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Sample records for drug delivery system

  1. Drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D H; Mauger, J W

    1991-10-01

    New and emerging drug delivery systems for traditional drugs and the products of biotechnology are discussed, and the role of the pharmacist in ensuring the appropriate use of these systems is outlined. Advantages of advanced drug delivery systems over traditional systems are the ability to deliver a drug more selectively to a specific site; easier, more accurate, less frequent dosing; decreased variability in systemic drug concentrations; absorption that is more consistent with the site and mechanism of action; and reductions in toxic metabolites. Four basic strategies govern the mechanisms of advanced drug delivery: physical, chemical, biological, and mechanical. Oral drug delivery systems use natural and synthetic polymers to deliver the product to a specific region in the gastrointestinal tract in a timely manner that minimizes adverse effects and increases drug efficacy. Innovations in injectable and implantable delivery systems include emulsions, particulate delivery systems, micromolecular products and macromolecular drug adducts, and enzymatic-controlled delivery. Options for noninvasive drug delivery include the transdermal, respiratory, intranasal, ophthalmic, lymphatic, rectal, intravaginal, and intrauterine routes as well as topical application. Rapid growth is projected in the drug delivery systems market worldwide in the next five years. Genetic engineering has mandated the development of new strategies to deliver biotechnologically derived protein and peptide drugs and chemoimmunoconjugates. The role of the pharmacist in the era of advanced drug delivery systems will be broad based, including administering drugs, compounding, calculating dosages based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic monitoring, counseling, and research. The advent of advanced drug delivery systems offers pharmacists a new opportunity to assume an active role in patient care. PMID:1772110

  2. Intracochlear Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advances in molecular biology and in the basic understanding of the mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing loss and other diseases of the inner ear, are paving the way towards new approaches for treatments for millions of patients. However, the cochlea is a particularly challenging target for drug therapy, and new technologies will be required to provide safe and efficacious delivery of these compounds. Emerging delivery systems based on microfluidic technologies are showing promise as a means for direct intracochlear delivery. Ultimately, these systems may serve as a means for extended delivery of regenerative compounds to restore hearing in patients suffering from a host of auditory diseases. Areas covered in this review Recent progress in the development of drug delivery systems capable of direct intracochlear delivery is reviewed, including passive systems such as osmotic pumps, active microfluidic devices, and systems combined with currently available devices such as cochlear implants. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of intracochlear drug delivery systems currently under development, and ultimately capable of being combined with emerging therapeutic compounds for the treatment of inner ear diseases. Expert Opinion Safe and efficacious treatment of auditory diseases will require the development of microscale delivery devices, capable of extended operation and direct application to the inner ear. These advances will require miniaturization and integration of multiple functions, including drug storage, delivery, power management and sensing, ultimately enabling closed-loop control and timed-sequence delivery devices for treatment of these diseases. PMID:21615213

  3. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  4. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  5. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  6. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases. PMID:24325540

  7. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems. PMID:19925443

  8. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  9. Physically facilitating drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge I; Ambure, Sunny; Shi, Zhi-Dong; Yuan, Yuyu; Sun, Wei; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Facilitated/modulated drug-delivery systems have emerged as a possible solution for delivery of drugs of interest to pre-allocated sites at predetermined doses for predefined periods of time. Over the past decade, the use of different physical methods and mechanisms to mediate drug release and delivery has grown significantly. This emerging area of research has important implications for development of new therapeutic drugs for efficient treatments. This review aims to introduce and describe different modalities of physically facilitating drug-delivery systems that are currently in use for cancer and other diseases therapy. In particular, delivery methods based on ultrasound, electrical, magnetic and photo modulations are highlighted. Current uses and areas of improvement for these different physically facilitating drug-delivery systems are discussed. Furthermore, the main advantages and drawbacks of these technologies reviewed are compared. The review ends with a speculative viewpoint of how research is expected to evolve in the upcoming years. PMID:22485192

  10. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery. PMID:23662604

  11. Fibrin Glue as a Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Patrick P.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrin glue has been used surgically for decades for hemostasis as well as a sealant. It has also been researched as both a gel for cell delivery and a vehicle for drug delivery. The drug delivery applications for fibrin glue span tissue engineering to chemotherapy and involve several mechanisms for drug matrix interactions and control of release kinetics. Additionally, drugs or factors can be loaded in the gel via impregnation and tethering to the gel through covalent linkages or affinity based systems. This review highlights recent research of fibrin glue as a drug delivery vehicle. PMID:20637815

  12. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  13. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation. PMID:24936306

  14. [Progression of drug delivery system for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Lyu, Liu

    2014-12-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) by drugs is a major treatment for glaucoma. Clinically, diverse antiglaucoma drugs take effect to decrease the IOP through different mechanisms.However, due to limitations of traditional form of eye drops, the bioavailability of the drug and the patient compliance is lowered, the clinical efficacy is not good and also some toxic and side-effects come out.Otherwise, traditional medication is not suitable for neuroprotective drugs to work on both retina and optic nerve. Drug delivery system has the potential to improve the bioavailability of the drug, prolong the time of drug action, decrease the dosage and frequency of drugs, reduce the side-effects, and improve the patient compliance and efficacy.It is one of the most important studies in glaucoma medication development because it is valuable for patients' neuroprotection.Nowadays, several novel delivery systems have been designed. This review will focus on the progressions of some of the sustained-release antiglaucoma eye drops, polymeric gels, colloidal systems, membrane-controlled drug delivery system, ocular implants, and transscleral drug delivery systems. PMID:25619186

  15. Chitosan Microspheres in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-01-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:22707817

  16. Novel drug delivery systems for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lavik, E; Kuehn, M H; Kwon, Y H

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) by pharmaceutical or surgical means has long been the standard treatment for glaucoma. A number of excellent drugs are available that are effective in reducing IOP. These drugs are typically applied as eye drops. However, patient adherence can be poor, thus reducing the clinical efficacy of the drugs. Several novel delivery systems designed to address the issue of adherence and to ensure consistent reduction of IOP are currently under development. These delivery systems include contact lenses-releasing glaucoma medications, injectables such as biodegradable micro- and nanoparticles, and surgically implanted systems. These new technologies are aimed at increasing clinical efficacy by offering multiple delivery options and are capable of managing IOP for several months. There is also a desire to have complementary neuroprotective approaches for those who continue to show progression, despite IOP reduction. Many potential neuroprotective agents are not suitable for traditional oral or drop formulations. Their potential is dependent on developing suitable delivery systems that can provide the drugs in a sustained, local manner to the retina and optic nerve. Drug delivery systems have the potential to improve patient adherence, reduce side effects, increase efficacy, and ultimately, preserve sight for glaucoma patients. In this review, we discuss benefits and limitations of the current systems of delivery and application, as well as those on the horizon. PMID:21475311

  17. Drug Delivery Systems: Entering the Mainstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Theresa M.; Cullis, Pieter R.

    2004-03-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) such as lipid- or polymer-based nanoparticles can be designed to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of drugs administered parenterally. Many of the early problems that hindered the clinical applications of particulate DDS have been overcome, with several DDS formulations of anticancer and antifungal drugs now approved for clinical use. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in exploiting the advantages of DDS for in vivo delivery of new drugs derived from proteomics or genomics research and for their use in ligand-targeted therapeutics.

  18. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Hina; Bala, Rajni; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The principle objective of formulation of lipid-based drugs is to enhance their bioavailability. The use of lipids in drug delivery is no more a new trend now but is still the promising concept. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) are one of the emerging technologies designed to address challenges like the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipid-based formulations can be tailored to meet a wide range of product requirements dictated by disease indication, route of administration, cost consideration, product stability, toxicity, and efficacy. These formulations are also a commercially viable strategy to formulate pharmaceuticals, for topical, oral, pulmonary, or parenteral delivery. In addition, lipid-based formulations have been shown to reduce the toxicity of various drugs by changing the biodistribution of the drug away from sensitive organs. However, the number of applications for lipid-based formulations has expanded as the nature and type of active drugs under investigation have become more varied. This paper mainly focuses on novel lipid-based formulations, namely, emulsions, vesicular systems, and lipid particulate systems and their subcategories as well as on their prominent applications in pharmaceutical drug delivery. PMID:26556202

  19. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment. PMID:23016644

  20. Liposomes as delivery systems for antineoplastic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Luis Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Liposome drug formulations are defined as pharmaceutical products containing active drug substances encapsulated within the lipid bilayer or in the interior aqueous space of the liposomes. The main importance of this drug delivery system is based on its drastic reduction in systemic dose and concomitant systemic toxicity that in comparison with the free drug, results in an improvement of patient compliance and in a more effective treatment. There are several therapeutic drugs that are potential candidates to be encapsulated into liposomes; particular interest has been focused in therapeutic and antineoplastic drugs, which are characterized for its low therapeutic index and high systemic toxicity. The use of liposomes as drug carriers has been extensively justified and the importance of the development of different formulations or techniques to encapsulate therapeutic drugs has an enormous value in benefit of patients affected by neoplastic diseases.

  1. Osmotically controlled drug delivery system with associated drugs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Brahma Prakash; Thakur, Navneet; Jain, Nishi P; Banweer, Jitendra; Jain, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    Conventional drug delivery systems have slight control over their drug release and almost no control over the effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the controlled or modified release drug delivery systems. They include dosage forms for oral and transdermal administration as well as injectable and implantable systems. For most of drugs, oral route remains as the most acceptable route of administration. Certain molecules may have low oral bioavailability because of solubility or permeability limitations. Development of an extended release dosage form also requires reasonable absorption throughout the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). Among the available techniques to improve the bioavailability of these drugs fabrication of osmotic drug delivery system is the most appropriate one. Osmotic drug delivery systems release the drug with the zero order kinetics which does not depend on the initial concentration and the physiological factors of GIT. This review brings out new technologies, fabrication and recent clinical research in osmotic drug delivery. PMID:21486532

  2. Recent technologies in pulsatile drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Raturi, Richa; Jain, Vikas; Bansal, Praveen; Singh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery systems (PDDS) have attracted attraction because of their multiple benefits over conventional dosage forms. They deliver the drug at the right time, at the right site of action and in the right amount, which provides more benefit than conventional dosages and increased patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body, and the drug is released rapidly and completely as a pulse after a lag time. These products follow the sigmoid release profile characterized by a time period. These systems are beneficial for drugs with chronopharmacological behavior, where nocturnal dosing is required, and for drugs that show the first-pass effect. This review covers methods and marketed technologies that have been developed to achieve pulsatile delivery. Marketed technologies, such as PulsincapTM, Diffucaps®, CODAS®, OROS® and PULSYSTM, follow the above mechanism to render a sigmoidal drug release profile. Diseases wherein PDDS are promising include asthma, peptic ulcers, cardiovascular ailments, arthritis and attention deficit syndrome in children and hypercholesterolemia. Pulsatile drug delivery systems have the potential to bring new developments in the therapy of many diseases. PMID:23507727

  3. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  4. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

  5. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  6. Microemulsions based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Harini C; Narendran, Hyndavi; Nagaswaram, Tejeswari; Yaga, Gowri; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of microemulsions by Jack H Schulman, there has been huge progress made in applying microemulsion systems in plethora of research and industrial process. Microemulsions are optically isotropic systems consisting of water, oil and amphiphile. These systems are beneficial due to their thermodynamic stability, optical clarity, ease of preparation, higher diffusion and absorption rates. Moreover, it has been reported that the ingredients of microemulsion can effectively overcome the diffusion barrier and penetrate through the stratum corneum of the skin. Hence it becomes promising for both transdermal and dermal drug delivery. However, low viscosity of microemulsion restrains its applicability in pharmaceutical industry. To overcome the above drawback, the low viscous microemulsions were added to viscous gel bases to potentiate its applications as topical drug delivery systems so that various drug related toxic effects and erratic drug absorption can be avoided. The present review deals with the microemulsions, various techniques involved in the development of organic nanoparticles. The review emphasized on microemulsion based systems such as hydrogels and organogels. The physicochemical characteristics, mechanical properties, rheological and stability principles involved in microemulsion based viscous gels were also explored. PMID:25466399

  7. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative. PMID:22124008

  8. Silk Electrogel Based Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianrui

    Gastric cancer has become a global pandemic and there is imperative to develop efficient therapies. Oral dosing strategy is the preferred route to deliver drugs for treating the disease. Recent studies suggested silk electro hydrogel, which is pH sensitive and reversible, has potential as a vehicle to deliver the drug in the stomach environment. The aim of this study is to establish in vitro electrogelation e-gel based silk gel as a gastroretentive drug delivery system. We successfully extended the duration of silk e-gel in artificial gastric juice by mixing silk solution with glycerol at different ratios before the electrogelation. Structural analysis indicated the extended duration was due to the change of beta sheet content. The glycerol mixed silk e-gel had good doxorubicin loading capability and could release doxorubicin in a sustained-release profile. Doxorubicin loaded silk e-gels were applied to human gastric cancer cells. Significant cell viability decrease was observed. We believe that with further characterization as well as functional analysis, the silk e-gel system has the potential to become an effective vehicle for gastric drug delivery applications.

  9. Biomedical Imaging in Implantable Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haoyan; Hernandez, Christopher; Goss, Monika; Gawlik, Anna; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems (DDS) provide a platform for sustained release of therapeutic agents over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years. Such strategies are typically used clinically to increase patient compliance by replacing frequent administration of drugs such as contraceptives and hormones to maintain plasma concentration within the therapeutic window. Implantable or injectable systems have also been investigated as a means of local drug administration which favors high drug concentration at a site of interest, such as a tumor, while reducing systemic drug exposure to minimize unwanted side effects. Significant advances in the field of local DDS have led to increasingly sophisticated technology with new challenges including quantification of local and systemic pharmacokinetics and implant-body interactions. Because many of these sought-after parameters are highly dependent on the tissue properties at the implantation site, and rarely represented adequately with in vitro models, new nondestructive techniques that can be used to study implants in situ are highly desirable. Versatile imaging tools can meet this need and provide quantitative data on morphological and functional aspects of implantable systems. The focus of this review article is an overview of current biomedical imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and their application in evaluation of implantable DDS. PMID:25418857

  10. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems. PMID:27173823

  11. Towards more effective advanced drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Crommelin, Daan J A; Florence, Alexander T

    2013-09-15

    This position paper discusses progress made and to be made with so-called advanced drug delivery systems, particularly but not exclusively those in the nanometre domain. The paper has resulted from discussions with a number of international experts in the field who shared their views on aspects of the subject, from the nomenclature used for such systems, the sometimes overwrought claims made in the era of nanotechnology, the complex nature of targeting delivery systems to specific destinations in vivo, the need for setting standards for the choice and characterisation of cell lines used in in vitro studies, to attention to the manufacturability, stability and analytical profiling of systems and more relevant studies on toxicology. The historical background to the development of many systems is emphasised. So too is the stochastic nature of many of the steps to successful access to and action in targets. A lacuna in the field is the lack of availability of data on a variety of carrier systems using the same models in vitro and in vivo using standard controls. The paper asserts that greater emphasis must also be paid to the effective levels of active attained in target organs, for without such crucial data it will be difficult for many experimental systems to enter the clinic. This means the use of diagnostic/imaging technologies to monitor targeted drug delivery and stratify patient groups, identifying patients with optimum chances for successful therapy. Last, but not least, the critical importance of the development of science bases for regulatory policies, scientific platforms overseeing the field and new paradigms of financing are discussed. PMID:23415662

  12. Micro- and nano-fabricated implantable drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems provide new means for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations over entire treatment durations in order to optimize drug action. This article focuses on new drug administration modalities achieved using implantable drug-delivery systems that are enabled by micro- and nano-fabrication technologies, and microfluidics. Recent advances in drug administration technologies are discussed and remaining challenges are highlighted. PMID:23323562

  13. Implantable microchip: the futuristic controlled drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Kumar Bishwajit; Sumi, Chandra Datta

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that controlled and pulsatile drug delivery system is an important challenge in medicine over the conventional drug delivery system in case of therapeutic efficacy. However, the conventional drug delivery systems often offer a limited by their inability to drug delivery which consists of systemic toxicity, narrow therapeutic window, complex dosing schedule for long term treatment etc. Therefore, there has been a search for the drug delivery system that exhibit broad enhancing activity for more drugs with less complication. More recently, some elegant study has noted that, a new type of micro-electrochemical system or MEMS-based drug delivery systems called microchip has been improved to overcome the problems related to conventional drug delivery. Moreover, micro-fabrication technology has enabled to develop the implantable controlled released microchip devices with improved drug administration and patient compliance. In this article, we have presented an overview of the investigations on the feasibility and application of microchip as an advanced drug delivery system. Commercial manufacturing materials and methods, related other research works and current advancement of the microchips for controlled drug delivery have also been summarized. PMID:24758139

  14. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Devi, V Kusum; Jain, Nimisha; Valli, Kusum S

    2010-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in increasing the efficacy and reducing the side effects of various herbal compounds and herbs. This is the basic idea behind incorporating novel method of drug delivery in herbal medicines. Thus it is important to integrate novel drug delivery system and Indian Ayurvedic medicines to combat more serious diseases. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research can solve the scientific needs (such as determination of pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, site of action, accurate dose required etc.) of herbal medicines to be incorporated in novel drug delivery system, such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies, which can be used for herbal actives together with some examples. PMID:22228938

  15. [Anti-HIV drugs and drug delivery system].

    PubMed

    Obaru, K; Mitsuya, H

    1998-03-01

    A number of candidate drugs for therapy of HIV-1 infection which show significant activity against the virus in vitro were reported; however, many of them have been dropped from drug development due to (i) insufficient intracellular activation in certain human target cells (particularly in case of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (ii) poor pharmacokinetic profiles, or (iii) intolerable in vitro and/or in vivo toxicities. To circumvent some of these problems, certain drug delivery systems have been applied and several candidate drugs including two novel nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, abacavir and adefovir, have acquired favorable properties in the clinical setting. This paper reviews several avenues for developing prodrugs of anti-HIV-1 agents to overcome their inherent limitations. PMID:9549371

  16. Drug accumulation by means of noninvasive magnetic drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuzawa, M.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2011-11-01

    The medication is one of the most general treatment methods, but drugs diffuse in the normal tissues other than the target part by the blood circulation. Therefore, side effect in the medication, particularly for a drug with strong effect such as anti-cancer drug, are a serious issue. Drug Delivery System (DDS) which accumulates the drug locally in the human body is one of the techniques to solve the side-effects. Magnetic Drug Delivery System (MDDS) is one of the active DDSs, which uses the magnetic force. The objective of this study is to accumulate the ferromagnetic drugs noninvasively in the deep part of the body by using MDDS. It is necessary to generate high magnetic field and magnetic gradient at the target part to reduce the side-effects to the tissues with no diseases. The biomimetic model was composed, which consists of multiple model organs connected with diverged blood vessel model. The arrangement of magnetic field was examined to accumulate ferromagnetic drug particles in the target model organ by using a superconducting bulk magnet which can generate high magnetic fields. The arrangement of magnet was designed to generate high and stable magnetic field at the target model organ. The accumulation experiment of ferromagnetic particles has been conducted. In this study, rotating HTS bulk magnet around the axis of blood vessels by centering on the target part was suggested, and the model experiment for magnet rotation was conducted. As a result, the accumulation of the ferromagnetic particles to the target model organ in the deep part was confirmed.

  17. Designing polymeric microparticulate drug delivery system for hydrophobic drug quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Moumita; Dasgupta Mandal, Dalia; Mandal, Tamal; Bhuniya, Saikat; Ghosh, Mallika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate pharmaceutical potentialities of a polymeric microparticulate drug delivery system for modulating the drug profile of poorly water-soluble quercetin. In this research work two cost effective polymers sodium alginate and chitosan were used for entrapping the model drug quercetin through ionic cross linking method. In vitro drug release, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency, Fourier Transforms Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) studies were also done for physicochemical characterization of the formulations. Swelling index and drug release study were done at a pH of 1.2, 6.8 and 7.4 to evaluate the GI mimetic action which entails that the swelling and release of the all the Formulation1 (F1), Formulation2 (F2) and Formulation3 (F3) at pH 1.2 were minimal confirming the prevention of drug release in the acidic environment of stomach. Comparatively more sustained release was seen from the formulations F2 & F3 at pH 6.8 and pH 7.4 after 7 h of drug release profiling. Drug entrapment efficiency of the formulations shows in F1 (D:C:A = 2:5:30) was approximately 70% whereas the increase in chitosan concentration in F2 (D:C:A = 2:10:30) has shown an entrapment efficiency of 81%. But the comparative further increase of chitosan concentration in F3 (D:C:A = 2:15:30) has shown a entrapment of 80% which is not having any remarkable difference from F2. The FTIR analysis of drug, polymers and the formulations indicated the compatibility of the drug with the polymers. The smoothness of microspheres in F2 & F3 was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). However F1 microsphere has shown more irregular shape comparatively. The DSC studies indicated the absence of drug-polymer interaction in the microspheres. Our XRD studies have revealed that when pure drug exhibits crystalline structure with less dissolution profile

  18. Oral Dispersible System: A New Approach in Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, P. A.; Khan, J. A.; Khan, A.; Safiullah, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dosage form is a mean used for the delivery of drug to a living body. In order to get the desired effect the drug should be delivered to its site of action at such rate and concentration to achieve the maximum therapeutic effect and minimum adverse effect. Since oral route is still widely accepted route but having a common drawback of difficulty in swallowing of tablets and capsules. Therefore a lot of research has been done on novel drug delivery systems. This review is about oral dispersible tablets a novel approach in drug delivery systems that are now a day's more focused in formulation world, and laid a new path that, helped the patients to build their compliance level with the therapy, also reduced the cost and ease the administration especially in case of pediatrics and geriatrics. Quick absorption, rapid onset of action and reduction in drug loss properties are the basic advantages of this dosage form. PMID:27168675

  19. Local arterial wall drug delivery using balloon catheter system.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-09-28

    Balloon-based drug delivery systems allow localized application of drugs to a vascular segment to reduce neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis. Drugs are coated onto balloons using excipients as drug carriers to facilitate adherence and release of drug during balloon inflation. Drug-coated balloon delivery system is characterized by a rapid drug transfer that achieves high drug concentration along the vessel wall surface, intended to correspond to the balloon dilation-induced vascular injury and healing processes. The balloon catheter system allows homogenous drug delivery to the vessel wall, such that the drug release per unit surface area is kept constant along balloons of different lengths. Optimization of the balloon coating matrix is essential for efficient drug transfer and tissue retention until the artery remodels to a normal set point. Challenges in the development of balloon-based drug delivery to the arterial wall include finding suitable excipients for drug formulation to enable drug release to a targeted lesion site effectively, maintain coating integrity during transit, prolong tissue retention and reduce particulate generation. This review highlights various factors involved in the successful design of balloon-based delivery systems, including drug release kinetics, matrix coating transfer, transmural drug partitioning, dissolution rate and release of unbound active drug. PMID:27473765

  20. The Controlled Drug Delivery Systems: Past Forward and Future Back

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kinam

    2014-01-01

    The controlled drug delivery technology has progressed over the last six decades. It began in 1952 with the introduction of the first sustained release formulation. The 1st generation (1950-1980) of drug delivery was focused on developing oral and transdermal sustained release systems and establishing the controlled drug release mechanisms. Attention of the 2nd generation (1980-2010) was dedicated to development of zero-order release systems, self-regulated drug delivery systems, long-term depot formulations, and nanotechnology-based delivery systems. The latter part of the 2nd generation was consumed mostly for studying nanoparticle formulations. The Journal of Controlled Release (JCR) has played a pivotal role during the 2nd generation of drug delivery technologies, and it will continue playing a leading role for the next generation. Taking the right path towards the productive 3rd generation of drug delivery technologies requires honest open dialogues without any preconceived ideas of the past. The drug delivery field needs to take a bold approach of designing the future drug delivery formulations first, based on today’s necessities, and produce necessary innovations. The JCR will provide the forum for sharing the new ideas that will shape the 3rd generation of drug delivery technologies. PMID:24794901

  1. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems. PMID:26898739

  2. Oral drug delivery systems comprising altered geometric configurations for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix(®) multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise(®), which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix(®) as well as "release modules assemblage", which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  3. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  4. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Matias J; Costa, Rui R; Mano, João F

    2016-02-01

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine. PMID:26861358

  5. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Matias J.; Costa, Rui R.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine. PMID:26861358

  6. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  7. Colloidal drug delivery systems: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview an extensive range of colloidal drug delivery systems with special focus on vesicular and particulates systems that are being used in research or might be potentially useful as carriers systems for drug or active biomolecules or as cell carriers with application in the therapeutic field. We present some important examples of commercially available drug delivery systems with applications in research or in clinical fields. This class of systems is widely used due to excellent drug targeting, sustained and controlled release behavior, higher entrapment efficiency of drug molecules, prevention of drug hydrolysis or enzymatic degradation, and improvement of therapeutic efficacy. These characteristics help in the selection of suitable carrier systems for drug, cell, and gene delivery in different fields. PMID:25955882

  8. Auto-associative amphiphilic polysaccharides as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Leila N; Hendra, Frédéric; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2012-06-01

    Self-assembly of amphiphilic polysaccharides provides a positive outlook for drug delivery systems without the need for solvents or surfactants. Various polymeric amphiphilic polysaccharides undergo intramolecular or intermolecular associations in water. This type of association, promoted by hydrophobic segments, led to the formation of various drug delivery systems such as micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes and hydrogels. Here, we review a selection of the most important amphiphilic polysaccharides used as drug delivery systems and their pharmaceutical applications. Attention focuses on amphiphilic chitosan owing to its unique properties such as excellent biocompatibility, non-toxicity and antimicrobial and bioadhesive properties. PMID:22305936

  9. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  10. Drug delivery systems and combination therapy by using vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  11. Bioavailability of phytochemicals and its enhancement by drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, Farrukh; Munagala, Radha; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Vadhanam, Manicka V.

