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Sample records for drosophila p38b gene

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38b interaction with delta class glutathione transferases from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Sukittikul, Suchada; Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes involved in xenobiotic biotransformation, drug metabolism, and protection against oxidative damage. The p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase is involved in cellular stress response. This study screened interactions between Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Delta class glutathione transferases (DmGSTs) and the D. melanogaster p38b MAPK. Therefore, 12 DmGSTs and p38b kinase were obtained as recombinant proteins. The study showed that DmGSTD8 and DmGSTD11b significantly increased p38b activity toward ATF2 and jun, which are transcription factor substrates. DmGSTD3 and DmGSTD5 moderately increased p38b activity for jun. In addition, GST activity in the presence of p38b was also measured. It was found that p38b affected substrate specificity toward CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and DCNB (1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene) of several GST isoforms, i.e., DmGSTD2, DmGSTD5, DmGSTD8, and DmGSTD11b. The interaction of a GST and p38b can affect the substrate specificity of either enzyme, which suggests induced conformational changes affecting catalysis. Similar interactions do not occur for all the Delta enzymes and p38b, which suggests that these interactions could be specific. PMID:23438069

  2. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta Glutathione Transferases with p38b Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase from the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakul, J.; Janphen, K.; Saisawang, C.; Ketterman, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway. PMID:25373207

  3. The role of p38b MAPK in age-related modulation of intestinal stem cell proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2009-07-01

    It is important to understand how age-related changes in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) may contribute to age-associated intestinal diseases, including cancer. Drosophila midgut is an excellent model system for the study of ISC proliferation and differentiation. Recently, age-related changes in the Drosophila midgut have been shown to include an increase in ISC proliferation and accumulation of mis-differentiated ISC daughter cells. Here, we show that the p38b MAPK pathway contributes to the age-related changes in ISC and progenitor cells in Drosophila. D-p38b MAPK is required for an age-related increase of ISC proliferation. In addition, this pathway is involved in age and oxidative stress-associated mis-differentiation of enterocytes and upregulation of Delta, a Notch receptor ligand. Furthermore, we also show that D-p38b acts downstream of PVF2/PVR signaling in these age-related changes. Taken together, our findings suggest that p38 MAPK plays a crucial role in the balance between ISC proliferation and proper differentiation in the adult Drosophila midgut. PMID:20157545

  4. Gene Regulation Networks for Modeling Drosophila Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, E.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster.

  5. The 5S genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Artavanis-Tsakonas, S; Schedl, P; Tschudi, C; Pirrotta, V; Steward, R; Gehring, W J

    1977-12-01

    We have cloned embryonic Drosophila DNA using the poly (dA-DT) connector method (Lobban and Kaiser, 1973) and the ampicillin-resistant plasmid pSF2124 (So, Gill and Falkow, 1975) as a cloning vehicle. Two clones, containing hybrid plasmids with sequences complementary to a 5S RNA probe isolated from Drosophila tissue culture cells, were identified by the Grunstein and Hogness (1975) colony hybridization procedure. One hybrid plasmid has a Drosophila insert which is comprised solely of tandem repeats of the 5S gene plus spacer sequences. The other plasmid contains an insert which has about 20 tandem 5S repeat units plus an additional 4 kilobases of adjacent sequences. The size of the 5S repeat unit was determined by gel electrophoresis and was found to be approximately 375 base pairs. We present a restriction map of both plasmids, and a detailed map of of the5S repeat unit. The 5S repat unit shows slight length and sequence heterogeneity. We present evidence suggesting that the 5S genes in Drosophila melanogaster may be arranged in a single continuous cluster. PMID:413625

  6. Imprinted control of gene activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Golic, K G; Golic, M M; Pimpinelli, S

    1998-11-19

    Genetic imprinting is defined as a reversible, differential marking of genes or chromosomes that is determined by the sex of the parent from whom the genetic material is inherited [1]. Imprinting was first observed in insects where, in some species, most notably among the coccoids (scale insects and allies), the differential marking of paternally and maternally transmitted chromosome sets leads to inactivation or elimination of paternal chromosomes [2]. Imprinting is also widespread in plants and mammals [3,4], in which paternally and maternally inherited alleles may be differentially expressed. Despite imprinting having been discovered in insects, clear examples of parental imprinting are scarce in the model insect species Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a case of imprint-mediated control of gene expression in Drosophila. The imprinted gene - the white+ eye-color gene - is expressed at a low level when transmitted by males, and at a high level when transmitted by females. Thus, in common with coccoids, Drosophila is capable of generating an imprint, and can respond to that imprint by silencing the paternal allele. PMID:9822579

  7. Molecular evolution of Drosophila metallothionein genes.

    PubMed

    Lange, B W; Langley, C H; Stephan, W

    1990-12-01

    The metallothionein genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Mtn and Mto, may play an important role in heavy metal detoxification. Several different tandem duplications of Mtn have been shown to increase cadmium and copper tolerance, as well as Mtn expression. In order to investigate the possibility of increased selection for duplications of these genes in natural populations exposed to high levels of heavy metals, we compared the frequencies of such duplications among flies collected from metal-contaminated and non-contaminated orchards in Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Georgia. Restriction enzyme analysis was used to screen 1666 wild third chromosomes for Mtn duplications and a subset (327) of these lines for Mto duplications. The frequency of pooled Mtn duplications found ranged from 0% to 20%, and was not significantly higher at the contaminated sites. No Mto duplications were identified. Estimates of sequence diversity at the Mtn locus among a subsample (92) of the duplication survey were obtained using four-cutter analysis. This analysis revealed a low level of polymorphism, consistent with both selection at the Mtn locus, and a fairly recent origin for the duplications. To further examine this hypothesis, we sequenced an Mtn allele of Drosophila simulans and measured the amount of nucleotide sequence divergence between D. simulans and its sibling species D. melanogaster. The levels of silent nucleotide polymorphism and divergence in the Mtn region were compared with those in the Adh region, using the neutrality test of R.R. Hudson, M. Kreitman and M. Aguadé. PMID:1981765

  8. A novel, tissue-specific, Drosophila homeobox gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barad, M; Jack, T; Chadwick, R; McGinnis, W

    1988-01-01

    The homeobox gene family of Drosophila appears to control a variety of position-specific patterning decisions during embryonic and imaginal development. Most of these patterning decisions determine groups of cells on the anterior-posterior axis of the Drosophila germ band. We have isolated a novel homeobox gene from Drosophila, designated H2.0. H2.0 has the most diverged homeobox so far characterized in metazoa, and, in contrast to all previously isolated homeobox genes, H2.0 exhibits a tissue-specific pattern of expression. The cells that accumulate transcripts for this novel gene correspond to the visceral musculature and its anlagen. Images PMID:2901348

  9. The Sexually Antagonistic Genes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Innocenti, Paolo; Morrow, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    When selective pressures differ between males and females, the genes experiencing these conflicting evolutionary forces are said to be sexually antagonistic. Although the phenotypic effect of these genes has been documented in both wild and laboratory populations, their identity, number, and location remains unknown. Here, by combining data on sex-specific fitness and genome-wide transcript abundance in a quantitative genetic framework, we identified a group of candidate genes experiencing sexually antagonistic selection in the adult, which correspond to 8% of Drosophila melanogaster genes. As predicted, the X chromosome is enriched for these genes, but surprisingly they represent only a small proportion of the total number of sex-biased transcripts, indicating that the latter is a poor predictor of sexual antagonism. Furthermore, the majority of genes whose expression profiles showed a significant relationship with either male or female adult fitness are also sexually antagonistic. These results provide a first insight into the genetic basis of intralocus sexual conflict and indicate that genetic variation for fitness is dominated and maintained by sexual antagonism, potentially neutralizing any indirect genetic benefits of sexual selection. PMID:20305719

  10. Functional requirements driving the gene duplication in 12 Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplication supplies the raw materials for novel gene functions and many gene families arisen from duplication experience adaptive evolution. Most studies of young duplicates have focused on mammals, especially humans, whereas reports describing their genome-wide evolutionary patterns across the closely related Drosophila species are rare. The sequenced 12 Drosophila genomes provide the opportunity to address this issue. Results In our study, 3,647 young duplicate gene families were identified across the 12 Drosophila species and three types of expansions, species-specific, lineage-specific and complex expansions, were detected in these gene families. Our data showed that the species-specific young duplicate genes predominated (86.6%) over the other two types. Interestingly, many independent species-specific expansions in the same gene family have been observed in many species, even including 11 or 12 Drosophila species. Our data also showed that the functional bias observed in these young duplicate genes was mainly related to responses to environmental stimuli and biotic stresses. Conclusions This study reveals the evolutionary patterns of young duplicates across 12 Drosophila species on a genomic scale. Our results suggest that convergent evolution acts on young duplicate genes after the species differentiation and adaptive evolution may play an important role in duplicate genes for adaption to ecological factors and environmental changes in Drosophila. PMID:23945147

  11. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project gene disruption project: Single P-element insertions mutating 25% of vital Drosophila genes.

    PubMed Central

    Spradling, A C; Stern, D; Beaton, A; Rhem, E J; Laverty, T; Mozden, N; Misra, S; Rubin, G M

    1999-01-01

    A fundamental goal of genetics and functional genomics is to identify and mutate every gene in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) gene disruption project generates single P-element insertion strains that each mutate unique genomic open reading frames. Such strains strongly facilitate further genetic and molecular studies of the disrupted loci, but it has remained unclear if P elements can be used to mutate all Drosophila genes. We now report that the primary collection has grown to contain 1045 strains that disrupt more than 25% of the estimated 3600 Drosophila genes that are essential for adult viability. Of these P insertions, 67% have been verified by genetic tests to cause the associated recessive mutant phenotypes, and the validity of most of the remaining lines is predicted on statistical grounds. Sequences flanking >920 insertions have been determined to exactly position them in the genome and to identify 376 potentially affected transcripts from collections of EST sequences. Strains in the BDGP collection are available from the Bloomington Stock Center and have already assisted the research community in characterizing >250 Drosophila genes. The likely identity of 131 additional genes in the collection is reported here. Our results show that Drosophila genes have a wide range of sensitivity to inactivation by P elements, and provide a rationale for greatly expanding the BDGP primary collection based entirely on insertion site sequencing. We predict that this approach can bring >85% of all Drosophila open reading frames under experimental control. PMID:10471706

  12. Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein genes: Selection for duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    The metallothionein genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Mtn and Mto, may play an important role in heavy-metal detoxification. In order to investigate the possibility of increased selection for duplications of these genes in natural populations exposed to high levels of heavy metals, I compared the frequencies of such duplications among flies collected from metal-contaminated and non-contaminated orchards in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Georgia. Contaminated of collection sites and of local flies was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrosphotometry. Six-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis was used to screen 1666 wild third chromosomes for Mtn duplications. A subset (327) of these lines was screened for Mto duplications: none were found. Cadmium tolerance test performed on F{sub 2} progeny of wild females failed to detect a difference in tolerance levels between flies from contaminated orchards and flies from control orchards. Estimates of sequence diversity among a subsample (92) of the chromosomes used in the duplication survey, including all 27 Mtn duplication chromosomes, were obtained using four-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis.

  13. Mammalian homologues of the Drosophila eye specification genes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, I M

    2001-12-01

    The Drosophila compound eye is specified by the simultaneous and interdependent activity of transcriptional regulatory genes from four families: PAX6 (eyeless, twin of eyeless, eyegone), EYA (eyes absent), SIX (sine oculis, Optix) and DACH (dachshund). Mammals have homologues of all these genes, and many of them are expressed in the embryonic or adult eye, but the functional relationships between them are currently much less clear than in Drosophila. Nevertheless, mutations in the mammalian genes highlight their requirement both within and outside the eye in embryos and adults, and emphasize that they can be deployed in many different contexts. PMID:11735383

  14. Cohesin, Gene Expression and Development: Lessons from Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dorsett, Dale

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin complex, discovered for its role in sister chromatid cohesion, also plays roles in gene expression and development in organisms from yeast to man. This review highlights what has been learned about the gene control and developmental functions of cohesin and the Nipped-B (NIPBL/Scc2) cohesin loading factor in Drosophila. The Drosophila studies have provided unique insights into the etiology of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), which is caused by mutations affecting sister chromatid cohesion proteins in humans. In vivo experiments with Drosophila show that cohesin and Nipped-B have dosage-sensitive effects on the functions of many evolutionarily conserved genes and developmental pathways. Genome-wide studies with Drosophila cultured cells show that Nipped-B and cohesin co-localize on chromosomes, and bind preferentially, but not exclusively, to many actively-transcribed genes and their regulatory sequences, including many of the proposed in vivo target genes. In contrast, the cohesion factors are largely excluded from genes silenced by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. Combined, the in vivo genetic data and the binding patterns of cohesin and Nipped-B in cultured cells are consistent with the hypothesis that they control the action of gene regulatory sequences, including transcriptional enhancers and insulators, and suggest that they might also help define active chromatin domains and influence transcriptional elongation. PMID:19308700

  15. Quantitative analysis of gene function in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, W D; Ning, X; Klingler, M; Kramer, S G; Gergen, J P

    2000-01-01

    The specific functions of gene products frequently depend on the developmental context in which they are expressed. Thus, studies on gene function will benefit from systems that allow for manipulation of gene expression within model systems where the developmental context is well defined. Here we describe a system that allows for genetically controlled overexpression of any gene of interest under normal physiological conditions in the early Drosophila embryo. This regulated expression is achieved through the use of Drosophila lines that express a maternal mRNA for the yeast transcription factor GAL4. Embryos derived from females that express GAL4 maternally activate GAL4-dependent UAS transgenes at uniform levels throughout the embryo during the blastoderm stage of embryogenesis. The expression levels can be quantitatively manipulated through the use of lines that have different levels of maternal GAL4 activity. Specific phenotypes are produced by expression of a number of different developmental regulators with this system, including genes that normally do not function during Drosophila embryogenesis. Analysis of the response to overexpression of runt provides evidence that this pair-rule segmentation gene has a direct role in repressing transcription of the segment-polarity gene engrailed. The maternal GAL4 system will have applications both for the measurement of gene activity in reverse genetic experiments as well as for the identification of genetic factors that have quantitative effects on gene function in vivo. PMID:10628987

  16. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R

    2016-09-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  17. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  18. Drosophila GRAIL: An intelligent system for gene recognition in Drosophila DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying; Einstein, J.R.; Uberbacher, E.C.; Helt, G.; Rubin, G.

    1995-06-01

    An AI-based system for gene recognition in Drosophila DNA sequences was designed and implemented. The system consists of two main modules, one for coding exon recognition and one for single gene model construction. The exon recognition module finds a coding exon by recognition of its splice junctions (or translation start) and coding potential. The core of this module is a set of neural networks which evaluate an exon candidate for the possibility of being a true coding exon using the ``recognized`` splice junction (or translation start) and coding signals. The recognition process consists of four steps: generation of an exon candidate pool, elimination of improbable candidates using heuristic rules, candidate evaluation by trained neural networks, and candidate cluster resolution and final exon prediction. The gene model construction module takes as input the clustered exon candidates and builds a ``best`` possible single gene model using an efficient dynamic programming algorithm. 129 Drosophila sequences consisting of 441 coding exons including 216358 coding bases were extructed from GenBank and used to build statistical matrices and to train the neural networks. On this training set the system recognized 97% of the coding messages and predicted only 5% false messages. Among the ``correctly`` predicted exons, 68% match the actual exon exactly and 96% have at least one edge predicted correctly. On an independent test set consisting of 30 Drosophila sequences, the system recognized 96% of the coding messages and predicted 7% false messages.

  19. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  20. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  1. Drosophila Myc is required for normal DREF gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dang Thi Phuong Thao; Seto, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila DNA replication-related element-binding factor (dDREF) is required for the expression of many proliferation-related genes carrying the DRE sequence, 5'-TATCGATA. Finding a canonical E-box, 5'-CACGTG, in the dDREF gene promoter prompted us to explore the possibility that the dDREF gene is a target of Drosophila Myc (dMyc). Luciferase transient expression assays combined with RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells revealed that knockdown of dmyc reduced dDREF gene promoter activity by 35% to 82%, an effect at least partly mediated by the E-box in the promoter. dm{sup 4}/Y hemizygous mutant larvae demonstrated no maternal dMyc and severe impairment of dDREF mRNA transcription. dMyc loss of function in dm{sup 2}/dm{sup 2} homozygous mutant follicle cell clones also resulted in loss of anti-dDREF immunostaining in nuclei. In contrast, co-expression of dMyc-dMax up-regulated dDREF promoter activity in S2 cells. Furthermore, dMyc over-expressing clones exhibited a high level of dDREF gene expression in wing and eye discs. These results taken together indicate that dMyc is indeed required for dDREF gene expression.

  2. Systematic determination of patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomancak, Pavel; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Kwan, Elaine; Shu, ShengQiang; Lewis, Suzanna E; Richards, Stephen; Ashburner, Michael; Hartenstein, Volker; Celniker, Susan E; Rubin, Gerald M

    2002-01-01

    Background Cell-fate specification and tissue differentiation during development are largely achieved by the regulation of gene transcription. Results As a first step to creating a comprehensive atlas of gene-expression patterns during Drosophila embryogenesis, we examined 2,179 genes by in situ hybridization to fixed Drosophila embryos. Of the genes assayed, 63.7% displayed dynamic expression patterns that were documented with 25,690 digital photomicrographs of individual embryos. The photomicrographs were annotated using controlled vocabularies for anatomical structures that are organized into a developmental hierarchy. We also generated a detailed time course of gene expression during embryogenesis using microarrays to provide an independent corroboration of the in situ hybridization results. All image, annotation and microarray data are stored in publicly available database. We found that the RNA transcripts of about 1% of genes show clear subcellular localization. Nearly all the annotated expression patterns are distinct. We present an approach for organizing the data by hierarchical clustering of annotation terms that allows us to group tissues that express similar sets of genes as well as genes displaying similar expression patterns. Conclusions Analyzing gene-expression patterns by in situ hybridization to whole-mount embryos provides an extremely rich dataset that can be used to identify genes involved in developmental processes that have been missed by traditional genetic analysis. Systematic analysis of rigorously annotated patterns of gene expression will complement and extend the types of analyses carried out using expression microarrays. PMID:12537577

  3. The BDGP gene disruption project: Single transposon insertions associated with 40 percent of Drosophila genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Levis, Robert W.; Liao, Guochun; He, Yuchun; Carlson, Joseph W.; Tsang, Garson; Evans-Holm, Martha; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Schulze, Karen L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Spradling, Allan C.

    2004-01-13

    The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) strives to disrupt each Drosophila gene by the insertion of a single transposable element. As part of this effort, transposons in more than 30,000 fly strains were localized and analyzed relative to predicted Drosophila gene structures. Approximately 6,300 lines that maximize genomic coverage were selected to be sent to the Bloomington Stock Center for public distribution, bringing the size of the BDGP gene disruption collection to 7,140 lines. It now includes individual lines predicted to disrupt 5,362 of the 13,666 currently annotated Drosophila genes (39 percent). Other lines contain an insertion at least 2 kb from others in the collection and likely mutate additional incompletely annotated or uncharacterized genes and chromosomal regulatory elements. The remaining strains contain insertions likely to disrupt alternative gene promoters or to allow gene mis-expression. The expanded BDGP gene disruption collection provides a public resource that will facilitate the application of Drosophila genetics to diverse biological problems. Finally, the project reveals new insight into how transposons interact with a eukaryotic genome and helps define optimal strategies for using insertional mutagenesis as a genomic tool.

  4. The BDGP gene disruption project: single transposon insertions associated with 40% of Drosophila genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, Hugo J; Levis, Robert W; Liao, Guochun; He, Yuchun; Carlson, Joseph W; Tsang, Garson; Evans-Holm, Martha; Hiesinger, P Robin; Schulze, Karen L; Rubin, Gerald M; Hoskins, Roger A; Spradling, Allan C

    2004-01-01

    The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) strives to disrupt each Drosophila gene by the insertion of a single transposable element. As part of this effort, transposons in >30,000 fly strains were localized and analyzed relative to predicted Drosophila gene structures. Approximately 6300 lines that maximize genomic coverage were selected to be sent to the Bloomington Stock Center for public distribution, bringing the size of the BDGP gene disruption collection to 7140 lines. It now includes individual lines predicted to disrupt 5362 of the 13,666 currently annotated Drosophila genes (39%). Other lines contain an insertion at least 2 kb from others in the collection and likely mutate additional incompletely annotated or uncharacterized genes and chromosomal regulatory elements. The remaining strains contain insertions likely to disrupt alternative gene promoters or to allow gene misexpression. The expanded BDGP gene disruption collection provides a public resource that will facilitate the application of Drosophila genetics to diverse biological problems. Finally, the project reveals new insight into how transposons interact with a eukaryotic genome and helps define optimal strategies for using insertional mutagenesis as a genomic tool. PMID:15238527

  5. Regulation of proboscipedia in Drosophila by homeotic selector genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rusch, D B; Kaufman, T C

    2000-01-01

    The gene proboscipedia (pb) is a member of the Antennapedia complex in Drosophila and is required for the proper specification of the adult mouthparts. In the embryo, pb expression serves no known function despite having an accumulation pattern in the mouthpart anlagen that is conserved across several insect orders. We have identified several of the genes necessary to generate this embryonic pattern of expression. These genes can be roughly split into three categories based on their time of action during development. First, prior to the expression of pb, the gap genes are required to specify the domains where pb may be expressed. Second, the initial expression pattern of pb is controlled by the combined action of the genes Deformed (Dfd), Sex combs reduced (Scr), cap'n'collar (cnc), and teashirt (tsh). Lastly, maintenance of this expression pattern later in development is dependent on the action of a subset of the Polycomb group genes. These interactions are mediated in part through a 500-bp regulatory element in the second intron of pb. We further show that Dfd protein binds in vitro to sequences found in this fragment. This is the first clear demonstration of autonomous positive cross-regulation of one Hox gene by another in Drosophila melanogaster and the binding of Dfd to a cis-acting regulatory element indicates that this control might be direct. PMID:10978284

  6. Imaging transcription dynamics at endogenous genes in living Drosophila tissues.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Zobeck, Katie L; Lis, John T; Webb, Watt W

    2008-07-01

    How transcription of individual genes is regulated in a single, intact, three-dimensionally organized cell nucleus remains mysterious. Recently, live cell imaging has become an essential tool to dissect the in vivo mechanisms of gene transcription. It not only examines functions of transcription factors at their gene targets within the chromatin context, but it also provides a non-disruptive approach for observing the dynamics of a transcription cycle in real time. However, the identification of any endogenous gene loci and their associated transcription factors remains technically difficult. Here, we describe the method of imaging the transcriptional dynamics of heat shock genes in Drosophila polytene chromosomes in living salivary gland tissues by multiphoton microscopy (MPM). This method has provided the experimental capability to visualize the assembly and dynamics of individual transcription factors and regulators and to dissect their functions at their endogenous gene targets in living cells. PMID:18586105

  7. Quantitative imaging of gene expression in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Surkova, Svetlana; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Kozlov, Konstantin N; Pisarev, Andrei; Reinitz, John; Samsonova, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative measurements derived using sophisticated microscopy techniques are essential for understanding the basic principles that control the behavior of biological systems. Here we describe a data pipeline developed to extract quantitative data on segmentation gene expression from confocal images of gene expression patterns in Drosophila. The pipeline consists of image segmentation, background removal, temporal characterization of an embryo, data registration, and data averaging. This pipeline has been successfully applied to obtain quantitative gene expression data at cellular resolution in space and at 6.5-min resolution in time. It has also enabled the construction of a spatiotemporal atlas of segmentation gene expression. We describe the software used to construct a workflow for extracting quantitative data on segmentation gene expression and the BREReA package, which implements the methods for background removal and registration of segmentation gene expression patterns. PMID:23734022

  8. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons. PMID:26486873

  9. Common genes regulate food and ethanol intake in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Morgan L; Lamina, Omoteniola; Hogan, Kerry E; Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2016-06-01

    The abuse liability of alcohol (ethanol) is believed to result in part from its actions on neurobiological substrates that underlie the motivation toward food and other natural reinforcers, and a growing body of evidence indicates that these substrates are broadly conserved among animal phyla. Understanding the extent to which the substrates regulating ethanol and food intake overlap is an important step toward developing therapeutics that selectively reduce ethanol intake. In the current experiments, we measured food and ethanol intake in Recombinant Inbred (RI) lines of Drosophila melanogaster using several assays, and then calculated genetic correlations to estimate the degree to which common genes might underlie behavior in these assays. We found that food intake and ethanol intake as measured in the capillary assay are genetically correlated traits in D. melanogaster, as well as in a panel of 11 Drosophila species that we tested subsequently. RI line differences in food intake in a dyed food assay were genetically unrelated to ethanol intake in the capillary assay or to ethanol preference measured using an olfactory trap apparatus. Using publicly available gene expression data, we found that expression profiles across the RI lines of a number of genes (including the D2-like dopamine receptor, DOPA decarboxylase, and fruitless) correlated with the RI line differences in food and ethanol intake we measured, while the expression profiles of other genes, including NPF, and the NPF and 5-HT2 receptors, correlated only with ethanol intake or preference. Our results suggest that food and ethanol intake are regulated by some common genes in Drosophila, but that other genes regulate ethanol intake independently of food intake. These results have implications toward the development of therapeutics that preferentially reduce ethanol intake. PMID:27286934

  10. The Evolution of Olfactory Gene Families in Drosophila and the Genomic Basis of chemical-Ecological Adaptation in Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Sukanya; Ometto, Lino; Crava, Cristina M; Revadi, Santosh; Kaur, Rupinder; Horner, David S; Pisani, Davide; Dekker, Teun; Anfora, Gianfranco; Rota-Stabelli, Omar

    2016-01-01

    How the evolution of olfactory genes correlates with adaption to new ecological niches is still a debated topic. We explored this issue in Drosophila suzukii, an emerging model that reproduces on fresh fruit rather than in fermenting substrates like most other Drosophila We first annotated the repertoire of odorant receptors (ORs), odorant binding proteins (OBPs), and antennal ionotropic receptors (aIRs) in the genomes of two strains of D. suzukii and of its close relative Drosophila biarmipes We then analyzed these genes on the phylogeny of 14 Drosophila species: whereas ORs and OBPs are characterized by higher turnover rates in some lineages including D. suzukii, aIRs are conserved throughout the genus. Drosophila suzukii is further characterized by a non-random distribution of OR turnover on the gene phylogeny, consistent with a change in selective pressures. In D. suzukii, we found duplications and signs of positive selection in ORs with affinity for short-chain esters, and loss of function of ORs with affinity for volatiles produced during fermentation. These receptors-Or85a and Or22a-are characterized by divergent alleles in the European and American genomes, and we hypothesize that they may have been replaced by some of the duplicated ORs in corresponding neurons, a hypothesis reciprocally confirmed by electrophysiological recordings. Our study quantifies the evolution of olfactory genes in Drosophila and reveals an array of genomic events that can be associated with the ecological adaptations of D. suzukii. PMID:27435796

  11. The Evolution of Olfactory Gene Families in Drosophila and the Genomic Basis of chemical-Ecological Adaptation in Drosophila suzukii

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Sukanya; Ometto, Lino; Crava, Cristina M.; Revadi, Santosh; Kaur, Rupinder; Horner, David S.; Pisani, Davide; Dekker, Teun; Anfora, Gianfranco; Rota-Stabelli, Omar

    2016-01-01

    How the evolution of olfactory genes correlates with adaption to new ecological niches is still a debated topic. We explored this issue in Drosophila suzukii, an emerging model that reproduces on fresh fruit rather than in fermenting substrates like most other Drosophila. We first annotated the repertoire of odorant receptors (ORs), odorant binding proteins (OBPs), and antennal ionotropic receptors (aIRs) in the genomes of two strains of D. suzukii and of its close relative Drosophila biarmipes. We then analyzed these genes on the phylogeny of 14 Drosophila species: whereas ORs and OBPs are characterized by higher turnover rates in some lineages including D. suzukii, aIRs are conserved throughout the genus. Drosophila suzukii is further characterized by a non-random distribution of OR turnover on the gene phylogeny, consistent with a change in selective pressures. In D. suzukii, we found duplications and signs of positive selection in ORs with affinity for short-chain esters, and loss of function of ORs with affinity for volatiles produced during fermentation. These receptors—Or85a and Or22a—are characterized by divergent alleles in the European and American genomes, and we hypothesize that they may have been replaced by some of the duplicated ORs in corresponding neurons, a hypothesis reciprocally confirmed by electrophysiological recordings. Our study quantifies the evolution of olfactory genes in Drosophila and reveals an array of genomic events that can be associated with the ecological adaptations of D. suzukii. PMID:27435796

  12. Expression patterns of cadherin genes in Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zartman, Jeremiah J.; Kanodia, Jitendra S.; Yakoby, Nir; Schafer, Xenia; Watson, Colin; Schlichting, Karin; Dahmann, Christian; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila oogenesis, the follicular epithelium that envelops the oocyte is patterned by a small set of inductive signals and gives rise to an elaborate three-dimensional eggshell. Several eggshell structures provide sensitive readouts of the patterning signals, but the formation of these structures is still poorly understood. In other systems, epithelial morphogenesis is guided by the spatial patterning of cell adhesion and cytoskeleton genes. As a step towards developing a comprehensive description of patterning events leading to eggshell morphogenesis, we report the expression of Drosophila cadherins, calcium dependent adhesion molecules that are repeatedly used throughout development. We found that 9/17 of Drosophila cadherins are expressed in the follicular epithelium in dynamic patterns during oogenesis. In late oogenesis, the expression patterns of cadherin genes in the main body follicle cells is summarized using a compact set of simple geometric shapes, reflecting the integration of the EGFR and DPP inductive signals. The multi-layered composite patterning of the cadherins is hypothesized to play a key role in the formation of the eggshell. Of particular note is the complex patterning of the region of the follicular epithelium that gives rise to the dorsal appendages, which are tubular structures that serve as respiratory organs for the developing embryo. PMID:18817893

  13. Recurrent Gene Duplication Diversifies Genome Defense Repertoire in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Levine, Mia T; Vander Wende, Helen M; Hsieh, Emily; Baker, EmilyClare P; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-07-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise large fractions of many eukaryotic genomes and imperil host genome integrity. The host genome combats these challenges by encoding proteins that silence TE activity. Both the introduction of new TEs via horizontal transfer and TE sequence evolution requires constant innovation of host-encoded TE silencing machinery to keep pace with TEs. One form of host innovation is the adaptation of existing, single-copy host genes. Indeed, host suppressors of TE replication often harbor signatures of positive selection. Such signatures are especially evident in genes encoding the piwi-interacting-RNA pathway of gene silencing, for example, the female germline-restricted TE silencer, HP1D/Rhino Host genomes can also innovate via gene duplication and divergence. However, the importance of gene family expansions, contractions, and gene turnover to host genome defense has been largely unexplored. Here, we functionally characterize Oxpecker, a young, tandem duplicate gene of HP1D/rhino We demonstrate that Oxpecker supports female fertility in Drosophila melanogaster and silences several TE families that are incompletely silenced by HP1D/Rhino in the female germline. We further show that, like Oxpecker, at least ten additional, structurally diverse, HP1D/rhino-derived daughter and "granddaughter" genes emerged during a short 15-million year period of Drosophila evolution. These young paralogs are transcribed primarily in germline tissues, where the genetic conflict between host genomes and TEs plays out. Our findings suggest that gene family expansion is an underappreciated yet potent evolutionary mechanism of genome defense diversification. PMID:26979388

  14. Regulation of the Gene Sex-Lethal: A Comparative Analysis of Drosophila Melanogaster and Drosophila Subobscura

    PubMed Central

    Penalva, LOF.; Sakamoto, H.; Navarro-Sabate, A.; Sakashita, E.; Granadino, B.; Segarra, C.; Sanchez, L.

