both for SPECT and for PET imaging. We also describe the advantages/disadvantages of each of the assays developed and discuss future animal and human applications. PMID:10933072

  12. Screening pigs for xenotransplantation: expression of porcine endogenous retroviruses in transgenic pig skin.

    PubMed

    Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Strzalka-Mrozik, Barbara; Kimsa, Malgorzata W; Blecharz, Irena; Gola, Joanna; Skowronek, Bartlomiej; Janiszewski, Adrian; Lipinski, Daniel; Zeyland, Joanna; Szalata, Marlena; Slomski, Ryszard; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-06-01

    Pigs seem to be the answer to worldwide organ donor shortage. Porcine skin may also be applied as a dressing for severe burns. Genetic modifications of donor animals enable reduction of immune response, which prolongs xenograft survival as temporary biological dressing and allows achieving resistance against xenograft rejection. The risk posed by porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) cannot be eliminated by breeding animals under specific-pathogen-free conditions and so all recipients of porcine graft will be exposed to PERVs. Therefore our study has been focused on the assessment of PERV DNA and mRNA level in skin samples of transgenic pigs generated for xenotransplantation. Porcine skin fragments were obtained from 3- to 6-month-old non-transgenic and transgenic Polish Landrace pigs. Transgenic pigs were produced by pronuclear DNA microinjection and were developed to express the human α-galactosidase and the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase gene. The copy numbers of PERV DNA and RNA were evaluated using real-time Q-PCR and QRT-PCR. Comparative analysis of all PERV subtypes revealed that PERV-A is the main subtype of PERVs in analyzed skin samples. There was no significantly different copy number of PERV-A, PERV-B and PERV-C between non-transgenic pigs, pigs with the human α-galactosidase and pigs expressing the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase gene, except of PERV-C DNA. It brings the conclusion, that transgenesis process exerts no influence on PERVs transinfection. That is another step forward in the development of pig skin xenografts as burn wounds dressing. PMID:25812516

  13. Premature lethality, hyperactivity, and aberrant phosphorylation in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of Fyn

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Di; Götz, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The kinase Fyn, the microtubule-associated protein tau and the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ) constitute a toxic triad in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau's subcellular localization is mainly regulated by phosphorylation whereas Fyn's localization is dictated by palmitoylation targeting it to the plasma membrane in a reversible manner. We have previously shown that tau is required for Fyn to be targeted to the dendritic spine. We had also shown that a truncated form of tau (Δtau) that accumulates in the cell soma is capable of trapping Fyn and preventing it from entering the spine. Here we determined that palmitoylation is required for Fyn's membrane and spine localization. We further evaluated the functional consequences of neuronal over-expression of the constitutively active Y531F mutant form of Fyn (FynCA) in transgenic mice. We found that the FynCA transgenic mice displayed a reduced weight, a massively reduced lifespan and a high level of hyperactivity. The lifespan of the FynCA mice was only slightly extended by crossing them with Δtau transgenic mice, possibly reflecting differences in expression patterns of the transgenes and high levels of transgenic FynCA compared to endogenous Fyn. Analysis of synaptosomes revealed that FynCA accumulated at high levels in the spine, resulting in increased levels of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2b phosphorylated at residue Y1472. Tau was strongly phosphorylated at the AT8 epitope S202/T205 as shown by Western blot and immunohistochemistry indicating that an increased tyrosine kinase activity of Fyn has down-stream consequences for serine/threonine-directed phosphorylation. PMID:24860422

  14. Long-term transgene expression in the central nervous system using DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yurek, David M; Fletcher, Anita M; Smith, George M; Seroogy, Kim B; Ziady, Assem G; Molter, Joseph; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Padegimas, Linas; Cooper, Mark J

    2009-04-01

    This study demonstrates proof of concept for delivery and expression of compacted plasmid DNA in the central nervous system. Plasmid DNA was compacted with polyethylene glycol substituted lysine 30-mer peptides, forming rod-like nanoparticles with diameters between 8 and 11 nm. Here we show that an intracerebral injection of compacted DNA can transfect both neurons and glia, and can produce transgene expression in the striatum for up to 8 weeks, which was at least 100-fold greater than intracerebral injections of naked DNA plasmids. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) of injected animals at the 11th postinjection week revealed significantly higher transgene activity in animals receiving compacted DNA plasmids when compared to animals receiving naked DNA. There was minimal evidence of brain inflammation. Intrastriatal injections of a compacted plasmid encoding for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (pGDNF) resulted in a significant overexpression of GDNF protein in the striatum 1-3 weeks after injection. PMID:19223866

