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Sample records for drug screening assay

  1. Primary and secondary drug screening assays for Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Cotticelli, M Grazia; Rasmussen, Lynn; Kushner, Nicole L; McKellip, Sara; Sosa, Melinda Ingrum; Manouvakhova, Anna; Feng, Shuang; White, E Lucile; Maddry, Joseph A; Heemskerk, Jill; Oldt, Robert J; Surrey, Lea F; Ochs, Rachel; Wilson, Robert B

    2012-03-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neuro- and cardiodegenerative disorder for which there are no proven effective treatments. FRDA is caused by decreased expression and/or function of the protein frataxin. Frataxin chaperones iron in the mitochondrial matrix for the assembly of iron-sulfur clusters (ISCs), which are prosthetic groups critical for the function of the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). Decreased expression of frataxin or the yeast frataxin orthologue, Yfh1p, is associated with decreased ISC assembly, mitochondrial iron accumulation, and increased oxidative stress, all of which contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. Using yeast depleted of Yfh1p, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was developed in which mitochondrial function was monitored by reduction of the tetrazolium dye WST-1 in a growth medium with a respiration-only carbon source. Of 101 200 compounds screened, 302 were identified that effectively rescue mitochondrial function. To confirm activities in mammalian cells and begin understanding mechanisms of action, secondary screening assays were developed using murine C2C12 cells and yeast mutants lacking specific complexes of the ETC, respectively. The compounds identified in this study have potential relevance for other neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as Parkinson disease. PMID:22086726

  2. Development of an in vitro drug screening assay using Schistosoma haematobium schistosomula

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of novel antischistosomal drugs is crucial, as currently no vaccine and only a single drug is available for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Fast and accurate in vitro assays are urgently needed to identify new drug candidates and research efforts should include Schistosoma haematobium. The aim of the present study was to develop a S. haematobium drug sensitivity assay based on newly transformed schistosomula (NTS). Methods We first undertook comparative studies on the cercarial emergence rhythms of the intermediate host snails Biomphalaria glabrata (S. mansoni) and Bulinus truncatus (S. haematobium). Two transformation methods as well as three purification methods were studied on S. haematobium cercariae in order to produce a large number of viable and clean NTS. Known antischistosomal drugs were tested in the established NTS assay in vitro. Drug effects were evaluated either microscopically or fluorometrically, using a resazurin based viability marker. Microscopically obtained IC50 values were compared with results obtained for S. mansoni. Results A circadian rhythm existed in both snail species. Infected B. truncatus snails shed less cercariae than B. glabrata during the testing period. The highest transformation rate (69%) of S. haematobium cercariae into NTS was obtained with the vortex transformation (mechanical input) and the highest purification factor was observed using Percoll®. The fluorimetric readout based on resazurin was very precise in detecting dead or/and severely damaged schistosomula. Conclusions With the use of viability markers such as resazurin, drug screening assays using S. haematobium NTS can be efficiently performed. However, drugs acting on the morphology and motility of S. haematobium NTS, such as metrifonate are missed. Drug sensitivity assays with NTS of both species, S. haematobium and S. mansoni, showed very similar results using known antischistosomal drugs. The S. mansoni NTS assay might be more

  3. Application of a human tumor colony-forming assay to new drug screening.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, R H; Wolpert-DeFilippes, M K; Kern, D H; Lieber, M M; Makuch, R W; Melnick, N R; Miller, W T; Salmon, S E; Simon, R M; Venditti, J M

    1985-05-01

    The applicability of a human tumor colony-forming assay to drug screening was investigated in terms of feasibility, validity, and potential for discovering new antitumor drugs. Feasibility was addressed in a pilot study during which basic methods, appropriate assay quality controls, and a standardized protocol for screening were developed. Considerable variability was noted in the availability and colony growth of different tumor types. The majority of the evaluable experiments utilized breast, colorectal, kidney, lung, melanoma, or ovarian tumors. For many tumor types, little evidence of growth was observed, or only rare specimens formed colonies. Colony-forming efficiencies ranged from 0.05 to 0.11% for the six most useful tumors listed above. A set of quality control measures was developed to address technical problems inherent in the assay. Testing of standard agents in the pilot study established that most of these agents could be detected as active. However, it also identified three assay limitations: compounds requiring systemic metabolic activation are inactive; medium constituents may block the activity of certain antimetabolites; and compounds without therapeutic efficacy may be positive in the assay. The assay categorized nontoxic clinically ineffective agents as true negatives with 97% accuracy. Of 79 compounds which were negative in the current National Cancer Institute prescreen (leukemia P388), 14 were active in the assay. Several demonstrated outstanding in vitro activity and are structurally unrelated to compounds already in development or in clinical trials. A subset of these active compounds were found to lack activity in a P388 in vitro colony-forming assay. This indication of differential cytotoxicity to human tumor cells makes this subset of compounds particularly interesting as antitumor drug leads. The demonstrated sensitivity to most standard agents, discrimination of nontoxic compounds, reproducibility of survival values within assays and

  4. Validating a Firefly Luciferase-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Antimalarial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Che, Pulin; Cui, Long; Kutsch, Olaf; Cui, Liwang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and recent detection of potential artemisinin-resistant strains in Southeast Asia highlight the importance of developing novel antimalarial therapies. Using a previously generated stable transgenic P. falciparum line with high-level firefly luciferase expression, we report the adaptation, miniaturization, optimization, and validation of a high-throughput screening assay in 384-well plates. Assay conditions, including the percentage of parasitemia and hematocrit, were optimized. Parameters of assay robustness, including Z′-value, coefficient variation (CV), and signal-to-background (S/B) ratio, were determined. The LOPAC1280 small-compound library was used to validate this assay. Our results demonstrated that this assay is robust and reliable, with an average Z′-value of >0.7 and CV of <10%. Moreover, this assay showed a very low background, with the S/B ratio up to 71. Further, identified hits were selected and confirmed using a SYBR Green I-based confirmatory assay. It is evident that this assay is suitable for large-scale screening of chemical libraries for antimalarial drug discovery. PMID:22050430

  5. Validation of a modified fluorimetric assay for the screening of trichomonacidal drugs.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Alexandra Ibáñez; Marcel, Alfredo Meneses; Tugores, Yanetsy Machado; Ruiz, Juan José Nogal; Redó, Vicente J Arán; García-Trevijano, José Antonio Escario; Barrio, Alicia Gómez

    2012-08-01

    A fluorimetric microassay that uses a redox dye to determine the viability of the flagellate Trichomonas vaginalis has been optimised to provide a more sensitive method to evaluate potential trichomonacidal compounds. Resazurin has been used in recent years to test drugs against different parasites, including trichomonadid protozoa; however, the reproducibility of these resazurin-based methods in our laboratory has been limited because the flagellate culture medium spontaneously reduces the resazurin. The objective of this work was to refine the fluorimetric microassay method previously developed by other research groups to reduce the fluorescence background generated by the media and increase the sensitivity of the screening assay. The experimental conditions, time of incubation, resazurin concentration and media used in the microtitre plates were adjusted. Different drug sensitivity studies against T. vaginalis were developed using the 5-nitroimidazole reference drugs, new 5-nitroindazolinones and 5-nitroindazole synthetic derivatives. Haemocytometer count results were compared with the resazurin assay using a 10% solution of 3 mM resazurin dissolved in phosphate buffered saline with glucose (1 mg/mL). The fluorimetric assay and the haemocytometer counts resulted in similar percentages of trichomonacidal activity in all the experiments, demonstrating that the fluorimetric microtitre assay has the necessary accuracy for high-throughput screening of new drugs against T. vaginalis. PMID:22850954

  6. An optimized lactate dehydrogenase release assay for screening of drug candidates in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Singh, Tulsi; Ghuman, Jasleen K.; Sieck, Erin G.; Koulen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantification of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release is a widely accepted assay for the quantitative determination of cell viability and late-stage apoptosis. Major disadvantages of commercially available LDH assay kits include proprietary formulations, limited options for optimization and high cost, all resulting in limited reproducibility in research applications. New Method Here, we describe a novel, custom LDH assay suitable in the context of plate reader-based screening of drug candidates for glioprotection, but with wide applicability to other cell types and experimental paradigms. Results We developed a novel and highly reproducible LDH release assay that is more cost-effective than commercially available assays with comparable performance. The assay was validated by assessing 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid antioxidant protection against tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress in C6 astroglioma cells. Assay performance was validated by direct comparison and compatible with other methods of measuring cellular viability, namely 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and 6-carboxy-2′, 7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate assays. Comparison with Existing Method(s) There was no statistically significant difference between results obtained with the novel custom assay and a commercially available assay CytoTox96® (Promega, Madison, WI). Conclusions The novel custom LDH release assay allows the reproducible quantification of cell viability and is highly cost-effective when compared to commercially available assays (approximately 25 times cheaper). In addition and in contrast to commercially available assays, the identification and detailed description of all assay components and procedures provide greater control over experimental conditions and design. We provide a detailed standard operating procedure permitting our novel assay to be readily adapted depending on experimental requirements

  7. Large-scale drug screening against Babesia divergens parasite using a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-08-30

    The validation of a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for determining the efficacies of large chemical libraries against Babesia divergens (bovine strain) in in vitro cultures was evaluated in this study. Hematocrits (HCTs) of 2.5%, 5%, and 10% were used for the in vitro culture at 1% parasitemia without daily replacement of the medium. Linearity and HTS assay results revealed that the best HCTs were 5% and 10%. The obtained IC50 values of diminazene aceturate, either by fluorescence-based HTS assay with and without daily replacement of medium or by fluorescence- and microscopy-based methods, did not differ significantly at 5% HCT. Actinonin and chloroquine diphosphate were the most effective drugs against the in vitro growth of B. divergens, followed by pyronaridine tetraphosphate- and luteolin-treated cultures. On contrary, tetracycline hydrochloride and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate from green tea exhibited poor activity as compared with diminazene aceturate (positive control drug). The data indicated that 5% HCT without daily replacement of the culture medium mixed with bovine serum in vitro using a fluorescence-based HTS assay creates the best conditions for large-scale drug screening against B. divergens that infect cattle. PMID:27523944

  8. Assay development and high throughput antiviral drug screening against Bluetongue virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianjun; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Hobrath, Judith V.; White, Lucile E.

    2009-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection is one of the most important diseases of domestic livestock. There are no antivirals available against BTV disease. In this paper, we present the development, optimization and validation of an in vitro cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay using the luminescent-based CellTiter-Glo reagent to identify novel antivirals against BTV. Conditions of the cytopathic effect (CPE)-based assay were optimized at cell density of 5 000 cells/well in medium containing 1% FBS and a multiplicity of infection at 0.01 in 384-well plate, with Z'-values ≥ 0.70, Coefficient of Variations ≥ 5.68 and signal-to-background ratio ≥ 7.10. This assay was further validated using a 9 532 compound library. The fully validated assay was then used to screen the 194 950 compound collection, which identified 693 compounds with > 30% CPE inhibition. The ten-concentration dose response assay identified 185 structures with IC50 ≤ 100 μM, out of which 42 compounds were grouped into six analog series corresponding to six scaffolds enriched within the active set compared to their distribution in the library. The CPE-based assay development demonstrated its robustness and reliability, and its application in the HTS campaign will make significant contribution to the antiviral drug discovery against BTV disease. PMID:19559054

  9. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  10. Cell-Based Assay Design for High-Content Screening of Drug Candidates.

    PubMed

    Nierode, Gregory; Kwon, Paul S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kwon, Seok-Joon

    2016-02-01

    To reduce attrition in drug development, it is crucial to consider the development and implementation of translational phenotypic assays as well as decipher diverse molecular mechanisms of action for new molecular entities. High-throughput fluorescence and confocal microscopes with advanced analysis software have simplified the simultaneous identification and quantification of various cellular processes through what is now referred to as highcontent screening (HCS). HCS permits automated identification of modifiers of accessible and biologically relevant targets and can thus be used to detect gene interactions or identify toxic pathways of drug candidates to improve drug discovery and development processes. In this review, we summarize several HCS-compatible, biochemical, and molecular biology-driven assays, including immunohistochemistry, RNAi, reporter gene assay, CRISPR-Cas9 system, and protein-protein interactions to assess a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, morphological changes, protein expression, localization, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. These cell-based assay methods can be applied to not only 2D cell culture but also 3D cell culture systems in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26428732

  11. Cellular impedance assays for predictive preclinical drug screening of kinase inhibitor cardiovascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lamore, Sarah D; Kamendi, Harriet W; Scott, Clay W; Dragan, Yvonne P; Peters, Matthew F

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is a leading contributor to drug attrition. Implementing earlier testing has successfully reduced human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene-related arrhythmias. How- ever, analogous assays targeting functional CV effects remain elusive. Demand to address this gap is particularly acute for kinase inhibitors (KIs) that suffer frequent CV toxicity. The drug class also presents some particularly challenging requirements for assessing functional CV toxicity. Specifically, an assay must sense a downstream response that integrates diverse kinase signaling pathways. In addition, sufficient throughput is essential for handling inherent KI nonselectivity. A new opportunity has emerged with cellular impedance technology, which detects spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes. Impedance assays sense morphology changes downstream of cardiomyocyte contraction. To evaluate cardiomyocyte impedance assays for KI screening, we investigated two distinct KI classes where CV toxicity was discovered late and target risks remain unresolved. Microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK) inhibitors decrease blood pressure in dogs, whereas checkpoint kinase (Chk) inhibitors (AZD7762, SCH900776) exhibit dose-limiting CV toxicities in clinical trials. These in vivo effects manifested in vitro as cardiomyocyte beat cessation. MARK effects were deemed mechanism associated because beat inhibition potencies correlated with kinase inhibition, and gene knockdown and microtubule-targeting agents suppressed beating. MARK inhibitor impedance and kinase potencies aligned with rat blood pressure effects. Chk inhibitor effects were judged off-target because Chk and beat inhibition potencies did not correlate and knockdowns did not alter beating. Taken together, the data demonstrate that cardiomyocyte impedance assays can address three unmet needs-detecting KI functional cardiotoxicity in vitro, determining mechanism of action, and supporting safety structure

  12. Development of specific dengue virus 2'-O- and N7-methyltransferase assays for antiviral drug screening.

    PubMed

    Barral, K; Sallamand, C; Petzold, C; Coutard, B; Collet, A; Thillier, Y; Zimmermann, J; Vasseur, J-J; Canard, B; Rohayem, J; Debart, F; Decroly, E

    2013-09-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protein NS5 carries two mRNA cap methyltransferase (MTase) activities involved in the synthesis of a cap structure, (7Me)GpppA(2'OMe)-RNA, at the 5'-end of the viral mRNA. The methylation of the cap guanine at its N7-position (N7-MTase, (7Me)GpppA-RNA) is essential for viral replication. The development of high throughput methods to identify specific inhibitors of N7-MTase is hampered by technical limitations in the large scale synthesis of long capped RNAs. In this work, we describe an efficient method to generate such capped RNA, GpppA(2'OMe)-RNA₇₄, by ligation of two RNA fragments. Then, we use GpppA(2'OMe)-RNA₇₄ as a substrate to assess DENV N7-MTase activity and to develop a robust and specific activity assay. We applied the same ligation procedure to generate (7Me)GpppA-RNA₇₄ in order to characterize the DENV 2'-O-MTase activity specifically on long capped RNA. We next compared the N7- and 2'-O-MTase inhibition effect of 18 molecules, previously proposed to affect MTase activities. These experiments allow the validation of a rapid and sensitive method easily adaptable for high-throughput inhibitor screening in anti-flaviviral drug development. PMID:23769894

  13. Optimization of a Fluorescence-Based Assay for Large-Scale Drug Screening against Babesia and Theileria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Mohamed Alaa; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; El Said, El Said El Shirbini; Elsayed, Gehad; El-Khodery, Sabry; El-Ashker, Maged; Elsify, Ahmed; Omar, Mosaab; Salama, Akram; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and accurate assay for evaluating antibabesial drugs on a large scale is required for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia parasites. In the current study, we evaluated the usefulness of a fluorescence-based assay for determining the efficacies of antibabesial compounds against bovine and equine hemoparasites in in vitro cultures. Three different hematocrits (HCTs; 2.5%, 5%, and 10%) were used without daily replacement of the medium. The results of a high-throughput screening assay revealed that the best HCT was 2.5% for bovine Babesia parasites and 5% for equine Babesia and Theileria parasites. The IC50 values of diminazene aceturate obtained by fluorescence and microscopy did not differ significantly. Likewise, the IC50 values of luteolin, pyronaridine tetraphosphate, nimbolide, gedunin, and enoxacin did not differ between the two methods. In conclusion, our fluorescence-based assay uses low HCT and does not require daily replacement of culture medium, making it highly suitable for in vitro large-scale drug screening against Babesia and Theileria parasites that infect cattle and horses. PMID:25915529