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) controls the processes of sex determination and dosage compensation. A Drosophila subobscura genomic fragment containing all the exons and the late and early promotors in the Sxl gene of D. melanogaster was isolated. Early Sxl expression in D. subobscura seems to be controlled at the transcriptional level, possibly by the X:A signal. In the region upstream of the early Sxl transcription initiation site are two conserved regions suggested to be involved in the early activation of Sxl. Late Sxl expression in D. subobscura produces four transcripts in adult females and males. In males, the transcripts have an additional exon which contains three translational stop codons so that a truncated, presumably nonfunctional Sxl protein is produced. The Sxl pre-mRNA of D. subobscura lacks the poly-U sequence presented at the polypirimidine tract of the 3' splice site of the male-specific exon present in D. melanogaster. Introns 2 and 3 contain the Sxl-binding poly-U stretches, whose localization in intron 2 varies but in intron 3 is conserved. The Sxl protein is fully conserved at the amino acid level in both species. PMID:8978052

  15. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Prud`homme, N.; Gans, M.; Masson, M.; Terzian, C.; Bucheton, A.

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is table and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovo{sup D1} female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovo{sup D1} reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. 40 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, N; Gans, M; Masson, M; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is stable and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovoD1 female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovoD1 reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. PMID:7713426

  17. Amyrel, a paralogous gene of the amylase gene family in Drosophila melanogaster and the Sophophora subgenus

    PubMed Central

    Da Lage, Jean-Luc; Renard, Emmanuelle; Chartois, Frédérique; Lemeunier, Françoise; Cariou, Marie-Louise

    1998-01-01

    We describe a gene from Drosophila melanogaster related to the alpha-amylase gene Amy. This gene, which exists as a single copy, was named Amyrel. It is strikingly divergent from Amy because the amino acid divergence is 40%. The coding sequence is interrupted by a short intron at position 655, which is unusual in amylase genes. Amyrel has also been cloned in Drosophila ananassae, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and Drosophila subobscura and is likely to be present throughout the Sophophora subgenus, but, to our knowledge, it has not been detected outside. Unexpectedly, there is a strong conservation of 5′ and 3′ flanking regions between Amyrel genes from different species, which is not the case for Amy and which suggests that selection acts on these regions. In contrast to the Amy genes, Amyrel is transcribed in larvae of D. melanogaster but not in adults. However, the protein has not been detected yet. Amyrel evolves about twice as fast as Amy in the several species studied. We suggest that this gene could result from a duplication of Amy followed by accelerated and selected divergence toward a new adaptation. PMID:9618501

  18. Smellblind: A Gene Required for Drosophila Olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, M.; Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    In this article we define and characterize the smellblind gene (sbl). We show that two mutants, sbl and olfD(x9), both isolated by virtue of their olfactory phenotypes and analyzed extensively by others with respect to courtship behavior, contain mutations at a single locus. Meiotic recombination, duplication, and deficiency mapping are used to localize this gene, sbl, to cytogenetic position 14F6-15A2-3 on the X chromosome. Mutations of the locus are shown to produce severe defects not only in larval olfactory response to several volatile chemicals, but also in larval contact chemosensory response. Both sbl and olfD(x9) give a robust response, however, in a new test of larval phototactic response, which we describe here. Both alleles are shown to be heat-sensitive lethals. Four additional recessive lethal alleles, two EMS-induced, one dysgenic, and one spontaneous, are also described. PMID:2106470

  19. Histone Gene Multiplicity and Position Effect Variegation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gerald D.; Sinclair, Donald A.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.

    1983-01-01

    The histone genes of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster are reiterated 100–150 times per haploid genome and are located in the segment of chromosome 2 that corresponds to polytene bands 39D2-3 to E1-2. The influence of altered histone gene multiplicity on chromatin structure has been assayed by measuring modification of the gene inactivation associated with position effect variegation in genotypes bearing deletions of the 39D-E segment. The proportion of cells in which a variegating gene is active is increased in genotypes that are heterozygous for a deficiency that removes the histone gene complex. Deletions that remove segments adjacent to the histone gene complex have no effect on the expression of variegating genes. Suppression of position effect variegation associated with reduction of histone gene multiplicity applies to both X-linked and autosomal variegating genes. Position effects exerted by both autosomal and sex-chromosome heterochromatin were suppressible by deletions of the histone gene complex. The suppression was independent of the presence of the Y chromosome. A deficiency that deletes only the distal portion of the histone gene complex also has the ability to suppress position effect variegation. Duplication of the histone gene complex did not enhance position effect variegation. Deletion or duplication of the histone gene complex in the maternal genome had no effect on the extent of variegation in progeny whose histone gene multiplicity was normal. These results are discussed with respect to current knowledge of the organization of the histone gene complex and control of its expression. PMID:17246163

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah Gene: A Novel Gene with Ancient Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Helder; Aguiar, Bruno; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Reboiro-Jato, David; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth), has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila), a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general. PMID:23696853

  1. A Systematic Analysis of Human Disease-Associated Gene Sequences In Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Lawrence T.; Potocki, Lorraine; Chien, Sam; Gribskov, Michael; Bier, Ethan

    2001-01-01

    We performed a systematic BLAST analysis of 929 human disease gene entries associated with at least one mutant allele in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database against the recently completed genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster. The results of this search have been formatted as an updateable and searchable on-line database called Homophila. Our analysis identified 714 distinct human disease genes (77% of disease genes searched) matching 548 unique Drosophila sequences, which we have summarized by disease category. This breakdown into disease classes creates a picture of disease genes that are amenable to study using Drosophila as the model organism. Of the 548 Drosophila genes related to human disease genes, 153 are associated with known mutant alleles and 56 more are tagged by P-element insertions in or near the gene. Examples of how to use the database to identify Drosophila genes related to human disease genes are presented. We anticipate that cross-genomic analysis of human disease genes using the power of Drosophila second-site modifier screens will promote interaction between human and Drosophila research groups, accelerating the understanding of the pathogenesis of human genetic disease. The Homophila database is available at http://homophila.sdsc.edu. PMID:11381037

  2. Transvection at the Eyes Absent Gene of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Leiserson, W. M.; Bonini, N. M.; Benzer, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Drosophila eyes absent (eya) gene is required for survival and differentiation of eye progenitor cells. Loss of gene function in the eye results in reduction or absence of the adult compound eye. Certain combinations of eya alleles undergo partial complementation, with dramatic restoration of eye size. This interaction is sensitive to the relative positions of the two alleles in the genome; rearrangements predicted to disrupt pairing of chromosomal homologs in the eya region disrupt complementation. Ten X-ray-induced rearrangements that suppress the interaction obey the same general rules as those tha disrupt transvection at the bithorax complex and the decapentaplegic gene. Moreover, like transvection in those cases, the interaction at eya depends on the presence of normal zeste function. The discovery of transvection at eya suggests that transvection interactions of this type may be more prevalent than generally thought. PMID:7896099

  3. Visualization of Drosophila melanogaster chorion genes undergoing amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Osheim, Y.N.; Miller, O.L. Jr.; Beyer, A.L.

    1988-07-01

    The authors visualized by electron microscopy the preferential amplification of Drosophila chorion genes in late-stage follicle cells. Chromatin spreads revealed large clusters of actively transcribed genes of the appropriate size, spacing, and orientation for chorion genes that were expressed with the correct temporal specificity. Occasionally the active genes were observed within or contiguous with intact replicons and replication forks. In every case, our micrographs are consistent with the hypothesis that the central region of each chorion domain contains a replication origin(s) used during the amplification event. In one case, a small replication bubble was observed precisely at the site of the essential region of the X chromosome amplification control element. The micrographs also suggest that forks at either end of a replicon frequently progress very different distances, presumably due to different times in initiation or different rates of movement. It appears that all chorion genes (even those coding for minor proteins) are transcribed in a ''fully on'' condition, albeit for varied durations, and that if replication fork passage does inactivate a promoter, it does so very transiently. Furthermore, a DNA segment containing one active gene is likely to have an additional active gene(s). Surprisingly, during the time frame of expected maximum activity, approximately half of the chorion sequences appear transciptionally inactive.

  4. Interspecific Comparison of the Transformer Gene of Drosophila Reveals an Unusually High Degree of Evolutionary Divergence

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, M. T.; Belote, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The transformer (tra) gene of Drosophila melanogaster occupies an intermediate position in the regulatory pathway controlling all aspects of somatic sexual differentiation. The female-specific expression of this gene's function is regulated by the Sex lethal (Sxl) gene, through a mechanism involving sex-specific alternative splicing of tra pre-mRNA. The tra gene encodes a protein that is thought to act in conjunction with the transformer-2 (tra-2) gene product to control the sex-specific processing of doublesex (dsx) pre-mRNA. The bifunctional dsx gene carries out opposite functions in the two sexes, repressing female differentiation in males and repressing male differentiation in females. Here we report the results from an evolutionary approach to investigate tra regulation and function, by isolating the tra-homologous genes from selected Drosophila species, and then using the interpecific DNA sequence comparisons to help identify regions of functional significance. The tra-homologous genes from two Sophophoran subgenus species, Drosophila simulans and Drosophila erecta, and two Drosophila subgenus species, Drosophila hydei and Drosophila virilis, were cloned, sequenced and compared to the D. melanogaster tra gene. This comparison reveals an unusually high degree of evolutionary divergence among the tra coding sequences. These studies also highlight a highly conserved sequence within intron one that probably defines a cis-acting regulator of the sex-specific alternative splicing event. PMID:1592233

  5. Identifying sexual differentiation genes that affect Drosophila life span

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sexual differentiation often has significant effects on life span and aging phenotypes. For example, males and females of several species have different life spans, and genetic and environmental manipulations that affect life span often have different magnitude of effect in males versus females. Moreover, the presence of a differentiated germ-line has been shown to affect life span in several species, including Drosophila and C. elegans. Methods Experiments were conducted to determine how alterations in sexual differentiation gene activity might affect the life span of Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila females heterozygous for the tudor[1] mutation produce normal offspring, while their homozygous sisters produce offspring that lack a germ line. To identify additional sexual differentiation genes that might affect life span, the conditional transgenic system Geneswitch was employed, whereby feeding adult flies or developing larvae the drug RU486 causes the over-expression of selected UAS-transgenes. Results In this study germ-line ablation caused by the maternal tudor[1] mutation was examined in a long-lived genetic background, and was found to increase life span in males but not in females, consistent with previous reports. Fitting the data to a Gompertz-Makeham model indicated that the maternal tudor[1] mutation increases the life span of male progeny by decreasing age-independent mortality. The Geneswitch system was used to screen through several UAS-type and EP-type P element mutations in genes that regulate sexual differentiation, to determine if additional sex-specific effects on life span would be obtained. Conditional over-expression of transformer female isoform (traF) during development produced male adults with inhibited sexual differentiation, however this caused no significant change in life span. Over-expression of doublesex female isoform (dsxF) during development was lethal to males, and produced a limited number of female escapers

  6. Neurally expressed Drosophila genes encoding homologs of the NSF and SNAP secretory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, R W; Pallanck, L; Ganetzky, B

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of investigation have now converged to indicate that the neurotransmitter release apparatus is formed by assembly of cytosolic proteins with proteins of the synaptic vesicle and presynaptic terminal membranes. We are undertaking a genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the functions of two types of cytosolic proteins thought to function in this complex: N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and the soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs). We have identified Drosophila homologs of the vertebrate and yeast NSF and SNAP genes. Both Drosophila genes encode polypeptides that closely resemble their vertebrate counterparts and are expressed in the nervous system; neither appears to be in a family of closely related Drosophila genes. These results indicate that the Drosophila NSF and SNAP genes are excellent candidates for mutational analysis of neurotransmitter release. Images PMID:8202553

  7. The ribosomal protein genes and Minute loci of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marygold, Steven J; Roote, John; Reuter, Gunter; Lambertsson, Andrew; Ashburner, Michael; Millburn, Gillian H; Harrison, Paul M; Yu, Zhan; Kenmochi, Naoya; Kaufman, Thomas C; Leevers, Sally J; Cook, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to cause an array of cellular and developmental defects in a variety of organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, disruption of RP genes can result in the 'Minute' syndrome of dominant, haploinsufficient phenotypes, which include prolonged development, short and thin bristles, and poor fertility and viability. While more than 50 Minute loci have been defined genetically, only 15 have so far been characterized molecularly and shown to correspond to RP genes. Results We combined bioinformatic and genetic approaches to conduct a systematic analysis of the relationship between RP genes and Minute loci. First, we identified 88 genes encoding 79 different cytoplasmic RPs (CRPs) and 75 genes encoding distinct mitochondrial RPs (MRPs). Interestingly, nine CRP genes are present as duplicates and, while all appear to be functional, one member of each gene pair has relatively limited expression. Next, we defined 65 discrete Minute loci by genetic criteria. Of these, 64 correspond to, or very likely correspond to, CRP genes; the single non-CRP-encoding Minute gene encodes a translation initiation factor subunit. Significantly, MRP genes and more than 20 CRP genes do not correspond to Minute loci. Conclusion This work answers a longstanding question about the molecular nature of Minute loci and suggests that Minute phenotypes arise from suboptimal protein synthesis resulting from reduced levels of cytoribosomes. Furthermore, by identifying the majority of haplolethal and haplosterile loci at the molecular level, our data will directly benefit efforts to attain complete deletion coverage of the D. melanogaster genome. PMID:17927810

  8. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  9. Global analysis of patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomancak, Pavel; Berman, Benjamin P; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Kwan, Elaine; Hartenstein, Volker; Celniker, Susan E; Rubin, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell and tissue specific gene expression is a defining feature of embryonic development in multi-cellular organisms. However, the range of gene expression patterns, the extent of the correlation of expression with function, and the classes of genes whose spatial expression are tightly regulated have been unclear due to the lack of an unbiased, genome-wide survey of gene expression patterns. Results We determined and documented embryonic expression patterns for 6,003 (44%) of the 13,659 protein-coding genes identified in the Drosophila melanogaster genome with over 70,000 images and controlled vocabulary annotations. Individual expression patterns are extraordinarily diverse, but by supplementing qualitative in situ hybridization data with quantitative microarray time-course data using a hybrid clustering strategy, we identify groups of genes with similar expression. Of 4,496 genes with detectable expression in the embryo, 2,549 (57%) fall into 10 clusters representing broad expression patterns. The remaining 1,947 (43%) genes fall into 29 clusters representing restricted expression, 20% patterned as early as blastoderm, with the majority restricted to differentiated cell types, such as epithelia, nervous system, or muscle. We investigate the relationship between expression clusters and known molecular and cellular-physiological functions. Conclusion Nearly 60% of the genes with detectable expression exhibit broad patterns reflecting quantitative rather than qualitative differences between tissues. The other 40% show tissue-restricted expression; the expression patterns of over 1,500 of these genes are documented here for the first time. Within each of these categories, we identified clusters of genes associated with particular cellular and developmental functions. PMID:17645804

  10. Trainable Gene Regulation Networks with Applications to Drosophila Pattern Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2000-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. For details the reader is referred to the papers introduced below. It will then introduce a new gene regulation network model which can describe promoter-level substructure in gene regulation. As described in chapter 2, gene regulation may be thought of as a combination of cis-acting regulation by the extended promoter of a gene (including all regulatory sequences) by way of the transcription complex, and of trans-acting regulation by the transcription factor products of other genes. If we simplify the cis-action by using a phenomenological model which can be tuned to data, such as a unit or other small portion of an artificial neural network, then the full transacting interaction between multiple genes during development can be modelled as a larger network which can again be tuned or trained to data. The larger network will in general need to have recurrent (feedback) connections since at least some real gene regulation networks do. This is the basic modeling approach taken, which describes how a set of recurrent neural networks can be used as a modeling language for multiple developmental processes including gene regulation within a single cell, cell-cell communication, and cell division. Such network models have been called "gene circuits", "gene regulation networks", or "genetic regulatory networks", sometimes without distinguishing the models from the actual modeled systems.

  11. Genotype and gene expression associations with immune function in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sackton, Timothy B; Lazzaro, Brian P; Clark, Andrew G

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster harbor substantial genetic variation associated with physiological measures of immune function. In no case, however, have intermediate measures of immune function, such as transcriptional activity of immune-related genes, been tested as mediators of phenotypic variation in immunity. In this study, we measured bacterial load sustained after infection of D. melanogaster with Serratia marcescens, Providencia rettgeri, Enterococcus faecalis, and Lactococcus lactis in a panel of 94 third-chromosome substitution lines. We also measured transcriptional levels of 329 immune-related genes eight hours after infection with E. faecalis and S. marcescens in lines from the phenotypic tails of the test panel. We genotyped the substitution lines at 137 polymorphic markers distributed across 25 genes in order to test for statistical associations among genotype, bacterial load, and transcriptional dynamics. We find that genetic polymorphisms in the pathogen recognition genes (and particularly in PGRP-LC, GNBP1, and GNBP2) are most significantly associated with variation in bacterial load. We also find that overall transcriptional induction of effector proteins is a significant predictor of bacterial load after infection with E. faecalis, and that a marker upstream of the recognition gene PGRP-SD is statistically associated with variation in both bacterial load and transcriptional induction of effector proteins. These results show that polymorphism in genes near the top of the immune system signaling cascade can have a disproportionate effect on organismal phenotype due to the amplification of minor effects through the cascade. PMID:20066029

  12. Fasciclin II controls proneural gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, L; VanBerkum, M F; Grenningloh, G; Schuster, C; Goodman, C S

    1995-01-01

    Fasciclin II (Fas II), an NCAM-like cell adhesion molecule in Drosophila, is expressed on a subset of embryonic axons and controls selective axon fasiculation. Fas II is also expressed in imaginal discs. Here we use genetic analysis to show that Fas II is required for the control of proneural gene expression. Clusters of cells in the eye-antennal imaginal disc express the achaete proneural gene and give rise to mechanosensory neurons; other clusters of cells express the atonal gene and give rise to ocellar photoreceptor neurons. In fasII loss-of-function mutants, the expression of both proneural genes is absent in certain locations, and, as a result, the corresponding sensory precursors fail to develop. In fasII gain-of-function conditions, extra sensory structures arise from this same region of the imaginal disc. Mutations in the Abelson tyrosine kinase gene show dominant interactions with fasII mutations, suggesting that Abl and Fas II function in a signaling pathway that controls proneural gene expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7479828

  13. A toolkit for high-throughput, cross-species gene engineering in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ejsmont, Radoslaw K; Sarov, Mihail; Winkler, Sylke; Lipinski, Kamil A; Tomancak, Pavel

    2009-06-01

    We generated two complementary genomic fosmid libraries for Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila pseudoobscura that permit seamless modification of large genomic clones by high-throughput recombineering and direct transgenesis. The fosmid transgenes recapitulated endogenous gene expression patterns. These libraries, in combination with recombineering technology, will be useful to rescue mutant phenotypes, allow imaging of gene products in living flies and enable systematic analysis and manipulation of gene activity across species. PMID:19465918

  14. The Drosophila gene escargot encodes a zinc finger motif found in snail-related genes.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, M; Noguchi, P D; Sensabaugh, S M; Odenwald, W F; Kassis, J A

    1992-02-01

    Two independent P-element enhancer detection lines were obtained that express lacZ in a pattern of longitudinal stripes early in germband elongation. In this paper, molecular and genetic characterization of a gene located near these transposons is presented. Sequence analysis of a cDNA clone from the region reveals that this gene has a high degree of similarity with the Drosophila snail gene (Boulay et al., 1987). The sequence similarity extends over 400 nucleotides, and includes a region encoding five tandem zinc finger motifs (72% nucleotide identity; 76% amino acid identity). This region is also conserved in the snail homologue from Xenopus laevis (76% nucleotide identity; 83% amino acid identity) (Sargent and Bennett, 1990). We have named the Drosophila snail-related gene escargot (esg), and the region of sequence conservation common to all three genes the 'snailbox'. A number of Drosophila genomic DNA fragments cross-hybridize to a probe from the snailbox region suggesting that snail and escargot are members of a multigene family. The expression pattern of escargot is dynamic and complex. Early in germband elongation, escargot RNA is expressed in a pattern of longitudinal stripes identical to the one observed in the two enhancer detection lines. Later in development, escargot is expressed in cells that will form the larval imaginal tissues, escargot is allelic with l(2)35Ce, an essential gene located near snail in the genome. PMID:1571289

  15. 2010: A century of Drosophila genetics through the prism of the white gene.

    PubMed

    Green, M M

    2010-01-01

    In January 1910, a century ago, Thomas Hunt Morgan discovered his first Drosophila mutant, a white-eyed male (Morgan 1910). Morgan named the mutant gene white and soon demonstrated that it resided on the X chromosome. This was the first localization of a specific gene to a particular chromosome. Thus began Drosophila experimental genetics. The story of the initial work on white is well known but what is less well appreciated is the multiplicity of ways in which this gene has been used to explore fundamental questions in genetics. Here, I review some of the highlights of a century's productive use of white in Drosophila genetics. PMID:20061564

  16. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Embryonic Crystal Cell Formation During Drosophila Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Milchanowski, Allison B.; Henkenius, Amy L.; Narayanan, Maya; Hartenstein, Volker; Banerjee, Utpal

    2004-01-01

    Parallels between vertebrate and Drosophila hematopoiesis add to the value of flies as a model organism to gain insights into blood development. The Drosophila hematopoietic system is composed of at least three classes of terminally differentiated blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. Recent studies have identified transcriptional and signaling pathways in Drosophila involving proteins similar to those seen in human blood development. To identify additional genes involved in Drosophila hematopoiesis, we have conducted a P-element-based genetic screen to isolate mutations that affect embryonic crystal cell development. Using a marker of terminally differentiated crystal cells, we screened 1040 P-element-lethal lines located on the second and third chromosomes and identified 44 individual lines that affect crystal cell development. Identifying novel genes and pathways involved in Drosophila hematopoiesis is likely to provide further insights into mammalian hematopoietic development and disorders. PMID:15454546

  17. GLAD: an Online Database of Gene List Annotation for Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanhui; Comjean, Aram; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Perrimon, Norbert; Mohr, Stephanie E

    2015-01-01

    We present a resource of high quality lists of functionally related Drosophila genes, e.g. based on protein domains (kinases, transcription factors, etc.) or cellular function (e.g. autophagy, signal transduction). To establish these lists, we relied on different inputs, including curation from databases or the literature and mapping from other species. Moreover, as an added curation and quality control step, we asked experts in relevant fields to review many of the lists. The resource is available online for scientists to search and view, and is editable based on community input. Annotation of gene groups is an ongoing effort and scientific need will typically drive decisions regarding which gene lists to pursue. We anticipate that the number of lists will increase over time; that the composition of some lists will grow and/or change over time as new information becomes available; and that the lists will benefit the scientific community, e.g. at experimental design and data analysis stages. Based on this, we present an easily updatable online database, available at www.flyrnai.org/glad, at which gene group lists can be viewed, searched and downloaded. PMID:26157507

  18. Epistatic Partners of Neurogenic Genes Modulate Drosophila Olfactory Behavior

    PubMed Central

    St. Armour, Genevieve E.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Anholt, Robert R. H.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which epistasis affects the genetic architecture of complex traits is difficult to quantify, and identifying variants in natural populations with epistatic interactions is challenging. Previous studies in Drosophila implicated extensive epistasis between variants in genes that affect neural connectivity and contribute to natural variation in olfactory response to benzaldehyde. Here, we implemented a powerful screen to quantify the magnitude of epistasis as well as identify candidate interacting variants using 203 inbred wild-derived lines with sequenced genomes of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). We crossed the DGRP lines to P[GT1]-element insertion mutants in Sema-5c and neuralized (neur), two neurodevelopmental loci which affect olfactory behavior, and to their co-isogenic wild type control. We observed significant variation in olfactory responses to benzaldehyde among F1 genotypes and for the DGRP line by mutant genotype interactions for both loci, revealing extensive non-additive genetic variation. We performed genome-wide association analyses to identify the candidate modifier loci. None of these polymorphisms were in or near the focal genes; therefore, epistasis is the cause of the non-additive genetic variance. The candidate epistatic partners form interaction networks enriched for functions in neural development. Analyses of mutants of candidate epistatic partners with neur (merry-go-round (mgr), prospero (pros), CG10098, Alhambra (Alh) and CG12535) and Sema-5c (CG42540 and bruchpilot (brp)) showed aberrant olfactory responses compared to co-isogenic controls. Thus, integrating genome-wide analyses of natural variants with mutations at defined genomic locations in a common co-isogenic background can unmask specific epistatic modifiers of behavioral phenotypes. PMID:26678546

  19. Regulation of Drosophila yolk protein genes by an ovary-specific GATA factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lossky, M.; Wensink, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the expression of the genes for yolk protein of Drosophila melanogaster and the tissue specific function of the regulatory element which activates transcription in vivo. 70 refs., 8 figs.

  20. High-level expression of the photorepair gene in Drosophila ovary and its evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Todo, T; Ryo, H; Takemori, H; Toh, H; Nomura, T; Kondo, S

    1994-11-01

    DNA photolyase catalyzes light-dependent repair of cis, syn-cyclobutane dipyrimidines (pyrimidine dimers); its apoenzyme is encoded by the photorepair (phr) gene. The phr cDNA was cloned from D. melanogaster; it has an open reading frame to encode a 61,483-Da protein. The phr cDNA hybridized to band 44C-D of Drosophila polytene chromosome, equivalent to the locus of the phr- gene. Drosophila photolyase is made of an apoenzyme with a molecular weight of 62 kDa. Drosophila photolyase is extraordinarily abundant in the embryo and adult ovary, whereas mRNA of the phr gene is abundant only in the ovary. The action spectrum of Drosophila photolyase for photoreactivation has a maximum at 440 nm. The phr gene of Drosophila has about 60% identical amino acid sites with that of goldfish but only 13-18% with those of microorganisms. Implications of the unique characteristics of the Drosophila phr gene are discussed overviewing the diversified characteristics of phr genes in various organisms that have presumably evolved from a common ancestral gene. PMID:7526199

  1. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Mark D; Pearce, Michael; Fak, John; Fan, HongQing; Unnerstall, Ulrich; Emberly, Eldon; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Siggia, Eric D; Gaul, Ulrike

    2004-09-01

    The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross-) regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules) with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a uniform set of

  2. Transcriptional Control in the Segmentation Gene Network of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fan, HongQing; Unnerstall, Ulrich; Emberly, Eldon; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Siggia, Eric D

    2004-01-01

    The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross-) regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules) with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a uniform set of

  3. Hsp27 gene in Drosophila ananassae subgroup was split by a recently acquired intron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Kang, Han; Jin, Shan; Zeng, Qing Tao; Yang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    In Drosophila, heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a critical single-copy intron-free nuclear gene involved in the defense response against fungi and bacteria, and is a regulator of adult lifespan. In the present study, 33 homologous Hsp27 nucleotide sequences from different Drosophila species were amplified by PCR and reverse transcription PCR, and the phylogenetic relationships were analysed using neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods. The phylogenetic topologies from analysis with different algorithms were similar, suggesting that the Hsp27 gene was split by a recently acquired intron during the evolution of the Drosophila ananassae subgroup. PMID:27350667

  4. Identification of novel regulatory factor X (RFX) target genes by comparative genomics in Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Efimenko, Evgeni; Grenier, Guillaume; Bissett, Ryan; Cortier, Elisabeth; Rolland, Vivien; Swoboda, Peter; Durand, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    Background Regulatory factor X (RFX) transcription factors play a key role in ciliary assembly in nematode, Drosophila and mouse. Using the tremendous advantages of comparative genomics in closely related species, we identified novel genes regulated by dRFX in Drosophila. Results We first demonstrate that a subset of known ciliary genes in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila are regulated by dRFX and have a conserved RFX binding site (X-box) in their promoters in two highly divergent Drosophila species. We then designed an X-box consensus sequence and carried out a genome wide computer screen to identify novel genes under RFX control. We found 412 genes that share a conserved X-box upstream of the ATG in both species, with 83 genes presenting a more restricted consensus. We analyzed 25 of these 83 genes, 16 of which are indeed RFX target genes. Two of them have never been described as involved in ciliogenesis. In addition, reporter construct expression analysis revealed that three of the identified genes encode proteins specifically localized in ciliated endings of Drosophila sensory neurons. Conclusion Our X-box search strategy led to the identification of novel RFX target genes in Drosophila that are involved in sensory ciliogenesis. We also established a highly valuable Drosophila cilia and basal body dataset. These results demonstrate the accuracy of the X-box screen and will be useful for the identification of candidate genes for human ciliopathies, as several human homologs of RFX target genes are known to be involved in diseases, such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome. PMID:17875208

  5. Core Promoter Functions in the Regulation of Gene Expression of Drosophila Dorsal Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NFκB homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes. PMID:24634215

  6. Domesticated retroviral GAG gene in Drosophila: new functions for an old gene.

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Kuzmin, I V; Makhnovskii, P A; Kim, A I

    2014-02-01

    The domestication of foreign genes is a powerful mechanism for new gene formation and genome evolution. It is known that domesticated retroviral gag genes in mammals not only take part in protecting against viral infection but also control cell division, apoptosis, function of the placenta, and other biological processes. In this study, we focused on the domesticated retroviral gag gene homolog (Grp) in the Drosophila melanogaster genome. According to the results of a bioinformatic analysis, the Grp gene product is primarily under purifying selection in Drosophilidae family. The Grp protein has been shown to be transmembrane. The Grp gene is expressed at the adult stage of D. melanogaster in gender-specific and tissue-specific manner. Also the Grp gene expression is increased in response to the gypsy retrovirus. A function of the protein as a component of the endosomic membrane is considered. PMID:24503082

  7. Spatiotemporal gene expression targeting with the TARGET and gene-switch systems in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Sean E; Mao, Zhengmei; Davis, Ronald L

    2004-02-17

    Targeted gene expression has become a standard technique for the study of biological questions in Drosophila. Until recently, transgene expression could be targeted in the dimension of either time or space, but not both. Several new systems have recently been developed to direct transgene expression simultaneously in both time and space. We describe here two such systems that we developed in our laboratory. The first system provides a general method for temporal and regional gene expression targeting (TARGET) with the conventional GAL4-upstream activator sequence (UAS) system and a temperature-sensitive GAL80 molecule, which represses GAL4 transcriptional activity at permissive temperatures. The second system, termed Gene-Switch, is based on a GAL4-progesterone receptor chimera that is hormone-inducible. We have used both systems for simultaneous spatial and temporal rescue of memory dysfunction in the rutabaga (rut) memory mutant of Drosophila. In this protocol, we provide guidelines for the use of these two novel systems, which should have general utility in studying Drosophila biology and in using the fly as a model for human disease. PMID:14970377

  8. Evolution in the Fast Lane: Rapidly Evolving Sex-Related Genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Haerty, Wilfried; Jagadeeshan, Santosh; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Wong, Alex; Ravi Ram, Kristipati; Sirot, Laura K.; Levesque, Lisa; Artieri, Carlo G.; Wolfner, Mariana F.; Civetta, Alberto; Singh, Rama S.