  15. Polyethylenimine-mediated expression of transgenes in the acinar cells of rats salivary glands in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Wigand, Timothy; Aye, Myo-Pale'; Shitara, Akiko; Weigert, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Non viral-mediated transfection of plasmid DNA provides a fast and reliable way to express various transgenes in selected cell populations in live animals. Here, we show an improvement of a previously published method that is based on injecting plasmid DNA into the ductal system of the salivary glands in live rats. Specifically, using complexes between plasmid DNA and polyethyleneimine (PEI) we show that the expression of the transgenes is directed selectively to the salivary acinar cells. PEI does not affect the ability of cells to undergo regulated exocytosis, which was one of the main drawbacks of the previous methods. Moreover PEI does not affect the proper localization and targeting of transfected proteins, as shown for the apical plasma membrane water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5). Overall, this approach, coupled with the use of intravital microscopy, permits to conduct localization and functional studies under physiological conditions, in a rapid, reliable, and affordable fashion. PMID:25621283

  16. Enhanced neurofibrillary degeneration in transgenic mice expressing mutant tau and APP.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J; Dickson, D W; Lin, W L; Chisholm, L; Corral, A; Jones, G; Yen, S H; Sahara, N; Skipper, L; Yager, D; Eckman, C; Hardy, J; Hutton, M; McGowan, E

    2001-08-24

    JNPL3 transgenic mice expressing a mutant tau protein, which develop neurofibrillary tangles and progressive motor disturbance, were crossed with Tg2576 transgenic mice expressing mutant beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP), thus modulating the APP-Abeta (beta-amyloid peptide) environment. The resulting double mutant (tau/APP) progeny and the Tg2576 parental strain developed Abeta deposits at the same age; however, relative to JNPL3 mice, the double mutants exhibited neurofibrillary tangle pathology that was substantially enhanced in the limbic system and olfactory cortex. These results indicate that either APP or Abeta influences the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. The interaction between Abeta and tau pathologies in these mice supports the hypothesis that a similar interaction occurs in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:11520987

  17. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors. PMID:27246030

  18. Delay of Disease Development in Transgenic Plants that Express the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell Abel, Patricia; Nelson, Richard S.; de, Barun; Hoffmann, Nancy; Rogers, Stephen G.; Fraley, Robert T.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1986-05-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned cDNA of the coat protein (CP) gene of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was introduced into tobacco cells on a Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from which tumor inducing genes had been removed. Plants regenerated from transformed cells expressed TMV mRNA and CP as a nuclear trait. Seedlings from self-fertilized transgenic plants were inoculated with TMV and observed for development of disease symptoms. The seedlings that expressed the CP gene were delayed in symptom development and 10 to 60 percent of the transgenic plants failed to develop symptoms for the duration of the experiments. Increasing the concentration of TMV in the inoculum shortened the delay in appearance of symptoms. The results of these experiments indicate that plants can be genetically transformed for resistance to virus disease development.

  19. Modulation of Mammary Gland Development and Milk Production by Growth Hormone Expression in GH Transgenic Goats

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zekun; Lin, Jian; Ye, Lulu; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland development during puberty and reconstruction during pregnancy and lactation is under the control of circulating endocrine hormones, such as growth hormone, which are released from the pituitary. In this study, we explored the influence of overexpression of growth hormone in the mammary gland on breast development and milk production in goats. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the number of highly expressed genes was greater in GH transgenic goats than non-transgenic goats. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the majority of the genes belonged to the MAPK signaling pathway and the ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression of genes related to breast development was further confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, both milk production and milk quality were increased. The results of these experiments imply that overexpression of growth hormone in the breast may stimulate breast development and enhances milk production by modulating alveolar cell proliferation or branching through the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27445863

  20. Transgenically expressed Parascaris P-glycoprotein-11 can modulate ivermectin susceptibility in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Janssen, I Jana I; Krücken, Jürgen; Demeler, Janina; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2015-08-01

    P-glycoproteins (Pgps) are suspected to mediate drug extrusion in nematodes contributing to macrocyclic lactone resistance. This association was recently shown for Parascaris Pgp-11. Ivermectin resistance was correlated with the presence of three pgp-11 single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or increased pgp-11 mRNA levels. In the present study, the ability of Pgp-11 to modulate ivermectin susceptibility was investigated by its expression in a pgp-11-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans strain. Expression of Parascaris pgp-11 in two transgenic lines significantly decreased ivermectin susceptibility in a motility (thrashing) assay conducted in liquid medium. The EC50 values increased by 3.2- and 4.6-fold in the two lines relative to a transgenic control strain. This is the first report on the successful functional analysis of a parasitic nematode Pgp in the model organism C. elegans. PMID:25905032

  1. Virus-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Expressed in Milk of Transgenic Mice Provides Full Protection against Virus-Induced Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Andreas F.; Pewe, Lecia; Webster, John; Perlman, Stanley; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.; Siddell, Stuart G.

