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Sample records for drosophila arginine methyltransferase

  1. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-07-11

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly.

  2. Nuclear import factor transportin and arginine methyltransferase 1 modify FUS neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jäckel, Sandra; Summerer, Anna K; Thömmes, Catherine M; Pan, Xia; Voigt, Aaron; Schulz, Jörg B; Rasse, Tobias M; Dormann, Dorothee; Haass, Christian; Kahle, Philipp J

    2015-02-01

    Inclusions containing Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) are found in familial and sporadic cases of the incurable progressive motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in a common form of dementia, frontotemporal dementia. Most disease-associated mutations are located in the C-terminal proline-tyrosine nuclear localization sequence (PY-NLS) of FUS and impair its nuclear import. It has been shown in cell culture that the nuclear import of FUS is mediated by transportin, which binds the PY-NLS and the last arginine/glycine/glycine-rich (RGG) domain of FUS. Methylation of this last RGG domain by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) weakens transportin binding and therefore impairs nuclear translocation of FUS. To investigate the requirements for the nuclear import of FUS in an in vivo model, we generated different transgenic Drosophila lines expressing human FUS wild type (hFUS wt) and two disease-related variants P525L and R495X, in which the NLS is mutated or completely absent, respectively. To rule out effects caused by heterologous hFUS expression, we analysed the corresponding variants for the Drosophila FUS orthologue Cabeza (Caz wt, P398L, Q349X). Expression of these variants in eyes and motor neurons confirmed the PY-NLS-dependent nuclear localization of FUS/Caz and caused neurodegenerative effects. Surprisingly, FUS/Caz toxicity was correlated to the degree of its nuclear localization in this overexpression model. High levels of nuclear FUS/Caz became insoluble and reduced the endogenous Caz levels, confirming FUS autoregulation in Drosophila. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the two transportin orthologues interfered with the nuclear import of FUS/Caz and also enhanced the eye phenotype. Finally, we screened the Drosophila PRMT proteins (DART1-9) and found that knockdown of Dart1 led to a reduction in methylation of hFUS P525L and aggravated its phenotype. These findings show that the molecular mechanisms controlling the nuclear import of FUS/Caz and FUS

  3. Arginine methyltransferases in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, Sarah M; Liu, Fan; Nimer, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    Arginine methylation is an abundant covalent modification that regulates diverse cellular processes, including transcription, translation, DNA repair, and RNA processing. The enzymes that catalyze these marks are known as the protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), and they can generate asymmetric dimethyl arginine (type I arginine methyltransferases), symmetric dimethylarginine (type II arginine methyltransferases), or monomethyarginine (type III arginine methyltransferases). The PRMTs are capable of modifying diverse substrates, from histone components to specific nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Additionally, the PRMTs can orchestrate chromatin remodeling by blocking the docking of other epigenetic modifying enzymes or by recruiting them to specific gene loci. In the hematopoietic system, PRMTs can regulate cell behavior, including the critical balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, in at least two critical ways, via (i) the covalent modification of transcription factors and (ii) the regulation of histone modifications at promoters critical to cell fate determination. Given these important functions, it is not surprising that these processes are altered in hematopoietic malignancies, such as acute myeloid leukemia, where they promote increased self-renewal and impair hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:27026282

  4. Diamidine Compounds for Selective Inhibition of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification critical for a variety of biological processes. Misregulation of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) has been linked to many pathological conditions. Most current PRMT inhibitors display limited specificity and selectivity, indiscriminately targeting many methyltransferase enzymes that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine as a cofactor. Here we report diamidine compounds for specific inhibition of PRMT1, the primary type I enzyme. Docking, molecular dynamics, and MM/PBSA analysis together with biochemical assays were conducted to understand the binding modes of these inhibitors and the molecular basis of selective inhibition for PRMT1. Our data suggest that 2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl)furan (1, furamidine, DB75), one leading inhibitor, targets the enzyme active site and is primarily competitive with the substrate and noncompetitive toward the cofactor. Furthermore, cellular studies revealed that 1 is cell membrane permeable and effectively inhibits intracellular PRMT1 activity and blocks cell proliferation in leukemia cell lines with different genetic lesions. PMID:24564570

  5. Redox Control of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) Activity.

    PubMed

    Morales, Yalemi; Nitzel, Damon V; Price, Owen M; Gui, Shanying; Li, Jun; Qu, Jun; Hevel, Joan M

    2015-06-12

    Elevated levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) correlate with risk factors for cardiovascular disease. ADMA is generated by the catabolism of proteins methylated on arginine residues by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. Reports have shown that dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase activity is down-regulated and PRMT1 protein expression is up-regulated under oxidative stress conditions, leading many to conclude that ADMA accumulation occurs via increased synthesis by PRMTs and decreased degradation. However, we now report that the methyltransferase activity of PRMT1, the major PRMT isoform in humans, is impaired under oxidative conditions. Oxidized PRMT1 displays decreased activity, which can be rescued by reduction. This oxidation event involves one or more cysteine residues that become oxidized to sulfenic acid (-SOH). We demonstrate a hydrogen peroxide concentration-dependent inhibition of PRMT1 activity that is readily reversed under physiological H2O2 concentrations. Our results challenge the unilateral view that increased PRMT1 expression necessarily results in increased ADMA synthesis and demonstrate that enzymatic activity can be regulated in a redox-sensitive manner. PMID:25911106

  6. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Byong Chul; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Hong, Sungyoul

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I–IV). Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM) to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6) in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses. PMID:27041824

  7. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Byong Chul; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Hong, Sungyoul; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I-IV). Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM) to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6) in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses. PMID:27041824

  8. Mammalian Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) Specifically Targets RXR Sites in Lysine- and Arginine-rich Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Feng, You; Maity, Ranjan; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Li, Ziwei; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia; Al-Hadid, Qais; Clark, Amander T.; Bedford, Mark T.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Clarke, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) has been implicated in roles of transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair, RNA splicing, cell differentiation, and metastasis. However, the type of reaction that it catalyzes and its substrate specificity remain controversial. In this study, we purified a recombinant mouse PRMT7 expressed in insect cells that demonstrates a robust methyltransferase activity. Using a variety of substrates, we demonstrate that the enzyme only catalyzes the formation of ω-monomethylarginine residues, and we confirm its activity as the prototype type III protein arginine methyltransferase. This enzyme is active on all recombinant human core histones, but histone H2B is a highly preferred substrate. Analysis of the specific methylation sites within intact histone H2B and within H2B and H4 peptides revealed novel post-translational modification sites and a unique specificity of PRMT7 for methylating arginine residues in lysine- and arginine-rich regions. We demonstrate that a prominent substrate recognition motif consists of a pair of arginine residues separated by one residue (RXR motif). These findings will significantly accelerate substrate profile analysis, biological function study, and inhibitor discovery for PRMT7. PMID:24247247

  9. PRMT11: a new Arabidopsis MBD7 protein partner with arginine methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Scebba, Francesca; De Bastiani, Morena; Bernacchia, Giovanni; Andreucci, Andrea; Galli, Alvaro; Pitto, Letizia

    2007-10-01

    Plant methyl-DNA-binding proteins (MBDs), discovered by sequence homology to their animal counterparts, have not been well characterized at the physiological and functional levels. In order better to characterize the Arabidopsis AtMBD7 protein, unique in bearing three MBD domains, we used a yeast two-hybrid system to identify its partners. One of the interacting proteins we cloned is the Arabidopsis arginine methyltransferase 11 (AtPRMT11). Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that the two proteins interact with each other and can be co-isolated. Using GFP fluorescence, we show that both AtMBD7 and AtPRMT11 are present in the nucleus. Further analyses revealed that AtPRMT11 acts as an arginine methyltransferase active on both histones and proteins of cellular extracts. The analysis of a T-DNA mutant line lacking AtPRMT11 mRNA revealed reduced levels of proteins with asymmetrically dimethylated arginines, suggesting that AtPRMT11, which is highly similar to mammalian PRMT1, is indeed a type I arginine methyltransferase. Further, AtMBD7 is a substrate for AtPRMT11, which post-translationally modifies the portion of the protein-containing C-terminal methylated DNA-binding domain. These results suggest the existence of a link between DNA methylation and arginine methylation. PMID:17711414

  10. Aflatoxin B1 induced upregulation of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ghufran, Md Sajid; Ghosh, Krishna; Kanade, Santosh R

    2016-09-01

    The exposure of naturally occurring mycotoxins affects human health and play a vital role in cancer initiation and progression. Aflatoxin B1 is a difuranocoumarin mycotoxin, classified as a group I carcinogen. The present study was conducted to assess the effect of aflatoxin B1 on epigenetic regulatory proteins. The protein arginine methyltransferase 5 expression was induced upon aflatoxin B1 treatment in a dose and time dependent manner. Further global arginine methylation was also increased in the same manner. This is the first report showing the induction of epigenetic regulatory protein, protein arginine methyltransferase 5 upon aflatoxin B1 treatment. Further study is required to establish the detailed pathway of PRMT5 induction. PMID:27242039

  11. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jungeun; Shin, Bongjin; Park, Eui-Soon; Yang, Sujeong; Choi, Seunga; Kang, Misun; Rho, Jaerang

    2010-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  12. A Potent, Selective, and Cell-Active Inhibitor of Human Type I Protein Arginine Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Shen, Yudao; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Wu, Hong; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Butler, Kyle V; Kaniskan, H Ümit; Speed, Brandon A; dela Seña, Carlo; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Schapira, Matthieu; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2016-03-18

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Overexpression of PRMTs has been implicated in various human diseases including cancer. Consequently, selective small-molecule inhibitors of PRMTs have been pursued by both academia and the pharmaceutical industry as chemical tools for testing biological and therapeutic hypotheses. PRMTs are divided into three categories: type I PRMTs which catalyze mono- and asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, type II PRMTs which catalyze mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, and type III PRMT which catalyzes only monomethylation of arginine residues. Here, we report the discovery of a potent, selective, and cell-active inhibitor of human type I PRMTs, MS023, and characterization of this inhibitor in a battery of biochemical, biophysical, and cellular assays. MS023 displayed high potency for type I PRMTs including PRMT1, -3, -4, -6, and -8 but was completely inactive against type II and type III PRMTs, protein lysine methyltransferases and DNA methyltransferases. A crystal structure of PRMT6 in complex with MS023 revealed that MS023 binds the substrate binding site. MS023 potently decreased cellular levels of histone arginine asymmetric dimethylation. It also reduced global levels of arginine asymmetric dimethylation and concurrently increased levels of arginine monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation in cells. We also developed MS094, a close analog of MS023, which was inactive in biochemical and cellular assays, as a negative control for chemical biology studies. MS023 and MS094 are useful chemical tools for investigating the role of type I PRMTs in health and disease. PMID:26598975

  13. Type I Arginine Methyltransferases PRMT1 and PRMT-3 Act Distributively*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kölbel, Knut; Ihling, Christian; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Neundorf, Ines; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Sinz, Andrea; Kühn, Uwe; Wahle, Elmar

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues is a common posttranslational modification of proteins carried out by type I protein arginine methyltransferases, including PRMT1 and -3. We report that the consecutive transfer of two methyl groups to a single arginine side chain by PRMT1 and -3 occurs in a distributive manner, i.e. with intermittent release of the monomethylated intermediate. The oligomeric state of PRMTs together with the clustering of methylated arginine residues in most proteins carrying this type of modification suggests that multiple methyl transfers to a single polypeptide chain might proceed in a processive manner by cooperation of multiple active sites. However, three different types of experiments provide evidence that the reaction is distributive even with substrates containing multiple methyl-accepting arginines, including one with 13 such residues. PRMT1 also does not prefer substrates already containing one or more singly or doubly methylated arginine residues. Even though the reaction is distributive, the efficiency of methylation of one particular protein strongly depends on the number of methyl-accepting arginine residues it contains. PMID:19158082

  14. Structural basis for Sfm1 functioning as a protein arginine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Fengjuan; Zhang, Tianlong; Zhou, Zhen; Gao, Shuaixin; Wong, Catherine CL; Zhou, Jin-Qiu; Ding, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    SPOUT proteins constitute one class of methyltransferases, which so far are found to exert activity mainly towards RNAs. Previously, yeast Sfm1 was predicted to contain a SPOUT domain but can methylate ribosomal protein S3. Here we report the crystal structure of Sfm1, which comprises of a typical SPOUT domain and a small C-terminal domain. The active site is similar to that of protein arginine methyltransferases but different from that of RNA methyltransferases. In addition, Sfm1 exhibits a negatively charged surface surrounding the active site unsuitable for RNA binding. Our biochemical data show that Sfm1 exists as a monomer and has high activity towards ribosomal protein S3 but no activity towards RNA. It can specifically catalyze the methylation of Arg146 of S3 and the C-terminal domain is critical for substrate binding and activity. These results together provide the structural basis for Sfm1 functioning as a PRMT for ribosomal protein S3.

  15. Two distinct arginine methyltransferases are required for biogenesis of Sm-class ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Tian, Liping; Ospina, Jason K.; Boisvert, François-Michel; Lamond, Angus I.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) are core components of the spliceosome. The U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs each contain a common set of seven Sm proteins. Three of these Sm proteins are posttranslationally modified to contain symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA) residues within their C-terminal tails. However, the precise function of this modification in the snRNP biogenesis pathway is unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that the methyltransferase protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is responsible for sDMA modification of Sm proteins. We found that in human cells, PRMT5 and a newly discovered type II methyltransferase, PRMT7, are each required for Sm protein sDMA modification. Furthermore, we show that the two enzymes function nonredundantly in Sm protein methylation. Lastly, we provide in vivo evidence demonstrating that Sm protein sDMA modification is required for snRNP biogenesis in human cells. PMID:17709427

  16. Molecular characterization, phylogenetic analysis and expression patterns of five protein arginine methyltransferase genes of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein arginine methylation, catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT), has recently emerged as an important modification in the regulation of gene expression. In this communication, we identified and characterized the channel catfish orthologs to human PRMT 1, 3, 4 and 5, and PRMT4 ...

  17. A glutamate/aspartate switch controls product specificity in a protein arginine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Debler, Erik W; Jain, Kanishk; Warmack, Rebeccah A; Feng, You; Clarke, Steven G; Blobel, Günter; Stavropoulos, Pete

    2016-02-23

    Trypanosoma brucei PRMT7 (TbPRMT7) is a protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) that strictly monomethylates various substrates, thus classifying it as a type III PRMT. However, the molecular basis of its unique product specificity has remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of TbPRMT7 in complex with its cofactor product S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.8 Å resolution and identify a glutamate residue critical for its monomethylation behavior. TbPRMT7 comprises the conserved methyltransferase and β-barrel domains, an N-terminal extension, and a dimerization arm. The active site at the interface of the N-terminal extension, methyltransferase, and β-barrel domains is stabilized by the dimerization arm of the neighboring protomer, providing a structural basis for dimerization as a prerequisite for catalytic activity. Mutagenesis of active-site residues highlights the importance of Glu181, the second of the two invariant glutamate residues of the double E loop that coordinate the target arginine in substrate peptides/proteins and that increase its nucleophilicity. Strikingly, mutation of Glu181 to aspartate converts TbPRMT7 into a type I PRMT, producing asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using a histone H4 peptide showed that the Glu181Asp mutant has markedly increased affinity for monomethylated peptide with respect to the WT, suggesting that the enlarged active site can favorably accommodate monomethylated peptide and provide sufficient space for ADMA formation. In conclusion, these findings yield valuable insights into the product specificity and the catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferases and have important implications for the rational (re)design of PRMTs. PMID:26858449

  18. A glutamate/aspartate switch controls product specificity in a protein arginine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Debler, Erik W.; Jain, Kanishk; Warmack, Rebeccah A.; Feng, You; Clarke, Steven G.; Blobel, Günter; Stavropoulos, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei PRMT7 (TbPRMT7) is a protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) that strictly monomethylates various substrates, thus classifying it as a type III PRMT. However, the molecular basis of its unique product specificity has remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of TbPRMT7 in complex with its cofactor product S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.8 Å resolution and identify a glutamate residue critical for its monomethylation behavior. TbPRMT7 comprises the conserved methyltransferase and β-barrel domains, an N-terminal extension, and a dimerization arm. The active site at the interface of the N-terminal extension, methyltransferase, and β-barrel domains is stabilized by the dimerization arm of the neighboring protomer, providing a structural basis for dimerization as a prerequisite for catalytic activity. Mutagenesis of active-site residues highlights the importance of Glu181, the second of the two invariant glutamate residues of the double E loop that coordinate the target arginine in substrate peptides/proteins and that increase its nucleophilicity. Strikingly, mutation of Glu181 to aspartate converts TbPRMT7 into a type I PRMT, producing asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using a histone H4 peptide showed that the Glu181Asp mutant has markedly increased affinity for monomethylated peptide with respect to the WT, suggesting that the enlarged active site can favorably accommodate monomethylated peptide and provide sufficient space for ADMA formation. In conclusion, these findings yield valuable insights into the product specificity and the catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferases and have important implications for the rational (re)design of PRMTs. PMID:26858449

  19. Identification of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 as a Regulator for Encystation of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Yeonchul; Chung, Dong-Il; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Encystation is an essential process for Acanthamoeba survival under nutrient-limiting conditions and exposure to drugs. The expression of several genes has been observed to increase or decrease during encystation. Epigenetic processes involved in regulation of gene expression have been shown to play a role in several pathogenic parasites. In the present study, we identified the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), a known epigenetic regulator, in Acanthamoeba castellanii. PRMT5 of A. castellanii (AcPRMT5) contained domains found in S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases and in PRMT5 arginine-N-methyltransferase. Expression levels of AcPRMT5 were increased during encystation of A. castellanii. The EGFP-PRMT5 fusion protein was mainly localized in the nucleus of trophozoites. A. castellanii transfected with siRNA designed against AcPRMT5 failed to form mature cysts. The findings of this study lead to a better understanding of epigenetic mechanisms behind the regulation of encystation in cyst-forming pathogenic protozoa. PMID:27180570

  20. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of mouse protein arginine methyltransferase 7.

    PubMed

    Cura, Vincent; Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Lambert, Marie-Annick; Bonnefond, Luc; Cavarelli, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) is a unique but less characterized member of the family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) that plays a role in male germline gene imprinting. PRMT7 is the only known PRMT member that catalyzes the monomethylation but not the dimethylation of the target arginine residues and harbours two catalytic domains in tandem. PRMT7 genes from five different species were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Sf21 insect cells. Four gave soluble proteins from Sf21 cells, of which two were homogeneous and one gave crystals. The mouse PRMT7 structure was solved by the single anomalous dispersion method using a crystal soaked with thimerosal that diffracted to beyond 2.1 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 97.4, c = 168.1 Å and one PRMT7 monomer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of another crystal form belonging to space group I222 was solved by molecular replacement. PMID:24419624

  1. The PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase: many roles in development, cancer and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational arginine methylation is responsible for regulation of many biological processes. The protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5, also known as Hsl7, Jbp1, Skb1, Capsuleen, or Dart5) is the major enzyme responsible for mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine. An expanding literature demonstrates its critical biological function in a wide range of cellular processes. Histone and other protein methylation by PRMT5 regulate genome organization, transcription, stem cells, primordial germ cells, differentiation, the cell cycle, and spliceosome assembly. Metazoan PRMT5 is found in complex with the WD-repeat protein MEP50 (also known as Wdr77, androgen receptor coactivator p44, or Valois). PRMT5 also directly associates with a range of other protein factors, including pICln, Menin, CoPR5 and RioK1 that may alter its subcellular localization and protein substrate selection. Protein substrate and PRMT5–MEP50 post-translation modifications induce crosstalk to regulate PRMT5 activity. Crystal structures of C. elegans PRMT5 and human and frog PRMT5–MEP50 complexes provide substantial insight into the mechanisms of substrate recognition and procession to dimethylation. Enzymo-logical studies of PRMT5 have uncovered compelling insights essential for future development of specific PRMT5 inhibitors. In addition, newly accumulating evidence implicates PRMT5 and MEP50 expression levels and their methyltransferase activity in cancer tumorigenesis, and, significantly, as markers of poor clinical outcome, marking them as potential oncogenes. Here, we review the substantial new literature on PRMT5 and its partners to highlight the significance of understanding this essential enzyme in health and disease. PMID:25662273

  2. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel coactivator of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR).

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Inajima, Jun; Kato, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Maika; Tokumoto, Chikako; Kure, Yuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-03-27

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Furthermore, the PRMT-dependent induction of a CAR reporter gene, which was independent of methyltransferase activity, was enhanced in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) or DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase DP97. Using tetracycline inducible-hCAR system in HepG2 cells, we showed that knockdown of PRMT5 with small interfering RNA suppressed tetracycline -induced mRNA expression of CYP2B6 but not of CYP2C9 or CYP3A4. PRMT5 enhanced phenobarbital-mediated transactivation of a phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM)-driven reporter gene in co-operation with PGC-1α in rat primary hepatocytes. Based on these findings, we suggest PRMT5 to be a gene (or promoter)-selective coactivator of CAR by mediating the formation of complexes between hCAR and appropriate coactivators. PMID:25721668

  3. The Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT6 Cooperates with Polycomb Proteins in Regulating HOXA Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Caroline; Bauer, Uta-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) catalyses asymmetric dimethylation of histone H3 at arginine 2 (H3R2me2a), which has been shown to impede the deposition of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) by blocking the binding and activity of the MLL1 complex. Importantly, the genomic occurrence of H3R2me2a has been found to coincide with histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), a repressive histone mark generated by the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Therefore, we investigate here a putative crosstalk between PRMT6- and PRC-mediated repression in a cellular model of neuronal differentiation. We show that PRMT6 and subunits of PRC2 as well as PRC1 are bound to the same regulatory regions of rostral HOXA genes and that they control the differentiation-associated activation of these genes. Furthermore, we find that PRMT6 interacts with subunits of PRC1 and PRC2 and that depletion of PRMT6 results in diminished PRC1/PRC2 and H3K27me3 occupancy and in increased H3K4me3 levels at these target genes. Taken together, our data uncover a novel, additional mechanism of how PRMT6 contributes to gene repression by cooperating with Polycomb proteins. PMID:26848759

  4. The arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 regulates CIITA-dependent MHC II transcription.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhiwen; Kong, Xiaocen; Xia, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, He; Xu, Huihui; Fang, Mingming; Xu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC II) dependent antigen presentation serves as a key step in mammalian adaptive immunity and host defense. In antigen presenting cells (e.g., macrophages), MHC II transcription can be activated by interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and mediated by class II transactivator (CIITA). The underlying epigenetic mechanism, however, is not completely understood. Here we report that following IFN-γ stimulation, symmetrically dimethylated histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2Me2s) accumulated on the MHC II promoter along with CIITA. IFN-γ augmented expression, nuclear translocation, and promoter binding of the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 in macrophages. Over-expression of PRMT5 potentiated IFN-γ induced activation of MHC II transcription in an enzyme activity-dependent manner. In contrast, PRMT5 silencing or inhibition of PRMT5 activity by methylthioadenosine (MTA) suppressed MHC II transactivation by IFN-γ. CIITA interacted with and recruited PRMT5 to the MHC II promoter and mediated the synergy between PRMT5 and ASH2/WDR5 to activate MHC II transcription. PRMT5 expression was down-regulated in senescent and H2O2-treated macrophages rendering ineffectual induction of MHC II transcription by IFN-γ. Taken together, our data reveal a pathophysiologically relevant role for PRMT5 in MHC II transactivation in macrophages. PMID:26972221

  5. Genetic validation of the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 as a candidate therapeutic target in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fengting; Alinari, Lapo; Lustberg, Mark E.; Martin, Ludmila Katherine; Cordero-Nieves, Hector M.; Banasavadi-Siddegowda, Yeshavanth; Virk, Selene; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Bell, Erica Hlavin; Wojton, Jeffrey; Jacob, Naduparambil K.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Nowicki, Michal O.; Wu, Xin; Lapalombella, Rosa; Datta, Jharna; Yu, Bo; Gordon, Kate; Haseley, Amy; Patton, John T.; Smith, Porsha L.; Ryu, John; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mo, Xiaokui; Marcucci, Guido; Nuovo, Gerard; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Byrd, John C.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Li, Chenglong; Sif, Said; Jacob, Samson; Lawler, Sean; Kaur, Balveen; Baiocchi, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive histologic subtype of brain cancer with poor outcomes and limited treatment options. Here we report the selective overexpression of the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 as a novel candidate theranostic target in this disease. PRMT5 silences the transcription of regulatory genes by catalyzing symmetric di-methylation of arginine residues on histone tails. PRMT5 overexpression in patient-derived primary tumors and cell lines correlated with cell line growth rate and inversely with overall patient survival. Genetic attenuation of PRMT5 led to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and loss of cell migratory activity. Cell death was p53-independent but caspase-dependent and enhanced with temozolomide, a chemotherapeutic agent used as a present standard of care. Global gene profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified the tumor suppressor ST7 as a key gene silenced by PRMT5. Diminished ST7 expression was associated with reduced patient survival. PRMT5 attenuation limited PRMT5 recruitment to the ST7 promoter, led to restored expression of ST7 and cell growth inhibition. Lastly, PRMT5 attenuation enhanced GBM cell survival in a mouse xenograft model of aggressive GBM. Together, our findings defined PRMT5 as a candidate prognostic factor and therapeutic target in GBM, offering a preclinical justification for targeting PRMT5-driven oncogenic pathways in this deadly disease. PMID:24453002

  6. Using oriented peptide array libraries to evaluate methylarginine-specific antibodies and arginine methyltransferase substrate motifs.

    PubMed

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Cowles, Martis W; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Cheng, Donghang; Sun, Zu-Wen; Bedford, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction in response to stimuli relies on the generation of cascades of posttranslational modifications that promote protein-protein interactions and facilitate the assembly of distinct signaling complexes. Arginine methylation is one such modification, which is catalyzed by a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases, or PRMTs. Elucidating the substrate specificity of each PRMT will promote a better understanding of which signaling networks these enzymes contribute to. Although many PRMT substrates have been identified, and their methylation sites mapped, the optimal target motif for each of the nine PRMTs has not been systematically addressed. Here we describe the use of Oriented Peptide Array Libraries (OPALs) to methodically dissect the preferred methylation motifs for three of these enzymes - PRMT1, CARM1 and PRMT9. In parallel, we show that an OPAL platform with a fixed methylarginine residue can be used to validate the methyl-specific and sequence-specific properties of antibodies that have been generated against different PRMT substrates, and can also be used to confirm the pan nature of some methylarginine-specific antibodies. PMID:27338245

  7. Using oriented peptide array libraries to evaluate methylarginine-specific antibodies and arginine methyltransferase substrate motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Cowles, Martis W.; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Cheng, Donghang; Sun, Zu-Wen; Bedford, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction in response to stimuli relies on the generation of cascades of posttranslational modifications that promote protein-protein interactions and facilitate the assembly of distinct signaling complexes. Arginine methylation is one such modification, which is catalyzed by a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases, or PRMTs. Elucidating the substrate specificity of each PRMT will promote a better understanding of which signaling networks these enzymes contribute to. Although many PRMT substrates have been identified, and their methylation sites mapped, the optimal target motif for each of the nine PRMTs has not been systematically addressed. Here we describe the use of Oriented Peptide Array Libraries (OPALs) to methodically dissect the preferred methylation motifs for three of these enzymes – PRMT1, CARM1 and PRMT9. In parallel, we show that an OPAL platform with a fixed methylarginine residue can be used to validate the methyl-specific and sequence-specific properties of antibodies that have been generated against different PRMT substrates, and can also be used to confirm the pan nature of some methylarginine-specific antibodies. PMID:27338245

  8. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel coactivator of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Yuichiro Inajima, Jun; Kato, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Maika; Tokumoto, Chikako; Kure, Yuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-03-27

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Furthermore, the PRMT-dependent induction of a CAR reporter gene, which was independent of methyltransferase activity, was enhanced in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) or DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase DP97. Using tetracycline inducible-hCAR system in HepG2 cells, we showed that knockdown of PRMT5 with small interfering RNA suppressed tetracycline -induced mRNA expression of CYP2B6 but not of CYP2C9 or CYP3A4. PRMT5 enhanced phenobarbital-mediated transactivation of a phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM)-driven reporter gene in co-operation with PGC-1α in rat primary hepatocytes. Based on these findings, we suggest PRMT5 to be a gene (or promoter)-selective coactivator of CAR by mediating the formation of complexes between hCAR and appropriate coactivators. - Highlights: • Nuclear receptor CAR interact with PRMT5. • PRMT5 enhances transcriptional activity of CAR. • PRMT5 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1, DP97 or PGC1α. • PRMT5 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR.

  9. MTAP deletion confers enhanced dependency on the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase in cancer cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The discovery of cancer dependencies has the potential to inform therapeutic strategies and to identify putative drug targets. Integrating data from comprehensive genomic profiling of cancer cell lines and from functional characterization of cancer cell dependencies, we discovered that loss of the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) confers a selective dependence on protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and its binding partner WDR77. MTAP is frequently lost due to its proximity to the commonly deleted tumor suppressor gene, CDKN2A.