  14. Optimization of a Fluorescence-Based Assay for Large-Scale Drug Screening against Babesia and Theileria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; Terkawi, Mohamed Alaa; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; El Said, El Said El Shirbini; Elsayed, Gehad; El-Khodery, Sabry; El-Ashker, Maged; Elsify, Ahmed; Omar, Mosaab; Salama, Akram; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and accurate assay for evaluating antibabesial drugs on a large scale is required for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia parasites. In the current study, we evaluated the usefulness of a fluorescence-based assay for determining the efficacies of antibabesial compounds against bovine and equine hemoparasites in in vitro cultures. Three different hematocrits (HCTs; 2.5%, 5%, and 10%) were used without daily replacement of the medium. The results of a high-throughput screening assay revealed that the best HCT was 2.5% for bovine Babesia parasites and 5% for equine Babesia and Theileria parasites. The IC50 values of diminazene aceturate obtained by fluorescence and microscopy did not differ significantly. Likewise, the IC50 values of luteolin, pyronaridine tetraphosphate, nimbolide, gedunin, and enoxacin did not differ between the two methods. In conclusion, our fluorescence-based assay uses low HCT and does not require daily replacement of culture medium, making it highly suitable for in vitro large-scale drug screening against Babesia and Theileria parasites that infect cattle and horses. PMID:25915529

  15. A Systematic Comparison Identifies an ATP-Based Viability Assay as Most Suitable Read-Out for Drug Screening in Glioma Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleijn, A.; Kloezeman, J. J.; Balvers, R. K.; van der Kaaij, M.; Dirven, C. M. F.; Leenstra, S.; Lamfers, M. L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Serum-free culture methods for patient-derived primary glioma cultures, selecting for glioma stem-like cells (GSCs), are becoming the gold standard in neurooncology research. These GSCs can be implemented in drug screens to detect patient-specific responses, potentially bridging the translational gap to personalized medicine. Since numerous compounds are available, a rapid and reliable readout for drug efficacies is required. This can be done using approaches that measure viability, confluency, cytotoxicity, or apoptosis. To determine which assay is best suitable for drug screening, 10 different assays were systematically tested on established glioma cell lines and validated on a panel of GSCs. General applicability was assessed using distinct treatment modalities, being temozolomide, radiation, rapamycin, and the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD. The apoptosis and cytotoxicity assays did not unequivocally detect responses and were excluded from further testing. The NADH- and ATP-based viability assays revealed comparable readout for all treatments; however, the latter had smaller standard deviations and direct readout. Importantly, drugs that interfere with cell metabolism require alternative techniques such as confluency monitoring to accurately measure treatment effects. Taken together, our data suggest that the combination of ATP luminescence assays with confluency monitoring provides the most specific and reproducible readout for drug screening on primary GSCs. PMID:27274737

  16. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  17. High-throughput microsomal stability assay for screening new chemical entities in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Fonsi, Massimiliano; Orsale, Maria V; Monteagudo, Edith

    2008-10-01

    In this work, the authors present a novel, robotic, automated protocol for assessing a metabolic stability protocol assembled on a Hamilton platform and a new strategy for pooling samples (cassette analysis). To increase the high throughput of the liquid chromatography (LC) step, fast chromatography and automated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analytical methods were also developed, and a rapid data analysis system was generated that converts peak areas obtained by LC/MS/MS in intrinsic clearance values. All of the steps of the microsomal stability assay were carefully studied and optimized. Standard errors and confidence intervals of the measured clearances were also automatically generated in the process to allow an immediate evaluation of the significance of observed values. Methods based on pooling analysis of 2 and 4 different analytes were compared with a standard method without pooling. A simple statistical treatment was used to show their equivalence. The different protocols developed were analyzed in terms of the best compromise between accuracy and high-throughput capabilities. PMID:18812573

  18. Establishment of a novel experimental protocol for drug-induced seizure liability screening based on a locomotor activity assay in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Naoteru; Deguchi, Jiro; Yamashita, Akihito; Miyawaki, Izuru; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    As drug-induced seizures have severe impact on drug development, evaluating seizure induction potential of candidate drugs at the early stages of drug discovery is important. A novel assay system using zebrafish has attracted interest as a high throughput toxicological in vivo assay system, and we tried to establish an experimental method for drug-induced seizure liability on the basis of locomotor activity in zebrafish. We monitored locomotor activity at high-speed movement (> 20 mm/sec) for 60 min immediately after exposure, and assessed seizure liability potential in some drugs using locomotor activity. However this experimental procedure was not sufficient for predicting seizures because the potential of several drugs with demonstrated seizure potential in mammals was not detected. We, therefore, added other parameters for locomotor activity such as extending exposure time or conducting flashlight stimulation (10 Hz) which is a known seizure induction stimulus, and these additional parameters improved seizure potential detection in some drugs. The validation study using the improved methodology was used to assess 52 commercially available drugs, and the prediction rate was approximately 70%. The experimental protocol established in this present study is considered useful for seizure potential screening during early stages of drug discovery. PMID:25056783

  19. Quantitative RT-PCR assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of drugs against the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed a qRT-PCR assay to assess drug efficacy on the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro by detecting the levels of parasite 18S rRNA. This approach displayed up to four orders of magnitude of linear dynamic range and was much less labor-intensive than the traditional microscopic methods. However, conventional qRT-PCR protocol is not very amendable to high-throughput analysis when total RNA needs to be purified by lengthy, multi-step procedures. Recently, several commercial reagents are available for preparing cell lysates that could be directly used in downstream qRT-PCR analysis (e.g., Ambion Cell-to-cDNA kit and Bio-Rad iScript sample preparation reagent). Using these reagents, we are able to adapt the qRT-PCR assay into high-throughput screening of drugs in vitro (i.e., 96-well and 384-well formats for the cultivation of parasites and qRT-PCR detection, respectively). This qRT-PCR protocol is able to give a >150-fold linear dynamic range using samples isolated from cells infected with various numbers of parasites. The new assay is also validated by the NIH-recommended intra-plate, inter-plate, and inter-day uniformity tests. The robustness and effectiveness of the assay are also confirmed by evaluating the anti-cryptosporidial efficacy of paromomycin and by a small scale screening of compounds. PMID:26441920

  20. A High-Throughput Fluorescence-Based Assay System for Appetite-Regulating Gene and Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yasuhito; Hirano, Minoru; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish). This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1), and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant) revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers. PMID:23300705

  1. Cross-reactivity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay in drugs-of-abuse screening: influence of dose and metabolites of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jon Andsnes; Schjøtt, Jan; Fossan, Kjell O; Riedel, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA) for buprenorphine is applied for both urine drugs-of-abuse screening and compliance monitoring. Sensitivity, specificity, and optimal cutoff of this assay have differed between studies. This may indicate that cross-reactivity has to be taken into account during assay evaluation. We therefore investigated the performance of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay for use in our patient population and explored the impact of cross-reactivity on assay accuracy. Methods The CEDIA buprenorphine assay and high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry were employed to analyze drugs-of-abuse in urine samples from a healthy drug-naïve male volunteer after intake of two tablets of a prescription drug containing 400 mg paracetamol +30 mg codeine phosphate, and in urine samples (n=2,272) from drug-addicted patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to express the diagnostic accuracy of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. Results CEDIA buprenorphine was positive in one urine sample from the drug-naïve person after intake of the prescription drug. Twenty-five (1.1%) of the patient urine samples were positive for buprenorphine by CEDIA, but negative by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Codeine, morphine, and their respective metabolites were prevalent in samples that were false positive for buprenorphine. The specificity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay increased to 99.7% when the cutoff was increased from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. Conclusion Intake of a therapeutic dose of codeine can yield a false-positive CEDIA buprenorphine result. Additive effects from metabolites of codeine contribute to cross-reactivity in concentrations much lower than listed in the manufacturer’s cross-reactivity guide. Raising the cutoff from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL increased the diagnostic accuracy. Clinicians should be informed about the risk of false-positive results with the CEDIA

  2. In vitro bioassays for anticancer drug screening: effects of cell concentration and other assay parameters on growth inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M M; Patterson, G M; Moore, R E

    2001-11-01

    In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed using human cancer cell lines at various concentrations with experimental anticancer drugs such as the cryptophycins and other cytotoxins. The effect of variations in assay parameters on the observed growth inhibition of these anticancer therapeutic agents was determined. The results demonstrated that the observed inhibitory activity of these compounds varied inversely with the cell concentrations used. The observed differences in activity between different cytotoxins were not necessarily proportionate. Thus, the relative activities of two toxins also varied with cell concentration. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these cell lines to the cytostatic purine analog, 6-mercaptopurine (used as a control), varied with cell concentration as well. The activity of this compound was dependent on the medium used for cell growth, yielding good activity in Eagle's minimum essential medium, but not in Ham's F-12 (Kaigin) medium. Moreover, growth inhibition by cryptophycin as well as 6-mercaptopurine was also dependent on the serum concentration in the medium. Finally, the sensitivity of the cancer cell lines to various organic solvents commonly used as drug vehicles for in vitro testing, such as ethanol, dimethylformamide, and dimethylsulfoxide, was likewise found to vary inversely with cell concentration. PMID:11578805

  3. An aptamer-based bio-barcode assay with isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification for cytochrome-c detection and anti-cancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Loo, Jacky F C; Lau, P M; Ho, H P; Kong, S K

    2013-10-15

    Based on a recently reported ultra-sensitive bio-barcode (BBC) assay, we have developed an aptamer-based bio-barcode (ABC) alternative to detect a cell death marker cytochrome-c (Cyto-c) and its subsequent application to screen anti-cancer drugs. Aptamer is a short single-stranded DNA selected from a synthetic DNA library by virtue of its high binding affinity and specificity to its target based on its unique 3D structure from the nucleotide sequence after folding. In the BBC assay, an antigen (Ag) in analytes is captured by a micro-magnetic particle (MMP) coated with capturing antibodies (Abs). Gold nanoparticles (NPs) with another recognition Ab against the same target and hundreds of identical DNA molecules of known sequence are subsequently added to allow the formation of sandwich structures ([MMP-Ab1]-Ag-[Ab2-NP-DNA]). After isolating the sandwiches by a magnetic field, the DNAs hybridized to their complementary DNAs covalently bound on the NPs are released from the sandwiches after heating. Acting as an Ag identification tag, these bio-barcode DNAs with known DNA sequence are then amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and detected by fluorescence. In our ABC assay, we employed a Cyto-c-specific aptamer to substitute both the recognition Ab and barcode DNAs on the NPs in the BBC assay; and a novel isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification for the time-consuming PCR. The detection limit of our ABC assay for the Cyto-c was found to be 10 ng/mL and this new assay can be completed within 3h. Several potential anti-cancer drugs have been tested in vitro for their efficacy to kill liver cancer with or without multi-drug resistance. PMID:24054573

  4. Developing a microbiological growth inhibition screening assay for the detection of 27 veterinary drugs from 13 different classes in animal feedingstuffs.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Torsten; Pellet, Terence; Boscher, Aurore; Hoffmann, Lucien

    2013-01-01

    Many regulations prohibit using veterinary drugs in feedingstuffs to protect consumers and animals alike. Within this investigation we developed a simple, cost-efficient primary screening method for detecting antibiotics and coccidiostats in animal feeds. Thirty-two veterinary drugs were originally considered. Following matrix-free testing to optimise detection, an assay based on matrix extraction with methanol/acetonitrile/phosphate buffer followed by inoculation and diffusion in agar plates was developed. Final validation was performed with 14 representative drugs (one per drug class) and four bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC11303 and ATCC27166, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC6538P, Micrococcus luteus ATCC9341) in bovine, lamb and swine fodder, measuring growth inhibition zones. Of the original drugs tested, 27 remained detectable in feed matrices at or below 20 mg kg(-1). Of the 14 validated representatives, two had estimated minimum detectable concentrations of 10-11 mg kg(-1), others of 5 mg kg(-1) or lower, an earlier minimum European Union inclusion rate for many veterinary drugs. No significant matrix effect on inhibition zones was detected. Per cent wrong negative deviations ranged from 0% (nine of 14 compounds) to 20-27% (two of 14), while inter-day precision based on inhibition zones had relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 6-109% (mean of 40%). When setting a 1 mm inhibition zone, the maximum observed for negative controls, as a cut-off level, no false-positives were found. While not all targeted antibiotics were detectable in complex matrices, the majority of veterinary drugs were detected with reasonable sensitivity, indicating that this method could be suitable for screening feedingstuffs prior to further confirmatory investigation of positive findings such as by LC-MS/MS. PMID:24053648

  5. Evaluation of a range of anti-proliferative assays for the preclinical screening of anti-psoriatic drugs: a comparison of colorimetric and fluorimetric assays with the thymidine incorporation assay.

    PubMed

    George, Suja Elizabeth; Anderson, Rosaleen J; Cunningham, Anne; Donaldson, Michael; Groundwater, Paul W

    2010-06-01

    Established treatments for psoriasis are generally based on antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, or differentiation-modifying activity, or a combination of these effects. New agents for the treatment of psoriasis could be identified by high-throughput screening (HTS) of large compound libraries using keratinocyte proliferation models. Although several new proliferation assays have been developed, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay is still considered to be the gold standard for the evaluation of keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. In this study, we compare a number of simple, and reliable, colorimetric (MTT, NRU, SRB, and CVS), and fluorimetric (CAM and AB) methods with the [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay for the measurement of keratinocyte proliferation in the exponential growth phase in 96-well formats. The concentrations that induced 50% growth inhibition (GI(50)) were determined by each assay for the established antipsoriatics, dithranol, and methotrexate. Strong correlations were observed between the percentage growth inhibitions determined by the radioactive and the colorimetric assays, with no significant differences (P > 0.05) between their GI(50) values. The colorimetric assays are thus suitable alternatives to the radioactive assay for quantifying keratinocyte growth inhibition. We have also validated the use of the HaCaT cell line as a representative of the hyperproliferative psoriatic epidermis, in the preclinical screening of experimental anti-psoriatic agents. PMID:20482335

  6. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  7. A new microperfusion system for the cultivation of tumor-cells invitro - approach to integrate pharmacokinetic parameters in screening assays for cytostatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gimmel, S; Kinawi, A; Maurer, H

    1993-01-01

    By a newly introduced microperfusion system absorption and elimination rates can be simulated in vitro. This article describes the optimization of culture conditions (medium composition, membrane filters, pumping rates, and stirring speeds) of tumor cell lines (L1210, KB) maintained in suspension in an ultrafiltration-flat chamber. Viability and colony-forming ability are measured. Our results indicate that tumor cells can be cultured under serum-free conditions over a five hour incubation period with only minimal decrease in colony-forming ability. Survival of cells is independent from the pumping rate in the tested range, but is dependent of the stirring speed. Each cell line requires its own stirring speed. Ultrafiltration membranes with minimal nonspecific adsorption properties proved to be the best in terms of cell adsorption and toxicity to retain cells in the chamber. This system might improve the tumor cell colony assay for cytostatic drug screening. PMID:21573513

  8. LC-MS vs. GC-MS, online extraction systems, advantages of technology for drug screening assays.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews recent applications of mass spectrometry to systematic toxicological analysis (STA), where extended lists of compounds of toxicological interest are screened, as well as to the general unknown screening (GUS), where all exogenous compounds present in a sample are tentatively detected and identified, without any preselection. Many recent improvements in sample preparation, chromatographic separation, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and above all liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques are described, which are applicable or have been applied to STA and/or GUS, generally with promising results. These improvements come from miniaturization and automation of solid-phase extraction, turbulent-flow or ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography, linear ion traps, accurate (e.g., time of flight or orbital trap) mass spectrometry, as well as software refinements to alternate between different ionization modes or automatically interpret the results. It also shows that robust LC-MS/MS techniques already exist for STA or GUS, which are at least as efficient as the traditional techniques used in most toxicology laboratories, such as GC-MS or high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection, as shown by three comparative studies. However, the major drawback of LC-MS/MS in the full-scan mode for STA or GUS is that it still lacks universal reference libraries due to insufficient reproducibility of LC-MS(/MS) mass spectra obtained with different instrument types. PMID:22767104

  9. TOXICITY SCREENING WITH ZEBRAFISH ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed toxicity screening will help EPA to prioritize chemicals for further testing, and it may also alert chemical manufacturers that some of their commercial products may be toxic. The proposed toxicity pathway studies will improve the research community’s abi...

  10. Solid-Phase Biological Assays for Drug Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Erica M.; Sicard, Clémence; Brennan, John D.