    2001-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies represent a major host defense mechanism against viral infections. In mammals, passive immunity is provided by neutralizing antibodies passed to the offspring via the placenta or the milk as immunoglobulin G and secreted immunoglobulin A. With the long-term goal of producing virus-resistant livestock, we have generated mice carrying transgenes that encode the light and heavy chains of an antibody that is able to neutralize the neurotropic JHM strain of murine hepatitis virus (MHV-JHM). MHV-JHM causes acute encephalitis and acute and chronic demyelination in susceptible strains of mice and rats. Transgene expression was targeted to the lactating mammary gland by using the ovine β-lactoglobulin promoter. Milk from these transgenic mice contained up to 0.7 mg of recombinant antibody/ml. In vitro analysis of milk derived from different transgenic lines revealed a linear correlation between antibody expression and virus-neutralizing activity, indicating that the recombinant antibody is the major determinant of MHV-JHM neutralization in murine milk. Offspring of transgenic and control mice were challenged with a lethal dose of MHV-JHM. Litters suckling nontransgenic dams succumbed to fatal encephalitis, whereas litters suckling transgenic dams were fully protected against challenge, irrespective of whether they were transgenic. This demonstrates that a single neutralizing antibody expressed in the milk of transgenic mice is sufficient to completely protect suckling offspring against MHV-JHM-induced encephalitis. PMID:11222704

  2. Hepatic expression of mature transforming growth factor beta 1 in transgenic mice results in multiple tissue lesions.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, N; Factor, V; Nagy, P; Kopp, J; Kondaiah, P; Wakefield, L; Roberts, A B; Sporn, M B; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1995-03-28

    Aberrant expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) has been implicated in a number of disease processes, particularly those involving fibrotic and inflammatory lesions. To determine the in vivo effects of overexpression of TGF-beta 1 on the function and structure of hepatic as well as extrahepatic tissues, transgenic mice were generated containing a fusion gene (Alb/TGF-beta 1) consisting of modified porcine TGF-beta 1 cDNA under the control of the regulatory elements of the mouse albumin gene. Five transgenic lines were developed, all of which expressed the Alb/TGF-beta 1 transgene selectively in hepatocytes. The transgenic line 25 expressing the highest level of the transgene in the liver also had high (> 10-fold over control) plasma levels of TGF-beta 1. Hepatic fibrosis and apoptotic death of hepatocytes developed in all the transgenic lines but was more pronounced in line 25. The fibrotic process was characterized by deposition of collagen around individual hepatocytes and within the space of Disse in a radiating linear pattern. Several extrahepatic lesions developed in line 25, including glomerulonephritis and renal failure, arteritis and myocarditis, as well as atrophic changes in pancreas and testis. The results from this transgenic model strongly support the proposed etiological role for TGF-beta 1 in a variety of fibrotic and inflammatory disorders. The transgenic model may also provide an appropriate paradigm for testing therapeutic interventions aimed at neutralizing the detrimental effects of this important cytokine. PMID:7708687

  3. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Entinostat enhances polymer-mediated transgene expression in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Jacob J; Christensen, Matthew D; Barua, Sutapa; Lehrman, Jennifer; Haynes, Karmella A; Rege, Kaushal

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells maintain an immense amount of genetic information by tightly wrapping their DNA around positively charged histones. While this strategy allows human cells to maintain more than 25,000 genes, histone binding can also block gene expression. Consequently, cells express histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to acetylate histone lysines and release DNA for transcription. Conversely, histone deacetylases (HDACs) are employed for restoring the positive charge on the histones, thereby silencing gene expression by increasing histone-DNA binding. It has previously been shown that histones bind and silence viral DNA, while hyperacetylation of histones via HDAC inhibition restores viral gene expression. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with Entinostat, an HDAC inhibitor, enhances transgene (luciferase) expression by up to 25-fold in human prostate and murine bladder cancer cell lines when used with cationic polymers for plasmid DNA delivery. Entinostat treatment altered cell cycle progression, resulting in a significant increase in the fraction of cells present in the G0/G1 phase at low micromolar concentrations. While this moderate G0/G1 arrest disappeared at higher concentrations, a modest increase in the fraction of apoptotic cells and a decrease in cell proliferation were observed, consistent with the known anticancer effects of the drug. DNase accessibility studies revealed no significant change in plasmid transcriptional availability with Entinostat treatment. However, quantitative PCR studies indicated that Entinostat treatment, at the optimal dose for enhancing transgene expression, led to an increase in the amount of plasmid present in the nucleus in two cancer cell lines. Taken together, our results show that Entinostat enhances polymer- mediated transgene expression and can be useful in applications related to transient protein expression in mammalian cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1345-1356. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID

  4. Engineering the AAVS1 locus for consistent and scalable transgene expression in human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Kim, Shin-Il; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Tan, Ghee Wan; Xiang, Long; Hatani, Takeshi; Kondo, Takayuki; Ikeya, Makoto; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Inoue, Haruhisa; Woltjen, Knut