  10. Identification of Methylated Proteins in the Yeast Small Ribosomal Subunit: A Role for SPOUT Methyltransferases in Protein Arginine Methylation†

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian D.; Weiss, David I.; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.; McBride, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    We have characterized the posttranslational methylation of Rps2, Rps3, and Rps27a, three small ribosomal subunit proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. We found that Rps2 is substoichiometrically modified at arginine-10 by the Rmt1 methyltransferase. We demonstrated that Rps3 is stoichiometrically modified by ω-monomethylation at arginine-146 by mass spectrometric and site-directed mutagenic analyses. Substitution of alanine for arginine at position 146 is associated with slow cell growth, suggesting that the amino acid identity at this site may influence ribosomal function and/or biogenesis. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Rps3 in S. cerevisiae shows that arginine-146 makes contacts with the small subunit rRNA. Screening of deletion mutants encoding potential yeast methyltransferases revealed that the loss of the YOR021C gene results in the absence of methylation on Rps3. We demonstrated that recombinant Yor021c catalyzes ω-monomethylarginine formation when incubated with S-adenosylmethionine and hypomethylated ribosomes prepared from a YOR021C deletion strain. Interestingly, Yor021c belongs to the family of SPOUT methyltransferases that, to date, have only been shown to modify RNA substrates. Our findings suggest a wider role for SPOUT methyltransferases in nature. Finally, we have demonstrated the presence of a stoichiometrically methylated cysteine residue at position 39 of Rps27a in a zinc-cysteine cluster. The discovery of these three novel sites of protein modification within the small ribosomal subunit will now allow for an analysis of their functional roles in translation and possibly other cellular processes. PMID:22650761

  11. Unique Features of Human Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 9 (PRMT9) and Its Substrate RNA Splicing Factor SF3B2*

    PubMed Central

    Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Yang, Yanzhong; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Human protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 9 symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues on splicing factor SF3B2 (SAP145) and has been functionally linked to the regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis studies on this enzyme and its substrate had revealed essential unique residues in the double E loop and the importance of the C-terminal duplicated methyltransferase domain. In contrast to what had been observed with other PRMTs and their physiological substrates, a peptide containing the methylatable Arg-508 of SF3B2 was not recognized by PRMT9 in vitro. Although amino acid substitutions of residues surrounding Arg-508 had no great effect on PRMT9 recognition of SF3B2, moving the arginine residue within this sequence abolished methylation. PRMT9 and PRMT5 are the only known mammalian enzymes capable of forming symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) residues as type II PRMTs. We demonstrate here that the specificity of these enzymes for their substrates is distinct and not redundant. The loss of PRMT5 activity in mouse embryo fibroblasts results in almost complete loss of SDMA, suggesting that PRMT5 is the primary SDMA-forming enzyme in these cells. PRMT9, with its duplicated methyltransferase domain and conserved sequence in the double E loop, appears to have a unique structure and specificity among PRMTs for methylating SF3B2 and potentially other polypeptides. PMID:25979344

  12. Myc and Omomyc functionally associate with the Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mongiardi, Maria Patrizia; Savino, Mauro; Bartoli, Laura; Beji, Sara; Nanni, Simona; Scagnoli, Fiorella; Falchetti, Maria Laura; Favia, Annarita; Farsetti, Antonella; Levi, Andrea; Nasi, Sergio; Illi, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc protein is dysregulated in many human cancers and its function has not been fully elucitated yet. The c-Myc inhibitor Omomyc displays potent anticancer properties in animal models. It perturbs the c-Myc protein network, impairs c-Myc binding to the E-boxes, retaining transrepressive properties and inducing histone deacetylation. Here we have employed Omomyc to further analyse c-Myc activity at the epigenetic level. We show that both Myc and Omomyc stimulate histone H4 symmetric dimethylation of arginine (R) 3 (H4R3me2s), in human glioblastoma and HEK293T cells. Consistently, both associated with protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5)—the catalyst of the reaction—and its co-factor Methylosome Protein 50 (MEP50). Confocal experiments showed that Omomyc co-localized with c-Myc, PRMT5 and H4R3me2s-enriched chromatin domains. Finally, interfering with PRMT5 activity impaired target gene activation by Myc whereas it restrained Omomyc-dependent repression. The identification of a histone-modifying complex associated with Omomyc represents the first demonstration of an active role of this miniprotein in modifying chromatin structure and adds new information regarding its action on c-Myc targets. More importantly, the observation that c-Myc may recruit PRMT5-MEP50, inducing H4R3 symmetric di-methylation, suggests previously unpredictable roles for c-Myc in gene expression regulation and new potential targets for therapy. PMID:26563484

  13. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 is a key regulator of the MYCN oncoprotein in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hyun; Szemes, Marianna; Vieira, Gabriella Cunha; Melegh, Zsombor; Malik, Sally; Heesom, Kate J; Von Wallwitz-Freitas, Laura; Greenhough, Alexander; Brown, Keith W; Zheng, Y George; Catchpoole, Daniel; Deery, Michael J; Malik, Karim

    2015-03-01

    Approximately half of poor prognosis neuroblastomas (NBs) are characterized by pathognomonic MYCN gene amplification and MYCN over-expression. Here we present data showing that short-interfering RNA mediated depletion of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) in cell-lines representative of NBs with MYCN gene amplification leads to greatly impaired growth and apoptosis. Growth suppression is not apparent in the MYCN-negative SH-SY5Y NB cell-line, or in two immortalized human fibroblast cell-lines. Immunoblotting of NB cell-lines shows that high PRMT5 expression is strongly associated with MYCN-amplification (P < 0.004, Mann-Whitney U-test) and immunohistochemical analysis of primary NBs reveals that whilst PRMT5 protein is ubiquitously expressed in the cytoplasm of most cells, MYCN-amplified tumours exhibit pronounced nuclear PRMT5 staining. PRMT5 knockdown in MYCN-overexpressing cells, including the SHEP-21N cell-line with inducible MYCN expression leads to a dramatic decrease in MYCN protein and MYCN-associated cell-death in SHEP-21N cells. Quantitative gene expression analysis and cycloheximide chase experiments suggest that PRMT5 regulates MYCN at a post-transcriptional level. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that endogenous PRMT5 and MYCN interact in both SK-N-BE(2)C and NGP cell lines. By using liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of immunoprecipitated MYCN protein, we identified several potential sites of arginine dimethylation on the MYCN protein. Together our studies implicate PRMT5 in a novel mode of MYCN post-translational regulation and suggest PRMT5 plays a major role in NB tumorigenesis. Small-molecule inhibitors of PRMT5 may therefore represent a novel therapeutic strategy for neuroblastoma and other cancers driven by the MYCN oncogene. PMID:25475372

  14. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 is associated with malignant phenotype and peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Shimizu, Dai; Fujii, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Haruyoshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Iwata, Naoki; Hayashi, Masamichi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Chie; Yamada, Suguru; Nakayama, Goro; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Koike, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Identification of novel gastric cancer (GC)-related molecules is necessary to improve management of patients with GC in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. The aim of the present study was to determine whether protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) acts as an oncogene in the progression of GC and whether it serves as a novel diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. We conducted global expression profiling of GC cell lines and RNA interference experiments to evaluate the effect of PRMT5 expression on the phenotype of GC cells. We analysed tissues of 179 patients with GC to assess the association of PRMT5 mRNA levels with clinicopathological factors. Differential expression of PRMT5 mRNA by GC cell lines correlated positively with the levels of GEMIN2, STAT3 and TGFB3. PRMT5 knockdown reduced the proliferation, invasion and migration of a GC cell line. PRMT5 mRNA levels were significantly higher in GC tissues than the corresponding adjacent normal tissues and were independent of tumour depth, differentiation and lymph node metastasis. High PRMT5 expression was an independent risk factor of positive peritoneal lavage cytology (odds ratio 3.90, P=0.003) and decreased survival. PRMT5 enhances the malignant phenotype of GC cell lines and its expression in gastric tissues may serve as a biomarker for patient stratification and a potential target of therapy. PMID:27315569

  15. Exploration of Cyanine Compounds as Selective Inhibitors of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is involved in many biological activities, such as gene transcription, signal transduction, and RNA processing. Overexpression of PRMT1 is related to cardiovascular diseases, kidney diseases, and cancers; therefore, selective PRMT1 inhibitors serve as chemical probes to investigate the biological function of PRMT1 and drug candidates for disease treatment. Our previous work found trimethine cyanine compounds that effectively inhibit PRMT1 activity. In our present study, we systematically investigated the structure–activity relationship of cyanine structures. A pentamethine compound, E-84 (compound 50), showed inhibition on PRMT1 at the micromolar level and 6- to 25-fold selectivity over CARM1, PRMT5, and PRMT8. The cellular activity suggests that compound 50 permeated the cellular membrane, inhibited cellular PRMT1 activity, and blocked leukemia cell proliferation. Additionally, our molecular docking study suggested compound 50 might act by occupying the cofactor binding site, which provided a roadmap to guide further optimization of this lead compound. PMID:25559100

  16. Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through the induction of MMP9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R. Mitchell; Haghandish, Nasim; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Amin, Shahrier; Paris, Geneviève; Falls, Theresa J.; Bell, John C.; Islam, Shahidul; Côté, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes playing critical roles in cancer. PRMT7 has been identified in several gene expression studies to be associated with increased metastasis and decreased survival in breast cancer patients. However, this has not been extensively studied. Here we report that PRMT7 expression is significantly upregulated in both primary breast tumour tissues and in breast cancer lymph node metastases. We have demonstrated that reducing PRMT7 levels in invasive breast cancer cells using RNA interference significantly decreased cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of PRMT7 in non-aggressive MCF7 cells enhanced their invasiveness. Furthermore, we show that PRMT7 induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a well-known mediator of breast cancer metastasis. Importantly, we significantly rescued invasion of aggressive breast cancer cells depleted of PRMT7 by the exogenous expression of MMP9. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of PRMT7 in breast cancer may have a significant role in promoting cell invasion through the regulation of MMP9. This identifies PRMT7 as a novel and potentially significant biomarker and therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:25605249

  17. Novel Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 8 Isoform Is Essential for Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sarah; Dominko, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    Identification of molecular mechanisms that regulate cellular replicative lifespan is needed to better understand the transition between a normal and a neoplastic cell phenotype. We have previously reported that low oxygen-mediated activity of FGF2 leads to an increase in cellular lifespan and acquisition of regeneration competence in human dermal fibroblasts (iRC cells). Though cells display a more plastic developmental phenotype, they remain non-tumorigenic when injected into SCID mice (Page et al. [2009] Cloning Stem Cells 11:417-426; Page et al. [2011] Eng Part A 17:2629-2640) allowing for investigation of mechanisms that regulate increased cellular lifespan in a non-tumorigenic system. Analysis of chromatin modification enzymes by qRT-PCR revealed a 13.3-fold upregulation of the arginine methyltransferase PRMT8 in iRC cells. Increased protein expression was confirmed in both iRC and human embryonic stem cells-the first demonstration of endogenous human PRMT8 expression outside the brain. Furthermore, iRC cells express a novel PRMT8 mRNA variant. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown we demonstrated that this novel variant was required for proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) and grade IV glioblastomas. PRMT8 upregulation in a non-tumorigenic system may offer a potential diagnostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for cells in pre-cancerous and cancerous states. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2056-2066, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26851891

  18. Toxoplasma gondii Arginine Methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) Is Necessary for Centrosome Dynamics during Tachyzoite Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    El Bissati, Kamal; Suvorova, Elena S.; Xiao, Hui; Lucas, Olivier; Upadhya, Rajendra; Ma, Yanfen; Hogue Angeletti, Ruth; White, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arginine methyltransferase family (PRMT) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including signal transduction, epigenetic regulation, and DNA repair pathways. PRMT1 is thought to be responsible for the majority of PRMT activity in Toxoplasma gondii, but its exact function is unknown. To further define the biological function of the PRMT family, we generated T. gondii mutants lacking PRMT1 (Δprmt1) by deletion of the PRMT1 gene. Δprmt1 parasites exhibit morphological defects during cell division and grow slowly, and this phenotype reverses in the Δprmt::PRMT1mRFP complemented strain. Tagged PRMT1 localizes primarily in the cytoplasm with enrichment at the pericentriolar material, and the strain lacking PRMT1 is unable to segregate progeny accurately. Unlike wild-type and complemented parasites, Δprmt1 parasites have abnormal daughter buds, perturbed centrosome stoichiometry, and loss of synchronous replication. Whole-genome expression profiling demonstrated differences in expression of cell-cycle-regulated genes in the Δprmt1 strain relative to the complemented Δprmt1::PRMT1mRFP and parental wild-type strains, but these changes do not correlate with a specific block in cell cycle. Although PRMT1’s primary biological function was previously proposed to be methylation of histones, our studies suggest that PRMT1 plays an important role within the centrosome to ensure the proper replication of the parasite. PMID:26838719

  19. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  20. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  1. C9orf72 repeat expansions cause neurodegeneration in Drosophila through arginine-rich proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ridler, Charlotte E.; Clayton, Emma L.; Devoy, Anny; Moens, Thomas; Norona, Frances E.; Woollacott, Ione O.C.; Pietrzyk, Julian; Cleverley, Karen; Nicoll, Andrew J.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Dols, Jacqueline; Cabecinha, Melissa; Hendrich, Oliver; Fratta, Pietro; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Partridge, Linda; Isaacs, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    An expanded GGGGCC repeat in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A fundamental question is whether toxicity is driven by the repeat RNA itself and/or by dipeptide repeat proteins generated by repeat-associated, non-ATG translation. To address this question we developed in vitro and in vivo models to dissect repeat RNA and dipeptide repeat protein toxicity. Expression of pure repeats in Drosophila caused adult-onset neurodegeneration attributable to poly-(glycine-arginine) proteins. Thus expanded repeats promoted neurodegeneration through neurotoxic proteins. Expression of individual dipeptide repeat proteins with a non-GGGGCC RNA sequence showed both poly-(glycine-arginine) and poly-(proline-arginine) proteins caused neurodegeneration. These findings are consistent with a dual toxicity mechanism, whereby both arginine-rich proteins and repeat RNA contribute to C9orf72-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:25103406

  2. Genomic insights of protein arginine methyltransferase Hmt1 binding reveals novel regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein arginine methylation is a post-translational modification involved in important biological processes such as transcription and RNA processing. This modification is catalyzed by both type I and II protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). One of the most conserved type I PRMTs is PRMT1, the homolog of which is Hmt1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hmt1 has been shown to play a role in various gene expression steps, such as promoting the dynamics of messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) biogenesis, pre-mRNA splicing, and silencing of chromatin. To determine the full extent of Hmt1’s involvement during gene expression, we carried out a genome-wide location analysis for Hmt1. Results A comprehensive genome-wide binding profile for Hmt1 was obtained by ChIP-chip using NimbleGen high-resolution tiling microarrays. Of the approximately 1000 Hmt1-binding sites found, the majority fall within or proximal to an ORF. Different occupancy patterns of Hmt1 across genes with different transcriptional rates were found. Interestingly, Hmt1 occupancy is found at a number of other genomic features such as tRNA and snoRNA genes, thereby implicating a regulatory role in the biogenesis of these non-coding RNAs. RNA hybridization analysis shows that Hmt1 loss-of-function mutants display higher steady-state tRNA abundance relative to the wild-type. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that Hmt1 interacts with the TFIIIB component Bdp1, suggesting a mechanism for Hmt1 in modulating RNA Pol III transcription to regulate tRNA production. Conclusions The genome-wide binding profile of Hmt1 reveals multiple potential new roles for Hmt1 in the control of eukaryotic gene expression, especially in the realm of non-coding RNAs. The data obtained here will provide an important blueprint for future mechanistic studies on the described occupancy relationship for genomic features bound by Hmt1. PMID:23268696

  3. Protein N-arginine methyltransferase 5 promotes the tumor progression and radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daoke; Liang, Tiansong; Gu, Yue; Zhao, Yulin; Shi, Yonggang; Zuo, Xiaoxiao; Cao, Qinchen; Yang, Ya; Kan, Quancheng

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy resistance is the main cause of the the poor prognosis of some nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Yet, the exact mechanism is still elusive. In the present study, we explored the clinical and biological role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) in NPC. Our results revealed that PRMT5 was overexpressed in NPC tissues when compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. High expression of PRMT5 was correlated with adverse outcomes of NPC patients as determined by the scoring of a tissue microarray. Silencing of PRMT5 promoted the radiosensitivity of 5-8F and CNE2 cells as determined by cell proliferation and colony formation assays. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) was identified as one of the downstream targets of PRMT5, and the silencing of PRMT5 decreased the mRNA and protein levels of FGFR3 in the 5-8F and CNE2 cells. Silencing of FGFR3 induced similar phenotypes as the inhibition of PRMT5, and re-expression of FGFR3 in 5-8F/shPRMT5 and CNE2/shPRMT5 cells restored the proliferation and colony formation ability induced by irradiation exposure. Our results indicate that PRMT5 is a marker of poor prognosis in NPC patients. PRMT5 promoted the radioresistance of NPC cells via targeting FGFR3, at least partly if not totally. PRMT5 and its downstream effector FGFR3 may be potential targets for anticancer strategy. PMID:26708443

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of isolated modules of the mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Cura, Vincent; Hassenboehler, Pierre; Moras, Dino; Cavarelli, Jean

    2007-04-01

    Isolated modules of mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 encompassing the protein arginine N-methyltransferase catalytic domain have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected and have enabled determination of the structures by multiple isomorphous replacement using anomalous scattering. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) plays a crucial role in gene expression as a coactivator of several nuclear hormone receptors and also of non-nuclear receptor systems. Its recruitment by the transcriptional machinery induces protein methylation, leading to chromatin remodelling and gene activation. CARM1{sub 28–507} and two structural states of CARM1{sub 140–480} were expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of CARM1{sub 28–507} belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.0, c = 125.3 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and contain one monomer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of CARM1{sub 28–507} was solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and anomalous scattering methods. Crystals of apo CARM1{sub 140–480} belong to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 99.0, c = 207.4 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.7 Å resolution and contain two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of CARM1{sub 140–480} in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine belong to space P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 98.65, c = 206.08 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution and contain four monomers in the asymmetric unit. The structures of apo and holo CARM1{sub 140–480} were solved by molecular-replacement techniques from the structure of CARM1{sub 28–507}.

  5. Improving treatment of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency: reduction of guanidinoacetic acid in body fluids by arginine restriction and ornithine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A; Ebinger, F; Rating, D; Mayatepek, E

    2001-12-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency (McKusick 601240), an inborn error of creatine biosynthesis, is characterized by creatine depletion and accumulation of guanidinoacetate (GAA) in the brain. Treatment by oral creatine supplementation had no effect on the intractable seizures. Based on the possible role of GAA as an epileptogenic agent, we evaluated a dietary treatment with arginine restriction and ornithine supplementation in order to achieve reduction of GAA. In an 8-year-old Kurdish girl with GAMT deficiency arginine intake was restricted to 15 mg/kg/day (0.4 g natural protein/kg/day) and ornithine was supplemented with 100 mg/kg/day over a period of 14 months. The diet was enriched with 0.4 g/kg/day of arginine-free essential amino acid mixture and creatine treatment remained unchanged (1.1 g/kg/day). Guanidino compounds in blood, urine, and CSF were measured by means of cation-exchange chromatography. The combination of arginine restriction and ornithine supplementation led to a substantial and permanent decrease of arginine without disturbance of nitrogen detoxification. Formation of GAA was effectively reduced after 4 weeks of treatment and sustained thereafter. Biochemical effects were accompanied by a marked clinical improvement. Distinctly reduced epileptogenic activities in electroencephalography accompanied by almost complete disappearance of seizures demonstrates the positive effect of GAA reduction. This indicates for the first time that GAA may exert an important epileptogenic potential in man. Arginine restriction in combination with ornithine supplementation represents a new and rationale therapeutic approach in GAMT deficiency. PMID:11749046

  6. Protein arginine methyltransferase CARM1 attenuates the paraspeckle-mediated nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi-Bin; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Li, Xiang; Xu, Yefen; Xue, Wei; Huang, Min; Wong, Catharine C; Sagum, Cari A; Bedford, Mark T; Yang, Li; Cheng, Donghang; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2015-03-15

    In many cells, mRNAs containing inverted repeated Alu elements (IRAlus) in their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) are inefficiently exported to the cytoplasm. Such nuclear retention correlates with paraspeckle-associated protein complexes containing p54(nrb). However, nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus is variable, and how regulation of retention and export is achieved is poorly understood. Here we show one mechanism of such regulation via the arginine methyltransferase CARM1 (coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1). We demonstrate that disruption of CARM1 enhances the nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus. CARM1 regulates this nuclear retention pathway at two levels: CARM1 methylates the coiled-coil domain of p54(nrb), resulting in reduced binding of p54(nrb) to mRNAs containing IRAlus, and also acts as a transcription regulator to suppress NEAT1 transcription, leading to reduced paraspeckle formation. These actions of CARM1 work together synergistically to regulate the export of transcripts containing IRAlus from paraspeckles under certain cellular stresses, such as poly(I:C) treatment. This work demonstrates how a post-translational modification of an RNA-binding protein affects protein-RNA interaction and also uncovers a mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the long noncoding RNA NEAT1. PMID:25792598

  7. Protein arginine methyltransferase CARM1 attenuates the paraspeckle-mediated nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shi-Bin; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Li, Xiang; Xu, Yefen; Xue, Wei; Huang, Min; Wong, Catharine C.; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    In many cells, mRNAs containing inverted repeated Alu elements (IRAlus) in their 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) are inefficiently exported to the cytoplasm. Such nuclear retention correlates with paraspeckle-associated protein complexes containing p54nrb. However, nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus is variable, and how regulation of retention and export is achieved is poorly understood. Here we show one mechanism of such regulation via the arginine methyltransferase CARM1 (coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1). We demonstrate that disruption of CARM1 enhances the nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus. CARM1 regulates this nuclear retention pathway at two levels: CARM1 methylates the coiled-coil domain of p54nrb, resulting in reduced binding of p54nrb to mRNAs containing IRAlus, and also acts as a transcription regulator to suppress NEAT1 transcription, leading to reduced paraspeckle formation. These actions of CARM1 work together synergistically to regulate the export of transcripts containing IRAlus from paraspeckles under certain cellular stresses, such as poly(I:C) treatment. This work demonstrates how a post-translational modification of an RNA-binding protein affects protein–RNA interaction and also uncovers a mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the long noncoding RNA NEAT1. PMID:25792598

  8. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-gamma-inducible MHC-II gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-11-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, CARM1, and the acetyltransferase cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during this process. CARM1 synergizes with CIITA in activating MHC-II transcription and synergy is abrogated when an arginine methyltransferase-defective CARM1 mutant is used. Protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 has much less effect on MHC-II transcription. Specific RNA interference reduced CARM1 expression as well as MHC-II expression. The recruitment of CARM1 to the promoter requires endogenous CIITA and results in methylation of histone H3-R17; hence, CIITA is an upstream regulator of histone methylation. Previous work has shown that CARM1 can methylate CBP at three arginine residues. Using wild-type CBP and a mutant of CBP lacking the CARM1-targeted arginine residues (R3A), we show that arginine methylation of CBP is required for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. A kinetic analysis shows that CIITA, CARM1, and H3-R17 methylation all precede CBP loading on the MHC-II promoter during IFN-gamma treatment. These results suggest functional and temporal relationships among CIITA, CARM1, and CBP for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. PMID:16254053

  9. Arginine and proline applied as food additives stimulate high freeze tolerance in larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an insect of tropical origin. Its larval stage is evolutionarily adapted for rapid growth and development under warm conditions and shows high sensitivity to cold. In this study, we further developed an optimal acclimation and freezing protocol that significantly improves larval freeze tolerance (an ability to survive at -5°C when most of the freezable fraction of water is converted to ice). Using the optimal protocol, freeze survival to adult stage increased from 0.7% to 12.6% in the larvae fed standard diet (agar, sugar, yeast, cornmeal). Next, we fed the larvae diets augmented with 31 different amino compounds, administered in different concentrations, and observed their effects on larval metabolomic composition, viability, rate of development and freeze tolerance. While some diet additives were toxic, others showed positive effects on freeze tolerance. Statistical correlation revealed tight association between high freeze tolerance and high levels of amino compounds involved in arginine and proline metabolism. Proline- and arginine-augmented diets showed the highest potential, improving freeze survival to 42.1% and 50.6%, respectively. Two plausible mechanisms by which high concentrations of proline and arginine might stimulate high freeze tolerance are discussed: (i) proline, probably in combination with trehalose, could reduce partial unfolding of proteins and prevent membrane fusions in the larvae exposed to thermal stress (prior to freezing) or during freeze dehydration; (ii) both arginine and proline are exceptional among amino compounds in their ability to form supramolecular aggregates which probably bind partially unfolded proteins and inhibit their aggregation under increasing freeze dehydration. PMID:27489218

  10. The protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT6 inhibits HIV-1 Tat nucleolar retention.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Alex J; Sivakumaran, Haran; Jin, Hongping; Rawle, Daniel J; Harrich, David; Jans, David A

    2016-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivator protein Tat is known to play a key role in HIV infection, integrally related to its role in the host cell nucleus/nucleolus. Here we show for the first time that Tat localisation can be modulated by specific methylation, whereby overexpression of active but not catalytically inactive PRMT6 methyltransferase specifically leads to exclusion of Tat from the nucleolus. An R52/53A mutated Tat derivative does not show this redistribution, implying that R52/53, within Tat's nuclear/nucleolar localisation signal, are the targets of PRMT6 activity. Analysis using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching indicate that Tat nucleolar accumulation is largely through binding to nucleolar components, with methylation of Tat by PRMT6 preventing this. To our knowledge, this is the first report of specific protein methylation inhibiting nucleolar retention. PMID:26611710

  11. Mapping of Post-translational Modifications of Transition Proteins, TP1 and TP2, and Identification of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 4 and Lysine Methyltransferase 7 as Methyltransferase for TP2*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nikhil; Madapura, M. Pradeepa; Bhat, U. Anayat; Rao, M. R. Satyanarayana

    2015-01-01

    In a unique global chromatin remodeling process during mammalian spermiogenesis, 90% of the nucleosomal histones are replaced by testis-specific transition proteins, TP1, TP2, and TP4. These proteins are further substituted by sperm-specific protamines, P1 and P2, to form a highly condensed sperm chromatin. In spermatozoa, a small proportion of chromatin, which ranges from 1 to 10% in mammals, retains the nucleosomal architecture and is implicated to play a role in transgenerational inheritance. However, there is still no mechanistic understanding of the interaction of chromatin machinery with histones and transition proteins, which facilitate this selective histone replacement from chromatin. Here, we report the identification of 16 and 19 novel post-translational modifications on rat endogenous transition proteins, TP1 and TP2, respectively, by mass spectrometry. By in vitro assays and mutational analysis, we demonstrate that protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT4 (CARM1) methylates TP2 at Arg71, Arg75, and Arg92 residues, and lysine methyltransferase KMT7 (Set9) methylates TP2 at Lys88 and Lys91 residues. Further studies with modification-specific antibodies that recognize TP2K88me1 and TP2R92me1 modifications showed that they appear in elongating to condensing spermatids and predominantly associated with the chromatin-bound TP2. This work establishes the repertoire of post-translational modifications that occur on TP1 and TP2, which may play a significant role in various chromatin-templated events during spermiogenesis and in the establishment of the sperm epigenome. PMID:25818198

  12. Mapping of Post-translational Modifications of Transition Proteins, TP1 and TP2, and Identification of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 4 and Lysine Methyltransferase 7 as Methyltransferase for TP2.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nikhil; Madapura, M Pradeepa; Bhat, U Anayat; Rao, M R Satyanarayana

    2015-05-01

    In a unique global chromatin remodeling process during mammalian spermiogenesis, 90% of the nucleosomal histones are replaced by testis-specific transition proteins, TP1, TP2, and TP4. These proteins are further substituted by sperm-specific protamines, P1 and P2, to form a highly condensed sperm chromatin. In spermatozoa, a small proportion of chromatin, which ranges from 1 to 10% in mammals, retains the nucleosomal architecture and is implicated to play a role in transgenerational inheritance. However, there is still no mechanistic understanding of the interaction of chromatin machinery with histones and transition proteins, which facilitate this selective histone replacement from chromatin. Here, we report the identification of 16 and 19 novel post-translational modifications on rat endogenous transition proteins, TP1 and TP2, respectively, by mass spectrometry. By in vitro assays and mutational analysis, we demonstrate that protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT4 (CARM1) methylates TP2 at Arg(71), Arg(75), and Arg(92) residues, and lysine methyltransferase KMT7 (Set9) methylates TP2 at Lys(88) and Lys(91) residues. Further studies with modification-specific antibodies that recognize TP2K88me1 and TP2R92me1 modifications showed that they appear in elongating to condensing spermatids and predominantly associated with the chromatin-bound TP2. This work establishes the repertoire of post-translational modifications that occur on TP1 and TP2, which may play a significant role in various chromatin-templated events during spermiogenesis and in the establishment of the sperm epigenome. PMID:25818198

  13. RmtA, a Putative Arginine Methyltransferase, Regulates Secondary Metabolism and Development in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Satterlee, Timothy; Cary, Jeffrey W; Calvo, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes numerous oil seed crops such as corn, peanuts, treenuts and cotton worldwide, contaminating them with aflatoxin and other harmful potent toxins. In the phylogenetically related model fungus Aspergillus nidulans, the methyltransferase, RmtA, has been described to be involved in epigenetics regulation through histone modification. Epigenetics regulation affects a variety of cellular processes, including morphogenesis and secondary metabolism. Our study shows that deletion of rmtA in A. flavus results in hyperconidiating colonies, indicating that rmtA is a repressor of asexual development in this fungus. The increase in conidiation in the absence of rmtA coincides with greater expression of brlA, abaA, and wetA compared to that in the wild type. Additionally, the rmtA deletion mutant presents a drastic reduction or loss of sclerotial production, while forced expression of this gene increased the ability of this fungus to generate these resistant structures, revealing rmtA as a positive regulator of sclerotial formation. Importantly, rmtA is also required for the production of aflatoxin B1 in A. flavus, affecting the expression of aflJ. Furthermore, biosynthesis of additional metabolites is also controlled by rmtA, indicating a broad regulatory output in the control of secondary metabolism. This study also revealed that rmtA positively regulates the expression of the global regulatory gene veA, which could contribute to mediate the effects of rmtA on development and secondary metabolism in this relevant opportunistic plant pathogen. PMID:27213959

  14. RmtA, a Putative Arginine Methyltransferase, Regulates Secondary Metabolism and Development in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Satterlee, Timothy; Cary, Jeffrey W.; Calvo, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes numerous oil seed crops such as corn, peanuts, treenuts and cotton worldwide, contaminating them with aflatoxin and other harmful potent toxins. In the phylogenetically related model fungus Aspergillus nidulans, the methyltransferase, RmtA, has been described to be involved in epigenetics regulation through histone modification. Epigenetics regulation affects a variety of cellular processes, including morphogenesis and secondary metabolism. Our study shows that deletion of rmtA in A. flavus results in hyperconidiating colonies, indicating that rmtA is a repressor of asexual development in this fungus. The increase in conidiation in the absence of rmtA coincides with greater expression of brlA, abaA, and wetA compared to that in the wild type. Additionally, the rmtA deletion mutant presents a drastic reduction or loss of sclerotial production, while forced expression of this gene increased the ability of this fungus to generate these resistant structures, revealing rmtA as a positive regulator of sclerotial formation. Importantly, rmtA is also required for the production of aflatoxin B1 in A. flavus, affecting the expression of aflJ. Furthermore, biosynthesis of additional metabolites is also controlled by rmtA, indicating a broad regulatory output in the control of secondary metabolism. This study also revealed that rmtA positively regulates the expression of the global regulatory gene veA, which could contribute to mediate the effects of rmtA on development and secondary metabolism in this relevant opportunistic plant pathogen. PMID:27213959

  15. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 is an essential component of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Ji-Hong; Choi, Yong-Joon; Cho, Chung-Hyun

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HIF-1{alpha} is expressed PRMT5-dependently in hypoxic cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HIF-1 regulation of hypoxia-induced genes is attenuated in PRMT5-knocked-down cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo synthesis of HIF-1{alpha} depends on PRMT5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PRMT5 is involved in the HIF-1{alpha} translation initiated by 5 Prime UTR of HIF-1{alpha} mRNA. -- Abstract: Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an enzyme that transfers one or two methyl groups to the arginine residues of histones or non-histone proteins, and that plays critical roles in cellular processes as diverse as receptor signaling and gene expression. Furthermore, PRMT5 is highly expressed in tumors, where it may be associated with tumor growth. Although much research has been conducted on PRMT5, little is known regarding its role in adaption to hypoxia. As hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a key player in hypoxic response, we examined the possible involvement of PRMT5 in the HIF-1 signaling pathway. Of the siRNAs targeting PRMT1-8, only PRMT5 siRNA attenuated the hypoxic induction of HIF-1{alpha} in A549 cells, and this result was reproducible in all three cancer cell lines examined. PRMT5 knock-down also repressed the promoter activities and the transcript levels of HIF-1-governed genes. Mechanistically, de novo synthesis of HIF-1{alpha} protein was reduced in PRMT5-knocked-down A549 cells, and this was rescued by PRMT5 restoration. In contrast, HIF-1{alpha} transcription, RNA processing, and protein stability were unaffected by PRMT5 knock-down. Furthermore, PRMT5 was found to be essential for the HIF-1{alpha} translation initiated by the 5 Prime UTR of HIF-1{alpha} mRNA. Given our results and previous reports, we believe that PRMT5 probably promotes tumor growth by stimulating cell proliferation and by participating in the construction of a tumor-favorable microenvironment via HIF-1 activation.