    2007-01-01

    A large portion of the annotated genes in Drosophila melanogaster show sex-biased expression, indicating that sex and reproduction-related genes (SRR genes) represent an appreciable component of the genome. Previous studies, in which subsets of genes were compared among few Drosophila species, have found that SRR genes exhibit unusual evolutionary patterns. Here, we have used the newly released genome sequences from 12 Drosophila species, coupled to a larger set of SRR genes, to comprehensively test the generality of these patterns. Among 2505 SRR genes examined, including ESTs with biased expression in reproductive tissues and genes characterized as involved in gametogenesis, we find that a relatively high proportion of SRR genes have experienced accelerated divergence throughout the genus Drosophila. Several testis-specific genes, male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs), and spermatogenesis genes show lineage-specific bursts of accelerated evolution and positive selection. SFP genes also show evidence of lineage-specific gene loss and/or gain. These results bring us closer to understanding the details of the evolutionary dynamics of SRR genes with respect to species divergence. PMID:18039869

  9. Isolation and characterization of the dopa decarboxylase gene of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, J; Davidson, N

    1981-01-01

    We have isolated chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid clones containing the Drosophila dopa decarboxylase gene. We describe an isolation procedure which can be applied to other nonabundantly expressed Drosophila genes. The dopa decarboxylase gene lies within or very near polytene chromosome band 37C1-2. The gene is interrupted by at least one intron, and the primary mode of regulation is pretranslational. At least two additional sequences hybridized by in vivo ribonucleic acid-derived probes are found within a 35-kilobase region surrounding the gene. The developmental profile of ribonucleic acid transcribed from one of these regions differs from that of the dopa decarboxylase transcript. Images PMID:6086012

  10. Dopamine Dynamics and Signaling in Drosophila: An Overview of Genes, Drugs and Behavioral Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Seto, Elaine S.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in dopamine (DA) signaling have been implicated in a number of human neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Similarly, defects in DA signaling in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have also been associated with several behavioral defects. As most genes involved in DA synthesis, transport, secretion, and signaling are conserved between species, Drosophila is a powerful genetic model organism to study the regulation of DA signaling in vivo. In this review, we will provide an overview of the genes and drugs that regulate DA biology in Drosophila. Furthermore, we will discuss the behavioral paradigms that are regulated by DA signaling in flies. By analyzing the genes and neuronal circuits that govern such behaviors using sophisticated genetic, pharmacologic, electrophysiologic, and imaging approaches in Drosophila, we will likely gain a better understanding about how this neuromodulator regulates motor tasks and cognition in humans. PMID:24770636

  11. Genetic analysis of the Drosophila Gs(alpha) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, W J; Hoskote, A; Roberts, I J; Jackson, S; Forte, M

    2001-01-01

    One of the best understood signal transduction pathways activated by receptors containing seven transmembrane domains involves activation of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes containing Gs(alpha), the subsequent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, production of cAMP, activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and the phosphorylation of substrates that control a wide variety of cellular responses. Here, we report the identification of "loss-of-function" mutations in the Drosophila Gs(alpha) gene (dgs). Seven mutants have been identified that are either complemented by transgenes representing the wild-type dgs gene or contain nucleotide sequence changes resulting in the production of altered Gs(alpha) protein. Examination of mutant alleles representing loss-of-Gs(alpha) function indicates that the phenotypes generated do not mimic those created by mutational elimination of PKA. These results are consistent with the conclusion reached in previous studies that activation of PKA, at least in these developmental contexts, does not depend on receptor-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP, in contrast to the predictions of models developed primarily on the basis of studies in cultured cells. PMID:11454767

  12. Characterization of the Mus308 Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, E. A.; Henderson, D. S.; Rinehart, J. E.; Boyd, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Among the available mutagen-sensitive mutations in Drosophila, those at the mus308 locus are unique in conferring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents but not to monofunctional agents. Those mutations are also associated with an elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations, altered DNA metabolism and the modification of a deoxyribonuclease. This spectrum of phenotypes is shared with selected mammalian mutations including Fanconi anemia in humans. In anticipation of the molecular characterization of the mus308 gene, it has been localized cytogenetically to 87C9-87D1,2 on the right arm of chromosome three. Nine new mutant alleles of the gene have been generated by X-ray mutagenesis and one was recovered following hybrid dysgenesis. Characterization of these new alleles has uncovered additional phenotypes of mutations at this locus. Homozygous mus308 flies that have survived moderate mutagen treatment exhibit an altered wing position that is correlated with reduced flight ability and an altered mitochondrial morphology. In addition, observations of elevated embryo mortality are potentially explained by an aberrant distribution of nuclear material in early embryos which is similar to that seen in the mutant giant nuclei. PMID:8417992

  13. Characterization of the mus308 gene in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, E.A.; Henderson, D.S.; Rinehart, J.E.; Boyd, J.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Among the available mutagen-sensitive mutations in Drosophila, those at the mus3O8 locus are unique in conferring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents but not to monofunctional agents. Those mutations are also associated with an elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations, altered DNA metabolism and the modification of a deoxyribonuclease. This spectrum of phenotypes is shared with selected mammalian mutations including Fanconi anemia in humans. In anticipation of the molecular characterization of the mus3O8 gene, it has been localized cytogenetically to 87C9-87D1,2 on the right arm of chromosome three. Nine new mutant alleles of the gene have been generated by X-ray mutagenesis and one was recovered following hybrid dysgenesis. Characterization of these new alleles has uncovered additional phenotypes of mutations at this locus. Homozygous mus3O8 flies that have survived moderate mutagen treatment exhibit an altered wing position that is correlated with reduced flight ability and an altered mitochondrial morphology. In addition, observations of elevated embryo mortality are potentially explained by an aberrant distribution of nuclear material in early embryos which is similar to that seen in the mutant giant nuclei.

  14. Cloning, characterization, and embryonic expression analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster gene encoding insulin/relaxin-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Barrette, Terry; Cheng, Michael M; Thomas, Pamela M; Nikitin, Alexey G

    2002-07-12

    Insulin is one of the key peptide hormones that regulates growth and metabolism in vertebrates. Evolutionary conservation of many elements of the insulin/IGF signaling network makes it possible to study the basic genetic function of this pathway in lower metazoan models such as Drosophila. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the gene for Drosophila insulin/relaxin-like peptide (DIRLP). The predicted protein structure of DIRLP greatly resembles typical insulin structure and contains features that differentiate it from the Drosophila juvenile hormone, another member of the insulin family. The Dirlp gene is represented as a single copy in the Drosophila melanogaster genome (compared to multiple copies for Drosophila juvenile hormone) and shows evolutionary conservation of genetic structure. The gene was mapped to the Drosophila chromosome 3, region 67D2. In situ hybridization of whole-mount Drosophila embryos with Dirlp antisense RNA probe reveals early embryonic mesodermal/ventral furrow expression pattern, consistent with earlier observation of the insulin protein immunoreactivity in Drosophila embryos. The in situ hybridization pattern was found to be identical to that obtained during immunohistochemistry analysis of the Drosophila embryos using various insulin monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies that do not recognize Drosophila juvenile hormone, supporting the idea that Dirlp is a possible Drosophila insulin ortholog. Identification of the gene for DIRLP provides a new approach for study of the regulatory pathway of the insulin family of peptides. PMID:12150949

  15. A novel circadianly expressed Drosophila melanogaster gene dependent on the period gene for its rhythmic expression.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, R N; Krasnow, M A

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster period (per) gene is required for expression of endogenous circadian rhythms of locomotion and eclosion. per mRNA is expressed with a circadian rhythm that is dependent on Per protein; this feedback loop has been proposed to be essential to the central circadian pacemaker. This model would suggest the Per protein also controls the circadian expression of other genetic loci to generate circadian behavior and physiology. In this paper we describe Dreg-5, a gene whose mRNA is expressed in fly heads with a circadian rhythm nearly identical to that of the per gene. Dreg-5 mRNA continues to cycle in phase with that of per mRNA in conditions of total darkness and also when the daily feeding time is altered. Like per mRNA, Dreg-5 mRNA is not expressed rhythmically in per null mutant flies. Dreg-5 encodes a novel 298 residue protein and Dreg-5 protein isoforms also oscillate in abundance with a circadian rhythm. The phase of Dreg-5 protein oscillation, however, is different from that of Per protein expression, suggesting that Dreg-5 and per have common translational but different post-translational control mechanisms. These results demonstrate that the per gene is capable of modulating the rhythmic expression of other genes; this activity may form the basis of the output of circadian rhythmicity in Drosophila. Images PMID:8612586

  16. Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Zhang, Peili; Liu, Jing; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catharine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenée; Verduzco, Daniel; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    We have sequenced the genome of a second Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and compared this to the genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster, a primary model organism. Throughout evolution the vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same chromosome arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled, leading to a minimum of 921 syntenic blocks shared between the species. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 25–55 million years (Myr) since the pseudoobscura/melanogaster divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome-wide average, consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than random and nearby sequences between the species—but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila. PMID:15632085

  17. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster and Vector Mosquito Developmental Genes

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Susanta K.; Haugen, Morgan; Flannery, Ellen; Sarro, Joseph; Tessier, Charles R.; Severson, David W.; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Genome sequencing projects have presented the opportunity for analysis of developmental genes in three vector mosquito species: Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles gambiae. A comparative genomic analysis of developmental genes in Drosophila melanogaster and these three important vectors of human disease was performed in this investigation. While the study was comprehensive, special emphasis centered on genes that 1) are components of developmental signaling pathways, 2) regulate fundamental developmental processes, 3) are critical for the development of tissues of vector importance, 4) function in developmental processes known to have diverged within insects, and 5) encode microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate developmental transcripts in Drosophila. While most fruit fly developmental genes are conserved in the three vector mosquito species, several genes known to be critical for Drosophila development were not identified in one or more mosquito genomes. In other cases, mosquito lineage-specific gene gains with respect to D. melanogaster were noted. Sequence analyses also revealed that numerous repetitive sequences are a common structural feature of Drosophila and mosquito developmental genes. Finally, analysis of predicted miRNA binding sites in fruit fly and mosquito developmental genes suggests that the repertoire of developmental genes targeted by miRNAs is species-specific. The results of this study provide insight into the evolution of developmental genes and processes in dipterans and other arthropods, serve as a resource for those pursuing analysis of mosquito development, and will promote the design and refinement of functional analysis experiments. PMID:21754989

  18. Recurrent Tandem Gene Duplication Gave Rise to Functionally Divergent Genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Long, Manyuan

    2008-01-01

    Tandem gene duplication is one of the major gene duplication mechanisms in eukaryotes, as illustrated by the prevalence of gene family clusters. Tandem duplicated paralogs usually share the same regulatory element, and as a consequence, they are likely to perform similar biological functions. Here, we provide an example of a newly evolved tandem duplicate acquiring novel functions, which were driven by positive selection. CG32708, CG32706, and CG6999 are 3 clustered genes residing in the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. CG6999 and CG32708 have been examined for their molecular population genetic properties (Thornton and Long 2005). We further investigated the evolutionary forces acting on these genes with greater sample sizes and a broader approach that incorporate between-species divergence, using more variety of statistical methods. We explored the possible functional implications by characterizing the tissue-specific and developmental expression patterns of these genes. Sequence comparison of species within D. melanogaster subgroup reveals that this 3-gene cluster was created by 2 rounds of tandem gene duplication in the last 5 Myr. Based on phylogenetic analysis, CG32708 is clearly the parental copy that is shared by all species. CG32706 appears to have originated in the ancestor of Drosophila simulans and D. melanogaster about 5 Mya, and CG6999 is the newest duplicate that is unique to D. melanogaster. All 3 genes have different expression profiles, and CG6999 has in addition acquired a novel transcript. Biased polymorphism frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium, nucleotide substitution, and McDonald–Kreitman analyses suggested that the evolution of CG6999 and CG32706 were driven by positive Darwinian selection. PMID:18408233

  19. Molecular Characterization of Neurally Expressing Genes in the Para Sodium Channel Gene Cluster of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hong, C. S.; Ganetzky, B.

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms regulating expression of para, which encodes the major class of sodium channels in the Drosophila nervous system, we have tried to locate upstream cis-acting regulatory elements by mapping the transcriptional start site and analyzing the region immediately upstream of para in region 14D of the polytene chromosomes. From these studies, we have discovered that the region contains a cluster of neurally expressing genes. Here we report the molecular characterization of the genomic organization of the 14D region and the genes within this region, which are: calnexin (Cnx), actin related protein 14D (Arp14D), calcineurin A 14D (CnnA14D), and chromosome associated protein (Cap). The tight clustering of these genes, their neuronal expression patterns, and their potential functions related to expression, modulation, or regulation of sodium channels raise the possibility that these genes represent a functionally related group sharing some coordinate regulatory mechanism. PMID:8849894

  20. A Drosophila muscle-specific gene related to the mouse quaking locus.

    PubMed

    Fyrberg, C; Becker, J; Barthmaier, P; Mahaffey, J; Fyrberg, E

    1997-09-15

    We have characterized a novel muscle-specific gene of Drosophila melanogaster, defined by enhancer trap strain 24B of Brand and Perrimon (1993). We show that transcripts of the gene accumulate within presumptive mesoderm and persist within developing muscles, strongly suggesting that the encoded protein is involved in muscle cell determination and differentiation. cDNA sequences reveal that the Drosophila protein is similar to quaking (64% identity over 210 amino acids), a protein essential for mouse embryogenesis, and gld-1 (53% identity over 162 amino acids) a germ-line-specific tumor suppressing protein of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that the Drosophila gene resides within the 93F chromosome subdivision, and describe its physical map. Finally, we have used the gene, which we have named quaking-related 93F (qkr93F), to identify a family of closely related KH domains. PMID:9332381

  1. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A M; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes. PMID:26385968

  2. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A. M.; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes. PMID:26385968

  3. Dynamics of Wolbachia pipientis Gene Expression Across the Drosophila melanogaster Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gutzwiller, Florence; Carmo, Catarina R.; Miller, Danny E.; Rice, Danny W.; Newton, Irene L. G.; Hawley, R. Scott; Teixeira, Luis; Bergman, Casey M.

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic interactions between microbes and their multicellular hosts have manifold biological consequences. To better understand how bacteria maintain symbiotic associations with animal hosts, we analyzed genome-wide gene expression for the endosymbiotic α-proteobacteria Wolbachia pipientis across the entire life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster. We found that the majority of Wolbachia genes are expressed stably across the D. melanogaster life cycle, but that 7.8% of Wolbachia genes exhibit robust stage- or sex-specific expression differences when studied in the whole-organism context. Differentially-expressed Wolbachia genes are typically up-regulated after Drosophila embryogenesis and include many bacterial membrane, secretion system, and ankyrin repeat-containing proteins. Sex-biased genes are often organized as small operons of uncharacterized genes and are mainly up-regulated in adult Drosophila males in an age-dependent manner. We also systematically investigated expression levels of previously-reported candidate genes thought to be involved in host-microbe interaction, including those in the WO-A and WO-B prophages and in the Octomom region, which has been implicated in regulating bacterial titer and pathogenicity. Our work provides comprehensive insight into the developmental dynamics of gene expression for a widespread endosymbiont in its natural host context, and shows that public gene expression data harbor rich resources to probe the functional basis of the Wolbachia-Drosophila symbiosis and annotate the transcriptional outputs of the Wolbachia genome. PMID:26497146

  4. Mental Retardation Genes in Drosophila: New Approaches to Understanding and Treating Developmental Brain Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restifo, Linda L.

    2005-01-01

    "Drosophila melanogaster" is emerging as a valuable genetic model system for the study of mental retardation (MR). MR genes are remarkably similar between humans and fruit flies. Cognitive behavioral assays can detect reductions in learning and memory in flies with mutations in MR genes. Neuroanatomical methods, including some at single-neuron…

  5. Comparison of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) nuclear genes in the genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila pseudoobscura and Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Tripoli, Gaetano; D'Elia, Domenica; Barsanti, Paolo; Caggese, Corrado

    2005-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic cells, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) uses the products of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes to generate cellular ATP. Interspecies comparative analysis of these genes, which appear to be under strong functional constraints, may shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms that act on a set of genes correlated by function and subcellular localization of their products. Results We have identified and annotated the Drosophila melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura and Anopheles gambiae orthologs of 78 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation by a comparative analysis of their genomic sequences and organization. We have also identified 47 genes in these three dipteran species each of which shares significant sequence homology with one of the above-mentioned OXPHOS orthologs, and which are likely to have originated by duplication during evolution. Gene structure and intron length are essentially conserved in the three species, although gain or loss of introns is common in A. gambiae. In most tissues of D. melanogaster and A. gambiae the expression level of the duplicate gene is much lower than that of the original gene, and in D. melanogaster at least, its expression is almost always strongly testis-biased, in contrast to the soma-biased expression of the parent gene. Conclusions Quickly achieving an expression pattern different from the parent genes may be required for new OXPHOS gene duplicates to be maintained in the genome. This may be a general evolutionary mechanism for originating phenotypic changes that could lead to species differentiation. PMID:15693940

  6. Expression of Human Gaucher Disease Gene GBA Generates Neurodevelopmental Defects and ER Stress in Drosophila Eye

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kumpei; Hanai, Shuji; Aizawa, Hidenobu; Kato, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Terumi; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Tsuji, Shoji; Ishida, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common of the lysosomal storage disorders and is caused by defects in the GBA gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase). The accumulation of its substrate, glucocylceramide (GlcCer) is considered the main cause of GD. We found here that the expression of human mutated GlcCerase gene (hGBA) that is associated with neuronopathy in GD patients causes neurodevelopmental defects in Drosophila eyes. The data indicate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was elevated in Drosophila eye carrying mutated hGBAs by using of the ER stress markers dXBP1 and dBiP. We also found that Ambroxol, a potential pharmacological chaperone for mutated hGBAs, can alleviate the neuronopathic phenotype through reducing ER stress. We demonstrate a novel mechanism of neurodevelopmental defects mediated by ER stress through expression of mutants of human GBA gene in the eye of Drosophila. PMID:23936319

  7. Evolutionary Genomics of Genes Involved in Olfactory Behavior in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Nicolás; Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Hernán; Hasson, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Previous comparative genomic studies of genes involved in olfactory behavior in Drosophila focused only on particular gene families such as odorant receptor and/or odorant binding proteins. However, olfactory behavior has a complex genetic architecture that is orchestrated by many interacting genes. In this paper, we present a comparative genomic study of olfactory behavior in Drosophila including an extended set of genes known to affect olfactory behavior. We took advantage of the recent burst of whole genome sequences and the development of powerful statistical tools to analyze genomic data and test evolutionary and functional hypotheses of olfactory genes in the six species of the Drosophila melanogaster species group for which whole genome sequences are available. Our study reveals widespread purifying selection and limited incidence of positive selection on olfactory genes. We show that the pace of evolution of olfactory genes is mostly independent of the life cycle stage, and of the number of life cycle stages, in which they participate in olfaction. However, we detected a relationship between evolutionary rates and the position that the gene products occupy in the olfactory system, genes occupying central positions tend to be more constrained than peripheral genes. Finally, we demonstrate that specialization to one host does not seem to be associated with bursts of adaptive evolution in olfactory genes in D. sechellia and D. erecta, the two specialists species analyzed, but rather different lineages have idiosyncratic evolutionary histories in which both historical and ecological factors have been involved. PMID:22346339

  8. Hybrid Lethal Systems in the Drosophila Melanogaster Species Complex. I. the Maternal Hybrid Rescue (Mhr) Gene of Drosophila Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Sawamura, K.; Taira, T.; Watanabe, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid females from Drosophila simulans females X Drosophila melanogaster males die as embryos while hybrid males from the reciprocal cross die as late larvae. The other two classes are sterile adults. Letting C, X, and Y designate egg cytoplasm, X, and Y chromosomes, respectively, and subscripts m and s stand for melanogaster and simulans, C(m)X(m)Y(s) males are lethal in the larval stage and are rescued by the previously reported genes, Lhr (Lethal hybrid rescue) in simulans or Hmr (Hybrid male rescue) in melanogaster. We report here another rescue gene located on the second chromosome of simulans, mhr (maternal hybrid rescue) that, when present in the mother, rescues C(s)X(m)X(s) females from embryonic lethality. It has been postulated that the hybrids not carrying the X(s) like C(m)X(m)Y(s) males are larval lethal and that the hybrids carrying both the C(s) and the X(m) like C(s)X(m)X(s) females are embryonic lethal. According to these postulates C(s)X(m)Y(s) males (obtained by mating attached-X simulans females to melanogaster males) should be doubly lethal, at both embryo and larval stages. When both rescuing genes are present, Hmr in the father and mhr in the mother, males of this genotype are fully viable, as predicted. PMID:8436276

  9. Further Characterization of the Odysseus Locus of Hybrid Sterility in Drosophila: One Gene Is Not Enough

    PubMed Central

    Perez, D. E.; Wu, C. I.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we mapped by genetical and molecular means a gene that contributes to hybrid-male sterility between Drosophila mauritiana and D. simulans to the cytological interval of 16D. In this report, we refine the mapping of this gene, Odysseus (Ods) and show that it can be delineated to a region the size of an average gene. We further demonstrate that, while Ods appears to be a discrete element, it requires other nearby gene(s) to be cointrogressed to confer full hybrid sterility effect. This observation is in agreement with the view that reproductive isolation between closely related species of Drosophila is usually caused by several genes of weak effect from the same species that interact strongly among themselves as well as with the foreign genetic background. PMID:7635285

  10. The evolution of courtship behaviors through the origination of a new gene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongzheng; Chen, Ying; Chen, Sidi; Mao, Qiyan; Kennedy, David; Landback, Patrick; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Du, Wei; Long, Manyuan

    2008-01-01

    New genes can originate by the combination of sequences from unrelated genes or their duplicates to form a chimeric structure. These chimeric genes often evolve rapidly, suggesting that they undergo adaptive evolution and may therefore be involved in novel phenotypes. Their functions, however, are rarely known. Here, we describe the phenotypic effects of a chimeric gene, sphinx, that has recently evolved in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that a knockout of this gene leads to increased male–male courtship in D. melanogaster, although it leaves other aspects of mating behavior unchanged. Comparative studies of courtship behavior in other closely related Drosophila species suggest that this mutant phenotype of male–male courtship is the ancestral condition because these related species show much higher levels of male–male courtship than D. melanogaster. D. melanogaster therefore seems to have evolved in its courtship behaviors by the recruitment of a new chimeric gene. PMID:18508971

  11. Evolution of Three Parent Genes and Their Retrogene Copies in Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Ryan S.; Clark, Denise V.

    2013-01-01

    Retrogenes form a class of gene duplicate lacking the regulatory sequences found outside of the mRNA-coding regions of the parent gene. It is not clear how a retrogene's lack of parental regulatory sequences affects the evolution of the gene pair. To explore the evolution of parent genes and retrogenes, we investigated three such gene pairs in the family Drosophilidae; in Drosophila melanogaster, these gene pairs are CG8331 and CG4960, CG17734 and CG11825, and Sep2 and Sep5. We investigated the embryonic expression patterns of these gene pairs across multiple Drosophila species. Expression patterns of the parent genes and their single copy orthologs are relatively conserved across species, whether or not a species has a retrogene copy, although there is some variation in CG8331 and CG17734. In contrast, expression patterns of the retrogene orthologs have diversified. We used the genome sequences of 20 Drosophila species to investigate coding sequence evolution. The coding sequences of the three gene pairs appear to be evolving predominantly under negative selection; however, the parent genes and retrogenes show some distinct differences in amino acid sequence. Therefore, in general, retrogene expression patterns and coding sequences are distinct compared to their parents and, in some cases, retrogene expression patterns diversify. PMID:23841016

  12. Evidence for gene conversion in the amylase multigene family of Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Popadić, A; Anderson, W W

    1995-07-01

    The alpha-amylase (Amy) multigene family in Drosophila pseudoobscura is located on the third chromosome, which is polymorphic for more than 40 inverted gene arrangements. The number of copies in this family ranges from one to three, depending on the arrangement in question. A previous study of the three Amy genes from the Standard (ST) arrangement suggested either that duplicated copies (Amy2 and Amy3) are functionally constrained or that they are undergoing gene conversion with Amy1. In order to elucidate further the pattern of molecular evolution in this family, we cloned and sequenced four additional Amy genes, two from the Santa Cruz (SC) and two from the Chiricahua (CH) gene arrangement. Of the two alternatives, only the hypothesis of gene conversion is supported by the sequence analysis. The homogenization effect of gene conversion has been strongest in SC, whose copies differ by only two nucleotides, less noticeable in ST, and negligible in the CH. Furthermore, the action of gene conversion is apparently localized, occurring only in the coding region. Interestingly, these results concur with the findings of other workers for the duplicated Amy genes in the Drosophila melanogaster group. Thus, the occurrence of gene conversion in the Amy multigene family seems to be a common feature in the Drosophila species studied so far. PMID:7659012

  13. Nitric oxide directly regulates gene expression during Drosophila development: need some gas to drive into metamorphosis?

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Naoki; O'Connor, Michael B

    2011-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger involved in numerous biological processes, but how it regulates gene expression is not well understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, Cáceres and colleagues (pp. 1476-1485) report a critical requirement of NO as a direct regulator of gene expression through its binding to a heme-containing nuclear receptor in Drosophila. This may be an anciently evolved mechanism to coordinate behavior and metabolism during animal development. PMID:21764850

  14. Structure and expression of the Drosophila ubiquitin-52-amino-acid fusion-protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, H L; Barrio, R; Arribas, C

    1992-01-01

    Ubiquitin belongs to a multigene family. In Drosophila two members of this family have been previously described. We report here the organization and expression of a third member, the DUb52 gene, isolated by screening a Drosophila melanogaster genomic library. This gene encodes an ubiquitin monomer fused to a 52-amino acid extension protein. There are no introns interrupting the coding sequence. Recently, it has been described that this extension encodes a ribosomal protein in Saccharomyces, Dictyostelium, and Arabidopsis. The present results show that the 5' regulatory region of DUb52 shares common features with the ribosomal protein genes of Drosophila, Xenopus and mouse, including GC- and pyrimidine-rich regions. Moreover, sequences similar to the consensus Ribo-box in Neurospora crassa have been identified. Furthermore, a sequence has been found that is similar to the binding site for the TFIIIA distal element factor from Xenopus laevis. The DUb52 gene is transcribed to a 0.9 kb mRNA that is expressed constitutively throughout development and is particularly abundant in ovaries. In addition, the DUb52 gene has been found to be preferentially transcribed in exponentially growing Drosophila cells. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1381584

  15. Molecular Evolution of Drosophila Germline Stem Cell and Neural Stem Cell Regulating Genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Aquadro, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we study the molecular evolution of a near complete set of genes that had functional evidence in the regulation of the Drosophila germline and neural stem cell. Some of these genes have previously been shown to be rapidly evolving by positive selection raising the possibility that stem cell genes as a group have elevated signatures of positive selection. Using recent Drosophila comparative genome sequences and population genomic sequences of Drosophila melanogaster, we have investigated both long- and short-term evolution occurring across these two different stem cell systems, and compared them with a carefully chosen random set of genes to represent the background rate of evolution. Our results showed an excess of genes with evidence of a recent selective sweep in both germline and neural stem cells in D. melanogaster. However compared with their control genes, both stem cell systems had no significant excess of genes with long-term recurrent positive selection in D. melanogaster, or across orthologous sequences from the melanogaster group. The evidence of long-term positive selection was limited to a subset of genes with specific functions in both the germline and neural stem cell system. PMID:26507797

  16. Tenm, a Drosophila gene related to tenascin, is a new pair-rule gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, S; Martin, D; Hagios, C; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe the molecular characterization of the Drosophila gene tenm, a large transcription unit spanning > 110 kb of DNA. tenm encodes a large extracellular protein of 2515 amino acids related to the extracellular matrix molecule tenascin. The Tenm protein is found in seven stripes during the blastoderm stage, and each stripe overlaps with the even-skipped stripes. tenm mutants show a phenotype resembling that of odd-paired (opa), a member of the pair-rule class of segmentation genes. Thus, Tenm is the first example of a pair-rule gene product acting from outside the cell. While the Tenm protein is under the control of fushi tarazu and even-skipped, but not of opa, at least two pair-rule genes, paired (prd) and sloppy paired (slp), and all segment-polarity genes analysed to date are under the control of tenm. Our data suggest that Tenm initiates a signal transduction cascade which acts, via or in concert with opa, on downstream targets such as prd, slp, gooseberry, engrailed and wingless, leading to an opa-like phenotype. Images PMID:8070401

  17. Mapping Linked Genes in "Drosophila Melanogaster" Using Data from the F2 Generation of a Dihybrid Cross

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    "Drosophila melanogaster" is a commonly utilized organism for testing hypotheses about inheritance of traits. Students in both high school and university labs study the genetics of inheritance by analyzing offspring of appropriate "Drosophila" crosses to determine inheritance patterns, including gene linkage. However, most genetics investigations…

  18. The pink gene encodes the Drosophila orthologue of the human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (HPS5) gene.