    2016-05-15

    The potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in personalized regenerative medicine applications may be augmented by transgenics, including the expression of constitutive cell labels, differentiation reporters, or modulators of disease phenotypes. Thus, there is precedence for reproducible transgene expression amongst iPSC sub-clones with isogenic or diverse genetic backgrounds. Using virus or transposon vectors, transgene integration sites and copy numbers are difficult to control, and nearly impossible to reproduce across multiple cell lines. Moreover, randomly integrated transgenes are often subject to pleiotropic position effects as a consequence of epigenetic changes inherent in differentiation, undermining applications in iPSCs. To address this, we have adapted popular TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease technologies in order to introduce transgenes into pre-defined loci and overcome random position effects. AAVS1 is an exemplary locus within the PPP1R12C gene that permits robust expression of CAG promoter-driven transgenes. Gene targeting controls transgene copy number such that reporter expression patterns are reproducible and scalable by ∼2-fold. Furthermore, gene expression is maintained during long-term human iPSC culture and in vitro differentiation along multiple lineages. Here, we outline our AAVS1 targeting protocol using standardized donor vectors and construction methods, as well as provide practical considerations for iPSC culture, drug selection, and genotyping. PMID:26707206

  5. Proper expression of myosin genes in transgenic nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Fire, A; Waterston, R H

    1989-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has four genes which encode skeletal myosin heavy chain isoforms. We have re-introduced clones of two of these genes, myo-3 and unc-54 at low copy number into the germline of C. elegans. The resulting loci behave as functional copies of the genes by two genetic criteria: (i) they can result in phenotypic rescue of strains carrying inactivating myo-3 or unc-54 mutations, and (ii) their presence in strains with wild-type copies of the endogenous myosin loci has genetic consequences similar to duplicating the endogenous loci. The re-introduced genes function at a level close to that of the endogenous loci. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the different isoforms have been used to localize the expressed proteins. The re-introduced genes express in precisely the same cell types as the endogenous genes, and the myosin products produced assemble into filament structures as in wild-type. Unexpectedly, we have found in the course of this work that very high copy numbers of the unc-54 gene lead to a disruption of muscle structure which may result from overexpression of the protein product. Images PMID:2583105

  6. Ethanolic fermentation in transgenic tobacco expressing Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, M; Brändle, R; Kuhlemeier, C

    1994-01-01

    During oxygen limitation in higher plants, energy metabolism switches from respiration to fermentation. As part of this anaerobic response the expression of genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is strongly induced. In addition there is ample evidence for post-translational regulation. In order to understand this multi-level regulation of the anaerobic response, we provided tobacco with the constitutive capacity of ethanolic fermentation by expressing a PDC gene derived from the obligate anaerobe Zymomonas mobilis. The protein accumulated to high levels and was active in an in vitro assay. During the first 2-4 h of anoxia, acetaldehyde accumulated to 10- to 35-fold and ethanol to 8- to 20-fold higher levels than in wild-type. Under normoxic conditions no accumulation of acetaldehyde and ethanol could be measured. Instead, the two products may be immediately re-metabolized in tobacco leaf tissue. We show that aerobic fermentation takes place when the respiratory system is inhibited. Although these conditions enhance ethanolic fermentation under normoxia, they fail to increase ADH transcript levels. These results indicate that anaerobic transcription is triggered not by the metabolic consequences of oxygen limitation, but directly through an oxygen-sensing system. Images PMID:8026460

  7. Functional expression of a Δ12 fatty acid desaturase gene from spinach in transgenic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Kinoshita, Mikio; Suzuki, Iwane; Tasaka, Yasushi; Kano, Koichiro; Taguchi, Yoshitomo; Mikami, Koji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Kashiwazaki, Naomi; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Murata, Norio; Iritani, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Linoleic acid (18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) are polyunsaturated fatty acids that are essential for mammalian nutrition, because mammals lack the desaturases required for synthesis of Δ12 (n-6) and n-3 fatty acids. Many plants can synthesize these fatty acids and, therefore, to examine the effects of a plant desaturase in mammals, we generated transgenic pigs that carried the fatty acid desaturation 2 gene for a Δ12 fatty acid desaturase from spinach. Levels of linoleic acid (18:2n-6) in adipocytes that had differentiated in vitro from cells derived from the transgenic pigs were ≈10 times higher than those from wild-type pigs. In addition, the white adipose tissue of transgenic pigs contained ≈20% more linoleic acid (18:2n-6) than that of wild-type pigs. These results demonstrate the functional expression of a plant gene for a fatty acid desaturase in mammals, opening up the possibility of modifying the fatty acid composition of products from domestic animals by transgenic technology, using plant genes for fatty acid desaturases. PMID:15067141

  8. Expression of bkt and bch genes from Haematococcus pluvialis in transgenic Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, KaiJing; Wang, ChaoGang; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Jun; Li, JianCheng; Hu, ZhangLi