  16. The arginine methyltransferase Rmt2 is enriched in the nucleus and co-purifies with the nuclear porins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup100

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Ida; Berrez, Jean-Marc; Leipus, Arunas; Ostlund, Cecilia; Mutvei, Ann . E-mail: ann.mutvei@sh.se

    2007-05-15

    Arginine methylation is a post-translational modification of proteins implicated in RNA processing, protein compartmentalization, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. In a screen for proteins associated with the nuclear envelope in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have identified the arginine methyltransferase Rmt2, previously shown to methylate the ribosomal protein L12. By indirect immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionations we demonstrate here that Rmt2 has nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations. Biochemical analysis of a fraction enriched in nuclei reveals that nuclear Rmt2 is resistant to extractions with salt and detergent, indicating an association with structural components. This was supported by affinity purification experiments with TAP-tagged Rmt2. Rmt2 was found to co-purify with the nucleoporins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup100, revealing a novel link between arginine methyltransferases and the nuclear pore complex. In addition, a genome-wide transcription study of the rmt2{delta} mutant shows significant downregulation of the transcription of MYO1, encoding the Type II myosin heavy chain required for cytokinesis and cell separation.

  17. Identification of the methylation preference region in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 and its implication in regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yuan-I; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Chau, Gar-Yang; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Sung, Jung-Sung; Hua, Wei-Kai; Lin, Wey-Jinq

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Verifying by direct methylation assay the substrate sites of PRMT1 in the hnRNP K protein. {yields} Identifying the preferred PMRT1 methylation regions in hnRNP K by kinetic analysis. {yields} Linking methylation in regulating nuclear localization of hnRNP K. -- Abstract: Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles in numerous cellular processes. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein participating in a variety of cellular functions including transcription and RNA processing. HnRNP K is methylated at multiple sites in the glycine- and arginine-rich (RGG) motif. Using various RGG domain deletion mutants of hnRNP K as substrates, here we show by direct methylation assay that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) methylated preferentially in a.a. 280-307 of the RGG motif. Kinetic analysis revealed that deletion of a.a. 280-307, but not a.a. 308-327, significantly inhibited rate of methylation. Importantly, nuclear localization of hnRNP K was significantly impaired in mutant hnRNP K lacking the PRMT1 methylation region or upon pharmacological inhibition of methylation. Together our results identify preferred PRMT1 methylation sequences of hnRNP K by direct methylation assay and implicate a role of arginine methylation in regulating intracellular distribution of hnRNP K.

  18. Cloning of a protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT1 homologue from Schistosoma mansoni: Evidence for roles in nuclear receptor signaling and RNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Mansure, Jose Joao; Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco Meirelles; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Franco, Gloria Regina; Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado . E-mail: fantappie@bioqmed.ufrj.br

    2005-10-07

    The most studied arginine methyltransferase is the type I enzyme, which catalyzes the transfer of an S-adenosyl-L-methionine to a broad spectrum of substrates, including histones, RNA-transporting proteins, and nuclear hormone receptor coactivators. We cloned a cDNA encoding a protein arginine methyltransferase in Schistosoma mansoni (SmPRMT1). SmPRMT1 is highly homologous to the vertebrate PRMT1 enzyme. In vitro methylation assays showed that SmPRMT1 recombinant protein was able to specifically methylate histone H4. Two schistosome proteins likely to be involved in RNA metabolism, SMYB1 and SmSmD3, that display a number of RGG motifs, were strongly methylated by SmPRMT1. In vitro GST pull-down assays showed that SMYB1 and SmSmD3 physically interacted with SmPRMT1. Additional GST pull-down assay suggested the occurrence of a ternary complex including SmPRMT1, SmRXR1 nuclear receptor, and the p160 (SRC-1) nuclear receptor coactivator. Together, these data suggest a mechanism by which SmPRMT1 plays a role in nuclear receptor-mediated chromatin remodeling and RNA transactions.

  19. Upregulated protein arginine methyltransferase 1 by IL-4 increases eotaxin-1 expression in airway epithelial cells and participates in antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingzhu; Yang, Xudong; Zhong, Bo; Jiao, Fangfang; Li, Chenyan; Li, Dongmin; Lan, Xi; Sun, Jian; Lu, Shemin

    2012-04-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), catalyzing methylation of both histones and other cellular proteins, have emerged as key regulators of various cellular processes. This study aimed to identify key PRMTs involved in Ag-induced pulmonary inflammation (AIPI), a rat model for asthma, and to explore the role of PRMT1 in the IL-4-induced eosinophil infiltration process. E3 rats were i.p. sensitized with OVA/alum and intranasally challenged with OVA to induce AIPI. The expressions of PRMT1-6, eotaxin-1, and CCR3 in lungs were screened by real-time quantitative PCR. Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1, a pan-PRMT inhibitor) and small interfering RNA-PRMT1 were used to interrupt the function of PRMT1 in A549 cells. In addition, AMI-1 was administrated intranasally to AIPI rats to observe the effects on inflammatory parameters. The results showed that PRMT1 expression was mainly expressed in bronchus and alveolus epithelium and significantly upregulated in lungs from AIPI rats. The inhibition of PRMTs by AMI-1 and the knockdown of PRMT1 expression were able to downregulate the expressions of eotaxin-1 and CCR3 with the IL-4 stimulation in the epithelial cells. Furthermore, AMI-1 administration to AIPI rats can also ameliorate pulmonary inflammation, reduce IL-4 production and humoral immune response, and abrogate eosinophil infiltration into the lungs. In summary, PRMT1 expression is upregulated in AIPI rat lungs and can be stimulated by IL-4. Intervention of PRMT1 activity can abrogate IL-4-dependent eotaxin-1 production to influence the pulmonary inflammation with eosinophil infiltration. The findings may provide experimental evidence that PRMT1 plays an important role in asthma pathogenesis. PMID:22387551

  20. Protein arginine Methyltransferase 8 gene is expressed in pluripotent stem cells and its expression is modulated by the transcription factor Sox2.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Echegaray, Camila Vázquez; Luzzani, Carlos; Cosentino, María Soledad; Waisman, Ariel; Petrone, María Victoria; Francia, Marcos; Sassone, Alina; Canizo, Jésica; Sevlever, Gustavo; Barañao, Lino; Miriuka, Santiago; Guberman, Alejandra

    2016-04-22

    Addition of methyl groups to arginine residues is catalyzed by a group of enzymes called Protein Arginine Methyltransferases (Prmt). Although Prmt1 is essential in development, its paralogue Prmt8 has been poorly studied. This gene was reported to be expressed in nervous system and involved in neurogenesis. In this work, we found that Prmt8 is expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and in induced pluripotent stem cells, and modulated along differentiation to neural precursor cells. We found that Prmt8 promoter activity is induced by the pluripotency transcription factors Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. Moreover, endogenous Prmt8 mRNA levels were reduced in ESC transfected with Sox2 shRNA vector. As a whole, our results indicate that Prmt8 is expressed in pluripotent stem cells and its transcription is modulated by pluripotency transcription factors. These findings suggest that besides its known function in nervous system, Prmt8 could play a role in pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27012206

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 gene (As-PRMT1) from Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Yao, Feng; Li, Xuejie; Jia, Baolin; Zhong, Guangying; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is an important epigenetic regulation factor in eukaryotic genomes. PRMT1 is involved in histone arginine loci methylation modification, changes in eukaryotic genomes' chromatin structure, and gene expression regulation. In the present paper, the full-length 1201-bp cDNA sequence of the PRMT1 homolog of Artemia sinica (As-PRMT1) was cloned for the first time. The putative As-PRMT1 protein comprises 346 amino acids with a SAM domain and a PRMT5 domain. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that the putative sequence of As-PRMT1 protein was relatively conserved across species, especially in the SAM domain. As-PRMT1 is widely expressed during embryo development of A. sinica. This is followed by a dramatic upregulation after diapause termination and then downregulation from the nauplius stage. Furthermore, As-PRMT1 transcripts are highly upregulated under conditions of high salinity and low temperature stress. These findings suggested that As-PRMT1 is a stress-related factor that might promote or inhibit the expression of certain genes, play a critical role in embryonic development and in resistance to low temperature and high salinity stress. PMID:25843627

  2. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 6 (Prmt6) Is Essential for Early Zebrafish Development through the Direct Suppression of gadd45αa Stress Sensor Gene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Xi; Zhang, Yun-Bin; Ni, Pei-Li; Wu, Zhi-Li; Yan, Yuan-Chang; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine methylation is important in early zebrafish development; however, the role of histone arginine methylation in this process remains unclear. H3R2me2a, generated by protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (Prmt6), is a repressive mark. To explore the role of Prmt6 and H3R2me2a during zebrafish embryogenesis, we identified the maternal characteristic of prmt6 and designed two prmt6-specific morpholino-oligos (MOs) to study its importance in early development, application of which led to early epiboly defects and significantly reduced the level of H3R2me2a marks. prmt6 mRNA could rescue the epiboly defects and the H3R2me2a reduction in the prmt6 morphants. Functionally, microarray data demonstrated that growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible, α, a (gadd45αa) was a significantly up-regulated gene in MO-treated embryos, the activity of which was linked to the activation of the p38/JNK pathway and apoptosis. Importantly, gadd45αa MO and p38/JNK inhibitors could partially rescue the defect of prmt6 morphants, the downstream targets of Prmt6, and the apoptosis ratios of the prmt6 morphants. Moreover, the results of ChIP quantitative real time PCR and luciferase reporter assay indicated that gadd45αa is a repressive target of Prmt6. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal Prmt6 is essential to early zebrafish development by directly repressing gadd45αa. PMID:26487724

  3. Severe Hypomyelination and Developmental Defects Are Caused in Mice Lacking Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Misuzu; Murata, Kazuya; Ishida, Junji; Kanou, Akihiko; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-29

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is involved in cell proliferation, DNA damage response, and transcriptional regulation. Although PRMT1 is extensively expressed in the CNS at embryonic and perinatal stages, the physiological role of PRMT1 has been poorly understood. Here, to investigate the primary function of PRMT1 in the CNS, we generated CNS-specific PRMT1 knock-out mice by the Cre-loxP system. These mice exhibited postnatal growth retardation with tremors, and most of them died within 2 weeks after birth. Brain histological analyses revealed prominent cell reduction in the white matter tracts of the mutant mice. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that myelin sheath was almost completely ablated in the CNS of these animals. In agreement with hypomyelination, we also observed that most major myelin proteins including myelin basic protein (MBP), 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) were dramatically decreased, although neuronal and astrocytic markers were preserved in the brain of CNS-specific PRMT1 knock-out mice. These animals had a reduced number of OLIG2(+) oligodendrocyte lineage cells in the white matter. We found that expressions of transcription factors essential for oligodendrocyte specification and further maturation were significantly suppressed in the brain of the mutant mice. Our findings provide evidence that PRMT1 is required for CNS development, especially for oligodendrocyte maturation processes. PMID:26637354

  4. Exchange Factor TBL1 and Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT6 Cooperate in Protecting G Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) from Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiawen; Cardamone, M. Dafne; Johnson, Holly E.; Neault, Mathieu; Chan, Michelle; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth; Mallette, Frédérick A.; Perissi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of a number of metabolic organs. First identified as part of the NCoR-SMRT corepressor complex, GPS2 is known to play an important role in the nucleus in the regulation of gene transcription and meiotic recombination. In addition, we recently reported a non-transcriptional role of GPS2 as an inhibitor of the proinflammatory TNFα pathway in the cytosol. Although this suggests that the control of GPS2 localization may be an important determinant of its molecular functions, a clear understanding of GPS2 differential targeting to specific cellular locations is still lacking. Here we show that a fine balance between protein stabilization and degradation tightly regulates GPS2 nuclear function. Our findings indicate that GPS2 is degraded upon polyubiquitination by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2. Unexpectedly, interaction with the exchange factor TBL1 is required to protect GPS2 from degradation, with methylation of GPS2 by arginine methyltransferase PRMT6 regulating the interaction with TBL1 and inhibiting proteasome-dependent degradation. Overall, our findings indicate that regulation of GPS2 by posttranslational modifications provides an effective strategy for modulating its molecular function within the nuclear compartment. PMID:26070566

  5. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  6. pUL69 of Human Cytomegalovirus Recruits the Cellular Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 6 via a Domain That Is Crucial for mRNA Export and Efficient Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marco; Sonntag, Eric; Müller, Regina; Schmidt, Stefanie; Zielke, Barbara; Fossen, Torgils

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The regulatory protein pUL69 of human cytomegalovirus acts as a viral mRNA export factor, facilitating the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced RNA via interaction with the cellular mRNA export factor UAP56. Here we provide evidence for a posttranslational modification of pUL69 via arginine methylation within the functionally important N terminus. First, we demonstrated a specific immunoprecipitation of full-length pUL69 as well as pUL69aa1-146 by a mono/dimethylarginine-specific antibody. Second, we observed a specific electrophoretic mobility shift upon overexpression of the catalytically active protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6). Third, a direct interaction of pUL69 and PRMT6 was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analyses. We mapped the PRMT6 interaction motif to the pUL69 N terminus and identified critical amino acids within the arginine-rich R1 box of pUL69 that were crucial for PRMT6 and/or UAP56 recruitment. In order to test the impact of putative methylation substrates on the functions of pUL69, we constructed various pUL69 derivatives harboring arginine-to-alanine substitutions and tested them for RNA export activity. Thus, we were able to discriminate between arginines within the R1 box of pUL69 that were crucial for UAP56/PRMT6-interaction and/or mRNA export activity. Remarkably, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses revealed the same α-helical structures for pUL69 sequences encoding either the wild type R1/R2 boxes or a UAP56/PRMT6 binding-deficient derivative, thereby excluding the possibility that R/A amino acid substitutions within R1 affected the secondary structure of pUL69. We therefore conclude that the pUL69 N terminus is methylated by PRMT6 and that this critically affects the functions of pUL69 for efficient mRNA export and replication of human cytomegalovirus. IMPORTANCE The UL69 protein of human cytomegalovirus is a multifunctional regulatory protein that acts as a viral RNA export factor with a

  7. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  8. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  9. PRMT9 is a Type II methyltransferase that methylates the splicing factor SAP145

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanzhong; Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Xia, Zheng; Gayatri, Sitaram; Kim, Daehoon; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia; Kelly, Ryan; Guo, Ailan; Li, Wei; Clarke, Steven G.; Bedford, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT1-9), which members can catalyze three distinct types of methylation on arginine residues. Here, we identify two spliceosome-associated proteins – SAP145 and SAP49 – as PRMT9 binding partners, linking PRMT9 to U2snRNP maturation. We show that SAP145 is methylated by PRMT9 at arginine 508, which takes the form of monomethylated arginine (MMA) and symmetrically dimethylated arginine (SDMA). PRMT9 thus joins PRMT5 as the only mammalian enzymes capable of depositing the SDMA mark. Methylation of SAP145 on Arg508 generates a binding site for the Tudor domain of the Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, and RNA-seq analysis reveals gross splicing changes when PRMT9 levels are attenuated. These results identify PRMT9 as a non-histone methyltransferase that primes the U2snRNP for interaction with SMN. PMID:25737013

  10. [Bioinformatics analysis and expressed level of histone methyltransferase genes in Lonicera japonica].

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin-jie; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-qi; Long, Ping; Zha, Liang-ping; Wang, Yao-long

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three histone methyltransferase genes were obtained from transcriptome dataset of Lonicera japonica. The nucleotide and proteins characteristics, subcellular localization, senior structural domains and conservative forecasting were analyzed. The result of phylogenetic tree showed that 23 histone methyltransferases were mainly divided into two groups: lysine methyltransferase and arginine methyltransferases. The result of gene expression showed that 23 histone methyltransferases showed preference in terms of interspecies and organs. They were more expressed in buds of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis and lower in leaves of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis. Eight genes were specific expressed in flower. These results provided basis for further understanding the function of histone methyltransferase and epigenetic regulation of active ingredients of L. japonica. PMID:26552158

  11. Sm protein methylation is dispensable for snRNP assembly in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Praveen, Kavita; Hicks, Amanda J.; Tian, Liping; Matera, A. Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Sm proteins form stable ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes with small nuclear (sn)RNAs and are core components of the eukaryotic spliceosome. In vivo, the assembly of Sm proteins onto snRNAs requires the survival motor neurons (SMN) complex. Several reports have shown that SMN protein binds with high affinity to symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA) residues present on the C-terminal tails of SmB, SmD1, and SmD3. This post-translational modification is thought to play a crucial role in snRNP assembly. In human cells, two distinct protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT5 and PRMT7) are required for snRNP biogenesis. However, in Drosophila, loss of Dart5 (the fruit fly PRMT5 ortholog) has little effect on snRNP assembly, and homozygous mutants are completely viable. To resolve these apparent differences, we examined this topic in detail and found that Drosophila Sm proteins are also methylated by two methyltransferases, Dart5/PRMT5 and Dart7/PRMT7. Unlike dart5, we found that dart7 is an essential gene. However, the lethality associated with loss of Dart7 protein is apparently unrelated to defects in snRNP assembly. To conclusively test the requirement for sDMA modification of Sm proteins in Drosophila snRNP assembly, we constructed a fly strain that exclusively expresses an isoform of SmD1 that cannot be sDMA modified. Interestingly, these flies were viable, and snRNP assays revealed no defects in comparison to wild type. In contrast, dart5 mutants displayed a strong synthetic lethal phenotype in the presence of a hypomorphic Smn mutation. We therefore conclude that dart5 is required for viability when SMN is limiting. PMID:18369183

  12. L-arginine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with your health provider.Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)L-arginine seems to slow blood clotting. Taking L-arginine along with medications that also ...

  13. Yeast Hmt1 catalyses asymmetric dimethylation of histone H3 arginine 2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Tao; Gong, Ting; Zhou, Zhen; Liu, Yu-Ting; Cao, Xiongwen; He, Yongning; Chen, Charlie Degui; Zhou, Jin-Qiu

    2015-05-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) are a family of enzymes that can methylate protein arginine residues. PRMTs' substrates include histones and a variety of non-histone proteins. Previous studies have shown that yeast Hmt1 is a type I PRMT and methylates histone H4 arginine 3 and several mRNA-binding proteins. Hmt1 forms dimers or oligomers, but how dimerization or oligomerization affects its activity remains largely unknown. We now report that Hmt1 can methylate histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2) in vitro. The dimerization but not hexamerization is essential for Hmt1's activity. Interestingly, the methyltransferase activity of Hmt1 on histone H3R2 requires reciprocal contributions from two Hmt1 molecules. Our results suggest an intermolecular trans-complementary mechanism by which Hmt1 dimer methylates its substrates. PMID:25715670

  14. Comprehensive identification of arginine methylation in primary T cells reveals regulatory roles in cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, Vincent; Guo, Ailan; Trudgian, David; Thomas, Benjamin; Acuto, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    The impact of protein arginine methylation on the regulation of immune functions is virtually unknown. Here, we apply a novel method—isomethionine methyl-SILAC—coupled with antibody-mediated arginine-methylated peptide enrichment to identify methylated peptides in human T cells by mass spectrometry. This approach allowed the identification of 2,502 arginine methylation sites from 1,257 tissue-specific and housekeeping proteins. We find that components of T cell antigen receptor signal machinery and several key transcription factors that regulate T cell fate determination are methylated on arginine. Moreover, we demonstrate changes in arginine methylation stoichiometry during cellular stimulation in a subset of proteins critical to T cell differentiation. Our data suggest that protein arginine methyltransferases exert key regulatory roles in T cell activation and differentiation, opening a new field of investigation in T cell biology. PMID:25849564

  15. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  16. Arginine metabolism in asthma.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeremy A; Grasemann, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is important in the regulation of airway tone and airway responsiveness. Alterations in the L-arginine metabolism resulting in reduced availability of the substrate L-arginine for NO synthases, as well as the presence of NO synthase inhibitors such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, contribute to the reduced NO formation and airway dysfunction in asthma. Therapeutic interventions aiming to modulate the impaired L-arginine metabolism may help correct the enhanced airway tone and responsiveness in asthma. PMID:25282289

  17. GABAAergic stimulation modulates intracellular protein arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Denman, Robert B; Xie, Wen; Merz, George; Sung, Ying-Ju

    2014-06-20

    Changes in cytoplasmic pH are known to regulate diverse cellular processes and influence neuronal activities. In neurons, the intracellular alkalization is shown to occur after stimulating several channels and receptors. For example, it has previously demonstrated in P19 neurons that a sustained intracellular alkalinization can be mediated by the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. In addition, the benzodiazepine binding subtypes of the γ-amino butyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor mediate a transient intracellular alkalinization when they are stimulated. Because the activities of many enzymes are sensitive to pH shift, here we investigate the effects of intracellular pH modulation resulted from stimulating GABAA receptor on the protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT) activities. We show that the major benzodiazepine subtype (2α1, 2β2, 1γ2) is constitutively expressed in both undifferentiated P19 cells and retinoic acid (RA) differentiated P19 neurons. Furthermore stimulation with diazepam and, diazepam plus muscimol produce an intracellular alkalinization that can be detected ex vivo with the fluorescence dye. The alkalinization results in significant perturbation in protein arginine methylation activity as measured in methylation assays with specific protein substrates. Altered protein arginine methylation is also observed when cells are treated with the GABAA agonist muscimol but not an antagonist, bicuculline. These data suggest that pH-dependent and pH-independent methylation pathways can be activated by GABAAergic stimulation, which we verified using hippocampal slice preparations from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome. PMID:24793772

  18. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, Rebecca S.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2010-01-22

    Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells.

  19. Endothelial transcriptome in response to pharmacological methyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Jun; Fernandez, Ana Z; Ziemann, Mark; Keating, Samuel T; Balcerczyk, Aneta; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-08-01

    The enzymatic activities of protein methyltransferases serve to write covalent modifications on histone and non-histone proteins in the control of gene transcription. Here, we describe gene expression changes in human endothelial cells caused by treatment with methyltransferase inhibitors 7,7'-carbonylbis (azanediyl) bis(4-hydroxynaphthalene-2 -sulfonic acid (AMI-1) and disodium-2-(2,4,5,7- tetrabromo-3-oxido-6-oxoxanthen-9-yl) benzoate trihydrate (AMI-5). Deep sequencing of mRNA indicated robust change on transcription following AMI-5 treatment compared with AMI-1. Functional annotation analysis revealed that both compounds suppress the expression of genes associated with translational regulation, suggesting arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) could be associated with regulation of this pathway. Interestingly, AMI-5 but not AMI-1 was found to decrease methylation of H3 histones at lysine 4 and down-regulate gene expression associated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling pathways. These results imply that inhibition of protein methylation by AMI-1 and AMI-5 can differentially regulate specific pathways with potential to interrupt pathological signaling in the vascular endothelium. PMID:24850797

  20. L-arginine

    MedlinePlus

    ... L-arginine is used in combination with a number of over-the-counter and prescription medications for ... to help reduce the recovery time, reduce the number of infections, and improve wound healing after surgery. ...