    2014-06-01

    In the past 30 years, there has been a significant growth in the use of solid-phase assays in the area of drug discovery, with a range of new assays being used for both soluble and membrane-bound targets. In this review, we provide some basic background to typical drug targets and immobilization protocols used in solid-phase biological assays (SPBAs) for drug discovery, with emphasis on particularly labile biomolecular targets such as kinases and membrane-bound receptors, and highlight some of the more recent approaches for producing protein microarrays, bioaffinity columns, and other devices that are central to small molecule screening by SPBA. We then discuss key applications of such assays to identify drug leads, with an emphasis on the screening of mixtures. We conclude by highlighting specific advantages and potential disadvantages of SPBAs, particularly as they relate to particular assay formats.

  11. In vitro screening for drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Graeme F; Pritchard, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    Drug repositioning or repurposing has received much coverage in the scientific literature in recent years and has been responsible for the generation of both new intellectual property and investigational new drug submissions. The literature indicates a significant trend toward the use of computational- or informatics-based methods for generating initial repositioning hypotheses, followed by focused assessment of biological activity in phenotypic assays. Another viable method for drug repositioning is in vitro screening of known drugs or drug-like molecules, initially in disease-relevant phenotypic assays, to identify and validate candidates for repositioning. This approach can use large compound libraries or can focus on subsets of known drugs or drug-like molecules. In this short review, we focus on ways to generate and validate repositioning candidates in disease-related in vitro and phenotypic assays, and we discuss specific examples of this approach as applied to a variety of disease areas. We propose that in vitro screens offer several advantages over biochemical or in vivo methods as a starting point for drug repositioning. PMID:25527136

  12. Design and implementation of high throughput screening assays.

    PubMed

    Macarrón, Ricardo; Hertzberg, Robert P

    2011-03-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) is at the core of the drug discovery process, and so it is critical to design and implement HTS assays in a comprehensive fashion involving scientists from the disciplines of biology, chemistry, engineering, and informatics. This requires careful analysis of many variables, starting with the choice of assay target and ending with the discovery of lead compounds. At every step in this process, there are decisions to be made that can greatly impact the outcome of the HTS effort, to the point of making it a success or a failure. Although specific guidelines should be established to insure that the screening assay reaches an acceptable level of quality, many choices require pragmatism and the ability to compromise opposing forces. PMID:20865348

  13. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Pincus MR, Abraham NZ Jr. Toxicology and therapeutic drug monitoring. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 23.

  14. High-content screening for biofilm assays.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fubing; Hoek, Eric M V; Damoiseaux, Robert

    2010-08-01

    The authors describe a novel high-throughput screening platform that provides rapid, reliable, quantitative assessment of biofilm formation and removal on engineered surfaces. Unlike traditional biofilm assays based on plate readers, this assay platform is based on high-content screening, which allows for multiplexing to simultaneously quantify the number of bacterial adhesions per unit area and the viability of adhered cells using fluorescent dye combinations. This platform is fully automated and has a throughput of more than 10,000 wells per day. The authors used this platform to examine the influence of different assay buffer systems on bacterial adhesion, viability, and removal on cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol coating films synthesized directly onto the bottoms of 384-well plates. The results indicated that water chemistry, bacteria cell type, and film chemistry combine to govern biofilm formation. In general, both reversible and irreversible bacterial adhesion increased with the extent of cross-linking in coating films, which correlates strongly with coating film cross-linking degree and hydrophobicity, which is closely related. The high-throughput platform offers a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of fouling-resistant coating films in addition to elucidation of fundamental mechanisms governing bacterial adhesion. PMID:20639506

  15. Design and Implementation of High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Powell, David J; Hertzberg, Robert P; Macarrόn, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    HTS remains at the core of the drug discovery process, and so it is critical to design and implement HTS assays in a comprehensive fashion involving scientists from the disciplines of biology, chemistry, engineering, and informatics. This requires careful consideration of many options and variables, starting with the choice of screening strategy and ending with the discovery of lead compounds. At every step in this process, there are decisions to be made that can greatly impact the outcome of the HTS effort, to the point of making it a success or a failure. Although specific guidelines should be established to ensure that the screening assay reaches an acceptable level of quality, many choices require pragmatism and the ability to compromise opposing forces. PMID:27316985

  16. Design and implementation of high throughput screening assays.

    PubMed

    Macarrón, Ricardo; Hertzberg, Robert P

    2002-01-01

    HTS is at the core of the drug-discovery process, and so it is critical to design and implement HTS assays in a comprehensive fashion involving scientists from the disciplines of biology, chemistry, engineering, and informatics. This requires careful analysis of many variables, starting with the choice of assay target and ending with the discovery of lead compounds. At every step in this process, there are decisions to be made that can greatly impact the outcome of the HTS effort, to the point of making it a success or a failure. Although specific guidelines can be established to ensure that the screening assay reaches an acceptable level of quality, many choices require pragmatism and the ability to compromise opposing forces. PMID:12029816

  17. Design and implementation of high-throughput screening assays.

    PubMed

    Macarrón, Ricardo; Hertzberg, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    HTS is at the core of the drug discovery process, and so it is critical to design and implement HTS assays in a comprehensive fashion involving scientists from the disciplines of biology, chemistry, engineering, and informatics. This requires careful analysis of many variables, starting with the choice of assay target and ending with the discovery of lead compounds. At every step in this process, there are decisions to be made that can greatly impact the outcome of the HTS effort, to the point of making it a success or a failure. Although specific guidelines should be established to ensure that the screening assay reaches an acceptable level of quality, many choices require pragmatism and the ability to compromise opposing forces. PMID:19551355

  18. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays. PMID:25027375

  19. Emerging Technologies and Generic Assays for the Detection of Anti-Drug Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Elango, Chinnasamy

    2016-01-01

    Anti-drug antibodies induced by biologic therapeutics often impact drug pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics response, clinical efficacy, and patient safety. It is critical to assess the immunogenicity risk of potential biotherapeutics in producing neutralizing and nonneutralizing anti-drug antibodies, especially in clinical phases of drug development. Different assay methodologies have been used to detect all anti-drug antibodies, including ELISA, radioimmunoassay, surface plasmon resonance, and electrochemiluminescence-based technologies. The most commonly used method is a bridging assay, performed in an ELISA or on the Meso Scale Discovery platform. In this report, we aim to review the emerging new assay technologies that can complement or address challenges associated with the bridging assay format in screening and confirmation of ADAs. We also summarize generic anti-drug antibody assays that do not require drug-specific reagents for nonclinical studies. These generic assays significantly reduce assay development efforts and, therefore, shorten the assay readiness timeline. PMID:27556048

  20. Emerging Technologies and Generic Assays for the Detection of Anti-Drug Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Michael A; Purushothama, Shobha; Elango, Chinnasamy; Lu, Yanmei

    2016-01-01

    Anti-drug antibodies induced by biologic therapeutics often impact drug pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics response, clinical efficacy, and patient safety. It is critical to assess the immunogenicity risk of potential biotherapeutics in producing neutralizing and nonneutralizing anti-drug antibodies, especially in clinical phases of drug development. Different assay methodologies have been used to detect all anti-drug antibodies, including ELISA, radioimmunoassay, surface plasmon resonance, and electrochemiluminescence-based technologies. The most commonly used method is a bridging assay, performed in an ELISA or on the Meso Scale Discovery platform. In this report, we aim to review the emerging new assay technologies that can complement or address challenges associated with the bridging assay format in screening and confirmation of ADAs. We also summarize generic anti-drug antibody assays that do not require drug-specific reagents for nonclinical studies. These generic assays significantly reduce assay development efforts and, therefore, shorten the assay readiness timeline. PMID:27556048

  1. Reporting biological assay screening results for maximum impact.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Evan

    2015-07-01

    A very large corpus of biological assay screening results exist in the public domain. The ability to compare and analyze this data is hampered due to missing details and lack of a commonly used terminology to describe assay protocols and assay endpoints. Minimum reporting guidelines exist that, if followed, would greatly enhance the utility of biological assay screening data so it may be independently reproduced, readily integrated, effectively compared, and rapidly analyzed. PMID:26194585

  2. Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for preformulation.

    PubMed

    Alsenz, Jochem; Haenel, Elisabeth; Anedda, Aline; Du Castel, Pauline; Cirelli, Giorgio

    2016-05-25

    This study describes a novel Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for measuring disk intrinsic dissolution rates (DIDR). In MINDISS, compacted mini disks of drugs (2-5mg/disk) are prepared in custom made holders with a surface area of 3mm(2). Disks are immersed, pellet side down, into 0.35ml of appropriate dissolution media per well in 96-well microtiter plates, media are stirred and disk-holders are transferred to new wells after defined periods of time. After filtration, drug concentration in dissolution media is quantified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) and solid state property of the disk is characterized by Raman spectroscopy. MINDISS was identified as an easy-to-use tool for rapid, parallel determination of DIDR of compounds that requires only small amounts of compound and of dissolution medium. Results obtained with marketed drugs in MINDISS correlate well with large scale DIDR methods and indicate that MINDISS can be used for (1) rank-ordering of compounds by intrinsic dissolution in late phase discovery and early development, (2) comparison of polymorphic forms and salts, (3) screening and selection of appropriate dissolution media, and (4) characterization of the intestinal release behavior of compounds along the gastro intestinal tract by changing biorelevant media during experiments. PMID:26360839

  3. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare. PMID:26658480

  4. Microfluidic assay without blocking for rapid HIV screening and confirmation.

    PubMed

    Song, Lusheng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wenjun; Ma, Liying; Liu, Yong; Hao, Yanlin; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2012-08-01

    The essential step for HIV spreading limitation is the screening tests. However, there are multiple disadvantages in current screening assays which need further confirmation test. Herein we developed a rapid HIV assay combining screening and confirmation test by using the microfluidic network assay. Meanwhile, the assay is accelerated by bypassing the step of blocking. We call this method as microfluidic assay without blocking (MAWB). Both the limit of detection and reagent incubation time of MAWB are determined by screening of one model protein pair: ovalbumin and its antibody. The assay time is accelerated about 25% while the limit of detection (LOD) is well kept. Formatting the method in for both HIV screening (testing 8 HIV-related samples) and confirmation (assaying 6 kinds of HIV antibodies of each sample) within 30 min was successful. Fast HIV screening and confirmation of 20 plasma samples were also demonstrated by this method. MAWB improved the assay speed while keeping the LOD of conventional ELISA. Meanwhile, both the accuracy and throughput of MAWB were well improved, which made it an excellent candidate for a quick HIV test for both screening and confirmation. Methods like this one will find wide applications in clinical diagnosis and biochemical analysis based on the interactions between pairs of molecules. PMID:22374476

  5. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  6. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  7. Zebrafish developmental toxicity assay: A fishy solution to reproductive toxicity screening, or just a red herring?

    PubMed

    Van den Bulck, Kathleen; Hill, Adrian; Mesens, Natalie; Diekman, Heike; De Schaepdrijver, Luc; Lammens, Lieve

    2011-09-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity/teratogenicity assay is described as a useful alternative screening model to evaluate the effect of drugs on embryofoetal development. Fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of 15 compounds with teratogenic (8) and non-teratogenic (7) potential until 96h post-fertilization when 28 morphological endpoints and the level of compound uptake was assessed. The majority of drugs testing positive in mammals was also positive in zebrafish (75% sensitivity), while a relative high number of false positives were noted (43% specificity). Compound uptake determination appears useful for clarifying classifications as teratogenic or potential overdose although assay sensitivity could be improved to 71% if the exposure threshold, previously suggested as ∼50ng/larvae, is reconsidered. The zebrafish assay shows some potential, though limited in its current form, as a screening tool for developmental toxicity within Janssen drug development. Further assay refinement with respect to endpoints and body burden threshold is required. PMID:21704152

  8. Addressing drug effects on cut point determination for an anti-drug antibody assay.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Maria D F S; Gleason, Carol R; Phillips, Kelli R; Berisha, Flora; Stouffer, Bruce; Warrack, Bethanne M; Chen, Guodong

    2012-10-31

    The effect of trough levels of a monoclonal antibody drug (drugB) on screening cut point (CP) determination for an anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay was scrutinized and the conclusions substantiated by data from a phase 3 cancer clinical study. The ADA assay utilized an acid dissociation step and either 0 or 100 μg/ml drugB was added to the samples prior to obtaining the signals used for CP calculations. Serum samples from three different drug-naive populations were tested (healthy individuals, cancer patients enrolled in the drugB clinical trial and cancer patients whose serum samples were available commercially). For the same disease state samples, both the screening CP and confirmation CP were different when calculated during validation or from study sample analysis. It is reasonable to assume that variability was due to the patient heterogeneity, as they could have been at distinct stages of disease progression, and/or taking different medications, amongst other differences. The patients enrolled in the clinical trial were stratified as per protocol and hence represented a more homogeneous population. Drug effects on CP may be population dependent and also assay dependent. PMID:22750627

  9. Automated Triplex (HBV, HCV and HIV) NAT Assay Systems for Blood Screening in India.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Manoj Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review is confined to triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays to be used on fully automated platform. Around the world, these assays are being used at various transfusion medicine centres or blood banks to screen blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV. These assay systems can screen up to 1000 blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV simultaneously in a day. This area has been dominated by mainly two manufacturers: M/s Gen-Probe-Novartis and M/s Roche Molecular Systems. The triplex NAT assay systems of both manufacturers are licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. There is not much awareness about the technology and procedures used in these assays. The main objective of this review is to create awareness about the technology and procedure of these assays. PMID:27042485

  10. Automated Triplex (HBV, HCV and HIV) NAT Assay Systems for Blood Screening in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This review is confined to triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays to be used on fully automated platform. Around the world, these assays are being used at various transfusion medicine centres or blood banks to screen blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV. These assay systems can screen up to 1000 blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV simultaneously in a day. This area has been dominated by mainly two manufacturers: M/s Gen-Probe-Novartis and M/s Roche Molecular Systems. The triplex NAT assay systems of both manufacturers are licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. There is not much awareness about the technology and procedures used in these assays. The main objective of this review is to create awareness about the technology and procedure of these assays. PMID:27042485

  11. Developing predictive assays: the phenotypic screening "rule of 3".

    PubMed

    Vincent, Fabien; Loria, Paula; Pregel, Marko; Stanton, Robert; Kitching, Linda; Nocka, Karl; Doyonnas, Regis; Steppan, Claire; Gilbert, Adam; Schroeter, Thomas; Peakman, Marie-Claire

    2015-06-24

    Phenotypic drug discovery approaches can positively affect the translation of preclinical findings to patients. However, not all phenotypic assays are created equal. A critical question then follows: What are the characteristics of the optimal assays? We analyze this question and propose three specific criteria related to the disease relevance of the assay-system, stimulus, and end point-to help design the most predictive phenotypic assays. PMID:26109101

  12. Screening for Drugs Against the Plasmodium falciparum Digestive Vacuole by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yan Quan; Hall, Brian E; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic assays are increasingly employed to provide clues about drug mechanisms. In antimalarial drug screening, however, the majority of assays are designed to only measure parasite-killing activity. We describe here a high-content assay to detect drug-mediated perturbation of the digestive vacuole integrity in the trophozoite stage of Plasmodium falciparum, using the ImageStream imaging flow cytometer. PMID:27460247

  13. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (/sup 47/Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO/sub 3/. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the /sup 47/Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison.