    2014-10-01

    β-carotene ketolase and β-carotene hydroxylase encoded by bkt and bch, respectively, are key enzymes required for astaxanthin biosynthesis in Haematococcu pluvialis 34-1n. Two expression vectors containing cDNA sequences of bkt and bch were constructed and co-transformed into cell-wall-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-849. Transgenic algae were screened on TAP agar plates containing 10 μg mL(-1) Zeomycin. PCR-Southern analysis showed that bkt and bch were integrated into the genomes of C. reinhardtii. Transcripts of bkt and bch were further confirmed by RT-PCR-Southern analysis. Compared with the wild type, transgenic algae produced 29.04% and 30.27% more carotenoids and xanthophylls, respectively. Moreover, the transgenic algae could accumulate 34% more astaxanthin than wild type. These results indicate that foreign bkt and bch genes were successfully translated into β-carotene ketolase and β-carotene hydroxylase, which were responsible for catalyzing the biosynthesis of astaxanthin in transgenic algae. PMID:25209726

  9. Genetic background and environmental conditions drive metabolic variation in wild type and transgenic soybean (Glycine max) seeds.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Hagai; Shir, Ofer M; Yu, Yang; Hou, Wensheng; Sun, Shi; Han, Tianfu; Amir, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    The metabolic profiles and composition of storage reserves of agricultural crop seeds are strongly regulated by heritable and environmental factors. Yet, very little is known about the genetic and environmental determinants of adaptive metabolic variation amongst wild type as well as transgenic seed populations derived from the same genetic background, grown under natural field conditions. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effects of natural environmental conditions on wild type and transgenic soybean seeds expressing a feedback-insensitive form of cystathionine γ-synthase, a methionine main regulatory enzyme. The seeds were grown in four geographically distinct habitats in China and then assayed for primary metabolic profiles using gas chromatography mass spectrometry, morphological traits and storage reserve accumulation. The analyses revealed changes in the levels of primary metabolites which evidently exhibited high correlation to methionine regardless of changes in environmental conditions. The environment, however, constituted a major determinant of metabolic profiles amongst seeds, as much more metabolites were observed to be affected by this variable, particularly along the north-to-south latitudinal gradient. The observations suggest that metabolic variation amongst seeds grown under natural field conditions depends upon the complex relationships existing amongst their genetic background and the environmental conditions characterizing their cultivation areas. PMID:27038216

  10. Cosmetics-triggered percutaneous remote control of transgene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Haifeng; Xie, Mingqi; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the rational design of trigger-inducible gene switches that program cellular behavior in a reliable and predictable manner. Capitalizing on genetic componentry, including the repressor PmeR and its cognate operator OPmeR, that has evolved in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 to sense and resist plant-defence metabolites of the paraben class, we have designed a set of inducible and repressible mammalian transcription-control devices that could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice in response to paraben derivatives. With an over 60-years track record as licensed preservatives in the cosmetics industry, paraben derivatives have become a commonplace ingredient of most skin-care products including shower gels, cleansing toners and hand creams. As parabens can rapidly reach the bloodstream of mice following topical application, we used this feature to percutaneously program transgene expression of subcutaneous designer cell implants using off-the-shelf commercial paraben-containing skin-care cosmetics. The combination of non-invasive, transdermal and orthogonal trigger-inducible remote control of transgene expression may provide novel opportunities for dynamic interventions in future gene and cell-based therapies. PMID:25943548

  11. Threonine Overproduction in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Expressing a Mutant Desensitized Aspartate Kinase of Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Shaul, Orit; Galili, Gad

    1992-01-01

    In higher plants, the synthesis of the essential amino acid threonine is regulated primarily by the sensitivity of the first enzyme in its biosynthetic pathway, aspartate kinase, to feedback inhibition by threonine and lysine. We aimed to study the potential of increasing threonine accumulation in plants by means of genetic engineering. This was addressed by the expression of a mutant, desensitized aspartate kinase derived from Escherichia coli either in the cytoplasm or in the chloroplasts of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana Tabacum cv Samsun NN) plants. Both types of transgenic plants exhibited a significant overproduction of free threonine. However, threonine accumulation was higher in plants expressing the bacterial enzyme in the chloroplast, indicating that compartmentalization of aspartate kinase within this organelle was important, although not essential. Threonine overproduction in leaves was positively correlated with the level of the desensitized enzyme. Transgenic plants expressing the highest leaf aspartate kinase activity also exhibited a slight increase in the levels of free lysine and isoleucine, both of which share a common biosynthetic pathway with threonine, but showed no significant change in the level of other free amino acids. The present study proposes a new molecular biological approach to increase the limiting content of threonine in higher plants. PMID:16653099

  12. Enhanced selenium tolerance and accumulation in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing a mouse selenocysteine lyase.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Marinus; Owen, Jennifer D; Garifullina, Gulnara F; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Mihara, Hisaaki; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2003-03-01