    PubMed

    Syrzycka, Monika; McEachern, Lori A; Kinneard, Jennifer; Prabhu, Kristel; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen; Schulze, Sandra; Rawls, John M; Lloyd, Vett K; Sinclair, Donald A R; Honda, Barry M

    2007-06-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) consists of a set of human autosomal recessive disorders, with symptoms resulting from defects in genes required for protein trafficking in lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes and platelet dense granules. A number of human HPS genes and rodent orthologues have been identified whose protein products are key components of 1 of 4 different protein complexes (AP-3 or BLOC-1, -2, and -3) that are key participants in the process. Drosophila melanogaster has been a key model organism in demonstrating the in vivo significance of many genes involved in protein trafficking pathways; for example, mutations in the "granule group" genes lead to changes in eye colour arising from improper protein trafficking to pigment granules in the developing eye. An examination of the chromosomal positioning of Drosophila HPS gene orthologues suggested that CG9770, the Drosophila HPS5 orthologue, might correspond to the pink locus. Here we confirm this gene assignment, making pink the first eye colour gene in flies to be identified as a BLOC complex gene. PMID:17632576

  19. Functional Evolution of cis-Regulatory Modules at a Homeotic Gene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Benjamin J.; Bae, Esther; Tran, Diana A.; Shur, Andrey S.; Allen, John M.; Rau, Christoph; Bender, Welcome; Fisher, William W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Drewell, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    It is a long-held belief in evolutionary biology that the rate of molecular evolution for a given DNA sequence is inversely related to the level of functional constraint. This belief holds true for the protein-coding homeotic (Hox) genes originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the Hox genes in Drosophila embryos is essential for body patterning and is controlled by an extensive array of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). How the regulatory modules functionally evolve in different species is not clear. A comparison of the CRMs for the Abdominal-B gene from different Drosophila species reveals relatively low levels of overall sequence conservation. However, embryonic enhancer CRMs from other Drosophila species direct transgenic reporter gene expression in the same spatial and temporal patterns during development as their D. melanogaster orthologs. Bioinformatic analysis reveals the presence of short conserved sequences within defined CRMs, representing gap and pair-rule transcription factor binding sites. One predicted binding site for the gap transcription factor KRUPPEL in the IAB5 CRM was found to be altered in Superabdominal (Sab) mutations. In Sab mutant flies, the third abdominal segment is transformed into a copy of the fifth abdominal segment. A model for KRUPPEL-mediated repression at this binding site is presented. These findings challenge our current understanding of the relationship between sequence evolution at the molecular level and functional activity of a CRM. While the overall sequence conservation at Drosophila CRMs is not distinctive from neighboring genomic regions, functionally critical transcription factor binding sites within embryonic enhancer CRMs are highly conserved. These results have implications for understanding mechanisms of gene expression during embryonic development, enhancer function, and the molecular evolution of eukaryotic regulatory modules. PMID:19893611

  20. Eukaryotic operon-like transcription of functionally related genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shahar, Yehuda; Nannapaneni, Kishore; Casavant, Thomas L.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Complex biological processes require coordinated function of many genes. One evolutionary solution to the problem of coordinately expressing functionally related genes in bacteria and nematodes is organization of genes in operons. Surprisingly, eukaryotic operons are considered rare outside the nematode lineage. In Drosophila melanogaster, we found lounge lizard (llz), which encodes a degenerin/ENaC cation channel, cotranscribed with CheB42a, a nonhomologous gene of unknown function residing <100 bp upstream. These two genes were transcribed from a single promoter as one primary transcript and were processed posttranscriptionally to generate individual mRNAs. The mechanism did not involve alternative splicing, and it differed from the trans splicing used in nematode operons. Both genes were expressed in the same tissues, and previous work suggested that both may be involved in courtship behavior. A bioinformatic approach identified numerous additional loci as potential Drosophila operons. These data reveal eukaryotic operon-like transcription of functionally related genes in Drosophila. The results also suggest that operon-based transcription may be more common in eukaryotes than previously appreciated. PMID:17190802

  1. Circadian rhythms of female mating activity governed by clock genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Takaomi; Ishida, Norio

    2001-01-01

    The physiological and behavioral activities of many animals are restricted to specific times of the day. The daily fluctuation in the mating activity of some insects is controlled by an endogenous clock, but the genetic mechanism that controls it remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that wild-type Drosophila melanogaster display a robust circadian rhythm in the mating activity, and that these rhythms are abolished in period- or timeless-null mutant flies (per01 and tim01). Circadian rhythms were lost when rhythm mutant females were paired with wild-type males, demonstrating that female mating activity is governed by clock genes. Furthermore, we detected an antiphasic relationship in the circadian rhythms of mating activity between D. melanogaster and its sibling species Drosophila simulans. Female- and species-specific circadian rhythms in the mating activity of Drosophila seem to cause reproductive isolation. PMID:11470898

  2. Dosage Effects of a Drosophila Sodium Channel Gene on Behavior and Axonal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Stern, M.; Kreber, R.; Ganetzky, B.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of para mutations on behavior and axonal excitability in Drosophila suggested that para specifically affects sodium channels. This hypothesis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the para locus, which demonstrates that the encoded para product is a sodium channel polypeptide. Here we characterize the effects of altered para(+) dosage on behavior and axonal excitability, both in an otherwise wild-type background and in combination with two other mutations: nap(ts), which also affects sodium channels, and Sh(KS133), which specifically affects potassium channels. Whereas it was previously shown that decreased dosage of para(+) is unconditionally lethal in a .nap(ts) background, we find that increased dosage of para(+) suppresses nap(ts). Similarly, we find that para hypomorphs or decreased dosage of para(+) suppresses Sh(KS133), whereas increased dosage of para(+) enhances Sh(KS133). The electrophysiological basis for these effects is investigated. Other genes in Drosophila that have sequence homology to sodium channels do not show such dosage effects, which suggests that the para(+) product has a function distinct from that of other putative Drosophila sodium channel genes. We conclude that the number of sodium channels present in at least some Drosophila neurons can be affected by changes in para(+) gene dosage, and that the level of para(+) expression can strongly influence neuronal excitability. PMID:2155153

  3. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    SciTech Connect

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-12-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation.

  4. Molecular Population Genetics of Accessory Gland Protein Genes and Testis-Expressed Genes in Drosophila mojavensis and D. arizonae

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Bradley J.; Begun, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular population genetic investigation of Drosophila male reproductive genes has focused primarily on melanogaster subgroup accessory gland protein genes (Acp's). Consistent with observations from male reproductive genes of numerous taxa, Acp's evolve more rapidly than nonreproductive genes. However, within the Drosophila genus, large data sets from additional types of male reproductive genes and from different species groups are lacking. Here we report findings from a molecular population genetics analysis of male reproductive genes of the repleta group species, Drosophila arizonae and D. mojavensis. We find that Acp's have dramatically higher average pairwise Ka/Ks (0.93) than testis-enriched genes (0.19) and previously reported melanogaster subgroup Acp's (0.42). Overall, 10 of 19 Acp's have Ka/Ks > 1 either in nonpolarized analyses or in at least one lineage of polarized analyses. Of the nine Acp's for which outgroup data were available, average Ka/Ks was considerably higher in D. mojavensis (2.08) than in D. arizonae (0.87). Contrasts of polymorphism and divergence suggest that adaptive protein evolution at Acp's is more common in D. mojavensis than in D. arizonae. PMID:16085702

  5. 2mit, an Intronic Gene of Drosophila melanogaster timeless2, Is Involved in Behavioral Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Benna, Clara; Leonardi, Emanuela; Romoli, Ottavia; Cognolato, Moira; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.; Costa, Rodolfo; Sandrelli, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Background Intronic genes represent ~6% of the total gene complement in Drosophila melanogaster and ~85% of them encode for proteins. We recently characterized the D. melanogaster timeless2 (tim2) gene, showing its active involvement in chromosomal stability and light synchronization of the adult circadian clock. The protein coding gene named 2mit maps on the 11th tim2 intron in the opposite transcriptional orientation. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the molecular and functional characterization of 2mit. The 2mit gene is expressed throughout Drosophila development, localizing mainly in the nervous system during embryogenesis and mostly in the mushroom bodies and ellipsoid body of the central complex in the adult brain. In silico analyses revealed that 2mit encodes a putative leucine-Rich Repeat transmembrane receptor with intrinsically disordered regions, harboring several fully conserved functional interaction motifs in the cytosolic side. Using insertional mutations, tissue-specific over-expression, and down-regulation approaches, it was found that 2mit is implicated in adult short-term memory, assessed by a courtship conditioning assay. In D. melanogaster, tim2 and 2mit do not seem to be functionally related. Bioinformatic analyses identified 2MIT orthologs in 21 Drosophilidae, 4 Lepidoptera and in Apis mellifera. In addition, the tim2-2mit host-nested gene organization was shown to be present in A. mellifera and maintained among Drosophila species. Within the Drosophilidae 2mit-hosting tim2 intron, in silico approaches detected a neuronal specific transcriptional binding site which might have contributed to preserve the specific host-nested gene association across Drosophila species. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate that 2mit, a gene mainly expressed in the nervous system, has a role in the behavioral plasticity of the adult Drosophila. The presence of a putative 2mit regulatory enhancer within the 2mit-hosting tim2

  6. Evidence for the fixation of gene duplications by positive selection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Moreira, Margarida; Arguello, J Roman; Gottipati, Srikanth; Harshman, L G; Grenier, Jennifer K; Clark, Andrew G

    2016-06-01

    Gene duplications play a key role in the emergence of novel traits and in adaptation. But despite their centrality to evolutionary processes, it is still largely unknown how new gene duplicates are initially fixed within populations and later maintained in genomes. Long-standing debates on the evolution of gene duplications could be settled by determining the relative importance of genetic drift vs. positive selection in the fixation of new gene duplicates. Using the Drosophila Global Diversity Lines (GDL), we have combined genome-wide SNP polymorphism data with a novel set of copy number variant calls and gene expression profiles to characterize the polymorphic phase of new genes. We found that approximately half of the roughly 500 new complete gene duplications segregating in the GDL lead to significant increases in the expression levels of the duplicated genes and that these duplications are more likely to be found at lower frequencies, suggesting a negative impact on fitness. However, we also found that six of the nine gene duplications that are fixed or close to fixation in at least one of the five populations in our study show signs of being under positive selection, and that these duplications are likely beneficial because of dosage effects, with a possible role for additional mutations in two duplications. Our work suggests that in Drosophila, theoretical models that posit that gene duplications are immediately beneficial and fixed by positive selection are most relevant to explain the long-term evolution of gene duplications in this species. PMID:27197209

  7. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex

    PubMed Central

    Arbeitman, Michelle N.; New, Felicia N.; Fear, Justin M.; Howard, Tiffany S.; Dalton, Justin E.; Graze, Rita M.

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx) mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation. PMID:27172187

  8. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex.

    PubMed

    Arbeitman, Michelle N; New, Felicia N; Fear, Justin M; Howard, Tiffany S; Dalton, Justin E; Graze, Rita M

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx) mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation. PMID:27172187

  9. Position-Effect Variegation, Heterochromatin Formation, and Gene Silencing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Elgin, Sarah C.R.; Reuter, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) results when a gene normally in euchromatin is juxtaposed with heterochromatin by rearrangement or transposition. When heterochromatin packaging spreads across the heterochromatin/euchromatin border, it causes transcriptional silencing in a stochastic pattern. PEV is intensely studied in Drosophila using the white gene. Screens for dominant mutations that suppress or enhance white variegation have identified many conserved epigenetic factors, including the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase SU(VAR)3-9. Heterochromatin protein HP1a binds H3K9me2/3 and interacts with SU(VAR)3-9, creating a core memory system. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical analysis of PEV in Drosophila has contributed many key findings concerning establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin with concomitant gene silencing. PMID:23906716

  10. From vestigial to vestigial-like: the Drosophila gene that has taken wing.

    PubMed

    Simon, Emilie; Faucheux, Corinne; Zider, Alain; Thézé, Nadine; Thiébaud, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    The members of the vestigial-like gene family have been identified as homologs of the Drosophila vestigial, which is essential to wing formation. All members of the family are characterized by the presence of the TONDU domain, a highly conserved sequence that mediates their interaction with the transcription factors of the TEAD family. Mammals possess four vestigial-like genes that can be subdivided into two classes, depending on the number of Tondu domains present. While vestigial proteins have been studied in great depth in Drosophila, we still have sketchy knowledge of the functions of vestigial-like proteins in vertebrates. Recent studies have unveiled unexpected functions for some of these members and reveal the role they play in the Hippo pathway. Here, we present the current knowledge about vestigial-like family gene members and their functions, together with their identification in different taxa. PMID:27116603

  11. Use of a Drosophila Model to Identify Genes Regulating Plasmodium Growth in the Mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie M.; Jaramillo-Gutierrez, Giovanna; Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Schneider, David S.

    2008-01-01

    We performed a forward genetic screen, using Drosophila as a surrogate mosquito, to identify host factors required for the growth of the avian malaria parasite, Plasmodium gallinaceum. We identified 18 presumed loss-of-function mutants that reduced the growth of the parasite in flies. Presumptive mutation sites were identified in 14 of the mutants on the basis of the insertion site of a transposable element. None of the identified genes have been previously implicated in innate immune responses or interactions with Plasmodium. The functions of five Anopheles gambiae homologs were tested by using RNAi to knock down gene function followed by measuring the growth of the rodent parasite, Plasmodium berghei. Loss of function of four of these genes in the mosquito affected Plasmodium growth, suggesting that Drosophila can be used effectively as a surrogate mosquito to identify relevant host factors in the mosquito. PMID:18791251

  12. Use of a Drosophila model to identify genes regulating Plasmodium growth in the mosquito.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Stephanie M; Jaramillo-Gutierrez, Giovanna; Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Schneider, David S

    2008-11-01

    We performed a forward genetic screen, using Drosophila as a surrogate mosquito, to identify host factors required for the growth of the avian malaria parasite, Plasmodium gallinaceum. We identified 18 presumed loss-of-function mutants that reduced the growth of the parasite in flies. Presumptive mutation sites were identified in 14 of the mutants on the basis of the insertion site of a transposable element. None of the identified genes have been previously implicated in innate immune responses or interactions with Plasmodium. The functions of five Anopheles gambiae homologs were tested by using RNAi to knock down gene function followed by measuring the growth of the rodent parasite, Plasmodium berghei. Loss of function of four of these genes in the mosquito affected Plasmodium growth, suggesting that Drosophila can be used effectively as a surrogate mosquito to identify relevant host factors in the mosquito. PMID:18791251

  13. Identification and characterization of kraken, a gene encoding a putative hydrolytic enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Edwin Chan, H Y; Harris, S J; O'Kane, C J

    1998-11-19

    Kraken, a novel Drosophila gene isolated from a 4-8-h-old Drosophila embryo cDNA library, shows homology to a family of serine hydrolases whose common feature is that they all catalyse breakage of substrates with a carbonyl-containing group. It is a single-copy gene with at least two introns and maps to position 21D on polytene chromosomes. kraken is a member of a conserved gene family. Messenger RNA of kraken is expressed ubiquitously in early embryogenesis. Later, it is concentrated in the foregut and the posterior midgut primordium. Towards the end of embryogenesis, expression of kraken is confined to the gastric caeca. During the third-instar larval stage, kraken is expressed at low levels in the gastric caeca and parts of the gut, and at higher levels in the fat body. We suggest a role for Kraken in detoxification and digestion during embryogenesis and larval development. PMID:9831651

  14. Relationship between organization and function of ribosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Karpen, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    In most eukaryotic organisms, the genes that encode the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNAs (rDNA genes) are tandemly repeated, and are located in constitutive heterochromatin and/or centromeric or telomeric regions. P-element mediated transformation was used to investigate the relationship between rDNA organization and function in Drosophila melanogaster. Tritiated-uridine incorporation under heat shock conditions and in situ hybridization to rRNA were used to demonstrate that a single rDNA gene inserted into euchromatin can be transcribed at a high rate, in polytene nuclei. P-element-mediated transformation of a single Drosophila rDNA gene was also utilized to investigate the ability of ribosomal DNA to organize a nucleolus. Cytological approaches demonstrated that structures resembling the endogenous nucleoli were preferentially associated with four different sites of rDNA insertion, in polytene nuclei. These mini-nucleoli also contained components specific to the nucleolus, as shown by in situ hybridization to rRNA and indirect immunofluorescence with an antibody that binds to Drosophila nucleoli. The transformed genes were able to partially rescue mutant phenotypes due to a deficiency of rDNA, indicating that the mini-nucleoli were functional.

  15. Neurodegenerative mutants in Drosophila: a means to identify genes and mechanisms involved in human diseases?

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Doris

    2005-11-01

    There are 50 ways to leave your lover (Simon 1987) but many more to kill your brain cells. Several neurodegenerative diseases in humans, like Alzheimer's disease, have been intensely studied but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unknown for most of them. For those syndromes where associated gene products have been identified their biochemistry and physiological as well as pathogenic function is often still under debate. This is in part due to the inherent limitations of genetic analyses in humans and other mammals and therefore experimentally accessible invertebrate in vivo models, such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, have recently been introduced to investigate neurodegenerative syndromes. Several laboratories have used transgenic approaches in Drosophila to study the human genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases. This has added substantially to our understanding of the mechanisms leading to neurodegenerative diseases in humans. The isolation and characterization of Drosophila mutants, which display a variety of neurodegenerative phenotypes, also provide valuable insights into genes, pathways, and mechanisms causing neurodegeneration. So far only about two dozen such mutants have been described but already their characterization reveals an involvement of various cellular functions in neurodegeneration, ranging from preventing oxidative stress to RNA editing. Some of the isolated genes can already be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases and hopefully the isolation and characterization of more of these mutants, together with an analysis of homologous genes in vertebrate models, will provide insights into the genetic and molecular basis of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16187075

  16. [Role of DNA repair genes in radiation-induced changes of lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Shilova, L A; Pliusnina, E N; Zemskaia, N V; Moskalev, A A

    2014-01-01

    One of the main effects of various stress factors, including ionizing radiation, is DNA damage. Accumulation of DNA damage and somatic mutations in the somatic tissues is regarded as one of the basic mechanisms of aging. We have developed an approach to the study of molecular and genetic mechanisms of radioadaptation, which is based on the analysis of changes in the lifespan of Drosophila with a transformed genotype. In this study we investigated the radioadaptive response and hormesis by radiation-induced changed of the lifespan of different strains of Drosophila melanogaster, such as a wild type strain Canton-Sand strains with mutations in DNA damage response gene (homologue of GADD45), excision repair genes (homologues of XPF, XPC, PCNA) and double-strand breaks repair genes (homologues of RAD54, XRCC3, BLM). The exposure to irradiation at the dose rate of 40 cGy was performed chronically through the stages of fly development; an acute exposure at the dose rate of 30 Gy was applied to the adult stages of flies. Also, we investigated the resistance to acute gamma-radiation of Drosophila with conditional ubiquitous overexpression of genes that are involved in DNA damage recognition (homologues of GADD45, HUS1, CHK2), excision repair (homologues of XPF, XPC, AP-endonuclease-1) and double-strand break repair (homologues of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80, WRNexo). In the wild type strain Canton-S, manifestation of the radioadaptive response and radiation hormesis were observed. In individuals with DNA repair gene mutations, no radioadaptive response was observed, or observed to a lesser extent than in wild type flies. Mifepristone--inducible transgene activation does not lead to an increase in resistance to acute irradiation by the parameters of lifespan of Drosophila. Overexpression of DNA repair genes led to a sharp decline in lifespan also in the absence of irradiation. PMID:25775840

  17. Genes for Drosophila small heat shock proteins are regulated differently by ecdysterone

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.; Voellmy, R. ); Mestril, R. )

    1991-12-01

    Genes for small heat shock proteins (hsp27 to hsp22) are activated in late third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster in the absence of heat stress. This regulation has been stimulated in cultured Drosophila cells in which the genes are activated by the addition of ecdysterone. Sequence elements (HERE) involved in ecdysterone regulation of the hsp27 and hsp23 genes have been defined by transfection studies and have recently been identified as binding sites for ecdysterone receptor. The authors report here that the shp27 and hsp23 genes are regulated differently by ecdysterone. The hsp27 gene is activated rapidly by ecdysterone, even in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, high-level expression of the hsp23 gene begins only after a lag of about 6 h, is dependent on the continuous presence of ecdysterone, and is sensitive to low concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors. Transfection experiments with reported constructs show that this difference in regulation is at the transcriptional level. Synthetic hsp27 or hsp23 HERE sequences confer hsp27- or hsp23-type ecdysterone regulation on a basal promoter. These findings indicate that the hsp27 gene is primary, and the hsp23 gene is mainly a secondary, hormone-responsive gene. Ecdysterone receptor is implied to play a role in the regulation of both genes.

  18. mef2 activity levels differentially affect gene expression during Drosophila muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Elgar, Stuart J.; Han, Jun; Taylor, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Cell differentiation is controlled by key transcription factors, and a major question is how they orchestrate cell-type-specific genetic programs. Muscle differentiation is a well studied paradigm in which the conserved Mef2 transcription factor plays a pivotal role. Recent genomic studies have identified a large number of mef2-regulated target genes with distinct temporal expression profiles during Drosophila myogenesis. However, the question remains as to how a single transcription factor can control such diverse patterns of gene expression. In this study we used a strategy combining genomics and developmental genetics to address this issue in vivo during Drosophila muscle development. We found that groups of mef2-regulated genes respond differently to changes in mef2 activity levels: some require higher levels for their expression than others. Furthermore, this differential requirement correlates with when the gene is first expressed during the muscle differentiation program. Genes that require higher levels are activated later. These results implicate mef2 in the temporal regulation of muscle gene expression, and, consistent with this, we show that changes in mef2 activity levels can alter the start of gene expression in a predictable manner. Together these results indicate that Mef2 is not an all-or-none regulator; rather, its action is more subtle, and levels of its activity are important in the differential expression of muscle genes. This suggests a route by which mef2 can orchestrate the muscle differentiation program and contribute to the stringent regulation of gene expression during myogenesis. PMID:18198273

  19. Joint stage recognition and anatomical annotation of drosophila gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao; Wang, Hua; Huang, Heng; Ding, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Staining the mRNA of a gene via in situ hybridization (ISH) during the development of a Drosophila melanogaster embryo delivers the detailed spatio-temporal patterns of the gene expression. Many related biological problems such as the detection of co-expressed genes, co-regulated genes and transcription factor binding motifs rely heavily on the analysis of these image patterns. To provide the text-based pattern searching for facilitating related biological studies, the images in the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) study are annotated with developmental stage term and anatomical ontology terms manually by domain experts. Due to the rapid increase in the number of such images and the inevitable bias annotations by human curators, it is necessary to develop an automatic method to recognize the developmental stage and annotate anatomical terms. Results: In this article, we propose a novel computational model for jointly stage classification and anatomical terms annotation of Drosophila gene expression patterns. We propose a novel Tri-Relational Graph (TG) model that comprises the data graph, anatomical term graph, developmental stage term graph, and connect them by two additional graphs induced from stage or annotation label assignments. Upon the TG model, we introduce a Preferential Random Walk (PRW) method to jointly recognize developmental stage and annotate anatomical terms by utilizing the interrelations between two tasks. The experimental results on two refined BDGP datasets demonstrate that our joint learning method can achieve superior prediction results on both tasks than the state-of-the-art methods. Availability: http://ranger.uta.edu/%7eheng/Drosophila/ Contact: heng@uta.edu PMID:22689756

  20. Molecular Genetic Analysis of the Nested Drosophila melanogaster Lamin C Gene

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Sandra R.; Curio-Penny, Beatrice; Li, Yuhong; Imani, Reza A.; Rydberg, Lena; Geyer, Pamela K.; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2005-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that line the inner surface of the nuclear envelope, providing structural support and making contacts with chromatin. There are two types of lamins, A- and B-types, which differ in structure and expression. Drosophila possesses both lamin types, encoded by the LamC (A-type) and lamin Dm0 (B-type) genes. LamC is nested within an intron of the essential gene ttv. We demonstrate that null mutations in LamC are lethal, and expression of a wild-type LamC transgene rescues lethality of LamC but not ttv mutants. Mutations in the human A-type lamin gene lead to diseases called laminopathies. To determine if Drosophila might serve as a useful model to study lamin biology and disease mechanisms, we generated transgenic flies expressing mutant LamC proteins modeled after human disease-causing lamins. These transgenic animals display a nuclear lamin aggregation phenotype remarkably similar to that observed when human mutant A-type lamins are expressed in mammalian cells. LamC aggregates also cause disorganization of lamin Dm0, indicating interdependence of both lamin types for proper lamina assembly. Taken together, these data provide the first detailed genetic analysis of the LamC gene and support using Drosophila as a model to study the role of lamins in disease. PMID:15965247

  1. Regulation of lifespan in Drosophila by modulation of genes in the TOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kapahi, Pankaj; Zid, Brian M; Harper, Tony; Koslover, Daniel; Sapin, Viveca; Benzer, Seymour

    2004-05-25

    In many species, reducing nutrient intake without causing malnutrition extends lifespan. Like DR (dietary restriction), modulation of genes in the insulin-signaling pathway, known to alter nutrient sensing, has been shown to extend lifespan in various species. In Drosophila, the target of rapamycin (TOR) and the insulin pathways have emerged as major regulators of growth and size. Hence we examined the role of TOR pathway genes in regulating lifespan by using Drosophila. We show that inhibition of TOR signaling pathway by alteration of the expression of genes in this nutrient-sensing pathway, which is conserved from yeast to human, extends lifespan in a manner that may overlap with known effects of dietary restriction on longevity. In Drosophila, TSC1 and TSC2 (tuberous sclerosis complex genes 1 and 2) act together to inhibit TOR (target of rapamycin), which mediates a signaling pathway that couples amino acid availability to S6 kinase, translation initiation, and growth. We find that overexpression of dTsc1, dTsc2, or dominant-negative forms of dTOR or dS6K all cause lifespan extension. Modulation of expression in the fat is sufficient for the lifespan-extension effects. The lifespan extensions are dependent on nutritional condition, suggesting a possible link between the TOR pathway and dietary restriction. PMID:15186745

  2. Regulation of Lifespan in Drosophila by Modulation of Genes in the TOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kapahi, Pankaj; Zid, Brian M.; Harper, Tony; Koslover, Daniel; Sapin, Viveca; Benzer, Seymour

    2009-01-01

    Summary In many species, reducing nutrient intake without causing malnutrition extends lifespan [1-3]. Like DR (dietary restriction), modulation of genes in the insulin-signaling pathway, known to alter nutrient sensing, has been shown to extend lifespan in various species [1-4]. In Drosophila, the target of rapamycin (TOR) and the insulin pathways have emerged as major regulators of growth and size. Hence we examined the role of TOR pathway genes in regulating lifespan by using Drosophila. We show that inhibition of TOR signaling pathway by alteration of the expression of genes in this nutrient-sensing pathway, which is conserved from yeast to human, extends lifespan in a manner that may overlap with known effects of dietary restriction on longevity. In Drosophila , TSC1 and TSC2 (tuberous sclerosis complex genes 1 and 2) act together to inhibit TOR (target of rapamycin), which mediates a signaling pathway that couples amino acid availability to S6 kinase, translation initiation, and growth [5]. We find that overexpression of dTsc1, dTsc2, or dominant-negative forms of dTOR or dS6K all cause lifespan extension. Modulation of expression in the fat is sufficient for the lifespan-extension effects. The lifespan extensions are dependent on nutritional condition, suggesting a possible link between the TOR pathway and dietary restriction. PMID:15186745

  3. Identification of murine homologues of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene: potential activators of ras.

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, D; Fu, P; Simon, M; Senior, P

    1992-01-01

    Several findings suggest that signals from tyrosine kinases are transduced, at least in part, through ras proteins. These findings include (i) blockage of the transforming activity of constitutively active tyrosine kinases by inhibiting ras function and (ii) genetic screens in Caenorhabditis elegans and in Drosophila that identified ras genes as downstream effectors of tyrosine kinases. The recently isolated Drosophila gene Son of sevenless (Sos) is postulated to act as a positive regulatory link between tyrosine kinase and ras proteins by catalyzing exchange of GDP for GTP on ras protein. Such exchange proteins have been reported in extracts of mammalian cells but have not been previously characterized at a molecular level. As Sos appears to function in this role in Drosophila, we sought to isolate a vertebrate counterpart(s). We have characterized two widely expressed murine genes with a high degree of homology to Sos. Hybridization with human DNA and RNA indicates a high degree of conservation of these genes in other vertebrates. Images PMID:1631150

  4. EYA4, a novel vertebrate gene related to Drosophila eyes absent.

    PubMed

    Borsani, G; DeGrandi, A; Ballabio, A; Bulfone, A; Bernard, L; Banfi, S; Gattuso, C; Mariani, M; Dixon, M; Donnai, D; Metcalfe, K; Winter, R; Robertson, M; Axton, R; Brown, A; van Heyningen, V; Hanson, I

    1999-01-01

    We have isolated a family of four vertebrate genes homologous to eyes absent (eya), a key regulator of ocular development in Drosophila. Here we present the detailed characterization of the EYA4 gene in human and mouse. EYA4 encodes a 640 amino acid protein containing a highly conserved C-terminal domain of 271 amino acids which in Drosophila eya is known to mediate developmentally important protein-protein interactions. Human EYA4 maps to 6q23 and mouse Eya4 maps to the predicted homology region near the centromere of chromosome 10. In the developing mouse embryo, Eya4 is expressed primarily in the craniofacial mesenchyme, the dermamyotome and the limb. On the basis of map position and expression pattern, EYA4 is a candidate for oculo-dento-digital (ODD) syndrome, but no EYA4 mutations were found in a panel of ODD patients. PMID:9887327

  5. Mutations in the circadian gene period alter behavioral and biochemical responses to ethanol in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jennifer; Seggio, Joseph A; Ahmad, S Tariq

    2016-04-01

    Clock genes, such as period, which maintain an organism's circadian rhythm, can have profound effects on metabolic activity, including ethanol metabolism. In turn, ethanol exposure has been shown in Drosophila and mammals to cause disruptions of the circadian rhythm. Previous studies from our labs have shown that larval ethanol exposure disrupted the free-running period and period expression of Drosophila. In addition, a recent study has shown that arrhythmic flies show no tolerance to ethanol exposure. As such, Drosophila period mutants, which have either a shorter than wild-type free-running period (perS) or a longer one (perL), may also exhibit altered responses to ethanol due to their intrinsic circadian differences. In this study, we tested the initial sensitivity and tolerance of ethanol exposure on Canton-S, perS, and perL, and then measured their Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH) and body ethanol levels. We showed that perL flies had slower sedation rate, longer recovery from ethanol sedation, and generated higher tolerance for sedation upon repeated ethanol exposure compared to Canton-S wild-type flies. Furthermore, perL flies had lower ADH activity and had a slower ethanol clearance compared to wild-type flies. The findings of this study suggest that period mutations influence ethanol induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in Drosophila and that flies with longer circadian periods are more sensitive to ethanol exposure. PMID:26802726

  6. Temperature Stress Mediates Decanalization and Dominance of Gene Expression in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory architecture of gene expression remains an area of active research. Here, we studied how the interplay of genetic and environmental variation affects gene expression by exposing Drosophila melanogaster strains to four different developmental temperatures. At 18°C we observed almost complete canalization with only very few allelic effects on gene expression. In contrast, at the two temperature extremes, 13°C and 29°C a large number of allelic differences in gene expression were detected due to both cis- and trans-regulatory effects. Allelic differences in gene expression were mainly dominant, but for up to 62% of the genes the dominance swapped between 13 and 29°C. Our results are consistent with stabilizing selection causing buffering of allelic expression variation in non-stressful environments. We propose that decanalization of gene expression in stressful environments is not only central to adaptation, but may also contribute to genetic disorders in human populations. PMID:25719753

  7. Adaptive Evolution of Genes Duplicated from the Drosophila pseudoobscura neo-X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Richard P.; Hilldorfer, Benedict B.; Koch, Jessica L.; Lockton, Steven; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila X chromosomes are disproportionate sources of duplicated genes, and these duplications are usually the result of retrotransposition of X-linked genes to the autosomes. The excess duplication is thought to be driven by natural selection for two reasons: X chromosomes are inactivated during spermatogenesis, and the derived copies of retroposed duplications tend to be testis expressed. Therefore, autosomal derived copies of retroposed genes provide a mechanism for their X-linked paralogs to “escape” X inactivation. Once these duplications have fixed, they may then be selected for male-specific functions. Throughout the evolution of the Drosophila genus, autosomes have fused with X chromosomes along multiple lineages giving rise to neo-X chromosomes. There has also been excess duplication from the two independent neo-X chromosomes that have been examined—one that occurred prior to the common ancestor of the willistoni species group and another that occurred along the lineage leading to Drosophila pseudoobscura. To determine what role natural selection plays in the evolution of genes duplicated from the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome, we analyzed DNA sequence divergence between paralogs, polymorphism within each copy, and the expression profiles of these duplicated genes. We found that the derived copies of all duplicated genes have elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism, suggesting that they are under relaxed selective constraints. The derived copies also tend to have testis- or male-biased expression profiles regardless of their chromosome of origin. Genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome appear to be under less constraints than those duplicated from other chromosome arms. We also find more evidence for historical adaptive evolution in genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome, suggesting that they are under a unique selection regime in which elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism provides a large reservoir of functional variants, some of which are

  8. An integrated gene annotation and transcriptional profiling approach towards the full gene content of the Drosophila genome

    PubMed Central

    Hild, M; Beckmann, B; Haas, SA; Koch, B; Solovyev, V; Busold, C; Fellenberg, K; Boutros, M; Vingron, M; Sauer, F; Hoheisel, JD; Paro, R