  14. An axenic amastigote system for drug screening.

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, H L; Portal, A C; Devereaux, R; Grogl, M

    1997-01-01

    Currently available primary screens for selection of candidate antileishmanial compounds are not ideal. The choices include screens that are designed to closely reflect the situation in vivo but are labor-intensive and expensive (intracellular amastigotes and animal models) and screens that are designed to facilitate rapid testing of a large number of drugs but do not use the clinically relevant parasite stage (promastigote model). The advent of successful in vitro culture of axenic amastigotes permits the development of a primary screen which is quick and easy like the promastigote screen but still representative of the situation in vivo, since it uses the relevant parasite stage. We have established an axenic amastigote drug screening system using a Leishmania mexicana strain (strain M379). A comparison of the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) drug sensitivity profiles of M379 promastigotes, intracellular amastigotes, and axenic amastigotes for six clinically relevant antileishmanial drugs (sodium stibogluconate, meglumine antimoniate, pentamidine, paromomycin, amphotericin B, WR6026) showed that M379 axenic amastigotes are a good model for a primary drug screen. Promastigote and intracellular amastigote IC50s differed for four of the six drugs tested by threefold or more; axenic amastigote and intracellular amastigote IC50s differed by twofold for only one drug. This shows that the axenic amastigote susceptibility to clinically used reference drugs is comparable to the susceptibility of amastigotes in macrophages. These data also suggest that for the compounds tested, susceptibility is intrinsic to the parasite stage. This contradicts previous hypotheses that suggested that the activities of antimonial agents against intracellular amastigotes were solely a function of the macrophage. PMID:9087496

  15. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  16. A rapid screening assay for identifying mycobacteria targeted nanoparticle antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Donnellan, Samantha; Tran, Lang; Johnston, Helinor; McLuckie, Joyce; Stevenson, Karen; Stone, Vicki

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem. Nanotechnology offers enormous potential in medicine, yet there is limited knowledge regarding the toxicity of nanoparticles (NP) for mycobacterial species that cause serious human diseases (e.g. tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy). Mycobacterial diseases are a major global health problem; TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills up to 2 million people annually and there are over 200 000 leprosy cases each year caused by Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). Few drugs are effective against these mycobacteria and increasing antibiotic resistance exacerbates the problem. As such, alternative therapies are urgently needed but most current assays used to assess the effectiveness of therapeutics against mycobacteria are slow and expensive. This study aimed to develop a rapid, low-cost assay which can be used for screening the antimicrobial properties of compounds against pathogenic mycobacteria and to assess the toxicity of three NP (silver [Ag], copper oxide [Cu(II)O], and zinc oxide [ZnO]) against a green fluorescent protein reporter strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, a slow growing, pathogenic mycobacterial species causing paratuberculosis in ruminants. Fluorescence was used to monitor mycobacterial growth over time, with NP concentrations of 6.25-100 μg/mL tested for up to 7 days, and a method of data analysis was designed to permit comparison between results. Mycobacterial sensitivity to the NP was found to be NP composition specific and toxicity could be ranked in the following order: Ag > Cu(II)O > ZnO. PMID:26618564

  17. The virtual heart as a platform for screening drug cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongfeng; Bai, Xiangyun; Luo, Cunjin; Wang, Kuanquan; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-12-01

    To predict the safety of a drug at an early stage in its development is a major challenge as there is a lack of in vitro heart models that correlate data from preclinical toxicity screening assays with clinical results. A biophysically detailed computer model of the heart, the virtual heart, provides a powerful tool for simulating drug-ion channel interactions and cardiac functions during normal and disease conditions and, therefore, provides a powerful platform for drug cardiotoxicity screening. In this article, we first review recent progress in the development of theory on drug-ion channel interactions and mathematical modelling. Then we propose a family of biomarkers that can quantitatively characterize the actions of a drug on the electrical activity of the heart at multi-physical scales including cellular and tissue levels. We also conducted some simulations to demonstrate the application of the virtual heart to assess the pro-arrhythmic effects of cisapride and amiodarone. Using the model we investigated the mechanisms responsible for the differences between the two drugs on pro-arrhythmogenesis, even though both prolong the QT interval of ECGs. Several challenges for further development of a virtual heart as a platform for screening drug cardiotoxicity are discussed. PMID:25363597

  18. [Comparison of four drug interaction screening programs].

    PubMed

    Ing Lorenzini, K; Reutemann, B; Samer, C F; Guignard, B; Bonnabry, P; Dayer, P; Perrier, A; Desmeules, J

    2012-10-17

    Adverse drug events (ADE) are a major public health issue, with drug-drug interactions (DDI) being one of well-recognized causes of ADE that could be preventable by the use of DDI screening software. We compared the ability of four programs to detect clinically important DDI. We tested 62 drug pairs with and 12 drug pairs without clinically important DDI. Lexi-Interact and Epocrates were the most sensitive (95%) compared to the Compendium and Theriaque (80 and 73%, respectively). The Compendium and Theriaque also showed the lowest negative predictive value. All programs showed high specificity and positive predictive value. The qualitative assessment showed the best performances for Compendium and Lexi-Interact. The last one seems to be the best screening program, but the Compendium is in French and is freely available. PMID:23198652

  19. Sulfonylureas and Glinides as New PPARγ Agonists:. Virtual Screening and Biological Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarsi, Marco; Podvinec, Michael; Roth, Adrian; Hug, Hubert; Kersten, Sander; Albrecht, Hugo; Schwede, Torsten; Meyer, Urs A.; Rücker, Christoph

    2007-12-01

    This work combines the predictive power of computational drug discovery with experimental validation by means of biological assays. In this way, a new mode of action for type 2 diabetes drugs has been unvealed. Most drugs currently employed in the treatment of type 2 diabetes either target the sulfonylurea receptor stimulating insulin release (sulfonylureas, glinides), or target PPARγ improving insulin resistance (thiazolidinediones). Our work shows that sulfonylureas and glinides bind to PPARγ and exhibit PPARγ agonistic activity. This result was predicted in silico by virtual screening and confirmed in vitro by three biological assays. This dual mode of action of sulfonylureas and glinides may open new perspectives for the molecular pharmacology of antidiabetic drugs, since it provides evidence that drugs can be designed which target both the sulfonylurea receptor and PPARγ. Targeting both receptors could in principle allow to increase pancreatic insulin secretion, as well as to improve insulin resistance.

  20. Synthetic Tumor Networks for Screening Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B.; Garson, Charles J.; Mills, Ivy R.; Matar, Majed M.; Fewell, Jason G.; Pant, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle’s physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of “leaky vessels”. Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  1. Synthetic tumor networks for screening drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B; Garson, Charles J; Mills, Ivy R; Matar, Majed M; Fewell, Jason G; Pant, Kapil

    2015-03-10

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle's physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of "leaky vessels". Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  2. Rapid fluorescence screening assay for tetracyclines in chicken muscle.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marilyn J; Lehotay, Steven J

    2004-01-01

    A simple, rapid fluorescence assay was developed for screening tetracyclines in chicken muscle at the U.S. tolerance level (2 mg/kg). The method requires only a homogenization of the tissue in acetonitrile-ammonium hydroxide, centrifugation, addition of Mg+2, and another centrifugation before fluorescence of the supernatant is measured at 505 nm (excitation at 385 nm). Comparison of the fluorescence of control chicken muscle extracts with extracts from muscle fortified with either 2 mg/kg tetracycline, oxytetracycline, or chlortetracycline showed no overlap. A threshold level set at the average fluorescence for a series of fortified 2 mg/kg samples minus 3sigma minimized false-negative responses to provide a successful screening method. The method was tested with blinded samples as controls or samples fortified with tetracycline, oxytetracycline, or chlortetracycline in order to demonstrate its utility. This approach can provide an alternative to microbial screening assays. PMID:15287655

  3. Development and Validation of a Novel Leishmania donovani Screening Cascade for High-Throughput Screening Using a Novel Axenic Assay with High Predictivity of Leishmanicidal Intracellular Activity.

    PubMed

    Nühs, Andrea; De Rycker, Manu; Manthri, Sujatha; Comer, Eamon; Scherer, Christina A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Gray, David W

    2015-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease of the developing world with a limited arsenal of drugs available for treatment. The existing drugs have significant deficiencies so there is an urgent need for new and improved drugs. In the human host, Leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites which poses particular challenges in terms of drug discovery. To achieve sufficient throughput and robustness, free-living parasites are often used in primary screening assays as a surrogate for the more complex intracellular assays. We and others have found that such axenic assays have a high false positive rate relative to the intracellular assays, and that this limits their usefulness as a primary platform for screening of large compound collections. While many different reasons could lie behind the poor translation from axenic parasite to intracellular parasite, we show here that a key factor is the identification of growth slowing and cytostatic compounds by axenic assays in addition to the more desirable cytocidal compounds. We present a screening cascade based on a novel cytocidal-only axenic amastigote assay, developed by increasing starting density of cells and lowering the limit of detection, and show that it has a much improved translation to the intracellular assay. We propose that this assay is an improved primary platform in a new Leishmania screening cascade designed for the screening of large compound collections. This cascade was employed to screen a diversity-oriented-synthesis library, and yielded two novel antileishmanial chemotypes. The approach we have taken may have broad relevance to anti-infective and anti-parasitic drug discovery. PMID:26407168

  4. Development and Validation of a Novel Leishmania donovani Screening Cascade for High-Throughput Screening Using a Novel Axenic Assay with High Predictivity of Leishmanicidal Intracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nühs, Andrea; De Rycker, Manu; Manthri, Sujatha; Comer, Eamon; Scherer, Christina A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Gray, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease of the developing world with a limited arsenal of drugs available for treatment. The existing drugs have significant deficiencies so there is an urgent need for new and improved drugs. In the human host, Leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites which poses particular challenges in terms of drug discovery. To achieve sufficient throughput and robustness, free-living parasites are often used in primary screening assays as a surrogate for the more complex intracellular assays. We and others have found that such axenic assays have a high false positive rate relative to the intracellular assays, and that this limits their usefulness as a primary platform for screening of large compound collections. While many different reasons could lie behind the poor translation from axenic parasite to intracellular parasite, we show here that a key factor is the identification of growth slowing and cytostatic compounds by axenic assays in addition to the more desirable cytocidal compounds. We present a screening cascade based on a novel cytocidal-only axenic amastigote assay, developed by increasing starting density of cells and lowering the limit of detection, and show that it has a much improved translation to the intracellular assay. We propose that this assay is an improved primary platform in a new Leishmania screening cascade designed for the screening of large compound collections. This cascade was employed to screen a diversity-oriented-synthesis library, and yielded two novel antileishmanial chemotypes. The approach we have taken may have broad relevance to anti-infective and anti-parasitic drug discovery. PMID:26407168

  5. An assay for screening microbial cultures for chalkophore production.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Kraemer, Stephan M; Dispirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2010-04-01

    Methanotrophs, bacteria that utilize methane as their sole carbon and energy source, are known to have high requirements for copper. These bacteria have recently been found to synthesize a copper-chelating agent, or chalkophore, termed methanobactin. To aid in screening methanobactin production by methanotrophs, a plate assay developed from the chrome azurol S (CAS) assay for siderophore production, was modified. In the typical CAS assay, a colour change from blue to orange in iron-CAS plates is observed as iron (III) ion weakly bound to CAS is sequestered by siderophores with higher affinities. In our modified assay, iron (III) chloride of the original CAS solution was substituted with copper (II) chloride, and removal of copper from CAS caused a colour change from blue to yellow. Assay results indicated that of the four tested methanotrophs (Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, Methylomicrobium album BG8 and Methylocystis parvus OBBP), only M. trichosporium OB3b, M. capsulatus Bath and M. album BG8 produced chalkophores capable of competing with CAS for copper, while M. parvus OBBP did not or did not export sufficient concentrations of methanobactin for detection by this assay. It was also found using Fe-CAS plates that at least M. trichosporium OB3b and M. album BG8 produce siderophores. These results may be expanded for the detection of chalkophores in other microorganisms as well as for screening of putative mutants of chalkophore synthesis. PMID:23766081

  6. Biomimetic three-dimensional tissue models for advanced high-throughput drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Smith, Alec S.T.; Lone, Saifullah; Kwon, Sunghoon; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Most current drug screening assays used to identify new drug candidates are 2D cell-based systems, even though such in vitro assays do not adequately recreate the in vivo complexity of 3D tissues. Inadequate representation of the human tissue environment during a preclinical test can result in inaccurate predictions of compound effects on overall tissue functionality. Screening for compound efficacy by focusing on a single pathway or protein target, coupled with difficulties in maintaining long-term 2D monolayers, can serve to exacerbate these issues when utilizing such simplistic model systems for physiological drug screening applications. Numerous studies have shown that cell responses to drugs in 3D culture are improved from those in 2D, with respect to modeling in vivo tissue functionality, which highlights the advantages of using 3D-based models for preclinical drug screens. In this review, we discuss the development of microengineered 3D tissue models which accurately mimic the physiological properties of native tissue samples, and highlight the advantages of using such 3D micro-tissue models over conventional cell-based assays for future drug screening applications. We also discuss biomimetic 3D environments, based-on engineered tissues as potential preclinical models for the development of more predictive drug screening assays for specific disease models. PMID:25385716

  7. A novel screening assay for hydroxynitrile lyases suitable for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Krammer, B; Rumbold, K; Tschemmernegg, M; Pöchlauer, P; Schwab, H

    2007-03-30

    Hydroxynitrile lyases (Hnls) are important biocatalysts for the synthesis of optically pure cyanohydrins, which are used as precursors and building blocks for a wide range of high price fine chemicals. Although two Hnl enzymes, from the tropical rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis and from the almond tree Prunus amygdalus, are already used for large scale industrial applications, the enzymes still need to be improved and adapted to the special demands of industrial processes. In many cases directed evolution has been the method of choice to improve enzymes, which are applied as industrial biocatalysts. The screening procedure is the most crucial point in every directed evolution experiment. Herein, we describe the successful development of a novel screening assay for Hnls and its application in high-throughput screening of Escherichia coli mutant libraries. The new assay allows rapid screening of mutant libraries and facilitates the discovery of improved enzyme variants. Hnls catalyze the cleavage of cyanohydrins to hydrocyanic acid and the corresponding aldehyde or ketone. The enzyme assay is based on the detection of hydrocyanic acid produced, making it an all-purpose screening assay, without restriction to any kind of substrate. The gaseous HCN liberated within the Hnl reaction is detected by a visible colorimetric reaction. The facile, highly sensitive and reproducible screening method was validated by identifying new enzyme variants with novel substrate specificities. PMID:17157404

  8. Label-free cytotoxicity screening assay by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Jonas; Shaffer, Etienne; Mena, Julien; Breton, Billy; Parent, Jérôme; Rappaz, Benjamin; Chambon, Marc; Emery, Yves; Magistretti, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian; Marquet, Pierre; Turcatti, Gerardo

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a label-free technology based on digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with applicability for screening by imaging, and we demonstrate its capability for cytotoxicity assessment using mammalian living cells. For this first high content screening compatible application, we automatized a digital holographic microscope for image acquisition of cells using commercially available 96-well plates. Data generated through both label-free DHM imaging and fluorescence-based methods were in good agreement for cell viability identification and a Z'-factor close to 0.9 was determined, validating the robustness of DHM assay for phenotypic screening. Further, an excellent correlation was obtained between experimental cytotoxicity dose-response curves and known IC50 values for different toxic compounds. For comparable results, DHM has the major advantages of being label free and close to an order of magnitude faster than automated standard fluorescence microscopy. PMID:23062077

  9. Determination of designer drug cross-reactivity on five commercial immunoassay screening kits.

    PubMed

    Regester, Laura E; Chmiel, Jeffrey D; Holler, Justin M; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-03-01

    The detection of new designer drugs is often a difficult issue in forensic urine drug testing as immunoassays are the primary screening methodology for drugs of abuse in many of these laboratories. Cross-reactivity of compounds with immunoassay kits can either aid or complicate the detection of a variety of drug and drug metabolites. For instance, emerging designer drugs that share structural similarities to amphetamines and phencyclidine (PCP) have the potential to cross-react with assays designed to detect these compounds. This study evaluates the cross-reactivity of five commercially available immunoassay reagent kits for 94 designer drugs on a Roche/Hitachi Modular P automated screening instrument. The compounds used in this study are grouped by structural class as follows: 2,5-dimethoxyamphetamines, 2C (2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamines), β-keto amphetamines, substituted amphetamines, piperazines, α-pyrrolidinopropiophenones, tryptamines and PCP analogs. A drug concentration of 100 µg/mL was used to determine cross-reactivity for each assay and resulted in the following positive rates: Microgenics DRI(®) Ecstasy enzyme assay (19%), Microgenics DRI(®) Phencyclidine enzyme assay (20%), Lin-Zhi Methamphetamine enzyme immunoassay (39%), Siemens/Syva(®) EMIT(®)II Plus Amphetamines assay (43%) and CEDIA(®) DAU Amphetamine/Ecstasy assay (57%). Of the 94 designer drugs tested, 14% produced a negative response for all five kits. No designer drug used in this study generated a positive result for all five immunoassay kits. PMID:25492523

  10. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J.; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72 h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15 min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z′ = 0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3 h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47 h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples. PMID:26383544

  11. Fluorescence Polarization Screening Assays for Small Molecule Allosteric Modulators of ABL Kinase Function

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Prerna; Shi, Haibin; Baumgartner, Matthew; Camacho, Carlos J.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The ABL protein-tyrosine kinase regulates intracellular signaling pathways controlling diverse cellular processes and contributes to several forms of cancer. The kinase activity of ABL is repressed by intramolecular interactions involving its regulatory Ncap, SH3 and SH2 domains. Small molecules that allosterically regulate ABL kinase activity through its non-catalytic domains may represent selective probes of ABL function. Here we report a screening assay for chemical modulators of ABL kinase activity that target the regulatory interaction of the SH3 domain with the SH2-kinase linker. This fluorescence polarization (FP) assay is based on a purified recombinant ABL protein consisting of the N-cap, SH3 and SH2 domains plus the SH2-kinase linker (N32L protein) and a short fluorescein-labeled probe peptide that binds to the SH3 domain. In assay development experiments, we found that the probe peptide binds to the recombinant ABL N32L protein in vitro, producing a robust FP signal that can be competed with an excess of unlabeled peptide. The FP signal is not observed with control N32L proteins bearing either an inactivating mutation in the SH3 domain or enhanced SH3:linker interaction. A pilot screen of 1200 FDA-approved drugs identified four compounds that specifically reduced the FP signal by at least three standard deviations from the untreated controls. Secondary assays showed that one of these hit compounds, the antithrombotic drug dipyridamole, enhances ABL kinase activity in vitro to a greater extent than the previously described ABL agonist, DPH. Docking studies predicted that this compound binds to a pocket formed at the interface of the SH3 domain and the linker, suggesting that it activates ABL by disrupting this regulatory interaction. These results show that screening assays based on the non-catalytic domains of ABL can identify allosteric small molecule regulators of kinase function, providing a new approach to selective drug discovery for this important

  12. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D.; Ali, Syed F.; Paule, Merle G.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:24871937

  13. Development of a cell viability assay to assess drug metabolite structure-toxicity relationships.

    PubMed

    Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi; Jones, Lyn H

    2016-08-15

    Many adverse drug reactions are caused by the cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent activation of drugs into reactive metabolites. In order to reduce attrition due to metabolism-induced toxicity and to improve the safety of drug candidates, we developed a simple cell viability assay by combining a bioactivation system (human CYP3A4, CYP2D6 and CYP2C9) with Hep3B cells. We screened a series of drugs to explore structural motifs that may be responsible for CYP450-dependent activation caused by reactive metabolite formation, which highlighted specific liabilities regarding certain phenols and anilines. PMID:27397500

  14. Comparison of rapid screening assays using organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, S.A.; Robideau, R.R.