  1. Accessing Protein Methyltransferase and Demethylase Enzymology Using Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, Tim J.; Provencher, Laurel M.; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Jin, Jian; Brown, Peter J.; Frye, Stephen V.; Janzen, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The discovery of small molecules targeting the > 80 enzymes that add (methyltransferases) or remove (demethylases) methyl marks from lysine and arginine residues, most notably present in histone tails, may yield unprecedented chemotherapeutic agents and facilitate regenerative medicine. To better enable chemical exploration of these proteins, we have developed a novel and highly quantitative microfluidic capillary electrophoresis assay to enable full mechanistic studies of these enzymes and the kinetics of their inhibition. This technology separates small biomolecules, i.e., peptides, based on their charge-to-mass ratio. Methylation, however, does not alter the charge of peptide substrates. To overcome this limitation, we have employed a methylation-sensitive endoproteinase strategy to separate methylated from unmethylated peptides. The assay was validated on a lysine methyltransferase (G9a) and a lysine demethylase (LSD1) and was employed to investigate the inhibition of G9a by small molecules. PMID:20659682

  2. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  3. An enzyme-coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay for S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kathleen M; Wooderchak, Whitney L; Wynn, Donraphael P; Karschner, Erin L; Alfaro, Joshua F; Cui, Yinqiu; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Hevel, Joan M

    2006-03-15

    Modification of small molecules and proteins by methyltransferases affects a wide range of biological processes. Here, we report an enzyme-coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay to quantitatively characterize S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet/SAM)-dependent methyltransferase activity. In this assay, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy/SAH), the transmethylation product of AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases, is hydrolyzed to S-ribosylhomocysteine and adenine by recombinant S-adenosylhomocysteine/5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (SAHN/MTAN, EC 3.2.2.9). Subsequently, adenine generated from AdoHcy is further hydrolyzed to hypoxanthine and ammonia by recombinant adenine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.2). This deamination is associated with a decrease in absorbance at 265 nm that can be monitored continuously. Coupling enzymes are recombinant and easily purified. The utility of this assay was shown using recombinant rat protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1, EC 2.1.1.125), which catalyzes the mono- and dimethylation of guanidino nitrogens of arginine residues in select proteins. Using this assay, the kinetic parameters of PRMT1 with three synthetic peptides were determined. An advantage of this assay is the destruction of AdoHcy by AdoHcy nucleosidase, which alleviates AdoHcy product feedback inhibition of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. Finally, this method may be used to assay other enzymes that produce AdoHcy, 5'-methylthioadenosine, or compounds that can be cleaved by AdoHcy nucleosidase. PMID:16460659

  4. Arginine and nitrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Llácer, José L; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-12-01

    When nitrogen is abundant, prokaryotic and eukaryotic oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms store nitrogen as arginine, by relieving feedback inhibition of the arginine biosynthesis controlling enzyme, N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK). The signalling protein PII, an ancient and widely distributed nitrogen/carbon/ADP/ATP sensor, mediates feedback inhibition relief of NAGK by binding to this enzyme. PII phosphorylation or PII binding of ADP or 2-oxoglutarate prevents PII-NAGK complex formation. Crystal structures of NAGK, cyanobacterial and plant PII and corresponding PII-NAGK complexes have been recently determined. In these complexes, two polar PII trimers sandwich one ring-like NAGK hexamer. Each PII subunit contacts one NAGK subunit, triggering a symmetry-restricted narrowing of the NAGK ring, with concomitant adoption by the arginine sites of a low-affinity conformation. PMID:19013524

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa EftM Is a Thermoregulated Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Owings, Joshua P; Kuiper, Emily G; Prezioso, Samantha M; Meisner, Jeffrey; Varga, John J; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Dammer, Eric B; Duong, Duc M; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Albertí, Sebastián; Conn, Graeme L; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2016-02-12

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that trimethylates elongation factor-thermo-unstable (EF-Tu) on lysine 5. Lysine 5 methylation occurs in a temperature-dependent manner and is generally only seen when P. aeruginosa is grown at temperatures close to ambient (25 °C) but not at higher temperatures (37 °C). We have previously identified the gene, eftM (for EF-Tu-modifying enzyme), responsible for this modification and shown its activity to be associated with increased bacterial adhesion to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. Bioinformatic analyses predicted EftM to be a Class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. An in vitro methyltransferase assay was employed to show that, in the presence of SAM, EftM directly trimethylates EF-Tu. A natural variant of EftM, with a glycine to arginine substitution at position 50 in the predicted SAM-binding domain, lacks both SAM binding and enzyme activity. Mass spectrometry analysis of the in vitro methyltransferase reaction products revealed that EftM exclusively methylates at lysine 5 of EF-Tu in a distributive manner. Consistent with the in vivo temperature dependence of methylation of EF-Tu, preincubation of EftM at 37 °C abolished methyltransferase activity, whereas this activity was retained when EftM was preincubated at 25 °C. Irreversible protein unfolding at 37 °C was observed, and we propose that this instability is the molecular basis for the temperature dependence of EftM activity. Collectively, our results show that EftM is a thermolabile, SAM-dependent methyltransferase that directly trimethylates lysine 5 of EF-Tu in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26677219

  6. A single amino-acid substitution toggles chloride dependence of the alpha-amylase paralog amyrel in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila virilis species.

    PubMed

    Claisse, Gaëlle; Feller, Georges; Bonneau, Magalie; Da Lage, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    In animals, most α-amylases are chloride-dependent enzymes. A chloride ion is required for allosteric activation and is coordinated by one asparagine and two arginine side chains. Whereas the asparagine and one arginine are strictly conserved, the main chloride binding arginine is replaced by a glutamine in some rare instances, resulting in the loss of chloride binding and activation. Amyrel is a distant paralogue of α-amylase in Diptera, which was not characterized biochemically to date. Amyrel shows both substitutions depending on the species. In Drosophila melanogaster, an arginine is present in the sequence but in Drosophila virilis, a glutamine occurs at this position. We have investigated basic enzymological parameters and the dependence to chloride of Amyrel of both species, produced in yeast, and in mutants substituting arginine to glutamine or glutamine to arginine. We found that the amylolytic activity of Amyrel is about thirty times weaker than the classical Drosophila α-amylase, and that the substitution of the arginine by a glutamine in D. melanogaster suppressed the chloride-dependence but was detrimental to activity. In contrast, changing the glutamine into an arginine rendered D. virilis Amyrel chloride-dependent, and interestingly, significantly increased its catalytic efficiency. These results show that the chloride ion is not mandatory for Amyrel but stimulates the reaction rate. The possible phylogenetic origin of the arginine/glutamine substitution is also discussed. PMID:27312592

  7. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  8. Arginine methylation of HSP70 regulates retinoid acid-mediated RARβ2 gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei-wei; Xiao, Rong-quan; Peng, Bing-ling; Xu, Huan-teng; Shen, Hai-feng; Huang, Ming-feng; Shi, Tao-tao; Yi, Jia; Zhang, Wen-juan; Wu, Xiao-nan; Gao, Xiang; Lin, Xiang-zhi; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Liu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Although “histone” methyltransferases and demethylases are well established to regulate transcriptional programs and to use nonhistone proteins as substrates, their possible roles in regulation of heat-shock proteins in the nucleus have not been investigated. Here, we report that a highly conserved arginine residue, R469, in HSP70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) proteins, an evolutionarily conserved protein family of ATP-dependent molecular chaperone, was monomethylated (me1), at least partially, by coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1/protein arginine methyltransferase 4 (CARM1/PRMT4) and demethylated by jumonji-domain–containing 6 (JMJD6), both in vitro and in cultured cells. Functional studies revealed that HSP70 could directly regulate retinoid acid (RA)-induced retinoid acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) gene transcription through its binding to chromatin, with R469me1 being essential in this process. HSP70’s function in gene transcriptional regulation appears to be distinct from its protein chaperon activity. R469me1 was shown to mediate the interaction between HSP70 and TFIIH, which involves in RNA polymerase II phosphorylation and thus transcriptional initiation. Our findings expand the repertoire of nonhistone substrates targeted by PRMT4 and JMJD6, and reveal a new function of HSP70 proteins in gene transcription at the chromatin level aside from its classic role in protein folding and quality control. PMID:26080448

  9. PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation controls ATXN2L localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaehler, Christian; Guenther, Anika; Uhlich, Anja; Krobitsch, Sylvia

    2015-05-15

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that is of importance in diverse cellular processes. Recent proteomic mass spectrometry studies reported arginine methylation of ataxin-2-like (ATXN2L), the paralog of ataxin-2, a protein that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Here, we investigated the methylation state of ATXN2L and its significance for ATXN2L localization. We first confirmed that ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo, and observed that the nuclear localization of ATXN2L is altered under methylation inhibition. We further discovered that ATXN2L associates with the protein arginine-N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). Finally, we showed that neither mutation of the arginine–glycine-rich motifs of ATXN2L nor methylation inhibition alters ATXN2L localization to stress granules, suggesting that methylation of ATXN2L is probably not mandatory. - Highlights: • ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo. • ATXN2L interacts with PRMT1 under normal and stress conditions. • PRMT1-mediated dimethylation of ATXN2L controls its nuclear localization. • ATXN2L localization to stress granules appears independent of its methylation state.

  10. Discovery and mechanistic study of a class of protein arginine methylation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Feng, You; Li, Mingyong; Wang, Binghe; Zheng, Yujun George

    2010-08-26

    Protein arginine methylation regulates multiple biological processes such as chromatin remodeling and RNA splicing. Malfunction of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) is correlated with many human diseases. Thus, small molecule inhibitors of protein arginine methylation are of great potential for therapeutic development. Herein, we report a type of compound that blocks PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation at micromolar potency through a unique mechanism. Most of the discovered compounds bear naphthalene and sulfonate groups and are structurally different from typical PRMT substrates, for example, histone H4 and glycine- and arginine-rich sequences. To elucidate the molecular basis of inhibition, we conducted a variety of kinetic and biophysical assays. The combined data reveal that this type of naphthyl-sulfo (NS) molecule directly targets the substrates but not PRMTs for the observed inhibition. We also found that suramin effectively inhibited PRMT1 activity. These findings about novel PRMT inhibitors and their unique inhibition mechanism provide a new way for chemical regulation of protein arginine methylation. PMID:20666457

  11. Arginine methylation of DRBD18 differentially impacts its opposing effects on the trypanosome transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Kaylen; Mukhopadhyay, Shreya; Li, Jun; Wang, Jie; Yao, Jin; Sun, Yijun; Qu, Jun; Read, Laurie K.

    2015-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that impacts wide-ranging cellular functions, including transcription, mRNA splicing and translation. RNA binding proteins (RBPs) represent one of the largest classes of arginine methylated proteins in both mammals and the early diverging parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we report the effects of arginine methylation on the functions of the essential and previously uncharacterized T. brucei RBP, DRBD18. RNAseq analysis shows that DRBD18 depletion causes extensive rearrangement of the T. brucei transcriptome, with increases and decreases in hundreds of mRNAs. DRBD18 contains three methylated arginines, and we used complementation of DRBD18 knockdown cells with methylmimic or hypomethylated DRBD18 to assess the functions of these methylmarks. Methylmimic and hypomethylated DRBD18 associate with different ribonucleoprotein complexes. These altered macromolecular interactions translate into differential impacts on the T. brucei transcriptome. Methylmimic DRBD18 preferentially stabilizes target RNAs, while hypomethylated DRBD18 is more efficient at destabilizing RNA. The protein arginine methyltransferase, TbPRMT1, interacts with DRBD18 and knockdown of TbPRMT1 recapitulates the effects of hypomethylated DRBD18 on mRNA levels. Together, these data support a model in which arginine methylation acts as a switch that regulates T. brucei gene expression. PMID:25940618

  12. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  13. Arginine catabolism in Aphanocapsa 6308.

    PubMed

    Weathers, P J; Chee, H L; Allen, M M

    1978-07-01

    The catabolic products of arginine metabolism were observed in Aphanocapsa 6308, a unicellular cyanobacterium, by thin layer chromatography of growth media, by limiting growth conditions, and by enzymatic analysis. Of the organic, nitrogenous compounds examined, only arginine supported growth in CO2-free media. The excretion of ornithine at a concentration level greater than citrulline suggested the existence in Aphanocapsa 6308 of the arginine dihydrolase pathway which produced ornithine, CO2,NH4,+ adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Its existence was confirmed by enzymatic analysis. Although cells could not grow on urea as a sole carbon source a very active urease and subsequently an arginase were also demonstrated, indicating that Aphanocapsa can metabolize arginine via the arginase pathway. The level of enzymes for both pathways indicates a lack of genetic control. It is suggested that the arginase pathway provides only nitrogen for the cells wheras the arginine dihydrolase pathway provides not only nitrogen, but also CO2 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate. PMID:100070

  14. MEP50/PRMT5 reduces gene expression by histone arginine methylation and this is reversed by PKCδ/p38δ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Kamalika; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    PKCδ and p38δ are key proteins in a cascade that stimulates keratinocyte differentiation. This cascade activates transcription of involucrin (hINV) and other genes associated with differentiation. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an arginine methyltransferase that symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues. This protein interacts with a cofactor, MEP50, and symmetrically dimethylates arginine eight of histone 3 (H3R8me2s) and arginine three of histone 4 (H4R3me2s) to silence gene expression. We use the involucrin gene as a tool to understand the relationship between PKCδ/p38δ and PRMT5/MEP50 signaling. MEP50 suppresses hINV mRNA level and promoter activity. This is associated with increased arginine dimethylation of hINV gene-associated H3/H4. We further show that the PKCδ/p38δ keratinocyte differentiation cascade reduces PRMT5 and MEP50 expression, association with the hINV gene promoter, and H3R8me2s and H4R2me2s formation. We propose that PRMT5/MEP50-dependent methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that assists in silencing of hINV expression, and that PKCδ signaling activates gene expression by directly activating transcription and by suppressing PRMT5/MEP50 dependent arginine dimethylation of promoter associated histones. This is an example of crosstalk between PKCδ/p38δ signaling and PRMT5/MEP50 epigenetic silencing. PMID:26763441

  15. Beyond PAINs: Chemotype Sensitivity of Protein Methyltransferases in Screens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cen; Margolis, Brandon J; Strelow, John M; Vidler, Lewis R; Mader, Mary M

    2016-02-11

    Screening of the relatively new target class, the lysine and arginine methyltransferases (MTases), presents unique challenges in the identification and confirmation of active chemical matter. Examination of high throughput screening data generated using Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) format for a number of protein MTase targets reveals sensitivity to both the known pan assay interference compounds (PAINS) and also other scaffolds not currently precedented as assay interferers. We find that, in general, true actives show significant selectivity within the MTase family. With the exception of slight modifications of SAM-like compounds, scaffolds that are observed frequently in multiple MTase assays should be viewed with caution and should be carefully validated before following up. PMID:26985291

  16. Structural Biology of Human H3K9 Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.; Min, J; Lunin, V; Antoshenko, T; Dombrovsk, L; Zeng, H; Allali-Hassani, A; Campagna-Slater, V; Vedadi, M; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins regulate chromatin compaction, mediate epigenetic regulation of transcription, and control cellular differentiation in health and disease. Methylation of histone tails is one of the fundamental events of epigenetic signaling. Tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) mediates chromatin recruitment of HP1, heterochromatin condensation and gene silencing. Similarly, methylation of H3K27 and H4K20 are associated with a repressed state of chromatin, whereas expressed genes are methylated at H3K4, H3K36 and H3K79. Histone methyltransferases are divided into protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). HKMTs catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from the co-factor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to a substrate lysine and, with the exception of DOT1L, are all organized around a canonical SET domain. The structures of a number of HKMTs have been reported, including ternary complexes of human orthologs with co-factor and substrate peptides (SETD7-H3K4, SETD8-H4K20 and MLL1-H3K4), as well

  17. Arginine transport in catabolic disease states.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Choudry, Haroon A; Epler, Mark J; Meng, Qinghe; Karinch, Anne; Lin, Chengmao; Souba, Wiley

    2004-10-01

    Arginine appears to be a semiessential amino acid in humans during critical illness. Catabolic disease states such as sepsis, injury, and cancer cause an increase in arginine utilization, which exceeds body production, leading to arginine depletion. This is aggravated by the reduced nutrient intake that is associated with critical illness. Arginine depletion may have negative consequences on tissue function under these circumstances. Nutritional regimens containing arginine have been shown to improve nitrogen balance and lymphocyte function, and stimulate arginine transport in the liver. We have studied the effects of stress mediators on arginine transport in vascular endothelium, liver, and gut epithelium. In vascular endothelium, endotoxin stimulates arginine uptake, an effect that is mediated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. This TNF-alpha stimulation involves the activation of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC). A significant increase in hepatic arginine transport activity also occurs following burn injury and in rats with progressive malignant disease. Surgical removal of the growing tumor results in a normalization of the accelerated hepatic arginine transport within days. Chronic metabolic acidosis and sepsis individually augment intestinal arginine transport in rats and Caco-2 cell culture. PKC and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in mediating the sepsis/acidosis stimulation of arginine transport. Understanding the regulation of plasma membrane arginine transport will enhance our knowledge of nutrition and metabolism in seriously ill patients and may lead to the design of improved nutritional support formulas. PMID:15465794

  18. Drosophila spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Lacramioara; Brill, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster spermatids undergo dramatic morphological changes as they differentiate from small round cells approximately 12 μm in diameter into highly polarized, 1.8 mm long, motile sperm capable of participating in fertilization. During spermiogenesis, syncytial cysts of 64 haploid spermatids undergo synchronous differentiation. Numerous changes occur at a subcellular level, including remodeling of existing organelles (mitochondria, nuclei), formation of new organelles (flagellar axonemes, acrosomes), polarization of elongating cysts and plasma membrane addition. At the end of spermatid morphogenesis, organelles, mitochondrial DNA and cytoplasmic components not needed in mature sperm are stripped away in a caspase-dependent process called individualization that results in formation of individual sperm. Here, we review the stages of Drosophila spermiogenesis and examine our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in shaping male germ cell-specific organelles and forming mature, fertile sperm. PMID:23087837

  19. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5145 Arginine. (a) Product. Arginine...

  20. Quantification of Arginine and Its Methylated Derivatives in Plasma by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Vicente, Faye B; Vespa, Gina; Miller, Alan; Haymond, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide synthases (NOS), thus the production of nitric oxide (NO) is based on arginine availability. Arginine is methylated through the activity of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT1 and PRMT2), to form asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) and symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA). These compounds have gained interest in recent years due to their influence on NO production rates and association with cardiovascular and renal diseases. The accurate and precise measurement of arginine and its methylated derivatives is needed for research studies investigating their role(s) in NO bioavailability and development of disease. We describe a high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for quantifying arginine, ADMA, and SDMA requiring only 50 μL of plasma. The sample preparation involves addition of internal standards (ADMA-d7 for ADMA and SDMA, and (13)C6 -arginine for arginine) prior to protein precipitation with LCMS grade acetonitrile. Samples are centrifuged and supernatant is dried under nitrogen gas at 50 °C. Samples are reconstituted with mobile phase (ammonium acetate-formic acid-water). Arginine, ADMA, and SDMA are separated using an isocratic HPLC method on a 3 μM silica analytical column. MS/MS detection is performed in the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode and the transitions monitored are m/z 203 to m/z 70 for ADMA and SDMA, m/z 210 to m/z 77 for ADMA-d7, m/z 175 to m/z 70 for arginine, and m/z 181 to m/z 74 for (13)C6-arginine. PMID:26602113

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen arginine.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Dario; Clementi, Emilio

    2010-11-01

    Currently, several ibuprofen compounds are available on the market, mainly differing in terms of pharmaceutical composition that influence the pharmacokinetic profile and eventually the onset of drug action. This review will mainly deal with the clinical pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen arginine, an alternative formulation specifically designed to improve the absorption of ibuprofen. Indeed, available data from studies in healthy volunteers have consistently shown that the formulation of ibuprofen arginine is characterized by prompt absorption of ibuprofen as compared to the conventional formulation at all tested doses with higher peak plasma concentration and lower Tmax values. This trend has been confirmed also in studies dealing with chiral ibuprofen pharmacokinetics. Most importantly, the shortening in the absorption time observed either with racemic mixture or with the S(+)-enantiomer of ibuprofen arginine did not imply a faster drug elimination eventually leading to inadequate daily drug exposure, as documented by T1/2 and AUC values being comparable to those measured with the free acid form. Taken together, the pharmacokinetic/dynamic characteristics of ibuprofen arginine can be considered particularly favorable for several clinical conditions, such as moderate/severe pain, in which a rapid pharmacologic effect is required. PMID:20925647

  2. Arginine methylation modulates autophagic degradation of PGL granules in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Sihui; Yang, Peiguo; Tian, E; Zhang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    The selective degradation of intracellular components by autophagy involves sequential interactions of the cargo with a receptor, which also binds the autophagosomal protein Atg8 and a scaffold protein. Here, we demonstrated that mutations in C. elegans epg-11, which encodes an arginine methyltransferase homologous to PRMT1, cause the defective removal of PGL-1 and PGL-3 (cargo)-SEPA-1 (receptor) complexes, known as PGL granules, from somatic cells during embryogenesis. Autophagic degradation of the PGL granule scaffold protein EPG-2 and other protein aggregates was unaffected in epg-11/prmt-1 mutants. Loss of epg-11/prmt-1 activity impairs the association of PGL granules with EPG-2 and LGG-1 puncta. EPG-11/PRMT-1 directly methylates arginines in the RGG domains of PGL-1 and PGL-3. Autophagic removal of PGL proteins is impaired when the methylated arginines are mutated. Our study reveals that posttranslational arginine methylation regulates the association of the cargo-receptor complex with the scaffold protein, providing a mechanism for modulating degradation efficiency in selective autophagy. PMID:24140420

  3. Drosophila myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K

    2016-09-12

    The skeletal muscle system is the largest organ in motile animals, constituting between 35 and 55% of the human body mass, and up to 75% of the body mass in flying organisms like Drosophila. The flight muscles alone in flying insects comprise up to 65% of total body mass. Not only is the musculature the largest organ system, it is also exquisitely complex, with single muscles existing in different shapes and sizes. These different morphologies allow for such different functions as the high-frequency beating of a wing in a hummingbird, the dilation of the pupil in a human eye, or the maintenance of posture in a giraffe's neck. PMID:27623256

  4. Arginine metabolic endotypes in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wedes, Samuel H.; Hsu, Jean W.; Bohren, Kurt M.; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Jahoor, Farook; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Decreased synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthases (NOS) is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Multiple factors may contribute to decreased NO bioavailability, including increased activity of arginase, the enzyme that converts arginine to ornithine and urea, which may compete with NOS for arginine; inadequate de novo arginine production from citrulline; and increased concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of NOS. We hypothesized that PAH patients with the lowest arginine availability secondary to increased arginase activity and/or inadequate de novo arginine synthesis might have a slower rate of NO synthesis and greater pulmonary vascular resistance. Nine patients with group 1 PAH and 10 healthy controls were given primed, constant intravenous infusions of 15N2-arginine, 13C,2H4-citrulline, 15N2-ornithine, and 13C-urea in the postabsorptive state. The results showed that, compared with healthy controls, PAH patients had a tendency toward increased arginine clearance and ornithine flux but no difference in arginine and citrulline flux, de novo arginine synthesis, or NO synthesis. Arginine-to-ADMA ratio was increased in PAH patients. Two endotypes of patients with low and high arginase activity were identified; compared with the low-arginase group, the patients with high arginase had increased arginine flux, slower NO synthesis, and lower plasma concentrations of ADMA. These results demonstrate that increased breakdown of arginine by arginase occurs in PAH and affects NO synthesis. Furthermore, there is no compensatory increase in de novo arginine synthesis to overcome this increased utilization of arginine by arginase. PMID:25992277

  5. Arginine Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Barry J.; Shelp, Barry J.

    1989-01-01

    Tracerkinetic experiments were performed using l-[guanidino-14C]arginine, l-[U-14C]arginine, l-[ureido-14C]citrulline, and l-[1-14C]ornithine to investigate arginine utilization in developing cotyledons of Glycine max (L.) Merrill. Excised cotyledons were injected with carrier-free 14C compounds and incubated in sealed vials containing a CO2 trap. The free and protein amino acids were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography and arginine-specific enzyme-linked assays. After 4 hours, 75% and 90% of the 14C metabolized from [guanidino-14C]arginine and [U-14C]arginine, respectively, was in protein arginine. The net protein arginine accumulation rate, calculated from the depletion of nitrogenous solutes in the cotyledon during incubation, was 17 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. The data indicated that arginine was also catabolized by the arginase-urease reactions at a rate of 5.5 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. Between 2 and 4 hours 14CO2 was also evolved from carbons other than C-6 of arginine at a rate of 11.0 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. It is suggested that this extra 14CO2 was evolved during the catabolism of ornithine-derived glutamate; 14C-ornithine was a product of the arginase reaction. A model for the estimated fluxes associated with arginine utilization in developing soybean cotyledons is presented. The maximum specific radioactivity ratios between arginine in newly synthesized protein and total free arginine in the 14C-citrulline and 14C-ornithine experiments indicated that only 3% of the free arginine was in the protein precursor pool, and that argininosuccinate and citrulline were present in multiple pools. PMID:16666991

  6. Structural insights into mechanisms of the small RNA methyltransferase HEN1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ying; Ji, Lijuan; Huang, Qichen; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Jin-Biao

    2010-02-22

    RNA silencing is a conserved regulatory mechanism in fungi, plants and animals that regulates gene expression and defence against viruses and transgenes. Small silencing RNAs of {approx}20-30 nucleotides and their associated effector proteins, the Argonaute family proteins, are the central components in RNA silencing. A subset of small RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in plants, Piwi-interacting RNAs in animals and siRNAs in Drosophila, requires an additional crucial step for their maturation; that is, 2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal nucleotide. A conserved S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase, HUA ENHANCER 1 (HEN1), and its homologues are responsible for this specific modification. Here we report the 3.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of full-length HEN1 from Arabidopsis in complex with a 22-nucleotide small RNA duplex and cofactor product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. Highly cooperative recognition of the small RNA substrate by multiple RNA binding domains and the methyltransferase domain in HEN1 measures the length of the RNA duplex and determines the substrate specificity. Metal ion coordination by both 2' and 3' hydroxyls on the 3'-terminal nucleotide and four invariant residues in the active site of the methyltransferase domain suggests a novel Mg{sup 2+}-dependent 2'-O-methylation mechanism.

  7. Altered asymmetric dimethyl arginine metabolism in allergically inflamed mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram; Agrawal, Anurag

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causes uncoupling of NOS leading to generation of reactive nitrogen species, such as peroxynitrite. The lung generates a significant amount of ADMA, potentially contributing to plasma ADMA levels that have been related to endothelial dysfunction. ADMA infusion causes increased collagen deposition in lungs, suggesting that it could influence the development of chronic lung diseases such as fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma. To explore the link between endogenous ADMA and asthma, we determined the levels of ADMA, enzymes implicated in its metabolism, and peroxynitrite in murine models of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) resembling asthma. ADMA levels and nitrosative stress were found to be positively correlated in cytosol and mitochondria during AAI. This was associated with increased expression of protein-arginine methyltransferase-2, an ADMA-synthesizing enzyme, and reduced expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-2, an ADMA-degrading enzyme, in bronchial epithelia. Increased nitrotyrosine similarly localized to the bronchial epithelium, as well as in infiltrated inflammatory cells. Administration of L-arginine, which was expected to compete with ADMA and reverse the uncoupling/inhibition of NOS, restored normal ADMA metabolism, along with the expected reduction of nitrosative stress in lung. Because dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-2 function is known to be negatively related to oxidative stress, this may represent a feed-forward loop effect. We conclude that a delicate balance between ADMA-metabolizing enzymes is disturbed in bronchial epithelium during AAI, potentially causing increased nitrosative stress in a self-propagating cycle. This represents a potential therapeutic target in asthma. PMID:19648472

  8. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D.; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  9. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  10. Arginine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Micallef, B.J.; Shelp, B.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Tracerkinetic experiments were performed using L-(guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(U-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(ureido-{sup 14}C)citrulline, and L-(1-{sup 14}C)ornithine to investigate arginine utilization in developing cotyledons of Gycine max (L.) Merrill. Excised cotyledons were injected with carrier-free {sup 14}C compounds and incubated in sealed vials containing a CO{sub 2} trap. The free and protein amino acids were analyzed using higher performance liquid chromatography and arginine-specific enzyme-linked assays. After 4 hours, 75% and 90% of the {sup 14}C metabolized from (guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine and (U-{sup 14}C)arginine, respectively, was in protein arginine. The net protein arginine accumulation rate, calculated from the depletion of nitrogenous solutes in the cotyledon during incubation, was 17 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. The data indicated that arginine was also catabolized by the arginase-urease reactions at a rate of 5.5 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. Between 2 and 4 hours {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was also evolved from carbons other than C-6 of arginine at a rate of 11.0 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. It is suggested that this extra {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was evolved during the catabolism of ornithine-derived glutamate; {sup 14}C-ornithine was a product of the arginase reaction. A model for the estimated fluxes associated with arginine utilization in developing soybean cotyledons is presented.