    Selenium (Se) toxicity is thought to be due to nonspecific incorporation of selenocysteine (Se-Cys) into proteins, replacing Cys. In an attempt to direct Se flow away from incorporation into proteins, a mouse (Mus musculus) Se-Cys lyase (SL) was expressed in the cytosol or chloroplasts of Arabidopsis. This enzyme specifically catalyzes the decomposition of Se-Cys into elemental Se and alanine. The resulting SL transgenics were shown to express the mouse enzyme in the expected intracellular location, and to have SL activities up to 2-fold (cytosolic lines) or 6-fold (chloroplastic lines) higher than wild-type plants. Se incorporation into proteins was reduced 2-fold in both types of SL transgenics, indicating that the approach successfully redirected Se flow in the plant. Both the cytosolic and chloroplastic SL plants showed enhanced shoot Se concentrations, up to 1.5-fold compared with wild type. The cytosolic SL plants showed enhanced tolerance to Se, presumably because of their reduced protein Se levels. Surprisingly, the chloroplastic SL transgenics were less tolerant to Se, indicating that (over) production of elemental Se in the chloroplast is toxic. Expression of SL in the cytosol may be a useful approach for the creation of plants with enhanced Se phytoremediation capacity. PMID:12644675

  13. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminaryin vitroandin vivoimaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  14. Cosmetics-triggered percutaneous remote control of transgene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Haifeng; Xie, Mingqi; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the rational design of trigger-inducible gene switches that program cellular behavior in a reliable and predictable manner. Capitalizing on genetic componentry, including the repressor PmeR and its cognate operator OPmeR, that has evolved in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 to sense and resist plant-defence metabolites of the paraben class, we have designed a set of inducible and repressible mammalian transcription-control devices that could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice in response to paraben derivatives. With an over 60-years track record as licensed preservatives in the cosmetics industry, paraben derivatives have become a commonplace ingredient of most skin-care products including shower gels, cleansing toners and hand creams. As parabens can rapidly reach the bloodstream of mice following topical application, we used this feature to percutaneously program transgene expression of subcutaneous designer cell implants using off-the-shelf commercial paraben-containing skin-care cosmetics. The combination of non-invasive, transdermal and orthogonal trigger-inducible remote control of transgene expression may provide novel opportunities for dynamic interventions in future gene and cell-based therapies. PMID:25943548

  15. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M.; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  16. Expression of Cry1Ac in transgenic tobacco plants under the control of a wound-inducible promoter (AoPR1) isolated from Asparagus officinalis to control Heliothis virescens and Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gulbitti-Onarici, Selma; Zaidi, Mohsin Abbas; Taga, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Altosaar, Illimar

    2009-07-01

    Expression of cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was evaluated under the control of a wound-inducible AoPR1 promoter from Asparagus officinalis in transgenic tobacco plants. The leaves of transgenic plants were mechanically wounded to evaluate the activity of the AoPR1 promoter in driving the expression of Cry1Ac protein at the wound site. Our results indicate that mechanical wounding of transgenic plants was effective in inducing the expression of Cry1Ac protein. As a result of this induction, the accumulated levels of Cry1Ac protein increased during 6-72 h post-wounding period. The leaves of transgenic tobacco plants were evaluated for resistance against Heliothis virescens and Manduca sexta in insect bioassays in two different ways. The detached tobacco leaves were either fed directly to the insect larvae or they were first mechanically wounded followed by a 72 h post-wounding feeding period. Complete protection of mechanically wounded leaves of transgenic plants was observed within 24 h of the bioassay. The leaves of transgenic plants fed directly (without pre-wounding) to the larvae achieved the same level of protection between 24 and 72 h of the bioassay. PMID:19353306

  17. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  18. Transgenic mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein under control of the human tyrosine hydroxylase promoter.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Yang; Yang, Jae Won; Park, Myung Sun; Sun, Woong; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Seung U; Lee, Myung Ae

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and related catecholaminergic neurological disorders is closely associated with changes in the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Therefore, investigation of the regulation of the TH gene system should assist in understanding the pathomechanisms involved in these neurological disorders. To identify regulatory domains that direct human TH expression in the central nervous system (CNS), we generated two transgenic mouse lines in which enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) is expressed under the control of either 3.2-kb (hTHP-EYFP construct) human TH promoter or 3.2-kb promoter with 2-kb 3'-flanking regions (hTHP-ex3-EYFP construct) of the TH gene. In the adult transgenic mouse brain, the hTHP-EYFP construct directs neuron-specific EYFP expression in various CNS areas, such as olfactory bulb, striatum, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and particularly dentate gyrus. Although these EYFP-positive cells were identified as mature neurons, few EYFP-positive cells were TH-positive neurons. On the other hand, we could detect the EYFP mRNA expression in a subset of neurons in the olfactory bulb, midbrain, and cerebellum, in which expression of endogenous TH is enriched, with hTHP-ex3-EYFP transgenic mice. These results indicate that the 3.2-kb sequence upstream of the TH gene is not sufficient for proper expression and that the 2-kb sequence from the translation start site to exon 3 is necessary for expression of EYFP in a subset of catecholaminergic neurons. PMID:22714400

  19. Increased ability of transgenic plants expressing the bacterial enzyme ACC deaminase to accumulate Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn.