    2004-01-01

    Background While the genome sequences for a variety of organisms are now available, the precise number of the genes encoded is still a matter of debate. For the human genome several stringent annotation approaches have resulted in the same number of potential genes, but a careful comparison revealed only limited overlap. This indicates that only the combination of different computational prediction methods and experimental evaluation of such in silico data will provide more complete genome annotations. In order to get a more complete gene content of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, we based our new D. melanogaster whole-transcriptome microarray, the Heidelberg FlyArray, on the combination of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) annotation and a novel ab initio gene prediction of lower stringency using the Fgenesh software. Results Here we provide evidence for the transcription of approximately 2,600 additional genes predicted by Fgenesh. Validation of the developmental profiling data by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization indicates a lower limit of 2,000 novel annotations, thus substantially raising the number of genes that make a fly. Conclusions The successful design and application of this novel Drosophila microarray on the basis of our integrated in silico/wet biology approach confirms our expectation that in silico approaches alone will always tend to be incomplete. The identification of at least 2,000 novel genes highlights the importance of gathering experimental evidence to discover all genes within a genome. Moreover, as such an approach is independent of homology criteria, it will allow the discovery of novel genes unrelated to known protein families or those that have not been strictly conserved between species. PMID:14709175

  9. Functional characterisation of human synaptic genes expressed in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Zografos, Lysimachos; Tang, Joanne; Hesse, Franziska; Wanker, Erich E; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B; Davies, R Wayne; Armstrong, J Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an established and versatile model organism. Here we describe and make available a collection of transgenic Drosophila strains expressing human synaptic genes. The collection can be used to study and characterise human synaptic genes and their interactions and as controls for mutant studies. It was generated in a way that allows the easy addition of new strains, as well as their combination. In order to highlight the potential value of the collection for the characterisation of human synaptic genes we also use two assays, investigating any gain-of-function motor and/or cognitive phenotypes in the strains in this collection. Using these assays we show that among the strains made there are both types of gain-of-function phenotypes investigated. As an example, we focus on the three strains expressing human tyrosine protein kinase Fyn, the small GTPase Rap1a and human Arc, respectively. Of the three, the first shows a cognitive gain-of-function phenotype while the second a motor gain-of-function phenotype. By contrast, Arc, which has no Drosophila ortholog, shows no gain-of-function phenotype. PMID:27069252

  10. The contribution of E2F-regulated transcription to Drosophila PCNA gene function.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Stephen A; Bonnette, Peter C; Duronio, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    E2F proteins control cell cycle progression by predominantly acting as either activators or repressors of transcription. How the antagonizing activities of different E2Fs are integrated by cis-acting control regions into a final transcriptional output in an intact animal is not well understood. E2F function is required for normal development in many species, but it is not completely clear for which genes E2F-regulated transcription provides an essential biological function. To address these questions, we have characterized the control region of the Drosophila PCNA gene. A single E2F binding site within a 100-bp enhancer is necessary and sufficient to direct the correct spatiotemporal program of G1-S-regulated PCNA expression during development. This dynamic program requires both E2F-mediated transcriptional activation and repression, which, in Drosophila, are thought to be carried out by two distinct E2F proteins. Our data suggest that functional antagonism between these different E2F proteins can occur in vivo by competition for the same binding site. An engineered PCNA gene with mutated E2F binding sites supports a low level of expression that can partially rescue the lethality of PCNA null mutants. Thus, E2F regulation of PCNA is dispensable for viability, but is nonetheless important for normal Drosophila development. PMID:12526745

  11. A regulatory circuit for piwi by the large Maf gene traffic jam in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kuniaki; Inagaki, Sachi; Mituyama, Toutai; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Ono, Yukiteru; Sakota, Eri; Kotani, Hazuki; Asai, Kiyoshi; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C

    2009-10-29

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) silence retrotransposons in Drosophila germ lines by associating with the PIWI proteins Argonaute 3 (AGO3), Aubergine (Aub) and Piwi. piRNAs in Drosophila are produced from intergenic repetitive genes and piRNA clusters by two systems: the primary processing pathway and the amplification loop. The amplification loop occurs in a Dicer-independent, PIWI-Slicer-dependent manner. However, primary piRNA processing remains elusive. Here we analysed piRNA processing in a Drosophila ovarian somatic cell line where Piwi, but not Aub or AGO3, is expressed; thus, only the primary piRNAs exist. In addition to flamenco, a Piwi-specific piRNA cluster, traffic jam (tj), a large Maf gene, was determined as a new piRNA cluster. piRNAs arising from tj correspond to the untranslated regions of tj messenger RNA and are sense-oriented. piRNA loading on to Piwi may occur in the cytoplasm. zucchini, a gene encoding a putative cytoplasmic nuclease, is required for tj-derived piRNA production. In tj and piwi mutant ovaries, somatic cells fail to intermingle with germ cells and Fasciclin III is overexpressed. Loss of tj abolishes Piwi expression in gonadal somatic cells. Thus, in gonadal somatic cells, tj gives rise simultaneously to two different molecules: the TJ protein, which activates Piwi expression, and piRNAs, which define the Piwi targets for silencing. PMID:19812547

  12. Drosophila Gene Expression Pattern Annotation Using Sparse Features and Term-Term Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shuiwang; Yuan, Lei; Li, Ying-Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Hua; Kumar, Sudhir; Ye, Jieping

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila gene expression pattern images document the spatial and temporal dynamics of gene expression and they are valuable tools for explicating the gene functions, interaction, and networks during Drosophila embryogenesis. To provide text-based pattern searching, the images in the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) study are annotated with ontology terms manually by human curators. We present a systematic approach for automating this task, because the number of images needing text descriptions is now rapidly increasing. We consider both improved feature representation and novel learning formulation to boost the annotation performance. For feature representation, we adapt the bag-of-words scheme commonly used in visual recognition problems so that the image group information in the BDGP study is retained. Moreover, images from multiple views can be integrated naturally in this representation. To reduce the quantization error caused by the bag-of-words representation, we propose an improved feature representation scheme based on the sparse learning technique. In the design of learning formulation, we propose a local regularization framework that can incorporate the correlations among terms explicitly. We further show that the resulting optimization problem admits an analytical solution. Experimental results show that the representation based on sparse learning outperforms the bag-of-words representation significantly. Results also show that incorporation of the term-term correlations improves the annotation performance consistently. PMID:21614142

  13. Functional characterisation of human synaptic genes expressed in the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, Lysimachos; Tang, Joanne; Hesse, Franziska; Wanker, Erich E.; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B.; Davies, R. Wayne; Armstrong, J. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila melanogaster is an established and versatile model organism. Here we describe and make available a collection of transgenic Drosophila strains expressing human synaptic genes. The collection can be used to study and characterise human synaptic genes and their interactions and as controls for mutant studies. It was generated in a way that allows the easy addition of new strains, as well as their combination. In order to highlight the potential value of the collection for the characterisation of human synaptic genes we also use two assays, investigating any gain-of-function motor and/or cognitive phenotypes in the strains in this collection. Using these assays we show that among the strains made there are both types of gain-of-function phenotypes investigated. As an example, we focus on the three strains expressing human tyrosine protein kinase Fyn, the small GTPase Rap1a and human Arc, respectively. Of the three, the first shows a cognitive gain-of-function phenotype while the second a motor gain-of-function phenotype. By contrast, Arc, which has no Drosophila ortholog, shows no gain-of-function phenotype. PMID:27069252

  14. Repeated Evolution of Testis-Specific New Genes: The Case of Telomere-Capping Genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Marais, Gabriel A. B.; Loppin, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genome analysis has allowed the identification of various mechanisms involved in gene birth. However, understanding the evolutionary forces driving new gene origination still represents a major challenge. In particular, an intriguing and not yet fully understood trend has emerged from the study of new genes: many of them show a testis-specific expression pattern, which has remained poorly understood. Here we review the case of such a new gene, which involves a telomere-capping gene family in Drosophila. hiphop and its testis-specific paralog K81 are critical for the protection of chromosome ends in somatic cells and male gametes, respectively. Two independent functional studies recently proposed that these genes evolved under a reproductive-subfunctionalization regime. The 2011 release of new Drosophila genome sequences from the melanogaster group of species allowed us to deepen our phylogenetic analysis of the hiphop/K81 family. This work reveals an unsuspected dynamic of gene birth and death within the group, with recurrent duplication events through retroposition mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the plausibility of different evolutionary scenarios that could explain the diversification of this gene family. PMID:22844639

  15. Repeated evolution of testis-specific new genes: the case of telomere-capping genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Marais, Gabriel A B; Loppin, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genome analysis has allowed the identification of various mechanisms involved in gene birth. However, understanding the evolutionary forces driving new gene origination still represents a major challenge. In particular, an intriguing and not yet fully understood trend has emerged from the study of new genes: many of them show a testis-specific expression pattern, which has remained poorly understood. Here we review the case of such a new gene, which involves a telomere-capping gene family in Drosophila. hiphop and its testis-specific paralog K81 are critical for the protection of chromosome ends in somatic cells and male gametes, respectively. Two independent functional studies recently proposed that these genes evolved under a reproductive-subfunctionalization regime. The 2011 release of new Drosophila genome sequences from the melanogaster group of species allowed us to deepen our phylogenetic analysis of the hiphop/K81 family. This work reveals an unsuspected dynamic of gene birth and death within the group, with recurrent duplication events through retroposition mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the plausibility of different evolutionary scenarios that could explain the diversification of this gene family. PMID:22844639

  16. A genetic and molecular characterization of the garnet gene of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, V K; Sinclair, D A; Wennberg, R; Warner, T S; Honda, B M; Grigliatti, T A

    1999-12-01

    The garnet gene was one of the first genes to be identified in Drosophila melanogaster. Mutations in the garnet gene affect both of the biochemically distinct types of pigments in the eye and disrupt pigmentation of other organs. As an initial step in the analysis of this gene, we have analyzed the pigmentation defects in several of the garnet alleles. We have also cloned the gene and examined its expression in various tissues and at different stages of development. The garnet gene is expressed throughout development and in all tissues examined. Structurally related sequences can be detected in a variety of other eukaryotes. The predicted protein sequence of the garnet product resembles clathrin and nonclathrin adaptin proteins and is highly similar to the delta subunit of the newly isolated mammalian AP-3 adaptin complex, which is associated with the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. This suggests that garnet encodes a protein that acts in the intracellular sorting and trafficking of vesicles from the trans-Golgi network to endosomes, and related specialized organelles such as the pigment granule. This finding provides an explanation for the phenotype of garnet mutations and predicts that other Drosophila eye-colour genes will be a rich resource for the genetic dissection of intracellular vesicle transport. PMID:10659786

  17. Structure and expression of the Drosophila ubiquitin-80-amino-acid fusion-protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, R; del Arco, A; Cabrera, H L; Arribas, C

    1994-01-01

    In the fruitfly Drosophila, as in all eukaryotes examined so far, some ubiquitin-coding sequences appear fused to unrelated open reading frames. Two of these fusion genes have been previously described (the homologues of UBI1-UBI2 and UBI4 in yeast), and we report here the organization and expression of a third one, the DUb80 gene (the homologue of UBI3 in yeast). This gene encodes a ubiquitin monomer fused to an 80-amino-acid extension which is homologous with the ribosomal protein encoded by the UB13 gene. The 5' regulatory region of DUb80 shares common features with another ubiquitin fusion gene, DUb52, and with the ribosomal protein genes of Drosophila, Xenopus and mouse. We also find helix-loop-helix protein-binding sequences (E-boxes). The DUb80 gene is transcribed to a 0.9 kb mRNA which is particularly abundant under conditions of high protein synthesis, such as in ovaries and exponentially growing cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8068011

  18. Sequential construction of a model for modular gene expression control, applied to spatial patterning of the Drosophila gene hunchback.

    PubMed

    Spirov, Alexander V; Myasnikova, Ekaterina M; Holloway, David M

    2016-04-01

    Gene network simulations are increasingly used to quantify mutual gene regulation in biological tissues. These are generally based on linear interactions between single-entity regulatory and target genes. Biological genes, by contrast, commonly have multiple, partially independent, cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for regulator binding, and can produce variant transcription and translation products. We present a modeling framework to address some of the gene regulatory dynamics implied by this biological complexity. Spatial patterning of the hunchback (hb) gene in Drosophila development involves control by three CRMs producing two distinct mRNA transcripts. We use this example to develop a differential equations model for transcription which takes into account the cis-regulatory architecture of the gene. Potential regulatory interactions are screened by a genetic algorithms (GAs) approach and compared to biological expression data. PMID:27122317

  19. Positive selection of Iris, a retroviral envelope-derived host gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Malik, Harmit S; Henikoff, Steven

    2005-10-01

    Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris) was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B). Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana), a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene outside vertebrates

  20. The Dca gene involved in cold adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster arose by duplication of the ancestral regucalcin gene.

    PubMed

    Arboleda-Bustos, Carlos E; Segarra, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    The Drosophila cold acclimation gene (Dca) is involved in the adaptive response to low temperatures. This gene is upregulated at the transcriptional level when D. melanogaster flies are exposed 1 day to 15 °C. Dca (or smp-30) is a member of the SMP-30/Gluconolactonase/LRE-like family. In the current study, we characterized the members of this gene family in the 12 Drosophila species with available complete genomes sequences. Two paralogous genes, Dca and regucalcin, were identified in all the Sophophora subgenus species (9 of the 12 species), and their presence was further confirmed in three other species of the subgenus (D. subobscura, D. madeirensis, and D. guanche). However, only regucalcin was present in the species of the Drosophila subgenus (D. grimshawi, D. virilis, and D. mojavensis). The phylogenetic analysis and the molecular organization of Dca that is a nested intronic gene support that Dca arose by a duplication event from the ancestral regucalcin gene after the split of the Sophophora and Drosophila subgenera but before the Sophophora radiation. After the duplication event, the nonsynonymous fixation rate increased in the branch leading to Dca (but not to regucalcin), suggesting the neofunctionalization of the former duplicate. Thus, regucalcin would have maintained the ancestral gene function, and Dca would have acquired a new function likely related to Ca²⁺ homeostasis and cold acclimation. Molecular evolution of Dca has been affected by its implication in the adaptive response to cold temperatures. Indeed, the gene has evolved under stronger purifying selection in the temperate than in the tropical Sophophora species, as reflected by the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions. This result is consistent with functional constraints acting on the DCA protein to keep species adaptation to temperate climates. Dca and regucalcin also differ in their expression patterns. The expression profile of regucalcin is similar to that of the

  1. Flexibility in a Gene Network Affecting a Simple Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    van Swinderen, Bruno; Greenspan, Ralph J.

    2005-01-01

    Gene interactions are emerging as central to understanding the realization of any phenotype. To probe the flexibility of interactions in a defined gene network, we isolated a set of 16 interacting genes in Drosophila, on the basis of their alteration of a quantitative behavioral phenotype—the loss of coordination in a temperature-sensitive allele of Syntaxin1A. The interactions inter se of this set of genes were then assayed in the presence and in the absence of the original Syntaxin1A mutation to ask whether the relationships among the 16 genes remain stable or differ after a change in genetic context. The pattern of epistatic interactions that occurs within this set of variants is dramatically altered in the two different genetic contexts. The results imply considerable flexibility in the network interactions of genes. PMID:15687281

  2. Cross-Regulation among the Polycomb Group Genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Janann Y.; Bender, Welcome

    2004-01-01

    Genes of the Polycomb group in Drosophila melanogaster function as long-term transcriptional repressors. A few members of the group encode proteins found in two evolutionarily conserved chromatin complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and the ESC-E(Z) complex. The majority of the group, lacking clear biochemical functions, might be indirect regulators. The transcript levels of seven Polycomb group genes were assayed in embryos mutant for various other genes in the family. Three Polycomb group genes were identified as upstream positive regulators of the core components of PRC1. There is also negative feedback regulation of some PRC1 core components by other PRC1 genes. Finally, there is positive regulation of PRC1 components by the ESC-E(Z) complex. These multiple pathways of cross-regulation help to explain the large size of the Polycomb group family of genes, but they complicate the genetic analysis of any single member. PMID:15314179

  3. Expression profiling of Drosophila mitochondrial genes via deep mRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Tatiana Teixeira; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian; Ottenwälder, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in several cellular processes. Nevertheless, very little is known about patterns of gene expression of genes encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this study, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) for transcription profiling of genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura. The analysis of males and females in both species indicated that the expression pattern was conserved between the two species, but differed significantly between both sexes. Interestingly, mRNA levels were not only different among genes encoded by separate transcription units, but also showed significant differences among genes located in the same transcription unit. Hence, mRNA abundance of genes encoded by mtDNA seems to be heavily modulated by post-transcriptional regulation. Finally, we also identified several transcripts with a noncanonical structure, suggesting that processing of mitochondrial transcripts may be more complex than previously assumed. PMID:19843606

  4. The inconstant gut microbiota of Drosophila species revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adam C-N; Chaston, John M; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-01-01

    The gut microorganisms in some animals are reported to include a core microbiota of consistently associated bacteria that is ecologically distinctive and may have coevolved with the host. The core microbiota is promoted by positive interactions among bacteria, favoring shared persistence; its retention over evolutionary timescales is evident as congruence between host phylogeny and bacterial community composition. This study applied multiple analyses to investigate variation in the composition of gut microbiota in drosophilid flies. First, the prevalence of five previously described gut bacteria (Acetobacter and Lactobacillus species) in individual flies of 21 strains (10 Drosophila species) were determined. Most bacteria were not present in all individuals of most strains, and bacterial species pairs co-occurred in individual flies less frequently than predicted by chance, contrary to expectations of a core microbiota. A complementary pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the gut microbiota of 11 Drosophila species identified 209 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs), with near-saturating sampling of sequences, but none of the OTUs was common to all host species. Furthermore, in both of two independent sets of Drosophila species, the gut bacterial community composition was not congruent with host phylogeny. The final analysis identified no common OTUs across three wild and four laboratory samples of D. melanogaster. Our results yielded no consistent evidence for a core microbiota in Drosophila. We conclude that the taxonomic composition of gut microbiota varies widely within and among Drosophila populations and species. This is reminiscent of the patterns of bacterial composition in guts of some other animals, including humans. PMID:23719154

  5. The inconstant gut microbiota of Drosophila species revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adam C-N; Chaston, John M; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-10-01

    The gut microorganisms in some animals are reported to include a core microbiota of consistently associated bacteria that is ecologically distinctive and may have coevolved with the host. The core microbiota is promoted by positive interactions among bacteria, favoring shared persistence; its retention over evolutionary timescales is evident as congruence between host phylogeny and bacterial community composition. This study applied multiple analyses to investigate variation in the composition of gut microbiota in drosophilid flies. First, the prevalence of five previously described gut bacteria (Acetobacter and Lactobacillus species) in individual flies of 21 strains (10 Drosophila species) were determined. Most bacteria were not present in all individuals of most strains, and bacterial species pairs co-occurred in individual flies less frequently than predicted by chance, contrary to expectations of a core microbiota. A complementary pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the gut microbiota of 11 Drosophila species identified 209 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs), with near-saturating sampling of sequences, but none of the OTUs was common to all host species. Furthermore, in both of two independent sets of Drosophila species, the gut bacterial community composition was not congruent with host phylogeny. The final analysis identified no common OTUs across three wild and four laboratory samples of D. melanogaster. Our results yielded no consistent evidence for a core microbiota in Drosophila. We conclude that the taxonomic composition of gut microbiota varies widely within and among Drosophila populations and species. This is reminiscent of the patterns of bacterial composition in guts of some other animals, including humans. PMID:23719154

  6. The gene search system. A method for efficient detection and rapid molecular identification of genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Toba, G; Ohsako, T; Miyata, N; Ohtsuka, T; Seong, K H; Aigaki, T

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed a P-element-based gene search vector for efficient detection of genes in Drosophila melanogaster. The vector contains two copies of the upstream activating sequence (UAS) enhancer adjacent to a core promoter, one copy near the terminal inverted repeats at each end of the vector, and oriented to direct transcription outward. Genes were detected on the basis of phenotypic changes caused by GAL4-dependent forced expression of vector-flanking DNA, and the transcripts were identified with reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) using the vector-specific primer and followed by direct sequencing. The system had a greater sensitivity than those already in use for gain-of-function screening: 64% of the vector insertion lines (394/613) showed phenotypes with forced expression of vector-flanking DNA, such as lethality or defects in adult structure. Molecular analysis of 170 randomly selected insertions with forced expression phenotypes revealed that 21% matched the sequences of cloned genes, and 18% matched reported expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Of the insertions in cloned genes, 83% were upstream of the protein-coding region. We discovered two new genes that showed sequence similarity to human genes, Ras-related protein 2 and microsomal glutathione S-transferase. The system can be useful as a tool for the functional mapping of the Drosophila genome. PMID:9927464

  7. Fragile regions and not functional constraints predominate in shaping gene organization in the genus Drosophila.

    PubMed

    von Grotthuss, Marcin; Ashburner, Michael; Ranz, José M

    2010-08-01

    During evolution, gene repatterning across eukaryotic genomes is not uniform. Some genomic regions exhibit a gene organization conserved phylogenetically, while others are recurrently involved in chromosomal rearrangement, resulting in breakpoint reuse. Both gene order conservation and breakpoint reuse can result from the existence of functional constraints on where chromosomal breakpoints occur or from the existence of regions that are susceptible to breakage. The balance between these two mechanisms is still poorly understood. Drosophila species have very dynamic genomes and, therefore, can be very informative. We compared the gene organization of the main five chromosomal elements (Muller's elements A-E) of nine Drosophila species. Under a parsimonious evolutionary scenario, we estimate that 6116 breakpoints differentiate the gene orders of the species and that breakpoint reuse is associated with approximately 80% of the orthologous landmarks. The comparison of the observed patterns of change in gene organization with those predicted under different simulated modes of evolution shows that fragile regions alone can explain the observed key patterns of Muller's element A (X chromosome) more often than for any other Muller's element. High levels of fragility plus constraints operating on approximately 15% of the genome are sufficient to explain the observed patterns of change and conservation across species. The orthologous landmarks more likely to be under constraint exhibit both a remarkable internal functional heterogeneity and a lack of common functional themes with the exception of the presence of highly conserved noncoding elements. Fragile regions rather than functional constraints have been the main determinant of the evolution of the Drosophila chromosomes. PMID:20601587

  8. Repression of the Drosophila proliferating-cell nuclear antigen gene promoter by zerknuellt protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Hirose, Fumiko; Nishida, Yasuyoshi; Matsukage, Akio )

    1991-10-01

    A 631-bp fragment containing the 5{prime}-flanking region of the Drosophila melanogaster proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene was placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene of a CAT vector. A transient expression assay of CAT activity in Drosophila Kc cells transfected with this plasmid and a set of 5{prime}-deletion derivatives revealed that the promoter function resided within a 192-bp region. Cotransfection with a zerknuellt (zen)-expressing plasmid specifically repressed CAT expression. However, cotransfection with expression plasmids for a nonfunctional zen mutation, even skipped, or bicoid showed no significant effect on CAT expression. RNase protection analysis revealed that the repression by zen was at the transcription step. The target sequence of zen was mapped within the 34-bp region of the PCNA gene promoter, even though it lacked zen protein-binding sites. Transgenic flies carrying the PCNA gene regulatory region fused with lacZ were established. These results indicate that zen indirectly represses PCNA gene expression, probably by regulating the expression of some transcription factor(s) that binds to the PCNA gene promoter.

  9. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  10. Quantitative analysis of bristle number in Drosophila mutants identifies genes involved in neural development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norga, Koenraad K.; Gurganus, Marjorie C.; Dilda, Christy L.; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Lyman, Richard F.; Patel, Prajal H.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Mackay, Trudy F.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of the function of all genes that contribute to specific biological processes and complex traits is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. One approach is to employ forward genetic screens in genetically tractable model organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, P element-mediated insertional mutagenesis is a versatile tool for the dissection of molecular pathways, and there is an ongoing effort to tag every gene with a P element insertion. However, the vast majority of P element insertion lines are viable and fertile as homozygotes and do not exhibit obvious phenotypic defects, perhaps because of the tendency for P elements to insert 5' of transcription units. Quantitative genetic analysis of subtle effects of P element mutations that have been induced in an isogenic background may be a highly efficient method for functional genome annotation. RESULTS: Here, we have tested the efficacy of this strategy by assessing the extent to which screening for quantitative effects of P elements on sensory bristle number can identify genes affecting neural development. We find that such quantitative screens uncover an unusually large number of genes that are known to function in neural development, as well as genes with yet uncharacterized effects on neural development, and novel loci. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings establish the use of quantitative trait analysis for functional genome annotation through forward genetics. Similar analyses of quantitative effects of P element insertions will facilitate our understanding of the genes affecting many other complex traits in Drosophila.

  11. Expression of a Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholine receptor-related gene in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, S.C.; Rosenthal, L.S.; Kammermeyer, K.L.; Potter, M.B.; Nelson, D.J.

    1988-02-01

    The authors isolated Drosophila melanogaster genomic sequences with nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology to subunits of vertebrate acetylcholine receptor by hybridization with a Torpedo acetylcholine receptor subunit cDNA probe. Five introns are present in the portion of the Drosophila gene encoding the unprocessed protein and are positionally conserved relative to the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit gene. The Drosophila genomic clone hybridized to salivary gland polytene chromosome 3L within region 64B and was termed AChR64B. A 3-kilobasae poly(A)-containing transcript complementary to the AChR64B clone was readily detectable by RNA blot hybridizations during midembryogenesis, during metamorphosis, and in newly enclosed adults. AChR64B transcripts were localized to the cellular regions of the central nervous system during embryonic, larval, pupal, and adult stages of development. During metamorphosis, a temporal relationship between the morphogenesis of the optic lobe and expression of AChR64B transcripts was observed.

  12. Expression of Genes Involved in Drosophila Wing Morphogenesis and Vein Patterning Are Altered by Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Imaginal wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) defined during embryogenesis ultimately result in mature wings of stereotyped (specific) venation patterning. Major regulators of wing disc development are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF), Notch, Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wg), and Dpp signaling pathways. Highly stereotyped vascular patterning is also characteristic of tissues in other organisms flown in space such as the mouse retina and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic and other adaptations of vascular patterning to space environmental factors have not yet been systematically quantified, despite widespread recognition of their critical importance for terrestrial and microgravity applications. Here we report changes in gene expression with space flight related to Drosophila wing morphogenesis and vein patterning. In addition, genetically modified phenotypes of increasingly abnormal ectopic wing venation in the Drosophila wing1 were analyzed by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software2. Our goal is to further develop insightful vascular mappings associated with bioinformatic dimensions of genetic or other molecular phenotypes for correlation with genetic and other molecular profiling relevant to NASA's GeneLab and other Space Biology exploration initiatives.

  13. Gene expression variations during Drosophila metamorphosis in real and simulated gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, R.; Leandro-García, L. J.; Benguría, A.; Herranz, R.; Zeballos, A.; Gassert, G.; van Loon, J. J.; Medina, F. J.

    Establishing the extent and significance of the effects of the exposure to microgravity of complex living organisms is a critical piece of information if the long-term exploration of near-by planets involving human beings is going to take place in the Future As a first step in this direction we have started to look into the patterns of gene expression during Drosophila development in real and simulated microgravity using microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from samples exposed to different environmental conditions In these experiments we used Affymetrix chips version 1 0 containing probes for more than 14 000 genes almost the complete Drosophila genome 55 of which are tagged with some molecular or functional designation while 45 are still waiting to be identified in functional terms The real microgravity exposure was imposed on the samples during the crew exchanging Soyuz 8 Mission to the ISS in October 2003 when after 11 days in Microgravity the Spanish-born astronaut Pedro Duque returned in the Soyuz 7 capsule carrying the experiments prepared by our Team Due to the constraints in the current ISS experiments in these Missions we limited the stages explored in our experiment to the developmental processes occurring during Drosophila metamorphosis As the experimental conditions at the launch site Baikonour were fairly limited we prepared the experiment in Madrid Toulouse and transp o rted the samples at 15 C in a temperature controlled container to slow down the developmental process a

  14. The amnesiac gene is involved in the regulation of thermal nociception in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Benjamin T.; Kasuya, Junko; Faron, Matthew; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Nociception is a mechanism fundamental to the ability of animals to avoid noxious stimuli capable of causing serious tissue damage. It has been established that in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel encoded by the painless gene (pain) is required for detecting thermal and mechanical noxious stimuli. Little is known, however, about other genetic components that control nociceptive behaviors in Drosophila. The amnesiac gene (amn), which encodes a putative neuropeptide precursor, is important for stabilizing olfactory memory, and is involved in various aspects of other associative and non-associative learning. Previous studies have indicated that amn also regulates ethanol sensitivity and sleep. Here we show that amn plays an additional critical role in nociception. Our data show that amn mutant larvae and adults are significantly less responsive to noxious heat stimuli (> ~ 40 °C) than their wild-type counterparts. The phenotype of amn mutants in thermal nociception, which closely resembles that of pain mutants, was phenocopied in flies expressing amn RNAi, and this phenotype was rescued by the expression of a wild-type amn transgene. Our results provide compelling evidence that amn is a novel genetic component of the mechanism that regulates thermal nociception in Drosophila. PMID:19995327

  15. Pleiohomeotic Interacts with the Core Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5 to Regulate Gene Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    The early elongation checkpoint regulated by Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) is a critical control point for the expression of many genes. Spt5 interacts directly with RNA polymerase II and has an essential role in establishing this checkpoint, and also for further transcript elongation. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Spt5 interacts both physically and genetically with the Polycomb Group (PcG) protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho), and the majority of Pho binding sites overlap with Spt5 binding sites across the genome in S2 cells. Our results indicate that Pho can interact with Spt5 to regulate transcription elongation in a gene specific manner. PMID:23894613

  16. Mutations in the midway gene disrupt a Drosophila acyl coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Buszczak, Michael; Lu, Xiaohui; Segraves, William A; Chang, Ta Yuan; Cooley, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, defective or unwanted egg chambers are eliminated during mid-oogenesis by programmed cell death. In addition, final cytoplasm transport from nurse cells to the oocyte depends upon apoptosis of the nurse cells. To study the regulation of germline apoptosis, we analyzed the midway mutant, in which egg chambers undergo premature nurse cell death and degeneration. The midway gene encodes a protein similar to mammalian acyl coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), which converts diacylglycerol (DAG) into triacylglycerol (TAG). midway mutant egg chambers contain severely reduced levels of neutral lipids in the germline. Expression of midway in insect cells results in high levels of DGAT activity in vitro. These results show that midway encodes a functional DGAT and that changes in acylglycerol lipid metabolism disrupt normal egg chamber development in Drosophila. PMID:11973306

  17. The Drosophila gene collection: Identification of putative full-length cDNAs for 70 percent of D. melanogaster genes

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Liao, Guochun; Brokstein, Peter; Hong, Ling; Carninci, Piero; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Champe, Mark; Pacleb, Joanne; Wan, Ken; Yu, Charles; Carlson, Joe; George, Reed; Celniker, Susan; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2002-08-12

    Collections of full-length nonredundant cDNA clones are critical reagents for functional genomics. The first step toward these resources is the generation and single-pass sequencing of cDNA libraries that contain a high proportion of full-length clones. The first release of the Drosophila Gene Collection Release 1 (DGCr1) was produced from six libraries representing various tissues, developmental stages, and the cultured S2 cell line. Nearly 80,000 random 5prime expressed sequence tags (EST) from these libraries were collapsed into a nonredundant set of 5849 cDNAs, corresponding to {approx}40 percent of the 13,474 predicted genes in Drosophila. To obtain cDNA clones representing the remaining genes, we have generated an additional 157,835 5prime ESTs from two previously existing and three new libraries. One new library is derived from adult testis, a tissue we previously did not exploit for gene discovery; two new cap-trapped normalized libraries are derived from 0-22hr embryos and adult heads. Taking advantage of the annotated D. melanogaster genome sequence, we clustered the ESTs by aligning them to the genome. Clusters that overlap genes not already represented by cDNA clones in the DGCr1 were analyzed further, and putative full-length clones were selected for inclusion in the new DGC. This second release of the DGC (DGCr2) contains 5061 additional clones, extending the collection to 10,910 cDNAs representing >70 percent of the predicted genes in Drosophila.