  11. Protein arginine methylation facilitates KCNQ channel-PIP2 interaction leading to seizure suppression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Ran; Jung, Chang-Yun; Lee, Seul-Yi; Kim, Hanna; Koh, Jewoo; Vuong, Tuan Anh; Jung, Seungmoon; Yang, Hyunwoo; Park, Su-Kyung; Choi, Dahee; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, KyeongJin; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Park, Joo Min; Jeon, Daejong; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Ho, Won-Kyung; Kang, Jong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cho, Hana

    2016-01-01

    KCNQ channels are critical determinants of neuronal excitability, thus emerging as a novel target of anti-epileptic drugs. To date, the mechanisms of KCNQ channel modulation have been mostly characterized to be inhibitory via Gq-coupled receptors, Ca(2+)/CaM, and protein kinase C. Here we demonstrate that methylation of KCNQ by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (Prmt1) positively regulates KCNQ channel activity, thereby preventing neuronal hyperexcitability. Prmt1+/- mice exhibit epileptic seizures. Methylation of KCNQ2 channels at 4 arginine residues by Prmt1 enhances PIP2 binding, and Prmt1 depletion lowers PIP2 affinity of KCNQ2 channels and thereby the channel activities. Consistently, exogenous PIP2 addition to Prmt1+/- neurons restores KCNQ currents and neuronal excitability to the WT level. Collectively, we propose that Prmt1-dependent facilitation of KCNQ-PIP2 interaction underlies the positive regulation of KCNQ activity by arginine methylation, which may serve as a key target for prevention of neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures. PMID:27466704

  12. Protein arginine methylation facilitates KCNQ channel-PIP2 interaction leading to seizure suppression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Ran; Jung, Chang-Yun; Lee, Seul-Yi; Kim, Hanna; Koh, Jewoo; Vuong, Tuan Anh; Jung, Seungmoon; Yang, Hyunwoo; Park, Su-Kyung; Choi, Dahee; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, KyeongJin; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Park, Joo Min; Jeon, Daejong; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Ho, Won-Kyung; Kang, Jong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cho, Hana

    2016-01-01

    KCNQ channels are critical determinants of neuronal excitability, thus emerging as a novel target of anti-epileptic drugs. To date, the mechanisms of KCNQ channel modulation have been mostly characterized to be inhibitory via Gq-coupled receptors, Ca2+/CaM, and protein kinase C. Here we demonstrate that methylation of KCNQ by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (Prmt1) positively regulates KCNQ channel activity, thereby preventing neuronal hyperexcitability. Prmt1+/- mice exhibit epileptic seizures. Methylation of KCNQ2 channels at 4 arginine residues by Prmt1 enhances PIP2 binding, and Prmt1 depletion lowers PIP2 affinity of KCNQ2 channels and thereby the channel activities. Consistently, exogenous PIP2 addition to Prmt1+/- neurons restores KCNQ currents and neuronal excitability to the WT level. Collectively, we propose that Prmt1-dependent facilitation of KCNQ-PIP2 interaction underlies the positive regulation of KCNQ activity by arginine methylation, which may serve as a key target for prevention of neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17159.001 PMID:27466704

  13. Granulocyte functions are independent of arginine availability.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Katharina; Prüfer, Steve; Michel, Christian S; Habermeier, Alice; Luckner-Minden, Claudia; Giese, Thomas; Bomalaski, John; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Kropf, Pascale; Müller, Ingrid; Closs, Ellen I; Radsak, Markus P; Munder, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Arginine depletion via myeloid cell arginase is critically involved in suppression of the adaptive immune system during cancer or chronic inflammation. On the other hand, arginine depletion is being developed as a novel anti-tumor metabolic strategy to deprive arginine-auxotrophic cancer cells of this amino acid. In human immune cells, arginase is mainly expressed constitutively in PMNs. We therefore purified human primary PMNs from healthy donors and analyzed PMN function as the main innate effector cell and arginase producer in the context of arginine deficiency. We demonstrate that human PMN viability, activation-induced IL-8 synthesis, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, generation of ROS, and fungicidal activity are not impaired by the absence of arginine in vitro. Also, profound pharmacological arginine depletion in vivo via ADI-PEG20 did not inhibit PMN functions in a mouse model of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis; PMN invasion into the lung, activation, and successful PMN-dependent clearance of Aspergillus fumigatus and survival of mice were not impaired. These novel findings add to a better understanding of immunity during inflammation-associated arginine depletion and are also important for the development of therapeutic arginine depletion as anti-metabolic tumor therapy. PMID:25104794

  14. Mechanism of arginine regulation of acetylglutamate synthase, the first enzyme of arginine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Fernández-Murga, María L; Rubio, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS), the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis in bacteria/plants and an essential urea cycle activator in animals, is, respectively, arginine-inhibited and activated. Arginine binds to the hexameric ring-forming amino acid kinase (AAK) domain of NAGS. We show that arginine inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa NAGS by altering the functions of the distant, substrate binding/catalytic GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) domain, increasing K(m)(Glu), decreasing V(max) and triggering substrate inhibition by AcCoA. These effects involve centrally the interdomain linker, since we show that linker elongation or two-residue linker shortening hampers and mimics, respectively, arginine inhibition. We propose a regulatory mechanism in which arginine triggers the expansion of the hexameric NAGS ring, altering AAK-GNAT domain interactions, and the modulation by these interactions of GNAT domain functions, explaining arginine regulation. PMID:19084009

  15. The COMPASS Family of H3K4 Methylases in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Man; Herz, Hans-Martin; Smith, Edwin R.; Zhang, Ying; Jackson, Jessica; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is implemented by Set1/COMPASS, which was originally purified based on the similarity of yeast Set1 to human MLL1 and Drosophila melanogaster Trithorax (Trx). While humans have six COMPASS family members, Drosophila possesses a representative of the three subclasses within COMPASS-like complexes: dSet1 (human SET1A/SET1B), Trx (human MLL1/2), and Trr (human MLL3/4). Here, we report the biochemical purification and molecular characterization of the Drosophila COMPASS family. We observed a one-to-one similarity in subunit composition with their mammalian counterparts, with the exception of LPT (lost plant homeodomains [PHDs] of Trr), which copurifies with the Trr complex. LPT is a previously uncharacterized protein that is homologous to the multiple PHD fingers found in the N-terminal regions of mammalian MLL3/4 but not Drosophila Trr, indicating that Trr and LPT constitute a split gene of an MLL3/4 ancestor. Our study demonstrates that all three complexes in Drosophila are H3K4 methyltransferases; however, dSet1/COMPASS is the major monoubiquitination-dependent H3K4 di- and trimethylase in Drosophila. Taken together, this study provides a springboard for the functional dissection of the COMPASS family members and their role in the regulation of histone H3K4 methylation throughout development in Drosophila. PMID:21875999

  16. Diminished L-arginine bioavailability in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moss, Monique B; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Soares De Moura, Roberto; Novaes Malagris, Lúcia E; Roberts, Norman B; Ellory, J Clive; Mann, Giovanni E; Mendes Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2004-10-01

    L-Arginine is the precursor of NO (nitric oxide), a key endogenous mediator involved in endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and platelet function. Although the concentration of intracellular L-arginine is well above the Km for NO synthesis, in many cells and pathological conditions the transport of L-arginine is essential for NO production (L-arginine paradox). The present study was designed to investigate the modulation of L-arginine/NO pathway in systemic arterial hypertension. Transport of L-arginine into RBCs (red blood cells) and platelets, NOS (NO synthase) activity and amino acid profiles in plasma were analysed in hypertensive patients and in an animal model of hypertension. Influx of L-arginine into RBCs was mediated by the cationic amino acid transport systems y+ and y+L, whereas, in platelets, influx was mediated only via system y+L. Chromatographic analyses revealed higher plasma levels of L-arginine in hypertensive patients (175+/-19 micromol/l) compared with control subjects (137+/-8 micromol/l). L-Arginine transport via system y+L, but not y+, was significantly reduced in RBCs from hypertensive patients (60+/-7 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=16) compared with controls (90+/-17 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=18). In human platelets, the Vmax for L-arginine transport via system y+L was 86+/-17 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in controls compared with 36+/-9 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in hypertensive patients (n=10; P<0.05). Basal NOS activity was decreased in platelets from hypertensive patients (0.12+/-0.02 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8) compared with controls (0.22+/-0.01 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8; P<0.05). Studies with spontaneously hypertensive rats demonstrated that transport of L-arginine via system y+L was also inhibited in RBCs. Our findings provide the first evidence that hypertension is associated with an inhibition of L-arginine transport via system y+L in both humans and animals, with reduced availability of L-arginine limiting NO synthesis

  17. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  18. The Sm protein methyltransferase PRMT5 is not required for primordial germ cell specification in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziwei; Yu, Juehua; Hosohama, Linzi; Nee, Kevin; Gkountela, Sofia; Chaudhari, Sonal; Cass, Ashley A; Xiao, Xinshu; Clark, Amander T

    2015-03-12

    PRMT5 is a type II protein arginine methyltransferase with roles in stem cell biology, reprograming, cancer and neurogenesis. During embryogenesis in the mouse, it was hypothesized that PRMT5 functions with the master germline determinant BLIMP1 to promote primordial germ cell (PGC) specification. Using a Blimp1-Cre germline conditional knockout, we discovered that Prmt5 has no major role in murine germline specification, or the first global epigenetic reprograming event involving depletion of cytosine methylation from DNA and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation from chromatin. Instead, we discovered that PRMT5 functions at the conclusion of PGC reprograming I to promote proliferation, survival and expression of the gonadal germline program as marked by MVH. We show that PRMT5 regulates gene expression by promoting methylation of the Sm spliceosomal proteins and significantly altering the spliced repertoire of RNAs in mammalian embryonic cells and primordial cells. PMID:25519955

  19. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  20. Loss of RUNX1/AML1 arginine-methylation impairs peripheral T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shinsuke; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Zhao, Xinyang; Nimer, Stephen D; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Okuda, Tsukasa

    2015-09-01

    RUNX1 (previously termed AML1) is a frequent target of human leukaemia-associated gene aberrations, and it encodes the DNA-binding subunit of the Core-Binding Factor transcription factor complex. RUNX1 expression is essential for the initiation of definitive haematopoiesis, for steady-state thrombopoiesis, and for normal lymphocytes development. Recent studies revealed that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), which accounts for the majority of the type I PRMT activity in cells, methylates two arginine residues in RUNX1 (R206 and R210), and these modifications inhibit corepressor-binding to RUNX1 thereby enhancing its transcriptional activity. In order to elucidate the biological significance of these methylations, we established novel knock-in mouse lines with non-methylable, double arginine-to-lysine (RTAMR-to-KTAMK) mutations in RUNX1. Homozygous Runx1(KTAMK) (/) (KTAMK) mice are born alive and appear normal during adulthood. However, Runx1(KTAMK) (/) (KTAMK) mice showed a reduction in CD3(+) T lymphoid cells and a decrease in CD4(+) T cells in peripheral lymphoid organs, in comparison to their wild-type littermates, leading to a reduction in the CD4(+) to CD8(+) T-cell ratio. These findings suggest that arginine-methylation of RUNX1 in the RTAMR-motif is dispensable for the development of definitive haematopoiesis and for steady-state platelet production, however this modification affects the role of RUNX1 in the maintenance of the peripheral CD4(+) T-cell population. PMID:26010396

  1. Loss of RUNX1/AML1 arginine-methylation impairs in peripheral T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Shinsuke; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Zhao, Xinyang; Nimer, Stephen D.; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Okuda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Summary RUNX1 (previously termed AML1) is a frequent target of human leukaemia-associated gene aberrations, and it encodes the DNA-binding subunit of the Core-Binding Factor transcription factor complex. RUNX1 expression is essential for the initiation of definitive haematopoiesis, for steady-state thrombopoiesis, and for normal lymphocytes development. Recent studies revealed that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), which accounts for the majority of the type I PRMT activity in cells, methylates two arginine residues in RUNX1 (R206 and R210), and these modifications inhibit corepressor-binding to RUNX1 thereby enhancing its transcriptional activity. In order to elucidate the biological significance of these methylations, we established novel knock-in mouse lines with non-methylable, double arginine-to-lysine (RTAMR-to-KTAMK) mutations in RUNX1. Homozygous Runx1KTAMK/KTAMK mice are born alive and appear normal during adulthood. However, Runx1KTAMK/KTAMK mice showed a reduction in CD3+ T lymphoid cells and a decrease in CD4+ T cells in peripheral lymphoid organs, in comparison to their wild-type littermates, leading to a reduction in the CD4+ to CD8+ T-cell ratio. These findings suggest that arginine-methylation of RUNX1 in the RTAMR-motif is dispensable for the development of definitive haematopoiesis and for steady-state platelet production, however this modification affects the role of RUNX1 in the maintenance of the peripheral CD4+ T-cell population. PMID:26010396

  2. Arginine behaviour after arginine or citrulline administration in older subjects.

    PubMed

    Moinard, C; Maccario, J; Walrand, S; Lasserre, V; Marc, J; Boirie, Y; Cynober, L

    2016-02-14

    Arginine (ARG) and its precursor citrulline (CIT) are popular dietary supplements, especially for the elderly. However, age-related reductions in lean body mass and alterations in organ functions could change their bioavailability. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance to amino acid (AA) loads are poorly documented in elderly subjects. The objective here was to characterise the plasma kinetics of CIT and ARG in a single-dosing study design. Eight fasting elderly men underwent two separate isomolar oral loading tests (10 g of CIT or 9·94 g of ARG). Blood was withdrawn over an 8-h period to measure plasma AA concentrations. Only CIT, ornithine and ARG plasma concentrations were changed. Volume of distribution was not dependent on AA administered. Conversely, parameters related to ARG kinetics were strongly dependent on AA administered: after ARG load, elimination was higher (ARG>CIT; P=0·041) and admission period+time at peak concentration was lower (ARG

  3. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depl...

  4. Arginine requirement of starting broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Cuca, M; Jensen, L S

    1990-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to estimate the arginine requirement of male broiler chicks from 0 to 3 wk of age. The experiments were conducted in battery brooders with wires floors, and the birds received water and feed ad libitum. In the first experiment, chicks were fed a diet based on corn, soybean meal, casein, and corn-gluten meal containing 3,200 kcal ME per kg and either 20 or 23% crude protein. Regression analysis indicated an arginine requirement of 1.22% for maximum growth rate and feed efficiency with the 20% protein diet. For chicks fed the 23% protein diet, neither growth rate nor feed efficiency was significantly different among the diets containing arginine ranging from 1.13 to 1.43%. In the second experiment, a basal diet was used containing 17.5% casein and 22.5% protein with arginine ranging from 1.03 to 1.43%. An arginine requirement of 1.18% for maximum body weight gain was estimated by regression analysis, but no significant response to arginine above the basal level was observed for feed efficiency. Performance of chicks fed the basal diet was somewhat reduced because of a difficulty with adherence of feed to the beaks. In a third experiment, three basal diets containing 21, 22, or 23% protein were formulated from practical ingredients without use of casein. The requirement for maximum growth rate and feed efficiency was estimated to be 1.24 to 1.28% for the three diets. The results of these investigations indicate that the arginine requirement for starting chicks suggested by the National Research Council in 1984 of 1.44% in diets containing 3,200 kcal ME per kg is too high for practical diets. The data presented here support an arginine requirement of 1.25%. PMID:2235851

  5. Protein arginine deiminase 4: a target for an epigenetic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Slack, Jessica L; Causey, Corey P; Thompson, Paul R

    2011-02-01

    The recent approvals of anticancer therapeutic agents targeting the histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases have highlighted the important role that epigenetics plays in human diseases, and suggested that the factors controlling gene expression are novel drug targets. Protein arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is one such target because its effects on gene expression parallel those observed for the histone deacetylases. We demonstrated that F- and Cl-amidine, two potent PAD4 inhibitors, display micromolar cytotoxic effects towards several cancerous cell lines (HL-60, MCF7 and HT-29); no effect was observed in noncancerous lines (NIH 3T3 and HL-60 granulocytes). These compounds also induced the differentiation of HL-60 and HT29 cells. Finally, these compounds synergistically potentiated the cell killing effects of doxorubicin. Taken together, these findings suggest PAD4 inhibition as a novel epigenetic approach for the treatment of cancer, and suggest that F- and Cl-amidine are candidate therapeutic agents for this disease. PMID:20706768

  6. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials. PMID:25896651

  7. Targeting Arginine-Dependent Cancers with Arginine-Degrading Enzymes: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Melissa M.; Sheaff, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Arginine deprivation is a novel antimetabolite strategy for the treatment of arginine-dependent cancers that exploits differential expression and regulation of key urea cycle enzymes. Several studies have focused on inactivation of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) in a range of malignancies, including melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mesothelial and urological cancers, sarcomas, and lymphomas. Epigenetic silencing has been identified as a key mechanism for loss of the tumor suppressor role of ASS1 leading to tumoral dependence on exogenous arginine. More recently, dysregulation of argininosuccinate lyase has been documented in a subset of arginine auxotrophic glioblastoma multiforme, HCC and in fumarate hydratase-mutant renal cancers. Clinical trials of several arginine depletors are ongoing, including pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20, Polaris Group) and bioengineered forms of human arginase. ADI-PEG20 is furthest along the path of clinical development from combinatorial phase 1 to phase 3 trials and is described in more detail. The challenge will be to identify tumors sensitive to drugs such as ADI-PEG20 and integrate these agents into multimodality drug regimens using imaging and tissue/fluid-based biomarkers as predictors of response. Lastly, resistance pathways to arginine deprivation require further study to optimize arginine-targeted therapies in the oncology clinic. PMID:24453997

  8. COBALAMIN- AND COBAMIDE-DEPENDENT METHYLTRANSFERASES

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Rowena G.; Koutmos, Markos; Datta, Supratim

    2008-01-01

    Methyltransferases that employ cobalamin cofactors, or their analogues the cobamides, as intermediates in catalysis of methyl transfer play vital roles in energy generation in anaerobic unicellular organisms. In a broader range of organisms they are involved in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Although the individual methyl transfer reactions catalyzed are simple SN2 displacements, the required change in coordination at the cobalt of the cobalamin or cobamide cofactors and the lability of the reduced Co+1 intermediates introduces the necessity for complex conformational changes during the catalytic cycle. Recent spectroscopic and structural studies on several of these methyltransferases have helped to reveal the strategies by which these conformational changes are facilitated and controlled. PMID:19059104

  9. The Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitor A-366 Uncovers a Role for G9a/GLP in the Epigenetics of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yupeng; Ferguson, Debra; Jagadeeswaran, Sujatha; Osterling, Donald J.; Gao, Wenqing; Spence, Julie K.; Pliushchev, Marina; Sweis, Ramzi F.; Buchanan, Fritz G.; Michaelides, Michael R.; Shoemaker, Alexander R.; Tse, Chris; Chiang, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    Histone methyltransferases are epigenetic regulators that modify key lysine and arginine residues on histones and are believed to play an important role in cancer development and maintenance. These epigenetic modifications are potentially reversible and as a result this class of enzymes has drawn great interest as potential therapeutic targets of small molecule inhibitors. Previous studies have suggested that the histone lysine methyltransferase G9a (EHMT2) is required to perpetuate malignant phenotypes through multiple mechanisms in a variety of cancer types. To further elucidate the enzymatic role of G9a in cancer, we describe herein the biological activities of a novel peptide-competitive histone methyltransferase inhibitor, A-366, that selectively inhibits G9a and the closely related GLP (EHMT1), but not other histone methyltransferases. A-366 has significantly less cytotoxic effects on the growth of tumor cell lines compared to other known G9a/GLP small molecule inhibitors despite equivalent cellular activity on methylation of H3K9me2. Additionally, the selectivity profile of A-366 has aided in the discovery of a potentially important role for G9a/GLP in maintenance of leukemia. Treatment of various leukemia cell lines in vitro resulted in marked differentiation and morphological changes of these tumor cell lines. Furthermore, treatment of a flank xenograft leukemia model with A-366 resulted in growth inhibition in vivo consistent with the profile of H3K9me2 reduction observed. In summary, A-366 is a novel and highly selective inhibitor of G9a/GLP that has enabled the discovery of a role for G9a/GLP enzymatic activity in the growth and differentiation status of leukemia cells. PMID:26147105

  10. Structural Chemistry of Human RNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-03-18

    RNA methyltransferases (RNMTs) play important roles in RNA stability, splicing, and epigenetic mechanisms. They constitute a promising target class that is underexplored by the medicinal chemistry community. Information of relevance to drug design can be extracted from the rich structural coverage of human RNMTs. In this work, the structural chemistry of this protein family is analyzed in depth. Unlike most methyltransferases, RNMTs generally feature a substrate-binding site that is largely open on the cofactor-binding pocket, favoring the design of bisubstrate inhibitors. Substrate purine or pyrimidines are often sandwiched between hydrophobic walls that can accommodate planar ring systems. When the substrate base is laying on a shallow surface, a 5' flanking base is sometimes anchored in a druggable cavity. The cofactor-binding site is structurally more diverse than in protein methyltransferases and more druggable in SPOUT than in Rossman-fold enzymes. Finally, conformational plasticity observed both at the substrate and cofactor binding sites may be a challenge for structure-based drug design. The landscape drawn here may inform ongoing efforts toward the discovery of the first human RNMT inhibitors. PMID:26566070

  11. The Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    A compact genome and a tiny brain make Drosophila the prime model to understand the neural substrate of behavior. The neurogenetic efforts to reveal neural circuits underlying Drosophila vision started about half a century ago, and now the field is booming with sophisticated genetic tools, rich behavioral assays, and importantly, a greater number of scientists joining from different backgrounds. This review will briefly cover the structural anatomy of the Drosophila visual system, the animal’s visual behaviors, the genes involved in assembling these circuits, the new and powerful techniques, and the challenges ahead for ultimately identifying the general principles of biological computation in the brain.   A typical brain utilizes a great many compact neural circuits to collect and process information from the internal biological and external environmental worlds and generates motor commands for observable behaviors. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, despite of its miniature body and tiny brain, can survive in almost any corner of the world.1 It can find food, court mate, fight rival conspecific, avoid predators, and amazingly fly without crashing into trees. Drosophila vision and its underlying neuronal machinery has been a key research model for at least half century for neurogeneticists.2 Given the efforts invested on the visual system, this animal model is likely to offer the first full understanding of how visual information is computed by a multi-cellular organism. Furthermore, research in Drosophila has revealed many genes that play crucial roles in the formation of functional brains across species. The architectural similarities between the visual systems of Drosophila and vertebrate at the molecular, cellular, and network levels suggest new principles discovered at the circuit level on the relationship between neurons and behavior in Drosophila shall also contribute greatly to our understanding of the general principles for how bigger brains work.3

  12. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    PubMed Central

    Durzan, Don J

    2009-01-01

    Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors. PMID:19187550

  13. Methylation of arginine by PRMT1 regulates Nrf2 transcriptional activity during the antioxidative response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Li, Hongyuan; Liu, Lingxia; Lu, Yang; Gao, Yanyan; Geng, Pengyu; Li, Xiaoxue; Huang, Baiqu; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The cap 'n' collar (CNC) family of transcription factors play important roles in resistance of oxidative and electrophilic stresses. Among the CNC family members, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is critical for regulating the antioxidant and phase II enzymes through antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated transactivation. The activity of Nrf2 is controlled by a variety of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation and sumoylation. Here we demonstrate that the arginine methyltransferase-1 (PRMT1) methylates Nrf2 protein at a single residue of arginine 437, both in vitro and in vivo. Using the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as a model of phase II enzyme gene, we found that methylation of Nrf2 by PRMT1 led to a moderate increase of its DNA-binding activity and transactivation, which subsequently protected cells against the tBHP-induced glutathione depletion and cell death. Collectively, our results define a novel modification of Nrf2, which operates as a fine-tuning mechanism for the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 under the oxidative stress. PMID:27183873

  14. When Is It Appropriate to Use Arginine in Critical Illness?

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayshil J; Miller, Keith R; Rosenthal, Cameron; Rosenthal, Martin D

    2016-08-01

    In health, arginine is considered a nonessential amino acid but can become an essential amino acid (ie, conditionally essential amino acid) during periods of metabolic or traumatic stress as endogenous arginine supply is inadequate to meet physiologic demands. Arginine depletion in critical illness is associated with impairments in microcirculatory blood flow, impaired wound healing, and T-cell dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to (1) describe arginine metabolism and role in health and critical illness, (2) describe the relationship between arginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine, and (3) review studies of supplemental arginine in critically ill patients. PMID:27252277

  15. Drosophila Blastorderm Analysis Software

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    PointCloudMake analyzes 3D fluorescent images of whole Drosophila embryo and produces a table-style "PointCloud" file which contains the coordinates and volumes of all the nuclei, cells, their associated relative gene expression levels along with morphological features of the embryo. See: Luengo Hendrix et at 2006 3D Morphology and Gene Expression in the Drosophila Blastoderm at Cellular Resolution manuscript submitted LBNL # LBNL-60178 Knowles DW, Keranen SVE, Biggin M. Sudar S (2002) Mapping organism expression levels at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila. In: Conchello JA, Cogswell CJ, Wilson T, editors. Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing IX. pp. 57-64

  16. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand E; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-05-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼ 12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group. PMID:25808204

  17. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group. PMID:25808204

  18. L-Arginine transport in disease.

    PubMed

    Mendes Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio; Brunini, Tatiana M C

    2004-04-01

    The importance of membrane transport in normal physiological cell function is unquestionable. However, to what extent alterations in the transport of amino acids are the cause and/or consequence of pathological changes observed in disease states is a question not yet completely clarified. Kinetic experiments with blood cells provide a simple and useful model for researching alterations in amino acid transport. The cationic amino acid L-arginine is the precursor of nitric oxide (NO), a key second messenger involved in functions such as endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation, immune defence and platelet activation. The transport of L-arginine, being rate-limiting for nitric oxide production, is extremely relevant to pathological conditions where NO synthesis and/or actions are affected. The current review provides an overview of L-arginine transport in disease, specifically in uraemia, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, septic shock and sickle cell disease. PMID:15320795

  19. Poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in stroke models

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Bruno P; Brookes, Laura M; Clark, Vince W; Cross, Jane L; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Hopkins, Richard M; Hoffmann, Katrin; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-01-01

    Using cortical neuronal cultures and glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) stroke models, we demonstrated that poly-arginine and arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), are highly neuroprotective, with efficacy increasing with increasing arginine content, have the capacity to reduce glutamic acid-induced neuronal calcium influx and require heparan sulfate preotoglycan-mediated endocytosis to induce a neuroprotective effect. Furthermore, neuroprotection could be induced with immediate peptide treatment or treatment up to 2 to 4 hours before glutamic acid excitotoxicity or OGD, and with poly-arginine-9 (R9) when administered intravenously after stroke onset in a rat model. In contrast, the JNKI-1 peptide when fused to the (non-arginine) kFGF CPP, which does not rely on endocytosis for uptake, was not neuroprotective in the glutamic acid model; the kFGF peptide was also ineffective. Similarly, positively charged poly-lysine-10 (K10) and R9 fused to the negatively charged poly-glutamic acid-9 (E9) peptide (R9/E9) displayed minimal neuroprotection after excitotoxicity. These results indicate that peptide positive charge and arginine residues are critical for neuroprotection, and have led us to hypothesize that peptide-induced endocytic internalization of ion channels is a potential mechanism of action. The findings also question the mode of action of different neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich CPPs. PMID:25669902

  20. Poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in stroke models.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Brookes, Laura M; Clark, Vince W; Cross, Jane L; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Hopkins, Richard M; Hoffmann, Katrin; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-06-01

    Using cortical neuronal cultures and glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) stroke models, we demonstrated that poly-arginine and arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), are highly neuroprotective, with efficacy increasing with increasing arginine content, have the capacity to reduce glutamic acid-induced neuronal calcium influx and require heparan sulfate preotoglycan-mediated endocytosis to induce a neuroprotective effect. Furthermore, neuroprotection could be induced with immediate peptide treatment or treatment up to 2 to 4 hours before glutamic acid excitotoxicity or OGD, and with poly-arginine-9 (R9) when administered intravenously after stroke onset in a rat model. In contrast, the JNKI-1 peptide when fused to the (non-arginine) kFGF CPP, which does not rely on endocytosis for uptake, was not neuroprotective in the glutamic acid model; the kFGF peptide was also ineffective. Similarly, positively charged poly-lysine-10 (K10) and R9 fused to the negatively charged poly-glutamic acid-9 (E9) peptide (R9/E9) displayed minimal neuroprotection after excitotoxicity. These results indicate that peptide positive charge and arginine residues are critical for neuroprotection, and have led us to hypothesize that peptide-induced endocytic internalization of ion channels is a potential mechanism of action. The findings also question the mode of action of different neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich CPPs. PMID:25669902

  1. Meiosis in male Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Bruce D.; Yan, Rihui; Tsai, Jui-He

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis entails sorting and separating both homologous and sister chromatids. The mechanisms for connecting sister chromatids and homologs during meiosis are highly conserved and include specialized forms of the cohesin complex and a tightly regulated homolog synapsis/recombination pathway designed to yield regular crossovers between homologous chromatids. Drosophila male meiosis is of special interest because it dispenses with large segments of the standard meiotic script, particularly recombination, synapsis and the associated structures. Instead, Drosophila relies on a unique protein complex composed of at least two novel proteins, SNM and MNM, to provide stable connections between homologs during meiosis I. Sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila is mediated by cohesins, ring-shaped complexes that entrap sister chromatids. However, unlike other eukaryotes Drosophila does not rely on the highly conserved Rec8 cohesin in meiosis, but instead utilizes two novel cohesion proteins, ORD and SOLO, which interact with the SMC1/3 cohesin components in providing meiotic cohesion. PMID:23087836

  2. Translational control of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by arginine can explain the arginine paradox

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junghee; Ryu, Hoon; Ferrante, Robert J.; Morris, Sidney M.; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2003-01-01

    l-Arginine is the only endogenous nitrogen-containing substrate of NO synthase (NOS), and it thus governs the production of NO during nervous system development as well as in disease states such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and HIV dementia. The “arginine paradox” refers to the dependence of cellular NO production on exogenous l-arginine concentration despite the theoretical saturation of NOS enzymes with intracellular l-arginine. Herein, we report that decreased availability of l-arginine blocked induction of NO production in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes, owing to inhibition of inducible NOS (iNOS) protein expression. However, activity of the promoter of the iNOS gene, induction of iNOS mRNA, and stability of iNOS protein were not inhibited under these conditions. Our results indicate that inhibition of iNOS activity by arginine depletion in stimulated astrocyte cultures occurs via inhibition of translation of iNOS mRNA. After stimulation by cytokines, uptake of l-arginine negatively regulates the phosphorylation status of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF2α), which, in turn, regulates translation of iNOS mRNA. eIF2α phosphorylation correlates with phosphorylation of the mammalian homolog of yeast GCN2 eIF2α kinase. As the kinase activity of GCN2 is activated by phosphorylation, these findings suggest that GCN2 activity represents a proximal step in the iNOS translational regulation by availability of l-arginine. These results provide an explanation for the arginine paradox for iNOS and define a distinct mechanism by which a substrate can regulate the activity of its associated enzyme. PMID:12655043

  3. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Tawnya L.; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is under-expressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by ∼50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed. PMID:18661517

  4. In focus: spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, across perspectives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An effective response to the invasion of spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, requires proper taxonomic identification at the initial phase, understanding its basic biology and phenology, developing management tools, transferring information and technology quickly to user groups, and e...