    2013-01-01

    Issues of poor oral bioavailability of cancer chemopreventives have hindered progress in cancer prevention. Novel delivery systems that modulate the pharmacokinetics of existing drugs, such as nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, niosomes, liposomes and implants, could be used to enhance the delivery of chemopreventive agents to target sites. The development of new approaches in prevention and treatment of cancer could encompass new delivery systems for approved and newly investigated compounds. In this review, we discuss some of the delivery approaches that have already made an impact by either delivering a drug to target tissue or increasing its bioavailability by many fold. PMID:23435377

  12. Niosomes: a controlled and novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rajera, Rampal; Nagpal, Kalpana; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade formulation of vesicles as a tool to improve drug delivery, has created a lot of interest amongst the scientist working in the area of drug delivery systems. Vesicular system such as liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, pharmacosomes and ethosomes provide an alternative to improve the drug delivery. Niosomes play an important role owing to their nonionic properties, in such drug delivery system. Design and development of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) has two prerequisites. First, it should deliver the drug in accordance with a predetermined rate and second it should release therapeutically effective amount of drug at the site of action. Conventional dosage forms are unable to meet these requisites. Niosomes are essentially non-ionic surfactant based multilamellar or unilamellar vesicles in which an aqueous solution of solute is entirely enclosed by a membrane resulting from the organization of surfactant macromolecules as bilayer. Niosomes are formed on hydration of non-ionic surfactant film which eventually hydrates imbibing or encapsulating the hydrating aqueous solution. The main aim of development of niosomes is to control the release of drug in a sustained way, modification of distribution profile of drug and for targeting the drug to the specific body site. This paper deals with composition, characterization/evaluation, merits, demerits and applications of niosomes. PMID:21719996

  13. Mucoadhesive and thermogelling systems for vaginal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Caramella, Carla M; Rossi, Silvia; Ferrari, Franca; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Sandri, Giuseppina

    2015-09-15

    This review focuses on two formulation approaches, mucoadhesion and thermogelling, intended for prolonging residence time on vaginal mucosa of medical devices or drug delivery systems, thus improving their efficacy. The review, after a brief description of the vaginal environment and, in particular, of the vaginal secretions that strongly affect in vivo performance of vaginal formulations, deals with the above delivery systems. As for mucoadhesive systems, conventional formulations (gels, tablets, suppositories and emulsions) and novel drug delivery systems (micro-, nano-particles) intended for vaginal administration to achieve either local or systemic effect are reviewed. As for thermogelling systems, poly(ethylene oxide-propylene oxide-ethylene oxide) copolymer-based and chitosan-based formulations are discussed as thermogelling systems. The methods employed for functional characterization of both mucoadhesive and thermogelling drug delivery systems are also briefly described. PMID:25683694

  14. Albumin-based nanocomposite spheres for advanced drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Misak, Heath E; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Gopu, Janani S; Man, Ka-Poh; Zacharias, Nora M; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2014-01-01

    A novel drug delivery system incorporating human serum albumin, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, magnetite nanoparticles, and therapeutic agent(s) was developed for potential application in the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and skin cancer. An oil-in-oil emulsion/solvent evaporation (O/OSE) method was modified to produce a drug delivery system with a diameter of 0.5–2 μm. The diameter was mainly controlled by adjusting the viscosity of albumin in the discontinuous phase of the O/OSE method. The drug-release study showed that the release of drug and albumin was mostly dependent on the albumin content of the drug delivery system, which is very similar to the drug occlusion-mesopore model. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that increasing the albumin content in the drug delivery system increased cell viability, possibly due to the improved biocompatibility of the system. Overall, these studies show that the proposed system could be a viable option as a drug delivery system in the treatment of many illnesses, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and skin and breast cancers. PMID:24106002

  15. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  16. Iontophoresis: A Potential Emergence of a Transdermal Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Dhote, Vinod; Bhatnagar, Punit; Mishra, Pradyumna K.; Mahajan, Suresh C.; Mishra, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of drugs into systemic circulation via skin has generated much attention during the last decade. Transdermal therapeutic systems propound controlled release of active ingredients through the skin and into the systemic circulation in a predictive manner. Drugs administered through these systems escape first-pass metabolism and maintain a steady state scenario similar to a continuous intravenous infusion for up to several days. However, the excellent impervious nature of the skin offers the greatest challenge for successful delivery of drug molecules by utilizing the concepts of iontophoresis. The present review deals with the principles and the recent innovations in the field of iontophoretic drug delivery system together with factors affecting the system. This delivery system utilizes electric current as a driving force for permeation of ionic and non-ionic medications. The rationale behind using this technique is to reversibly alter the barrier properties of skin, which could possibly improve the penetration of drugs such as proteins, peptides and other macromolecules to increase the systemic delivery of high molecular weight compounds with controlled input kinetics and minimum inter-subject variability. Although iontophoresis seems to be an ideal candidate to overcome the limitations associated with the delivery of ionic drugs, further extrapolation of this technique is imperative for translational utility and mass human application. PMID:22396901

  17. Dendrimeric systems and their applications in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Burçin; Pehlivan, Sibel Bozdağ; Unlü, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  18. Dendrimeric Systems and Their Applications in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Burçin; Bozdağ Pehlivan, Sibel; Ünlü, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  19. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V P Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T

    2011-07-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  20. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V. P. Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  1. Pharmacosomes: An Emerging Novel Vesicular Drug Delivery System for Poorly Soluble Synthetic and Herbal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the arena of solubility enhancement, several problems are encountered. A novel approach based on lipid drug delivery system has evolved, pharmacosomes. Pharmacosomes are colloidal, nanometric size micelles, vesicles or may be in the form of hexagonal assembly of colloidal drug dispersions attached covalently to the phospholipid. They act as befitting carrier for delivery of drugs quite precisely owing to their unique properties like small size, amphiphilicity, active drug loading, high entrapment efficiency, and stability. They help in controlled release of drug at the site of action as well as in reduction in cost of therapy, drug leakage and toxicity, increased bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs, and restorative effects. There has been advancement in the scope of this delivery system for a number of drugs used for inflammation, heart diseases, cancer, and protein delivery along with a large number of herbal drugs. Hence, pharmacosomes open new challenges and opportunities for improved novel vesicular drug delivery system. PMID:24106615

  2. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

  3. Strategies for Enhanced Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Dwibhashyam, V. S. N. M.; Nagappa, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Treating central nervous system diseases is very challenging because of the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles that impede drug delivery. Physiological barriers like the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier as well as various efflux transporter proteins make the entry of drugs into the central nervous system very difficult. The present review provides a brief account of the blood brain barrier, the P-glycoprotein efflux and various strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:20046703

  4. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  5. Coordination polymer particles as potential drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Imaz, Inhar; Rubio-Martínez, Marta; García-Fernández, Lorena; García, Francisca; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Hernando, Jordi; Puntes, Victor; Maspoch, Daniel

    2010-07-14

    Micro- and nanoscale coordination polymer particles can be used for encapsulating and delivering drugs. In vitro cancer cell cytotoxicity assays showed that these capsules readily release doxorubicin, which shows anticancer efficacy. The results from this work open up new avenues for metal-organic capsules to be used as potential drug delivery systems. PMID:20485835

  6. Micro and nanoparticle drug delivery systems for preventing allotransplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James D; Acharya, Abhinav P; Little, Steven R

    2015-09-01

    Despite decades of advances in transplant immunology, tissue damage caused by acute allograft rejection remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the transplant recipient. Moreover, the long-term sequelae of lifelong immunosuppression leaves patients at risk for developing a host of other deleterious conditions. Controlled drug delivery using micro- and nanoparticles (MNPs) is an effective way to deliver higher local doses of a given drug to specific tissues and cells while mitigating systemic effects. Herein, we review several descriptions of MNP immunotherapies aimed at prolonging allograft survival. We also discuss developments in the field of biomimetic drug delivery that use MNP constructs to induce and recruit our bodies' own suppressive immune cells. Finally, we comment on the regulatory pathway associated with these drug delivery systems. Collectively, it is our hope the studies described in this review will help to usher in a new era of immunotherapy in organ transplantation. PMID:25937032

  7. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-07-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. PMID:27297745

  8. Intracellular Delivery System for Antibody–Peptide Drug Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Convertine, Anthony J; Frayo, Shani; Kern, Hanna B; Procko, Erik; Roy, Debashish; Srinivasan, Selvi; Margineantu, Daciana H; Booth, Garrett; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Baker, David; Hockenbery, David; Press, Oliver W; Stayton, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies armed with biologic drugs could greatly expand the therapeutic potential of antibody–drug conjugates for cancer therapy, broadening their application to disease targets currently limited by intracellular delivery barriers. Additional selectivity and new therapeutic approaches could be realized with intracellular protein drugs that more specifically target dysregulated pathways in hematologic cancers and other malignancies. A multifunctional polymeric delivery system for enhanced cytosolic delivery of protein drugs has been developed that incorporates endosomal-releasing activity, antibody targeting, and a biocompatible long-chain ethylene glycol component for optimized safety, pharmacokinetics, and tumor biodistribution. The pH-responsive polymeric micelle carrier, with an internalizing anti-CD22 monoclonal targeting antibody, effectively delivered a proapoptotic Bcl-2 interacting mediator (BIM) peptide drug that suppressed tumor growth for the duration of treatment and prolonged survival in a xenograft mouse model of human B-cell lymphoma. Antitumor drug activity was correlated with a mechanistic induction of the Bcl-2 pathway biomarker cleaved caspase-3 and a marked decrease in the Ki-67 proliferation biomarker. Broadening the intracellular target space by more effective delivery of protein/peptide drugs could expand the repertoire of antibody–drug conjugates to currently undruggable disease-specific targets and permit tailored drug strategies to stratified subpopulations and personalized medicines. PMID:25669432

  9. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  10. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s.

    PubMed

    Patel, Apurv; Dodiya, Hitesh; Shelate, Pragna; Shastri, Divyesh; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  11. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s

    PubMed Central

    Shelate, Pragna; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  12. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  13. The Targeted-liposome Delivery System of Antitumor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-dang; Yi, Xiu-lin; Jiang, Li-xin; Li, Ya-zhuo; Gao, Jing; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Rong-da; Dai, Li-peng; Li, Wei; Ci, Xiao-yan; Si, Duan-yun; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2015-01-01

    The liposome delivery system has been intensively explored as novel drug delivery system (DDS) for antitumor drugs, due to its safety, selective cytotoxicity, long circulation and slow elimination in blood, which is favorable for cancer therapy. The liposome-based chemotherapeutics are used to treat a variety of cancers to enhance the therapeutic index of antitumor drugs. Here, the author reviewed the important targets for cancer therapy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of liposomal drugs in vivo, as well as the application of the targeting liposomal system in cancer therapy. Considering further application for clinical use, the great challenges of the liposome-based delivery system were also proposed as follows: 1) prepare stealth liposome with steric stabilization and further enhance the therapeutic effects and safety; 2) explore more safe clinical targets and complementary or different types of targeting liposome; 3) thirdly, more investment is needed on the research of pharmacokinetics of the elements such as the ligands (antibody), PEG and lipids of liposome delivery system as well as safety evaluation. Considering the complex process of the liposomal encapsulation drugs in vivo, the author inferred that there are maybe different forms of the encapsulation drug to be internalized by the tumor tissues at the same time and space, although there are little reports on it. PMID:26652257

  14. A look at emerging delivery systems for topical drug products.

    PubMed

    Fireman, Sharon; Toledano, Ofer; Neimann, Karine; Loboda, Natalia; Dayan, Nava

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of new topical drugs based on new chemical entities has become a rare event. Instead, pharmaceutical companies have been focused on reformulating existing drugs resulting in an ever-growing number of topical drug products for every approved drug substance. In light of this trend, soon reformulations may not be as rewarding to their sponsors as they are today unless they offer a substantial improvement over other formulations of the same drug substance and the same indication, namely improved efficacy over existing drugs, reduced side effects, unique drug combinations, or applicability for new indications. This article reviews and compares topical drug delivery systems currently under active research that are designed to offer such advantages in the coming years. The reviewed delivery systems are: liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, cyclodextrin, and sol-gel microcapsules. Among all the topical drug delivery systems currently undergoing active research, only the sol-gel microencapsulation is at clinical stages. PMID:22353154

  15. A clinical perspective on mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Gilhotra, Ritu M; Ikram, Mohd; Srivastava, Sunny; Gilhotra, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucoadhesion can be defined as a state in which two components, of which one is of biological origin, are held together for extended periods of time by the help of interfacial forces. Among the various transmucosal routes, buccal mucosa has excellent accessibility and relatively immobile mucosa, hence suitable for administration of retentive dosage form. The objective of this paper is to review the works done so far in the field of mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems (MBDDS), with a clinical perspective. Starting with a brief introduction of the mucoadhesive drug delivery systems, oral mucosa, and the theories of mucoadhesion, this article then proceeds to cover the works done so far in the field of MBDDS, categorizing them on the basis of ailments they are meant to cure. Additionally, we focus on the various patents, recent advancements, and challenges as well as the future prospects for mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems. PMID:24683406

  16. Crystallization Methods for Preparation of Nanocrystals for Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Jingkang; Wang, Yongli; Yin, Qiuxiang; Glennon, Brian; Zhong, Jian; Ouyang, Jinbo; Huang, Xin; Hao, Hongxun

    2015-01-01

    Low water solubility of drug products causes delivery problems such as low bioavailability. The reduced particle size and increased surface area of nanocrystals lead to the increasing of the dissolution rate. The formulation of drug nanocrystals is a robust approach and has been widely applied to drug delivery system (DDS) due to the significant development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. It can be used to improve drug efficacy, provide targeted delivery and minimize side-effects. Crystallization is the main and efficient unit operation to produce nanocrystals. Both traditional crystallization methods such as reactive crystallization, anti-solvent crystallization and new crystallization methods such as supercritical fluid crystallization, high-gravity controlled precipitation can be used to produce nanocrystals. The current mini-review outlines the main crystallization methods addressed in literature. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were summarized and compared. PMID:26027573

  17. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain’s vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual’s age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:24550672

  18. Numerical simulation of iontophoresis in the drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad; Zivanovic, Marko; Savic, Andrej; Bijelic, Goran

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and composition of stratum corneum act as barriers and limit the diffusion of most drug molecules and ions. Much effort has been made to overcome this barrier and it can be seen that iontophoresis has shown a good effect. Iontophoresis represents the application of low electrical potential to increase the transport of drugs into and across the skin or tissue. Iontophoresis is a noninvasive drug delivery system, and therefore, it is a useful alternative to drug transportation by injection. In this study, we present a numerical model and effects of electrical potential on the drug diffusion in the buccal tissue and the stratum corneum. The initial numerical results are in good comparison with experimental observation. We demonstrate that the application of an applied voltage can greatly improve the efficacy of localized drug delivery as compared to diffusion alone. PMID:26592537

  19. Using DNA nanotechnology to produce a drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyen La, Thi; Thu Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Phuc Pham, Van; Huyen Nguyen, Thi Minh; Huan Le, Quang

    2013-03-01

    Drug delivery to cancer cells in chemotherapy is one of the most advanced research topics. The effectiveness of the current cancer treatment drugs is limited because they are not capable of distinguishing between cancer cells and normal cells so that they kill not only cancer cells but also normal ones. To overcome this disadvantage by profiting from the differences in physical and chemical properties between cancer and normal cells, nanoparticles (NPs) delivering a drug are designed in a specific manner such that they can distinguish the cancer cells from the normal ones and are targeted only to the cancer cells. Currently, there are various drug delivery systems with many advantages, but sharing some common disadvantages such as difficulty with controlling the size, low encapsulation capacity and low stability. With the development and success of DNA nanotechnology, DNA strands are used to create effective drug delivery NPs with precisely controlled size and structure, safety and high stability. This article presents our study on drug encapsulation in DNA nanostructure which loaded docetaxel and curcumin in a desire to create a new and effective drug delivery system with high biological compatibility. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  20. An emerging platform for drug delivery: aerogel based systems.

    PubMed

    Ulker, Zeynep; Erkey, Can

    2014-03-10

    Over the past few decades, advances in "aerogel science" have provoked an increasing interest for these materials in pharmaceutical sciences for drug delivery applications. Because of their high surface areas, high porosities and open pore structures which can be tuned and controlled by manipulation of synthesis conditions, nanostructured aerogels represent a promising class of materials for delivery of various drugs as well as enzymes and proteins. Along with biocompatible inorganic aerogels and biodegradable organic aerogels, more complex systems such as surface functionalized aerogels, composite aerogels and layered aerogels have also been under development and possess huge potential. Emphasis is given to the details of the aerogel synthesis and drug loading methods as well as the influence of synthesis parameters and loading methods on the adsorption and release of the drugs. Owing to their ability to increase the bioavailability of low solubility drugs, to improve both their stability and their release kinetics, there are an increasing number of research articles concerning aerogels in different drug delivery applications. This review presents an up to date overview of the advances in all kinds of aerogel based drug delivery systems which are currently under investigation. PMID:24394377

  1. Current pharmaceutical design on adhesive based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Animesh; Banerjee, Subham; Kaity, Santanu; Wong, Tin W

    2015-01-01

    Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery matrix exploits intimate contact of the carrier with stratum corneum, the principal skin barrier to drug transport, to deliver the actives across the skin and into the systemic circulation. The main application challenges of drug-in-adhesive matrix lie in the physicochemical properties of skin varying with age, gender, ethnicity, health and environmental condition of patients. This in turn poses difficulty to design a universal formulation to meet the intended adhesiveness, drug release and drug permeation performances. This review focuses on pressure-sensitive adhesives, and their adhesiveness and drug release/permeation modulation mechanisms as a function of adhesive molecular structure and formulation attributes. It discusses approaches to modulate adhesive tackiness, strength, elasticity, hydrophilicity, molecular suspension capability and swelling capacity, which contribute to the net effect of adhesive on skin bonding, drug release and drug permeation. PMID:25925119

  2. Programmable nanomedicine: synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacardo, Dennis B.; Ligler, Frances S.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in nanomedicine for the cancer therapy have enabled programmable delivery of therapeutics by exploiting the stimuli-responsive properties of nanocarriers. These therapeutic systems were designed with the relevant chemical and physical properties that respond to different triggers for enhanced anticancer efficacy, including the reduced development of drug-resistance, lower therapeutic dose, site-specific transport, and spatiotemporally controlled release. This minireview discusses the current advances in programmable nanocarriers for cancer therapy with particular emphasis on synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems.

  3. Multifunctional, stimuli-sensitive nanoparticulate systems for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticulate pharmaceutical drug delivery systems (NDDSs) to enhance the in vivo effectiveness of drugs is now well established. The development of multifunctional and stimulus-sensitive NDDSs is an active area of current research. Such NDDSs can have long circulation times, target the site of the disease and enhance the intracellular delivery of a drug. This type of NDDS can also respond to local stimuli that are characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or shedding a protective coating, thus facilitating the interaction between drug-loaded nanocarriers and target cells or tissues. In addition, imaging contrast moieties can be attached to these carriers to track their real-time biodistribution and accumulation in target cells or tissues. Here, I highlight recent developments with multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive NDDSs and their therapeutic potential for diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. PMID:25287120

  4. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. PMID:26649286

  5. Interpenetrating Polymer Networks as Innovative Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Alka; Singh, Garima; Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Verma, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Polymers have always been valuable excipients in conventional dosage forms, also have shown excellent performance into the parenteral arena, and are now capable of offering advanced and sophisticated functions such as controlled drug release and drug targeting. Advances in polymer science have led to the development of several novel drug delivery systems. Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) have shown superior performances over the conventional individual polymers and, consequently, the ranges of applications have grown rapidly for such class of materials. The advanced properties of IPNs like swelling capacity, stability, biocompatibility, nontoxicity and biodegradability have attracted considerable attention in pharmaceutical field especially in delivering bioactive molecules to the target site. In the past few years various research reports on the IPN based delivery systems showed that these carriers have emerged as a novel carrier in controlled drug delivery. The present review encompasses IPNs, their types, method of synthesis, factors which affects the morphology of IPNs, extensively studied IPN based drug delivery systems, and some natural polymers widely used for IPNs. PMID:24949205

  6. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems’ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We’ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients. PMID:26109999

  7. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'. PMID:25451137

  8. Carrier-Based Drug Delivery System for Treatment of Acne

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Amber; Kumar Sonker, Avinesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 95% of the population suffers at some point in their lifetime from acne vulgaris. Acne is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit. This inflammatory skin disorder is most common in adolescents but also affects neonates, prepubescent children, and adults. Topical conventional systems are associated with various side effects. Novel drug delivery systems have been used to reduce the side effect of drugs commonly used in the topical treatment of acne. Topical treatment of acne with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) makes direct contact with the target site before entering the systemic circulation which reduces the systemic side effect of the parenteral or oral administration of drug. The objective of the present review is to discuss the conventional delivery systems available for acne, their drawbacks, and limitations. The advantages, disadvantages, and outcome of using various carrier-based delivery systems like liposomes, niosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and so forth, are explained. This paper emphasizes approaches to overcome the drawbacks and limitations associated with the conventional system and the advances and application that are poised to further enhance the efficacy of topical acne formulations, offering the possibility of simplified dosing regimen that may improve treatment outcomes using novel delivery system. PMID:24688376

  9. Microneedle-based drug delivery systems: Microfabrication, drug delivery, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Woolfson, A. David

    2010-01-01

    Many promising therapeutic agents are limited by their inability to reach the systemic circulation, due to the excellent barrier properties of biological membranes, such as the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin or the sclera/cornea of the eye and others. The outermost layer of the skin, the SC, is the principal barrier to topically-applied medications. The intact SC thus provides the main barrier to exogenous substances, including drugs. Only drugs with very specific physicochemical properties (molecular weight < 500 Da, adequate lipophilicity, and low melting point) can be successfully administered transdermally. Transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs and macromolecular agents of interest, including peptides, DNA, and small interfering RNA is problematic. Therefore, facilitation of drug penetration through the SC may involve by-pass or reversible disruption of SC molecular architecture. Microneedles (MNs), when used to puncture skin, will by-pass the SC and create transient aqueous transport pathways of micron dimensions and enhance the transdermal permeability. These micropores are orders of magnitude larger than molecular dimensions, and, therefore, should readily permit the transport of hydrophilic macromolecules. Various strategies have been employed by many research groups and pharmaceutical companies worldwide, for the fabrication of MNs. This review details various types of MNs, fabrication methods and, importantly, investigations of clinical safety of MN. PMID:20297904

  10. Development and characterization of chronomodulated drug delivery system of captopril

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Archana S; Dandagi, Panchaxari M; Masthiholimath, Vinayak S; Gadad, Anand P; Najwade, Basavaraj K