  18. Interaction between genes Mos and mwh expressed in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Vaisman, N.Ya.; Zakharov, I.K.

    1995-07-01

    Gene Mosaic (Mos) of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster was located by means of dominant markers Ly, Sb, and Dr. This gene was shown to be located between Ly and Sb in the centromeric region (45-50 map units). An analysis of interaction between Mos and mwh genes in cis- and trans-heterozygotes showed a significant effect of the Mos gene on mutability (recombinogenesis) of chromosome mwh in somatic cells. In the cis heterozygote mwh Mos/++, the frequency of small mutant clones on wings of flies increased. In mwh/Mos heterozygotes, the Mos gene caused a significant reduction of dorsocentral and scutellar bristles (78% in mwh/Mos, 85% in mwh +/+ Mos, and 98% in mwh Mos/mwh +). 20 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Gene regulation in Drosophila spermatogenesis: analysis of protein binding at the translational control element TCE.

    PubMed

    Kempe, E; Muhs, B; Schäfer, M

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified a 12 nucleotide long sequence element, the TCE, that was demonstrated to be necessary for translational control of expression in the male germ line of Drosophila melanogaster (Schäfer et al., 1990). It is conserved among all seven members of the Mst(3)CGP gene family, that encode structural proteins of the sperm tail. The TCE is invariably located in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) at position +28 relative to the transcription start site. In this paper we analyse the mode of action of this element. We show that protein binding occurs at the TCE after incubation with testis protein extracts from Drosophila melanogaster. While several proteins are associated with the translational control element in the RNA, only one of these proteins directly crosslinks to the sequence element. The binding activity is exclusively observed with testis protein extracts but can be demonstrated with testis extracts from other Drosophila species as well, indicating that regulatory proteins involved in translational regulation in the male germ line are conserved. Although binding to the TCE can occur independent of its position relative to the transcription start site of the in vitro transcripts, its function in vivo is not exerted when shifted further downstream within the 5' UTR of a fusion gene. In addition to being a translational control element the TCE also functions as a transcriptional regulator. Consequently, a DNA-protein complex is also formed at the TCE. In contrast to the RNA-protein complexes we find DNA-protein complexes with protein extracts of several tissues of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:8111973

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C.; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  1. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    PubMed

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  2. Effects of sister chromatid cohesion proteins on cut gene expression during wing development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dorsett, Dale; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Misulovin, Ziva; Martens, Andrew; Redding, Bethany; McKim, Kim

    2006-01-01

    Summary The cohesin protein complex is a conserved structural component of chromosomes. Cohesin binds numerous sites along interphase chromosomes and is essential for sister chromatid cohesion and DNA repair. Here, we test the idea that cohesin also regulates gene expression. This idea arose from the finding that the Drosophila Nipped-B protein, a functional homolog of the yeast Scc2 factor that loads cohesin onto chromosomes, facilitates the transcriptional activation of certain genes by enhancers located many kilobases away from their promoters. We find that cohesin binds between a remote wing margin enhancer and the promoter at the cut locus in cultured cells, and that reducing the dosage of the Smc1 cohesin subunit increases cut expression in the developing wing margin. We also find that cut expression is increased by a unique pds5 gene mutation that reduces the binding of cohesin to chromosomes. On the basis of these results, we posit that cohesin inhibits long-range activation of the Drosophila cut gene, and that Nipped-B facilitates activation by regulating cohesin-chromosome binding. Such effects of cohesin on gene expression could be responsible for many of the developmental deficits that occur in Cornelia de Lange syndrome, which is caused by mutations in the human homolog of Nipped-B. PMID:16207752

  3. Divergent functions through alternative splicing: the Drosophila CRMP gene in pyrimidine metabolism, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Morris, Deanna H; Dubnau, Josh; Park, Jae H; Rawls, John M

    2012-08-01

    DHP and CRMP proteins comprise a family of structurally similar proteins that perform divergent functions, DHP in pyrimidine catabolism in most organisms and CRMP in neuronal dynamics in animals. In vertebrates, one DHP and five CRMP proteins are products of six genes; however, Drosophila melanogaster has a single CRMP gene that encodes one DHP and one CRMP protein through tissue-specific, alternative splicing of a pair of paralogous exons. The proteins derived from the fly gene are identical over 90% of their lengths, suggesting that unique, novel functions of these proteins derive from the segment corresponding to the paralogous exons. Functional homologies of the Drosophila and mammalian CRMP proteins are revealed by several types of evidence. Loss-of-function CRMP mutation modifies both Ras and Rac misexpression phenotypes during fly eye development in a manner that is consistent with the roles of CRMP in Ras and Rac signaling pathways in mammalian neurons. In both mice and flies, CRMP mutation impairs learning and memory. CRMP mutant flies are defective in circadian activity rhythm. Thus, DHP and CRMP proteins are derived by different processes in flies (tissue-specific, alternative splicing of paralogous exons of a single gene) and vertebrates (tissue-specific expression of different genes), indicating that diverse genetic mechanisms have mediated the evolution of this protein family in animals. PMID:22649077

  4. The Amylase gene cluster on the evolving sex chromosomes of Drosophila miranda.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, S; Steinemann, M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of chromosomal homology, the Amylase gene cluster in Drosophila miranda must be located on the secondary sex chromosome pair, neo-X (X2) and neo-Y, but is autosomally inherited in all other Drosophila species. Genetic evidence indicates no active amylase on the neo-Y chromosome and the X2-chromosomal locus already shows dosage compensation. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the Amy gene cluster has been lost already from the evolving neo-Y chromosome. This finding shows that a relatively new neo-Y chromosome can start to lose genes and hence gradually lose homology with the neo-X. The X2-chromosomal Amy1 is intact and Amy2 contains a complete coding sequence, but has a deletion in the 3'-flanking region. Amy3 is structurally eroded and hampered by missing regulatory motifs. Functional analysis of the X2-chromosomal Amy1 and Amy2 regions from D. miranda in transgenic D. melanogaster flies reveals ectopic AMY1 expression. AMY1 shows the same electrophoretic mobility as the single amylase band in D. miranda, while ectopic AMY2 expression is characterized by a different mobility. Therefore, only the Amy1 gene of the resident Amy cluster remains functional and hence Amy1 is the dosage compensated gene. PMID:9872956

  5. Genome-Wide Gene Expression in relation to Age in Large Laboratory Cohorts of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kimberly A.; Gardner, Kylee; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carlson, Darby J.; Yu, Fang; Eudy, James D.; Zhang, Chi; Harshman, Lawrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a complex process characterized by a steady decline in an organism's ability to perform life-sustaining tasks. In the present study, two cages of approximately 12,000 mated Drosophila melanogaster females were used as a source of RNA from individuals sampled frequently as a function of age. A linear model for microarray data method was used for the microarray analysis to adjust for the box effect; it identified 1,581 candidate aging genes. Cluster analyses using a self-organizing map algorithm on the 1,581 significant genes identified gene expression patterns across different ages. Genes involved in immune system function and regulation, chorion assembly and function, and metabolism were all significantly differentially expressed as a function of age. The temporal pattern of data indicated that gene expression related to aging is affected relatively early in life span. In addition, the temporal variance in gene expression in immune function genes was compared to a random set of genes. There was an increase in the variance of gene expression within each cohort, which was not observed in the set of random genes. This observation is compatible with the hypothesis that D. melanogaster immune function genes lose control of gene expression as flies age. PMID:26090231

  6. A Circadian Clock Gene, Cry, Affects Heart Morphogenesis and Function in Drosophila as Revealed by Optical Coherence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Zeng, Xianxu; Tate, Rebecca E; McKee, Mary L; Capen, Diane E; Zhang, Zhan; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous, entrainable oscillations of physical, mental and behavioural processes in response to local environmental cues such as daylight, which are present in the living beings, including humans. Circadian rhythms have been related to cardiovascular function and pathology. However, the role that circadian clock genes play in heart development and function in a whole animal in vivo are poorly understood. The Drosophila cryptochrome (dCry) is a circadian clock gene that encodes a major component of the circadian clock negative feedback loop. Compared to the embryonic stage, the relative expression levels of dCry showed a significant increase (>100-fold) in Drosophila during the pupa and adult stages. In this study, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system to perform non-invasive and longitudinal analysis of functional and morphological changes in the Drosophila heart throughout its post-embryonic lifecycle for the first time. The Drosophila heart exhibited major morphological and functional alterations during its development. Notably, heart rate (HR) and cardiac activity period (CAP) of Drosophila showed significant variations during the pupa stage, when heart remodeling took place. From the M-mode (2D + time) OCM images, cardiac structural and functional parameters of Drosophila at different developmental stages were quantitatively determined. In order to study the functional role of dCry on Drosophila heart development, we silenced dCry by RNAi in the Drosophila heart and mesoderm, and quantitatively measured heart morphology and function in those flies throughout its development. Silencing of dCry resulted in slower HR, reduced CAP, smaller heart chamber size, pupal lethality and disrupted posterior segmentation that was related to increased expression of a posterior compartment protein, wingless. Collectively, our studies provided novel evidence that the circadian clock gene, dCry, plays an essential

  7. A Circadian Clock Gene, Cry, Affects Heart Morphogenesis and Function in Drosophila as Revealed by Optical Coherence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xianxu; Tate, Rebecca E.; McKee, Mary L.; Capen, Diane E.; Zhang, Zhan; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous, entrainable oscillations of physical, mental and behavioural processes in response to local environmental cues such as daylight, which are present in the living beings, including humans. Circadian rhythms have been related to cardiovascular function and pathology. However, the role that circadian clock genes play in heart development and function in a whole animal in vivo are poorly understood. The Drosophila cryptochrome (dCry) is a circadian clock gene that encodes a major component of the circadian clock negative feedback loop. Compared to the embryonic stage, the relative expression levels of dCry showed a significant increase (>100-fold) in Drosophila during the pupa and adult stages. In this study, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system to perform non-invasive and longitudinal analysis of functional and morphological changes in the Drosophila heart throughout its post-embryonic lifecycle for the first time. The Drosophila heart exhibited major morphological and functional alterations during its development. Notably, heart rate (HR) and cardiac activity period (CAP) of Drosophila showed significant variations during the pupa stage, when heart remodeling took place. From the M-mode (2D + time) OCM images, cardiac structural and functional parameters of Drosophila at different developmental stages were quantitatively determined. In order to study the functional role of dCry on Drosophila heart development, we silenced dCry by RNAi in the Drosophila heart and mesoderm, and quantitatively measured heart morphology and function in those flies throughout its development. Silencing of dCry resulted in slower HR, reduced CAP, smaller heart chamber size, pupal lethality and disrupted posterior segmentation that was related to increased expression of a posterior compartment protein, wingless. Collectively, our studies provided novel evidence that the circadian clock gene, dCry, plays an essential

  8. The Drosophila Clathrin Heavy Chain Gene: Clathrin Function Is Essential in a Multicellular Organism

    PubMed Central

    Bazinet, C.; Katzen, A. L.; Morgan, M.; Mahowald, A. P.; Lemmon, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The clathrin heavy chain (HC) is the major structural polypeptide of the cytoplasmic surface lattice of clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. As a genetic approach to understanding the role of clathrin in cellular morphogenesis and developmental signal transduction, a clathrin heavy chain (Chc) gene of Drosophila melanogaster has been identified by a combination of molecular and classical genetic approaches. Using degenerate primers based on mammalian and yeast clathrin HC sequences, a small fragment of the HC gene was amplified from genomic Drosophila DNA by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic and cDNA clones from phage libraries were isolated and analyzed using this fragment as a probe. The amino acid sequence of the Drosophila clathrin HC deduced from cDNA sequences is 80%, 57% and 49% identical, respectively, with the mammalian, Dictyostelium and yeast HCs. Hybridization in situ to larval polytene chromosomes revealed a single Chc locus at position 13F2 on the X chromosome. A 13-kb genomic Drosophila fragment including the Chc transcription unit was reintroduced into the Drosophila genome via P element-mediated germline transformation. This DNA complemented a group of EMS-induced lethal mutations mapping to the same region of the X chromosome, thus identifying the Chc complementation group. Mutant individuals homozygous or hemizygous for the Chc(1), Chc(2) or Chc(3) alleles developed to a late stage of embryogenesis, but failed to hatch to the first larval stage. A fourth allele, Chc(4), exhibited polyphasic lethality, with a significant number of homozygous and hemizygous offspring surviving to adulthood. Germline clonal analysis of Chc mutant alleles indicated that the three tight lethal alleles were autonomous cell-lethal mutations in the female germline. In contrast, Chc(4) germline clones were viable at a rate comparable to wild type, giving rise to viable adult progeny. However, hemizygous Chc(4) males were invariably sterile. The sterility was

  9. An in vivo RNA interference screen identifies gene networks controlling Drosophila melanogaster blood cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In metazoans, the hematopoietic system plays a key role both in normal development and in defense of the organism. In Drosophila, the cellular immune response involves three types of blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells and lamellocytes. This last cell type is barely present in healthy larvae, but its production is strongly induced upon wasp parasitization or in mutant contexts affecting larval blood cell homeostasis. Notably, several zygotic mutations leading to melanotic mass (or "tumor") formation in larvae have been associated to the deregulated differentiation of lamellocytes. To gain further insights into the gene regulatory network and the mechanisms controlling larval blood cell homeostasis, we conducted a tissue-specific loss of function screen using hemocyte-specific Gal4 drivers and UAS-dsRNA transgenic lines. Results By targeting around 10% of the Drosophila genes, this in vivo RNA interference screen allowed us to recover 59 melanotic tumor suppressor genes. In line with previous studies, we show that melanotic tumor formation is associated with the precocious differentiation of stem-cell like blood progenitors in the larval hematopoietic organ (the lymph gland) and the spurious differentiation of lamellocytes. We also find that melanotic tumor formation can be elicited by defects either in the fat body, the embryo-derived hemocytes or the lymph gland. In addition, we provide a definitive confirmation that lymph gland is not the only source of lamellocytes as embryo-derived plasmatocytes can differentiate into lamellocytes either upon wasp infection or upon loss of function of the Friend of GATA cofactor U-shaped. Conclusions In this study, we identify 55 genes whose function had not been linked to blood cell development or function before in Drosophila. Moreover our analyses reveal an unanticipated plasticity of embryo-derived plasmatocytes, thereby shedding new light on blood cell lineage relationship, and pinpoint the Friend of GATA

  10. Effect of Spaceflight on the Circadian Rhythm, Lifespan and Gene Expression of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kanyan

    2015-01-01

    Space travelers are reported to experience circadian rhythm disruption during spaceflight. However, how the space environment affects circadian rhythm is yet to be determined. The major focus of this study was to investigate the effect of spaceflight on the Drosophila circadian clock at both the behavioral and molecular level. We used China’s Shenzhou-9 spaceship to carry Drosophila. After 13 days of spaceflight, behavior tests showed that the flies maintained normal locomotor activity rhythm and sleep pattern. The expression level and rhythm of major clock genes were also unaffected. However, expression profiling showed differentially regulated output genes of the circadian clock system between space flown and control flies, suggesting that spaceflight affected the circadian output pathway. We also investigated other physiological effects of spaceflight such as lipid metabolism and lifespan, and searched genes significantly affected by spaceflight using microarray analysis. These results provide new information on the effects of spaceflight on circadian rhythm, lipid metabolism and lifespan. Furthermore, we showed that studying the effect of spaceflight on gene expression using samples collected at different Zeitgeber time could obtain different results, suggesting the importance of appropriate sampling procedures in studies on the effects of spaceflight. PMID:25798821

  11. Duplication, Selection and Gene Conversion in a Drosophila mojavensis Female Reproductive Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S.; Markow, Therese A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein components of the Drosophila male ejaculate, several of which evolve rapidly, are critical modulators of reproductive success. Recent studies of female reproductive tract proteins indicate they also are extremely divergent between species, suggesting that reproductive molecules may coevolve between the sexes. Our current understanding of intersexual coevolution, however, is severely limited by the paucity of genetic and evolutionary studies on the female molecules involved. Physiological evidence of ejaculate–female coadaptation, paired with a promiscuous mating system, makes Drosophila mojavensis an exciting model system in which to study the evolution of reproductive proteins. Here we explore the evolutionary dynamics of a five-paralog gene family of female reproductive proteases within populations of D. mojavensis and throughout the repleta species group. We show that the proteins have experienced ongoing gene duplication and adaptive evolution and further exhibit dynamic patterns of pseudogenation, copy number variation, gene conversion, and selection within geographically isolated populations of D. mojavensis. The integration of these patterns in a single gene family has never before been documented in a reproductive protein. PMID:19204376

  12. Shaped Singular Spectrum Analysis for Quantifying Gene Expression, with Application to the Early Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, David

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, with the development of automated microscopy technologies, the volume and complexity of image data on gene expression have increased tremendously. The only way to analyze quantitatively and comprehensively such biological data is by developing and applying new sophisticated mathematical approaches. Here, we present extensions of 2D singular spectrum analysis (2D-SSA) for application to 2D and 3D datasets of embryo images. These extensions, circular and shaped 2D-SSA, are applied to gene expression in the nuclear layer just under the surface of the Drosophila (fruit fly) embryo. We consider the commonly used cylindrical projection of the ellipsoidal Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate how circular and shaped versions of 2D-SSA help to decompose expression data into identifiable components (such as trend and noise), as well as separating signals from different genes. Detection and improvement of under- and overcorrection in multichannel imaging is addressed, as well as the extraction and analysis of 3D features in 3D gene expression patterns. PMID:25945341

  13. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P.; Cooper, Jacob C.; Frizzell, Kimberly A.; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A.; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and non-model systems. PMID:26680200

  14. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P; Cooper, Jacob C; Frizzell, Kimberly A; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-12-18

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers, such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle-regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids resulting from a cross between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and nonmodel systems. PMID:26680200

  15. Identification of Genes Associated with Resilience/Vulnerability to Sleep Deprivation and Starvation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Thimgan, Matthew S.; Seugnet, Laurent; Turk, John; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: Flies mutant for the canonical clock protein cycle (cyc01) exhibit a sleep rebound that is ∼10 times larger than wild-type flies and die after only 10 h of sleep deprivation. Surprisingly, when starved, cyc01 mutants can remain awake for 28 h without demonstrating negative outcomes. Thus, we hypothesized that identifying transcripts that are differentially regulated between waking induced by sleep deprivation and waking induced by starvation would identify genes that underlie the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation and/or protect flies from the negative consequences of waking. Design: We used partial complementary DNA microarrays to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between cyc01 mutants that had been sleep deprived or starved for 7 h. We then used genetics to determine whether disrupting genes involved in lipid metabolism would exhibit alterations in their response to sleep deprivation. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation and starvation. Measurements and Results: We identified 84 genes with transcript levels that were differentially modulated by 7 h of sleep deprivation and starvation in cyc01 mutants and were confirmed in independent samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Several of these genes were predicted to be lipid metabolism genes, including bubblegum, cueball, and CG4500, which based on our data we have renamed heimdall (hll). Using lipidomics we confirmed that knockdown of hll using RNA interference significantly decreased lipid stores. Importantly, genetically modifying bubblegum, cueball, or hll resulted in sleep rebound alterations following sleep deprivation compared to genetic background controls. Conclusions: We have identified a set of genes that may confer resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation and demonstrate that genes involved in lipid metabolism modulate sleep homeostasis. Citation: Thimgan MS

  16. A Screen for Genes Expressed in the Olfactory Organs of Drosophila melanogaster Identifies Genes Involved in Olfactory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Narelle E.; Herr, Anabel; de Bruyne, Marien; Warr, Coral G.

    2012-01-01

    Background For insects the sense of smell and associated olfactory-driven behaviours are essential for survival. Insects detect odorants with families of olfactory receptor proteins that are very different to those of mammals, and there are likely to be other unique genes and genetic pathways involved in the function and development of the insect olfactory system. Methodology/Principal Findings We have performed a genetic screen of a set of 505 Drosophila melanogaster gene trap insertion lines to identify novel genes expressed in the adult olfactory organs. We identified 16 lines with expression in the olfactory organs, many of which exhibited expression of the trapped genes in olfactory receptor neurons. Phenotypic analysis showed that six of the lines have decreased olfactory responses in a behavioural assay, and for one of these we showed that precise excision of the P element reverts the phenotype to wild type, confirming a role for the trapped gene in olfaction. To confirm the identity of the genes trapped in the lines we performed molecular analysis of some of the insertion sites. While for many lines the reported insertion sites were correct, we also demonstrated that for a number of lines the reported location of the element was incorrect, and in three lines there were in fact two pGT element insertions. Conclusions/Significance We identified 16 new genes expressed in the Drosophila olfactory organs, the majority in neurons, and for several of the gene trap lines demonstrated a defect in olfactory-driven behaviour. Further characterisation of these genes and their roles in olfactory system function and development will increase our understanding of how the insect olfactory system has evolved to perform the same essential function to that of mammals, but using very different molecular genetic mechanisms. PMID:22530061

  17. A Cluster of Cuticle Protein Genes of Drosophila Melanogaster at 65a: Sequence, Structure and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Charles, J. P.; Chihara, C.; Nejad, S.; Riddiford, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    A 36-kb genomic DNA segment of the Drosophila melanogaster genome containing 12 clustered cuticle genes has been mapped and partially sequenced. The cluster maps at 65A 5-6 on the left arm of the third chromosome, in agreement with the previously determined location of a putative cluster encompassing the genes for the third instar larval cuticle proteins LCP5, LCP6 and LCP8. This cluster is the largest cuticle gene cluster discovered to date and shows a number of surprising features that explain in part the genetic complexity of the LCP5, LCP6 and LCP8 loci. The genes encoding LCP5 and LCP8 are multiple copy genes and the presence of extensive similarity in their coding regions gives the first evidence for gene conversion in cuticle genes. In addition, five genes in the cluster are intronless. Four of these five have arisen by retroposition. The other genes in the cluster have a single intron located at an unusual location for insect cuticle genes. PMID:9383064

  18. Molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in the Drosophila ananassae subgroup

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Genes with sex-biased expression often show rapid molecular evolution between species. Previous population genetic and comparative genomic studies of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans revealed that male-biased genes have especially high rates of adaptive evolution. To test if this is also the case for other lineages within the melanogaster group, we investigated gene expression in D. ananassae, a species that occurs in structured populations in tropical and subtropical regions. We used custom-made microarrays and published microarray data to characterize the sex-biased expression of 129 D. ananassae genes whose D. melanogaster orthologs had been classified previously as male-biased, female-biased, or unbiased in their expression and had been studied extensively at the population-genetic level. For 43 of these genes we surveyed DNA sequence polymorphism in a natural population of D. ananassae and determined divergence to the sister species D. atripex and D. phaeopleura. Results Sex-biased expression is generally conserved between D. melanogaster and D. ananassae, with the majority of genes exhibiting the same bias in the two species. However, about one-third of the genes have either gained or lost sex-biased expression in one of the species and a small proportion of genes (~4%) have changed bias from one sex to the other. The male-biased genes of D. ananassae show evidence of positive selection acting at the protein level. However, the signal of adaptive protein evolution for male-biased genes is not as strong in D. ananassae as it is in D. melanogaster and is limited to genes with conserved male-biased expression in both species. Within D. ananassae, a significant signal of adaptive evolution is also detected for female-biased and unbiased genes. Conclusions Our findings extend previous observations of widespread adaptive protein evolution to an independent Drosophila lineage, the D. ananassae subgroup. However, the rate of adaptive evolution is

  19. SUMO-Enriched Proteome for Drosophila Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Handu, Mithila; Kaduskar, Bhagyashree; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Soory, Amarendranath; Giri, Ritika; Elango, Vijay Barathi; Gowda, Harsha; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S.

    2015-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification modulates the expression of defense genes in Drosophila, activated by the Toll/nuclear factor-κB and immune-deficient/nuclear factor-κB signaling networks. We have, however, limited understanding of the SUMO-modulated regulation of the immune response and lack information on SUMO targets in the immune system. In this study, we measured the changes to the SUMO proteome in S2 cells in response to a lipopolysaccharide challenge and identified 1619 unique proteins in SUMO-enriched lysates. A confident set of 710 proteins represents the immune-induced SUMO proteome and analysis suggests that specific protein domains, cellular pathways, and protein complexes respond to immune stress. A small subset of the confident set was validated by in-bacto SUMOylation and shown to be bona-fide SUMO targets. These include components of immune signaling pathways such as Caspar, Jra, Kay, cdc42, p38b, 14-3-3ε, as well as cellular proteins with diverse functions, many being components of protein complexes, such as prosß4, Rps10b, SmD3, Tango7, and Aats-arg. Caspar, a human FAF1 ortholog that negatively regulates immune-deficient signaling, is SUMOylated at K551 and responds to treatment with lipopolysaccharide in cultured cells. Our study is one of the first to describe SUMO proteome for the Drosophila immune response. Our data and analysis provide a global framework for the understanding of SUMO modification in the host response to pathogens. PMID:26290570

  20. Sex Bias and Maternal Contribution to Gene Expression Divergence in Drosophila Blastoderm Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Mathilde; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Eisen, Michael B.; Lott, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Early embryogenesis is a unique developmental stage where genetic control of development is handed off from mother to zygote. Yet the contribution of this transition to the evolution of gene expression is poorly understood. Here we study two aspects of gene expression specific to early embryogenesis in Drosophila: sex-biased gene expression prior to the onset of canonical X chromosomal dosage compensation, and the contribution of maternally supplied mRNAs. We sequenced mRNAs from individual unfertilized eggs and precisely staged and sexed blastoderm embryos, and compared levels between D. melanogaster, D. yakuba, D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis. First, we find that mRNA content is highly conserved for a given stage and that studies relying on pooled embryos likely systematically overstate the degree of gene expression divergence. Unlike studies done on larvae and adults where most species show a larger proportion of genes with male-biased expression, we find that transcripts in Drosophila embryos are largely female-biased in all species, likely due to incomplete dosage compensation prior to the activation of the canonical dosage compensation mechanism. The divergence of sex-biased gene expression across species is observed to be often due to lineage-specific decrease of expression; the most drastic example of which is the overall reduction of male expression from the neo-X chromosome in D. pseudoobscura, leading to a pervasive female-bias on this chromosome. We see no evidence for a faster evolution of expression on the X chromosome in embryos (no “faster-X” effect), unlike in adults, and contrary to a previous study on pooled non-sexed embryos. Finally, we find that most genes are conserved in regard to their maternal or zygotic origin of transcription, and present evidence that differences in maternal contribution to the blastoderm transcript pool may be due to species-specific divergence of transcript degradation rates. PMID:26485701

  1. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans as Discovery Platforms for Genes Involved in Human Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Grotewiel, Mike; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the profound clinical significance and strong heritability of alcohol use disorder (AUD), we do not yet have a comprehensive understanding of the naturally occurring genetic variance within the human genome that drives its development. This lack of understanding is likely to be due in part to the large phenotypic and genetic heterogeneities that underlie human AUD. As a complement to genetic studies in humans, many laboratories are using the invertebrate model organisms (iMOs) Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode worm) to identify genetic mechanisms that influence the effects of alcohol (ethanol) on behavior. While these extremely powerful models have identified many genes that influence the behavioral responses to alcohol, in most cases it has remained unclear whether results from behavioral–genetic studies in iMOs are directly applicable to understanding the genetic basis of human AUD. Methods In this review, we critically evaluate the utility of the fly and worm models for identifying genes that influence AUD in humans. Results Based on results published through early 2015, studies in flies and worms have identified 91 and 50 genes, respectively, that influence 1 or more aspects of behavioral responses to alcohol. Collectively, these fly and worm genes correspond to 293 orthologous genes in humans. Intriguingly, 51 of these 293 human genes have been implicated in AUD by at least 1 study in human populations. Conclusions Our analyses strongly suggest that the Drosophila and C. elegans models have considerable utility for identifying orthologs of genes that influence human AUD. PMID:26173477

  2. The relationship between the flamenco gene and gypsy in Drosophila: how to tame a retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Bucheton, A

    1995-09-01

    For a long time, retroviruses have been considered to be restricted to vertebrates. However, the genome of insects contains elements like gypsy in Drosophila melanogaster that are strikingly similar to vertebrate proviruses of retroviruses, which were considered to be transposable elements. Recent results indicate that gypsy has infective properties and is therefore a retrovirus, the first to be identified in invertebrates. It is normally repressed by a host gene called flamenco, which apparently controls the transposition and infective properties of gypsy. This provides an exceptional experimental model to investigate the genetic relationships between retroviruses and their hosts. PMID:7482786

  3. Using en-face optical coherence tomography to analyse gene function in Drosophila Melanogaster larval heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradu, Adrian; Ma, Lisha; Bloor, Jim; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2008-09-01

    In-vivo Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging of the fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster larval heart allows non invasive visualizations and assessment of its cardiac function. In order to image Drosophila heart, we have developed a dedicated imaging instrument able to provide simultaneous OCT and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) images. With this dual imaging system, the heart can easily be located and visualised within the specimen and the change of the heart shape in a cardiac cycle monitored. Here we have used targeted gene expression to knockdown the myospheroid (mys) gene in the larval heart using a specific RNAi construct. By knocking down a β integrin subunit encoded by mys we have recorded an enlarged heart chamber in both diastolic and systolic states. Also, the fraction of reduction of the chamber diameter was smaller in the knockdown heart. These phenotypic differences indicate that impaired cardiac contractility occurs in the heart where the integrin gene express level is reduced. At our knowledge, this is for the first time when it is shown that integrins have a direct relationship to a dilated heart defect.