  5. PRMT6 increases cytoplasmic localization of p21CDKN1A in cancer cells through arginine methylation and makes more resistant to cytotoxic agents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2015-01-01

    p21CDKN1A is known as a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), which regulates cell cycle in response to various stimuli, including DNA damage, on the p53-dependent manner. Here we demonstrate that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) methylates p21 at arginine 156 and promotes phosphorylation of threonine 145 on p21, resulting in the increase of cytoplasmic localization of p21. The cytoplasmic presence of p21 makes cancer cells more resistant to cytotoxic agents. Our results indicate that PRMT6 appears to be one of the key proteins to dysregulate p21 functions in human cancer, and targeting this pathway may be an appropriate strategy for development of anticancer drugs. PMID:26436589

  6. Arginine and Citrulline and the Immune Response in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wijnands, Karolina A.P.; Castermans, Tessy M.R.; Hommen, Merel P.J.; Meesters, Dennis M.; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid is an important initiator of the immune response. Arginine serves as a precursor in several metabolic pathways in different organs. In the immune response, arginine metabolism and availability is determined by the nitric oxide synthases and the arginase enzymes, which convert arginine into nitric oxide (NO) and ornithine, respectively. Limitations in arginine availability during inflammatory conditions regulate macrophages and T-lymfocyte activation. Furthermore, over the past years more evidence has been gathered which showed that arginine and citrulline deficiencies may underlie the detrimental outcome of inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis and endotoxemia. Not only does the immune response contribute to the arginine deficiency, also the impaired arginine de novo synthesis in the kidney has a key role in the eventual observed arginine deficiency. The complex interplay between the immune response and the arginine-NO metabolism is further underscored by recent data of our group. In this review we give an overview of physiological arginine and citrulline metabolism and we address the experimental and clinical studies in which the arginine-citrulline NO pathway plays an essential role in the immune response, as initiator and therapeutic target. PMID:25699985

  7. Watermelon consumption increases plasma arginine concentrations in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon is a good source of citrulline, an amino acid that can be converted to arginine in the human body. Arginine helps in cardiovascular and immune health. No studies have been conducted to evaluate plasma arginine response in humans following consumption of citrulline from natural plant so...

  8. Improving cancer immunotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad H; Wang, Lei; Goldberg, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit to melanoma, lung, and kidney cancer patients. Challengingly, most other solid tumors, including ovarian carcinoma, are not particularly responsive to immunotherapy, so combination with a complementary therapy may be beneficial. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic modifying drugs can prime antitumor immunity by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens, chemokines, and activating ligands by cancer cells as well as cytokines by immune cells. This review, drawing from both preclinical and clinical data, describes some of the mechanisms of action that enable DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to facilitate the establishment of antitumor immunity. PMID:26646852

  9. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  13. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease. PMID:27529679

  14. ARGININE AND COCCIDIOSIS RESPONSES IN BROILER CHICKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine (Arg) is an essential amino acid in broilers that has numerous physiological and immunological functions, in addition to being required for growth. The experiment was a 3 x 2 factorial design of dietary Arg (1.00, 1.25, and 1.50% of diet) and coccidiosis (with and with out a field isolate ...

  15. Subcellular Localization of Anthocyanin Methyltransferase in Flowers of Petunia hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Lisbeth M. V.; Donker-Koopman, Wilma E.; Uitslager, Piet; Schram, André W.

    1983-01-01

    The subcellular localization of the enzyme anthocyanin-methyltransferase was studied in cells (protoplasts) obtained from the upper epidermis of petals of Petunia hybrida Hort. Vacuoles were isolated from protoplasts to ascertain the possible presence of the enzyme in these organelles. The recovery of methyltransferase activity in vacuole-enriched fractions equalled that of the cytosolic marker enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The relative activity of methyltransferase in the vacuole fraction was one tenth of that in the protoplast. Neither whole protoplasts nor isolated vacuoles contained inhibitors of methyltransferase activity. Examination of fractions obtained by differential centrifugation of a protoplast lysate showed that the major part of the methyltransferase activity was cytosolic. Activity found in a 130,000g pellet was due to nonspecific adhesion to membranes. The results indicate that terminal steps of anthocyanin biosynthesis take place in the cytosol. They do not lend support to the notion that the vacuole might be involved in (part of) this process. PMID:16662994

  16. Biosynthesis of homoarginine (hArg) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) from acutely and chronically administered free L-arginine in humans.

    PubMed

    Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Langen, Jennifer; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Mariotti, François; Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Frölich, Jürgen C; Atzler, Dorothee; Choe, Chi-Un; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Huneau, Jean François; Lücke, Thomas; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, whereas L-arginine (Arg) and L-homoarginine (hArg) serve as substrates for NO synthesis. ADMA and other methylated arginines are generally believed to exclusively derive from guanidine (N (G))-methylated arginine residues in proteins by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) that use S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as the methyl donor. L-Lysine is known for decades as a precursor for hArg, but only recent studies indicate that arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) is responsible for the synthesis of hArg. AGAT catalyzes the formation of guanidinoacetate (GAA) that is methylated to creatine by guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) which also uses SAM. The aim of the present study was to learn more about the mechanisms of ADMA and hArg formation in humans. Especially, we hypothesized that ADMA is produced by N (G)-methylation of free Arg in addition to the known PRMTs-involving mechanism. In knockout mouse models of AGAT- and GAMT-deficiency, we investigated the contribution of these enzymes to hArg synthesis. Arg infusion (0.5 g/kg, 30 min) in children (n = 11) and ingestion of high-fat protein meals by overweight men (n = 10) were used to study acute effects on ADMA and hArg synthesis. Daily Arg ingestion (10 g) or placebo for 3 or 6 months by patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD, n = 20) or coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 30) was used to study chronic effects of Arg on ADMA synthesis. Mass spectrometric methods were used to measure all biochemical parameters in plasma and urine samples. In mice, AGAT but not GAMT was found to contribute to plasma hArg, while ADMA synthesis was independent of AGAT and GAMT. Arg infusion acutely increased plasma Arg, hArg and ADMA concentrations, but decreased the plasma hArg/ADMA ratio. High-fat protein meals acutely increased plasma Arg, hArg, ADMA concentrations, as well as the plasma h

  17. A conserved arginine-containing motif crucial for the assembly and enzymatic activity of the mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 core complex.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anamika; Vought, Valarie E; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2008-11-21

    The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) belongs to the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases. Recent studies indicate that the catalytic subunits of SET1 family members are regulated by interaction with a conserved core group of proteins that include the WD repeat protein-5 (WDR5), retinoblastoma-binding protein-5 (RbBP5), and the absent small homeotic-2-like protein (Ash2L). It has been suggested that WDR5 functions to bridge the interactions between the catalytic and regulatory subunits of SET1 family complexes. However, the molecular details of these interactions are unknown. To gain insight into the interactions among these proteins, we have determined the biophysical basis for the interaction between the human WDR5 and MLL1. Our studies reveal that WDR5 preferentially recognizes a previously unidentified and conserved arginine-containing motif, called the "Win" or WDR5 interaction motif, which is located in the N-SET region of MLL1 and other SET1 family members. Surprisingly, our structural and functional studies show that WDR5 recognizes arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif using the same arginine binding pocket on WDR5 that was previously shown to bind histone H3. We demonstrate that WDR5's recognition of arginine 3765 of MLL1 is essential for the assembly and enzymatic activity of the MLL1 core complex in vitro. PMID:18829457

  18. Dual role of arginine metabolism in establishing pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Mayuri; Datey, Akshay; Wilson, Keith T; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-02-01

    Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential. PMID:26610300

  19. Use of External, Biosynthetic, and Organellar Arginine by Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, K. N.; Weiss, Richard L.; Davis, Rowland H.

    1973-01-01

    The fate of very low amounts of 14C-arginine derived from the medium or from biosynthesis was studied in Neurospora cells grown in minimal medium. In both cases, the label enters the cytoplasm, where it is very briefly used with high efficiency for protein synthesis without mixing with the bulk of the large, endogenous pool of 12C-arginine. The soluble 14C-arginine which is not used for protein synthesis is sequestered in a vesicle with the bulk of the endogenous arginine pool. After this time, it is selectively excluded from use in protein synthesis except by exchange with cytoplasmic arginine. The data suggest that in vivo, the non-organellar cytoplasm contains less than 5% of the soluble, cellular arginine. The cellular organization of Neurospora described here also prevents the catabolism of arginine. Our results are discussed in relation to previous work on amino acid pools of other eukaryotic systems. PMID:4717516

  20. Drosophila Blastorderm Analysis Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-10-25

    PointCloudMake analyzes 3D fluorescent images of whole Drosophila embryo and produces a table-style "PointCloud" file which contains the coordinates and volumes of all the nuclei, cells, their associated relative gene expression levels along with morphological features of the embryo. See: Luengo Hendrix et at 2006 3D Morphology and Gene Expression in the Drosophila Blastoderm at Cellular Resolution manuscript submitted LBNL # LBNL-60178 Knowles DW, Keranen SVE, Biggin M. Sudar S (2002) Mapping organism expression levelsmore » at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila. In: Conchello JA, Cogswell CJ, Wilson T, editors. Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing IX. pp. 57-64« less

  1. A nonpyrrolysine member of the widely distributed trimethylamine methyltransferase family is a glycine betaine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ticak, Tomislav; Kountz, Duncan J.; Girosky, Kimberly E.; Krzycki, Joseph A.; Ferguson, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    COG5598 comprises a large number of proteins related to MttB, the trimethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase. MttB has a genetically encoded pyrrolysine residue proposed essential for catalysis. MttB is the only known trimethylamine methyltransferase, yet the great majority of members of COG5598 lack pyrrolysine, leaving the activity of these proteins an open question. Here, we describe the function of one of the nonpyrrolysine members of this large protein family. Three nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs are encoded in Desulfitobacterium hafniense, a Gram-positive strict anaerobe present in both the environment and human intestine. D. hafniense was found capable of growth on glycine betaine with electron acceptors such as nitrate or fumarate, producing dimethylglycine and CO2 as products. Examination of the genome revealed genes for tetrahydrofolate-linked oxidation of a methyl group originating from a methylated corrinoid protein, but no obvious means to carry out corrinoid methylation with glycine betaine. DSY3156, encoding one of the nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs, was up-regulated during growth on glycine betaine. The recombinant DSY3156 protein converts glycine betaine and cob(I)alamin to dimethylglycine and methylcobalamin. To our knowledge, DSY3156 is the first glycine betaine:corrinoid methyltransferase described, and a designation of MtgB is proposed. In addition, DSY3157, an adjacently encoded protein, was shown to be a methylcobalamin:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase and is designated MtgA. Homologs of MtgB are widely distributed, especially in marine bacterioplankton and nitrogen-fixing plant symbionts. They are also found in multiple members of the human microbiome, and may play a beneficial role in trimethylamine homeostasis, which in recent years has been directly tied to human cardiovascular health. PMID:25313086

  2. Interaction of arginine oligomer with model membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Dandan . E-mail: yi_dandan@yahoo.com.cn; Guoming, Li; Gao, Li; Wei, Liang

    2007-08-10

    Short oligomers of arginine (R8) have been shown to cross readily a variety of biological barriers. A hypothesis was put forward that inverted micelles form in biological membranes in the presence of arginine oligomer peptides, facilitating their transfer through the membranes. In order to define the role of peptide-lipid interaction in this mechanism, we prepared liposomes as the model membrane to study the ability of R8 inducing calcein release from liposomes, the fusion of liposomes, R8 binding to liposomes and membrane disturbing activity of the bound R8. The results show that R8 binding to liposome membrane depends on lipid compositions, negative surface charge density and interior water phase pH values of liposomes. R8 has no activity to induce the leakage of calcein from liposomes or improve liposome fusion. R8 does not permeabilize through the membrane spontaneously. These peptides delivering drugs through membranes may depend on receptors and energy.

  3. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  4. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-08-14

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  5. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  6. Effects of arginine on multimodal anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Atsushi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kameda, Tomoshi

    2015-12-01

    The effects of arginine on binding and elution properties of a multimodal anion exchanger, Capto adhere, were examined using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a monoclonal antibody against interleukin-8 (mAb-IL8). Negatively charged BSA was bound to the positively charged Capto adhere and was readily eluted from the column with a stepwise or gradient elution using 1M NaCl at pH 7.0. For heat-treated BSA, small oligomers and remaining monomers were also eluted using a NaCl gradient, whereas larger oligomers required arginine for effective elution. The positively charged mAb-IL8 was bound to Capto adhere at pH 7.0. Arginine was also more effective for elution of the bound mAb-IL8 than was NaCl. The results imply that arginine interacts with the positively charged Capto adhere. The mechanism underlying the interactions of arginine with Capto adhere was examined by calculating the binding free energy between an arginine molecule and a Capto adhere ligand in water through molecular dynamics simulations. The overall affinity of arginine for Capto adhere is attributed to the hydrophobic and π-π interactions between an arginine side chain and the aromatic moiety of the ligand as well as hydrogen bonding between arginine and the ligand hydroxyl group, which may account for the characteristics of protein elution using arginine. PMID:26225914

  7. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  8. Position-Effect Variegation, Heterochromatin Formation, and Gene Silencing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Elgin, Sarah C.R.; Reuter, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) results when a gene normally in euchromatin is juxtaposed with heterochromatin by rearrangement or transposition. When heterochromatin packaging spreads across the heterochromatin/euchromatin border, it causes transcriptional silencing in a stochastic pattern. PEV is intensely studied in Drosophila using the white gene. Screens for dominant mutations that suppress or enhance white variegation have identified many conserved epigenetic factors, including the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase SU(VAR)3-9. Heterochromatin protein HP1a binds H3K9me2/3 and interacts with SU(VAR)3-9, creating a core memory system. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical analysis of PEV in Drosophila has contributed many key findings concerning establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin with concomitant gene silencing. PMID:23906716

  9. Heritable Endosymbionts of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, Mariana; Castrezana, Sergio J.; Nankivell, Becky J.; Estes, Anne M.; Markow, Therese A.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2006-01-01

    Although heritable microorganisms are increasingly recognized as widespread in insects, no systematic screens for such symbionts have been conducted in Drosophila species (the primary insect genetic models for studies of evolution, development, and innate immunity). Previous efforts screened relatively few Drosophila lineages, mainly for Wolbachia. We conducted an extensive survey of potentially heritable endosymbionts from any bacterial lineage via PCR screens of mature ovaries in 181 recently collected fly strains representing 35 species from 11 species groups. Due to our fly sampling methods, however, we are likely to have missed fly strains infected with sex ratio-distorting endosymbionts. Only Wolbachia and Spiroplasma, both widespread in insects, were confirmed as symbionts. These findings indicate that in contrast to some other insect groups, other heritable symbionts are uncommon in Drosophila species, possibly reflecting a robust innate immune response that eliminates many bacteria. A more extensive survey targeted these two symbiont types through diagnostic PCR in 1225 strains representing 225 species from 32 species groups. Of these, 19 species were infected by Wolbachia while only 3 species had Spiroplasma. Several new strains of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma were discovered, including ones divergent from any reported to date. The phylogenetic distribution of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma in Drosophila is discussed. PMID:16783009

  10. Monolignol 4-O-methyltransferases and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Zhang, Kewei

    2014-11-18

    Modified (iso)eugenol 4-O-methyltransferase enzymes having novel capacity for methylation of monolignols and reduction of lignin polymerization in plant cell wall are disclosed. Sequences encoding the modified enzymes are disclosed.

  11. Progress in the Development of Lysine Methyltransferase SETD8 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Milite, Ciro; Feoli, Alessandra; Viviano, Monica; Rescigno, Donatella; Mai, Antonello; Castellano, Sabrina; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2016-08-19

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the only known lysine methyltransferase that monomethylates lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20) in vivo. The methyltransferase activity of SETD8 has been implicated in many essential cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. In addition to H4K20, SETD8 monomethylates non-histone substrates including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p53. During the past decade, different structural classes of inhibitors targeting various lysine methyltransferases have been designed and developed. However, the development of SETD8 inhibitors is still in its infancy. This review covers the progress made to date in inhibiting the activity of SETD8 by small molecules, with an emphasis on their discovery, selectivity over other methyltransferases, and cellular activity. PMID:27411844

  12. Monomethylioarsenicals are substratres for human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monomethylthioarsenicals are substrates for human arsenic (+3 oxida1tion state) methyltransferase Methylated thioarsenicals are structural analogs of methylated oxyarsenic in which one or more oxygen atom bound t...

  13. Role of several histone lysine methyltransferases in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIFU; ZHU, SHUNQIN; KE, XIAO-XUE; CUI, HONGJUAN

    2016-01-01

    The field of cancer epigenetics has been evolving rapidly in recent decades. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Histone modifications are important markers of function and chromatin state. Aberrant histone methylation frequently occurs in tumor development and progression. Multiple studies have identified that histone lysine methyltransferases regulate gene transcription through the methylation of histone, which affects cell proliferation and differentiation, cell migration and invasion, and other biological characteristics. Histones have variant lysine sites for different levels of methylation, catalyzed by different lysine methyltransferases, which have numerous effects on human cancers. The present review focused on the most recent advances, described the key function sites of histone lysine methyltransferases, integrated significant quantities of data to introduce several compelling histone lysine methyltransferases in various types of human cancers, summarized their role in tumor development and discussed their potential mechanisms of action. PMID:26998265

  14. Preferential interactions between protein and arginine: effects of arginine on tertiary conformational and colloidal stability of protein solution.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lili; Chen, Yan; Liao, Jie; Zheng, Xianxian; Yin, Zongning

    2015-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the preferential binding behavior of arginine to protein as well as the impact of arginine on the conformational and colloidal stability of protein solution. Physical stabilities of model proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA), were investigated by fluorescence-based and dynamic light scattering techniques in the absence and presence of arginine. We investigated the interactions between arginine and tryptophan or tyrosine residues by conducting solubility and fluorescence studies of two amino acid derivatives, N-acetyl-l-tryptophanamide (NATA) and N-acetyl-l-tyrosinamide (NAYA), in arginine solutions. The result showed that arginine preferentially bond to the aromatic amino acids of proteins mainly through hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals' forces, while the binding constant K of arginine with BSA and OVA at 298K was 41.92 and 5.77L/mol, respectively. The fluorescence quenching, the decreased fluorescence lifetime and the red-shifted ANS peak position revealed that arginine perturbed the local environment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. We also found the attenuated electrostatic repulsion among BSA and OVA molecules after adding arginine. These findings provided strong evidence that arginine possessed negative effects on tertiary conformational and colloidal stability of BSA and OVA during the preferential binding process. PMID:25529432

  15. Arginine biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: characterization of the arginine-sensitive N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-09-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and appears not to involve classical acetylglutamate synthase. The inhibition of NAGK by arginine was found to be pH independent and to depend sigmoidally on the concentration of arginine, with a Hill coefficient (N) of approximately 4, and the 50% inhibitory arginine concentration (I0.5) was shown to increase with temperature, approaching above 65 degrees C the I0.50 observed at 37 degrees C with the mesophilic NAGK of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the best-studied arginine-inhibitable NAGK). At 75 degrees C, the inhibition by arginine of T. maritima NAGK was due to a large increase in the Km for acetylglutamate triggered by the inhibitor, but at 37 degrees C arginine also substantially decreased the Vmax of the enzyme. The NAGKs of T. maritima and P. aeruginosa behaved in gel filtration as hexamers, justifying the sigmoidicity and high Hill coefficient of arginine inhibition, and arginine or the substrates failed to disaggregate these enzymes. In contrast, Escherichia coli NAGK is not inhibited by arginine and is dimeric, and thus the hexameric architecture may be an important determinant of arginine sensitivity. Potential thermostability determinants of T. maritima NAGK are also discussed. PMID:15342584

  16. Arginine Biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: Characterization of the Arginine-Sensitive N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L.; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and appears not to involve classical acetylglutamate synthase. The inhibition of NAGK by arginine was found to be pH independent and to depend sigmoidally on the concentration of arginine, with a Hill coefficient (N) of ∼4, and the 50% inhibitory arginine concentration (I0.5) was shown to increase with temperature, approaching above 65°C the I0.50 observed at 37°C with the mesophilic NAGK of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the best-studied arginine-inhibitable NAGK). At 75°C, the inhibition by arginine of T. maritima NAGK was due to a large increase in the Km for acetylglutamate triggered by the inhibitor, but at 37°C arginine also substantially decreased the Vmax of the enzyme. The NAGKs of T. maritima and P. aeruginosa behaved in gel filtration as hexamers, justifying the sigmoidicity and high Hill coefficient of arginine inhibition, and arginine or the substrates failed to disaggregate these enzymes. In contrast, Escherichia coli NAGK is not inhibited by arginine and is dimeric, and thus the hexameric architecture may be an important determinant of arginine sensitivity. Potential thermostability determinants of T. maritima NAGK are also discussed. PMID:15342584

  17. Biosynthesis of caffeine underlying the diversity of motif B' methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Fumiyo; Mizuno, Kouichi; Kato, Misako

    2015-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) are well-known purine alkaloids in Camellia, Coffea, Cola, Paullinia, Ilex, and Theobroma spp. The caffeine biosynthetic pathway depends on the substrate specificity of N-methyltransferases, which are members of the motif B' methyl-transferase family. The caffeine biosynthetic pathways in purine alkaloid-containing plants might have evolved in parallel with one another, consistent with different catalytic properties of the enzymes involved in these pathways. PMID:26058161

  18. Methylation mediated by an anthocyanin, O-methyltransferase, is involved in purple flower coloration in Paeonia

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hui; Wu, Jie; Ji, Kui-Xian; Zeng, Qing-Yin; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Su, Shang; Shu, Qing-Yan; Ren, Hong-Xu; Liu, Zheng-An; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are major pigments in plants. Methylation plays a role in the diversity and stability of anthocyanins. However, the contribution of anthocyanin methylation to flower coloration is still unclear. We identified two homologous anthocyanin O-methyltransferase (AOMT) genes from purple-flowered (PsAOMT) and red-flowered (PtAOMT) Paeonia plants, and we performed functional analyses of the two genes in vitro and in vivo. The critical amino acids for AOMT catalytic activity were studied by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed that the recombinant proteins, PsAOMT and PtAOMT, had identical substrate preferences towards anthocyanins. The methylation activity of PsAOMT was 60 times higher than that of PtAOMT in vitro. Interestingly, this vast difference in catalytic activity appeared to result from a single amino acid residue substitution at position 87 (arginine to leucine). There were significant differences between the 35S::PsAOMT transgenic tobacco and control flowers in relation to their chromatic parameters, which further confirmed the function of PsAOMT in vivo. The expression levels of the two homologous AOMT genes were consistent with anthocyanin accumulation in petals. We conclude that AOMTs are responsible for the methylation of cyanidin glycosides in Paeonia plants and play an important role in purple coloration in Paeonia spp. PMID:26208646

  19. Methylation mediated by an anthocyanin, O-methyltransferase, is involved in purple flower coloration in Paeonia.

    PubMed

    Du, Hui; Wu, Jie; Ji, Kui-Xian; Zeng, Qing-Yin; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Su, Shang; Shu, Qing-Yan; Ren, Hong-Xu; Liu, Zheng-An; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Anthocyanins are major pigments in plants. Methylation plays a role in the diversity and stability of anthocyanins. However, the contribution of anthocyanin methylation to flower coloration is still unclear. We identified two homologous anthocyanin O-methyltransferase (AOMT) genes from purple-flowered (PsAOMT) and red-flowered (PtAOMT) Paeonia plants, and we performed functional analyses of the two genes in vitro and in vivo. The critical amino acids for AOMT catalytic activity were studied by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed that the recombinant proteins, PsAOMT and PtAOMT, had identical substrate preferences towards anthocyanins. The methylation activity of PsAOMT was 60 times higher than that of PtAOMT in vitro. Interestingly, this vast difference in catalytic activity appeared to result from a single amino acid residue substitution at position 87 (arginine to leucine). There were significant differences between the 35S::PsAOMT transgenic tobacco and control flowers in relation to their chromatic parameters, which further confirmed the function of PsAOMT in vivo. The expression levels of the two homologous AOMT genes were consistent with anthocyanin accumulation in petals. We conclude that AOMTs are responsible for the methylation of cyanidin glycosides in Paeonia plants and play an important role in purple coloration in Paeonia spp. PMID:26208646

  20. Arginine methylation and citrullination of splicing factor proline- and glutamine-rich (SFPQ/PSF) regulates its association with mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Bloom, Alex; Williamson, James C.; Minshull, Thomas C.; Phillips, Helen L.; Mihaylov, Simeon R.; Gjerde, Douglas T.; Hornby, David P.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Hurd, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Splicing factor proline- and glutamine-rich (SFPQ) also commonly known as polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated-splicing factor (PSF) and its binding partner non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO/p54nrb), are highly abundant, multifunctional nuclear proteins. However, the exact role of this complex is yet to be determined. Following purification of the endogeneous SFPQ/NONO complex, mass spectrometry analysis identified a wide range of interacting proteins, including those involved in RNA processing, RNA splicing, and transcriptional regulation, consistent with a multifunctional role for SFPQ/NONO. In addition, we have identified several sites of arginine methylation in SFPQ/PSF using mass spectrometry and found that several arginines in the N-terminal domain of SFPQ/PSF are asymmetrically dimethylated. Furthermore, we find that the protein arginine N-methyltransferase, PRMT1, catalyzes this methylation in vitro and that this is antagonized by citrullination of SFPQ. Arginine methylation and citrullination of SFPQ/PSF does not affect complex formation with NONO. However, arginine methylation was shown to increase the association with mRNA in mRNP complexes in mammalian cells. Finally we show that the biochemical properties of the endogenous complex from cell lysates are significantly influenced by the ionic strength during purification. At low ionic strength, the SFPQ/NONO complex forms large heterogeneous protein assemblies or aggregates, preventing the purification of the SFPQ/NONO complex. The ability of the SFPQ/NONO complex to form varying protein assemblies, in conjunction with the effect of post-translational modifications of SFPQ modulating mRNA binding, suggests key roles affecting mRNP dynamics within the cell. PMID:25605962

  1. Aging Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaning; Yolitz, Jason; Wang, Cecilia; Spangler, Edward; Zhan, Ming; Zou, Sige

    2015-01-01

    Summary Drosophila is a genetically tractable system ideal for investigating the mechanisms of aging and developing interventions for promoting healthy aging. Here we describe methods commonly used in Drosophila aging research. These include basic approaches for preparation of diets and measurements of lifespan, food intake and reproductive output. We also describe some commonly used assays to measure changes in physiological and behavioral functions of Drosophila in aging, such as stress resistance and locomotor activity. PMID:23929099

  2. Protein Arginine Methylation and Citrullination in Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modification of arginine residues represents a key mechanism for the epigenetic control of gene expression. Aberrant levels of histone arginine modifications have been linked to the development of several diseases including cancer. In recent years, great progress has been made in understanding the physiological role of individual arginine modifications and their effects on chromatin function. The present review aims to summarize the structural and functional aspects of histone arginine modifying enzymes and their impact on gene transcription. We will discuss the potential for targeting these proteins with small molecules in a variety of disease states. PMID:26686581

  3. Protein Arginine Methylation and Citrullination in Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Jakob; Thompson, Paul R

    2016-03-18

    The post-translational modification of arginine residues represents a key mechanism for the epigenetic control of gene expression. Aberrant levels of histone arginine modifications have been linked to the development of several diseases including cancer. In recent years, great progress has been made in understanding the physiological role of individual arginine modifications and their effects on chromatin function. The present review aims to summarize the structural and functional aspects of histone arginine modifying enzymes and their impact on gene transcription. We will discuss the potential for targeting these proteins with small molecules in a variety of disease states. PMID:26686581

  4. Acute pancreatitis possibly due to arginine use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saka, Mendane; Tüzün, Ahmet; Ateş, Yüksel; Bağci, Sait; Karaeren, Necmettin; Dağalp, Kemal

    2004-03-01

    Arginine has been used by millions of athletes over the past 20 years to enhance production of human growth hormone. The effects of arginine supplementation include increased fat burning and muscle building, enhanced immunity, and improvement in erectile function in men. Excessive doses of basic amino acids such as ethionine, methionine and lysine are known to damage the rat pancreas. Recent studies have demonstrated that excessive doses of arginine induce necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. In this article, we report a 16-year-old male patient hospitalized in our clinic because of severe pain in upper abdomen, nausea and vomiting who was suspected to have arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:15264124

  5. Enhancing S-adenosyl-methionine catabolism extends Drosophila lifespan.

    PubMed

    Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Methionine restriction extends the lifespan of various model organisms. Limiting S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) synthesis, the first metabolic reaction of dietary methionine, extends longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans but accelerates pathology in mammals. Here, we show that, as an alternative to inhibiting SAM synthesis, enhancement of SAM catabolism by glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt) extends the lifespan in Drosophila. Gnmt strongly buffers systemic SAM levels by producing sarcosine in either high-methionine or low-sams conditions. During ageing, systemic SAM levels in flies are increased. Gnmt is transcriptionally induced in a dFoxO-dependent manner; however, this is insufficient to suppress SAM elevation completely in old flies. Overexpression of gnmt suppresses this age-dependent SAM increase and extends longevity. Pro-longevity regimens, such as dietary restriction or reduced insulin signalling, attenuate the age-dependent SAM increase, and rely at least partially on Gnmt function to exert their lifespan-extending effect in Drosophila. Our study suggests that regulation of SAM levels by Gnmt is a key component of lifespan extension. PMID:26383889