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypertension shows circadian rhythm that there is a rise in pressure from the time of waking or before (about 4 to 8 a.m.), in most people. Conventional drug delivery system of captopril is inappropriate for the delivery of drug, as they cannot be administered just before the symptoms are worsened, because during this time the patients are asleep, bedtime dosing of captopril will not provide a therapeutic plasma drug concentration at the early hours of morning because of poor pharmacokinetic profile and shorter half-life of 1.9 hours. Thus, this study attempts to design and evaluate a chronomodulated pulsatile drug delivery system of captopril which was aimed to release the drug after a lag time of 6 hours. Materials and Methods: Present delivery system was prepared by rupturable coating method. The core containing captopril as a bioactive compound were prepared by direct compression method and then coated sequentially with an inner swelling layer containing hydrocolloid HPMC E5 and an outer rupturable layer consisted of Eudragit RL/RS (1 : 1). Total 12 formulations with different levels of inner swelling layer and outer polymeric layer were prepared and subjected to various processing and formulative parameters like the effect of core composition, level of swelling layer, and rupturable coating on lag time was investigated. In vitro drug release and rupture tests were performed using United States Pharmacopoeia paddle method at 50 rpm in 0.1N HCl and phosphate buffer of pH 6.8. Results: The results showed that as the amount of inner swelling layer increases, the lag time decreases and as the Eudragit coating level increases, the lag time increases and percent water uptake of time-dependent pulsatile release system decreases. The presence of an osmotic agent and effervescent agent helped in shortening of lag time. Conclusion: The system was found to be satisfactory in terms of release of the drug after the lag time of 6 hours. PMID:23071948

  11. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, N A; Pandya, S K; Kirodian, G B; Sanath, S

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B) remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, Fungisome) drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India. We have therefore

  12. Self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) for phytoconstituents: a review.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Neeraj; Mittal, Vineet; Kaushik, Deepak; Khatkar, Anurag; Raina, Mitali

    2015-01-01

    The self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) is considered to be the novel technique for the delivery of lipophillic plant actives. The self emulsifying (SE) formulation significantly enhance the solubility and bioavailability of poorly aqueous soluble phytoconstituents. The self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) can be developed for such plant actives to enhance the oral bioavailability using different excipients (lipid, surfactant, co solvent etc.) and their concentration is selected on the basis of pre formulation studies like phase equilibrium studies, solvent capacity of oil for drug and mutual miscibility of excipients. The present review focuses mainly on the development of SEDDS and effect of excipients on oral bioavailability and aqueous solubility of poorly water soluble phytoconstituents/ derived products. A recent list of patents issued for self emulsifying herbal formulation has also been included. The research data for various self emulsifying herbal formulation and patents issued were reviewed using different databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Google patents, Scopus and Web of Science. In a nutshell, we can say that SEDDS was established as a novel drug delivery system for herbals and with the advances in this technique, lots of patents on herbal SEDDS can be translated into the commercial products. PMID:25335929

  13. Potential and problems in ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Du, Li-Na; Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Yi-Guang; Ge, Shu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important local stimulus for triggering drug release at the target tissue. Ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems (URDDS) have become an important research focus in targeted therapy. URDDS include many different formulations, such as microbubbles, nanobubbles, nanodroplets, liposomes, emulsions, and micelles. Drugs that can be loaded into URDDS include small molecules, biomacromolecules, and inorganic substances. Fields of clinical application include anticancer therapy, treatment of ischemic myocardium, induction of an immune response, cartilage tissue engineering, transdermal drug delivery, treatment of Huntington’s disease, thrombolysis, and disruption of the blood–brain barrier. This review focuses on recent advances in URDDS, and discusses their formulations, clinical application, and problems, as well as a perspective on their potential use in the future. PMID:23637531

  14. Potential and problems in ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Du, Li-Na; Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Yi-Guang; Ge, Shu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important local stimulus for triggering drug release at the target tissue. Ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems (URDDS) have become an important research focus in targeted therapy. URDDS include many different formulations, such as microbubbles, nanobubbles, nanodroplets, liposomes, emulsions, and micelles. Drugs that can be loaded into URDDS include small molecules, biomacromolecules, and inorganic substances. Fields of clinical application include anticancer therapy, treatment of ischemic myocardium, induction of an immune response, cartilage tissue engineering, transdermal drug delivery, treatment of Huntington's disease, thrombolysis, and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. This review focuses on recent advances in URDDS, and discusses their formulations, clinical application, and problems, as well as a perspective on their potential use in the future. PMID:23637531

  15. Gastric retentive drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S J; Park, H; Park, K

    1998-01-01

    The development of a long-term oral controlled-release dosage form has been difficult mainly because of the transit of the dosage form through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several approaches to extend gastric residence time have been tried. The most commonly used systems are (1) intragastric floating systems, (2) high-density systems, (3) mucoadhesive systems, (4) magnetic systems, (5) unfoldable, extendible, or swellable systems, and (6) superporous hydrogel systems. The concept of each approach is examined, and improvements that are needed for further development are discussed. Background materials in the GI physiology that are necessary for understanding the concept and usefulness of each approach are also provided. PMID:9699081

  16. Microsponges: A novel strategy for drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Kaity, Santanu; Maiti, Sabyasachi; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Ghosh, Animesh; Banerjee, Subham

    2010-01-01

    Microsponges are polymeric delivery systems composed of porous microspheres. They are tiny sponge-like spherical particles with a large porous surface. Moreover, they may enhance stability, reduce side effects and modify drug release favorably. Microsponge technology has many favorable characteristics, which make it a versatile drug delivery vehicle. Microsponge Systems are based on microscopic, polymer-based microspheres that can suspend or entrap a wide variety of substances, and can then be incorporated into a formulated product such as a gel, cream, liquid or powder. The outer surface is typically porous, allowing a sustained flow of substances out of the sphere. Microsponges are porous, polymeric microspheres that are used mostly for topical use and have recently been used for oral administration. Microsponges are designed to deliver a pharmaceutical active ingredient efficiently at the minimum dose and also to enhance stability, reduce side effects, and modify drug release. PMID:22247859

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

  18. Elastic vesicles as topical/transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Maibach, H I

    2005-08-01

    Skin acts a major target as well as a principle barrier for topical/transdermal drug delivery. Despite the many advantages of this system, the major obstacle is the low diffusion rate of drugs across the stratum corneum. Several methods have been assessed to increase the permeation rate of drugs temporarily. One simple and convenient approach is application of drugs in formulation with elastic vesicles or skin enhancers. Elastic vesicles are classified with phospholipid (Transfersomes((R)) and ethosomes) and detergent-based types. Elastic vesicles were more efficient at delivering a low and high molecular weight drug to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. Their effectiveness strongly depends on their physicochemical properties: composition, duration and application volume, and entrapment efficiency and application methods. This review focuses on the effect of elastic liposomes for enhancing the drug penetration and defines the action mechanism of penetration into deeper skin. PMID:18492190

  19. Packaged Au-PPy valves for drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Han-Kuan A.; Ma, Kuo-Sheng; Zoval, Jim; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Madou, Marc

    2006-03-01

    The most common methods for the drug delivery are swallowing pills or receiving injections. However, formulations that control the rate and period of medicine (i.e., time-release medications) are still problematic. The proposed implantable devices which include batteries, sensors, telemetry, valves, and drug storage reservoirs provide an alternative method for the responsive drug delivery system [1]. Using this device, drug concentration can be precisely controlled which enhances drug efficiency and decreases the side effects. In order to achieve responsive drug delivery, a reliable release valve has to be developed. Biocompatibility, low energy consumption, and minimized leakage are the main requirements for such release method. A bilayer structure composed of Au/PPy film is fabricated as a flap to control the release valve. Optimized potentiostatic control to synthesize polypyrrole (PPy) is presented. The release of miniaturize valve is tested and showed in this paper. A novel idea to simultaneously fabricate the device reservoirs as well as protective packaging is proposed in this paper. The solution of PDMS permeability problem is also mentioned in this article.

  20. Recent advances in pulsatile oral drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Politis, Stavros N; Rekkas, Dimitrios M

    2013-08-01

    It is well established that several diseases exhibit circadian behavior, following the relevant rhythm of the physiological functions of the human body. Their study falls in the fields of chronobiology and chronotherapeutics, the latter being essentially the effort of timely matching the treatment with the disease expression, in order to maximize the therapeutic benefits and minimize side effects. Pulsatile drug delivery is one of the pillars of chronopharmaceutics, achieved through dosage form design that allows programmable release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to follow the disease's time profile. Its major characteristic is the presence of lag phases, followed by drug release in a variety of rates, immediate, repeated or controlled. The scope of this review is to summarize the recent literature on pulsatile oral drug delivery systems and provide an overview of the ready to use solutions and early stage technologies, focusing on the awarded and pending patents in this technical field during the last few years. PMID:23506535

  1. Biologically erodable microspheres as potential oral drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiowitz, Edith; Jacob, Jules S.; Jong, Yong S.; Carino, Gerardo P.; Chickering, Donald E.; Chaturvedi, Pravin; Santos, Camilla A.; Vijayaraghavan, Kavita; Montgomery, Sean; Bassett, Michael; Morrell, Craig

    1997-03-01

    Biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantages1-5 over conventional drug delivery systems6. Here we show that engineered polymer microspheres made of biologically erodable polymers, which display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular linings, can traverse both the mucosal absorptive epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. The polymers maintain contact with intestinal epithelium for extended periods of time and actually penetrate it, through and between cells. Thus, once loaded with compounds of pharmacological interest, the microspheres could be developed as delivery systems to transfer biologically active molecules to the circulation. We show that these microspheres increase the absorption of three model substances of widely different molecular size: dicumarol, insulin and plasmid DNA.

  2. Exosome mimetics: a novel class of drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander AA; Vader, Pieter; van Dommelen, Susan M; van Solinge, Wouter W; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of extracellular phospholipid vesicles as conveyors of cellular information has created excitement in the field of drug delivery. Biological therapeutics, including short interfering RNA and recombinant proteins, are prone to degradation, have limited ability to cross biological membranes, and may elicit immune responses. Therefore, delivery systems for such drugs are under intensive investigation. Exploiting extracellular vesicles as carriers for biological therapeutics is a promising strategy to overcome these issues and to achieve efficient delivery to the cytosol of target cells. Exosomes are a well studied class of extracellular vesicles known to carry proteins and nucleic acids, making them especially suitable for such strategies. However, the considerable complexity and the related high chance of off-target effects of these carriers are major barriers for translation to the clinic. Given that it is well possible that not all components of exosomes are required for their proper functioning, an alternative strategy would be to mimic these vesicles synthetically. By assembly of liposomes harboring only crucial components of natural exosomes, functional exosome mimetics may be created. The low complexity and use of well characterized components strongly increase the pharmaceutical acceptability of such systems. However, exosomal components that would be required for the assembly of functional exosome mimetics remain to be identified. This review provides insights into the composition and functional properties of exosomes, and focuses on components which could be used to enhance the drug delivery properties of exosome mimetics. PMID:22619510

  3. Synthetic Microbes As Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cell therapy is a field that has broad potential for future applications in human disease treatment. Next generation therapies will consist of engineered bacterial strains capable of diagnosing disease, producing and delivering therapeutics, and controlling their numbers to meet containment and safety concerns. A thorough understanding of the microbial ecology of the human body and the interaction of the microbes with the immune system will benefit the choice of an appropriate chassis that engrafts stably and interacts productively with the resident community in specific body niches. PMID:25079685

  4. Chronopharmaceutical Drug Delivery Systems: Hurdles, Hype or Hope?⊗

    PubMed Central

    Youan, Bi-Botti C.

    2010-01-01

    The current advances in chronobiology and the knowledge gained from chronotherapy of selected diseases strongly suggest that “the one size fits all at all times” approach to drug delivery is no longer substantiated, at least for selected bioactive agents and disease therapy or prevention. Thus, there is a critical and urgent need for chronopharmaceutical research (e.g., design and evaluation of robust, spatially and temporally controlled drug delivery systems that would be clinically intended for chronotherapy by different routes of administration). This review provides a brief overview of current delivery system intended for chronotherapy. In theory, such an ideal “magic pill” preferably with affordable cost, would improve the safety, efficacy and patient compliance of old and new drugs. However, currently, there are three major hurdles for the successful transition of such system from laboratory to patient bedside. These include the challenges to identify adequate (i) rhythmic biomaterials and systems, (ii) rhythm engineering modeling, perhaps using system biology and (iii) regulatory guidance. PMID:20438781

  5. Transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  6. Spatiotemporal drug delivery using laser-generated-focused ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Di, Jin; Kim, Jinwook; Hu, Quanyin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Gu, Zhen

    2015-12-28

    Laser-generated-focused ultrasound (LGFU) holds promise for the high-precision ultrasound therapy owing to its tight focal spot, broad frequency band, and stable excitation with minimal ultrasound-induced heating. We here report the development of the LGFU as a stimulus for promoted drug release from microgels integrated with drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. The pulsed waves of ultrasound, generated by a carbon black/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-photoacoustic lens, were introduced to trigger the drug release from alginate microgels encapsulated with drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. We demonstrated the antibacterial capability of this drug delivery system against Escherichia coli by the disk diffusion method, and antitumor efficacy toward the HeLa cell-derived tumor spheroids in vitro. This novel LGFU-responsive drug delivery system provides a simple and remote approach to precisely control the release of therapeutics in a spatiotemporal manner and potentially suppress detrimental effects to the surrounding tissue, such as thermal ablation. PMID:26299506

  7. Enhancing intestinal drug solubilisation using lipid-based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Porter, Christopher J H; Pouton, Colin W; Cuine, Jean F; Charman, William N

    2008-03-17

    Lipid-based delivery systems are finding increasing application in the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble, lipophilic drugs. Whilst lipidic dose forms may improve oral bioavailability via several mechanisms, enhancement of gastrointestinal solubilisation remains argueably the most important method of absorption enhancement. This review firstly describes the mechanistic rationale which underpins the use of lipid-based delivery systems to enhance drug solubilisation and briefly reviews the available literature describing increases in oral bioavailability after the administration of lipid solution, suspension and self-emulsifying formulations. The use of in vitro methods including dispersion tests and more complex models of in vitro lipolysis as indicators of potential in vivo performance are subsequently described, with particular focus on recent data which suggests that the digestion of surfactants present in lipid-based formulations may impact on formulation performance. Finally, a series of seven guiding principles for formulation design of lipid-based delivery systems are suggested based on an analysis of recent data generated in our laboratories and elsewhere. PMID:18155801

  8. Intrathecal Drug Delivery (ITDD) systems for cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Lau, Mary E; Koury, Katharine M; Gulur, Padma

    2014-01-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery is an effective pain management option for patients with chronic and cancer pain. The delivery of drugs into the intrathecal space provides superior analgesia with smaller doses of analgesics to minimize side effects while significantly improving quality of life. This article aims to provide a general overview of the use of intrathecal drug delivery to manage pain, dosing recommendations, potential risks and complications, and growing trends in the field. PMID:24555051

  9. Therapeutic opportunities in colon-specific drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur; Shah, Tejal; Amin, Avani

    2007-01-01

    Oral colon-specific drug-delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents. The major obstacles to delivering drugs to the colon are the absorption and degradation pathways in the upper gastrointestinal tract. However, a successfully designed colon-targeted system can overcome these obstacles. Targeting drugs to the colon has proven quite valuable in a variety of disorders, and the colon has proven to be a potential site for local as well as systemic administration of drugs. Colon targeting has proven beneficial for local action in a variety of disease conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and colonic cancer. Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, cationized antioxidant enzymes, genetically engineered bacteria to produce cytokines, nicotine, and other drugs have exhibited significantly enhanced efficacy when delivered to the colon. Targeting drugs to cancer cells through receptors and ligands have opened up new avenues in the treatment of colonic cancer. Colon targeting has also proven useful for systemic action of protein-peptide drugs such as insulin, calcitonin, and met-enkaphalin and even for other nonpeptide drugs such as cardiovascular and antiasthmatic agents. This review also presents various approaches for targeting orally administered dosage forms to the colon. The use of a prodrug approach, bioadhesive polymers, and coating with pH-sensitive and biodegradable polymers has been, to an extent, highly successful in delivering the targeted formulations to the site of action. Biodegrable hydrogels such as amylose, chondroitin sulphate, chitosan, inulin, guar gum, and pectin have also been successfully used to achieve oral colon-targeted delivery. PMID:17725524

  10. In vivo Evaluation of Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery System for Oral Delivery of Nevirapine

    PubMed Central

    Chudasama, A. S.; Patel, V. V.; Nivsarkar, M.; Vasu, Kamala K.; Shishoo, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Nevirapine is a highly lipophilic and water insoluble non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Lymphoid tissue constitutes the major reservoir of HIV virus and infected cells in HIV-infected patients. Self-emulsifying drug delivery system, using long chain triglycerides, is a popular carrier of drugs due to their ability to transport lipophilic drugs into the lymphatic circulation. However, HIV/AIDS patients experience a variety of functional and anatomical abnormalities in gastrointestinal tract that result in diarrhoea and nutrient malabsorption. Medium chain triglycerides are readily absorbed from the small bowel under conditions in which the absorption of long chain triglycerides is impaired. Therefore, nevirapine self-emulsifying drug delivery system containing medium chain fatty acid, caprylic acid and a solubilizer, Soluphor® P (2-pyrrolidone) was developed and found to be superior to the marketed conventional suspension with respect to in vitro diffusion and ex vivo intestinal permeability. This self-emulsifying drug delivery system has now been further investigated for in vivo absorption in an animal model. The contribution of caprylic acid and Soluphor® P on in vivo absorption of nevirapine was also studied in the present study. The bioavailability of nevirapine from self-emulsifying drug delivery system, after oral administration, was 2.69 times higher than that of the marketed suspension. The improved bioavailability could be due to absorption of nevirapine via both portal and intestinal lymphatic routes. The study indicates that medium chain or structured triglycerides can be a better option to develop self-emulsifying drug delivery system for lipophilic and extensively metabolised drugs like nevirapine for patients with AIDS-associated malabsorption. PMID:25035533

  11. In vivo Evaluation of Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery System for Oral Delivery of Nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, A S; Patel, V V; Nivsarkar, M; Vasu, Kamala K; Shishoo, C J

    2014-05-01

    Nevirapine is a highly lipophilic and water insoluble non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Lymphoid tissue constitutes the major reservoir of HIV virus and infected cells in HIV-infected patients. Self-emulsifying drug delivery system, using long chain triglycerides, is a popular carrier of drugs due to their ability to transport lipophilic drugs into the lymphatic circulation. However, HIV/AIDS patients experience a variety of functional and anatomical abnormalities in gastrointestinal tract that result in diarrhoea and nutrient malabsorption. Medium chain triglycerides are readily absorbed from the small bowel under conditions in which the absorption of long chain triglycerides is impaired. Therefore, nevirapine self-emulsifying drug delivery system containing medium chain fatty acid, caprylic acid and a solubilizer, Soluphor(®) P (2-pyrrolidone) was developed and found to be superior to the marketed conventional suspension with respect to in vitro diffusion and ex vivo intestinal permeability. This self-emulsifying drug delivery system has now been further investigated for in vivo absorption in an animal model. The contribution of caprylic acid and Soluphor(®) P on in vivo absorption of nevirapine was also studied in the present study. The bioavailability of nevirapine from self-emulsifying drug delivery system, after oral administration, was 2.69 times higher than that of the marketed suspension. The improved bioavailability could be due to absorption of nevirapine via both portal and intestinal lymphatic routes. The study indicates that medium chain or structured triglycerides can be a better option to develop self-emulsifying drug delivery system for lipophilic and extensively metabolised drugs like nevirapine for patients with AIDS-associated malabsorption. PMID:25035533

  12. Unsteady jet in designing innovative drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Mazur, Paul; Cosse, Julia; Rider, Stephanie; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Micro-needle injections, a promising pain-free drug delivery method, is constrained by its limited penetration depth. This deficiency can be overcome by implementing fast unsteady jet that can penetrate sub-dermally. The development of a faster liquid jet would increase the penetration depth and delivery volume of micro-needles. In this preliminary work, the nonlinear transient behavior of an elastic tube balloon in providing fast discharge is analyzed. A physical model that combines the Mooney Rivlin Material model and Young-Lapalce's Law was developed and used to investigate the fast discharging dynamic phenomenon. A proof of concept prototype was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of a simple thumb-sized delivery system to generate liquid jet with desired speed in the range of 5-10 m/s. This work is supported by ZCUBE Corporation.

  13. Design of a Multiple Drug Delivery System Directed at Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, Sharath C.; Thomas, Mark V.; Peyyala, Rebecca; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Puleo, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is highly prevalent, with 90% of the world population affected by either periodontitis or its preceding condition, gingivitis. These conditions are caused by bacterial biofilms on teeth, which stimulate a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The present research sought to demonstrate development of a multiple drug delivery system for stepwise treatment of different stages of periodontal disease. More specifically, multilayered films were fabricated from an association polymer comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127 to achieve sequential release of drugs. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. Different erosion times and adjustable sequential release profiles were achieved by modifying the number of layers or by inclusion of a slower-eroding polymer layer. Analysis of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity showed that drugs released from the devices retained 100% bioactivity. The multilayered CAPP delivery system offers a versatile approach for releasing different drugs based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and other conditions. PMID:23948165

  14. Microemulsion Drug Delivery System: For Bioavailability Enhancement of Ampelopsin

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailendra Singh; Sarkar, Brajesh; Dhanwani, Rakesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Ampelopsin, one of the most common flavonoids, reported to possess numerous pharmacological activities and shows poor aqueous solubility. The purpose of this study was to enhance the dissolution rate and bioavailability of this drug by developing a novel delivery system that is microemulsion (ME) and to study the effect of microemulsion (ME) on the oral bioavailability of ampelopsin. Capmul MCM-based ME formulation with Cremophor EL as surfactant and Transcutol as cosurfactant was developed for oral delivery of ampelopsin. Optimised ME was evaluated for its transparency, viscosity, percentage assay and so forth. Solubilisation capacity of the ME system was also determined. The prepared ME was compared with the pure drug solution and commercially available tablet for in vitro drug release. The optimised ME formulation containing ampelopsin, Capmul MCM (5.5%), Cremophor EL (25%), Transcutol P (8.5%), and distilled water showed higher in vitro drug release, as compared to plain drug suspension and the suspension of commercially available tablet. These results demonstrate the potential use of ME for improving the bioavailability of poor water soluble compounds, such as ampelopsin. PMID:22830055

  15. Design of a multiple drug delivery system directed at periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Sharath C; Thomas, Mark V; Peyyala, Rebecca; Dziubla, Thomas D; Puleo, David A

    2013-11-01

    Periodontal disease is highly prevalent, with 90% of the world population affected by either periodontitis or its preceding condition, gingivitis. These conditions are caused by bacterial biofilms on teeth, which stimulate a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The present research sought to demonstrate development of a multiple drug delivery system for stepwise treatment of different stages of periodontal disease. More specifically, multilayered films were fabricated from an association polymer comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127 to achieve sequential release of drugs. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. Different erosion times and adjustable sequential release profiles were achieved by modifying the number of layers or by inclusion of a slower-eroding polymer layer. Analysis of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity showed that drugs released from the devices retained 100% bioactivity. The multilayered CAPP delivery system offers a versatile approach for releasing different drugs based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and other conditions. PMID:23948165

  16. A new family of folate-decorated and carbon nanotube-mediated drug delivery system: synthesis and drug delivery response.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Yuan, Q; Shah, J S; Misra, R D K

    2011-11-01

    We describe here a new family of folate-decorated and carbon nanotube (CNT)-mediated drug delivery system that involves uniquely combining carbon nanotubes with anticancer drug (doxorubicin) for controlled drug release, which is gaining significant attention. The synthesis of nanocarrier involved attachment of doxorubicin (DOX) to CNT surface via π-π stacking interaction, followed by encapsulation of CNTs with folic acid-conjugated chitosan. The π-π stacking interaction, ascribed as a non-covalent type of functionalization, allows controlled release of drug. Furthermore, encapsulation of CNTs enhances the stability of the nanocarrier in aqueous medium because of the hydrophilicity and cationic charge of chitosan. The unique integration of drug targeting and visualization has high potential to address the current challenges in cancer therapy. Thus, it is attractive to consider the possibility of investigating a drug delivery system that combines the biodegradable chitosan and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). PMID:21514336

  17. Stimulus-responsive "smart" hydrogels as novel drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Soppimath, K S; Aminabhavi, T M; Dave, A M; Kumbar, S G; Rudzinski, W E