    1994-12-31

    In a continuation of a study presented last year using metals, the sensitivity of short term toxicity tests is examined using common organic chemicals. In toxicity testing, the focus has shifted from the traditional long-term studies utilizing the mortality of complex, multicellular eukaryotic organisms as the endpoint towards short-term studies in which transformation of biochemical pathways are monitored. The relative sensitivity of aquatic screening techniques are compared to the standardized 48-hr Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia, 96-hr fathead minnow and 96-hr algal acute assays. The short-term test procedures investigated are: dehydrogenase enzyme activity assays utilizing triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) and resazurin as the calorimetric indicators; TOXI-Chromotest, inhibition of {beta}-galactosidase; reduction in bioluminescence output utilizing the Microtox{reg_sign} test; nitrification inhibition assays with a commercial preparation of nitrifying bacteria (Nitroseed{trademark}) and municipal activated sludge; respiration inhibition assays with a commercial preparation of heterotrophic bacteria (Polytox{reg_sign}) and activated sludge; inhibition of root growth in terrestrial plants; and galactosidase inhibition through the use of a fluorometrically tagged substrate with the Daphnia magna IQ{trademark} test. Toxicity values generated by this laboratory on commonly used organic chemicals are compared.

  15. Inhibition of Microglia Activation as a Phenotypic Assay in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Complex biological processes such as inflammation, cell death, migration, proliferation, and the release of biologically active molecules can be used as outcomes in phenotypic assays during early stages of drug discovery. Although target-based approaches have been widely used over the past decades, a disproportionate number of first-in-class drugs have been identified using phenotypic screening. This review details phenotypic assays based on inhibition of microglial activation and their utility in primary and secondary screening, target validation, and pathway elucidation. The role of microglia, both in normal as well as in pathological conditions such as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, is reviewed. Methodologies to assess microglia activation in vitro are discussed in detail, and classes of therapeutic drugs known to decrease the proinflammatory and cytotoxic responses of activated microglia are appraised, including inhibitors of glutaminase, cystine/glutamate antiporter, nuclear factor κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. PMID:23945875

  16. Mini-column screening assay for tetracyclines in chicken.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Ali R

    2015-01-01

    A simple, rapid, reliable and economical mini-column (MC) method for the detection of tetracyclines (TCs) residues in chicken meat was developed. The method employs a commonly available Pasteur pipette which is tightly packed with silica gel and anhydrous sodium sulfate. Clean-up and detection of illegal levels can be achieved on the same column. Viewing the developed MC under an ultraviolet lamp revealed that TCs can be detected as a compact golden yellow fluorescent band at the junction between the anhydrous sodium sulfate and silica gel layers. Comparing the yellow band of control extracts with those fortified (100 ng ml(-1)) showed no overlap between analyte and impurities. The limit of detection (LOD) of the MC assay was 1 ng, indicating that the chicken sample containing 10 µg TCs kg(-1) sample could be easily detected. Moreover, the intensity of the yellow band increased whenever TCs levels in the extract increased. Evaluation utility of the method with blind samples as controls or samples fortified with total TCs at various levels indicated that the total blank and spiked samples at levels equal or below the permissible limits were assessed as accepted. The method can provide an alternative to microbial screening assays and could be used as an effective pre-screening technique in public health laboratories. PMID:25430068

  17. A Quantitative Microfluidic Angiogenesis Screen for Studying Anti-Angiogenic Therapeutic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Choong; Kasuya, Junichi; Jeon, Jessie; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy, which suppresses tumor growth by disrupting oxygen and nutrient supply from blood to the tumor, is now widely accepted as a treatment for cancer. To investigate the mechanisms of action of these anti-angiogenesis drugs, new three dimensional (3D) cell culture-based drug screening models are increasingly employed. However, there is no in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) angiogenesis assay that can provide uniform culture conditions for quantitative assessment of physiological responses to chemoattractant reagents under various concentrations of anti-angiogenesis drugs. Here we describe a method for screening and quantifying the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced chemotactic response on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured under different concentrations of bortezomib, a selective 26S proteasome inhibitor. With this quantitative microfluidic angiogenesis screen (QMAS), we demonstrate that bortezomib-induced endothelial cell death was preceded by a series of morphological changes that develop over several days. We also explore the mechanisms by which bortezomib can inhibit angiogenesis. PMID:25370780

  18. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays: An Unexpected Challenge for the Choice of an Assay in Primary Cervical Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ejegod, Ditte Møller; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41% tested positive on all four. Agreement was lower in women aged ≥30 years (30%, vs. 49% at <30 years), in primary screening samples (29%, vs. 38% in follow-up samples), and in women with concurrent normal cytology (22%, vs. 68% with abnormal cytology). Among primary screening samples from women aged 30–65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women. PMID:24466262

  19. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families. PMID:26880188

  20. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families. PMID:26880188

  1. A Simple Assay to Screen Antimicrobial Compounds Potentiating the Activity of Current Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to pose a significant problem in the management of bacterial infections, despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Here, we suggest a simple, inexpensive, and easy-to-perform assay to screen antimicrobial compounds from natural products or synthetic chemical libraries for their potential to work in tandem with the available antibiotics against multiple drug-resistant bacteria. The aqueous extract of Juglans regia tree bark was tested against representative multiple drug-resistant bacteria in the aforementioned assay to determine whether it potentiates the activity of selected antibiotics. The aqueous extract of J. regia bark was added to Mueller-Hinton agar, followed by a lawn of multiple drug-resistant bacteria, Salmonella typhi or enteropathogenic E. coli. Next, filter paper discs impregnated with different classes of antibiotics were placed on the agar surface. Bacteria incubated with extract or antibiotics alone were used as controls. The results showed a significant increase (>30%) in the zone of inhibition around the aztreonam, cefuroxime, and ampicillin discs compared with bacteria incubated with the antibiotics/extract alone. In conclusion, our assay is able to detect either synergistic or additive action of J. regia extract against multiple drug-resistant bacteria when tested with a range of antibiotics. PMID:23865073

  2. Toxicology screen

    MedlinePlus

    Barbiturates - screen; Benzodiazepines - screen; Amphetamines - screen; Analgesics - screen; Antidepressants - screen; Narcotics - screen; Phenothiazines - screen; Drug abuse screen; Blood alcohol test

  3. Chemical interrogation of the neuronal kinome using a primary cell-based screening assay.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Schürer, Stephan C; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2013-05-17

    A fundamental impediment to functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury is the lack of sufficient axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system. There is thus a need to develop agents that can stimulate axon growth to re-establish severed connections. Given the critical role played by protein kinases in regulating axon growth and the potential for pharmacological intervention, small molecule protein kinase inhibitors present a promising therapeutic strategy. Here, we report a robust cell-based phenotypic assay, utilizing primary rat hippocampal neurons, for identifying small molecule kinase inhibitors that promote neurite growth. The assay is highly reliable and suitable for medium-throughput screening, as indicated by its Z'-factor of 0.73. A focused structurally diverse library of protein kinase inhibitors was screened, revealing several compound groups with the ability to strongly and consistently promote neurite growth. The best performing bioassay hit robustly and consistently promoted axon growth in a postnatal cortical slice culture assay. This study can serve as a jumping-off point for structure activity relationship (SAR) and other drug discovery approaches toward the development of drugs for treating SCI and related neurological pathologies. PMID:23480631

  4. Comprehensive drug screening in blood for detecting abused drugs or drugs potentially hazardous for traffic safety.

    PubMed

    Lillsunde, P; Michelson, L; Forsstrom, T; Korte, T; Schultz, E; Ariniemi, K; Portman, M; Sihvonen, M L; Seppala, T

    1996-02-01

    A comprehensive drug screening procedure for detecting drugs in the blood samples of car drivers suspected of driving under the influence of drugs, is presented. Amphetamines, cannabinoids, opioids, cocaine and benzodiazepines were screened by an immunological EMIT ETS system after acetone precipitation. Gas chromatographic methods were used to screen and quantitate basic, neutral and acidic drugs. The free amino groups of basic drugs were derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysis was performed by a dual channel gas chromatograph combined with a nitrogen phosphorus and an electron capture detector. Phenyltrimethylammonium hydroxide was used as a methylathing agent for acidic substances before analysis with a gas chromatograph connected to a nitrogen phosphorus detector. A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry was used as a common confirmation method. Tetrahydrocannabinol was quantitated after bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide derivatization, opiates after pentafluoropropionic anhydride derivatization and benzoylecgonine after pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol derivatization. Excluding benzodiazepines, which were confirmed with a gas chromatograph connected to a nitrogen phosphorus and an electron capture detector, the other basic drugs as well as the acidic drugs were confirmed after the same derivatization procedures as in the screening methods. Alcohols were quantitated in triplicate by gas chromatography using three different kinds of columns. Although urine is the most important specimen for screening abused drugs, it has only limited use in forensic toxicology. The described system is most useful for analyzing a wide range of substances, including illicit drugs, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, antidepressants and phenothiazenes in forensic samples when urine is not available. PMID:8819994

  5. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, M.J.; Armstrong, D.; Abi Gerges, N.; Bridgland-Taylor, M.; Pollard, C.E.; Bowes, J.; Valentin, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies – radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology – was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. - Highlights: • The L-type calcium channel is a significant safety liability during drug discovery. • Radioligand-binding to the L-type calcium channel can be measured in vitro. • The assay can be run at a single test concentration as part of a screening cascade. • This measurement is highly predictive of changes in cardiac myocyte contractility.

  6. Development of a Fluorescent Quenching Based High Throughput Assay to Screen for Calcineurin Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Syeb, Kathleen; Concannon, John; Callegari, Keri; Soto, Claudio; Glicksman, Marcie A

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no effective treatment available for major neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. One of most promising therapeutic approaches under development focuses on inhibiting the misfolding and aggregation pathway. However, it is likely that by the time clinical symptoms appear, there is a large accumulation of misfolded aggregates and a very substantial damage to the brain. Thus, it seems that at the clinical stage of the disease it is necessary also to develop strategies aiming to prevent the neuronal damage produced by already formed misfolded aggregates. Chronic activation of calcineurin (CaN), a type IIB phosphatase, has been implicated as a pivotal molecule connecting synaptic loss and neuronal damage to protein misfolding. The fact that the crystal structure of CaN is also well established makes it an ideal target for drug discovery. CaN activity assays for High Throughput Screening (HTS) reported so far are based on absorbance. In this article we report the development of a fluorescent quenching based CaN activity assay suitable for robotic screening of large chemical libraries to find novel inhibitors. The assay yielded a Z score of 0.84 with coefficient of variance ≤ 15%. Our results also show that this assay can be used to identify CaN inhibitors with a wide range of potencies. PMID:26176772

  7. Development of a Fluorescent Quenching Based High Throughput Assay to Screen for Calcineurin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Syeb, Kathleen; Concannon, John; Callegari, Keri; Soto, Claudio; Glicksman, Marcie A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no effective treatment available for major neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's disease. One of most promising therapeutic approaches under development focuses on inhibiting the misfolding and aggregation pathway. However, it is likely that by the time clinical symptoms appear, there is a large accumulation of misfolded aggregates and a very substantial damage to the brain. Thus, it seems that at the clinical stage of the disease it is necessary also to develop strategies aiming to prevent the neuronal damage produced by already formed misfolded aggregates. Chronic activation of calcineurin (CaN), a type IIB phosphatase, has been implicated as a pivotal molecule connecting synaptic loss and neuronal damage to protein misfolding. The fact that the crystal structure of CaN is also well established makes it an ideal target for drug discovery. CaN activity assays for High Throughput Screening (HTS) reported so far are based on absorbance. In this article we report the development of a fluorescent quenching based CaN activity assay suitable for robotic screening of large chemical libraries to find novel inhibitors. The assay yielded a Z score of 0.84 with coefficient of variance ≤ 15%. Our results also show that this assay can be used to identify CaN inhibitors with a wide range of potencies. PMID:26176772

  8. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds' inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  9. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds’ inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  10. High-throughput screening assays for antibacterial and antifungal activities of Lactobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Inglin, Raffael C; Stevens, Marc J A; Meile, Lukas; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2015-07-01

    We describe high-throughput screening techniques to rapidly detect either antimicrobial activity, using an agar-well diffusion assay in microtiter plates, or antifungal activity using an agar-spot assay in 24-well plates. 504 Lactobacillus isolates were screened with minimal laboratory equipment and screening rates of 2000-5000 individual antimicrobial interactions. PMID:25937247

  11. Tango assay for ligand-induced GPCR-β-arrestin2 interaction: Application in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Shalini; Sona, Chandan; Kumar, Ajeet; Yadav, Prem N

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are widely known to modulate almost all physiological functions and have been demonstrated over the time as therapeutic targets for wide gamut of diseases. The design and implementation of high-throughput GPCR-based assays that permit the efficient screening of large compound libraries to discover novel drug candidates are essential for a successful drug discovery endeavor. Usually, GPCR-based functional assays depend primarily on the measurement of G protein-mediated second messenger generation. However, with advent of advanced molecular biology tools and increased understanding of GPCR signal transduction, many G protein-independent pathways such as β-arrestin translocation are being utilized to detect the activity of GPCRs. These assays provide additional information on functional selectivity (also known as biased agonism) of compounds that could be harnessed to develop pathway-selective drug candidates to reduce the adverse effects associated with given GPCR target. In this chapter, we describe the basic principle, detailed methodologies and assay setup, result analysis and data interpretations of the β-arrestin2 Tango assay, and its comparison with cell-based G protein-dependent GPCR assays, which could be employed in a simple academic setup to facilitate GPCR-based drug discovery. PMID:26928547

  12. Development and utilization of activated STAT3 detection assays for screening a library of secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Fursov, Natalie; Gates, Irina V; Panavas, Tadas; Giles-Komar, Jill; Powers, Gordon

    2011-08-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines are multifunctional proteins that play an important role in host defenses, acute phase reactions, immune responses, hematopoiesis, and tumorigenesis. The cytokines are produced by various lymphoid and nonlymphoid cells and mediate their biological activity through initial low-affinity binding to cell surface receptors, which are specific for their respective ligands. Ligand-specific receptor binding results in the receptor heterodimerization with ubiquitously expressed signal-transducing transmembrane component gp130 followed by activation of the gp130-associated Janus kinase, which, in turn, phosphorylates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) dimerizes and translocates to the nucleus, where it activates gene transcription. Activation of STAT3 is essential to IL-6 family-associated physiological effects. Therefore, the ability to assess STAT3 phosphorylation is important for drug discovery efforts targeting IL-6 family cytokines. Various reagents and technologies are available to detect the effect of IL-6 type cytokines in treated cells. The present study describes the development of two pSTAT3 detection assays: the high-throughput screening assay based on Meso-Scale Discovery technology, which utilizes electrochemoluminescent signal measurements for the detection of pSTAT3 in treated cell extracts, and the secondary characterization assay based on fluorescent imaging analysis, which monitors pSTAT3 nuclear translocation in cells after activation. We have successfully utilized these assays to screen a small library of secreted proteins and identified inducers of STAT3 phosphorylation. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that both assays are robust, reliable, and amenable to high-throughput screening applications. PMID:21294636

  13. Cross-reactivity of designer drugs, including cathinone derivatives, in commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Swortwood, Madeleine J; Hearn, W Lee; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of synthetic heroin, designer drugs have been increasing in prevalence in the United States drug market over the past few decades. Recently, 'legal highs' sold as 'bath salts' have become a household term for one such class of designer drugs. While a number of federal and state bans have been enacted, the abuse of these designer drugs still continues. Few assays have been developed for the comprehensive detection of such compounds, so it is important to investigate how they may or may not react in presumptive screens, i.e. pre-existing commercial immunoassays. In this experiment, 16 different ELISA reagents were evaluated to determine the cross-reactivity of 30 designer drugs, including 24 phenylethylamines (including 8 cathinone derivatives), 3 piperazines, and 3 tryptamines. Cross-reactivity towards most drugs was <4% in assays targeting amphetamine or methamphetamine. Compounds such as MDA, MDMA, ethylamphetamine, and α-methyltryptamine demonstrated cross-reactivities in the range of 30-250%, but data were consistent with both manufacturer's inserts and published literature. When tested against the Randox Mephedrone/Methcathinone kit, cathinone derivatives demonstrated cross-reactivity at concentrations as low as 150 ng/ml. Since this same reagent did not cross-react with other amphetamine-like compounds, it opens the possibility to screen post-mortem specimens without the interference of putrefactive amines. All other assays demonstrated essentially no cross-reactivity towards any of the analytes evaluated. Given these results, a great need exists for more broad-range screening techniques to be applied when analyzing biological specimens by immunoassays for drugs of abuse, specifically the more recent designer drugs. PMID:23677923

  14. Testing Tuberculosis Drug Efficacy in a Zebrafish High-Throughput Translational Medicine Screen

    PubMed Central

    Ordas, Anita; Raterink, Robert-Jan; Cunningham, Fraser; Jansen, Hans J.; Wiweger, Malgorzata I.; Jong-Raadsen, Susanne; Bos, Sabine; Bates, Robert H.; Barros, David; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Vreeken, Rob J.; Ballell-Pages, Lluís; Dirks, Ron P.