  6. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%. PMID:15120115

  7. Asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA provides a repressive mark to modulate TNFα/NF-κB response.

    PubMed

    Reintjes, Anja; Fuchs, Julian E; Kremser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert H; Liedl, Klaus R; Huber, Lukas A; Valovka, Taras

    2016-04-19

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is an inducible transcription factor that plays critical roles in immune and stress responses and is often implicated in pathologies, including chronic inflammation and cancer. Although much has been learned about NF-κB-activating pathways, the specific repression of NF-κB is far less well understood. Here we identified the type I protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a restrictive factor controlling TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB. PRMT1 forms a cellular complex with NF-κB through direct interaction with the Rel homology domain of RelA. We demonstrate that PRMT1 methylates RelA at evolutionary conserved R30, located in the DNA-binding L1 loop, which is a critical residue required for DNA binding. Asymmetric R30 dimethylation inhibits the binding of RelA to DNA and represses NF-κB target genes in response to TNFα. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-bound RelA:p50 predicted structural changes in RelA caused by R30 methylation or a mutation that interferes with the stability of the DNA-NF-κB complex. Our findings provide evidence for the asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA and unveil a unique mechanism controlling TNFα/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27051065

  8. Asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA provides a repressive mark to modulate TNFα/NF-κB response

    PubMed Central

    Reintjes, Anja; Fuchs, Julian E.; Kremser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert H.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Huber, Lukas A.; Valovka, Taras

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is an inducible transcription factor that plays critical roles in immune and stress responses and is often implicated in pathologies, including chronic inflammation and cancer. Although much has been learned about NF-κB–activating pathways, the specific repression of NF-κB is far less well understood. Here we identified the type I protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a restrictive factor controlling TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB. PRMT1 forms a cellular complex with NF-κB through direct interaction with the Rel homology domain of RelA. We demonstrate that PRMT1 methylates RelA at evolutionary conserved R30, located in the DNA-binding L1 loop, which is a critical residue required for DNA binding. Asymmetric R30 dimethylation inhibits the binding of RelA to DNA and represses NF-κB target genes in response to TNFα. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-bound RelA:p50 predicted structural changes in RelA caused by R30 methylation or a mutation that interferes with the stability of the DNA–NF-κB complex. Our findings provide evidence for the asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA and unveil a unique mechanism controlling TNFα/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27051065

  9. Drosophila by the dozen

    SciTech Connect

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  10. The Drosophila Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoff-Falk, Grace; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Development of a functional auditory system in Drosophila requires specification and differentiation of the chordotonal sensilla of Johnston’s organ (JO) in the antenna, correct axonal targeting to the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) in the brain, and synaptic connections to neurons in the downstream circuit. Chordotonal development in JO is functionally complicated by structural, molecular and functional diversity that is not yet fully understood, and construction of the auditory neural circuitry is only beginning to unfold. Here we describe our current understanding of developmental and molecular mechanisms that generate the exquisite functions of the Drosophila auditory system, emphasizing recent progress and highlighting important new questions arising from research on this remarkable sensory system. PMID:24719289

  11. Characterization of an Arginine:Pyruvate Transaminase in Arginine Catabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2007-01-01

    The arginine transaminase (ATA) pathway represents one of the multiple pathways for l-arginine catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The AruH protein was proposed to catalyze the first step in the ATA pathway, converting the substrates l-arginine and pyruvate into 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine. Here we report the initial biochemical characterization of this enzyme. The aruH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified to homogeneity. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses were employed to detect the presence of the transamination products 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine, thus demonstrating the proposed biochemical reaction catalyzed by AruH. The enzymatic properties and kinetic parameters of dimeric recombinant AruH were determined by a coupled reaction with NAD+ and l-alanine dehydrogenase. The optimal activity of AruH was found at pH 9.0, and it has a novel substrate specificity with an order of preference of Arg > Lys > Met > Leu > Orn > Gln. With l-arginine and pyruvate as the substrates, Lineweaver-Burk plots of the data revealed a series of parallel lines characteristic of a ping-pong kinetic mechanism with calculated Vmax and kcat values of 54.6 ± 2.5 μmol/min/mg and 38.6 ± 1.8 s−1. The apparent Km and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) were 1.6 ± 0.1 mM and 24.1 mM−1 s−1 for pyruvate and 13.9 ± 0.8 mM and 2.8 mM−1 s−1 for l-arginine. When l-lysine was used as the substrate, MS analysis suggested Δ1-piperideine-2-carboxylate as its transamination product. These results implied that AruH may have a broader physiological function in amino acid catabolism. PMID:17416668

  12. Isolation of DNA methyltransferase from plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, K.; Malbroue, C.

    1987-05-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DMT) were isolated from nuclei of cauliflower, soybean, and pea by extraction with 0.35 M NaCl. Assays were performed on hemimethylated Micrococcus luteus DNA or on M. luteus DNA to test for maintenance or de novo methylase activity, respectively. Fully methylated DNA was used as a substrate to determine background levels of methylation. Based on these tests, yields of maintenance DMT activity in the crude extract from pea hypocotyl, soybean hypocotyl, and cauliflower inflorescence were 2.8, 0.9, and 1.6 units per g wet tissue (one unit equals 1 pmol of methyl from (/sup 3/H)AdoMet incorporated into acid precipitable material per h at 30/sup 0/). Two peaks of DMT activity were detected in the soybean nuclear extract following phosphocellulose chromatography. One eluted at 0.4 M and the other at 0.8 M KCl. With both fractions maintenance activity was approximately 2 times that of the de novo activity. Using gel filtration the DMT eluted at 220,000 Daltons. The optimal pH for activity was between 6.5 and 7.0, and the optimal temperature was 30/sup 0/.

  13. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  14. Crystal structure of MboIIA methyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Osipiuk, J.; Walsh, M. A.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Gdansk; Medical Research Council France

    2003-09-15

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are sequence-specific enzymes which transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the amino group of either cytosine or adenine within a recognized DNA sequence. Methylation of a base in a specific DNA sequence protects DNA from nucleolytic cleavage by restriction enzymes recognizing the same DNA sequence. We have determined at 1.74 {angstrom} resolution the crystal structure of a {beta}-class DNA MTase MboIIA (M {center_dot} MboIIA) from the bacterium Moraxella bovis, the smallest DNA MTase determined to date. M {center_dot} MboIIA methylates the 3' adenine of the pentanucleotide sequence 5'-GAAGA-3'. The protein crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit which we propose to resemble the dimer when M {center_dot} MboIIA is not bound to DNA. The overall structure of the enzyme closely resembles that of M {center_dot} RsrI. However, the cofactor-binding pocket in M {center_dot} MboIIA forms a closed structure which is in contrast to the open-form structures of other known MTases.

  15. Insulators recruit histone methyltransferase dMes4 to regulate chromatin of flanking genes

    PubMed Central

    Lhoumaud, Priscillia; Hennion, Magali; Gamot, Adrien; Cuddapah, Suresh; Queille, Sophie; Liang, Jun; Micas, Gael; Morillon, Pauline; Urbach, Serge; Bouchez, Olivier; Severac, Dany; Emberly, Eldon; Zhao, Keji; Cuvier, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal domains in Drosophila are marked by the insulator-binding proteins (IBPs) dCTCF/Beaf32 and cofactors that participate in regulating long-range interactions. Chromosomal borders are further enriched in specific histone modifications, yet the role of histone modifiers and nucleosome dynamics in this context remains largely unknown. Here, we show that IBP depletion impairs nucleosome dynamics specifically at the promoters and coding sequence of genes flanked by IBP binding sites. Biochemical purification identifies the H3K36 histone methyltransferase NSD/dMes-4 as a novel IBP cofactor, which specifically co-regulates the chromatin accessibility of hundreds of genes flanked by dCTCF/Beaf32. NSD/dMes-4 presets chromatin before the recruitment of transcriptional activators including DREF that triggers Set2/Hypb-dependent H3K36 trimethylation, nucleosome positioning, and RNA splicing. Our results unveil a model for how IBPs regulate nucleosome dynamics and gene expression through NSD/dMes-4, which may regulate H3K27me3 spreading. Our data uncover how IBPs dynamically regulate chromatin organization depending on distinct cofactors. PMID:24916307

  16. PRMT5- mediated symmetric arginine dimethylation is attenuated by mutant huntingtin and is impaired in Huntington's disease (HD)

    PubMed Central

    Ratovitski, Tamara; Arbez, Nicolas; Stewart, Jacqueline C; Chighladze, Ekaterine; Ross, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal protein interactions of mutant huntingtin (Htt) triggered by polyglutamine expansion are thought to mediate Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis. Here, we explored a functional interaction of Htt with protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), an enzyme mediating symmetrical dimethylation of arginine (sDMA) of key cellular proteins, including histones, and spliceosomal Sm proteins. Gene transcription and RNA splicing are impaired in HD. We demonstrated PRMT5 and Htt interaction and their co-localization in transfected neurons and in HD brain. As a result of this interaction, normal (but to a lesser extend mutant) Htt stimulated PRMT5 activity in vitro. SDMA of histones H2A and H4 was reduced in the presence of mutant Htt in primary cultured neurons and in HD brain, consistent with a demonstrated reduction in R3Me2s occupancy at the transcriptionally repressed promoters in HD brain. SDMA of another PRMT5 substrate, Cajal body marker coilin, was also reduced in the HD mouse model and in human HD brain. Finally, compensation of PRMT5 deficiency by ectopic expression of PRMT5/MEP50 complexes, or by the knock-down of H4R3Me2 demethylase JMJD6, reversed the toxic effects of mutant Htt in primary cortical neurons, suggesting that PRMT5 deficiency may mediate, at least in part, HD pathogenesis. These studies revealed a potential new mechanism for disruption of gene expression and RNA processing in HD, involving a loss of normal function of Htt in facilitation of PRMT5, supporting the idea that epigenetic regulation of gene transcription may be involved in HD and highlighting symmetric dimethylation of arginine as potential new therapeutic target. PMID:25927346

  17. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    SciTech Connect

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  18. Distinction between the Cfr Methyltransferase Conferring Antibiotic Resistance and the Housekeeping RlmN Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Gemma C.; Hansen, Lykke H.; Tenson, Tanel; Rasmussen, Anette; Kirpekar, Finn

    2013-01-01

    The cfr gene encodes the Cfr methyltransferase that primarily methylates C-8 in A2503 of 23S rRNA in the peptidyl transferase region of bacterial ribosomes. The methylation provides resistance to six classes of antibiotics of clinical and veterinary importance. The rlmN gene encodes the RlmN methyltransferase that methylates C-2 in A2503 in 23S rRNA and A37 in tRNA, but RlmN does not significantly influence antibiotic resistance. The enzymes are homologous and use the same mechanism involving radical S-adenosyl methionine to methylate RNA via an intermediate involving a methylated cysteine in the enzyme and a transient cross-linking to the RNA, but they differ in which carbon atom in the adenine they methylate. Comparative sequence analysis identifies differentially conserved residues that indicate functional sequence divergence between the two classes of Cfr- and RlmN-like sequences. The differentiation between the two classes is supported by previous and new experimental evidence from antibiotic resistance, primer extensions, and mass spectrometry. Finally, evolutionary aspects of the distribution of Cfr- and RlmN-like enzymes are discussed. PMID:23752511

  19. Melatonin biosynthesis requires N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase activity of caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in rice

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Yeong; Choi, Geun-Hee; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) methylates N-acetylserotonin into melatonin; that is, it has N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT) activity. The ASMT activity of COMT was first detected in Arabidopsis thaliana COMT (AtCOMT). To confirm the involvement of COMT on melatonin synthesis in other plant species, the ASMT activity of a COMT from rice (Oryza sativa) (OsCOMT) was evaluated. Purified recombinant OsCOMT protein from Escherichia coli was used to validate the high ASMT activity of OsCOMT, similar to that of AtCOMT. The K m and V max values for the ASMT activity of OsCOMT were 243 µM and 2400 pmol min−1 mg protein−1, which were similar to those of AtCOMT. Similar to AtCOMT, OsCOMT was localized in the cytoplasm. In vitro ASMT activity was significantly inhibited by either caffeic acid or quercetin in a dose-dependent manner. Analogously, in vivo production of melatonin was significantly inhibited by quercetin in 4-week-old detached rice leaves. Lastly, the transgenic rice plants overexpressing rice COMT showed an increase in melatonin levels whereas transgenic rice plants suppressing the rice COMT had a significant decrease on melatonin levels, suggestive of the direct role of COMT in melatonin biosynthesis in plants. PMID:26276868

  20. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  1. Effects of dietary salt intake on plasma arginine.

    PubMed

    Kitiyakara, C; Chabrashvili, T; Jose, P; Welch, W J; Wilcox, C S

    2001-04-01

    Because L-arginine is degraded by hepatic arginase to ornithine and urea and is transported by the regulated 2A cationic amino acid y(+) transporter (CAT2A), hepatic transport may regulate plasma arginine concentration. Groups of rats (n = 6) were fed a diet of either low salt (LS) or high salt (HS) for 7 days to test the hypothesis that dietary salt intake regulates plasma arginine concentration and renal nitric oxide (NO) generation by measuring plasma arginine and ornithine concentrations, renal NO excretion, and expression of hepatic CAT2A, and arginase. LS rats had lower excretion of NO metabolites and cGMP, lower plasma arginine concentration (LS: 83 +/- 7 vs. HS: 165 +/- 10 micromol/l, P < 0.001), but higher plasma ornithine concentration (LS: 82 +/- 6 vs. HS: 66 +/- 4 micromol/l, P < 0.05) and urea excretion. However, neither the in vitro hepatic arginase activity nor the mRNA for hepatic arginase I was different between groups. In contrast, LS rats had twice the abundance of mRNA for hepatic CAT2A (LS: 3.4 +/- 0.4 vs. HS: 1.6 +/- 0.5, P < 0.05). The reduced plasma arginine concentration with increased plasma ornithine concentration and urea excretion during LS indicates increased arginine metabolism by arginase. This cannot be ascribed to changes in hepatic arginase expression but may be a consequence of increased hepatic arginine uptake via CAT2A. PMID:11247829

  2. Arginine supplementation improves insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine through a NO mediated mechanism improves insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. To assess the effect of a short-term (1 week) dietary arginine supplementation on insulin resistance in glucose intolerant obese adolescents, we conducted a randomized, cross-over study in 12 subjects (16 +/- 1 ...

  3. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  4. Purification of free arginine from chickpea (Cicer arietinum) seeds.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Megías, Cristina; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Chickpea is a grain legume widely consumed in the Mediterranean region and other parts of the world. Chickpea seeds are rich in proteins but they also contain a substantial amount of free amino acids, especially arginine. Hence chickpea may represent a useful source of free amino acids for nutritional or pharmaceutical purposes. Arginine is receiving great attention in recent years because it is the substrate for the synthesis of nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes in mammals. In this work we describe a simple procedure for the purification of arginine from chickpea seeds, using nanofiltration technology and an ion-exchange resin, Amberlite IR-120. Arginine was finally purified by precipitation or crystallization, yielding preparations with purities of 91% and 100%, respectively. Chickpea may represent an affordable green source of arginine, and a useful alternative to production by fermentation or protein hydrolysis. PMID:26304327

  5. Pegylated arginine deiminase: a novel anticancer enzyme agent

    PubMed Central

    Feun, Lynn; Savaraj, Niramol

    2011-01-01

    Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) is a novel anticancer enzyme that produces depletion of arginine, which is a nonessential amino acid in humans. Certain tumours, such as malignant melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, are auxotrophic for arginine. These tumours that are sensitive to arginine depletion do not express argininosuccinate synthetase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of arginine from citrulline. ADI-PEG20 inhibits human melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in vitro and in vivo. Phase I – II trials in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinomas have shown the drug to have antitumour activity and tolerable side effects. Large Phase II trials and randomised, controlled Phase III trials are needed to determine its overall efficacy in the treatment of these malignancies and others. PMID:16787144

  6. Molecular basis and current strategies of therapeutic arginine depletion for cancer.

    PubMed

    Fultang, Livingstone; Vardon, Ashley; De Santo, Carmela; Mussai, Francis

    2016-08-01

    Renewed interest in the use of therapeutic enzymes combined with an improved knowledge of cancer cell metabolism, has led to the translation of several arginine depletion strategies into early phase clinical trials. Arginine auxotrophic tumors are reliant on extracellular arginine, due to the downregulation of arginosuccinate synthetase or ornithine transcarbamylase-key enzymes for intracellular arginine recycling. Engineered arginine catabolic enzymes such as recombinant human arginase (rh-Arg1-PEG) and arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG) have demonstrated cytotoxicity against arginine auxotrophic tumors. In this review, we discuss the molecular events triggered by extracellular arginine depletion that contribute to tumor cell death. PMID:26913960

  7. Drosophila screen connects nuclear transport genes to DPR pathology in c9ALS/FTD

    PubMed Central

    Boeynaems, Steven; Bogaert, Elke; Michiels, Emiel; Gijselinck, Ilse; Sieben, Anne; Jovičić, Ana; De Baets, Greet; Scheveneels, Wendy; Steyaert, Jolien; Cuijt, Ivy; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Callaerts, Patrick; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Damme, Philip; Gitler, Aaron D.; Robberecht, Wim; Van Den Bosch, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) (c9ALS/FTD). Unconventional translation of these repeats produces dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs) that may cause neurodegeneration. We performed a modifier screen in Drosophila and discovered a critical role for importins and exportins, Ran-GTP cycle regulators, nuclear pore components, and arginine methylases in mediating DPR toxicity. These findings provide evidence for an important role for nucleocytoplasmic transport in the pathogenic mechanism of c9ALS/FTD. PMID:26869068

  8. Plasma arginine and ornithine are the main citrulline precursors in mice infused with arginine-free diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary arginine is the main dietary precursor for citrulline synthesis, but it is not known if other precursors can compensate for when arginine is absent in the diet. To address this question, the contribution of plasma and dietary precursors were determined, utilizing multitracer protocols in con...

  9. An engineered L-arginine sensor of Chlamydia pneumoniae enables arginine-adjustable transcription control in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Hartenbach, Shizuka; Daoud-El Baba, Marie; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    For optimal compatibility with biopharmaceutical manufacturing and gene therapy, heterologous transgene control systems must be responsive to side-effect-free physiologic inducer molecules. The arginine-inducible interaction of the ArgR repressor and the ArgR-specific ARG box, which synchronize arginine import and synthesis in the intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae, was engineered for arginine-regulated transgene (ART) expression in mammalian cells. A synthetic arginine-responsive transactivator (ARG), consisting of ArgR fused to the Herpes simplex VP16 transactivation domain, reversibly adjusted transgene transcription of chimeric ARG box-containing mammalian minimal promoters (P(ART)) in an arginine-inducible manner. Arginine-controlled transgene expression showed rapid induction kinetics in a variety of mammalian cell lines and was adjustable and reversible at concentrations which were compatible with host cell physiology. ART variants containing different transactivation domains, variable spacing between ARG box and minimal promoter and several tandem ARG boxes showed modified regulation performance tailored for specific expression scenarios and cell types. Mice implanted with microencapsulated cells engineered for ART-inducible expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) exhibited adjustable serum phosphatase levels after treatment with different arginine doses. Using a physiologic inducer, such as the amino acid l-arginine, to control heterologous transgenes in a seamless manner which is devoid of noticeable metabolic interference will foster novel opportunities for precise expression dosing in future gene therapy scenarios as well as the manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:17947334

  10. Cloning of the human DNA methyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchanani, S.K.; Rouleau, J.; Szyf, M.

    1994-09-01

    During the process of carcinogenesis it has been observed that DNA methylation is deregulated. At least two levels of regulation of the mouse DNA MeTase have been shown: at the transcriptional level, via its promoter, and at the post transcriptional level in a cell cycle dependent fashion. The sequence of the complete DNA MeTase gene and identification of the promoter has not yet been reported. Using a probe generated by PCR of the human DNA MeTase cDNA, a human genomic library was screened and a clone of approximately 22 kilobases (kb) was isolated. It was found that this clone contains the complete coding sequence of the DNA MeTase enzyme. Sequence analysis along with restriction enzyme digests have allowed us to construct a partial map of the physical structure of the human DNA MeTase gene. This partial structure has already revealed some interesting aspects related to the genetic evolution of the human DNA MeTase. First, the proposed catalytic domain of the human DNA MeTase is extremely homologous to all other cytosine DNA MeTases, even to those that are found in bacteria, and this catalytic domain is conserved within one complete exon in the human gene. This is very different from the structure of the 5{prime} region of the gene, which is fragmented into numerous little introns and exons. Within one of the small introns that have been identified, a trinucleotide repeat of ATG occurs (9 times in a row), and this repeat is upstream of the proposed start site of translation. Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been shown to be a genetic hot spot for mutation, but even more interesting is the nature of the repeat, ATG, which is the translation start codon; this repeat appears to be in frame with the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} coding sequence, the implications being that possible alternative methyltransferases may be translated under certain conditions such as cancer.

  11. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  12. Chemical modification studies on arginine kinase: essential cysteine and arginine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jing; Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Chemical modification was used to elucidate the essential amino acids in the catalytic activity of arginine kinase (AK) from Migratoria manilensis. Among six cysteine (Cys) residues only one Cys residue was determined to be essential in the active site by Tsou's method. Furthermore, the AK modified by DTNB can be fully reactivated by dithiothreitol (DTT) in a monophasic kinetic course. At the same time, this reactivation can be slowed down in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the essential Cys is located near the ATP binding site. The ionizing groups at the AK active site were studied and the standard dissociation enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) was 12.38kcal/mol, showing that the dissociation group may be the guanidino of arginine (Arg). Using the specific chemical modifier phenylglyoxal (PG) demonstrated that only one Arg, located near the ATP binding site, is essential for the activity of AK. PMID:17765964

  13. Multiple lysine methylation of PCAF by Set9 methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Masatsugu, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Ken

    2009-03-27

    The molecular functions of several non-histone proteins are regulated through lysine modification by histone methyltransferases. The p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) is an acetyltransferase that has been implicated in many cellular processes. Here, we report that PCAF is a novel substrate of Set9 methyltransferase. In vitro mapping experiments revealed six lysine residues could be methylated by Set9. A comparison of amino acid sequences of target sites revealed the novel consensus motif which differs from previously identified Set9-consensus sequence. Further methyltransferase assays focusing on the six lysine residues showed that K78 and K89 are preferentially methylated in full-length PCAF in vitro. Using specific antibodies recognizing mono-methylated K89, in vivo PCAF methylation and its nuclear localization were demonstrated. Our data may lead to a new insight into PCAF functions and provide additional information to identify unknown targets of Set9.

  14. Arginine Vasopressin and Copeptin in Perinatology

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Katrina Suzanne; Wellmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a major role in the homeostasis of fluid balance, vascular tonus, and the regulation of the endocrine stress response. The measurement of AVP levels is difficult due to its short half-life and laborious method of detection. Copeptin is a more stable peptide derived from the same precursor molecule, is released in an equimolar ratio to AVP, and has a very similar response to osmotic, hemodynamic, and stress-related stimuli. In fact, copeptin has been propagated as surrogate marker to indirectly determine circulating AVP concentrations in various conditions. Here, we present an overview of the current knowledge on AVP and copeptin in perinatology with a particular focus on the baby’s transition from placenta to lung breathing. We performed a systematic review of the literature on fetal stress hormone levels, including norepinephrine, cortisol, AVP, and copeptin, in regard to birth stress. Finally, diagnostic and therapeutic options for copeptin measurement and AVP functions are discussed. PMID:27532032

  15. Toxoplasma gondii lacks the enzymes required for de novo arginine biosynthesis and arginine starvation triggers cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Gigley, Jason P; Bzik, David J

    2004-03-01

    Two separate carbamoyl phosphate synthetase activities are required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidines and arginine in most eukaryotes. Toxoplasma gondii is novel in possessing a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II gene that corresponds to a glutamine-dependent form required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. We therefore examined arginine acquisition in T. gondii to determine whether the single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II activity could provide both pyrimidine and arginine biosynthesis. We found that arginine deprivation efficiently blocks the replication of intracellular T. gondii, yet has little effect on long-term parasite viability. Addition of citrulline, but not ornithine, rescues the growth defect observed in the absence of exogenous arginine. This rescue with citrulline is ablated when parasites are cultured in a human citrullinemia fibroblast cell line that is deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase activity. These results reveal the absence of genes and activities of the arginine biosynthetic pathway and demonstrate that T. gondii is an arginine auxotroph. Arginine starvation was also found to efficiently trigger differentiation of replicative tachyzoites into bradyzoites contained within stable cyst-like structures. These same parasites expressing bradyzoite antigens can be efficiently switched back to rapidly proliferating tachyzoites several weeks after arginine starvation. We hypothesise that the absence of gene activities that are essential for the biosynthesis of arginine from carbamoyl phosphate confers a selective advantage by increasing bradyzoite switching during the host response to T. gondii infection. These findings are consistent with a model of host-parasite evolution that allowed host control of bradyzoite induction by trading off virulence for increased transmission. PMID:15003493

  16. The Drosophila anatomy ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anatomy ontologies are query-able classifications of anatomical structures. They provide a widely-used means for standardising the annotation of phenotypes and expression in both human-readable and programmatically accessible forms. They are also frequently used to group annotations in biologically meaningful ways. Accurate annotation requires clear textual definitions for terms, ideally accompanied by images. Accurate grouping and fruitful programmatic usage requires high-quality formal definitions that can be used to automate classification and check for errors. The Drosophila anatomy ontology (DAO) consists of over 8000 classes with broad coverage of Drosophila anatomy. It has been used extensively for annotation by a range of resources, but until recently it was poorly formalised and had few textual definitions. Results We have transformed the DAO into an ontology rich in formal and textual definitions in which the majority of classifications are automated and extensive error checking ensures quality. Here we present an overview of the content of the DAO, the patterns used in its formalisation, and the various uses it has been put to. Conclusions As a result of the work described here, the DAO provides a high-quality, queryable reference for the wild-type anatomy of Drosophila melanogaster and a set of terms to annotate data related to that anatomy. Extensive, well referenced textual definitions make it both a reliable and useful reference and ensure accurate use in annotation. Wide use of formal axioms allows a large proportion of classification to be automated and the use of consistency checking to eliminate errors. This increased formalisation has resulted in significant improvements to the completeness and accuracy of classification. The broad use of both formal and informal definitions make further development of the ontology sustainable and scalable. The patterns of formalisation used in the DAO are likely to be useful to developers of other

  17. Sexual circuitry in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Auer, Thomas O; Benton, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The sexual behavior of Drosophila melanogaster is an outstanding paradigm to understand the molecular and neuronal basis of sophisticated animal actions. We discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the genetic hardwiring of the underlying neuronal circuitry, and how pertinent sensory cues are differentially detected and integrated in the male and female brain. We also consider how experience influences these circuits over short timescales, and the evolution of these pathways over longer timescales to endow species-specific sexual displays and responses. PMID:26851712

  18. 1 Protein Methyltransferases: Their Distribution Among the Five Structural Classes of AdoMet-Dependent Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Heidi L; Blumenthal, Robert M; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) dependent methyltransferases (MTases) are involved in biosynthesis, signal transduction, protein repair, chromatin regulation, and gene silencing. Five different structural folds (designated I through V) have been described that bind AdoMet and catalyze methyltransfer to diverse substrates, although the great majority of known MTases have the Class I fold. Even within a particular MTase class the amino-acid sequence similarity can be as low as 10%. Thus, the structural and catalytic requirements for methyltransfer from AdoMet appear to be remarkably flexible. MTases that act on protein substrates have been found to date among three of the five structural classes (I, the classical fold; III, the corrin MTase fold; and V, the SET fold). "There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the view is always the same."-Chinese proverb The Columbia World of Quotations, New York, Columbia University Press, 1996. PMID:26718035

  19. Arginine depletion increases susceptibility to serious infections in preterm newborns

    PubMed Central

    Badurdeen, Shiraz; Mulongo, Musa; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm newborns are highly susceptible to bacterial infections. This susceptibility is regarded as being due to immaturity of multiple pathways of the immune system. However, it is unclear whether a mechanism that unifies these different, suppressed pathways exists. Here, we argue that the immune vulnerability of the preterm neonate is critically related to arginine depletion. Arginine, a “conditionally essential” amino acid, is depleted in acute catabolic states, including sepsis. Its metabolism is highly compartmentalized and regulated, including by arginase-mediated hydrolysis. Recent data suggest that arginase II-mediated arginine depletion is essential for the innate immune suppression that occurs in newborn models of bacterial challenge, impairing pathways critical for the immune response. Evidence that arginine depletion mediates protection from immune activation during first gut colonization suggests a regulatory role in controlling gut-derived pathogens. Clinical studies show that plasma arginine is depleted during sepsis. In keeping with animal studies, small clinical trials of L-arginine supplementation have shown benefit in reducing necrotizing enterocolitis in premature neonates. We propose a novel, broader hypothesis that arginine depletion during bacterial challenge is a key factor limiting the neonate's ability to mount an adequate immune response, contributing to the increased susceptibility to infections, particularly with respect to gut-derived sepsis. PMID:25360828

  20. Primary structure of a human arginine-rich nuclear protein that colocalizes with spliceosome components

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.; McMahon, C.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-09-15

    The cDNA for a 54-kDa nuclear protein (p54) has been cloned from a human hepatoma expression library. Contained within p54 is an arginine/serine-rich region similar to segments of several proteins that participate in pre-mRNA splicing including the 70-kDa component of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and the Drosophila transformer and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins. The arginine/serine-rich region is dominated by a series of 8-amino acid imperfect repetitive motifs (consensus sequence, Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg). Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides of p54 react with an {approximately}70-kDa protein on immunoblots of HeLa cell and rat liver nuclear proteins. This apparent discrepancy in mass is also observed when p54 mRNA is translated in vitro. Indirect immunofluorescence studies in HeLa cells show that p54 is distributed throughout the nucleus in a speckled pattern, with an additional diffuse labeling of the nucleus excluding the nucleoli. Double immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these punctate regions are coincident with the speckles seen in cells stained with antibodies against several constituents of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Sedimentation analysis of HeLa cell extracts on sucrose gradients showed that p54 migrates at 4-6 S, indicating that the protein is not a tightly associated component of snRNPs. Although the function of p54 is not yet known, the structure and immunolocalization data suggest that this protein may have a role in pre-mRNA processing.