    2002-09-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of research activity in the development of stimulus-responsive polymeric hydrogels. These hydrogels are responsive to external or internal stimuli and the response can be observed through abrupt changes in the physical nature of the network. This property can be favorable in many drug delivery applications. The external stimuli can be temperature, pH, ionic strength, ultrasonic sound, electric current, etc. A majority of the literature related to the development of stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems deals with temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (pNIPAAm) and its various derivatives. However, acrylic-based pH-sensitive systems with weakly acidic/basic functional groups have also been widely studied. Quite recently, glucose-sensitive hydrogels that are responsive to glucose concentration have been developed to monitor the release of insulin. The present article provides a brief introduction and recent developments in the area of stimulus-responsive hydrogels, particularly those that respond to temperature and pH, and their applications in drug delivery. PMID:12378965

  18. A new approach in gastroretentive drug delivery system using cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Umamaheshwari, R B; Jain, Subheet; Jain, N K

    2003-01-01

    We prepared cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)-coated cholestyramine microcapsules as a intragastric floating drug delivery system endowed with floating ability due to the carbon dioxide generation when exposed to the gastric fluid. The microcapsules also have a mucoadhesive property. Ion-exchange resin particles can be loaded with bicarbonate followed by acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) and coated with CAB by emulsion solvent evaporation method. The drug concentration was monitored to maintain the floating property and minimum effective concentration. The effect of CAB: drug-resin ratio (2:1, 4:1, 6:1 w/w) on the particle size, floating time, and drug release was determined. Cholestyramine microcapsules were characterized for shape, surface characteristics, and size distribution; cholestyramine/acetohydroxamic acid interactions inside microcapsules were investigated by X-ray diffractometry. The buoyancy time of CAB-coated formulations was better than that of uncoated resin particles. Also, a longer floating time was observed with a higher polymer:drug resin complex ratio (6:1). With increasing coating thickness the particle size was increased but drug release rate was decreased. The drug release rate was higher in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) than in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). The in vivo mucoadhesion studies were performed with rhodamine-isothiocyanate (RITC) by fluorescent probe method. The amount of CAB-coated cholestyramine microcapsules that remained in the stomach was slightly lower than that of uncoated resin particles. Cholestyramine microcapsules were distributed throughout the stomach and exhibited prolonged gastric residence via mucoadhesion. These results suggest that CAB-coated microcapsules could be a floating as well as a mucoadhesive drug delivery system. Thus, it has promise in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori. PMID:12944135

  19. Nanoparticle-Hydrogel: A Hybrid Biomaterial System for Localized Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Qiangzhe; Zhang, Liangfang

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles have offered a unique set of properties for drug delivery including high drug loading capacity, combinatorial delivery, controlled and sustained drug release, prolonged stability and lifetime, and targeted delivery. To further enhance therapeutic index, especially for localized application, nanoparticles have been increasingly combined with hydrogels to form a hybrid biomaterial system for controlled drug delivery. Herein, we review recent progresses in engineering such nanoparticle-hydrogel hybrid system (namely 'NP-gel') with a particular focus on its application for localized drug delivery. Specifically, we highlight four research areas where NP-gel has shown great promises, including (1) passively controlled drug release, (2) stimuli-responsive drug delivery, (3) site-specific drug delivery, and (4) detoxification. Overall, integrating therapeutic nanoparticles with hydrogel technologies creates a unique and robust hybrid biomaterial system that enables effective localized drug delivery. PMID:26951462

  20. Bionanocomposites containing magnetic graphite as potential systems for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lígia N M; Alcântara, Ana C S; Darder, Margarita; Aranda, Pilar; Herrmann, Paulo S P; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M; García-Hernández, Mar; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2014-12-30

    New magnetic bio-hybrid matrices for potential application in drug delivery are developed from the assembly of the biopolymer alginate and magnetic graphite nanoparticles. Ibuprofen (IBU) intercalated in a Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was chosen as a model drug delivery system (DDS) to be incorporated as third component of the magnetic bionanocomposite DDS. For comparative purposes DDS based on the incorporation of pure IBU in the magnetic bio-hybrid matrices were also studied. All the resulting magnetic bionanocomposites were processed as beads and films and characterized by different techniques with the aim to elucidate the role of the magnetic graphite on the systems, as well as that of the inorganic brucite-like layers in the drug-loaded LDH. In this way, the influence of both inorganic components on the mechanical properties, the water uptake ability, and the kinetics of the drug release from these magnetic systems were determined. In addition, the possibility of modulating the levels of IBU release by stimulating the bionanocomposites with an external magnetic field was also evaluated in in vitro assays. PMID:25455784

  1. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  2. Synthetic Tumor Networks for Screening Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B.; Garson, Charles J.; Mills, Ivy R.; Matar, Majed M.; Fewell, Jason G.; Pant, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle’s physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of “leaky vessels”. Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  3. Synthetic tumor networks for screening drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B; Garson, Charles J; Mills, Ivy R; Matar, Majed M; Fewell, Jason G; Pant, Kapil

    2015-03-10

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle's physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of "leaky vessels". Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  4. PECTIN IN CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled drug delivery remains a research focus for public health to enhance patient compliance, drug efficiency and to reduce the side effects of drugs. Pectin, an edible plant polysaccharide, has shown potential for the construction of drug delivery systems for site-specific drug delivery. Sev...

  5. Design and optimization of floating drug delivery system of acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kharia, A A; Hiremath, S N; Singhai, A K; Omray, L K; Jain, S K

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present work was to design and optimize floating drug delivery systems of acyclovir using psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. A 3(2) full factorial design was used for optimization of drug release profile. The amount of psyllium husk (X1) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M (X2) were selected as independent variables. The times required for 50% (t(50%)) and 70% (t(70%)) drug dissolution were selected as dependent variables. All the designed nine batches of formulations were evaluated for hardness, friability, weight variation, drug content uniformity, swelling index, in vitro buoyancy, and in vitro drug release profile. All formulations had floating lag time below 3 min and constantly floated on dissolution medium for more than 24 h. Validity of the developed polynomial equation was verified by designing two check point formulations (C1 and C2). The closeness of predicted and observed values for t(50%) and t(70%) indicates validity of derived equations for the dependent variables. These studies indicated that the proper balance between psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M can produce a drug dissolution profile similar to the predicted dissolution profile. The optimized formulations followed Higuchi's kinetics while the drug release mechanism was found to be anomalous type, controlled by diffusion through the swollen matrix. PMID:21694992

  6. Key Considerations in Designing Oral Drug Delivery Systems for Dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunmei; Peressin, Karl; Wong, Pooi Yin; Page, Stephen W; Garg, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    The present review discusses the pharmaceutical impact of the anatomy and physiology of the canine gastrointestinal tract to provide a comprehensive guide to the theories and challenges associated with the development of oral drug delivery systems for dogs. Novel pharmaceutical technologies applied to veterinary drugs are discussed indicating the advantages and benefits for animals. There are currently immense research and development efforts being funneled into novel canine health products. Such products are being used to overcome limitations of drugs that display site-dependent absorption or possess poor biopharmaceutical properties. Techniques that are employed to increase bioavailability of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II drugs are discussed in this article. Furthermore, an overview of palatable oral formulations for dog care is provided as an approach to easy administration. In vitro and in vivo evaluation and correlation of oral drug formulations in dogs are also addressed. This article assesses the outlook of canine oral drug development recognizing substantial growth forecasts of the dog care market. PMID:27056627

  7. Chitosan in nasal delivery systems for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Casettari, Luca; Illum, Lisbeth

    2014-09-28

    There is an obvious need for efficient and safe nasal absorption enhancers for the development of therapeutically efficacious nasal products for small hydrophilic drugs, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, which do not easily cross mucosal membranes, including the nasal. Recent years have seen the development of a range of nasal absorption enhancer systems such as CriticalSorb (based on Solutol HS15) (Critical Pharmaceuticals Ltd), Chisys based on chitosan (Archimedes Pharma Ltd) and Intravail based on alkylsaccharides (Aegis Therapeutics Inc.), that is presently being tested in clinical trials for a range of drugs. So far, none of these absorption enhancers have been used in a marketed nasal product. The present review discusses the evaluation of chitosan and chitosan derivatives as nasal absorption enhancers, for a range of drugs and in a range of formulations such as solutions, gels and nanoparticles and finds that chitosan and its derivatives are able to efficiently improve the nasal bioavailability. The revirtew also questions whether chitosan nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery provide any real improvement over simpler chitosan formulations. Furthermore, the review also evaluates the use of chitosan formulations for the improvement of transport of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the brain, based on its mucoadhesive characteristics and its ability to open tight junctions in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia. It is found that the use of chitosan nanoparticles greatly increases the transport of drugs from nose to brain over and above the effect of simpler chitosan formulations. PMID:24818769

  8. Pressure-sensitive adhesives for transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Tan; Pfister

    1999-02-01

    Adhesives are a critical component in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) devices. In addition to the usual requirements of functional adhesive properties, adhesives for TDD applications must have good biocompatibility with the skin, chemical compatibility with the drug, various components of the formulation, and provide consistent, effective delivery of the drug. This review discusses the three most commonly used adhesives (polyisobutylenes, polyacrylates and silicones) in TDD devices, and provides an update on recently introduced TDD products and recent developments of new adhesives. PMID:10234208

  9. Progress in Psoriasis Therapy via Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Nitha; Ramya, Devi D; Vedha, Hari BN

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a lifelong condition which is caused by the negative signals produced by immune system, which leads to hyper proliferation and other inflammatory reactions on the skin. In this case, keratinocytes which are the outermost layer of skin possess shortened life cycle and results in the alteration of desquamation process where the cytokines will come out through lesions of affected patients and as a result, scaling marks appears on the skin. These conditions may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life and lead to psychosocial stress. Psoriasis can be categorized as mild, moderate and severe conditions. Mild psoriasis leads to the formation of rashes, and when it becomes moderate, the skin turns into scaly. In severe conditions, red patches may be present on skin surface and becomes itchy. Topical therapy continues to be one of the pillars for psoriasis management. Drug molecules with target effect on the skin tissues and other inflammations should be selected for the treatment of psoriasis. Most of the existing drugs lead to systemic intoxication and dryness when applied in higher dose. Different scientific approaches for topical delivery are being explored by researches including emollient, modified gelling system, transdermal delivery, spray, nanogels, hydrogels, micro/nano emulsion, liposomes, nano capsules etc. These topical dosage forms are evaluated for various physico chemical properties such as drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, spreadability, toxicity, irritancy, permeability and drug release mechanism. This review paper focus attention to the impact of these formulation approaches on various anti-psoriasis drugs for their successful treatment. PMID:25386329

  10. Smart drug delivery systems: from fundamentals to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel

    2014-07-25

    Forty years after the first reports on stimuli-responsive phase transitions in synthetic hydrogels, the first medicines based on responsive components are approaching the market. Sensitiveness to internal or external signals of the body can be achieved by means of materials (mostly polymers, but also lipids and metals) that modify their properties as a function of the intensity of the signal and that enable the transduction into changes in the delivery system that affect its ability to host/release a therapeutic substance. Integration of responsive materials into implantable depots, targetable nanocarriers and even insertable medical devices can endow them with activation-modulated and feedback-regulated control of drug release. This review offers a critical overview of therapeutically-interesting stimuli to trigger drug release and the evolution of responsive materials suitable as functional excipients, illustrated with recent examples of formulations in clinical trials or already commercially available, which can provide a perspective on the current state of the art on smart drug delivery systems. PMID:24805962

  11. The Smart Drug Delivery System and Its Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Fang; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the unprecedented progresses of biomedical nanotechnology during the past few decades, conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been involved into smart DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. Benefiting from the response to specific internal or external triggers, those well-defined nanoplatforms can increase the drug targeting efficacy, in the meantime, reduce side effects/toxicities of payloads, which are key factors for improving patient compliance. In academic field, variety of smart DDSs have been abundantly demonstrated for various intriguing systems, such as stimuli-responsive polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, metals/metal oxides, and exosomes. However, these nanoplatforms are lack of standardized manufacturing method, toxicity assessment experience, and clear relevance between the pre-clinical and clinical studies, resulting in the huge difficulties to obtain regulatory and ethics approval. Therefore, such relatively complex stimulus-sensitive nano-DDSs are not currently approved for clinical use. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of smart nanoplatforms for targeting drug delivery. Furthermore, the clinical translation obstacles faced by these smart nanoplatforms have been reviewed and discussed. We also present the future directions and perspectives of stimuli-sensitive DDS in clinical applications. PMID:27375781

  12. Cubic and Hexagonal Liquid Crystals as Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulin; Ma, Ping; Gui, Shuangying

    2014-01-01

    Lipids have been widely used as main constituents in various drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, and lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals. Among them, lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals have highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix. The intricate nanostructures of the cubic phase and hexagonal phase have been shown to provide diffusion controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients with a wide range of molecular weights and polarities. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates the minimum toxicity and thus they are used for various routes of administration. Therefore, the research on lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystalline phases has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. This review will provide an overview of the lipids used to prepare cubic phase and hexagonal phase at physiological temperature, as well as the influencing factors on the phase transition of liquid crystals. In particular, the most current research progresses on cubic and hexagonal phases as drug delivery systems will be discussed. PMID:24995330

  13. The Smart Drug Delivery System and Its Clinical Potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Fang; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the unprecedented progresses of biomedical nanotechnology during the past few decades, conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been involved into smart DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. Benefiting from the response to specific internal or external triggers, those well-defined nanoplatforms can increase the drug targeting efficacy, in the meantime, reduce side effects/toxicities of payloads, which are key factors for improving patient compliance. In academic field, variety of smart DDSs have been abundantly demonstrated for various intriguing systems, such as stimuli-responsive polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, metals/metal oxides, and exosomes. However, these nanoplatforms are lack of standardized manufacturing method, toxicity assessment experience, and clear relevance between the pre-clinical and clinical studies, resulting in the huge difficulties to obtain regulatory and ethics approval. Therefore, such relatively complex stimulus-sensitive nano-DDSs are not currently approved for clinical use. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of smart nanoplatforms for targeting drug delivery. Furthermore, the clinical translation obstacles faced by these smart nanoplatforms have been reviewed and discussed. We also present the future directions and perspectives of stimuli-sensitive DDS in clinical applications. PMID:27375781

  14. Applications of novel drug delivery system for herbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Ajazuddin; Saraf, S

    2010-10-01

    Over the past several years, great advances have been made on development of novel drug delivery systems (NDDS) for plant actives and extracts. The variety of novel herbal formulations like polymeric nanoparticles, nanocapsules, liposomes, phytosomes, nanoemulsions, microsphere, transferosomes, and ethosomes has been reported using bioactive and plant extracts. The novel formulations are reported to have remarkable advantages over conventional formulations of plant actives and extracts which include enhancement of solubility, bioavailability, protection from toxicity, enhancement of pharmacological activity, enhancement of stability, improved tissue macrophages distribution, sustained delivery, and protection from physical and chemical degradation. The present review highlights the current status of the development of novel herbal formulations and summarizes their method of preparation, type of active ingredients, size, entrapment efficiency, route of administration, biological activity and applications of novel formulations. PMID:20471457

  15. Rosin: a naturally derived excipient in drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shobhit; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Natural polymers are primarily attractive because they are biodegradable, inexpensive, and readily available. The most important benefit of natural polymers is that they are capable for chemical modifications. One such biopolymer, rosin, and its derivatives have been pharmaceutically evaluated as microencapsulating materials, film forming agent and as binding agent in formulation of tablets. They are also employed in formulation of chewing gum bases and cosmetics. This review article provides an overview of pharmaceutical use of rosin and its derivatives as excipient in dosage forms as well as novel drug delivery systems. PMID:23808195

  16. Azithromycin novel drug delivery system for ocular application

    PubMed Central

    Gilhotra, Ritu Mehra; Nagpal, Kalpana; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2011-01-01

    Background: Azithromycin (AZT) is a macrolide antibiotic derived from and similar in structure to erythromycin. Oral administration of AZT is effective for the treatment of trachoma; however, topical formulations are difficult to develop because of the drug's hydrophobicity. The aim of this study is to formulate a novel topical ophthalmic delivery system of AZT. Materials and Methods: In the present study, ocular inserts of AZT are prepared using alginate, carbopol, and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) to solve the said formulation problem of drug and to facilitate ocular bioavailability. Ocular inserts were prepared by film casting method and the prepared films were subjected to investigations for their physical and mechanical properties, swelling behaviors, ex vivo bioadhesion, and in vitro drug release. Ocular irritation of the developed formulation was also checked by hen's egg chorioallantoic membrane test for ocular irritation potential. Results: The physicochemical, bioadhesive, and swelling properties of films were found to vary significantly depending on the type of polymers used and their combinations. The alginate films exhibited greater bioadhesion and showed higher tensile strength and elasticity than the carbopol films. HPMC addition to the films significantly affected the properties of ocular inserts. Carbopol:HPMC (30:70)-based ocular inserts sustained drug release for longest span of 6 h. The release profile of AZT showed that drug release was by both diffusion and swelling. The formulation was found to be practically nonirritant in ocular irritation studies. Conclusion: AZT can therefore be developed as an ocular insert delivery system for the treatment of ocular surface infections. PMID:23071916

  17. Advances in the applications of polyhydroxyalkanoate nanoparticles for novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Anupama; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Young-Rok

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery technology is emerging as an interdisciplinary science aimed at improving human health. The controlled delivery of pharmacologically active agents to the specific site of action at the therapeutically optimal rate and dose regimen has been a major goal in designing drug delivery systems. Over the past few decades, there has been considerable interest in developing biodegradable drug carriers as effective drug delivery systems. Polymeric materials from natural sources play an important role in controlled release of drug at a particular site. Polyhydroxyalkanoates, due to their origin from natural sources, are given attention as candidates for drug delivery materials. Biodegradable and biocompatible polyhydroxyalkanoates are linear polyesters produced by microorganisms under unbalanced growth conditions, which have emerged as potential polymers for use as biomedical materials for drug delivery due to their unique physiochemical and mechanical properties. This review summarizes many of the key findings in the applications of polyhydroxyalkanoates and polyhydroxyalkanoate nanoparticles for drug delivery system. PMID:23984383

  18. Advances in the Applications of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Nanoparticles for Novel Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Anupama; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Young-Rok

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery technology is emerging as an interdisciplinary science aimed at improving human health. The controlled delivery of pharmacologically active agents to the specific site of action at the therapeutically optimal rate and dose regimen has been a major goal in designing drug delivery systems. Over the past few decades, there has been considerable interest in developing biodegradable drug carriers as effective drug delivery systems. Polymeric materials from natural sources play an important role in controlled release of drug at a particular site. Polyhydroxyalkanoates, due to their origin from natural sources, are given attention as candidates for drug delivery materials. Biodegradable and biocompatible polyhydroxyalkanoates are linear polyesters produced by microorganisms under unbalanced growth conditions, which have emerged as potential polymers for use as biomedical materials for drug delivery due to their unique physiochemical and mechanical properties. This review summarizes many of the key findings in the applications of polyhydroxyalkanoates and polyhydroxyalkanoate nanoparticles for drug delivery system. PMID:23984383

  19. Recent patents survey on self emulsifying drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Jethara, Sahilhusen I; Patel, Alpesh D; Patel, Mukesh R

    2014-01-01

    Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery System is a unique feasible approach to overcome low oral bioavailability problem which is associated with the hydrophobic drugs due to their unparalleled potential as a drug delivery with the broad range of application. The estimated 40% of active pharmaceuticals are poorly water soluble. Now recently, formulation containing oral SEDDS has received much interest as it solve problems related to oral bioavailability, intra and inter-subject variability and lack of dose proportionality of hydrophobic drugs. Now a days, it is the first way to investigate the development of any kind of innovative dosage forms. Many important in-vitro characteristics such as surfactant concentration, oil/surfactant ratio, emulsion polarity, droplet size and zeta potential play an important role in oral absorption of drug from SEEDS. It can be orally administered in the form of SGC or HGC and also enhances bioavailability of drugs to increase solubility and minimizes the gastric irritation. After administration the drug remains entrapped in the oily droplets (inside the droplet or in the surfactant`s film at the interface) of the emulsion that are formed in the GIT upon self-emulsification process. It is also a bit problematic to say that the drug is being released from SMEDDS, it would be more precise to say that it diffuses out of oily droplets into the GIT media resulting in the formation of an equilibrium between the drug dissolved in oily droplets and the outer dispersed media (e.g. GIT fluids). Many of the application and preparation methods of SEDDS are reported by research articles and patents in different countries. We present an exhaustive and updated account of numerous literature reports and more than 150 patents published on SEDDS in the recent period. This current patent review is useful in knowledge of SEDDS for its preparations and patents in different countries with emphasis on their formulation, characterization and systematic optimization

  20. Bimodal Gastroretentive Drug Delivery Systems of Lamotrigine: Formulation and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Poonuru, R. R.; Gonugunta, C. S. R

    2014-01-01

    Gastroretentive bimodal drug delivery systems of lamotrigine were developed using immediate release and extended release segments incorporated in a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose capsule and in vitro and in vivo evaluations were conducted. In vivo radiographic studies were carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy human volunteers with replacement of drug polymer complex by barium sulphate and the floating time was noted. Here the immediate release segment worked as loading dose and extended release segment as maintenance dose. The results of release studies of formulations with hydrophillic matrix to formulations with dual matrix hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate shown that as the percentage of polymer increased, the release decreased. Selected formulation F2 having F-Melt has successfully released the drug within one hour and hydrophillic matrix composing polyethylene oxide with 5% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate showed a lag time of one hour and then extended its release up to 12th hour with 99.59% drug release following zero order kinetics with R2 value of 0.989. The Korsmeyer-Peppas equation showed the R2 value to be 0.941 and n value was 1.606 following non-Fickian diffusion pattern with supercase II relaxation mechanism. Here from extended release tablet the drug released slowly from the matrix while floating. PMID:25593380

  1. Cell or Cell Membrane-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Songwei; Wu, Tingting; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Natural cells have been explored as drug carriers for a long period. They have received growing interest as a promising drug delivery system (DDS) until recently along with the development of biology and medical science. The synthetic materials, either organic or inorganic, are found to be with more or less immunogenicity and/or toxicity. The cells and extracellular vesicles (EVs), are endogenous and thought to be much safer and friendlier. Furthermore, in view of their host attributes, they may achieve different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of personalized medicine as the next generation of DDS. In this review, we summarized the recent progress in cell or cell membrane-based DDS and their fabrication processes, unique properties and applications, including the whole cells, EVs and cell membrane coated nanoparticles. We expect the continuing development of this cell or cell membrane-based DDS will promote their clinic applications. PMID:26000058

  2. Processing of Polymer Nanofibers Through Electrospinning as Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenawy, E.; Abdel-Hay, F. I.; El-Newehy, M. H.; Wnek, G. E.

    The use of electrospun fibers as drug carriers could be promising in the future for biomedical applications, especially postoperative local chemotherapy. In this research, electrospun fibers were developed as a new system for the delivery of ketoprofen as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The fibers were made either from polycaprolactone (PCL) as a biodegradable polymer or polyurethane (PU) as a non-biodegradable polymer, or from the blends of the two. The release of the ketoprofen was followed by UV—VIS spectroscopy in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4 at 37°C and 20°C. The results showed that the release rates from the polycaprolactone, polyurethane and their blend were similar. However, the blend of the polycaprolactone with polyurethane improved its visual mechanical properties. Release profiles from the electrospun mats were compared to cast films of the various formulations.