    PubMed

    Grichko, V P; Filby, B; Glick, B R

    2000-07-28

    Transgenic tomato plants Lycopersicon esculentum (Solanaceae) cv. Heinz 902 expressing the bacterial gene 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, under the transcriptional control of either two tandem 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoters (constitutive expression), the rolD promoter from Agrobacterium rhizogenes (root specific expression) or the pathogenesis related PRB-1b promoter from tobacco, were compared to non-transgenic tomato plants in their ability to grow in the presence of Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Ni, Pb, or Zn and to accumulate these metals. Parameters that were examined include metal concentration and ACC deaminase activity in both plant shoots and roots; root and shoot development; and leaf chlorophyll content. In general, transgenic tomato plants expressing ACC deaminase, especially those controlled by the PRB-1b promoter, acquired a greater amount of metal within the plant tissues, and were less subject to the deleterious effects of the metals on plant growth than were non-transgenic plants. PMID:10936659

  20. Proximal and distal sequences control UV cone pigment gene expression in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenqin; Williams, John; Smallwood, Philip M; Touchman, Jeffrey W; Roman, Laura M; Nathans, Jeremy

    2004-04-30

    The molecular basis of cone photoreceptor-specific gene expression is largely unknown. In this study, we define cis-acting DNA sequences that control the cell type-specific expression of the zebrafish UV cone pigment gene by transient expression of green fluorescent protein transgenes following their injection into zebrafish embryos. These experiments show that 4.8 kb of 5'-flanking sequences from the zebrafish UV pigment gene direct expression specifically to UV cones and that this activity requires both distal and proximal sequences. In addition, we demonstrate that a proximal region located between -215 and -110 bp (with respect to the initiator methionine codon) can function in the context of a zebrafish rhodopsin promotor to convert its specificity from rod-only expression to rod and UV cone expression. These experiments demonstrate the power of transient transgenesis in zebrafish to efficiently define cis-acting regulatory sequences in an intact vertebrate. PMID:14966125

  1. Characterization of transgenic zebrafish lines that express GFP in the retina, pineal gland, olfactory bulb, hatching gland, and optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Bonaffini, Sarah; Zou, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Cen; Tsujimura, Taro; Kawamura, Shoji; Wei, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animals are powerful tools to study gene function invivo. Here we characterize several transgenic zebrafish lines that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the LCR(RH2)-RH2-1 or LCR(RH2)-RH2-2 green opsin regulatory elements. Using confocal immunomicroscopy, stereo-fluorescence microscopy, and Western blotting, we show that the Tg(LCR(RH2)-RH2-1:GFP)(pt112) and Tg(LCR(RH2)-RH2-2:GFP)(pt115) transgenic zebrafish lines express GFP in the pineal gland and certain types of photoreceptors. In addition, some of these lines also express GFP in the hatching gland, optic tectum, or olfactory bulb. Some of the expression patterns differ significantly from previously published similar transgenic fish lines, making them useful tools for studying the development of the corresponding tissues and organs. In addition, the variations of GFP expression among different lines corroborate the notion that transgenic expression is often subjected to position effect, thus emphasizing the need for careful verification of expression patterns when transgenic animal models are utilized for research. PMID:23499733

  2. Characterization of transgenic zebrafish lines that express GFP in the retina, pineal gland, olfactory bulb, hatching gland, and optic tectum

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei; Bonaffini, Sarah; Zou, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Cen; Tsujimura, Taro; Kawamura, Shoji; Wei, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animals are powerful tools to study gene function in vivo. Here we characterize several transgenic zebrafish lines that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the LCRRH2-RH2-1 or LCRRH2-RH2-2 green opsin regulatory elements. Using confocal immunomicroscopy, stereo-fluorescence microscopy, and Western blotting, we show that the Tg(LCRRH2-RH2-1:GFP)pt112 and Tg(LCRRH2-RH2-2:GFP)pt115 transgenic zebrafish lines express GFP in the pineal gland and certain types of photoreceptors. In addition, some of these lines also express GFP in the hatching gland, optic tectum, or olfactory bulb. Some of the expression patterns differ significantly from previously published similar transgenic fish lines, making them useful tools for studying the development of the corresponding tissues and organs. In addition, the variations of GFP expression among different lines corroborate the notion that transgenic expression is often subjected to position effect, thus emphasizing the need for careful verification of expression patterns when transgenic animal models are utilized for research. PMID:23499733