  4. A Maternal Screen for Genes Regulating Drosophila Oocyte Polarity Uncovers New Steps in Meiotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Vitor; Kimm, Naomi; Lehmann, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic checkpoints monitor chromosome status to ensure correct homologous recombination, genomic integrity, and chromosome segregation. In Drosophila, the persistent presence of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) activates the ATR/Mei-41 checkpoint, delays progression through meiosis, and causes defects in DNA condensation of the oocyte nucleus, the karyosome. Checkpoint activation has also been linked to decreased levels of the TGFα-like molecule Gurken, which controls normal eggshell patterning. We used this easy-to-score eggshell phenotype in a germ-line mosaic screen in Drosophila to identify new genes affecting meiotic progression, DNA condensation, and Gurken signaling. One hundred eighteen new ventralizing mutants on the second chromosome fell into 17 complementation groups. Here we describe the analysis of 8 complementation groups, including Kinesin heavy chain, the SR protein kinase cuaba, the cohesin-related gene dPds5/cohiba, and the Tudor-domain gene montecristo. Our findings challenge the hypothesis that checkpoint activation upon persistent DSBs is exclusively mediated by ATR/Mei-41 kinase and instead reveal a more complex network of interactions that link DSB formation, checkpoint activation, meiotic delay, DNA condensation, and Gurken protein synthesis. PMID:17507684

  5. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  6. Map position and expression of the genes in the 38 region of Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, H; Levine, S; Wang, X; Bonyadi, S; Fu, G; Lasko, P; Suter, B; Doerig, R

    2001-01-01

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequence, an important next step is to extract its biological information by systematic functional analysis of genes. We have produced a high-resolution genetic map of cytological region 38 of Drosophila using 41 deficiency stocks that provide a total of 54 breakpoints within the region. Of a total of 45 independent P-element lines that mapped by in situ hybridization to the region, 14 targeted 7 complementation groups within the 38 region. Additional EMS, X-ray, and spontaneous mutations define a total of 17 complementation groups. Because these two pools partially overlap, the completed analysis revealed 21 distinct complementation groups defined by point mutations. Seven additional functions were defined by trans-heterozygous combinations of deficiencies, resulting in a total of 28 distinct functions. We further produced a developmental expression profile for the 760 kb from 38B to 38E. Of 135 transcription units predicted by GENSCAN, 22 have at least partial homology to mobile genetic elements such as transposons and retroviruses and 17 correspond to previously characterized genes. We analyzed the developmental expression pattern of the remaining genes using poly(A)(+) RNA from ovaries, early and late embryos, larvae, males, and females. We discuss the correlation between GENSCAN predictions and experimentally confirmed transcription units, the high number of male-specific transcripts, and the alignment of the genetic and physical maps in cytological region 38. PMID:11514449

  7. [Male reproductive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster strains with different alleles of the flamenco gene].

    PubMed

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, N I; Karpova, N N; Iuneva, A O; Kim, A I

    2003-05-01

    The allelic state of gene flamenco has been determined in a number of Drosophila melanogaster strains using the ovoD test. The presence of an active copy of gypsy in these strains was detected by restriction analysis. Then male reproduction behavior was studied in the strains carrying a mutation in gene flamenco. In these experiments mating success has been experimentally estimated in groups of flies. It has been demonstrated that the presence of mutant allele flamMS decreases male mating activity irrespective of the presence or absence of mutation white. The active copy of gypsy does not affect mating activity in the absence of the mutation in gene flamenco. Individual analysis has demonstrated that that mutation flamMS results in characteristic changes in courtship: flamMS males exhibit a delay in the transition from the orientation stage to the vibration stage (the so-called vibration delay). The role of locus flamenco in the formation of male mating behavior in Drosophila is discussed. PMID:12838614

  8. MitoDrome: a database of Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes encoding proteins targeted to the mitochondrion

    PubMed Central

    Sardiello, Marco; Licciulli, Flavio; Catalano, Domenico; Attimonelli, Marcella; Caggese, Corrado

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles present in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells; although they have their own DNA, the majority of the proteins necessary for a functional mitochondrion are coded by the nuclear DNA and only after transcription and translation they are imported in the mitochondrion as proteins. The primary role of the mitochondrion is electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. Although it has been studied for a long time, the interest of researchers in mitochondria is still alive thanks to the discovery of mitochondrial role in apoptosis, aging and cancer. Aim of the MitoDrome database is to annotate the Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in order to contribute to the functional characterization of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins and to knowledge of gene diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunctions. Indeed D. melanogaster is one of the most studied organisms and a model for the Human genome. Data are derived from the comparison of Human mitochondrial proteins versus the Drosophila genome, ESTs and cDNA sequence data available in the FlyBase database. Links from the MitoDrome entries to the related homologous entries available in MitoNuC will be soon imple-mented. The MitoDrome database is available at http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/BIG/MitoDrome. Data are organised in a flat-file format and can be retrieved using the SRS system. PMID:12520013

  9. The Drosophila slamdance gene: a mutation in an aminopeptidase can cause seizure, paralysis and neuronal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, HaiGuang; Tan, Jeff; Reynolds, Elaine; Kuebler, Daniel; Faulhaber, Sally; Tanouye, Mark

    2002-01-01

    We report here the characterization of slamdance (sda), a Drosophila melanogaster "bang-sensitive" (BS) paralytic mutant. This mutant exhibits hyperactive behavior and paralysis following a mechanical "bang" or electrical shock. Electrophysiological analyses have shown that this mutant is much more prone to seizure episodes than normal flies because it has a drastically lowered seizure threshold. Through genetic mapping, molecular cloning, and RNA interference, we have demonstrated that the sda phenotype can be attributed to a mutation in the Drosophila homolog of the human aminopeptidase N (APN) gene. Furthermore, using mRNA in situ hybridization and LacZ staining, we have found that the sda gene is expressed specifically in the central nervous system at particular developmental stages. Together, these results suggest that the bang sensitivity in sda mutants is caused by a defective APN gene that somehow increases seizure susceptibility. Finally, by using the sda mutation as a sensitized background, we have been able to identify a rich variety of sda enhancers and other independent BS mutations. PMID:12454073

  10. Essential, Overlapping and Redundant Roles of the Drosophila Protein Phosphatase 1α and 1β Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Jasmin; Gross, Sascha; Bennett, Daimark; Alphey, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Protein serine/threonine phosphatase type 1 (PP1) has been found in all eukaryotes examined to date and is involved in the regulation of many cellular functions, including glycogen metabolism, muscle contraction, and mitosis. In Drosophila, four genes code for the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1c), three of which belong to the PP1α subtype. PP1β9C (flapwing) encodes the fourth PP1c gene and has a specific and nonredundant function as a nonmuscle myosin phosphatase. PP1α87B is the major form and contributes ∼80% of the total PP1 activity. We describe the first mutant alleles of PP1α96A and show that PP1α96A is not an essential gene, but seems to have a function in the regulation of nonmuscle myosin. We show that overexpression of the PP1α isozymes does not rescue semilethal PP1β9C mutants, whereas overexpression of either PP1α96A or PP1β9C does rescue a lethal PP1α87B mutant combination, showing that the lethality is due to a quantitative reduction in the level of PP1c. Overexpression of PP1β9C does not rescue a PP1α87B, PP1α96A double mutant, suggesting an essential PP1α-specific function in Drosophila. PMID:17513890

  11. Effect of anthranilic acid on the catabolite repression of a Drosophila amylase gene in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.M.; Moehring, J.M.; Chernin, M.I.

    1987-05-01

    A Drosophila pseudoobscura amylase pseudogene cloned in Escherichia coli is expressed at high levels. The expression of this pseudogene is repressed when glucose (0.5% final conc) is added to a starch minimal medium culture of E. coli cells that contain the amylase plasmid pAMY17F. Addition of anthranilic acid (7 mM final conc.) to catabolite repressed cells acts like adenosine 3',5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by derepressing the amylase pseudogene at the promoter. This is consistent with the Metabolite Gene Regulation (MGR) model proposed by Kline et al. which suggests that small molecules can circumvent the necessity for cAMP. Catabolite repression of the amylase structural gene of D. pseudoobscura has been previously shown. This would suggest that the amylase pseudogene expression in E. coli is either from a Drosophila structural gene promoter co-cloned with the pseudogene or a catabolite repressible E. coli promoter placed in the proper orientation and reading frame during the rearrangement of pAMY17F.

  12. Highly Improved Gene Targeting by Germline-Specific Cas9 Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shu; Ueda, Ryu

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple yet extremely efficient platform for systematic gene targeting by the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 in Drosophila. The system comprises two transgenic strains: one expressing Cas9 protein from the germline-specific nanos promoter and the other ubiquitously expressing a custom guide RNA (gRNA) that targets a unique site in the genome. The two strains are crossed to form an active Cas9–gRNA complex specifically in germ cells, which cleaves and mutates the target site. We demonstrate rapid generation of mutants in seven neuropeptide and two microRNA genes in which no mutants have been described. Founder animals stably expressing Cas9–gRNA transmitted germline mutations to an average of 60% of their progeny, a dramatic improvement in efficiency over the previous methods based on transient Cas9 expression. Simultaneous cleavage of two sites by co-expression of two gRNAs efficiently induced internal deletion with frequencies of 4.3–23%. Our method is readily scalable to high-throughput gene targeting, thereby accelerating comprehensive functional annotation of the Drosophila genome. PMID:24002648

  13. Inter- and intraspecific variation in Drosophila genes with sex-biased expression.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lena; Grath, Sonja; von Heckel, Korbinian; Parsch, John

    2012-01-01

    Genes with sexually dimorphic expression (sex-biased genes) often evolve rapidly and are thought to make an important contribution to reproductive isolation between species. We examined the molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in Drosophila melanogaster and D. ananassae, which represent two independent lineages within the melanogaster group. We find that strong purifying selection limits protein sequence variation within species, but that a considerable fraction of divergence between species can be attributed to positive selection. In D. melanogaster, the proportion of adaptive substitutions between species is greatest for male-biased genes and is especially high for those on the X chromosome. In contrast, male-biased genes do not show unusually high variation within or between populations. A similar pattern is seen at the level of gene expression, where sex-biased genes show high expression divergence between species, but low divergence between populations. In D. ananassae, there is no increased rate of adaptation of male-biased genes, suggesting that the type or strength of selection acting on sex-biased genes differs between lineages. PMID:22315698

  14. Inter- and Intraspecific Variation in Drosophila Genes with Sex-Biased Expression

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Lena; Grath, Sonja; von Heckel, Korbinian; Parsch, John

    2012-01-01

    Genes with sexually dimorphic expression (sex-biased genes) often evolve rapidly and are thought to make an important contribution to reproductive isolation between species. We examined the molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in Drosophila melanogaster and D. ananassae, which represent two independent lineages within the melanogaster group. We find that strong purifying selection limits protein sequence variation within species, but that a considerable fraction of divergence between species can be attributed to positive selection. In D. melanogaster, the proportion of adaptive substitutions between species is greatest for male-biased genes and is especially high for those on the X chromosome. In contrast, male-biased genes do not show unusually high variation within or between populations. A similar pattern is seen at the level of gene expression, where sex-biased genes show high expression divergence between species, but low divergence between populations. In D. ananassae, there is no increased rate of adaptation of male-biased genes, suggesting that the type or strength of selection acting on sex-biased genes differs between lineages. PMID:22315698

  15. Effects of Gene Dose, Chromatin, and Network Topology on Expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hangnoh; Cho, Dong-Yeon; Whitworth, Cale; Eisman, Robert; Phelps, Melissa; Roote, John; Kaufman, Thomas; Cook, Kevin; Russell, Steven; Przytycka, Teresa; Oliver, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Deletions, commonly referred to as deficiencies by Drosophila geneticists, are valuable tools for mapping genes and for genetic pathway discovery via dose-dependent suppressor and enhancer screens. More recently, it has become clear that deviations from normal gene dosage are associated with multiple disorders in a range of species including humans. While we are beginning to understand some of the transcriptional effects brought about by gene dosage changes and the chromosome rearrangement breakpoints associated with them, much of this work relies on isolated examples. We have systematically examined deficiencies of the left arm of chromosome 2 and characterize gene-by-gene dosage responses that vary from collapsed expression through modest partial dosage compensation to full or even over compensation. We found negligible long-range effects of creating novel chromosome domains at deletion breakpoints, suggesting that cases of gene regulation due to altered nuclear architecture are rare. These rare cases include trans de-repression when deficiencies delete chromatin characterized as repressive in other studies. Generally, effects of breakpoints on expression are promoter proximal (~100bp) or in the gene body. Effects of deficiencies genome-wide are in genes with regulatory relationships to genes within the deleted segments, highlighting the subtle expression network defects in these sensitized genetic backgrounds. PMID:27599372

  16. Genes encoding novel secreted and transmembrane proteins are temporally and spatially regulated during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, Alejandro; Hödar, Christian; Hanna, Patricia; Ibáñez, Freddy; Moreno, Pablo; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Pastenes, Luis; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica

    2009-01-01

    Background Morphogenetic events that shape the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are tightly controlled by a genetic program in which specific sets of genes are up-regulated. We used a suppressive subtractive hybridization procedure to identify a group of developmentally regulated genes during early stages of D. melanogaster embryogenesis. We studied the spatiotemporal activity of these genes in five different intervals covering 12 stages of embryogenesis. Results Microarrays were constructed to confirm induction of expression and to determine the temporal profile of isolated subtracted cDNAs during embryo development. We identified a set of 118 genes whose expression levels increased significantly in at least one developmental interval compared with a reference interval. Of these genes, 53% had a phenotype and/or molecular function reported in the literature, whereas 47% were essentially uncharacterized. Clustering analysis revealed demarcated transcript groups with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental intervals. In situ hybridization assays were carried out on 23 uncharacterized genes, 15 of which proved to have spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns. Among these 15 uncharacterized genes, 13 were found to encode putative secreted and transmembrane proteins. For three of them we validated our protein sequence predictions by expressing their cDNAs in Drosophila S2R+ cells and analyzed the subcellular distribution of recombinant proteins. We then focused on the functional characterization of the gene CG6234. Inhibition of CG6234 by RNA interference resulted in morphological defects in embryos, suggesting the involvement of this gene in germ band retraction. Conclusion Our data have yielded a list of developmentally regulated D. melanogaster genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis and provide new information on the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several uncharacterized genes. In particular, we recovered a substantial number of

  17. Lack of global meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and paucity of tissue-specific gene expression on the Drosophila X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paucity of male-biased genes on the Drosophila X chromosome is a well-established phenomenon, thought to be specifically linked to the role of these genes in reproduction and/or their expression in the meiotic male germline. In particular, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been widely considered a driving force behind depletion of spermatocyte-biased X-linked genes in Drosophila by analogy with mammals, even though the existence of global MCSI in Drosophila has not been proven. Results Microarray-based study and qRT-PCR analyses show that the dynamics of gene expression during testis development are very similar between X-linked and autosomal genes, with both showing transcriptional activation concomitant with meiosis. However, the genes showing at least ten-fold expression bias toward testis are significantly underrepresented on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the genes with similar expression bias toward tissues other than testis, even those not apparently associated with reproduction, are also strongly underrepresented on the X. Bioinformatics analysis shows that while tissue-specific genes often bind silencing-associated factors in embryonic and cultured cells, this trend is less prominent for the X-linked genes. Conclusions Our data show that the global meiotic inactivation of the X chromosome does not occur in Drosophila. Paucity of testis-biased genes on the X appears not to be linked to reproduction or germline-specific events, but rather reflects a general underrepresentation of tissue-biased genes on this chromosome. Our analyses suggest that the activation/repression switch mechanisms that probably orchestrate the highly-biased expression of tissue-specific genes are generally not efficient on the X chromosome. This effect, probably caused by dosage compensation counteracting repression of the X-linked genes, may be the cause of the exodus of highly tissue-biased genes to the autosomes. PMID:21542906

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster cinnabar gene is a cell autonomous genetic marker in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Nagaraja; O'Brochta, David A

    2005-07-01

    The cinnabar gene of Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen) encodes for kynurenine hydroxylase, an enzyme involved in ommochrome biosynthesis. This gene is commonly included as a visible genetic marker in gene vectors used to create transgenic Aedes aegypti (L.) that are homozygous for the khw allele, the mosquito homolog of cinnabar. Unexpectedly, the phenotype of cells expressing kynurenine hydroxylase in transgenic Ae. aegypti is cell autonomous as demonstrated by the recovery of insects heterozygous for the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene with mosaic eye color patterns. In addition, a transgenic gynandromorph was recovered in which one-half of the insect was expressing the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene, including one eye with red pigmentation, whereas the other half of the insect was homozygous khw and included a white eye. The cell autonomous behavior of cinnabar in transgenic Ae. aegypti is unexpected and increases the utility of this genetic marker. PMID:16119567

  19. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  20. GAL4 enhancer traps that can be used to drive gene expression in developing Drosophila spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Stephanie M; Monk, Adrian C; Siddall, Nicole A; Johnston, Neisha L; Hime, Gary R

    2012-12-01

    The Drosophila testis has proven to be a valuable model organ for investigation of germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance and differentiation as well as elucidation of the genetic programs that regulate differentiation of daughter spermatogonia. Development of germ cell specific GAL4 driver transgenes has facilitated investigation of gene function in GSCs and spermatogonia but specific GAL4 tools are not available for analysis of postmitotic spermatogonial differentiation into spermatocytes. We have screened publically available pGT1 strains, a GAL4-encoding gene trap collection, to identify lines that can drive gene expression in late spermatogonia and early spermatocytes. While we were unable to identify any germline-specific drivers, we did identify an insertion in the chiffon locus, which drove expression specifically in early spermatocytes within the germline along with the somatic cyst cells of the testis. PMID:22926963

  1. Sexual conflict is not counterbalanced by good genes in the laboratory Drosophila melanogaster model system.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A D; Hannes, A M; Mirzatuny, A; Rice, W R

    2008-11-01

    Sexual conflict theory is based on the observation that females of many species are harmed through their interactions with males. Direct harm to females, however, can potentially be counterbalanced by indirect genetic benefits, where females make up for a reduction in offspring quantity by an increase in offspring quality through a generic increase in offspring fitness (good genes) and/or one restricted to the context of sexual selection (sexy sons). Here, we quantify the magnitude of the good genes mechanism of indirect benefits in a laboratory-adapted population of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that despite high-standing genetic variance for fitness, females gain at most only a modest benefit through the good genes form of indirect benefits--far too little to counterbalance the direct cost of male-induced harm. PMID:18681915

  2. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  3. The Drosophila melanogaster developmental gene g1 encodes a variant zinc-finger-motif protein.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M L; Côté, S

    1993-03-30

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mechanisms involved in the pattern formation of complex internal organs are still largely unknown. However, the identity of the molecular determinants that control the development of these specific tissues is emerging from the combined use of genetic and molecular approaches. We have cloned a gene that is expressed in the mesoderm, one of the fundamental embryonic germ layers which gives rise to internal structures, such as the musculature. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of this gene, designated as g1. The nucleotide (nt) sequence of its cDNA shows an open reading frame of 852 nt, which encodes a 32-kDa protein with two putative zinc fingers, and a serine/glutamine/proline-rich region. These features indicate a functional role for g1, which remains to be elucidated, in regulating gene expression during mesoderm formation. PMID:8462875

  4. Interaction between bisphenol A and dietary sugar affects global gene transcription in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Alan T.; Lemos, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to environmental toxins is a public health issue. The microarray data available in the Gene Expression Omnibus database under accession number GSE55655 and GSE55670GSE55655GSE55670 show the isolated and combined effects of dietary sugar and two organic compounds present in a variety of plastics [bisphenol A (BPA) and Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)] on global gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster. The study was carried out with samples collected from flies exposed to these compounds for a limited period of time (48 h) in the adult stage, or throughout the entire development of the insect. The arrays were normalized using the limma/Bioconductor package. Differential expression was inferred using linear models in limma and BAGEL. The data show that each compound had its unique consequences to gene expression, and that the individual effect of each organic compound is maximized with the joint ingestion of dietary sugar. PMID:26484116

  5. Family size evolution in Drosophila chemosensory gene families: a comparative analysis with a critical appraisal of methods.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Francisca C; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Campos, Jose Luis; Rozas, Julio

    2014-07-01

    Gene turnover rates and the evolution of gene family sizes are important aspects of genome evolution. Here, we use curated sequence data of the major chemosensory gene families from Drosophila-the gustatory receptor, odorant receptor, ionotropic receptor, and odorant-binding protein families-to conduct a comparative analysis among families, exploring different methods to estimate gene birth and death rates, including an ad hoc simulation study. Remarkably, we found that the state-of-the-art methods may produce very different rate estimates, which may lead to disparate conclusions regarding the evolution of chemosensory gene family sizes in Drosophila. Among biological factors, we found that a peculiarity of D. sechellia's gene turnover rates was a major source of bias in global estimates, whereas gene conversion had negligible effects for the families analyzed herein. Turnover rates vary considerably among families, subfamilies, and ortholog groups although all analyzed families were quite dynamic in terms of gene turnover. Computer simulations showed that the methods that use ortholog group information appear to be the most accurate for the Drosophila chemosensory families. Most importantly, these results reveal the potential of rate heterogeneity among lineages to severely bias some turnover rate estimation methods and the need of further evaluating the performance of these methods in a more diverse sampling of gene families and phylogenetic contexts. Using branch-specific codon substitution models, we find further evidence of positive selection in recently duplicated genes, which attests to a nonneutral aspect of the gene birth-and-death process. PMID:24951565

  6. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  7. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

    PubMed

    Prata, Guilherme N; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Ramos, Alexandre F

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ∼1% of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes. PMID:26986358

  8. Regulatory autonomy and molecular characterization of the Drosophila out at first gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, D.E.; Merli, C.A.; Cygan, J.A.; Shelby, R.; Blackman, R.K.

    1995-03-01

    Our previous work has shown that the expression of the Drosophila decapentaplegic (dpp) gene in imaginal disks is controlled by a 30 kb array of enhancers located 3{prime} of the dpp coding region. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of out at first (oaf), a gene located near this enhancer region. Transcription of oaf results in three classes of alternatively polyadenylated RNAs whose expression is developmentally regulated. All oaf transcripts contain two adjacent open reading frames separated by a single UGA stop codon. Suppression of the UGA codon during translation, as seen previously in Drosophila, could lead to the production of different proteins from the same RNA. During oogenesis, oaf RNA is expressed in nurse cells of all ages and maternally contributed to the egg. During embryonic development, zygotic transcription of the gene occurs in small clusters of cells in most or all segments at the time of germband extension and subsequently in a segmentally repeated pattern in the developing central nervous system. The gene is also expressed in the embryonic, larval and adult gonads of both sexes. We also characterize an enhancer trap line with its transposon inserted within the oaf gene and use it to generate six recessive oaf mutations. All six cause death near the beginning of the first larval instar, with two characterized lines showing nervous system defects. Last, we discuss our data in light of the observation that the enhancers controlling dpp expression in the imaginal disks have no effect on the relatively nearby oaf gene. 67 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Cloning and characterization of two vertebrate homologs of the Drosophila eyes absent gene.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, J E; Bui, Q T; Steingrímsson, E; Nagle, D L; Fu, W; Genin, A; Spinner, N B; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Bucan, M; Bonini, N M

    1997-02-01

    The Drosophila eyes absent (eya) gene plays an essential role in the events that lead to proper development of the fly eye and embryo. Here we report the analysis of two human and two mouse homologs of the fly eya gene. Sequence comparison reveals a large domain of approximately 270 amino acids in the carboxyl terminus of the predicted mammalian proteins that shows 53% identity between the fly sequence and all of the vertebrate homologs. This Eya-homology domain is of novel sequence, with no previously identified motifs. RNA hybridization studies indicate that the mouse genes are expressed during embryogenesis and in select tissues of the adult. Both mouse Eya genes are expressed in the eye, suggesting that these genes may function in eye development in vertebrates as eya does in the fly. The mouse Eya2 gene maps to chromosome 2 in the region syntenic with human chromosome 20q13, and the mouse Eya2 gene maps to chromosome 4 in the region syntenic with human chromosome 1p36. Our findings support the notion that several families of genes (Pax-6/eyeless, Six-3/sine oculis, and Eya) play related and critical roles in the eye for both files and vertebrates. PMID:9049631

  10. Identification of Genes That Promote or Inhibit Olfactory Memory Formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Walkinshaw, Erica; Gai, Yunchao; Farkas, Caitlin; Richter, Daniel; Nicholas, Eric; Keleman, Krystyna; Davis, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster and other organisms have been pursued to filter the genome for genetic functions important for memory formation. Such screens have employed primarily chemical or transposon-mediated mutagenesis and have identified numerous mutants including classical memory mutants, dunce and rutabaga. Here, we report the results of a large screen using panneuronal RNAi expression to identify additional genes critical for memory formation. We identified >500 genes that compromise memory when inhibited (low hits), either by disrupting the development and normal function of the adult animal or by participating in the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying memory formation. We also identified >40 genes that enhance memory when inhibited (high hits). The dunce gene was identified as one of the low hits and further experiments were performed to map the effects of the dunce RNAi to the α/β and γ mushroom body neurons. Additional behavioral experiments suggest that dunce knockdown in the mushroom body neurons impairs memory without significantly affecting acquisition. We also characterized one high hit, sickie, to show that RNAi knockdown of this gene enhances memory through effects in dopaminergic neurons without apparent effects on acquisition. These studies further our understanding of two genes involved in memory formation, provide a valuable list of genes that impair memory that may be important for understanding the neurophysiology of memory or neurodevelopmental disorders, and offer a new resource of memory suppressor genes that will aid in understanding restraint mechanisms employed by the brain to optimize resources. PMID:25644700

  11. Stochastic Spatio-Temporal Dynamic Model for Gene/Protein Interaction Network in Early Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the possible mechanisms for eve stripe formation of Drosophila embryo, a spatio-temporal gene/protein interaction network model is proposed to mimic dynamic behaviors of protein synthesis, protein decay, mRNA decay, protein diffusion, transcription regulations and autoregulation to analyze the interplay of genes and proteins at different compartments in early embryogenesis. In this study, we use the maximum likelihood (ML) method to identify the stochastic 3-D Embryo Space-Time (3-DEST) dynamic model for gene/protein interaction network via 3-D mRNA and protein expression data and then use the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to prune the gene/protein interaction network. The identified gene/protein interaction network allows us not only to analyze the dynamic interplay of genes and proteins on the border of eve stripes but also to infer that eve stripes are established and maintained by network motifs built by the cooperation between transcription regulations and diffusion mechanisms in early embryogenesis. Literature reference with the wet experiments of gene mutations provides a clue for validating the identified network. The proposed spatio-temporal dynamic model can be extended to gene/protein network construction of different biological phenotypes, which depend on compartments, e.g. postnatal stem/progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:20054403

  12. Comparative transcriptome analysis among parental inbred and crosses reveals the role of dominance gene expression in heterosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xianwen; Li, Rongni; Li, Qianqian; Bao, Haigang; Wu, Changxin

    2016-01-01

    We observed heteroses for body weight in Drosophila melanogaster after generating hybrids from three inbred lines. To better understand the mechanism for this phenomenon at the mRNA level, we compared the mRNA profiles of the parental and hybrid lines using high-throughput RNA-seq. A total of 5877 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found and about 92% of these exhibited parental expression level dominance. Genes in the dominance category were functionally characterized using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and the gene classifications offered by the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium. The analysis identified genes associated with crucial processes such as development and growth in all three crosses. Functional assignments involving aminoglycan metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, and galactose metabolism are significantly overrepresented amongst the 215 common dominance DEGs. We conclude that dominance DEGs are important in heteroses in Drosophila melanogaster and contribute specifically to body weight heterosis. PMID:26928435

  13. Haplotype test reveals departure from neutrality in a segment of the white gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, D.A.; Stephan, W.

    1995-12-01

    Restriction map studies previously revealed extensive linkage disequilibria in the transcriptional unit of the white locus in natural Drosophila melanogaster populations. To understand the causes of these disequilibria, we sequenced a 4722-bp region of the white gene from 15 lines of D. melanogaster and 1 line of Drosophila simulans. Statistical tests applied to the entire 4722-bp region do not reject neutrality. In contrast, a test for high-frequency haplotypes ({open_quotes}Haplotype test{close_quotes}) revealed an 834-bp segment, encompassing the 3{prime} end of intron 1 to the 3{prime} end of intron 2, in which the structure of variation deviates significantly from the predictions of a neutral equilibrium model. The variants in this 834-bp segment segregate as single haplotype blocks. We propose that these unusually large haplotype blocks are due to positive selection on polymorphisms within the white gene, including a replacement polymorphism, Arg{yields}Leu, within this segment. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gene Duplication and Adaptive Evolution of Digestive Proteases in Drosophila arizonae Female Reproductive Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S; Swanson, Willie J; Markow, Therese A

    2007-01-01

    It frequently has been postulated that intersexual coevolution between the male ejaculate and the female reproductive tract is a driving force in the rapid evolution of reproductive proteins. The dearth of research on female tracts, however, presents a major obstacle to empirical tests of this hypothesis. Here, we employ a comparative EST approach to identify 241 candidate female reproductive proteins in Drosophila arizonae, a repleta group species in which physiological ejaculate–female coevolution has been documented. Thirty-one of these proteins exhibit elevated amino acid substitution rates, making them candidates for molecular coevolution with the male ejaculate. Strikingly, we also discovered 12 unique digestive proteases whose expression is specific to the D. arizonae lower female reproductive tract. These enzymes belong to classes most commonly found in the gastrointestinal tracts of a diverse array of organisms. We show that these proteases are associated with recent, lineage-specific gene duplications in the Drosophila repleta species group, and exhibit strong signatures of positive selection. Observation of adaptive evolution in several female reproductive tract proteins indicates they are active players in the evolution of reproductive tract interactions. Additionally, pervasive gene duplication, adaptive evolution, and rapid acquisition of a novel digestive function by the female reproductive tract points to a novel coevolutionary mechanism of ejaculate–female interaction. PMID:17784792

  15. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    PubMed

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R

    2001-08-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog. cype is an essential gene whose mutations are lethal and show pleiotropic phenotypes. The 77-amino acid peptide encoded by cype is 46% identical and 59% similar to the human subunit (75 amino acids). The transcripts are expressed maternally and throughout development in localized regions. They are found predominantly in the central nervous system of the embryo; in the central region of imaginal discs; in the germarium, follicular, and nurse cells of the ovary; and in testis. A search in the Genome Annotation Database of Drosophila revealed the absence of subunit VIIb and the presence of 9 putative nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits with high identity scores when compared to the 10 human subunits. PMID:11514451

  16. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R

    2001-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog. cype is an essential gene whose mutations are lethal and show pleiotropic phenotypes. The 77-amino acid peptide encoded by cype is 46% identical and 59% similar to the human subunit (75 amino acids). The transcripts are expressed maternally and throughout development in localized regions. They are found predominantly in the central nervous system of the embryo; in the central region of imaginal discs; in the germarium, follicular, and nurse cells of the ovary; and in testis. A search in the Genome Annotation Database of Drosophila revealed the absence of subunit VIIb and the presence of 9 putative nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits with high identity scores when compared to the 10 human subunits. PMID:11514451

  17. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. MiMIC: a highly versatile transposon insertion resource for engineering Drosophila melanogaster genes

    PubMed Central

    Venken, Koen J. T.; Schulze, Karen L.; Haelterman, Nele A.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Evans-Holm, Martha; Carlson, Joseph W.; Levis, Robert W.; Spradling, Allan C.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the versatility of a collection of insertions of the transposon Minos mediated integration cassette (MiMIC), in Drosophila melanogaster. MiMIC contains a gene-trap cassette and the yellow+ marker flanked by two inverted bacteriophage ΦC31 attP sites. MiMIC integrates almost at random in the genome to create sites for DNA manipulation. The attP sites allow the replacement of the intervening sequence of the transposon with any other sequence through recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). We can revert insertions that function as gene traps and cause mutant phenotypes to wild type by RMCE and modify insertions to control GAL4 or QF overexpression systems or perform lineage analysis using the Flp system. Insertions within coding introns can be exchanged with protein-tag cassettes to create fusion proteins to follow protein expression and perform biochemical experiments. The applications of MiMIC vastly extend the Drosophila melanogaster toolkit. PMID:21985007

  19. Identification of the Drosophila skpA gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    SciTech Connect

    Dang Thi Phuong Thao; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu . E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp

    2006-11-01

    SKPa is component of a Drosophila SCF complex that functions in combination with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcD1. skpA null mutation results in centrosome overduplication, unusual chromatin condensation, defective endoreduplication and cell-cycle progression. While the molecular mechanisms that regulate expression of the skpA gene are poorly understood, the DNA replication-related element (DRE) and the DRE-binding factor (DREF) play important roles in regulating proliferation-related genes in Drosophila and DRE (5'-TATCGATA) and DRE-like (5'-CATCGATT) sequences were here found to be involved in skpA promoter activity. Thus both luciferase transient expression assays in cultured Drosophila S2 cells using skpA promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids and anti-lacZ immunostaining of various tissues from transgenic third instar larvae carrying the skpA promoter-lacZ fusion genes provided supportive evidence. Furthermore, anti-SKPa immunostaining of eye imaginal discs from flies overexpressing DREF showed ectopic expression of protein in the region posterior to the morphogenetic furrow where DREF is overexpressed. Knockdown of DREF in some tissues where SKPa distribution is well known almost completely abrogated the skpA gene expression. These findings, taken together, indicate that the Drosophila skpA gene is a novel target of the transcription factor DREF.