  3. Expand classical drug administration ways by emerging routes using dendrimer drug delivery systems: a concise overview.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Serge; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Drugs are introduced into the body by numerous routes such as enteral (oral, sublingual and rectum administration), parenteral (intravascular, intramuscular, subcutaneous and inhalation administration), or topical (skin and mucosal membranes). Each route has specific purposes, advantages and disadvantages. Today, the oral route remains the preferred one for different reasons such as ease and compliance by patients. Several nanoformulated drugs have been already approved by the FDA, such as Abelcet®, Doxil®, Abraxane® or Vivagel®(Starpharma) which is an anionic G4-poly(L-lysine)-type dendrimer showing potent topical vaginal microbicide activity. Numerous biochemical studies, as well as biological and pharmacological applications of both dendrimer based products (dendrimers as therapeutic compounds per se, like Vivagel®) and dendrimers as drug carriers (covalent conjugation or noncovalent encapsulation of drugs) were described. It is widely known that due to their outstanding physical and chemical properties, dendrimers afforded improvement of corresponding carried-drugs as dendrimer-drug complexes or conjugates (versus plain drug) such as biodistribution and pharmacokinetic behaviors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent progresses of dendrimers as nanoscale drug delivery systems for the delivery of drugs using enteral, parenteral and topical routes. In particular, we focus our attention on the emerging and promising routes such as oral, transdermal, ocular and transmucosal routes using dendrimers as delivery systems. PMID:23415951

  4. [Progress of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in targeting drug delivery system of antitumor drug].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-min; Mo, Shu; Liu, Xiao-qian; Han, Fu-man; Wang, Jin-yu; Wang, Zhi-min

    2015-09-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is one of the main therapy for cancer. But the traditional antitumor drugs are systemic distribution in vivo, they are difficult to achieve an effective drug concentration in the tumor tissue and don't have the ability to distinguish normal cells and tumor cells by themselves, that cause systemic toxicity easily and can not meet the clinical needs. With the research on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) deepening, more and more attention in the drug delivery system have been payed to in recent years, because of its unique physicochemical structure characteristics, it has the effect on specific targets, directly inhibits the tumor cell growth, reduces the side effects to normal cells, tissues and organs and can be long-term medication, etc. It is expected to be excellent carriers of antitumor drugs. MSNs application in the field of cancer treatment has now become a hot research field of medicine. In this paper, the latest research about MSNs in antitumor drugs targeting delivery system from 2008 to 2015 is summarized, including the application of MSNs separately in antitumor drug targeting, passive targeting, active targeting, physical or chemical conditions response targeting and other compound targeting drug delivery system. We expect it to provide a reference to the toxicity reducing and efficacy enhancing and further development of chemical medicine, natural medicine and monomeric compound of chinese herbal medicine. PMID:26978988

  5. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner. PMID:25675450

  6. Delivery Systems for In Vivo Use of Nucleic Acid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Resende, R.R; Torres, H.A.M; Yuahasi, K.K; Majumder, P; Ulrich, H

    2007-01-01

    The notorious biotechnological advance of the last few decades has allowed the development of experimental methods for understanding molecular mechanisms of genes and new therapeutic approaches. Gene therapy is maturing into a viable, practical method with the potential to cure a variety of human illnesses. Some nucleic-acid-based drugs are now available for controlling the progression of genetic diseases by inhibiting gene expression or the activity of their gene products. New therapeutic strategies employ a wide range of molecular tools such as bacterial plasmids containing transgenic inserts, RNA interference and aptamers. A nucleic-acid based constitution confers a lower immunogenic potential and as result of the high stringency selection of large molecular variety, these drugs have high affinity and selectivity for their targets. However, nucleic acids have poor biostability thus requiring chemical modifications and delivery systems to maintain their activity and ease their cellular internalization. This review discusses some of the mechanisms of action and the application of therapies based on nucleic acids such as aptamers and RNA interference as well as platforms for cellular uptake and intracellular delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides and their trade-offs. PMID:21901073

  7. Bionanocomposites based on layered double hydroxides as drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Pilar; Alcântara, Ana C. S.; Ribeiro, Ligia N. M.; Darder, Margarita; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biopolymers to produce bionanocomposites, able to act as effective drug delivery systems (DDS). Ibuprofen (IBU) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) have been chosen as model drugs, being intercalated in a Mg-Al LDH matrix. On the one side, the LDHIBU intercalation compound prepared by ion-exchange reaction was blended with the biopolymers zein, a highly hydrophobic protein, and alginate, a polysaccharide widely applied for encapsulating drugs. On the other side, the LDH- 5-ASA intercalation compound prepared by co-precipitation was assembled to the polysaccharides chitosan and pectin, which show mucoadhesive properties and resistance to acid pH values, respectively. Characterization of the intercalation compounds and the resulting bionanocomposites was carried out by means of different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, chemical and thermal analysis, as well as optical and scanning electron microscopies. Data on the swelling behavior and drug release under different pH conditions are also reported.

  8. Development of self-microemulsifying drug delivery system and solid-self-microemulsifying drug delivery system of telmisartan

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Parul; Aggarwal, Geeta; Harikumar, Sasidharan Leelakumari; Singh, Kashmir

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) and solid-SMEDDS of telmisartan was aimed at overcoming the problems of poor solubility and bioavailability. Methodology: The formulation strategy included selection of oil phase based on saturated solubility studies and surfactant and co-surfactant screening on the basis of their emulsification ability. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the self-emulsifying region using a dilution method. The prepared formulations of SMEDDS were evaluated for their drug content, loading efficiency, morphology, globule size determination. Solid-SMEDDS were prepared by adsorption technique using microcrystalline cellulose (1% w/w) and were evaluated for micromeritic properties, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction. Results: The formulation containing telmisartan (20 mg), castor oil (30% w/w), tween 20 (55% w/w), propylene glycol (15% w/w) was concluded to be optimized. The optimized SMEDDS and solid-SMEDDS exhibited 100% in vitro drug release up to 120 min, which was significantly higher (P < 0.05, t-test) than that of the pure drug. Solid-SMEDDS may be considered as a better solid dosage form as solidified formulations are more ideal than liquid ones in terms of its stability. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential use of SMEDDS and solid-SMEDDS to improve the dissolution and hence oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs like telmisartan through oral route. PMID:25426441

  9. Formulation and evaluation of Ketoconazole niosomal gel drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Shirsand, SB; Para, MS; Nagendrakumar, D; Kanani, KM; Keerthy, D

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Niosomes play an increasingly important role in drug delivery as they can reduce toxicity and modify pharmacokinetic and bio-availability. Topically applied niosomes can increase the residence time of drugs in the stratum corneum and epidermis, while reducing the systemic absorption of the drug. It can act as drug containing reservoirs and the modification of the vesicular compositions or surface properties can adjust the drug release rate and the affinity for the target site. Ketoconazole is a broad spectrum Imidazole derivative useful in the treatment of superficial and systemic fungal infections. Materials and Methods: In order to improve the low skin penetration and to minimize the side effects associated with topical conventional drug administration, Ketoconazole niosomes were prepared by a thin film hydration method using different ratios of non-ionic surfactants (Span 40, 60 and Tween 60) along with cholesterol (CHO). The formulations were evaluated for size, shape, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. Results: Niosomes appeared spherical in shape and size range was found to be 4.86 ± 1.24-7.38 ± 3.64 μm. The entrapment efficiency was found in the range of 55.14 ± 2.29-78.63 ± 0.91% and in vitro drug release in the range of 46.63 ± 0.95-72.37 ± 0.59% in 24 h. Ketoconazole niosomes formulated with Span 60 and CHO in the ratio of 1:0.2 were found to be promising and were incorporated into 1% Carbopol gel. The formulated gel was evaluated for various physicochemical parameters and antifungal activity. The in vitro drug release study was carried out using phosphate buffer saline pH 7.4 and was found to be 36.18 ± 1.50% in 12 h. Conclusion: Gel formulation containing niosomes loaded with Ketoconazole showed prolonged action than formulations containing Ketoconazole in non-niosomal form and it can be developed successfully to improve the antifungal activity. PMID:23580936

  10. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  11. 75 FR 45640 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal... guidance for industry entitled ``Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems.'' This... of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug...

  12. Nanostructured Delivery Systems: Augmenting the Delivery of Antiretroviral Drugs for Better Management of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurinder; Pai, Roopa S; Mustafa, Sanaul

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, HIV-1, the retrovirus associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is globally one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, existing approaches for interventions are not able to suppress the progression of infection due to this virus. Of the many obstacles, viral entry into the mono-nuclear phagocyte system encompassing monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells is a major concern. Viral infection is also responsible for the subsequent distribution of the virus into various tissues throughout the organism. Tremendous progress has been made during the past few years to diagnose and treat patients with HIV/AIDS infection, yet much remains to be done. Recommended treatment involves long-term and multiple drug therapy that causes severe side effects. With almost 12% of the world population suffering from HIV/AIDS, better management of this global threat is highly desired. Nanostructured delivery systems hold promise for improving the situation. Such systems can facilitate the uptake of antiretroviral drugs, causing a considerable improvement in HIV/AIDS therapy. Nanoscale systems have intriguing potential to drastically improve existing HIV/AIDS diagnosis and treatment platforms. Nanosystems constitute a wide range of systems varying from polymeric nanoparticles, to solid-lipid nanoparticles, liposomes, micro- and nanoemulsions, dendrimers, and self-nanoemulsifying systems. Improved bioavailability, solubility, stability, and biocompatibility make them an ideal choice for delivery of antiretroviral drugs. The present review initially describes an updated bird's-eye view account of the literature. Then, we provide a relatively sententious overview on updated patents of recent nanostructured delivery systems for antiretroviral drugs. Finally, we discuss low-cost therapy (such as antioxidants and immune modulators) for the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26559551

  13. Boron nitride nanotube as a delivery system for platinum drugs: Drug encapsulation and diffusion coefficient prediction.

    PubMed

    Khatti, Zahra; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2016-06-10

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been applied to investigate a drug delivery system based on boron nitride nanotubes, particularly the delivery of platinum-based anticancer drugs. For this propose, the behavior of carboplatin drugs inserted in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) as a carrier was studied. The diffusion rate of water molecules and carboplatin was investigated inside functionalized and pristine boron nitride nanotubes. The penetration rate of water and drug in functionalized BNNT was higher than that in pristine BNNT due to favorable water-mediated hydrogen bonding in hydroxyl edge-functionalized BNNT. Additionally, the encapsulation of multiple carboplatin drugs inside functionalized boron nitride nanotubes with one to five drug molecules confined inside the nanotube cavity was examined. At high drug loading, the hydrogen bond formation between adjacent drugs and the non-bonded van der Waals interaction between carboplatin and functionalized BNNT inner surface were found to be influential in drug displacement within the functionalized BNNT cavity for higher drug-loading capacity. PMID:27084121

  14. Advanced Drug-Delivery Systems of Curcumin for Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shyam S.; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2011-01-01

    From ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases, including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-angiogenic activity in various cell culture and some animal studies. Research over the past four decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell-culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been demonstrated to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician’s armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  15. Advanced drug delivery systems of curcumin for cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Shyam S; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-08-01

    Since ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, anticarcinogenic, and antiangiogenic activity in various cell cultures and some animal studies. Research over the past 4 decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been shown to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician's armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  16. Development and characterization of a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system for potential application in oral delivery of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwu; Liu, Kaiyun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wenxiu; Guo, Chunliang; Tang, Bin; Gu, Jiang; Zhang, Jinyong; Li, Haibo; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Background: The stability of protein drugs remains one of the key hurdles to their success in the market. The aim of the present study was to design a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system (NEDDS) that would encapsulate a standard-model protein drug – bovine serum albumin (BSA) – to improve drug stability. Methods: The BSA NEDDS was prepared using a phase-inversion method and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The following characteristics were studied: morphology, size, zeta potential, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency. We also investigated the stability of the BSA NEDDS, bioactivity of BSA encapsulated within the NEDDS, the integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and specificity. Results: The BSA NEDDS consisted of Cremophor EL-35, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate, and normal saline. The average particle diameter of the BSA NEDDS was about 21.8 nm, and the system showed a high encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and an adequate drug-loading capacity (45 mg/mL). The thermodynamic stability of the system was investigated at different temperatures and pH levels and in room-temperature conditions for 180 days. BSA NEDDS showed good structural integrity and specificity for the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and good bioactivity of the loaded BSA. Conclusions: BSA NEDDS showed the properties of a good nanoemulsion-delivery system. NEDDS can greatly enhance the stability of the protein drug BSA while maintaining high levels of drug bioactivity, good specificity, and integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary protein structures. These findings indicate that the nanoemulsion is a potential formulation for oral administration of protein drugs. PMID:23118537

  17. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as Efficient Drug and Gene Delivery Systems: Recent Breakthroughs

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely applied as advanced drug and gene delivery nanosystems. Among them, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have attracted great attention as colloidal drug delivery systems for incorporating hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs and various macromolecules as well as proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, SLNs offer great promise for controlled and site specific drug and gene delivery. This article includes general information about SLN structures and properties, production procedures, characterization. In addition, recent progress on development of drug and gene delivery systems using SLNs was reviewed. PMID:26236652

  18. Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery System for Enhancing Bioavailability and Lymphatic Delivery of Tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hea-Young; Choi, Ji-Hoon; Oh, In-Joon; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2015-02-01

    A self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) containing tacrolimus has been developed to enhance the bioavailability and lymphatic delivery of tacrolimus. Solubility tests, combination tests, and phase diagrams were constructed for different sorts and ratios of oils, surfactants, and cosurfactants to identify optimal formulation. Optimized SEDDS was assessed for droplet size, zeta potential, stability in various media, and in vitro release. The tacrolimus-loaded SEDDS and commercial capsule (Prograf®) were orally administered (5 mg/kg) to rats. Whole blood, and mesenteric and axillary lymph node samples were taken and the concentrations of tacrolimus were measured to evaluate pharmacokinetic characteristics and the lymphatic delivery effects. The optimized SEDDS droplets were approximately 40 nm in size and stable enough to endure gastric pH environments. The release rate of tacrolimus from SEDDS was significantly higher than that from the commercial capsule. The bioavailability of tacrolimus in SEDDS after oral administration was significantly improved versus that of Prograf®. The lymphatic targeting efficiency of the prepared SEDDS formulation showed significantly greater than that of Prograf®. Our research indicates that prepared SEDDS can be an alternative to the conventional oral formulation of tacrolimus. Furthermore, SEDDS should be explored as a potential drug carrier for other lipophilic drugs. PMID:26353739

  19. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  20. Mesoporous silica material TUD-1 as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, T; Salonen, J; Tuura, J; Hamdy, M S; Mul, G; Kumar, N; Salmi, T; Murzin, D Yu; Laitinen, L; Kaukonen, A M; Hirvonen, J; Lehto, V-P

    2007-02-22

    For the first time the feasibility of siliceous mesoporous material TUD-1 (Technische Universiteit Delft) for drug delivery was studied. Model drug, ibuprofen, was adsorbed into TUD-1 mesopores via a soaking procedure. Characterizations with nitrogen adsorption, XRD, TG, HPLC and DSC demonstrated the successful inclusion of ibuprofen into TUD-1 host. The amount of ibuprofen adsorbed into the nanoreservoir of TUD-1 material was higher than reported for other mesoporous silica drug carriers (drug/carrier 49.5 wt.%). Drug release studies in vitro (HBSS buffer pH 5.5) demonstrated a fast and unrestricted liberation of ibuprofen, with 96% released at 210 min of the dissolution assay. The drug dissolution profile of TUD-1 material with the random, foam-like three-dimensional mesopore network and high accessibility to the dissolution medium was found to be much faster (kinetic constant k = 10.7) and more diffusion based (release constant n = 0.64) compared to a mesoporous MCM-41 material with smaller, unidirectional mesopore channels (k = 4.7, n = 0.71). Also, the mesoporous carriers were found to significantly increase the dissolution rate of ibuprofen, when compared to the pure crystalline form of the drug (k = 0.6, n = 0.96). TUD-1 was constituted as a potential drug delivery device with fast release property, with prospective applications in the formulation of poorly soluble drug compounds. PMID:17046183

  1. Formulation and development of gastroretentive drug delivery system for ofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Hasan, S; Ali, M

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a delivery system wherein the retention of ofloxacin could be achieved for increased local action in gastric region against Helicobacter pylori infection. The formulation was optimized on the basis of in vitro buoyancy and in vitro release in citrate phosphate buffer (pH 3). The hydrodynamically balanced capsules were prepared by physical mixing of various grades of HPMC and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) alone as well as in combinations. Cellulose acetate pthalate, liquid paraffin, and ethyl cellulose were used as release modifiers so as to maintain release of drug over a period of 12 h. The capsules prepared with PEOWSR 60K and drug coated with 2.5% ethyl cellulose gave the best in vitro percentage release and were taken as the optimized formulations. Various grades of Eudragit and PEO were used in combination for formulating floating microspheres using solvent diffusion technique for preparation of multiple unit system. The use of two different solvents (dichloromethane and ethanol) that differed in the rate of diffusion led to formation of a hollow core in the microspheres, which was partially responsible for the flotation ability. The in vitro release of the floating capsules and microspheres was found to be 96.02% and 95.83% in 12 h, respectively. Both the dosage forms follow Higuchi model for release from formulations. By fitting the in vitro release data of single unit dosage form into zero-order, first-order, and Higuchi model, it could be concluded that the release followed Higuchi model, as the correlation coefficient (R2 value) was higher than those in the other two release models. In both cases of single and multiple unit dosage form, R2 values for Higuchi model were found to be good, showing that drug release followed non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. PMID:17003848

  2. Metrology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter; Klein, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In various recently published studies, it is argued that there are underestimated risks with infusion technology, i.e., adverse incidents believed to be caused by inadequate administration of the drugs. This is particularly the case for applications involving very low-flow rates, i.e., <1 ml/h and applications involving drug delivery by means of multiple pumps. The risks in infusing are caused by a lack of awareness, incompletely understood properties of the complete drug delivery system and a lack of a proper metrological infrastructure for low-flow rates. Technical challenges such as these were the reason a European research project "Metrology for Drug Delivery" was started in 2011. In this special issue of Biomedical Engineering, the results of that project are discussed. PMID:25879307

  3. Surfactant-based drug delivery systems for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Among all cancers, lung cancer is the major cause of deaths. Lung cancer can be categorized into two classes for prognostic and treatment purposes: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both categories of cancer are resistant to certain drugs. Various mechanisms behind drug resistance are over-expression of superficial membrane proteins [glycoprotein (P-gp)], lung resistance-associated proteins, aberration of the intracellular enzyme system, enhancement of the cell repair system and deregulation of cell apoptosis. Structure-performance relationships and chemical compatibility are consequently major fundamentals in surfactant-based formulations, with the intention that a great deal investigation is committed to this region. With the purpose to understand the potential of P-gp in transportation of anti-tumor drugs to cancer cells with much effectiveness and specificity, several surfactant-based delivery systems have been developed which may include microspheres, nanosized drug carriers (nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, stealth liposomes, nanogels, polymer-drug conjugates), novel powders, hydrogels and mixed micellar systems intended for systemic and/or localized delivery. PMID:25013959

  4. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  5. Toxicological Concerns of Engineered Nanosize Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit; Maji, Ruma; Roychowdhury, Samrat; Ghosh, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    Matters when converted into nanosize provide some unique surface properties, which are different from those of the bulk materials. Nanomaterials show some extraordinary behavioral patterns because of those properties, such as supermagnetism, quantum confinement, etc. A great deal of implication of nanomaterials in nanomedicine has already been realized. Utility of nanomaterials as drug nanocarrier projects many potential advantages of them in drug delivery. Despite many such advantages, the potential risk of health and environmental hazards related to them cannot be ignored. Here various physicochemical factors, such as chemical nature, degradability, surface properties, surface charge, particle size, and shape, have been shown to play a crucial role in toxicity related to drug nanocarriers. Evidence-based findings of some drug nanocarriers have been incorporated to provide distinct knowledge to the readers in the field. A glimpse of current regulatory controls and measures required to combat the challenges of toxicological aspects of drug nanocarriers have been described. PMID:24100254

  6. Hydrophilic silica aerogels as dermal drug delivery systems--dithranol as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Guenther, U; Smirnova, I; Neubert, R H H

    2008-08-01

    A special class of porous silica materials, silica aerogels, was recently shown to be a potential candidate for oral drug delivery systems. It was demonstrated, that stability of drugs and their dissolution rate can essentially be improved through the adsorption on to these materials. In this work, drug loaded silica aerogels are firstly applied as dermal drug delivery systems. Dithranol is used as a representative drug since there is a need to enhance its dermal availability. The unstable and nearly water-insoluble drug exhibits a poor penetration. Release of dithranol from aerogels into various semi-solid formulations and its dissolution as well as the release and penetration into artificial membranes were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. Two model membranes (one hydrophilic and one lipophilic) were applied. Several formulations were tested and the most promising one was used in order to study the penetration of dithranol into human stratum corneum (SC). Dithranol adsorbed on hydrophilic silica aerogels exhibited superior penetration behaviour compared to that of the standard ointment (dithranol in white soft paraffin). PMID:18423994

  7. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  8. The potential of liposomes as dental drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sanko; Hiorth, Marianne; Rykke, Morten; Smistad, Gro

    2011-01-01

    The potential of liposomes as a drug delivery system for use in the oral cavity has been investigated. Specifically targeting for the teeth, the in vitro adsorption of charged liposomal formulations to hydroxyapatite (HA), a common model substance for the dental enamel, has been conducted. The experiments were performed in human parotid saliva to simulate oral-like conditions. It was observed, however, that precipitation occurred in tubes containing DPPC/DPTAP or DPPC/DPPG-liposomes in parotid saliva with no HA present, indicating that constituents of parotid saliva reacted with the liposomes. The aggregation reactions of liposome-parotid saliva mixtures were examined by turbidimetry and by atomic force microscopy. Negatively charged DPPC/DPPS and DPPC/PI-liposomes were additionally included in these experiments. The initial turbidity of positive DPPC/DPTAP-liposomes in parotid saliva was very high, but decreased markedly after 30 min. AFM images showed large aggregates of micelle-like globules known to be present in saliva. The turbidity of the various negatively charged liposome and parotid saliva mixtures stayed relatively constant throughout the measuring time; however, their initial turbidities were different; mixtures with DPPC/DPPG-liposomes were the most turbid and DPPC/DPPA-liposomes the least. Pyrophosphate (PP) was added to the various liposome-parotid saliva mixtures to examine the effect of Ca(2+) on the interactions. The effect of PP treatment of the negatively charged liposome-parotid saliva mixtures was most pronounced with DPPC/DPPG-liposome mixtures where it caused a sudden drop in turbidity. For positive DPPC/DPTAP liposome and parotid saliva mixtures, the effect of PP was minimal. These experiments showed that saliva constituents may interact with liposomes. An appropriate liposomal drug delivery system intended for use in the oral cavity seems to be dependent on the liposomal formulation. Based on the present results, negatively charged DPPC

  9. Role of Components in the Formation of Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, A. K.; Deshpande, P. B.; Kar, S. S.; Nayak, Usha Y.; Udupa, N.; Reddy, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research is focused in designing novel drug delivery systems to improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems, one among the lipid-based dosage forms were proven to be promising in improving the oral bioavailability of such drugs by enhancing solubility, permeability and avoiding first-pass metabolism via enhanced lymphatic transport. Further, they have been successful in avoiding both inter and intra individual variations as well as the dose disproportionality. Aqueous insoluble drugs, in general, show greater solubility in lipid based excipients, and hence they are formulated as lipid based drug delivery systems. The extent of solubility of a hydrophobic drug in lipid excipients i.e. oil, surfactant and co-surfactant (components of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems) greatly affects the drug loading and in producing stable self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems. The present review highlighted the influence of physicochemical factors and structural features of the hydrophobic drug on its solubility in lipid excipients and an attempt was made to explore the role of each component of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems in the formation of stable microemulsion upon dilution. PMID:26180269

  10. The effects of irradiation on controlled drug delivery/controlled drug release systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ražem, Dušan; Katušin-Ražem, Branka

    2008-03-01

    The research of radiation effects on drugs over the past 60 years has mainly dealt with radiation sterilization of individual active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the form of pure substances or injectable solutions. However, the emergence of novel systems for drug administration and targeting via controlled drug delivery (CDD) and/or controlled drug release (CDR) has extended the use of irradiation with respect to pharmaceuticals: the capacity of radiation to act as an initiator of crosslinking has been used in the manufacturing and modification of a number of polymeric carriers with an added advantage of reducing the microbial load of products at the same time. The application of irradiation to these novel systems requires the understanding of radiation action not only on APIs alone but also on drug carriers and on the functioning of the integral CDD/CDR systems. In this paper, the significance of CDD/CDR systems is considered with a special emphasis on the role of irradiation for sterilization and crosslinking in the developments over the past 15 years. Radiation sterilization, crosslinking and degradation of the principal forms of drug carrier systems and the effects of irradiation on the release kinetics of APIs are discussed in light of radiation chemical principles. Regulatory aspects pertaining to radiation sterilization of drugs are also considered. Relevant results are summarized in tabular form.