    2014-01-01

    The translational value of zebrafish high-throughput screens can be improved when more knowledge is available on uptake characteristics of potential drugs. We investigated reference antibiotics and 15 preclinical compounds in a translational zebrafish-rodent screening system for tuberculosis. As a major advance, we have developed a new tool for testing drug uptake in the zebrafish model. This is important, because despite the many applications of assessing drug efficacy in zebrafish research, the current methods for measuring uptake using mass spectrometry do not take into account the possible adherence of drugs to the larval surface. Our approach combines nanoliter sampling from the yolk using a microneedle, followed by mass spectrometric analysis. To date, no single physicochemical property has been identified to accurately predict compound uptake; our method offers a great possibility to monitor how any novel compound behaves within the system. We have correlated the uptake data with high-throughput drug-screening data from Mycobacterium marinum-infected zebrafish larvae. As a result, we present an improved zebrafish larva drug-screening platform which offers new insights into drug efficacy and identifies potential false negatives and drugs that are effective in zebrafish and rodents. We demonstrate that this improved zebrafish drug-screening platform can complement conventional models of in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected rodent assays. The detailed comparison of two vertebrate systems, fish and rodent, may give more predictive value for efficacy of drugs in humans. PMID:25385118

  15. Development of an in vitro drug sensitivity assay based on newly excysted larvae of Echinostoma caproni

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Echinostomiasis is one of the major food-borne trematodiases and the species Echinostoma caproni serves as a useful model for trematocidal drug discovery. The current in vitro drug sensitivity assay uses adult E. caproni worms that are incubated with candidate drugs and scored microscopically for viability at 72 hrs. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of newly excysted larvae (NEL) of E. caproni for in vitro drug testing, which would be faster, more cost effective and more ethical compared to adult worm assays. Methods Larvae were obtained by collecting metacercariae from snails and triggering their excystation using the trypsin-bile salt excystation method. Studies concerning various parameters of this chemical transformation process as well as appropriate NEL culturing conditions were carried out and findings evaluated. NEL and adult worms were incubated with praziquantel, tribendimidine, albendazole and quinine and evaluated microscopically 72 hrs post-incubation. In addition, the colorimetric markers resazurin, CellTiter-Glo® and Vybrant® were tested as an alternative assay read-out method. Results The chemical excystation method successfully induced E. caproni metacercariae to excyst at a rate of about 20-60%. NEL remained viable in culture medium for 5–7 days. The results of an in vitro drug assay using NEL mirrored the results of an assay using adult worms incubated with the same drugs. None of the markers could reliably produce signals proportional to NEL viability or cytotoxicity without significant complications. Conclusion NEL are adequate for in vitro drug testing. Challenges remain in further improving the excystation yield and the practicability of the assay setup. Resolving these issues could also improve read-outs using colorimetric markers. Using NEL is in alignment with the 3 R rules of the ethical use of laboratory animals and can greatly increase the rate and affordability with which drugs are screened in vitro

  16. Improving drug discovery with high-content phenotypic screens by systematic selection of reporter cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungseog; Hsu, Chien-Hsiang; Wu, Qi; Liu, Shanshan; Coster, Adam D; Posner, Bruce A; Altschuler, Steven J; Wu, Lani F

    2016-01-01

    High-content, image-based screens enable the identification of compounds that induce cellular responses similar to those of known drugs but through different chemical structures or targets. A central challenge in designing phenotypic screens is choosing suitable imaging biomarkers. Here we present a method for systematically identifying optimal reporter cell lines for annotating compound libraries (ORACLs), whose phenotypic profiles most accurately classify a training set of known drugs. We generate a library of fluorescently tagged reporter cell lines, and let analytical criteria determine which among them--the ORACL--best classifies compounds into multiple, diverse drug classes. We demonstrate that an ORACL can functionally annotate large compound libraries across diverse drug classes in a single-pass screen and confirm high prediction accuracy by means of orthogonal, secondary validation assays. Our approach will increase the efficiency, scale and accuracy of phenotypic screens by maximizing their discriminatory power. PMID:26655497

  17. Improving drug discovery with high-content phenotypic screens by systematic selection of reporter cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Liu, Shanshan; Coster, Adam D.; Posner, Bruce A.; Altschuler, Steven J.; Wu, Lani F.

    2015-01-01

    High-content, image-based screens enable the identification of compounds that induce cellular responses similar to those of known drugs but through different chemical structures or targets. A central challenge in designing phenotypic screens is choosing suitable imaging biomarkers. Here we present a method for systematically identifying optimal reporter cell lines for annotating compound libraries (ORACLs), whose phenotypic profiles most accurately classify a training set of known drugs. We generate a library of fluorescently tagged reporter cell lines, and let analytical criteria determine which among them—the ORACL—best classifies compounds into multiple, diverse drug classes. We demonstrate that an ORACL can functionally annotate large compound libraries across diverse drug classes in a single-pass screen and confirm high prediction accuracy via orthogonal, secondary validation assays. Our approach will increase the efficiency, scale and accuracy of phenotypic screens by maximizing their discriminatory power. PMID:26655497

  18. Adapting High-Throughput Screening Methods and Assays for Biocontainment Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E. Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.; Noah, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories. PMID:25710545

  19. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  20. Multidimensional GPCR profiling and screening using impedance-based label-free and real-time assay.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ning; Nguyen, Khanh; Irelan, Jeffery; Abassi, Yama A

    2015-01-01

    GPCRs constitute one of the most sought-after targets in drug discovery because they are associated with conditions ranging from cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, cancer, and diseases of the nervous system. Moreover, they are one of the most amenable targets for drug discovery because they can be modulated by small molecules, peptides, proteins, and antibodies. Therefore it may not come as a surprise that close to 40 % of the drugs that are currently on the market are targeting GPCRs. It has become evident that GPCR signaling is highly complex and may involve multiple or a subset of pathways depending on the interaction of a GPCR with an agonist or antagonist. It is imperative that any functional screening for GPCR activity integrates this complexity. In this assay protocol, we describe how the xCELLigence RTCA HT impedance-based platform which can be used for functional cell-based GPCR assays can be utilized for GPCR screening. PMID:25563187

  1. An LC-MS assay for the screening of cardiovascular medications in human samples.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eduardo; Hachey, Brian; McNaughton, Candace; Nian, Hui; Yu, Chang; Straka, Brittany; Brown, Nancy J; Caprioli, Richard M

    2013-10-15

    Cardiovascular drugs are the most commonly prescribed medications. Some prior assays successfully detect cardiovascular drugs among multiple classes using a single sample. Here, we develop an assay to detect a broad range of cardiovascular drug classes to include commonly used cardiovascular drugs and evaluate the assay's analytical and statistical properties in a clinical setting. We describe a protocol for drug detection that encompasses 34 commonly prescribed cardiovascular drugs or drug metabolites with a single LC-MS/MS method using 100μL of serum or plasma. Drug classes monitored by this assay include: anticoagulants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB), beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, statins, and vasodilators, as well as digoxin, fenofibrate, and niacin. Analytical accuracy and precision for each drug were evaluated by repeating the assay on spiked samples at low, medium, and high concentrations. In 294 clinical samples obtained from hospitalized patients for whom medication administration was recorded, we evaluated the assay's statistical sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. For the 34 drugs or drug metabolites, the assay was statistically sensitive (>0.90) for all drugs except captopril (0.25), isosorbide (0.81), and niacin (0.89). The assay was statistically specific for all drugs, with a minimum specificity of 0.94 (aspirin). To our knowledge, this method is the first method of simultaneous analysis of 34 cardiovascular drugs or drug metabolites from nine drug classes evaluated using clinical samples from hospitalized patients. PMID:24013190

  2. Drug-symptom networking: Linking drug-likeness screening to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue; Zhang, Chao; Li, PiDong; Zhang, FeiLong; Gao, Kuo; Chen, JianXin; Shang, HongCai

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between drugs and symptoms has broad medical consequences, yet a comprehensive description of the drug-symptom associations is currently lacking. Here, 1441 FDA-approved drugs were collected, and PCA was used to extract 122 descriptors which explained 91% of the variance. Then, a k-means++ method was employed to partition the drug dataset into 3 clusters, and 3 corresponding SVDD models (drug-likeness screening models) were constructed with an overall accuracy of up to 95.6%. Furthermore, 6878 herbal molecules from the TcmSP™ database were screened by the above 3 SVDD model to obtain 5309 candidate drug molecules with highly accept classification of 77.19%. To assess the accuracy of the SVDD models, 8559 herbal molecule-symptom co-occurrences were mined from Pubmed abstracts, involving 697 herbal molecules and 314 symptoms. Most of the 697 herbal molecules could be found in the accepted SVDD data (5309 molecules), showing the potential of the SVDD for the screening of drug candidates. Moreover, a herbal molecule-herbal molecule network and a herbal molecule-symptom were constructed. Overall, the results provided a new drug-likeness screening approach independent to abnormal training data, and the comprehensive collection of herbal molecule-symptom associations formed a new data resource for systematic characterization of the symptom-oriented medicines. PMID:26615785

  3. "Dilute-and-inject" multi-target screening assay for highly polar doping agents using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry for sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Orlovius, Anne-Katrin; Sigmund, Gerd; Thomas, Andreas; Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    In the field of LC-MS, reversed phase liquid chromatography is the predominant method of choice for the separation of prohibited substances from various classes in sports drug testing. However, highly polar and charged compounds still represent a challenging task in liquid chromatography due to their difficult chromatographic behavior using reversed phase materials. A very promising approach for the separation of hydrophilic compounds is hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Despite its great potential and versatile advantages for the separation of highly polar compounds, HILIC is up to now not very common in doping analysis, although most manufacturers offer a variety of HILIC columns in their portfolio. In this study, a novel multi-target approach based on HILIC high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry is presented to screen for various polar stimulants, stimulant sulfo-conjugates, glycerol, AICAR, ethyl glucuronide, morphine-3-glucuronide, and myo-inositol trispyrophosphate after direct injection of diluted urine specimens. The usage of an effective online sample cleanup and a zwitterionic HILIC analytical column in combination with a new generation Hybrid Quadrupol-Orbitrap® mass spectrometer enabled the detection of highly polar analytes without any time-consuming hydrolysis or further purification steps, far below the required detection limits. The methodology was fully validated for qualitative and quantitative (AICAR, glycerol) purposes considering the parameters specificity; robustness (rRT < 2.0%); linearity (R > 0.99); intra- and inter-day precision at low, medium, and high concentration levels (CV < 20%); limit of detection (stimulants and stimulant sulfo-conjugates < 10 ng/mL; norfenefrine; octopamine < 30 ng/mL; AICAR < 10 ng/mL; glycerol 100 μg/mL; ETG < 100 ng/mL); accuracy (AICAR 103.8-105.5%, glycerol 85.1-98.3% at three concentration levels) and ion suppression/enhancement effects. PMID

  4. Drug Discovery for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy via Utrophin Promoter Activation Screening

    PubMed Central

    Moorwood, Catherine; Lozynska, Olga; Suri, Neha; Napper, Andrew D.; Diamond, Scott L.; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating muscle wasting disease caused by mutations in dystrophin, a muscle cytoskeletal protein. Utrophin is a homologue of dystrophin that can functionally compensate for its absence when expressed at increased levels in the myofibre, as shown by studies in dystrophin-deficient mice. Utrophin upregulation is therefore a promising therapeutic approach for DMD. The use of a small, drug-like molecule to achieve utrophin upregulation offers obvious advantages in terms of delivery and bioavailability. Furthermore, much of the time and expense involved in the development of a new drug can be eliminated by screening molecules that are already approved for clinical use. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed and validated a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for utrophin promoter activation, and used it to screen the Prestwick Chemical Library of marketed drugs and natural compounds. Initial screening produced 20 hit molecules, 14 of which exhibited dose-dependent activation of the utrophin promoter and were confirmed as hits. Independent validation demonstrated that one of these compounds, nabumetone, is able to upregulate endogenous utrophin mRNA and protein, in C2C12 muscle cells. Conclusions/Significance We have developed a cell-based, high-throughput screening utrophin promoter assay. Using this assay, we identified and validated a utrophin promoter-activating drug, nabumetone, for which pharmacokinetics and safety in humans are already well described, and which represents a lead compound for utrophin upregulation as a therapy for DMD. PMID:22028826

  5. Development and application of an automated solution stability assay for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Kerns, Edward H; Chen, Hong; Petusky, Susan L

    2006-02-01

    Screening of solution stability provides an early alert on potential liabilities of drug candidates so that strategies can be developed to overcome the challenges. A fully automated solution stability assay has been developed to accelerate traditional manual operation. The assay uses the advanced capabilities of a high-performance liquid chromatography instrument that is present in many pharmaceutical research laboratories. The samples are prepared automatically by a temperature-controlled autosampler. The samples are delivered to the stability matrices, mixed, incubated, and injected at selected time points during the reaction time course. This automated process occurs without operator intervention, thus allowing 96 experiments to be run with 0.5 h of a scientist's time compared to 8 h for the same study when performed manually. Automation not only eliminates the manual operation but also improves accuracy and throughput. The assay protocol has been optimized to achieve homogenous mixing and eliminate carryover. The assay is robust, flexible, and high throughput. It can be used to study stability for a large number of samples under multiple incubation conditions and has a wide range of applications in drug discovery and development, such as screening compound stability in biological assay media, obtaining a stability-pH profile, surveying compound stability in physiological fluids, and performing development forced degradation and excipient compatibility. PMID:16234336

  6. Plateletworks: A screening assay for clopidogrel therapy monitoring in healthy cats

    PubMed Central

    Hamel-Jolette, Avril; Dunn, Marilyn; Bédard, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Plateletworks is a screening assay used in human medicine to monitor platelet-inhibiting drugs. As arterial thromboembolism is a common complication in cats suffering from cardiomyopathy, they are often treated with anti-platelet medication. Clopidogrel (Plavix), an anti-platelet aggregation drug, has recently been evaluated in healthy cats. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Plateletworks method can detect a decrease in platelet aggregation in cats receiving clopidogrel. Nine healthy adult cats were used for this study. Platelet aggregation was measured before and after a 3-day clopidogrel treatment (18.75 mg SID). Platelet aggregation after the clopidogrel treatment was significantly lower (P < 0.01). The Plateletworks method appears to be a promising test to monitor clopidogrel therapy in cats. PMID:19337399