  1. Effects of three permeases on arginine utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Du, Guocheng; Zou, Huijun; Chen, Jian; Xie, Guangfa; Shi, Zhongping; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Arginine plays an important role in cellular function and metabolism. Arginine uptake mainly occurs through three amino acid permeases, Alp1p, Gap1p and Can1p, which act as both transporters and receptors for amino acid utilization. In this study, seven mutants were constructed with different combinations of permease deficiencies that inhibit arginine utilization. Their effects on arginine metabolism were measured. The three amino acid permeases were also individually overexpressed in wild-type (WT), Δalp1Δgap1Δcan1 and Δnpr1 strains. The growth and arginine utilization of Δcan1, Δgap1Δcan1 and Δalp1Δgap1Δcan1 mutants were suppressed in YNB medium when arginine was the sole nitrogen source. Meanwhile, overexpression of Alp1p and Can1p enhanced growth and arginine utilization in WT, Δalp1Δgap1Δcan1 and Δnpr1. Besides, overexpression of Can1p caused a 26.7% increase in OD600 and 29.3% increase in arginine utilization compared to that of Alp1p in Δalp1Δgap1Δcan1. Transcription analysis showed that the effects of three amino acid permeases on the arginine utilization and the regulation of related genes, were tightly related to their individual characteristics. However, their overall effects were different for different combinations of mutants. The results presented here suggest some possible synergistic effects of different amino acid permeases on regulation of amino acid utilization and metabolism. PMID:26865023

  2. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  3. Initial neurogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hartenstein, Volker; Wodarz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis comprises the phase of nervous system development during which neural progenitor cells are born. In early development, the embryonic ectoderm is subdivided by a conserved signaling mechanism into two main domains, the epidermal ectoderm and the neurectoderm. Subsequently, cells of the neurectoderm are internalized and form a cell layer of proliferating neural progenitors. In vertebrates, the entire neurectoderm folds into the embryo to give rise to the neural tube. In Drosophila and many other invertebrates, a subset of neurectodermal cells, called neuroblasts (NBs), delaminates and forms the neural primordium inside the embryo where they divide in an asymmetric, stem cell-like mode. The remainder of the neuroectodermal cells that stay behind at the surface loose their neurogenic potential and later give rise to the ventral part of the epidermis. The genetic and molecular analysis of the mechanisms controlling specification and proliferation of NBs in the Drosophila embryo, which played a significant part in pioneering the field of modern developmental neurobiology, represents the topic of this review. PMID:24014455

  4. Initial neurogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Early neurogenesis comprises the phase of nervous system development during which neural progenitor cells are born. In early development, the embryonic ectoderm is subdivided by a conserved signaling mechanism into two main domains, the epidermal ectoderm and the neurectoderm. Subsequently, cells of the neurectoderm are internalized and form a cell layer of proliferating neural progenitors. In vertebrates, the entire neurectoderm folds into the embryo to give rise to the neural tube. In Drosophila and many other invertebrates, a subset of neurectodermal cells, called neuroblasts (NBs), delaminates and forms the neural primordium inside the embryo where they divide in an asymmetric, stem cell-like mode. The remainder of the neurectodermal cells that stay behind at the surface loose their neurogenic potential and later give rise to the ventral part of the epidermis. The genetic and molecular analysis of the mechanisms controlling specification and proliferation of NBs in the Drosophila embryo, which played a significant part in pioneering the field of modern developmental neurobiology, represents the topic of this review. PMID:24014455

  5. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair. PMID:26512127

  6. Cloning and expresion of cDNA for rat O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Sakumi, K; Shiraishi, A; Hayakawa, H; Sekiguchi, M

    1991-01-01

    cDNA for O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase was isolated by screening rat liver cDNA libraries, using as a probe the human cDNA sequence for methyltransferase. The rat cDNA encodes a protein with 209 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the rat methyltransferase exhibits considerable homology with those of the human, yeast and bacterial enzymes, especially around putative methyl acceptor sites. When the cDNA was placed under control of the lac promoter and expressed in methyltransferase-deficient Escherichia coli (ada-, ogt-) cells, a characteristic methyltransferase protein was produced. The rat DNA methyltransferase thus expressed could complement the biological defects of the E. coli cell caused by lack of its own DNA methyltransferases; e.g. increased sensitivity to alkylating agents in terms of both cell death and mutation induction. Images PMID:1945835

  7. Label-free electrochemical detection of human methyltransferase from tumors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel L; Muren, Natalie B; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-10-21

    The role of abnormal DNA methyltransferase activity in the development and progression of cancer is an essential and rapidly growing area of research, both for improved diagnosis and treatment. However, current technologies for the assessment of methyltransferase activity, particularly from crude tumor samples, limit this work because they rely on radioactivity or fluorescence and require bulky instrumentation. Here, we report an electrochemical platform that overcomes these limitations for the label-free detection of human DNA(cytosine-5)-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) methyltransferase activity, enabling measurements from crude cultured colorectal cancer cell lysates (HCT116) and biopsied tumor tissues. Our multiplexed detection system involving patterning and detection from a secondary electrode array combines low-density DNA monolayer patterning and electrocatalytically amplified DNA charge transport chemistry to measure selectively and sensitively DNMT1 activity within these complex and congested cellular samples. Based on differences in DNMT1 activity measured with this assay, we distinguish colorectal tumor tissue from healthy adjacent tissue, illustrating the effectiveness of this two-electrode platform for clinical applications. PMID:25288757

  8. Brain creatine depletion: guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (improving with creatine supplementation).

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, V; Bianchi, M C; Tosetti, M; Carducci, C; Cerquiglini, C A; Cioni, G; Antonozzi, I

    2000-11-14

    The authors describe an Italian child with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, neurologic regression, movement disorders, and epilepsy during the first year of life. Brain MRI showed pallidal and periaqueductal alterations. In vivo 1H-MRS showed brain creatine depletion. The assessment of guanidinoacetic acid concentration in biologic fluids confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiologic improvement followed creatine supplementation. PMID:11087795

  9. Diversity in mechanism and function of tRNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Swinehart, William E; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    tRNA molecules undergo extensive post-transcriptional processing to generate the mature functional tRNA species that are essential for translation in all organisms. These processing steps include the introduction of numerous specific chemical modifications to nucleotide bases and sugars; among these modifications, methylation reactions are by far the most abundant. The tRNA methyltransferases comprise a diverse enzyme superfamily, including members of multiple structural classes that appear to have arisen independently during evolution. Even among closely related family members, examples of unusual substrate specificity and chemistry have been observed. Here we review recent advances in tRNA methyltransferase mechanism and function with a particular emphasis on discoveries of alternative substrate specificities and chemistry associated with some methyltransferases. Although the molecular function for a specific tRNA methylation may not always be clear, mutations in tRNA methyltransferases have been increasingly associated with human disease. The impact of tRNA methylation on human biology is also discussed. PMID:25626150

  10. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  11. Convergent Mechanistic Features between the Structurally Diverse N- and O-Methyltransferases: Glycine N-Methyltransferase and Catechol O-Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianyu; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-07-27

    Although an enormous and still growing number of biologically diverse methyltransferases have been reported and identified, a comprehensive understanding of the enzymatic methyl transfer mechanism is still lacking. Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), a member of the family that acts on small metabolites as the substrate, catalyzes methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to glycine to form S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and sarcosine. We report primary carbon ((12)C/(14)C) and secondary ((1)H3/(3)H3) kinetic isotope effects at the transferred methyl group, together with (1)H3/(3)H3 binding isotope effects for wild-type GNMT and a series of Tyr21 mutants. The data implicate a compaction effect in the methyl transfer step that is conferred by the protein structure. Furthermore, a remarkable similarity of properties is observed between GNMT and catechol O-methyltransferase, despite significant differences between these enzymes with regard to their active site structures and catalyzed reactions. We attribute these results to a catalytically relevant reduction in the methyl donor-acceptor distance that is dependent on a tyrosine side chain positioned behind the methyl-bearing sulfur of AdoMet. PMID:27355841

  12. Structural Basis for WDR5 Interaction (Win) Motif Recognition in Human SET1 Family Histone Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Patel, Anamika; Skalnik, David G.; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Translocations and amplifications of the mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) gene are associated with aggressive myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias in humans. MLL1 is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases, which are required for transcription of genes involved in hematopoiesis and development. MLL1 associates with a subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD), which together form the MLL1 core complex that is required for sequential mono- and dimethylation of H3K4. We previously demonstrated that WDR5 binds the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif of MLL1 in vitro, an interaction that is required for the H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. In this investigation, we demonstrate that arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif is required to co-immunoprecipitate WRAD from mammalian cells, suggesting that the WDR5-Win motif interaction is important for the assembly of the MLL1 core complex in vivo. We also demonstrate that peptides that mimic SET1 family Win motif sequences inhibit H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex with varying degrees of efficiency. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we determined structures of WDR5 bound to six different naturally occurring Win motif sequences at resolutions ranging from 1.9 to 1.2 Å. Our results reveal that binding energy differences result from interactions between non-conserved residues C-terminal to the Win motif and to a lesser extent from subtle variation of residues within the Win motif. These results highlight a new class of methylation inhibitors that may be useful for the treatment of MLL1-related malignancies. PMID:22665483

  13. Review: Thermal preference in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Wang, George; Garrity, Paul A.; Huey, Raymond B.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature strongly affects physiology of ectotherms. Small ectotherms, like Drosophila, cannot endogenously regulate body temperature so must rely on behavior to maintain body temperature within a physiologically permissive range. Here we review what is known about Drosophila thermal preference. Work on thermal behavior in this group is particularly exciting because it provides the opportunity to connect genes to neuromolecular mechanisms to behavior to fitness in the wild. PMID:20161211

  14. Engineering Monolignol 4-O-Methyltransferases to Modulate Lignin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiya, M.W.; Liu, C.

    2010-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polymer derived from the oxidative coupling of three classical monolignols. Lignin precursors are methylated exclusively at the meta-positions (i.e. 3/5-OH) of their phenyl rings by native O-methyltransferases, and are precluded from substitution of the para-hydroxyl (4-OH) position. Ostensibly, the para-hydroxyls of phenolics are critically important for oxidative coupling of phenoxy radicals to form polymers. Therefore, creating a 4-O-methyltransferase to substitute the para-hydroxyl of monolignols might well interfere with the synthesis of lignin. The phylogeny of plant phenolic O-methyltransferases points to the existence of a batch of evolutionarily 'plastic' amino acid residues. Following one amino acid at a time path of directed evolution, and using the strategy of structure-based iterative site-saturation mutagenesis, we created a novel monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase from the enzyme responsible for methylating phenylpropenes. We show that two plastic residues in the active site of the parental enzyme are vital in dominating substrate discrimination. Mutations at either one of these separate the evolutionarily tightly linked properties of substrate specificity and regioselective methylation of native O-methyltransferase, thereby conferring the ability for para-methylation of the lignin monomeric precursors, primarily monolignols. Beneficial mutations at both sites have an additive effect. By further optimizing enzyme activity, we generated a triple mutant variant that may structurally constitute a novel phenolic substrate binding pocket, leading to its high binding affinity and catalytic efficiency on monolignols. The 4-O-methoxylation of monolignol efficiently impairs oxidative radical coupling in vitro, highlighting the potential for applying this novel enzyme in managing lignin polymerization in planta.

  15. Structure and Function of Flavivirus NS5 Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,Y.; Ray, D.; Zhao, Y.; Dong, H.; Ren, S.; Li, Z.; Guo, Y.; Bernard, K.; Shi, P.; Li, H.

    2007-01-01

    The plus-strand RNA genome of flavivirus contains a 5' terminal cap 1 structure (m{sup 7}GpppAmG). The flaviviruses encode one methyltransferase, located at the N-terminal portion of the NS5 protein, to catalyze both guanine N-7 and ribose 2'-OH methylations during viral cap formation. Representative flavivirus methyltransferases from dengue, yellow fever, and West Nile virus (WNV) sequentially generate GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppAm. The 2'-O methylation can be uncoupled from the N-7 methylation, since m{sup 7}GpppA-RNA can be readily methylated to m{sup 7}GpppAm-RNA. Despite exhibiting two distinct methylation activities, the crystal structure of WNV methyltransferase at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution showed a single binding site for S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), the methyl donor. Therefore, substrate GpppA-RNA should be repositioned to accept the N-7 and 2'-O methyl groups from SAM during the sequential reactions. Electrostatic analysis of the WNV methyltransferase structure showed that, adjacent to the SAM-binding pocket, is a highly positively charged surface that could serve as an RNA binding site during cap methylations. Biochemical and mutagenesis analyses show that the N-7 and 2'-O cap methylations require distinct buffer conditions and different side chains within the K{sub 61}-D{sub 146}-K{sub 182}-E{sub 218} motif, suggesting that the two reactions use different mechanisms. In the context of complete virus, defects in both methylations are lethal to WNV; however, viruses defective solely in 2'-O methylation are attenuated and can protect mice from later wild-type WNV challenge. The results demonstrate that the N-7 methylation activity is essential for the WNV life cycle and, thus, methyltransferase represents a novel target for flavivirus therapy.

  16. BRAF inhibitor resistance enhances vulnerability to arginine deprivation in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Ying; Wu, Chunjing; Chen, Shu-Mei; Shah, Sumedh S.; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Feun, Lynn G.; Kuo, Macus T.; Suarez, Miguel; Prince, Jeffrey; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) has been used for treatment of melanomas harboring V600E mutation. Despite a high initial response rate, resistance to BRAFi is inevitable. Here, we demonstrate that BRAFi-resistant (BR) melanomas are susceptible to arginine deprivation due to inability to initiate re-expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, a key enzyme for arginine synthesis) as well as ineffective autophagy. Autophagy and ASS1 re-expression are known to protect melanoma cells from cell death upon arginine deprivation. When melanoma cells become BR cells by long-term in vitro incubation with BRAFi, c-Myc-mediated ASS1 re-expression and the levels of autophagy-associated proteins (AMPK-α1 and Atg5) are attenuated. Furthermore, our study uncovers that downregulation of deubiquitinase USP28 which results in more active c-Myc degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome machinery is the primary mechanism for inability to re-express ASS1 upon arginine deprivation in BR cells. Overexpression of USP28 in BR cells enhances c-Myc expression and hence increases ASS1 transcription upon arginine deprivation, and consequently leads to cell survival. On the other hand, overexpression of Atg5 or AMPK-α1 in BR cells can redirect arginine deprivation-induced apoptosis toward autophagy. The xenograft models also confirm that BR tumors possess lower expression of ASS1 and are hypersensitive to arginine deprivation. These biochemical changes in BRAFi resistance which make them vulnerable to arginine deprivation can be exploited for the future treatment of BR melanoma patients. PMID:26771234

  17. Geometry of guanidinium groups in arginines.

    PubMed

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    The restraints in common usage today have been obtained based on small molecule X-ray crystal structures available 25 years ago and recent reports have shown that the values of bond lengths and valence angles can be, in fact, significantly different from those stored in libraries, for example for the peptide bond or the histidine ring geometry. We showed that almost 50% of outliers found in protein validation reports released in the Protein Data Bank on 23 March 2016 come from geometry of guanidine groups in arginines. Therefore, structures of small molecules and atomic resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive new target values for the geometry of this group. The most significant difference was found for NE-CZ-NH1 and NE-CZ-NH2 angles, showing that the guanidinium group is not symmetric. The NE-CZ-NH1 angle is larger, 121.5(10)˚, than NE-CZ-NH2, 119.2(10)˚, due to the repulsive interaction between NH1 and CD1 atom. PMID:27326702

  18. Fluorometric enzymatic assay of l-arginine.

    PubMed

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Yepremyan, Hasmik; Stepien, Agnieszka; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2017-01-01

    The enzymes of l-arginine (further - Arg) metabolism are promising tools for elaboration of selective methods for quantitative Arg analysis. In our study we propose an enzymatic method for Arg assay based on fluorometric monitoring of ammonia, a final product of Arg splitting by human liver arginase I (further - arginase), isolated from the recombinant yeast strain, and commercial urease. The selective analysis of ammonia (at 415nm under excitation at 360nm) is based on reaction with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of sulfite in alkali medium: these conditions permit to avoid the reaction of OPA with any amino acid. A linearity range of the fluorometric arginase-urease-OPA method is from 100nM to 6μМ with a limit of detection of 34nM Arg. The method was used for the quantitative determination of Arg in the pooled sample of blood serum. The obtained results proved to be in a good correlation with the reference enzymatic method and literature data. The proposed arginase-urease-OPA method being sensitive, economical, selective and suitable for both routine and micro-volume formats, can be used in clinical diagnostics for the simultaneous determination of Arg as well as urea and ammonia in serum samples. PMID:27450117

  19. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory. PMID:26965122

  20. Regulation of the Arginine Deiminase System by ArgR2 Interferes with Arginine Metabolism and Fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Christian; Gierok, Philipp; Petruschka, Lothar; Lalk, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae is auxotrophic for arginine, and molecular analysis of the pneumococcal genome showed that the gene encoding an arginine-ornithine antiporter (ArcD) is organized in a cluster together with the arcABC genes encoding the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of pneumococci. The ADS consists of the arginine deiminase (AD), the catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (cOCT), and the carbamate kinase (CK). Pneumococcal genomes contain three ArgR-type regulators (ArgR1, ArgR2, and AhrC) that are supposed to be involved in the regulation of arginine metabolism. Here, we identified ArgR2 of TIGR4 as the regulator of the ADS and ArcD. ArgR2 binds to promoter sequences of the arc operon, and the deficiency of ArgR2 in TIGR4 abrogates expression of the ADS, including the arginine-ornithine antiporter ArcD. Intranasal infection of mice and real-time bioimaging revealed that deletion of the arcABCDT genes attenuates TIGR4. However, the acute-pneumonia model and coinfection experiments indicated that the arginine-ornithine antiporter ArcD is essential to maintain fitness, while the deficiency of ADS enzymes has a minor impact on pneumococcal fitness under in vivo conditions. Strikingly, argR2 mutant TIGR4 outcompeted the wild type in the respiratory tract, suggesting an increase in fitness and further regulatory functions of ArgR2. In contrast to TIGR4, other pneumococci, such as D39, lacking expression of ArgR2, constitutively express the ADS with a truncated nonfunctional AD. On the basis of these results, we propose that the arginine-ornithine antiporter is essential to maintain pneumococcal fitness and that the genes of the ADS cluster are positively regulated in a strain-specific manner by ArgR2. PMID:25538192

  1. Interactions between two fission yeast serine/arginine-rich proteins and their modulation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhaohua; Käufer, Norbert F; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2002-01-01

    The unexpected low number of genes in the human genome has triggered increasing attention to alternative pre-mRNA splicing, and serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins have been correlated with the complex alternative splicing that is a characteristic of metazoans. SR proteins interact with RNA and splicing protein factors, and they also undergo reversible phosphorylation, thereby regulating constitutive and alternative splicing in mammals and Drosophila. However, it is not clear whether the features of SR proteins and alternative splicing are present in simple and genetically tractable organisms, such as yeasts. In the present study, we show that the SR-like proteins Srp1 and Srp2, found in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, interact with each other and the interaction is modulated by protein phosphorylation. By using Srp1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid analysis, we specifically isolated Srp2 from a random screen. This Srp interaction was confirmed by a glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay. We also found that the Srp1-Srp2 complex was phosphorylated at a reduced efficiency by a fission yeast SR-specific kinase, Dis1-suppression kinase (Dsk1). Conversely, Dsk1-mediated phosphorylation inhibited the formation of the Srp complex. These findings offer the first example in fission yeast for interactions between SR-related proteins and the modulation of the interactions by specific protein phosphorylation, suggesting that a mammalian-like SR protein function may exist in fission yeast. PMID:12186627

  2. Drosophila ptip is essential for anterior/posterior patterning in development and interacts with the PcG and trxG pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Ren, Hongyan; Liu, Jiabin; Cadigan, Ken M.; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R.; Dressler, Gregory R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Development of the fruit fly Drosophila depends in part on epigenetic regulation carried out by the concerted actions of the Polycomb and Trithorax group of proteins, many of which are associated with histone methyltransferase activity. Mouse PTIP is part of a histone H3K4 methyltransferase complex and contains six BRCT domains and a glutamine-rich region. In this article, we describe an essential role for the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian Ptip (Paxip1) gene in early development and imaginal disc patterning. Both maternal and zygotic ptip are required for segmentation and axis patterning during larval development. Loss of ptip results in a decrease in global levels of H3K4 methylation and an increase in the levels of H3K27 methylation. In cell culture, Drosophila ptip is required to activate homeotic gene expression in response to the derepression of Polycomb group genes. Activation of developmental genes is coincident with PTIP protein binding to promoter sequences and increased H3K4 trimethylation. These data suggest a highly conserved function for ptip in epigenetic control of development and differentiation. PMID:19429789

  3. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD. PMID:26899474

  4. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-02-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD.

  5. Deletion of Drosophila Nopp140 induces subcellular ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; James, Allison; Raje, Himanshu; Ghaffari, Helya; DiMario, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The nucleolar and Cajal body phosphoprotein of 140 kDa (Nopp140) is considered a ribosome assembly factor, but its precise functions remain unknown. To approach this problem, we deleted the Nopp140 gene in Drosophila using FLP-FRT recombination. Genomic PCR, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the loss of Nopp140, its messenger RNA (mRNA), and protein products from all tissues examined. Nopp140-/- larvae arrested in the second instar stage and most died within 8 days. While nucleoli appeared intact in Nopp140-/- cells, the C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) methyltransferase, fibrillarin, redistributed to the nucleoplasm in variable amounts depending on the cell type; RT-PCRs showed that 2'-O-methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in Nopp140-/- cells was reduced at select sites within both the 18S and 28S rRNAs. Ultrastructural analysis showed that Nopp140-/- cells were deficient in cytoplasmic ribosomes, but instead contained abnormal electron-dense cytoplasmic granules. Immunoblot analysis showed a loss of RpL34, and metabolic labeling showed a significant drop in protein translation, supporting the loss of functional ribosomes. Northern blots showed that pre-RNA cleavage pathways were generally unaffected by the loss of Nopp140, but that R2 retrotransposons that naturally reside within the 28S region of normally silent heterochromatic Drosophila ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were selectively expressed in Nopp140-/- larvae. Unlike copia elements and the related R1 retrotransposon, R2 expression appeared to be preferentially dependent on the loss of Nopp140 and not on environmental stresses. We believe the phenotypes described here define novel intracellular ribosomopathies resulting from the loss of Nopp140. PMID:25384888

  6. Novel arginine deiminase-based method to assay L-arginine in beverages.

    PubMed

    Stasyuk, N Ye; Gayda, G Z; Fayura, L R; Boretskyy, Y R; Gonchar, M V; Sibirny, A A

    2016-06-15

    A highly selective and sensitive enzymatic method for the quantitative determination of L-arginine (Arg) has been developed. The method is based on the use of recombinant bacterial arginine deiminase (ADI) isolated from the cells of a recombinant strain Escherichia coli and o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) as a chemical reagent. Ammonia, the product of the enzymatic digestion of Arg by ADI, reacts with OPA and forms in the presence of sulfite a product, which can be detected by spectrophotometry (S) and fluorometry (F). The linear concentration range for Arg assay in the final reaction mixture varies for ADI-OPA-F variant of the method from 0.35 μM to 24 μM with the detection limit of 0.25 μM. For ADI-OPA-S variant of the assay, the linearity varies from 0.7 μM to 50 μM with the detection limit of 0.55 μM. The new method was tested on real samples of wines and juices. A high correlation (R=0.978) was shown for the results obtained with the proposed and the reference enzymatic method. PMID:26868583

  7. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of arginine.

    PubMed

    Bouchoux, Guy; Desaphy, Sylvain; Bourcier, Sophie; Malosse, Christian; Bimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum

    2008-03-20

    The gas-phase basicity (GB), proton affinity (PA), and protonation entropy (DeltapS degrees (M)=S degrees (MH+)-S degrees (M)) of arginine (Arg) have been experimentally determined by the extended kinetic method using an electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. This method provides GB(Arg)=1004.3+/-2.2 (4.9) kJ.mol(-1) (indicated errors are standard deviations, and in parentheses, 95% confidence limits are given). Consideration of previous experimental data using a fast atom bombardment ionization tandem sector mass spectrometer slightly modifies these estimates since GB(Arg)=1005.9+/-3.1 (6.6) kJ.mol(-1). Lower limits of the proton affinity, PA(Arg)=1046+/-4 (7) kJ.mol(-1), and of the "protonation entropy", DeltapS degrees (Arg)=S degrees (ArgH+)-S degrees (Arg)=-27+/-7 (15) J.mol(-1).K(-1), are also provided by the experiments. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of ca. 1053 kJ.mol-1 after consideration of isodesmic proton-transfer reactions with guanidine as the reference base. Computations including explicit treatment of hindered rotations and mixing of conformers confirm that a noticeable entropy loss does occur upon protonation, which leads to a theoretical DeltapS degrees (Arg) term of ca. -45 J.mol(-1).K(-1). The following evaluated thermochemical parameter values are proposed: GB(Arg)=1005+/-3 kJ.mol(-1); PA(Arg)=1051+/-5 kJ.mol(-1), and DeltapS degrees (Arg)=-45+/-12 J.mol(-1).K(-1). PMID:18288831

  8. l-Arginine Supplementation and Metabolism in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Last, Michael; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Kwan, Vivian W.; O'Roark, Erin; Linderholm, Angela

    2011-01-01

    l-Arginine, the amino acid substrate for nitric oxide synthase, has been tested as a therapeutic intervention in a variety of chronic diseases and is commonly used as a nutritional supplement. In this study, we hypothesized that a subset of moderate to severe persistent asthma patients would benefit from supplementation with l-arginine by transiently increasing nitric oxide levels, resulting in bronchodilation and a reduction in inflammation. The pilot study consisted of a 3 month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of l-arginine (0.05 g/kg twice daily) in patients with moderate to severe asthma. We measured spirometry, exhaled breath nitric oxide, serum arginine metabolites, questionnaire scores, daily medication use and PEFR with the primary endpoint being the number of minor exacerbations at three months. Interim analysis of the 20 subjects showed no difference in the number of exacerbations, exhaled nitric oxide levels or lung function between groups, though participants in the l-arginine group had higher serum l-arginine at day 60 (2.0 ± 0.6 × 10−3 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 × 10−3 μmol/L, p < 0.05), ornithine at day 30 (2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 1.2 ± 0.3 μmol/L serum, p < 0.05) and ADMA at day 30 (6.0 ± 1.5 × 10−1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10−1 μmol/L serum, p < 0.05) on average compared to the placebo group. The study was terminated prematurely. Supplementing asthma subjects with l-arginine increases plasma levels; whether subgroups might benefit from such supplementation requires further study.

  9. Potential ergogenic effects of arginine and creatine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Børsheim, Elisabet; Wolfe, Robert R

    2004-10-01

    The rationale for the use of nutritional supplements to enhance exercise capacity is based on the assumption that they will confer an ergogenic effect above and beyond that afforded by regular food ingestion alone. The proposed or advertised ergogenic effect of many supplements is based on a presumptive metabolic pathway and may not necessarily translate to quantifiable changes in a variable as broadly defined as exercise performance. L-arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid that has received considerable attention due to potential effects on growth hormone secretion and nitric oxide production. In some clinical circumstances (e.g., burn injury, sepsis) in which the demand for arginine cannot be fully met by de novo synthesis and normal dietary intake, exogenous arginine has been shown to facilitate the maintenance of lean body mass and functional capacity. However, the evidence that supplemental arginine may also confer an ergogenic effect in normal healthy individuals is less compelling. In contrast to arginine, numerous studies have reported that supplementation with the arginine metabolite creatine facilitates an increase in anaerobic work capacity and muscle mass when accompanied by resistance training programs in both normal and patient populations. Whereas improvement in the rate of phosphocreatine resynthesis is largely responsible for improvements in acute work capacity, the direct effect of creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle protein synthesis is less clear. The purpose of this review is to summarize the role of arginine and its metabolite creatine in the context of a nutrition supplement for use in conjunction with an exercise stimulus in both healthy and patient populations. PMID:15465806

  10. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-C.; Kao, Y.-C.; Chang, T-J.; Wong, M.-L. . E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2005-08-26

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.