  11. A patchless dissolving microneedle delivery system enabling rapid and efficient transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lahiji, Shayan F.; Dangol, Manita; Jung, Hyungil

    2015-01-01

    Dissolving microneedles (DMNs) are polymeric, microscopic needles that deliver encapsulated drugs in a minimally invasive manner. Currently, DMN arrays are superimposed onto patches that facilitate their insertion into skin. However, due to wide variations in skin elasticity and the amount of hair on the skin, the arrays fabricated on the patch are often not completely inserted and large amount of loaded materials are not delivered. Here, we report “Microlancer”, a novel micropillar based system by which patients can self-administer DMNs and which would also be capable of achieving 97 ± 2% delivery efficiency of the loaded drugs regardless of skin type or the amount of hair on the skin in less than a second. PMID:25604728

  12. Raft forming system-an upcoming approach of gastroretentive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Khutliwala, Tohra A; Zala, Bhumi S

    2013-06-10

    In recent era various technologies have been made in research and development of controlled release oral drug delivery system to overcome various physiological difficulties such as variation in gastric retention and emptying time. To overcome this drawback and to maximize the oral absorption of various drugs, novel drug delivery systems have been developed. Gastroretentive drug delivery system is facing many challenges which can be overcome by upcoming newly emerging approach i.e. raft forming system. The purpose of writing this review is to focus on recent development of stomach specific floating drug delivery system to circumvent the difficulties associated with formulation design. Various gastroretentive approaches that have been developed till now are also discussed. The present study provides valuable information & highlights advances in this raft forming system. This review attempts to discuss various factors like physiological factors, physicochemical factors and formulation factors to be considered in the development of the raft forming system. Different types of smart polymers used for their formulation have also been summarized. The review focuses on the mechanism, formulation and development of the raft forming system. This review also summarizes the studies to evaluate the performance and application of these systems. The study finally highlights advantages, disadvantages, and marketed preparation of the raft forming system. PMID:23500062

  13. An overview of clinical and commercial impact of drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-09-28

    Drug delivery systems are widely researched and developed to improve the delivery of pharmaceutical compounds and molecules. The last few decades have seen a marked growth of the field fueled by increased number of researchers, research funding, venture capital and the number of start-ups. Collectively, the growth has led to novel systems that make use of micro/nano-particles, transdermal patches, inhalers, drug reservoir implants and antibody-drug conjugates. While the increased research activity is clearly an indication of proliferation of the field, clinical and commercial translation of early-stage research ideas is critically important for future growth and interest in the field. Here, we will highlight some of the examples of novel drug delivery systems that have undergone such translation. Specifically, we will discuss the developments, advantages, limitations and lessons learned from: (i) microparticle-based depot formulations, (ii) nanoparticle-based cancer drugs, (iii) transdermal systems, (iv) oral drug delivery systems, (v) pulmonary drug delivery, (vi) implants and (vii) antibody-drug conjugates. These systems have impacted treatment of many prevalent diseases including diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, among others. At the same time, these systems are integral and enabling components of products that collectively generate annual revenues exceeding US $100 billion. These examples provide strong evidence of the clinical and commercial impact of drug delivery systems. PMID:24747160

  14. An Overview of Clinical and Commercial Impact of Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Drug delivery systems are widely researched and developed to improve the delivery of pharmaceutical compounds and molecules. The last few decades have seen a marked growth of the field fueled by increased number of researchers, research funding, venture capital and the number of start-ups. Collectively, the growth has led to novel systems that make use of micro/nano-particles, transdermal patches, inhalers, drug reservoir implants and antibody-drug conjugates. While the increased research activity is clearly an indication of proliferation of the field, clinical and commercial translation of early-stage research ideas is critically important for future growth and interest in the field. Here, we will highlight some of the examples of novel drug delivery systems that have undergone such translation. Specifically, we will discuss the developments, advantages, limitations and lessons learned from: (i) microparticle-based depot formulations, (ii) nanoparticle-based cancer drugs, (iii) transdermal systems, (iv) oral drug delivery systems, (v) pulmonary drug delivery, (vi) implants and (vii) antibody-drug conjugates. These systems have impacted treatment of many prevalent diseases including diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, among others. At the same time, these systems are integral and enabling components of products that collectively generate annual revenues exceeding US $100 billion. These examples provide strong evidence of the clinical and commercial impact of drug delivery systems. PMID:24747160

  15. Development of a polymer stent with shape memory effect as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Wache, H M; Tartakowska, D J; Hentrich, A; Wagner, M H

    2003-02-01

    The article presents a new concept for vascular endoprothesis (stent). Almost all commercially available stents are made of metallic materials. A common after effect of stent implantation is restenosis. Several studies on metal stents coated with drug show, that the use of a drug delivery system may reduce restenosis. The purpose of this work is to develop a new stent for the drug delivery application. The shape memory properties of thermoplastic polyurethane allow to design a new fully polymeric self-expandable stent. The possibility to use the stent as a drug delivery system is described. PMID:15348481

  16. Fluorescent graphene quantum dots as traceable, pH-sensitive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jichuan; Zhang, Ruibin; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Tang, Wei; Rivera Gil, Pilar; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were rationally fabricated as a traceable drug delivery system for the targeted, pH-sensitive delivery of a chemotherapeutic drug into cancer cells. The GQDs served as fluorescent carriers for a well-known anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox). The whole system has the capacity for simultaneous tracking of the carrier and of drug release. Dox release is triggered upon acidification of the intracellular vesicles, where the carriers are located after their uptake by cancer cells. Further functionalization of the loaded carriers with targeting moieties such as arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides enhanced their uptake by cancer cells. DU-145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines were used to evaluate the anticancer ability of Dox-loaded RGD-modified GQDs (Dox-RGD-GQDs). The results demonstrated the feasibility of using GQDs as traceable drug delivery systems with the ability for the pH-triggered delivery of drugs into target cells. PMID:26604747

  17. Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Anil K.; Philip, Betty

    2010-01-01

    The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery) namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems, and microbially triggered systems, which achieved limited success and had limitations as compared with newer CDDS namely pressure controlled colonic delivery capsules, CODESTM, and osmotic controlled drug delivery which are unique in terms of achieving in vivo site specificity, and feasibility of manufacturing process. PMID:22125706

  18. Self-emulsifying drug delivery system and the applications in herbal drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lanying; Zhang, Manhong; Pang, Yue; Li, Zhaoming; Zhao, Aili; Feng, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Herbal drugs have been used for thousands of years in the east and have had a recent resurgence in popularity among consumers in the west. However, most of herbal drug are poorly soluble and have hydrophobic properties and poor distribution, leading to reduced bioavailability and hence decreased treatment efficacy, requiring repeated administration or increased dose. In the past few decades, considerable attention has been focused on the development of self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) for herbal drugs. SEDDS is isotropic and thermodynamically stable solutions consisting of oil, surfactant, co-surfactant and drug that can spontaneously form oil-in-water micro/nanoemulsion when mixed with water under gentle stirring. The formulation can be a viable alternative to classical formulations to take advantage of their lipophilic nature and to solve their problems of poor solubility, poor bioavailability, low oral absorption and instability. The mechanism of self-emulsification, solubility studies, construction of phase diagram, optimization and characterization of herbal drugs-loaded SEDDS formulation and in situ absorption evaluation of herbal drugs in rat intestine are presented in our article. PMID:24321014

  19. Alternating current electrospinning for preparation of fibrous drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Cselkó, Richárd; Démuth, Balázs; Verreck, Geert; Mensch, Jürgen; Marosi, György; Nagy, Zsombor Kristóf

    2015-11-10

    Alternating current electrospinning (ACES) was compared to direct current electrospinning (DCES) for the preparation of drug-loaded nanofibrous mats. It is generally considered that DCES is the solely technique to produce nanofibers using the electrostatic force from polymer solutions, however, less studied and also capable ACES provides further advantages such as increased specific productivities. A poorly water-soluble drug (carvedilol) was incorporated into the fibers based on three different polymeric matrices (an acid-soluble terpolymer (Eudragit(®) E), a base-soluble copolymer (Eudragit(®) L 100-55) and a nonionic homopolymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone K90)) to improve the dissolution of the weak base drug under different pH conditions. Morphology and fiber diameter evaluation showed similar electrospun fibers regardless the type of the high voltage and the major differences in feeding rates. The amorphous ACES and DCES fibers provided fast and total drug dissolutions in all cases. The presented results show that ACES can be a more feasible novel alternative to formulate fibers for drug delivery purposes. PMID:26320549

  20. Formulation and Evaluation of Galantamine Gel as Drug Reservoir in Transdermal Patch Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Fong Yen, Woo; Basri, Mahiran; Ahmad, Mansor; Ismail, Maznah

    2015-01-01

    Galantamine hydrobromide is formulated in tablets and capsules prescribed through oral delivery for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, oral delivery of drugs can cause severe side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Transdermal delivery of galantamine hydrobromide could avoid these unwanted side effects. In this work, galantamine hydrobromide was formulated in gel drug reservoir which was then fabricated in the transdermal patch. The in vitro drug release studies revealed that the drug release from the donor chamber to receptor chamber of Franz diffusion cell was affected by the amount of polymer, amount of neutralizer, amount of drug, types of permeation enhancer, and amount of permeation enhancer. Visual observations of the gels showed that all formulated gels are translucent, homogeneous, smooth, and stable. These gels have pH in the suitable range for skin. The gel also showed high drug content uniformity. Hence, this formulation can be further used in the preparation of transdermal patch drug delivery system. PMID:25853145

  1. The Benefits and Challenges Associated with the Use of Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, Edna; Khan, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Drug Delivery Systems as nanocarriers for chemotherapeutic agents can improve the pharmacological properties of drugs by altering drug pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Among the many drug delivery systems available, both micelles and liposomes have gained the most attention in recent years due to their clinical success. There are several formulations of these nanocarrier systems in various stages of clinical trials, as well as currently clinically approved liposomal-based drugs. In this review, we discuss these drug carrier systems, as well as current efforts that are being made in order to further improve their delivery efficacy through the incorporation of targeting ligands. In addition, this review discusses aspects of drug resistance attributed to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix that occurs during tumor development and progression, as well as to the acidic, hypoxic, and glucose deprived tumor microenvironment. Finally, we address future prospective approaches to overcoming drug resistance by further modifications made to these drug delivery systems, as well as the possibility of coencapsulation/coadministration of various drugs aimed to surmount some of these microenvironmental-influenced obstacles for efficacious drug delivery in chemotherapy. PMID:20417189

  2. Two cholesterol derivative-based PEGylated liposomes as drug delivery system, study on pharmacokinetics and drug delivery to retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Shengyong; Yang, Bin; Wang, Guowu; Qin, Geng; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2014-07-01

    In this study, two cholesterol derivatives, (4-cholesterocarbonyl-4‧-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4‧-(N,N-diethylamine butyloxyl) azobenzene (ACB), one of which is positively charged while the other is neutral, were synthesized and incorporated with phospholipids and cholesterol to form doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposomes. PEGylation was achieved by including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatiylethanol-amine-N-[methoxy-(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Our results showed that PEGylated liposomes displayed significantly improved stability and the drug leakage was decreased compared to the non-PEGylated ones in vitro. The in vivo study with rats also revealed that the pharmacokinetics and circulation half-life of DOX were significantly improved when liposomes were PEGylated (p < 0.05). In particular, the neutral cholesterol derivative ACB played some role in improving liposomes’ stability in systemic circulation compared to the conventional PC liposome and the positively charged CAB liposome, with or without PEGylation. In addition, in the case of local drug delivery, the positively charged PEG-liposome not only delivered much more of the drug into the rats’ retinas (p < 0.001), but also maintained much longer drug retention time compared to the neutral PEGylated liposomes.

  3. Nanocapsules: The Weapons for Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kothamasu, Pavankumar; Kanumur, Hemanth; Ravur, Niranjan; Maddu, Chiranjeevi; Parasuramrajam, Radhika; Thangavel, Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nanocapsules, existing in miniscule size, range from 10 nm to 1000 nm. They consist of a liquid/solid core in which the drug is placed into a cavity, which is surrounded by a distinctive polymer membrane made up of natural or synthetic polymers. They have attracted great interest, because of the protective coating, which are usually pyrophoric and easily oxidized and delay the release of active ingredients. Methods Various technical approaches are utilized for obtaining the nanocapsules; however, the methods of interfacial polymerization for monomer and the nano-deposition for preformed polymer are chiefly preferred. Most important characteristics in their preparation is particle size and size distribution which can be evaluated by using various techniques like X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolu¬tion transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device, multi angle laser light scattering and other spectroscopic techniques. Results Nanocapsules possessing extremely high reproducibility have a broad range of life science applications. They may be applied in agrochemicals, genetic engineering, cosmetics, cleansing products, wastewater treatments, adhesive component applications, strategic delivery of the drug in tumors, nanocapsule bandages to fight infec¬tion, in radiotherapy and as liposomal nanocapsules in food science and agriculture. In addition, they can act as self-healing materials. Conclusion The enhanced delivery of bio¬active molecules through the targeted delivery by means of a nanocapsule opens numerous challenges and opportunities for the research and future development of novel improved therapies. PMID:23678444

  4. Lipid nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery systems to the retina.

    PubMed

    del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Delgado, Diego; Gascón, Alicia R; Solinís, Maria Ángeles

    2013-03-01

    This review highlights the application of lipid nanoparticles (Solid Lipid Nanoparticles, Nanostructured Lipid Carriers, or Lipid Drug Conjugates) as effective drug/gene delivery systems for retinal diseases. Most drug products for ocular disease treatment are marketed as eye drop formulations but, due to ocular barriers, the drug concentration in the retina hardly ever turns out to be effective. Up to this date, several delivery systems have been designed to deliver drugs to the retina. Drug delivery strategies may be classified into 3 groups: noninvasive techniques, implants, and colloidal carriers. The best known systems for drug delivery to the posterior eye are intravitreal implants; in fact, some of them are being clinically used. However, their long-term accumulation might impact the patient's vision. On the contrary, colloidal drug delivery systems (microparticles, liposomes, or nanoparticles) can be easily administered in a liquid form. Nanoparticular systems diffuse rapidly and are better internalized in ocular tissues than microparticles. In comparison with liposomes, nanoparticles have a higher loading capacity and are more stable in biological fluids and during storage. In addition, their capacity to adhere to the ocular surface and interact with the endothelium makes these drug delivery systems interesting as new therapeutic tools in ophthalmology. Within the group of nanoparticles, those composed of lipids (Solid Lipid Nanoparticles, Nanostructred Lipid Carriers, and Lipid Drug Conjugates) are more biocompatible, easy to produce at large scale, and they may be autoclaved or sterilized. The present review summarizes scientific results that evidence the potential application of lipid nanoparticles as drug delivery systems for the retina and also as nonviral vectors in gene therapy of retina disorders, although much more effort is still needed before these lipidic systems could be available in the market. PMID:23286300

  5. Biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS): Revolution in drug delivery and analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Jivani, Rishad R; Lakhtaria, Gaurang J; Patadiya, Dhaval D; Patel, Laxman D; Jivani, Nurrudin P; Jhala, Bhagyesh P

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in microelectromechanical system has facilitated the microfabrication of polymeric substrates and the development of the novel class of controlled drug delivery devices. These vehicles have specifically tailored three dimensional physical and chemical features which together, provide the capacity to target cell, stimulate unidirectional controlled release of therapeutics and augment permeation across the barriers. Apart from drug delivery devices microfabrication technology's offer exciting prospects to generate biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models. BioMEMS are capable of analysing biochemical liquid sample like solution of metabolites, macromolecules, proteins, nucleic acid, cells and viruses. This review summarized multidisciplinary application of biomedical microelectromechanical systems in drug delivery and its potential in analytical procedures. PMID:26903763

  6. Biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS): Revolution in drug delivery and analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jivani, Rishad R.; Lakhtaria, Gaurang J.; Patadiya, Dhaval D.; Patel, Laxman D.; Jivani, Nurrudin P.; Jhala, Bhagyesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Advancement in microelectromechanical system has facilitated the microfabrication of polymeric substrates and the development of the novel class of controlled drug delivery devices. These vehicles have specifically tailored three dimensional physical and chemical features which together, provide the capacity to target cell, stimulate unidirectional controlled release of therapeutics and augment permeation across the barriers. Apart from drug delivery devices microfabrication technology’s offer exciting prospects to generate biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models. BioMEMS are capable of analysing biochemical liquid sample like solution of metabolites, macromolecules, proteins, nucleic acid, cells and viruses. This review summarized multidisciplinary application of biomedical microelectromechanical systems in drug delivery and its potential in analytical procedures. PMID:26903763

  7. Enzymatic action of phospholipase A₂ on liposomal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders H; Mouritsen, Ole G; Arouri, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    The overexpression of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) in tumors has opened new avenues for enzyme-triggered active unloading of liposomal antitumor drug carriers selectively at the target tumor. However, the effects of the liposome composition, drug encapsulation, and tumor microenvironment on the activity of sPLA2 are still not well understood. We carried out a physico-chemical study to characterize the sPLA2-assisted breakdown of liposomes using dye-release assays in the context of drug delivery and under physiologically relevant conditions. The influence of temperature, lipid concentration, enzyme concentration, and drug loading on the hydrolysis of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC, Tm=42°C) liposomes with snake venom sPLA2 was investigated. The sensitivity of human sPLA2 to the liposome composition was checked using binary lipid mixtures of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) phospholipids with C14 and C16 acyl chains. Increasing temperature (36-41°C) was found to mainly shorten the enzyme lag-time, whereas the effect on lipid hydrolysis rate was modest. The enzyme lag-time was also found to be inversely dependent on the lipid-to-enzyme ratio. Drug encapsulation can alter the hydrolysis profile of the carrier liposomes. The activity of human sPLA2 was highly sensitive to the phospholipid acyl-chain length and negative surface charge density of the liposomes. We believe our work will prove useful for the optimization of sPLA2-susceptible liposomal formulations as well as will provide a solid ground for predicting the hydrolysis profile of the liposomes in vivo at the target site. PMID:26056930

  8. Development of Bioadhesive Chitosan Superporous Hydrogel Composite Particles Based Intestinal Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Modhia, Ishan; Mehta, Anant; Patel, Rupal; Patel, Chhagan

    2013-01-01

    Bioadhesive superporous hydrogel composite (SPHC) particles were developed for an intestinal delivery of metoprolol succinate and characterized for density, porosity, swelling, morphology, and bioadhesion studies. Chitosan and HPMC were used as bioadhesive and release retardant polymers, respectively. A 32 full factorial design was applied to optimize the concentration of chitosan and HPMC. The drug loaded bioadhesive SPHC particles were filled in capsule, and the capsule was coated with cellulose acetate phthalate and evaluated for drug content, in vitro drug release, and stability studies. To ascertain the drug release kinetics, the drug release profiles were fitted for mathematical models. The prepared system remains bioadhesive up to eight hours in intestine and showed Hixson-Crowell release with anomalous nonfickian type of drug transport. The application of SPHC polymer particles as a biomaterial carrier opens a new insight into bioadhesive drug delivery system and could be a future platform for other molecules for intestinal delivery. PMID:23984380

  9. Intrathecal Drug Delivery Systems for Noncancer Pain: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Intrathecal drug delivery systems can be used to manage refractory or persistent chronic nonmalignant (noncancer) pain. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of these systems compared with current standards of care for adult patients with chronic pain owing to nonmalignant conditions. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the National Health Service's Economic Evaluation Database and Tufts Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry from January 1994 to April 2014 for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness. We used existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screen methods and also searched for studies published after the search date reported in the latest systematic review to identify studies. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. Results We found comparative evidence of effectiveness and harms in one cohort study at high risk of bias (≥ 3-year follow-up, N = 130). Four economic evaluations of low to very low quality were also included. Compared with oral opioid analgesia alone or a program of analgesia plus rehabilitation, intrathecal drug delivery systems significantly reduced pain (27% additional improvement) and morphine consumption. Despite these reductions, intrathecal drug delivery systems were not superior in patient-reported well-being or quality of life. There is no evidence of superiority of intrathecal drug delivery systems over oral opioids in global pain improvement and global treatment satisfaction. Comparative evidence of harms was not found. Cost-effectiveness evidence is of insufficient quality to assess the appropriateness of funding intrathecal drug delivery systems. Evidence comparing intrathecal drug delivery systems with standard care was of very low quality. Conclusions Current evidence does not establish (or rule out) superiority or cost-effectiveness of intrathecal drug delivery systems for managing

  10. Osmotic Drug Delivery System as a Part of Modified Release Dosage Form

    PubMed Central

    Keraliya, Rajesh A.; Patel, Chirag; Patel, Pranav; Keraliya, Vipul; Soni, Tejal G.; Patel, Rajnikant C.; Patel, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional drug delivery systems are known to provide an immediate release of drug, in which one can not control the release of the drug and can not maintain effective concentration at the target site for longer time. Controlled drug delivery systems offer spatial control over the drug release. Osmotic pumps are most promising systems for controlled drug delivery. These systems are used for both oral administration and implantation. Osmotic pumps consist of an inner core containing drug and osmogens, coated with a semipermeable membrane. As the core absorbs water, it expands in volume, which pushes the drug solution out through the delivery ports. Osmotic pumps release drug at a rate that is independent of the pH and hydrodynamics of the dissolution medium. The historical development of osmotic systems includes development of the Rose-Nelson pump, the Higuchi-Leeper pumps, the Alzet and Osmet systems, the elementary osmotic pump, and the push-pull system. Recent advances include development of the controlled porosity osmotic pump, and systems based on asymmetric membranes. This paper highlights the principle of osmosis, materials used for fabrication of pumps, types of pumps, advantages, disadvantages, and marketed products of this system. PMID:22852100

  11. Nanotransporters for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2016-06-01

    Soluble nanotransporters for drugs can be profiled for targeted delivery particularly to maximize the efficacy of highly potent drugs while minimizing off target effects. This article outlines on the use of biological carrier molecules with a focus on albumin, various drug linkers for site specific release of the drug payload from the nanotransporter and strategies to combine these in various ways to meet different drug delivery demands particularly the optimization of the payload per nanotransporter. PMID:26773302

  12. Preparation and drug controlled-release of polyion complex micelles as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yali; Yao, Xinjian; Yuan, Jinfang; Ding, Tao; Gao, Qingyu

    2009-02-01

    Block copolymers, poly(N-vinylprrolidone)-block-poly(styrene-alter-maleic anhydride) (PVP-b-PSMA) and poly(N-vinylprrolidone)-block-poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PVP-b-PDMAEMA), were synthesized by reversible addition- fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. In aqueous media, this a pair of oppositely-charged diblock copolymers could self-assemble into stable and narrow distribution polyion complex micelles (PICMs). Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed that the micelles to be spherically shaped with mean hydrodynamic diameter around 70nm. In addition, the PICMs display ability to response to external stimuli. All of theses features are quite feasible for utilizing it as a novel intelligent drug delivery system. In order to assess its application in biomedical area, release profiles of coenzyme A (Co A) from PICMs were studied under both simulated gastric and intestinal pH conditions. The release was much quicker in pH 7.4 buffer than in pH 2.0 solution. Based on these results, these PICMs could be a potential pH-sensitive carrier for colon-specific drug delivery system. PMID:19124231

  13. Poly-paclitaxel/cyclodextrin-SPION nano-assembly for magnetically guided drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeonjeong; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Yeong Mi; Kim, Jinhwan; Choi, Hyung Woo; Lee, Junseok; Park, Hyeongmok; Kang, Youngnam; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon; Hoffman, Allan S; Kim, Won Jong

    2016-06-10

    This work demonstrates the development of magnetically guided drug delivery systems and its potential on efficient anticancer therapy. The magnetically guided drug delivery system was successfully developed by utilizing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle, β-cyclodextrin, and polymerized paclitaxel. Multivalent host-guest interactions between β-cyclodextrin-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle and polymerized paclitaxel allowed to load the paclitaxel and the nanoparticle into the nano-assembly. Clusterized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the nano-assembly permitted the rapid and efficient targeted drug delivery. Compared to the control groups, the developed nano-assembly showed the enhanced anticancer effects in vivo as well as in vitro. Consequently, the strategy of the use of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and multivalent host-guest interactions has a promising potential for developing the efficient drug delivery systems. PMID:26780174

  14. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis-related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance-related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will be

  15. Physicochemical properties of structured phosphatidylcholine in drug carrier lipid emulsions for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Emi; Shimokawa, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi

    2008-03-15

    Drug carrier emulsions were prepared with structured phosphatidylcholine (PC-LM) which has both a long hydrocarbon chain and a medium hydrocarbon chain, and the characteristics of PC-LM as an emulsifier were investigated by measuring the creaming ratio, the surface tension of the emulsion system, and the mean particle size and zeta potential of the oil droplets in emulsions. The emulsion prepared with PC-LM as an emulsifier kept the condition and the ratio of separation was lower than those with purified egg yolk lecithin (PEL). The mean particle size of the emulsion prepared with PC-LM was smaller than that with PEL when using only sonication, approximately 250 nm. When using a high-pressure homogenizer after sonication, the mean emulsion size with PC-LM was also smaller than with PEL, approximately 150 nm. The surface tension of the various emulsions and the zeta potential of the emulsion droplets were measured to investigate the stability of the systems. In emulsions with PC-LM or PEL, the surface tension as an index of stability increased as the pressure of the homogenizer increased. Moreover, the zeta potential of the emulsion droplets prepared with PC-LM also increased with an increase in pressure of the homogenizer. As a result, it was found that the drug carrier emulsion prepared with PC-LM had significant advantages in terms of stability and mean diameter. We considered it could be used for the preparations of nanoparticle dispersion systems in drug delivery systems. PMID:17988839

  16. Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Medicine: Emphasis on RNAi-Containing Nanoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera Díaz, Mónica; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo E.