  7. Evaluation of bioluminescence-based assays of anti-malarial drug activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transgenic Plasmodium falciparum expressing luciferase offers an attractive bioluminescence-based assay platform for the investigation of the pharmacological properties of anti-malarial drugs. Here a side-by-side comparison of bioluminescence and fluorescence-based assays, utilizing a luciferase reporter cassette that confers a strong temporal pattern of luciferase expression during the S-phase of intraerythrocytic development, is reported. Methods Key assay parameters for a range of commercially available luminogenic substrates are determined and compared to those measured using a Malaria Sybr Green I fluorescence assay. In addition, the short-term temporal effects of anti-malarial compounds are evaluated using both bioluminescent and fluorescent assay platforms. Results The Z’, % coefficient of variation and 50% inhibition concentrations are essentially the same for bioluminescent and fluorescent assays in transgenic parasites generated in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant genetic backgrounds. Bioluminescent assays, irrespective of the luminogenic agent employed, do, however, offer significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, the bioluminescent assay is more dynamic in terms of determining temporal effects immediately following drug perturbation. Conclusion This study suggests that opportunities for bioluminescence-based assays lie not in the measurement of 50% inhibition concentrations, where the cheaper fluorescence assay performs excellently and is not restricted by the need to genetically modify the parasite clone under investigation. Instead, assays that use the dynamic response of the luciferase reporter for semi-automated screening of additional pharmacological properties, such as relative rate-of-kill and lethal dose estimation, are a more attractive development opportunity. PMID:23394077

  8. Pressure-driven perfusion culture microchamber array for a parallel drug cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shinji; Edahiro, Jun-ichi; Kikuchi, Kyoko; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2008-08-15

    This article reports a pressure-driven perfusion culture chip developed for parallel drug cytotoxicity assay. The device is composed of an 8 x 5 array of cell culture microchambers with independent perfusion microchannels. It is equipped with a simple interface for convenient access by a micropipette and connection to an external pressure source, which enables easy operation without special training. The unique microchamber structure was carefully designed with consideration of hydrodynamic parameters and was fabricated out of a polydimethylsiloxane by using multilayer photolithography and replica molding. The microchamber structure enables uniform cell loading and perfusion culture without cross-contamination between neighboring microchambers. A parallel cytotoxicity assay was successfully carried out in the 8 x 5 microchamber array to analyze the cytotoxic effects of seven anticancer drugs. The pressure-driven perfusion culture chip, with its simple interface and well-designed microfluidic network, will likely become an advantageous platform for future high-throughput drug screening by microchip. PMID:18553395

  9. Phenotypic Screens in Antimalarial Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hovlid, Marisa L; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic high-throughput screens are a valuable tool for identifying new chemical compounds with antimalarial activity. Traditionally, these screens have focused solely on the symptomatic asexual blood stage of the parasite life cycle; however, to discover new medicines for malaria treatment and prevention, robust screening technologies against other parasite life-cycle stages are required. This review highlights recent advances and progress toward phenotypic screening methodologies over the past several years, with a focus on exoerythrocytic stage screens. PMID:27247245

  10. Development and Optimization of a Novel 384-Well Anti-Malarial Imaging Assay Validated for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5–0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12. PMID:22232455

  11. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  12. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  13. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N; Tuszynski, Jack A; Klassen, John S

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26944280

  14. The validation of an invitro colonic motility assay as a biomarker for gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Christopher; Martinez, Vicente; Ewart, Lorna; Gibbons, Stephen; Grundy, Luke; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Grundy, David

    2010-06-15

    Motility-related gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (GADRs), such as constipation and diarrhea, are some of the most frequently reported adverse events associated with the clinical development of new chemical entities, and for marketed drugs. However, biomarkers capable of detecting such GADRs are lacking. Here, we describe an in vitro assay developed to detect and quantify changes in intestinal motility as a surrogate biomarker for constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. In vitro recordings of intraluminal pressure were used to monitor the presence of colonic peristaltic motor complexes (CPMCs) in mouse colonic segments. CPMC frequency, contractile and total mechanical activity were assessed. To validate the assay, two experimental protocols were conducted. Initially, five drugs with known gastrointestinal effects were tested to determine optimal parameters describing excitation and inhibition as markers for disturbances in colonic motility. This was followed by a 'blinded' evaluation of nine drugs associated with or without clinically identified constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. Concentration-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the effects were compared with their maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration in humans. The assay detected stimulatory and inhibitory responses, likely correlating to the occurrence of diarrhea or constipation. Concentration-related effects were identified and potential mechanisms of action were inferred for several drugs. Based on the results from the fourteen drugs assessed, the sensitivity of the assay was calculated at 90%, with a specificity of 75% and predictive capacity of 86%. These results support the potential use of this assay in screening for motility-related GADRs during early discovery phase, safety pharmacology assessment.

  15. TranScreen-N: Method for rapid screening of trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers.

    PubMed

    Murthy, S Narasimha; Vaka, Siva Ram Kiran; Sammeta, Srinivasa Murthy; Nair, Anroop B

    2009-11-01

    Topical monotherapy of nail diseases such as onychomycosis and nail psoriasis has been less successful due to poor permeability of the human nail plate to topically administered drugs. Chemical enhancers are utilized to improve the drug delivery across the nail plate. Choosing the most effective chemical enhancers for the given drug and formulation is highly critical in determining the efficacy of topical therapy of nail diseases. Screening the large pool of enhancers using currently followed diffusion cell experiments would be tedious and expensive. The main objective of this study is to develop TranScreen-N, a high throughput method of screening trans-ungual drug permeation enhancers. It is a rapid microwell plate based method which involves two different treatment procedures; the simultaneous exposure treatment and the sequential exposure treatment. In the present study, several chemicals were evaluated by TranScreen-N and by diffusion studies in the Franz diffusion cell (FDC). Good agreement of in vitro drug delivery data with TranScreen-N data provided validity to the screening technique. In TranScreen-N technique, the enhancers can be grouped according to whether they need to be applied before or simultaneously with drugs (or by either procedures) to enhance the drug delivery across the nail plate. TranScreen-N technique can significantly reduce the cost and duration required to screen trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers. PMID:19363796

  16. Differentiation of drug and non-drug Cannabis using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay.

    PubMed

    Rotherham, D; Harbison, S A

    2011-04-15

    Cannabis sativa is both an illegal drug and a legitimate crop. The differentiation of illegal drug Cannabis from non-drug forms of Cannabis is relevant in the context of the growth of fibre and seed oil varieties of Cannabis for commercial purposes. This differentiation is currently determined based on the levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adult plants. DNA based methods have the potential to assay Cannabis material unsuitable for analysis using conventional means including seeds, pollen and severely degraded material. The purpose of this research was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for the differentiation of "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis plants. An assay was developed based on four polymorphisms within a 399 bp fragment of the tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase gene, utilising the snapshot multiplex kit. This SNP assay was tested on 94 Cannabis plants, which included 10 blind samples, and was able to differentiate between "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis in all cases, while also differentiating between Cannabis and other species. Non-drug plants were found to be homozygous at the four sites assayed while drug Cannabis plants were either homozygous or heterozygous. PMID:21036496

  17. Assays for the Identification and Prioritization of Drug Candidates for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Jonathan J.; Kobayashi, Dione T.; Lynes, Maureen M.; Naryshkin, Nikolai N.; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Zaworski, Phillip G.; Rubin, Lee L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in degeneration of α-motor neurons of the anterior horn and proximal muscle weakness. It is the leading cause of genetic mortality in children younger than 2 years. It affects ∼1 in 11,000 live births. In 95% of cases, SMA is caused by homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene. In addition, all patients possess at least one copy of an almost identical gene called SMN2. A single point mutation in exon 7 of the SMN2 gene results in the production of low levels of full-length survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein at amounts insufficient to compensate for the loss of the SMN1 gene. Although no drug treatments are available for SMA, a number of drug discovery and development programs are ongoing, with several currently in clinical trials. This review describes the assays used to identify candidate drugs for SMA that modulate SMN2 gene expression by various means. Specifically, it discusses the use of high-throughput screening to identify candidate molecules from primary screens, as well as the technical aspects of a number of widely used secondary assays to assess SMN messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression, localization, and function. Finally, it describes the process of iterative drug optimization utilized during preclinical SMA drug development to identify clinical candidates for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:25147906

  18. BioAssay Ontology (BAO): a semantic description of bioassays and high-throughput screening results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-throughput screening (HTS) is one of the main strategies to identify novel entry points for the development of small molecule chemical probes and drugs and is now commonly accessible to public sector research. Large amounts of data generated in HTS campaigns are submitted to public repositories such as PubChem, which is growing at an exponential rate. The diversity and quantity of available HTS assays and screening results pose enormous challenges to organizing, standardizing, integrating, and analyzing the datasets and thus to maximize the scientific and ultimately the public health impact of the huge investments made to implement public sector HTS capabilities. Novel approaches to organize, standardize and access HTS data are required to address these challenges. Results We developed the first ontology to describe HTS experiments and screening results using expressive description logic. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO) serves as a foundation for the standardization of HTS assays and data and as a semantic knowledge model. In this paper we show important examples of formalizing HTS domain knowledge and we point out the advantages of this approach. The ontology is available online at the NCBO bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/44531. Conclusions After a large manual curation effort, we loaded BAO-mapped data triples into a RDF database store and used a reasoner in several case studies to demonstrate the benefits of formalized domain knowledge representation in BAO. The examples illustrate semantic querying capabilities where BAO enables the retrieval of inferred search results that are relevant to a given query, but are not explicitly defined. BAO thus opens new functionality for annotating, querying, and analyzing HTS datasets and the potential for discovering new knowledge by means of inference. PMID:21702939

  19. Phenotypic Screening Approaches to Develop Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Drug Discovery Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marugán, Carlos; Torres, Raquel; Lallena, María José

    2015-01-01

    Targeting mitotic regulators as a strategy to fight cancer implies the development of drugs against key proteins, such as Aurora-A and -B. Current drugs, which target mitosis through a general mechanism of action (stabilization/destabilization of microtubules), have several side effects (neutropenia, alopecia, and emesis). Pharmaceutical companies aim at avoiding these unwanted effects by generating improved and selective drugs that increase the quality of life of the patients. However, the development of these drugs is an ambitious task that involves testing thousands of compounds through biochemical and cell-based assays. In addition, molecules usually target complex biological processes, involving several proteins and different molecular pathways, further emphasizing the need for high-throughput screening techniques and multiplexing technologies in order to identify drugs with the desired phenotype. We will briefly describe two multiplexing technologies [high-content imaging (HCI) and flow cytometry] and two key processes for drug discovery research (assay development and validation) following our own published industry quality standards. We will further focus on HCI as a useful tool for phenotypic screening and will provide a concrete example of HCI assay to detect Aurora-A or -B selective inhibitors discriminating the off-target effects related to the inhibition of other cell cycle or non-cell cycle key regulators. Finally, we will describe other assays that can help to characterize the in vitro pharmacology of the inhibitors. PMID:26779442

  20. Phenotypic Screening Approaches to Develop Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marugán, Carlos; Torres, Raquel; Lallena, María José

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mitotic regulators as a strategy to fight cancer implies the development of drugs against key proteins, such as Aurora-A and -B. Current drugs, which target mitosis through a general mechanism of action (stabilization/destabilization of microtubules), have several side effects (neutropenia, alopecia, and emesis). Pharmaceutical companies aim at avoiding these unwanted effects by generating improved and selective drugs that increase the quality of life of the patients. However, the development of these drugs is an ambitious task that involves testing thousands of compounds through biochemical and cell-based assays. In addition, molecules usually target complex biological processes, involving several proteins and different molecular pathways, further emphasizing the need for high-throughput screening techniques and multiplexing technologies in order to identify drugs with the desired phenotype. We will briefly describe two multiplexing technologies [high-content imaging (HCI) and flow cytometry] and two key processes for drug discovery research (assay development and validation) following our own published industry quality standards. We will further focus on HCI as a useful tool for phenotypic screening and will provide a concrete example of HCI assay to detect Aurora-A or -B selective inhibitors discriminating the off-target effects related to the inhibition of other cell cycle or non-cell cycle key regulators. Finally, we will describe other assays that can help to characterize the in vitro pharmacology of the inhibitors. PMID:26779442

  1. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  2. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  3. The changing face of screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Matthew A

    2012-04-01

    Screening Asia 2011, Singapore, 22–23 November 2011. The meeting covered traditional topics such as high-content screening and assay development, as well as more contemporary, emergent areas involving novel screening platforms and technologies, strategies to deal with biosimilars and biologics, and natural product diversity. Notably, many talks challenged established screening practices and the use of 'combichem' small-molecule libraries. Instead, speakers offered an alternate view of compound library design and screening strategies that could better mimic the target and cell status found in the relevant disease state. PMID:22462783

  4. Automated fluorescent analysis for drug-induced cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Funa, K; Dawson, N; Jewett, P B; Agren, H; Ruckdeschel, J C; Bunn, P A; Gazdar, A F

    1986-10-01

    The human tumor clonogenic assay has been reported to predict for sensitivity of human tumors to a variety of drugs. However, this assay requires large numbers of viable cells, is time-consuming, and takes at least 2 weeks before results are available. To circumvent these problems, Weisenthal developed a microscope-based dye exclusion assay. Because this method is also time-consuming and subject to observer error, we have developed an automated method of quantitating drug cytotoxicity using a flow cytometric cell sorter (FCM). After incubation of drug-exposed tumor cells, acetaldehyde-fixed duck red blood cells (DRBC) are added. Dead tumor cells and the fixed DRBC are stained by the fluorescent dye propidium iodide, which penetrates dead cell membranes. A two-parameter analysis (cell size as measured by narrow angle light scatter vs propidium iodide fluorescence) enables determination of the live tumor cell:DRBC ratio. There was a strong correlation between the FCM method and manual counting (r = 0.958 for cell lines, r = 0.831 for fresh leukemic cells, P less than 0.0001 in both cases). We conclude that the automatized FCM method gives compatible results to the manual dye exclusion assay and increases efficiency. PMID:3019545

  5. Open innovation for phenotypic drug discovery: The PD2 assay panel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonathan A; Chu, Shaoyou; Willard, Francis S; Cox, Karen L; Sells Galvin, Rachelle J; Peery, Robert B; Oliver, Sarah E; Oler, Jennifer; Meredith, Tamika D; Heidler, Steven A; Gough, Wendy H; Husain, Saba; Palkowitz, Alan D; Moxham, Christopher M

    2011-07-01

    Phenotypic lead generation strategies seek to identify compounds that modulate complex, physiologically relevant systems, an approach that is complementary to traditional, target-directed strategies. Unlike gene-specific assays, phenotypic assays interrogate multiple molecular targets and signaling pathways in a target "agnostic" fashion, which may reveal novel functions for well-studied proteins and discover new pathways of therapeutic value. Significantly, existing compound libraries may not have sufficient chemical diversity to fully leverage a phenotypic strategy. To address this issue, Eli Lilly and Company launched the Phenotypic Drug Discovery Initiative (PD(2)), a model of open innovation whereby external research groups can submit compounds for testing in a panel of Lilly phenotypic assays. This communication describes the statistical validation, operations, and initial screening results from the first PD(2) assay panel. Analysis of PD(2) submissions indicates that chemical diversity from open source collaborations complements internal sources. Screening results for the first 4691 compounds submitted to PD(2) have confirmed hit rates from 1.6% to 10%, with the majority of active compounds exhibiting acceptable potency and selectivity. Phenotypic lead generation strategies, in conjunction with novel chemical diversity obtained via open-source initiatives such as PD(2), may provide a means to identify compounds that modulate biology by novel mechanisms and expand the innovation potential of drug discovery. PMID:21521801

  6. Evaluation of high-throughput assays for in vitro drug susceptibility testing of Tritrichomonas foetus trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Bader, Chris; Jesudoss Chelladurai, Jeba; Thompson, Kylie; Hall, Cindy; Carlson, Steve A; Brewer, Matthew T

    2016-06-15

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a sexually transmitted protozoan parasite that causes abortions in cattle and results in severe economic losses. In the United States, there are no safe and effective treatments for this parasite and infected animals are typically culled. In order to expedite drug discovery efforts, we investigated in vitro trophozoite killing assays amenable to high-throughput screening in 96 well plate formats. We evaluated the reduction of resorufin, incorporation of propidium iodide, and a luminescence-based ATP detection assay. Of these methods, reduction of resorufin was found to be the most reliable predictor of trophozoite concentrations. We further validated this method by conducting dose-response experiments suitable for calculation of EC50 values for two established compounds with known activity against trophozoites in vitro, namely, metronidazole and ronidazole. Our results demonstrate that the resorufin method is suitable for high-throughput screening and could be used to enhance efforts targeting new treatments for bovine trichomoniasis. PMID:27198774

  7. Screening system for drug-induced arrhythmogenic risk combining a patch clamp and heart simulator

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Jun-ichi; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Kurokawa, Junko; Washio, Takumi; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Sawada, Kohei; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    To save time and cost for drug discovery, a paradigm shift in cardiotoxicity testing is required. We introduce a novel screening system for drug-induced arrhythmogenic risk that combines in vitro pharmacological assays and a multiscale heart simulator. For 12 drugs reported to have varying cardiotoxicity risks, dose-inhibition curves were determined for six ion channels using automated patch clamp systems. By manipulating the channel models implemented in a heart simulator consisting of more than 20 million myocyte models, we simulated a standard electrocardiogram (ECG) under various doses of drugs. When the drug concentrations were increased from therapeutic levels, each drug induced a concentration-dependent characteristic type of ventricular arrhythmia, whereas no arrhythmias were observed at any dose with drugs known to be safe. We have shown that our system combining in vitro and in silico technologies can predict drug-induced arrhythmogenic risk reliably and efficiently. PMID:26601174

  8. Screening strategies to identify new chemical diversity for drug development to treat kinetoplastid infections.

    PubMed

    Don, Rob; Ioset, Jean-Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has defined and implemented an early discovery strategy over the last few years, in fitting with its virtual R&D business model. This strategy relies on a medium- to high-throughput phenotypic assay platform to expedite the screening of compound libraries accessed through its collaborations with partners from the pharmaceutical industry. We review the pragmatic approaches used to select compound libraries for screening against kinetoplastids, taking into account screening capacity. The advantages, limitations and current achievements in identifying new quality series for further development into preclinical candidates are critically discussed, together with attractive new approaches currently under investigation. PMID:23985066

  9. USER S GUIDE FOR THE RANDOM DRUG SCREENING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    McNeany, Karen I

    2013-12-01

    The Random Drug Screening System (RDSS) is a desktop computing application designed to assign nongameable drug testing dates to each member in a population of employees, within a specific time line. The program includes reporting capabilities, test form generation, unique test ID number assignment, and the ability to flag high-risk employees for a higher frequency of drug testing than the general population.