  3. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    PubMed

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression. PMID:24256726

  4. Function and distribution of circulating human PCSK9 expressed extrahepatically in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi; Warren, Laurie; Xia, Donghui; Jensen, Heather; Sand, Thomas; Petras, Stephen; Qin, Wenning; Miller, Kenneth S.; Hawkins, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is predominantly expressed in liver and regulates cholesterol metabolism by down regulating liver LDL receptor (LDLR) proteins. Here we report transgenic overexpression of human PCSK9 in kidney increased plasma levels of PCSK9 and subsequently led to a dramatic reduction in liver LDLR proteins. The regulation of LDLR by PCSK9 displayed tissue specificity, with liver being the most responsive tissue. Even though the PCSK9 transgene was highly expressed in kidney, LDLR proteins were suppressed to a lower extent in this tissue than in liver. Adrenal LDLR proteins were not regulated by elevated plasma PCSK9. hPCSK9 transgene expression and subsequent reduction of liver LDLR led to increases in plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and ApoB, which were further increased by a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet. We also observed that the size distribution of hPCSK9 in transgenic mouse plasma was heterogeneous. In chow-fed mice, the majority of PCSK9 proteins were in free forms; however, feeding a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet resulted in a shift of hPCSK9 distribution toward larger complexes. PCSK9 distribution in human plasma also exhibited heterogeneity and individual variability in the percentage of PCSK9 in free form and in large complexes. We provide strong evidence to support that human PCSK9 proteins secreted from extrahepatic tissue are able to promote LDLR degradation in liver and increase plasma LDL. Our data also suggest that LDLR protein regulation by PCSK9 has tissue specificity, with liver being the most responsive tissue. PMID:19060325

  5. Assessment of long-term transgene expression in barley: Ds-mediated delivery of bar results in robust, stable, and heritable expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utility of transgenic plants for both experimental and practical agronomic purposes is highly dependent on stable, predictable, and heritable expression of the introduced genes. This requirement is frequently unfulfilled, and transgenes are frequently subject to silencing. Studies of the charact...

  6. Targeted toxin-based selectable drug-free enrichment of Mammalian cells with high transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiro; Akasaka, Eri; Saitoh, Issei; Ohtsuka, Masato; Nakamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Takayuki; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Almost all transfection protocols for mammalian cells use a drug resistance gene for the selection of transfected cells. However, it always requires the characterization of each isolated clone regarding transgene expression, which is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In the current study, we developed a novel method to selectively isolate clones with high transgene expression without drug selection. Porcine embryonic fibroblasts were transfected with pCEIEnd, an expression vector that simultaneously expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and endo-b-galactosidase C(EndoGalC; an enzyme capable of digesting cell surface a-Gal epitope) upon transfection. After transfection, the surviving cells were briefly treated with IB4SAP (a-Gal epitope-specific BS-I-B4 lectin conjugated with a toxin saporin). The treated cells were then allowed to grow in normal medium, during which only cells strongly expressing EndoGalC and EGFP would survive because of the absence of a-Gal epitopes on their cell surface. Almost all the surviving colonies after IB4SAP treatment were in fact negative for BS-I-B4 staining, and also strongly expressed EGFP. This system would be particularly valuable for researchers who wish to perform large-scale production of therapeutically important recombinant proteins. PMID:24832665

  7. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  8. Rabies Virus Vector Transgene Expression Level and Cytotoxicity Improvement Induced by Deletion of Glycoprotein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Shinya; Sato, Sho; Oyama, Kei; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is required for binding to neuronal receptors and for viral entry. G-deleted RV vector is a powerful tool for investigating the organization and function of the neural circuits. It gives the investigator the ability to genetically target initial infection to particular neurons and to control trans-synaptic propagation. In this study we have quantitatively evaluated the effect of G gene deletion on the cytotoxicity and transgene expression level of the RV vector. We compared the characteristics of the propagation-competent RV vector (rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP) and the G-deleted RV vector (rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP), both of which are based on the attenuated HEP-Flury strain and express monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) as a transgene. rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP showed lower cytotoxicity than rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and within 16 days of infection we found no change in the basic electrophysiological properties of neurons infected with the rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP. The mRFP expression level of rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP was much higher than that of rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and 3 days after infection the retrogradely infected neurons were clearly visualized by the expressed fluorescent protein without any staining. This may be due to the low cytotoxicity and/or the presumed change in the polymerase gene (L) expression level of the G-deleted RV vector. Although the mechanisms remains to be clarified, the results of this study indicate that deletion of the G gene greatly improves the usability of the RV vector for studying the organization and function of the neural circuits by decreasing the cytotoxicity and increasing the transgene expression level. PMID:24244660

  9. Combinatorial Screening for Transgenic Yeasts with High Cellulase Activities in Combination with a Tunable Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Ikeuchi, Akinori; Imamura, Chie; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorial screening used together with a broad library of gene expression cassettes is expected to produce a powerful tool for the optimization of the simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes. Recently, we proposed a highly tunable protein expression system that utilized multiple genome-integrated target genes to fine-tune enzyme expression in yeast cells. This tunable system included a library of expression cassettes each composed of three gene-expression control elements that in different combinations produced a wide range of protein expression levels. In this study, four gene expression cassettes with graded protein expression levels were applied to the expression of three cellulases: cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2, and endoglucanase 2. After combinatorial screening for transgenic yeasts simultaneously secreting these three cellulases, we obtained strains with higher cellulase expressions than a strain harboring three cellulase-expression constructs within one high-performance gene expression cassette. These results show that our method will be of broad use throughout the field of metabolic engineering. PMID:26692026

  10. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353