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicine is a growing research field dealing with the creation and manipulation of materials at a nanometer scale for the better treatment, diagnosis and imaging of diseases. In cancer medicine, the use of nanoparticles as drug delivery systems has advanced the bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. The expansion of novel nanoparticles for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies, including small interference RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNAs)-based molecules. In this review, we focus on the currently available drug delivery systems for anticancer agents. In addition, we will discuss the promising use of nanoparticles for novel cancer treatment strategies. PMID:24287462

  17. Fast disintegrating tablets: Opportunity in drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Ved; Maan, Saurabh; Deepika; Yadav, Shiv Kumar; Hemlata; Jogpal, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Fast disintegrating tablets (FDTs) have received ever-increasing demand during the last decade, and the field has become a rapidly growing area in the pharmaceutical industry. Oral drug delivery remains the preferred route for administration of various drugs. Recent developments in the technology have prompted scientists to develop FDTs with improved patient compliance and convenience. Upon introduction into the mouth, these tablets dissolve or disintegrate in the mouth in the absence of additional water for easy administration of active pharmaceutical ingredients. The popularity and usefulness of the formulation resulted in development of several FDT technologies. FDTs are solid unit dosage forms, which disintegrate or dissolve rapidly in the mouth without chewing and water. FDTs or orally disintegrating tablets provide an advantage particularly for pediatric and geriatric populations who have difficulty in swallowing conventional tablets and capsules. This review describes various formulations and technologies developed to achieve fast dissolution/dispersion of tablets in the oral cavity. In particular, this review describes in detail FDT technologies based on lyophilization, molding, sublimation, and compaction, as well as approaches to enhancing the FDT properties, such as spray drying and use of disintegrants. In addition, taste-masking technologies, experimental measurements of disintegration times, and dissolution are also discussed. PMID:22247889

  18. Drug-in-cyclodextrin-in-liposomes: A novel drug delivery system for flurbiprofen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Wenji; Lin, Congcong; Chen, Fen; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2015-08-15

    A novel delivery system based on drug-cyclodextrin (CD) complexation and liposomes has been developed to improve therapeutic effect. Three different means, i.e., co-evaporation (COE), co-ground (GR) and co-lyophilization (COL) and three different CDs (β-CD, HP-β-CD and SBE-β-CD) were contrasted to investigate the characteristics of the end products. FP/FP-CD loaded liposomes were obtained by thin layer evaporation technique. Size, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency were investigated by light scattering analysis and minicolumn centrifugation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the amorphous form of complexes and spherical morphology of FP-HP-β-CD COE loaded liposomes. The pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was selected as the medium for the in vitro release. Wistar rats were put into use to study the pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo. FP-HP-β-CD COE loaded liposomes showed the better physicochemical characters that followed the average particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and mean encapsulation efficiency 158±10 nm, 0.19±0.1, -12.4±0.1 mW and 56.1±0.5%, separately. The relative bioavailability of FP-HP-β-CD COE loaded liposomes was 420%, 201% and 402% compared with FP solution, FP-HP-β-CD and FP-liposomes, respectively. In conclusion, the novel delivery system improved the relative bioavailability of FP significantly and provided a perspective way for delivery of insoluble drugs. PMID:26162980

  19. Osmotic micropumps for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Herrlich, Simon; Spieth, Sven; Messner, Stephan; Zengerle, Roland

    2012-11-01

    This paper reviews miniaturized drug delivery systems applying osmotic principles for pumping. Osmotic micropumps require no electrical energy and consequently enable drug delivery systems of smallest size for a broad field of new applications. In contrast to common tablets, these pumps provide constant (zero-order) drug release rates. This facilitates systems for long term use not limited by gastrointestinal transit time and first-pass metabolism. The review focuses on parenteral routes of administration targeting drug delivery either in a site-specific or systemic way. Osmotic pumps consist of three building blocks: osmotic agent, solvent, and drug. This is used to categorize pumps into (i) single compartment systems using water from body fluids as solvent and the drug itself as the osmotic agent, (ii) two compartment systems employing a separate osmotic agent, and (iii) multi-compartment architectures employing solvent, drug and osmotic agent separately. In parallel to the micropumps, relevant applications and therapies are discussed. PMID:22370615

  20. Intranasal delivery of systemic-acting drugs: small-molecules and biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Serralheiro, Ana; Sousa, Joana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-09-01

    As a non-invasive route, intranasal administration offers patient comfort and compliance which are hurdled in parenteral drug therapy. In addition, the current recognition that the high permeability and vascularization of nasal mucosa coupled to the avoidance of the first-pass elimination and/or gastrointestinal decomposition ensure higher systemic drug absorption than oral route has contributed to the growing interest for intranasal delivery of drugs that require considerable systemic exposure to exert their therapeutic actions (systemic-acting drugs). Nevertheless, several features may hamper drug absorption through the nasal mucosa, particularly the drug molecular weight and intrinsic permeability, and, therefore, several strategies have been employed to improve it, propelling a constant challenge during nasal drug (formulation) development. This review will firstly provide an anatomical, histological and mechanistic overview of drug systemic absorption after nasal administration and the relevant aspects of the therapeutic interest and limitations of the intranasal systemic delivery. The current studies regarding the nasal application of systemic-acting small drugs (analgesic drugs, cardiovascular drugs and antiviral drugs) and biomacromolecular drugs (peptide/protein drugs and vaccines) will also be outlined, addressing drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic improvements. PMID:24681294

  1. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Atik Badshah, Shaikh; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  2. Robust and versatile pectin-based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Marras-Marquez, T; Peña, J; Veiga-Ochoa, M D

    2015-02-20

    Pectin-based resistant, interactive and versatile hydrogel vehicles for oral administration have been prepared. These systems are thought to be versatile enough to allow the inclusion of substances (such as the surfactants tested: Pluronic, Tween, Na Lauryl sulphate) that may contribute to tailor the drug release patterns. Tolbutamide, that shows a discrete and pH-dependent solubility in water, has been employed as a model drug to test the capability of these matrices to overcome such drug-imposed restraints. The incorporation of different surfactants produced pectin-based hydrogels of difficult manipulation. In order to improve this drawback, two different strategies have been developed: blending with agarose or freeze-drying. The presence of agarose yields robust systems that can be handled and tested as prepared, in the fresh state. Freeze-drying not only allows to shape pure pectin and blend systems, but also generates a porous structure whose microstructure, determined by the different components included, influences on the drug release behavior. Tolbutamide release kinetics from freshly prepared matrices can be fitted to the Higuchi model while the freeze-dried ones adjust to the Korsmeyer-Peppas model; hence the hydrogel chains rearrangement processes rule the release during the rehydration process. PMID:25542990

  3. Alginate based hydrogel as a potential biopolymeric carrier for drug delivery and cell delivery systems: present status and applications.

    PubMed

    Giri, Tapan Kumar; Thakur, Deepa; Alexander, Amit; Ajazuddin; Badwaik, Hemant; Tripathi, Dulal Krishna

    2012-11-01

    Alginate is a non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable natural polymer with a number of peculiar physicochemical properties for which it has wide applications in drug delivery and cell delivery systems. Hydrogel formation can be obtained by interactions of anionic alginates with multivalent inorganic cations by simple ionotropic gelation method. Hydrophilic polymeric network of three dimensional cross linked structures of hydrogels absorb substantial amount of water or biological fluids. Among the numerous biomaterials used for hydrogel formation alginate has been and will continue to be one of the most important biomaterial. Therefore, in view of the vast literature support, we focus in this review on alginate - based hydrogel as drug delivery and cell delivery carriers for biomedical applications. Various properties of alginates, their hydrogels and also various techniques used for preparing alginate hydrogels have been reviewed. PMID:22998675

  4. Advances in drug delivery system for platinum agents based combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiang; Xiao, Hai-Hua; Song, Hai-Qin; Jing, Xia-Bin; Yan, Le-San; Qi, Ruo-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer agents are widely used as first-line drugs in cancer chemotherapy for various solid tumors. However, great side effects and occurrence of resistance remain as the major drawbacks for almost all the platinum drugs developed. To conquer these problems, new strategies should be adopted for platinum drug based chemotherapy. Modern nanotechnology has been widely employed in the delivery of various therapeutics and diagnostic. It provides the possibility of targeted delivery of a certain anticancer drug to the tumor site, which could minimize toxicity and optimize the drug efficacy. Here, in this review, we focused on the recent progress in polymer based drug delivery systems for platinum-based combination therapy. PMID:26779373

  5. Topical Delivery of Aceclofenac: Challenges and Promises of Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Kumar, Pramod; Malik, Ruchi; Sharma, Gajanand; Kaur, Manmeet; Katare, O. P.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a common musculoskeletal disorder, is projected to affect about 60 million people of total world population by 2020. The associated pain and disability impair the quality of life and also pose economic burden to the patient. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed in OA, while diclofenac is the most prescribed one. Oral NSAIDs are not very patient friendly, as they cause various gastrointestinal adverse effects like bleeding, ulceration, and perforation. To enhance the tolerability of diclofenac and decrease the common side effects, aceclofenac (ACE) was developed by its chemical modification. As expected, ACE is more well-tolerated than diclofenac and possesses superior efficacy but is not completely devoid of the NSAID-tagged side effects. A series of chemical modifications of already planned drug is unjustified as it consumes quanta of time, efforts, and money, and this approach will also pose stringent regulatory challenges. Therefore, it is justified to deliver ACE employing tools of drug delivery and nanotechnology to refine its safety profile. The present review highlights the constraints related to the topical delivery of ACE and the various attempts made so far for the safe and effective topical delivery employing the novel materials and methods. PMID:25045671

  6. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  7. A review on bioadhesive buccal drug delivery systems: current status of formulation and evaluation methods

    PubMed Central

    Chinna Reddy, P; Chaitanya, K.S.C.; Madhusudan Rao, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to the ease of the administration, the oral cavity is an attractive site for the delivery of drugs. Through this route it is possible to realize mucosal (local effect) and transmucosal (systemic effect) drug administration. In the first case, the aim is to achieve a site-specific release of the drug on the mucosa, whereas the second case involves drug absorption through the mucosal barrier to reach the systemic circulation. The main obstacles that drugs meet when administered via the buccal route derive from the limited absorption area and the barrier properties of the mucosa. The effective physiological removal mechanisms of the oral cavity that take the formulation away from the absorption site are the other obstacles that have to be considered. The strategies studied to overcome such obstacles include the employment of new materials that, possibly, combine mucoadhesive, enzyme inhibitory and penetration enhancer properties and the design of innovative drug delivery systems which, besides improving patient compliance, favor a more intimate contact of the drug with the absorption mucosa. This presents a brief description of advantages and limitations of buccal drug delivery and the anatomical structure of oral mucosa, mechanisms of drug permeation followed by current formulation design in line with developments in buccal delivery systems and methodology in evaluating buccal formulations. PMID:23008684

  8. Sericin/Dextran Injectable Hydrogel as an Optically Trackable Drug Delivery System for Malignant Melanoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Qi, Chao; Tao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Luming; Jiang, Xulin; Zhang, Yunti; Huang, Lei; Li, Qilin; Xie, Hongjian; Gao, Jinbo; Shuai, Xiaoming; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Severe side effects of cancer chemotherapy prompt developing better drug delivery systems. Injectable hydrogels are an effective site-target system. For most of injectable hydrogels, once delivered in vivo, some properties including drug release and degradation, which are critical to chemotherapeutic effects and safety, are challenging to monitor. Developing a drug delivery system for effective cancer therapy with in vivo real-time noninvasive trackability is highly desired. Although fluorescence dyes are used for imaging hydrogels, the cytotoxicity limits their applications. By using sericin, a natural photoluminescent protein from silk, we successfully synthesized a hydrazone cross-linked sericin/dextran injectable hydrogel. This hydrogel is biodegradable and biocompatible. It achieves efficient drug loading and controlled release of both macromolecular and small molecular drugs. Notably, sericin's photoluminescence from this hydrogel is directly and stably correlated with its degradation, enabling long-term in vivo imaging and real-time monitoring of the remaining drug. The hydrogel loaded with Doxorubicin significantly suppresses tumor growth. Together, the work demonstrates the efficacy of this drug delivery system, and the in vivo effectiveness of this sericin-based optical monitoring strategy, providing a potential approach for improving hydrogel design toward optimal efficiency and safety of chemotherapies, which may be widely applicable to other drug delivery systems. PMID:26900631

  9. Pathogen-inspired drug delivery to the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Rebecca L; Cacaccio, Joseph; Wrabel, Eileen; Schwartz, Mary E; Coleman, Timothy P; Sirianni, Rachael W

    2014-01-01

    For as long as the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been evolving to exclude bloodborne agents from the central nervous system (CNS), pathogens have adopted a multitude of strategies to bypass it. Some pathogens, notably viruses and certain bacteria, enter the CNS in whole form, achieving direct physical passage through endothelial or neuronal cells to infect the brain. Other pathogens, including bacteria and multicellular eukaryotic organisms, secrete toxins that preferentially interact with specific cell types to exert a broad range of biological effects on peripheral and central neurons. In this review, we will discuss the directed mechanisms that viruses, bacteria, and the toxins secreted by higher order organisms use to enter the CNS. Our goal is to identify ligand-mediated strategies that could be used to improve the brain-specific delivery of engineered nanocarriers, including polymers, lipids, biologically sourced materials, and imaging agents. PMID:25610755

  10. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  11. Organ-on-a-Chip Platforms for Studying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bhise, Nupura S.; Ribas, João; Manoharan, Vijayan; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Polini, Alessandro; Massa, Solange; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Novel microfluidic tools allow new ways to manufacture and test drug delivery systems. Organ-on-a-chip systems – microscale recapitulations of complex organ functions – promise to improve the drug development pipeline. This review highlights the importance of integrating microfluidic networks with 3D tissue engineered models to create organ-on-a-chip platforms, able to meet the demand of creating robust preclinical screening models. Specific examples are cited to demonstrate the use of these systems for studying the performance of drug delivery vectors and thereby reduce the discrepancies between their performance at preclinical and clinical trials. We also highlight the future directions that need to be pursued by the research community for these proof-of-concept studies to achieve the goal of accelerating clinical translation of drug delivery nanoparticles. PMID:24818770

  12. Advanced drug delivery to the lymphatic system: lipid-based nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Ali Khan, Arshad; Mudassir, Jahanzeb; Mohtar, Noratiqah; Darwis, Yusrida

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of drugs and bioactive compounds via the lymphatic system is complex and dependent on the physiological uniqueness of the system. The lymphatic route plays an important role in transporting extracellular fluid to maintain homeostasis and in transferring immune cells to injury sites, and is able to avoid first-pass metabolism, thus acting as a bypass route for compounds with lower bioavailability, ie, those undergoing more hepatic metabolism. The lymphatic route also provides an option for the delivery of therapeutic molecules, such as drugs to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus, which can travel through the lymphatic system. Lymphatic imaging is useful in evaluating disease states and treatment plans for progressive diseases of the lymph system. Novel lipid-based nanoformulations, such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have unique characteristics that make them promising candidates for lymphatic delivery. These formulations are superior to colloidal carrier systems because they have controlled release properties and provide better chemical stability for drug molecules. However, multiple factors regulate the lymphatic delivery of drugs. Prior to lymphatic uptake, lipid-based nanoformulations are required to undergo interstitial hindrance that modulates drug delivery. Therefore, uptake and distribution of lipid-based nanoformulations by the lymphatic system depends on factors such as particle size, surface charge, molecular weight, and hydrophobicity. Types of lipid and concentration of the emulsifier are also important factors affecting drug delivery via the lymphatic system. All of these factors can cause changes in intermolecular interactions between the lipid nanoparticle matrix and the incorporated drug, which in turn affects uptake of drug into the lymphatic system. Two lipid-based nanoformulations, ie, solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have been administered via multiple routes

  13. Advanced drug delivery to the lymphatic system: lipid-based nanoformulations

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad Ali; Mudassir, Jahanzeb; Mohtar, Noratiqah; Darwis, Yusrida

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of drugs and bioactive compounds via the lymphatic system is complex and dependent on the physiological uniqueness of the system. The lymphatic route plays an important role in transporting extracellular fluid to maintain homeostasis and in transferring immune cells to injury sites, and is able to avoid first-pass metabolism, thus acting as a bypass route for compounds with lower bioavailability, ie, those undergoing more hepatic metabolism. The lymphatic route also provides an option for the delivery of therapeutic molecules, such as drugs to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus, which can travel through the lymphatic system. Lymphatic imaging is useful in evaluating disease states and treatment plans for progressive diseases of the lymph system. Novel lipid-based nanoformulations, such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have unique characteristics that make them promising candidates for lymphatic delivery. These formulations are superior to colloidal carrier systems because they have controlled release properties and provide better chemical stability for drug molecules. However, multiple factors regulate the lymphatic delivery of drugs. Prior to lymphatic uptake, lipid-based nanoformulations are required to undergo interstitial hindrance that modulates drug delivery. Therefore, uptake and distribution of lipid-based nanoformulations by the lymphatic system depends on factors such as particle size, surface charge, molecular weight, and hydrophobicity. Types of lipid and concentration of the emulsifier are also important factors affecting drug delivery via the lymphatic system. All of these factors can cause changes in intermolecular interactions between the lipid nanoparticle matrix and the incorporated drug, which in turn affects uptake of drug into the lymphatic system. Two lipid-based nanoformulations, ie, solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have been administered via multiple routes

  14. In situ gel-forming system: an attractive alternative for nasal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Guiyang; Ma, Jianli; Guo, Shaolai; Gao, Lei; Jia, Yanhua; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Qingzhe

    2013-01-01

    Intranasal delivery is one of the most interesting and challenging endeavors facing pharmaceutical scientists. The conventional nasal drug delivery systems including solutions, suspensions, and ointments show drawbacks such as short residence in the nasal cavity, highly variable efficiency, low permeability, and inconvenient administration. In situ gel-forming systems are an interesting polymeric system that exists as flowing aqueous solution before administration and undergoes phase transition to form a viscoelastic gel in a physiologic environment. Benefiting from the merits of both a solution and a gel, an impressive number of in situ gel-forming systems induced by temperature, pH, and ions have been prepared for use in nasal drug delivery in the past few years. In situ gel-forming systems increase the retention of drugs in the nasal cavity, and some of them also show permeation-enhancing capabilities. This article reviews the in situ gel-forming systems used for nasal drug delivery and introduces their gelling mechanisms and other favorable features for intranasal delivery. It also describes the release patterns and drug stability of in situ gels as well as their in vivo performances and local safety following nasal administration. PMID:24099327

  15. Preparation of multiparticulate systems for oral delivery of a micronized or nanosized poorly soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Cerea, Matteo; Pattarino, Franco; Foglio Bonda, Andrea; Palugan, Luca; Segale, Lorena; Vecchio, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the present work was to prepare multiparticulate drug delivery systems for oral administration of a poorly soluble drug such as itraconazole. Multiparticulate systems were prepared by extrusion/spheronization technique using a mix of crospovidone, low viscosity hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose, micronized drug and water. In order to improve the release performance of the multiparticulate systems, the micronized drug was suspended in water with polysorbate 20 and nanonized by a high-pressure homogenization. The suspension of drug nanoparticles was then spray-dried for enabling an easy handling of the drug and for preventing the over-wetting of the powders during extrusion/spheronization processing. Both multiparticulate units prepared with micronized or nanonized drug showed acceptable disintegrating properties. The nanosizing of micronized drug powder provided a significant improvement of drug dissolution rates of the multiparticulates. PMID:26786555

  16. Controlled drug delivery through a novel PEG hydrogel encapsulated silica aerogel system.

    PubMed

    Giray, Seda; Bal, Tuğba; Kartal, Ayse M; Kızılel, Seda; Erkey, Can

    2012-05-01

    A novel composite material consisting of a silica aerogel core coated by a poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogel was developed. The potential of this novel composite as a drug delivery system was tested with ketoprofen as a model drug due to its solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide. The results indicated that both drug loading capacity and drug release profiles could be tuned by changing hydrophobicity of aerogels, and that drug loading capacity increased with decreased hydrophobicity, while slower release rates were achieved with increased hydrophobicity. Furthermore, higher concentration of PEG diacrylate in the prepolymer solution of the hydrogel coating delayed the release of the drug which can be attributed to the lower permeability at higher PEG diacrylate concentrations. The novel composite developed in this study can be easily implemented to achieve the controlled delivery of various drugs and/or proteins for specific applications. PMID:22374682

  17. Design of Drug Delivery Methods for the Brain and Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueshen, Eric

    Due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to macromolecules delivered systemically, drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is quite difficult and has become an area of intense research. Techniques such as convection-enhanced intraparenchymal delivery and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting offer a means of circumventing the blood-brain barrier for targeted delivery of therapeutics. This dissertation focuses on three aspects of drug delivery: pharmacokinetics, convection-enhanced delivery, and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting. Classical pharmacokinetics mainly uses black-box curve fitting techniques without biochemical or biological basis. This dissertation advances the state-of-the-art of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics by incorporating first principles and biochemical/biotransport mechanisms in the prediction of drug fate in vivo. A whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modeling framework is engineered which creates multiscale mathematical models for entire organisms composed of organs, tissues, and a detailed vasculature network to predict drug bioaccumulation and to rigorously determine kinetic parameters. These models can be specialized to account for species, weight, gender, age, and pathology. Systematic individual therapy design using the proposed mechanistic PBPK modeling framework is also a possibility. Biochemical, anatomical, and physiological scaling laws are also developed to accurately project drug kinetics in humans from small animal experiments. Our promising results demonstrate that the whole-body mechanistic PBPK modeling approach not only elucidates drug mechanisms from a biochemical standpoint, but offers better scaling precision. Better models can substantially accelerate the introduction of drug leads to clinical trials and eventually to the market by offering more understanding of the drug mechanisms, aiding in therapy design, and serving as an accurate dosing tool. Convection

  18. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wuxu; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yingge

    2011-10-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  19. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  20. Modified alginate beads for mucoadhesive drug delivery system: an updated review of patents.