  20. Gene Model Annotations for Drosophila melanogaster: Impact of High-Throughput Data

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Beverley B.; dos Santos, Gilberto; Crosby, Madeline A.; Emmert, David B.; St. Pierre, Susan E.; Gramates, L. Sian; Zhou, Pinglei; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Falls, Kathleen; Strelets, Victor; Russo, Susan M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the current status of the FlyBase annotated gene set for Drosophila melanogaster and highlight improvements based on high-throughput data. The FlyBase annotated gene set consists entirely of manually annotated gene models, with the exception of some classes of small non-coding RNAs. All gene models have been reviewed using evidence from high-throughput datasets, primarily from the modENCODE project. These datasets include RNA-Seq coverage data, RNA-Seq junction data, transcription start site profiles, and translation stop-codon read-through predictions. New annotation guidelines were developed to take into account the use of the high-throughput data. We describe how this flood of new data was incorporated into thousands of new and revised annotations. FlyBase has adopted a philosophy of excluding low-confidence and low-frequency data from gene model annotations; we also do not attempt to represent all possible permutations for complex and modularly organized genes. This has allowed us to produce a high-confidence, manageable gene annotation dataset that is available at FlyBase (http://flybase.org). Interesting aspects of new annotations include new genes (coding, non-coding, and antisense), many genes with alternative transcripts with very long 3′ UTRs (up to 15–18 kb), and a stunning mismatch in the number of male-specific genes (approximately 13% of all annotated gene models) vs. female-specific genes (less than 1%). The number of identified pseudogenes and mutations in the sequenced strain also increased significantly. We discuss remaining challenges, for instance, identification of functional small polypeptides and detection of alternative translation starts. PMID:26109357

  1. Dietary switch reveals fast coordinated gene expression changes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feifei; Tatar, Marc; Helfand, Stephen L.; Neretti, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) reduces age-specific mortality and increases lifespan in many organisms. DR elicits a large number of physiological changes, however many are undoubtedly not related to longevity. Whole-genome gene expression studies have typically revealed hundreds to thousands of differentially expressed genes in response to DR, and a key open question is which subset of genes mediates longevity. Here we performed transcriptional profiling of fruit flies in a closely spaced time series immediately following a switch to the DR regime and identified four patterns of transcriptional dynamics. Most informatively we find 144 genes rapidly switched to the same level observed in the DR cohort and are hence strong candidates as proximal mediators of reduced mortality upon DR. This class was enriched for genes involved in carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism. Folate biosynthesis was the only pathway enriched for gene up-regulated upon DR. Four among the down-regulated genes are involved in key regulatory steps within the pentose phosphate pathway, which has been previously associated with lifespan extension in Drosophila. Combined analysis of dietary switch with whole-genome time-course profiling can identify transcriptional responses that are closely associated with and perhaps causal to longevity assurance conferred by dietary restriction. PMID:24864304

  2. The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dopa Decarboxylase Gene Cluster of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Stathakis, D. G.; Pentz, E. S.; Freeman, M. E.; Kullman, J.; Hankins, G. R.; Pearlson, N. J.; Wright, TRF.

    1995-01-01

    We report the complete molecular organization of the Dopa decarboxylase gene cluster. Mutagenesis screens recovered 77 new Df(2L)TW130 recessive lethal mutations. These new alleles combined with 263 previously isolated mutations in the cluster to define 18 essential genes. In addition, seven new deficiencies were isolated and characterized. Deficiency mapping, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and P-element-mediated germline transformation experiments determined the gene order for all 18 loci. Genomic and cDNA restriction endonuclease mapping, Northern blot analysis and DNA sequencing provided information on exact gene location, mRNA size and transcriptional direction for most of these loci. In addition, this analysis identified two transcription units that had not previously been identified by extensive mutagenesis screening. Most of the loci are contained within two dense subclusters. We discuss the effectiveness of mutagens and strategies used in our screens, the variable mutability of loci within the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, the cytological and molecular organization of the Ddc gene cluster, the validity of the one band-one gene hypothesis and a possible purpose for the clustering of genes in the Ddc region. PMID:8647399

  3. The Drosophila wings apart gene anchors a novel, evolutionarily conserved pathway of neuromuscular development.

    PubMed

    Morriss, Ginny R; Jaramillo, Carmelita T; Mikolajczak, Crystal M; Duong, Sandy; Jaramillo, Maryann S; Cripps, Richard M

    2013-11-01

    wings apart (wap) is a recessive, semilethal gene located on the X chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster, which is required for normal wing-vein patterning. We show that the wap mutation also results in loss of the adult jump muscle. We use complementation mapping and gene-specific RNA interference to localize the wap locus to the proximal X chromosome. We identify the annotated gene CG14614 as the gene affected by the wap mutation, since one wap allele contains a non-sense mutation in CG14614, and a genomic fragment containing only CG14614 rescues the jump-muscle phenotypes of two wap mutant alleles. The wap gene lies centromere-proximal to touch-insensitive larva B and centromere-distal to CG14619, which is tentatively assigned as the gene affected in introverted mutants. In mutant wap animals, founder cell precursors for the jump muscle are specified early in development, but are later lost. Through tissue-specific knockdowns, we demonstrate that wap function is required in both the musculature and the nervous system for normal jump-muscle formation. wap/CG14614 is homologous to vertebrate wdr68, DDB1 and CUL4 associated factor 7, which also are expressed in neuromuscular tissues. Thus, our findings provide insight into mechanisms of neuromuscular development in higher animals and facilitate the understanding of neuromuscular diseases that may result from mis-expression of muscle-specific or neuron-specific genes. PMID:24026097

  4. An undergraduate laboratory class using CRISPR/Cas9 technology to mutate drosophila genes.

    PubMed

    Adame, Vanesa; Chapapas, Holly; Cisneros, Marilyn; Deaton, Carol; Deichmann, Sophia; Gadek, Chauncey; Lovato, TyAnna L; Chechenova, Maria B; Guerin, Paul; Cripps, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology is used in the manipulation of genome sequences and gene expression. Because of the ease and rapidity with which genes can be mutated using CRISPR/Cas9, we sought to determine if a single-semester undergraduate class could be successfully taught, wherein students isolate mutants for specific genes using CRISPR/Cas9. Six students were each assigned a single Drosophila gene, for which no mutants currently exist. Each student designed and created plasmids to encode single guide RNAs that target their selected gene; injected the plasmids into Cas9-expressing embryos, in order to delete the selected gene; carried out a three-generation cross to test for germline transmission of a mutated allele and generate a stable stock of the mutant; and characterized the mutant alleles by PCR and sequencing. Three genes out of six were successfully mutated. Pre- and post- survey evaluations of the students in the class revealed that student attitudes towards their research competencies increased, although the changes were not statistically significant. We conclude that it is feasible to develop a laboratory genome editing class, to provide effective laboratory training to undergraduate students, and to generate mutant lines for use by the broader scientific community. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:263-275, 2016. PMID:27009801

  5. Effects of the Maleless Mutation on X and Autosomal Gene Expression in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, J. C.; Birchler, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    The mutational effect of the maleless (mle) gene in Drosophila has been reexamined. Earlier work had suggested that mle along with other male-lethal genes was responsible for hypertranscription of the X chromosome in males to bring about dosage compensation. Prompted by studies on dosage sensitive regulatory genes, we tested for effects of mle(ts) on the phenotypes of 16 X or autosomal mutations in adult escapers of lethality. In third instar larvae, prior to the major lethal phase of mle, we examined activities of 6 X or autosomally encoded enzymes, steady state mRNA levels of 15 X-linked or autosomal genes and transcripts from two large genomic segments derived from either the X or from chromosome 2 and present in yeast artificial chromosomes. In contrast to the previously hypothesized role, we detected pronounced effects of mle on the expression of both X-linked and autosomal loci such that a large proportion of the tested genes were increased in expression, while only two X-linked loci were reduced. The most prevalent consequence was an increase of autosomal gene expression, which can explain previously observed reduced X:autosome transcription ratios. These observations suggest that if mle plays a role in the discrimination of the X and the autosomes, it may do so by modification of the effects of dosage sensitive regulatory genes. PMID:8005444

  6. About the origin of retroviruses and the co-evolution of the gypsy retrovirus with the Drosophila flamenco host gene.

    PubMed

    Pélisson, A; Teysset, L; Chalvet, F; Kim, A; Prud'homme, N; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1997-01-01

    The gypsy element of Drosophila melanogaster is the first retrovirus identified so far in invertebrates. According to phylogenetic data, gypsy belongs to the same group as the Ty3 class of LTR-retrotransposons, which suggests that retroviruses evolved from this kind of retroelements before the radiation of vertebrates. There are other invertebrate retroelements that are also likely to be endogenous retroviruses because they share with gypsy some structural and functional retroviral-like characteristics. Gypsy is controlled by a Drosophila gene called flamenco, the restrictive alleles of which maintain the retrovirus in a repressed state. In permissive strains, functional gypsy elements transpose at high frequency and produce infective particles. Defective gypsy proviruses located in pericentromeric heterochromatin of all strains seem to be very old components of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, which indicates that gypsy invaded this species, or an ancestor, a long time ago. At that time, Drosophila melanogaster presumably contained permissive alleles of the flamenco gene. One can imagine that the species survived to the increase of genetic load caused by the retroviral invasion because restrictive alleles of flamenco were selected. The characterization of a retrovirus in Drosophila, one of the most advanced model organisms for molecular genetics, provides us with an exceptional clue to study how a species can resist a retroviral invasion. PMID:9440256

  7. A screen for identifying genes interacting with armadillo, the Drosophila homolog of beta-catenin.

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, S; Sanson, B; White, P; Vincent, J P

    1999-01-01

    Drosophila Armadillo is a multifunctional protein implicated in both cell adhesion, as a catenin, and cell signaling, as part of the Wingless signal transduction pathway. We have generated viable fly stocks with alterations in the level of Armadillo available for signaling. Flies from one stock overexpress Armadillo and, as a result, have increased vein material and bristles in the wings. Flies from the other stock have reduced cytoplasmic Armadillo following overexpression of the intracellular domain of DE-cadherin. These flies display a wing-notching phenotype typical of wingless mutations. Both misexpression phenotypes can be dominantly modified by removing one copy of genes known to encode members of the wingless pathway. Here we describe the identification of further mutations that dominantly modify the Armadillo misexpression phenotypes. These mutations are in genes encoding three different functions: establishment and maintenance of adherens junctions, cell cycle control, and Egfr signaling. PMID:10581282

  8. Intron retention in the Drosophila melanogaster Rieske iron sulphur protein gene generated a new protein

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, Alisson M.; Miguela, Veronica; Whiting, Michael F.; Woodruff, R.C.; Dominguez, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Genomes can encode a variety of proteins with unrelated architectures and activities. It is known that protein-coding genes of de novo origin have significantly contributed to this diversity. However, the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary processes behind these originations are still poorly understood. Here we show that the last 102 codons of a novel gene, Noble, assembled directly from non-coding DNA following an intronic deletion that induced alternative intron retention at the Drosophila melanogaster Rieske Iron Sulphur Protein (RFeSP) locus. A systematic analysis of the evolutionary processes behind the origin of Noble showed that its emergence was strongly biased by natural selection on and around the RFeSP locus. Noble mRNA is shown to encode a bona fide protein that lacks an iron sulphur domain and localizes to mitochondria. Together, these results demonstrate the generation of a novel protein at a naturally selected site. PMID:21610726

  9. Engrailed cooperates with extradenticle and homothorax to repress target genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masatomo; Fujioka, Miki; Tolkunova, Elena N.; Deka, Deepali; Abu-Shaar, Muna; Mann, Richard S.; Jaynes, James B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Engrailed is a key transcriptional regulator in the nervous system and in the maintenance of developmental boundaries in Drosophila, and its vertebrate homologs regulate brain and limb development. Here, we show that the functions of both of the Hox cofactors Extradenticle and Homothorax play essential roles in repression by Engrailed. Mutations that remove either of them abrogate the ability of Engrailed to repress its target genes in embryos, both cofactors interact directly with Engrailed, and both stimulate repression by Engrailed in cultured cells. We suggest a model in which Engrailed, Extradenticle and Homothorax function as a complex to repress Engrailed target genes. These studies expand the functional requirements for extradenticle and homothorax beyond the Hox proteins to a larger family of non-Hox homeodomain proteins. PMID:12506004

  10. A mosaic genetic screen for Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor genes based on defective pupation.

    PubMed

    Menut, Laurent; Vaccari, Thomas; Dionne, Heather; Hill, Joseph; Wu, Geena; Bilder, David

    2007-11-01

    The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) coordinately control cell polarity and proliferation in epithelial and neuronal tissues. While a small group of neoplastic TSG mutations have been isolated and their corresponding genes cloned, the regulatory pathways that normally prevent inappropriate growth remain unclear. Identification of additional neoplastic TSGs may provide insight into this question. We report here the design of an efficient screen for isolating neoplastic TSG mutations utilizing genetically mosaic larvae. This screen is based on a defective pupation phenotype seen when a single pair of imaginal discs is homozygous for a neoplastic TSG mutation, which suggests that continuously proliferating cells can interfere with metamorphosis. Execution of this screen on two chromosome arms led to the identification of mutations in at least seven new neoplastic TSGs. The isolation of additional loci that affect hyperplastic as well as neoplastic growth indicates the utility of this screening strategy for studying epithelial growth control. PMID:17947427

  11. atonal regulates neurite arborization but does not act as a proneural gene in the Drosophila brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; He, Y.; Sun, Y.; Jan, Y. N.; Zoghbi, H. Y.; Bellen, H. J.

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila atonal (ato) is the proneural gene of the chordotonal organs (CHOs) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the larval and adult photoreceptor organs. Here, we show that ato is expressed at multiple stages during the development of a lineage of central brain neurons that innervate the optic lobes and are required for eclosion. A novel fate mapping approach shows that ato is expressed in the embryonic precursors of these neurons and that its expression is reactivated in third instar larvae (L3). In contrast to its function in the PNS, ato does not act as a proneural gene in the embryonic brain. Instead, ato performs a novel function, regulating arborization during larval and pupal development by interacting with Notch.

  12. [Some behavioral features in Drosophila melanogaster lines carrying a flamenco gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, L G; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2001-11-01

    Olfactory sensitivity and locomotor activity was assayed in Drosophila melanogaster strains carrying a mutation of the flamenco gene, which controls transposition of the mobile genetic element 4 (MGE4) retrotransposon the gypsy mobile element. A change in olfactory sensitivity was detected. The reaction to the odor of acetic acid was inverted in flies of the mutator strain (MS), which carried the flam mutation and active MGE4 copies and were characterized by genetic instability. Flies of the genetically unstable strains displayed a lower locomotor activity. The behavioral changes in MS flies can be explained by the pleiotropic effect of the flam mutation or by insertion mutations which arise in behavior genes as a result of genome destabilization by MGE4. PMID:11771305

  13. The Drosophila dominant wing mutation Dichaete results from ectopic expression of a Sox-domain gene.

    PubMed

    Russell, S

    2000-05-01

    The dominant Drosophila wing mutation Dichaete is characterised by the deletion of proximal wing structures. By analysing a number of new Dichaete alleles, phenotypic revertants and enhancer piracy lines, we show that the wing phenotype results from ectopic expression of the Sox-domain gene Dichaete. Ectopic expression of the Sox gene results in an increase in cell death in the proximal region of the wing imaginal disc and leads to alterations in the normal expression of wingless. Since ectopic expression of wingless in the proximal region of the wing disc can rescue aspects of the Dichaete phenotype, it is likely that Dichaete specifically interferes with the establishment or maintenance of a critical domain of wingless expression in the wing disc. PMID:10852492

  14. Control of imaginal cell development by the escargot gene of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Hirose, S; Metcalfe, T; Shirras, A D

    1993-05-01

    Mutations in the escargot (esg) locus, which codes for a zinc-finger-containing protein with similarity to the product of the snail gene, cause a variety of defects in adult structures such as loss of abdominal cuticle and malformation of the wings and legs. esg RNA is expressed in wing, haltere, leg and genital imaginal discs and in abdominal histoblast nests in the embryo. Expression in imaginal tissues is also found in third instar larvae. In esg mutant larvae, normally diploid abdominal histoblasts replicate their DNA without cell division and become similar in appearance to the polytene larval epidermal cells. A similar phenotype was also found in imaginal discs of larvae mutant for both esg and the Drosophila raf gene. These results suggest that one of the normal functions of esg may be the maintenance of diploidy in imaginal cells. PMID:8375329

  15. Cloning of murine G1RP, a novel gene related to Drosophila melanogaster g1.

    PubMed

    Baker, S J; Reddy, E P

    2000-05-01

    To study the nature of genes that are induced during the apoptotic death of myeloid precursor cells, we performed representational difference analysis (RDA) using 32Dcl3 myeloblastic cells that were deprived of IL-3 for 24h. We have isolated a novel cDNA (g1-related protein, G1RP) that is homologous to g1, a Drosophila melanogaster zinc-finger protein that is expressed in the mesoderm. Northern blot analysis using RNAs derived from 32Dcl3 cells that have been grown in the absence of IL-3 demonstrates that the G1RP message is upregulated in these cells following the removal of IL-3, suggesting that this gene may regulate growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis of myeloid precursor cells. PMID:10806348

  16. Developmental analysis of a hybrid gene composed of parts of the Ubx and abd-A genes of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Jordi; Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto; Morata, Ginés

    1988-01-01

    C1 is a mutation in the bithorax complex (BX-C) of Drosophila resulting from the deletion of parts of the Ubx and abd-A genes. We show that the `hybrid' gene formed by the fusion of the remaining parts of Ubx and abd-A (5'abd-A/Ubx3') is functional and developmentally active. It specifies parasegment patterns with a mixture of thoracic and abdominal identities. The hybrid gene also has other properties typical of conventional bithorax genes: it can be spatially derepressed in the absence of trans-acting genes like extra Sex combs or Polycomb and in turn represses other homeotics like Sex combs reduced. The comparison of embryos containing exclusively hybrid gene activity with others having no BX-C function indicates that the hybrid gene is active in the body region defined by PS5 to PS14. The expression in PS5 and PS6 suggests that one control region (abx) of Ubx can regulate the transcription of the abd-A promoter. Images PMID:16453832

  17. Integrating Circadian Activity and Gene Expression Profiles to Predict Chronotoxicity of Drosophila suzukii Response to Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hamby, Kelly A.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zalom, Frank G.; Chiu, Joanna C.

    2013-01-01

    Native to Southeast Asia, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is a recent invader that infests intact ripe and ripening fruit, leading to significant crop losses in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Since current D. suzukii management strategies rely heavily on insecticide usage and insecticide detoxification gene expression is under circadian regulation in the closely related Drosophila melanogaster, we set out to determine if integrative analysis of daily activity patterns and detoxification gene expression can predict chronotoxicity of D. suzukii to insecticides. Locomotor assays were performed under conditions that approximate a typical summer or winter day in Watsonville, California, where D. suzukii was first detected in North America. As expected, daily activity patterns of D. suzukii appeared quite different between ‘summer’ and ‘winter’ conditions due to differences in photoperiod and temperature. In the ‘summer’, D. suzukii assumed a more bimodal activity pattern, with maximum activity occurring at dawn and dusk. In the ‘winter’, activity was unimodal and restricted to the warmest part of the circadian cycle. Expression analysis of six detoxification genes and acute contact bioassays were performed at multiple circadian times, but only in conditions approximating Watsonville summer, the cropping season, when most insecticide applications occur. Five of the genes tested exhibited rhythmic expression, with the majority showing peak expression at dawn (ZT0, 6am). We observed significant differences in the chronotoxicity of D. suzukii towards malathion, with highest susceptibility at ZT0 (6am), corresponding to peak expression of cytochrome P450s that may be involved in bioactivation of malathion. High activity levels were not found to correlate with high insecticide susceptibility as initially hypothesized. Chronobiology and chronotoxicity of D. suzukii provide valuable insights for monitoring and control efforts, because insect activity as well as

  18. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  19. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  20. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  1. Transcriptional regulation of neuropeptide and peptide hormone expression by the Drosophila dimmed and cryptocephal genes.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Sebastien A; Hewes, Randall S

    2006-05-01

    The regulation of neuropeptide and peptide hormone gene expression is essential for the development and function of neuroendocrine cells in integrated physiological networks. In insects, a decline in circulating ecdysteroids triggers the activation of a neuroendocrine system to stimulate ecdysis, the behaviors used to shed the old cuticle at the culmination of each molt. Here we show that two evolutionarily conserved transcription factor genes, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene dimmed (dimm) and the basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) gene cryptocephal (crc), control expression of diverse neuropeptides and peptide hormones in Drosophila. Central nervous system expression of three neuropeptide genes, Dromyosuppressin, FMRFamide-related and Leucokinin, is activated by dimm. Expression of Ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) in the endocrine Inka cells requires crc; homozygous crc mutant larvae display markedly reduced ETH levels and corresponding defects in ecdysis. crc activates ETH expression though a 382 bp enhancer, which completely recapitulates the ETH expression pattern. The enhancer contains two evolutionarily conserved regions, and both are imperfect matches to recognition elements for activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4), the vertebrate ortholog of the CRC protein and an important intermediate in cellular responses to endoplasmic reticulum stress. These regions also contain a putative ecdysteroid response element and a predicted binding site for the products of the E74 ecdysone response gene. These results suggest that convergence between ATF-related signaling and an important intracellular steroid response pathway may contribute to the neuroendocrine regulation of insect molting. PMID:16651547

  2. Identification of the Drosophila Mes4 gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    SciTech Connect

    Suyari, Osamu; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Kato, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Reina; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2009-05-01

    The Mes4 gene has been identified as one of the maternal Dorsal target genes in Drosophila. In the present study, we found a DNA replication-related element (DRE, 5'-TATCGATA) in the Mes4 promoter recognized by the DRE-binding factor (DREF). Luciferase transient expression assays in S2 cells using Mes4 promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids revealed that the DRE sequence is essential for Mes4 promoter activity. Requirement of DRE for Mes4 promoter activity was further confirmed by anti-{beta}-galactosidase antibody-staining of various tissues from transgenic flies carrying Mes4 promoter-lacZ fusion genes. Furthermore, wild type Mes4 promoter activity was decreased by 40% in DREF-depleted S2 cells. These results indicate that DREF positively regulates Mes4 gene expression. Band mobility shift analyses using Kc cell nuclear extracts further indicated that the DRE sequence in the Mes4 promoter is especially important for binding to DREF. Moreover, specific binding of DREF to the involved genomic region could be demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. These results, taken together, indicate that the DRE/DREF system activates transcription of the Mes4 gene. In addition, knockdown of the Mes4 gene in wing imaginal discs using the GAL4-UAS system caused an atrophied wing phenotype, suggesting that Mes4 is required for wing morphogenesis.

  3. An efficient promoter trap for detection of patterned gene expression and subsequent functional analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Camilla; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Hartenstein, Volker; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    Transposable elements have been used in Drosophila to detect gene expression, inactivate gene function, and induce ectopic expression or overexpression. We have combined all of these features in a single construct. A promoterless GAL4 cDNA is expressed when the construct inserts within a transcriptional unit, and GAL4 activates a GFP-encoding gene present in the same transposon. In a primary screen, patterned gene expression is detected as GFP fluorescence in the live progeny of dysgenic males. Many animals expressing GFP in distinct patterns can be recovered with relatively little effort. As expected, many insertions cause loss of function. After insertion at a genomic location, specific parts of the transposon can be excised by FLP recombinase, thus allowing it to induce conditional misexpression of the tagged gene. Therefore, both gain- and loss-of-function studies can be carried out with a single insertion in a gene identified by virtue of its expression pattern. Using this promoter trap approach, we have identified a group of cells that innervate the calyx of the mushroom body and could thus define a previously unrecognized memory circuit. PMID:17093046

  4. Three-dimensional morphology and gene expression in the Drosophila blastoderm at cellular resolution II: dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Keränen, Soile VE; Fowlkes, Charless C; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Sudar, Damir; Knowles, David W; Malik, Jitendra; Biggin, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    Background To accurately describe gene expression and computationally model animal transcriptional networks, it is essential to determine the changing locations of cells in developing embryos. Results Using automated image analysis methods, we provide the first quantitative description of temporal changes in morphology and gene expression at cellular resolution in whole embryos, using the Drosophila blastoderm as a model. Analyses based on both fixed and live embryos reveal complex, previously undetected three-dimensional changes in nuclear density patterns caused by nuclear movements prior to gastrulation. Gene expression patterns move, in part, with these changes in morphology, but additional spatial shifts in expression patterns are also seen, supporting a previously proposed model of pattern dynamics based on the induction and inhibition of gene expression. We show that mutations that disrupt either the anterior/posterior (a/p) or the dorsal/ventral (d/v) transcriptional cascades alter morphology and gene expression along both the a/p and d/v axes in a way suggesting that these two patterning systems interact via both transcriptional and morphological mechanisms. Conclusion Our work establishes a new strategy for measuring temporal changes in the locations of cells and gene expression patterns that uses fixed cell material and computational modeling. It also provides a coordinate framework for the blastoderm embryo that will allow increasingly accurate spatio-temporal modeling of both the transcriptional control network and morphogenesis. PMID:17184547

  5. Genome-Wide Association Analyses Point to Candidate Genes for Electric Shock Avoidance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Mirjam; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus; König, Christian; Bockstaller, Marie; Oguz, Tuba; Khalili, Afshin; Antwi-Adjei, Emmanuel; Schauer, Tamas; Margulies, Carla; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Yarali, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Electric shock is a common stimulus for nociception-research and the most widely used reinforcement in aversive associative learning experiments. Yet, nothing is known about the mechanisms it recruits at the periphery. To help fill this gap, we undertook a genome-wide association analysis using 38 inbred Drosophila melanogaster strains, which avoided shock to varying extents. We identified 514 genes whose expression levels and/ or sequences co-varied with shock avoidance scores. We independently scrutinized 14 of these genes using mutants, validating the effect of 7 of them on shock avoidance. This emphasizes the value of our candidate gene list as a guide for follow-up research. In addition, by integrating our association results with external protein-protein interaction data we obtained a shock avoidance-associated network of 38 genes. Both this network and the original candidate list contained a substantial number of genes that affect mechanosensory bristles, which are hair-like organs distributed across the fly’s body. These results may point to a potential role for mechanosensory bristles in shock sensation. Thus, we not only provide a first list of candidate genes for shock avoidance, but also point to an interesting new hypothesis on nociceptive mechanisms. PMID:25992709

  6. Positive and negative regulation of odor receptor gene choice in Drosophila by acj6.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lei; Goldman, Aaron L; Carlson, John R

    2009-10-14

    Little is known about how individual olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) select, from among many odor receptor genes, which genes to express. Abnormal chemosensory jump 6 (Acj6) is a POU domain transcription factor essential for the specification of ORN identity and odor receptor (Or) gene expression in the Drosophila maxillary palp, one of the two adult olfactory organs. However, the mechanism by which Acj6 functions in this process has not been investigated. Here, we systematically examine the role of Acj6 in the maxillary palp and in a major subset of antennal ORNs. We define an Acj6 binding site by a reiterative in vitro selection process. The site is found upstream of Or genes regulated by Acj6, and Acj6 binds to the site in Or promoters. Mutational analysis shows that the site is essential for Or regulation in vivo. Surprisingly, a novel ORN class in acj6 adults is found to arise from ectopic expression of a larval Or gene, which is repressed in wild type via an Acj6 binding site. Thus, Acj6 acts directly in the process of receptor gene choice; it plays a dual role, positive and negative, in the logic of the process, and acts in partitioning the larval and adult receptor repertoires. PMID:19828808

  7. The clock gene period of the housefly, Musca domestica, rescues behavioral rhythmicity in Drosophila melanogaster. Evidence for intermolecular coevolution?

    PubMed Central

    Piccin, A; Couchman, M; Clayton, J D; Chalmers, D; Costa, R; Kyriacou, C P

    2000-01-01

    In Drosophila, the clock gene period (per), is an integral component of the circadian clock and acts via a negative autoregulatory feedback loop. Comparative analyses of per genes in insects and mammals have revealed that they may function in similar ways. However in the giant silkmoth, Antheraea pernyi, per expression and that of the partner gene, tim, is not consistent with the negative feedback role. As an initial step in developing an alternative dipteran model to Drosophila, we have identified the per orthologue in the housefly, Musca domestica. The Musca per sequence highlights a pattern of conservation and divergence similar to other insect per genes. The PAS dimerization domain shows an unexpected phylogenetic relationship in comparison with the corresponding region of other Drosophila species, and this appears to correlate with a functional assay of the Musca per transgene in Drosophila melanogaster per-mutant hosts. A simple hypothesis based on the coevolution of the PERIOD and TIMELESS proteins with respect to the PER PAS domain can explain the behavioral data gathered from transformants. PMID:10655226

  8. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    PubMed

    Landeen, Emily L; Muirhead, Christina A; Wright, Lori; Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution. PMID:27404402

  9. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline

    PubMed Central

    Landeen, Emily L.; Muirhead, Christina A.; Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower—approximately 3-fold or more—for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution. PMID:27404402

  10. Synergistic Interactions between Drosophila Orthologues of Genes Spanned by De Novo Human CNVs Support Multiple-Hit Models of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Grice, Stuart J.; Liu, Ji-Long; Webber, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable and characterised by deficits in social interaction and communication, as well as restricted and repetitive behaviours. Although a number of highly penetrant ASD gene variants have been identified, there is growing evidence to support a causal role for combinatorial effects arising from the contributions of multiple loci. By examining synaptic and circadian neurological phenotypes resulting from the dosage variants of unique human:fly orthologues in Drosophila, we observe numerous synergistic interactions between pairs of informatically-identified candidate genes whose orthologues are jointly affected by large de novo copy number variants (CNVs). These CNVs were found in the genomes of individuals with autism, including a patient carrying a 22q11.2 deletion. We first demonstrate that dosage alterations of the unique Drosophila orthologues of candidate genes from de novo CNVs that harbour only a single candidate gene display neurological defects similar to those previously reported in Drosophila models of ASD-associated variants. We then considered pairwise dosage changes within the set of orthologues of candidate genes that were affected by the same single human de novo CNV. For three of four CNVs with complete orthologous relationships, we observed significant synergistic effects following the simultaneous dosage change of gene pairs drawn from a single CNV. The phenotypic variation observed at the Drosophila synapse that results from these interacting genetic variants supports a concordant phenotypic outcome across all interacting gene pairs following the direction of human gene copy number change. We observe both specificity and transitivity between interactors, both within and between CNV candidate gene sets, supporting shared and distinct genetic aetiologies. We then show that different interactions affect divergent synaptic processes, demonstrating distinct molecular aetiologies. Our study illustrates