    PubMed

    Swain, Suryakanta; Behera, Aurobinda; Beg, Sarwar; Patra, Chinam N; Dinda, Subash C; Sruti, Jammula; Rao, Muddana E B

    2012-12-01

    Pharmaceutical research and inventions are increasingly developed for the design of an ideal dosage regimen in drug therapy of many diseases, which attains therapeutic concentration of drug in plasma and maintains it constant for the entire duration of treatment and also minimizes the side effects. Recent trends in pharmaceutical technology indicated that mucoadhesive micro particle and modified alginate beads as drug delivery system especially suitable for achieving delivery of drug in a predetermined rate locally or systemically for a prolonged period of time. The release of drug from microparticle depends on a variety of factors including carrier used to form the micro particle and amount of drug contained in them. The main aim of the present review is to explain the various theories, mechanisms, advanced mucoadhesive polymers, various delivery approaches, methodologies for developing a mucoadhesive micro-particle and modified alginate beads formulation, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo characterization. Apart from this, an innovative test method that is biacore is highlighted in this review to measure the mucoadhesive strength. This review is also briefly explained about the updated patenting system for the development of micro-particle and modified alginate beads as drug delivery system. PMID:22734868

  1. Intrathecal Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Pain: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Intrathecal drug delivery systems can be used to manage refractory or persistent cancer pain. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of these systems compared with current standards of care for adult patients with chronic pain due owing to cancer. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library databases, National Health Service's Economic Evaluation Database, and Tufts Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry from January 1994 to April 2014 for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness. We used existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screen methods and searched for studies published after the search date reported in the latest systematic review to identify studies. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. The cost burden of publicly funding intrathecal drug delivery systems for cancer pain was estimated for a 5-year timeframe using a combination of published literature, information from the device manufacturer, administrative data, and expert opinion for the inputs. Results We included one randomized trial that examined effectiveness and harms, and one case series that reported an eligible economic evaluation. We found very low quality evidence that intrathecal drug delivery systems added to comprehensive pain management reduce overall drug toxicity; no significant reduction in pain scores was observed. Weak conclusions from economic evidence suggested that intrathecal drug delivery systems had the potential to be more cost-effective than high-cost oral therapy if administered for 7 months or longer. The cost burden of publicly funding this therapy is estimated to be $100,000 in the first year, increasing to $500,000 by the fifth year. Conclusions Current evidence could not establish the benefit, harm, or cost-effectiveness of intrathecal drug delivery systems compared with current standards of care for managing refractory cancer pain in

  2. Polymer Particulates in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harmeet; Kumar, Virender; Kumar, Krishan; Rathor, Sandeep; Kumari, Parveen; Singh, Jasbir

    2016-01-01

    Development of effective drug delivery systems is important for medicine and healthcare. Polymer particulates (micro- and nanoparticles) have opened new opportunities in the field of drug delivery by overcoming various limitations of conventional delivery methods. The properties of polymeric particles can be readily tuned by precisely engineering the constituent blocks of polymers for improving drug loading, release rate, pharmacokinetics, targeting, etc. The end-groups of various polymers can be readily modified with ligands making them suitable for recognizing by cell-specific receptors, providing cellular specificity, and superior intracellular delivery. This review will mainly cover delivery of many potential drugs and biomolecules by means of polymeric microparticles, nanoparticles and copolymer micelles or assemblies. An overview about formulation methods of polymer particulates has also been addressed. Attempt has been made to cover all the potential polymers that are well known in pharmaceutical history. PMID:26898740

  3. Modular reservoir concept for MEMS-based transdermal drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantwell, Cara T.; Wei, Pinghung; Ziaie, Babak; Rao, Masaru P.

    2014-11-01

    While MEMS-based transdermal drug delivery device development efforts have typically focused on tightly-integrated solutions, we propose an alternate conception based upon a novel, modular drug reservoir approach. By decoupling the drug storage functionality from the rest of the delivery system, this approach seeks to minimize cold chain storage volume, enhance compatibility with conventional pharmaceutical practices, and allow independent optimization of reservoir device design, materials, and fabrication. Herein, we report the design, fabrication, and preliminary characterization of modular reservoirs that demonstrate the virtue of this approach within the application context of transdermal insulin administration for diabetes management.

  4. A review on mucoadhesive polymer used in nasal drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Mayank; Kumar, Manish; Pathak, Kamla

    2011-01-01

    This update review is on mucoadhesive polymers used in nasal dosage forms. The nasal mucosa provides a potentially good route for systemic drug delivery. One of the most important features of the nasal route is that it avoids first-pass hepatic metabolism, thereby reducing metabolism. The application of mucoadhesive polymers in nasal drug delivery systems has gained to promote dosage form residence time in the nasal cavity as well as improving intimacy of contact with absorptive membranes of the biological system. The various new technology uses in development of nasal drug delivery dosage forms are discussed. The various dosage forms are vesicular carriers (liposome, noisome), nanostructured particles, prodrugs, in situ gelling system with special attention to in vivo studies. PMID:22247888

  5. Formulation development of an albendazole self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) with enhanced systemic exposure.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ashok K; Sharma, Kuldeep; Kandaswamy, Murugesh; Rajagopal, Sriram; Mullangi, Ramesh

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a self--emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) formulation to improve solubility and dissolution and to enhance systemic exposure of a BCS class II anthelmetic drug, albendazole (ABZ). In the present study, solubility of ABZ was determined in various oils, surfactants and co-surfactants to identify the microemulsion components. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were plotted to identify the microemulsification existence area. SEDDS formulation of ABZ was prepared using oil (Labrafac Lipopfile WL1349) and a surfactant/co-surfactant (Tween 80/PEG 400) mixture and was characterized by appropriate studies, viz., microemulsifying properties, droplet size measurement, in vitro dissolution, etc. Finally, PK of the ABZ SEDDS formulation was performed on rats in parallel with suspension formulation. It was concluded that the SEDDS formulation approach can be used to improve the dissolution and systemic exposure of poorly water-soluble drugs such as ABZ. PMID:24000442

  6. Extracellular vesicles as drug delivery systems: lessons from the liposome field.

    PubMed

    van der Meel, Roy; Fens, Marcel H A M; Vader, Pieter; van Solinge, Wouter W; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2014-12-10

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-derived particles surrounded by a (phospho)lipid bilayer that are released by cells in the human body. In addition to direct cell-to-cell contact and the secretion of soluble factors, EVs function as another mechanism of intercellular communication. These vesicles are able to efficiently deliver their parental cell-derived molecular cargo to recipient cells, which can result in structural changes at an RNA, protein, or even phenotypic level. For this reason, EVs have recently gained much interest for drug delivery purposes. In contrast to these 'natural delivery systems', synthetic (phospho)lipid vesicles, or liposomes, have been employed as drug carriers for decades, resulting in several approved liposomal nanomedicines used in the clinic. This review discusses the similarities and differences between EVs and liposomes with the focus on features that are relevant for drug delivery purposes such as circulation time, biodistribution, cellular interactions and cargo loading. By applying beneficial features of EVs to liposomes and vice versa, improved drug carriers can be developed which will advance the field of nanomedicines and ultimately improve patient outcomes. While the application of EVs for therapeutic drug delivery is still in its infancy, issues regarding the understanding of EV biogenesis, large-scale production and in vivo interactions need to be addressed in order to develop successful and cost-effective EV-based drug delivery systems. PMID:25094032

  7. Dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug-delivery system for diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Dong, Wei-Jiang; Yang, Gao-Yi; Wang, Wei; Ji, Cong-Hua; Zhou, Fei-Ni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a novel transdermal drug-delivery system comprising a polyamidoamine dendrimer coupled with sonophoresis to enhance the permeation of diclofenac (DF) through the skin. The novel transdermal drug-delivery system was developed by using a statistical Plackett–Burman design. Hairless male Wistar rat skin was used for the DF-permeation study. Coupling media concentration, ultrasound-application time, duty cycle, distance from probe to skin, and a third-generation polyamidoamine-dendrimer concentration were selected as independent variables, while in vitro drug release was selected as a dependent variable. Independent variables were found to be statistically significant (P<0.05). DF gel without dendrimer and ultrasound treatment to skin (passive delivery, run 13) showed 56.69 µg/cm2 cumulative drug permeated through the skin, while the DF-dendrimer gel without sonophoresis treatment (run 14) showed 257.3 µg/cm2 cumulative drug permeated through the skin after 24 hours. However, when the same gel was applied to sonophoresis-treated skin, drastic permeation enhancement was observed. In the case of run 3, the cumulative drug that permeated through the skin was 935.21 µg/cm2. It was concluded that dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug delivery system has the potential to enhance the permeation of DF through the skin. PMID:26229447

  8. Use of the "Personal Delivery" System for Assessment of Drug and Alcohol Attitudes and Usage Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, J. Michael; Myers, Stanley B.

    Community data concerning drug and alcohol usage patterns was assessed via a unique "personal delivery" system. The system, which can be used for collecting other community data produced a return rate of 45% and was very economical. This system largely overcomes the main drawback of the mailed questionnaire (low return rate) by (1) having…

  9. Bioactive electrospun fish sarcoplasmic proteins as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Stephansen, Karen; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Nano-microfibers were made from cod (Gadus morhua) sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) (Mw<200kDa) using the electrospinning technique. The FSP fibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy, and the fiber morphology was found to be strongly dependent on FSP concentration. Interestingly, the FSP fibers were insoluble in water. However, when exposed to proteolytic enzymes, the fibers were degraded. The degradation products of the FSP fibers proved to be inhibitors of the diabetes-related enzyme DPP-IV. The FSP fibers may have biomedical applications, among others as a delivery system. To demonstrate this, a dipeptide (Ala-Trp) was encapsulated into the FSP fibers, and the release properties were investigated in gastric buffer and in intestinal buffer. The release profile showed an initial burst release, where 30% of the compound was released within the first minute, after which an additional 40% was released (still exponential) within the next 30min (gastric buffer) or 15min (intestinal buffer). The remaining 30% was not released in the timespan of the experiment. PMID:25033436

  10. Calcium phosphate ceramic systems in growth factor and drug delivery for bone tissue engineering: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman

    2012-01-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs) are the most widely used bone substitutes in bone tissue engineering due to their compositional similarities to bone mineral and excellent biocompatibility. In recent years, CaPs, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate, have attracted significant interest in simultaneous use as bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle, adding a new dimension to their application. CaPs are more biocompatible than many other ceramic and inorganic nanoparticles. Their biocompatibility and variable stoichiometry, thus surface charge density, functionality, and dissolution properties, make them suitable for both drug and growth factor delivery. CaP matrices and scaffolds have been reported to act as delivery vehicles for growth factors and drugs in bone tissue engineering. Local drug delivery in musculoskeletal disorder treatments can address some of the critical issues more effectively and efficiently than the systemic delivery. CaPs are used as coatings on metallic implants, CaP cements, and custom designed scaffolds to treat musculoskeletal disorders. This review highlights some of the current drug and growth factor delivery approaches and critical issues using CaP particles, coatings, cements, and scaffolds towards orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:22127225

  11. A gastroretentive drug delivery system of lisinopril imbibed on isabgol-husk.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Ravindra; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Semwal, Deepak Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The gastroretentive drug delivery system is site-specific and allows the drug to remain in the stomach for a prolonged period of time so that it can be released in a controlled manner in gastrointestinal tract. The present study was carried out to develop a gastroretentive drug delivery system using isabgol as an excipient to prolong the residence time of the model drug lisinopril in the stomach. The gastroretentive ability of isabgol was increased by addition of NaHCO3 as a gas-generating agent while its mucoadhesive property was enhanced by incorporation of HPMC-K4M. The drug, NaHCO3 and HPMC-K3M were imbibed on isabgol-husk as per entrapment efficiency of the isabgol-husk. After drying, the product was filled in a hard gelatin capsule and evaluated for its buoyancy, mucoadhesive properties, swelling index and in vitro drug release. The lisinopril released through isabgol was delayed by 12 hours when compared to a preparation available on the market which released the complete drug in 0.5 hours. The drug release study of lisinopril from the formulation follows first order kinetics using a diffusion controlled mechanism. The results from the present study revealed that isabgol can be used as a potential excipient for the formulation of gastroretentive drug delivery systems in the near future. PMID:24144200

  12. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1) controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2) targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger the release of drugs and localize the therapeutic within a particular site. These novel biomaterials, usually termed "smart" or "intelligent", are able to deliver a therapeutic agent based on either environmental cues or a remote stimulus. Stimuli-responsive materials could potentially elicit a therapeutically effective dose without adverse side effects. Polymers responding to different stimuli, such as pH, light, temperature, ultrasound, magnetism, or biomolecules have been investigated as potential drug delivery vehicles. This review describes the most recent advances in "smart" drug delivery systems that respond to one or multiple stimuli. PMID:21114841

  13. Controlled Release of Simvastatin from Biomimetic β-TCP Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Joshua; Ito, Tomoko; Bishop, David; Otsuka, Makoto; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Milthorpe, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Simvastatin have been shown to induce bone formation and there is currently a urgent need to develop an appropriate delivery system to sustain the release of the drug to increase therapeutic efficacy whilst reducing side effects. In this study, a novel drug delivery system for simvastatin by means of hydrothermally converting marine exoskeletons to biocompatible beta-tricalcium phosphate was investigated. Furthermore, the release of simvastatin was controlled by the addition of an outer apatite coating layer. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and mass spectroscopy confirming the conversion process. The in-vitro dissolution of key chemical compositional elements and the release of simvastatin were measured in simulated body fluid solution showing controlled release with reduction of approximately 25% compared with un-coated samples. This study shows the potential applications of marine structures as a drug delivery system for simvastatin. PMID:23349949

  14. Targeted drug delivery systems 6: Intracellular bioreductive activation, uptake and transport of an anticancer drug delivery system across intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gharat, L; Taneja, R; Weerapreeyakul, N; Rege, B; Polli, J; Chikhale, P J

    2001-05-21

    We demonstrate transport across, intracellular accumulation and bioreductive activation of a conformationally constrained, anticancer drug delivery system (the CH(3)-TDDS) using Caco-2 cell monolayers (CCMs) as an in vitro model of the human intestinal mucosa. Reverse-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) coupled with UV detection was used to detect CH(3)-TDDS, the bioreduction product (lactone) and the released drug (melphalan methyl ester; MME). Upon incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS with the apical (AP) surface of 21-day-old CCM, we observed rapid decrease in the AP concentration of the CH(3)-TDDS (60%/hr) as a result of cellular uptake. Rapid intracellular accumulation of the CH(3)-TDDS was followed by bioreductive activation to deplete the cellular levels of CH(3)-TDDS. The drug part (MME) and lactone, as well as CH(3)-TDDS, were detected in the basolateral (BL) chamber. Intracellular Caco-2 levels of TDDS and lactone were also detectable. Bioreductive activation of the CH(3)-TDDS was additionally confirmed by formation of lactone after incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS in the presence of freshly prepared Caco-2 cell homogenates. During transport studies of melphalan or MME alone (as control), the intact drug was not detected in the intracellular compartment or in the BL chamber. These observations demonstrate that CH(3)-TDDS has potential for improving intestinal delivery of MME. TDDS could be useful in facilitating oral absorption of MME as well as the oral delivery of other agents. PMID:11337161

  15. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  16. pH-sensitive drug-delivery systems for tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Jiang, Chen

    2013-12-01

    Drug-delivery system responses to stimuli have been well investigated recently. As pH decrease is observed in most solid tumors, drug-delivery systems responsive to the slightly acidic extracellular pH environment of solid tumors have been developed as a general strategy for tumor targeting. Drug vehicles that are sensitive to acidic endosome/lysosome pH have been constructed for efficient drug release in tumor cells. This review explains the mechanisms of acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment and endocytic-related organelles, endosomes and lysosomes. Nanoparticle responses to acidic extracellular pH are discussed, along with approaches for improving tumor-specific therapy. Endosome/lysosome pH-triggered vehicles are reviewed, which achieve rapid drug release in tumor cells and overcome multidrug resistance. PMID:24304248

  17. A thermoresponsive bubble-generating liposomal system for triggering localized extracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ko-Jie; Liang, Hsiang-Fa; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Wang, Yucai; Cheng, Po-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Li; Xia, Younan; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2013-01-22

    The therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapy is optimal only when tumor cells are subjected to a maximum drug exposure. To increase the intratumoral drug concentration and thus the efficacy of chemotherapy, a thermoresponsive bubble-generating liposomal system is proposed for triggering localized extracellular drug delivery. The key component of this liposomal formulation is the encapsulated ammonium bicarbonate (ABC), which is used to create the transmembrane gradient needed for a highly efficient encapsulation of doxorubicin (DOX). At an elevated temperature (42 °C), decomposition of ABC generates CO(2) bubbles, creating permeable defects in the lipid bilayer that rapidly release DOX and instantly increase the drug concentration locally. Because the generated CO(2) bubbles are hyperechogenic, they also enhance ultrasound imaging. Consequently, this new liposomal system encapsulated with ABC may also provide an ability to monitor a temperature-controlled drug delivery process. PMID:23240550

  18. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Treatment of Tuberculosis--A Review.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Patricia Bento; de Freitas, Eduardo Sinésio; Bernegossi, Jessica; Gonçalez, Maíra Lima; Sato, Mariana Rillo; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious and transmissible disease that is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and primarily affects the lungs, although it can affect other organs and systems. The pulmonary presentation of TB, in addition to being more frequent, is also the most relevant to public health because it is primarily responsible for the transmission of the disease. The to their low World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a combined therapeutic regimen of several drugs, such as rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), pyrazinamide (PZA) and ethambutol (ETB). These drugs have low plasma levels after oral administration, due to their low water solubility, poor permeability and ability to be rapidly metabolized by the liver and at high concentrations. Furthermore, they have short t₁/₂ (only 1-4 hours) indicating a short residence in the plasma and the need for multiple high doses, which can result in neurotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Nanotechnology drug delivery systems have considerable potential for the treatment of TB. The systems can also be designed to allow for the sustained release of drugs from the matrix and drug delivery to a specific target. These properties of the systems enable the improvement of the bioavailability of drugs, can reduce the dosage and frequency of administration, and may solve the problem of non-adherence to prescribed therapy, which is a major obstacle to the control of TB. The purpose of this study was to systematically review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of TB. PMID:27305759

  19. Mimicking Biological Delivery Through Feedback-Controlled Drug Release Systems Based on Molecular Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kryscio, David R.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent drug delivery systems (DDS) are able to rapidly detect a biological event and respond appropriately by releasing a therapeutic agent; thus, they are advantageous over their conventional counterparts. Molecular imprinting is a promising area that generates a polymeric network which can selectively recognize a desired analyte. This field has been studied for a variety of applications over a long period of time, but only recently has it been investigated for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Recent work in the area of molecularly imprinted polymers in drug delivery highlights the potential of these recognitive networks as environmentally responsive DDS that can ultimately lead to feedback controlled recognitive release systems. PMID:26500352

  20. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-06-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,l-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. PMID:24447933

  1. Photoresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rwei, Alina Y.; Wang, Weiping; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Externally triggerable drug delivery systems provide a strategy for the delivery of therapeutic agents preferentially to a target site, presenting the ability to enhance therapeutic efficacy while reducing side effects. Light is a versatile and easily tuned external stimulus that can provide spatiotemporal control. Here we will review the use of nanoparticles in which light triggers drug release or induces particle binding to tissues (phototargeting). PMID:26644797

  2. Development of Mesophasic Microreservoir-Based Transdermal Drug Delivery System of Propranolol

    PubMed Central

    Omray, L. K.; Kohli, S.; Khopade, A. J.; Patil, S.; Gajbhiye, Asmita; Agrawal, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    The mesophasic microreservoir comprises lyotrophic liquid crystals. The liquid crystals were prepared of Brij-35, cetosteryl alcohol and propranolol and evaluated for parameters viz. anisotropy, size and size distribution and drug entrapment efficiency. Subsequent to this liquid crystals based transdermal drug delivery system (TDS) was prepared by incorporating liquid crystals in previously prepared matrix based transdermal patch and evaluated for stability studies like temperature, humidity and aging. The system was also studied for tensile strength, moisture content, water vapor transmission, drug content, anisotropy and In vitro drug release studies. PMID:21394252

  3. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurological disorder that results in cognitive and behavioral impairment. Conventional treatment strategies, such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drugs, often fail due to their poor solubility, lower bioavailability, and ineffective ability to cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnological treatment methods, which involve the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems, have been employed to optimize therapeutics. These nanotechnologies include polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and liquid crystals. Each of these are promising tools for the delivery of therapeutic devices to the brain via various routes of administration, particularly the intranasal route. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26345528

  4. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurological disorder that results in cognitive and behavioral impairment. Conventional treatment strategies, such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drugs, often fail due to their poor solubility, lower bioavailability, and ineffective ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Nanotechnological treatment methods, which involve the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems, have been employed to optimize therapeutics. These nanotechnologies include polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and liquid crystals. Each of these are promising tools for the delivery of therapeutic devices to the brain via various routes of administration, particularly the intranasal route. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26345528

  5. In Vitro Dissolution Testing Strategies for Nanoparticulate Drug Delivery Systems: Recent Developments and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticulate systems have emerged as prevalent drug delivery systems over the past few decades. These delivery systems (such as liposomes, emulsions, nanocrystals, and polymeric nanocarriers) have been extensively used to improve bioavailability, prolong pharmacological effects, achieve targeted drug delivery, as well as reduce side effects. Considering that any unanticipated change in product performance of such systems may result in toxicity and/or change in vivo efficacy, it is essential to develop suitable in vitro dissolution/release testing methods to ensure product quality and performance, and to assist in product development. The present review provides an overview of the current in vitro dissolution/release testing methods such as dialysis, sample and separate, as well as continuous flow methods. Challenges and future directions in the development of standardized and biorelevant in vitro dissolution/release testing methods for novel nanoparticulate systems are discussed. PMID:24069580

  6. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  7. Pharmaceutical development and regulatory considerations for nanoparticles and nanoparticulate drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Chang, Rong-Kun; Hussain, Munir A

    2013-11-01

    Pharmaceutical nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a wide variety of materials including drug nanoparticles (NPs), which can be amorphous or crystalline; or nanoparticulate drug delivery systems, such as micelles, microemulsions, liposomes, drug-polymer conjugates, and antibody-drug conjugates. These NMs are either transient or persistent-depending on whether the integrity of their structure and size is maintained until reaching the site of drug action. Examples of several approved drug products are included as pharmaceutical nanoparticulate systems along with a commentary on the current development issues and paradigms for various categories of NPs. This commentary discusses the preparation of nanoparticulate systems for commercial development, and the biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic advantages of these systems. A criterion of criticality is defined that incorporates the structure, in addition to size requirement of pharmaceutical NPs to identify systems that may require special development and regulatory considerations. PMID:24037829

  8. Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Kuldeep Hemraj; Nath, Lilakant

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A), and concentration of cross linking agent (B) on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system. PMID:24511481

  9. Computational modeling of environmentally responsive hydrogels (ERH) for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Namboori, P K Krishnan; Ranjini, U P; Manakadan, Asha A; Jose, Anila; Silvipriya, K S; Belzik, N; Deepak, O M

    2013-03-01

    The present work aims at computational analysis of environmentally responsive hydrogels with enormous prospective in the formulation aspect of drug delivery systems. The drug delivery potential of hydrogels to the targets is owing to the specific stimuli responsive nature of the hydrogels. The environmental factors looked upon in the study are changes in pH, alteration of temperature and glucose concentration rise originated in the body as a result of various disease conditions. Polymers, synthetic polypeptides and dendrimers have been used in the present work to study the feasibility of drug delivery. The computational methods have been used to formulate polymer properties, pharmacokinetics and toxicity studies. Diverse interactions approximating electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions acquire place during incorporation of drugs within the polymer and dendrimers. The covalent and electrostatic interactions between a drug and the surface of polymer and dendrimer have been analyzed. The docking interaction studies have been performed and the best polymer and dendrimer complex have been selected based on the docking score, binding energy and interaction energy with the drugs. G5 generation of poly amidoamine dendrimers and poly N-Ndiethyl acrylamide (PDEAAM) have been identified as most suitable stimuli-responsive effective drug carriers for anti diabetic drugs and diuretics. Favorable results have been obtained while using poly acrylic acid (PAA) for corticosteroids and polylysine for diabetic drugs. ConA protein along with poly aspartic acid also showed good results. PMID:23106779

  10. Laser-induced disruption of systemically administered liposomes for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Larabi, Malika; Shinde, Rajesh; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M.; Guccione, Samira; Contag, Christopher H.

    2009-07-01

    Liposomal formulations of drugs have been shown to enhance drug efficacy by prolonging circulation time, increasing local concentration and reducing off-target effects. Controlled release from these formulations would increase their utility, and hyperthermia has been explored as a stimulus for targeted delivery of encapsulated drugs. Use of lasers as a thermal source could provide improved control over the release of the drug from the liposomes with minimal collateral tissue damage. Appropriate methods for assessing local release after systemic delivery would aid in testing and development of better formulations. We use in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of luciferin, used as a model small molecule, and demonstrate laser-induced release from liposomes in animal models after systemic delivery. These liposomes were tested for luciferin release between 37 and 45 °C in PBS and serum using bioluminescence measurements. In vivo studies were performed on transgenic reporter mice that express luciferase constitutively throughout the body, thus providing a noninvasive readout for controlled release following systemic delivery. An Nd:YLF laser was used (527 nm) to heat tissues and induce rupture of the intravenously delivered liposomes in target tissues. These data demonstrate laser-mediated control of small molecule delivery using thermally sensitive liposomal formulations.