  10. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  11. Ca2+ mobilization assays in GPCR drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Woszczek, Grzegorz; Fuerst, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium mobilization can be measured using several methods varying in indicator dyes and devices used. In this chapter, we describe the fluorescence-based method (FLIPR Calcium 4 Assay) developed by Molecular Devices for a FlexStation and routinely used in our laboratory for detecting intracellular calcium changes. The assay is designed to study calcium mobilization induced by majority of GPCRs and calcium channels and allows for simultaneous concentration-dependent analysis of several receptor agonists and antagonists, useful in receptor characterization and drug discovery projects. PMID:25563178

  12. A Different Approach to Validating Screening Assays for Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: There continues to be many efforts around the world to develop assays that are shorter than the traditional embryofetal developmental toxicity assay, or use fewer or no mammals, or use less compound, or have all three attributes. Each assay developer needs to test th...

  13. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Kidney Toxic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Susanne; Adler, Melanie; Vaidya, Vishal S

    2016-01-01

    Kidney toxicity due to drugs and chemicals poses a significant health burden for patients and a financial risk for pharmaceutical companies. However, currently no sensitive and high-throughput in vitro method exists for predictive nephrotoxicity assessment. Primary human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HPTECs) possess characteristics of differentiated epithelial cells, making them a desirable model to use in in vitro screening systems. Additionally, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein expression is upregulated as a protective mechanism during kidney toxicant-induced oxidative stress or inflammation in HPTECs and can therefore be used as a biomarker for nephrotoxicity. In this article, we describe two different methods to screen for HO-1 increase: A homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) assay and an immunofluorescence assay. The latter provides lower throughput but higher sensitivity due to the combination of two readouts, HO-1 intensity and cell number. The methods described in the protocol are amendable for other cell types as well. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479365

  14. Hematin Polymerization Assay as a High-Throughput Screen for Identification of New Antimalarial Pharmacophores

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Yae; Dorn, Arnulf; Kitsuji-Shirane, Michiko; Shimada, Hisao; Satoh, Tomoko; Matile, Hugues; Hofheinz, Werner; Masciadri, Raffaello; Kansy, Manfred; Ridley, Robert G.

    2000-01-01

    Hematin polymerization is a parasite-specific process that enables the detoxification of heme following its release in the lysosomal digestive vacuole during hemoglobin degradation, and represents both an essential and a unique pharmacological drug target. We have developed a high-throughput in vitro microassay of hematin polymerization based on the detection of 14C-labeled hematin incorporated into polymeric hemozoin (malaria pigment). The assay uses 96-well filtration microplates and requires 12 h and a Wallac 1450 MicroBeta liquid scintillation counter. The robustness of the assay allowed the rapid screening and evaluation of more than 100,000 compounds. Random screening was complemented by the development of a pharmacophore hypothesis using the “Catalyst” program and a large amount of data available on the inhibitory activity of a large library of 4-aminoquinolines. Using these methods, we identified “hit” compounds belonging to several chemical structural classes that had potential antimalarial activity. Follow-up evaluation of the antimalarial activity of these compounds in culture and in the Plasmodium berghei murine model further identified compounds with actual antimalarial activity. Of particular interest was a triarylcarbinol (Ro 06-9075) and a related benzophenone (Ro 22-8014) that showed oral activity in the murine model. These compounds are chemically accessible and could form the basis of a new antimalarial medicinal chemistry program. PMID:10991837

  15. Hematin polymerization assay as a high-throughput screen for identification of new antimalarial pharmacophores.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y; Dorn, A; Kitsuji-Shirane, M; Shimada, H; Satoh, T; Matile, H; Hofheinz, W; Masciadri, R; Kansy, M; Ridley, R G

    2000-10-01

    Hematin polymerization is a parasite-specific process that enables the detoxification of heme following its release in the lysosomal digestive vacuole during hemoglobin degradation, and represents both an essential and a unique pharmacological drug target. We have developed a high-throughput in vitro microassay of hematin polymerization based on the detection of (14)C-labeled hematin incorporated into polymeric hemozoin (malaria pigment). The assay uses 96-well filtration microplates and requires 12 h and a Wallac 1450 MicroBeta liquid scintillation counter. The robustness of the assay allowed the rapid screening and evaluation of more than 100, 000 compounds. Random screening was complemented by the development of a pharmacophore hypothesis using the "Catalyst" program and a large amount of data available on the inhibitory activity of a large library of 4-aminoquinolines. Using these methods, we identified "hit" compounds belonging to several chemical structural classes that had potential antimalarial activity. Follow-up evaluation of the antimalarial activity of these compounds in culture and in the Plasmodium berghei murine model further identified compounds with actual antimalarial activity. Of particular interest was a triarylcarbinol (Ro 06-9075) and a related benzophenone (Ro 22-8014) that showed oral activity in the murine model. These compounds are chemically accessible and could form the basis of a new antimalarial medicinal chemistry program. PMID:10991837

  16. High-throughput screening of FDA-approved drugs using oxygen biosensor plates reveals secondary mitofunctional effects

    PubMed Central

    Sahdeo, Sunil; Tomilov, Alexey; Komachi, Kelly; Iwahashi, Christine; Datta, Sandipan; Hughes, Owen; Hagerman, Paul; Cortopassi, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing of FDA-approved drugs with effects on mitochondrial function might shorten the critical path to mitochondrial disease drug development. We improved a biosensor-based assay of mitochondrial O2 consumption, and identified mitofunctional defects in cell models of LHON and FXTAS. Using this platform, we screened a 1600-compound library of clinically used drugs. The assay identified drugs known to affect mitochondrial function, such as metformin and decoquinate. We also identified several drugs not previously known to affect mitochondrial respiration including acarbose, metaraminol, gallamine triethiodide, and acamprosate. These previously unknown ‘mitoactives’ represent novel links to targets for mitochondrial regulation and potentially therapy, for mitochondrial disease. PMID:25034306

  17. Establishment of a cell model for screening antibody drugs against rheumatoid arthritis with ADCC and CDC.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Hu, Rui; Tu, Song; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng; Ren, Yi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    TNFα played a dominant role in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinical trials proved the efficacies of anti-TNFα agents for curing RA. However, most researchers were concentrating on their abilities of neutralizing TNFα, the potencies of different anti-TNFα agents varied a lot due to the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). For better understanding and differentiating the potentiality of various candidate anti-TNF reagents at the stage of new drug research and development, present study established a cell model expressing the transmembrane TNFα for usage in in vitro ADCC or CDC assay, meanwhile, the assay protocol described here could provide guidelines for screening macromolecular antibody drugs. A stable cell subline bearing transmembrane TNFα was first established by conventional transfection method, the expression of transmembrane TNFα was approved by flow cytometer, and the performance of the stable subline in ADCC and CDC assay was evaluated, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as effector cells, and Adalimumab as the anti-TNFα reagent. The stable cell subline demonstrated high level of surface expression of transmembrane TNFα, and Adalimumab exerted both ADCC and CDC effects on this cell model. In conclusion, the stable cell line we established in present research could be used in ADCC or CDC assay for screening antibody drugs, which would provide in-depth understanding of the potencies of candidate antibody drugs in addition to the traditional TNFα neutralizing assay. PMID:26884918

  18. Drug screening and confirmation by GC-MS: comparison of EMIT II and Online KIMS against 10 drugs between US and England laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lu, Natalie T; Taylor, Bruce G

    2006-03-10

    Drug screening through urinalysis is a widely accepted tool for rapid detection of potential drug use at a relatively low cost. It is, therefore, a potentially useful method for detecting and monitoring drug use in a variety of contexts such as the criminal justice system, pre-employment screening and a variety of treatment centers. This article explores the efficacy of two commercially available drug-screening assays: Online KIMS assay (Roche) and EMIT II assays. First, we evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of two immunoassays. A total of 738 urine samples were collected among adult arrestee populations from Chicago, New Orleans and Seattle through the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program. Partial samples were split within one laboratory and analyzed by both enzymes multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) II and kinetic interaction of microparticle in solution (KIMS) assays for a 10-drug panel (amphetamine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, marijuana, cocaine, methadone, methaqualone, opiate, phencyclidine and propoxyphene). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used as a confirmation method for all positives from either EMIT II or KIMS for all experiments. Second, the paper examines whether using different testing laboratories plays a role in the final results. The same experiments were repeated at two different testing locations: one in California and one in London and England. Third, the paper studies whether drug testing results vary between two laboratories when each of them had used their own routine screening method: the Forensic Science Service (FSS) at Birmingham, United Kingdom with KIMS assay and Medscreen Limited at London, United Kingdom with EMIT II. In summary, both EMIT II and KIMS assays generate fairly consistent results. The concordance rate against each of the 10 drugs tested is relatively high (97.4-100%). The discrepancies, in most cases, occurred at drug concentrations near the cut-off levels. There were more

  19. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay for High-throughput and Mechanistic Genotoxicity Assessment and Screening of Environmental Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiaqi; Gou, Na; Rahman, Sheikh Mokhles; Gao, Ce; He, Miao; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    The ecological and health concern of mutagenicity and carcinogenicity potentially associated with an overwhelmingly large and ever-increasing number of chemicals demands for cost-effective and feasible method for genotoxicity screening and risk assessment. This study proposed a genotoxicity assay using GFP-tagged yeast reporter strains, covering 38 selected protein biomarkers indicative of all the seven known DNA damage repair pathways. The assay was applied to assess four model genotoxic chemicals, eight environmental pollutants and four negative controls across six concentrations. Quantitative molecular genotoxicity end points were derived based on dose response modeling of a newly developed integrated molecular effect quantifier, Protein Effect Level Index (PELI). The molecular genotoxicity end points were consistent with multiple conventional in vitro genotoxicity assays, as well as with in vivo carcinogenicity assay results. Further more, the proposed genotoxicity end point PELI values quantitatively correlated with both comet assay in human cell and carcinogenicity potency assay in mice, providing promising evidence for linking the molecular disturbance measurements to adverse outcomes at a biological relevant level. In addition, the high-resolution DNA damaging repair pathway alternated protein expression profiles allowed for chemical clustering and classification. This toxicogenomics-based assay presents a promising alternative for fast, efficient and mechanistic genotoxicity screening and assessment of drugs, foods, and environmental contaminants. PMID:26855253

  20. Defining balanced conditions for inhibitor screening assays that target bisubstrate enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingsong; Copeland, Robert A; Lai, Zhihong

    2009-02-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is a common mechanism for identifying lead compounds for drug discovery efforts. Small molecules can inhibit enzymes by a variety of mechanisms, such as competitive, noncompetitive, and uncompetitive with respect to the substrate(s) of the catalytic reaction. To optimize the chances of finding the broadest diversity of inhibitor modalities during screening, one must run assays under ;;balanced'' conditions where the potency of inhibitors with various modes of action falls within a similar range. When an enzyme reaction involves more than one substrate, the definition and assessment of the apparent potency of inhibitors (IC(50)), in relation to their true potency (K(i)), can be nontrivial. This article provides a theoretical analysis, on the basis of the Cheng-Prusoff derivation, of the IC(50)/K( i) relationship of bisubstrate enzyme reactions following various sequential kinetic mechanisms, as well as the application and limitations of this information for defining optimal screening conditions for such enzymes. PMID:19196704

  1. A Cell-based PDE4 Assay in 1536-well Plate format for High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A.; Li, Xiao; Southall, Noel; Lu, Jianming; Inglese, James; Brasch, Michael; Austin, Christopher P.; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are intracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), to their corresponding 5'-nucleotide monophosphates. These enzymes play an important role in controlling cellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides and thus regulate a variety of cellular signaling events. PDEs are emerging as drug targets for several diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. Though biochemical assays with purified recombinant PDE enzymes and cAMP or cGMP substrate are commonly used for compound screening, cell-based assays would provide a better assessment of compound activity in a more physiological context. Here we report the development and validation of a new cell-based PDE4 assay using a constitutively active GPCR as a driving force for cAMP production and a cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) cation channel as a biosensor in 1536-well plates. PMID:18591513

  2. A high-content screening assay in transgenic zebrafish identifies two novel activators of fgf signaling.

    PubMed

    Saydmohammed, Manush; Vollmer, Laura L; Onuoha, Ezenwa Obi; Vogt, Andreas; Tsang, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Zebrafish have become an invaluable vertebrate animal model to interrogate small molecule libraries for modulators of complex biological pathways and phenotypes. We have recently described the implementation of a quantitative, high-content imaging assay in multi-well plates to analyze the effects of small molecules on Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) signaling in vivo. Here we have evaluated the capability of the assay to identify compounds that hyperactivate FGF signaling from a test cassette of agents with known biological activities. Using a transgenic zebrafish reporter line for FGF activity, we screened 1040 compounds from an annotated library of known bioactive agents, including FDA-approved drugs. The assay identified two molecules, 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate and pyrithione zinc, that enhanced FGF signaling in specific areas of the brain. Subsequent studies revealed that both compounds specifically expanded FGF target gene expression. Furthermore, treatment of early stage embryos with either compound resulted in dorsalized phenotypes characteristic of hyperactivation of FGF signaling in early development. Documented activities for both agents included activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), consistent with FGF hyperactivation. To conclude, we demonstrate the power of automated quantitative high-content imaging to identify small molecule modulators of FGF. PMID:21932436

  3. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of an enzymatic assay suitable for small molecule screening and profiling: A case-study

    PubMed Central

    Sancenon, Vicente; Goh, Wei Hau; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Er, Kai Shih; Johal, Nidhi; Mukhina, Svetlana; Carr, Grant; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar

    2015-01-01

    The successful discovery and subsequent development of small molecule inhibitors of drug targets relies on the establishment of robust, cost-effective, quantitative, and physiologically relevant in vitro assays that can support prolonged screening and optimization campaigns. The current study illustrates the process of developing and validating an enzymatic assay for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors using alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestine as model target. The assay development workflow includes an initial phase of optimization of assay materials, reagents, and conditions, continues with a process of miniaturization and automation, and concludes with validation by quantitative measurement of assay performance and signal variability. The assay is further evaluated for dose–response and mechanism-of-action studies required to support structure–activity-relationship studies. Emphasis is placed on the most critical aspects of assay optimization and other relevant considerations, including the technology, assay materials, buffer constituents, reaction conditions, liquid handling equipment, analytical instrumentation, and quantitative assessments. Examples of bottlenecks encountered during assay development and strategies to address them are provided. PMID:27077032

  4. Robust ridge regression estimators for nonlinear models with applications to high throughput screening assay data.

    PubMed

    Lim, Changwon

    2015-03-30

    Nonlinear regression is often used to evaluate the toxicity of a chemical or a drug by fitting data from a dose-response study. Toxicologists and pharmacologists may draw a conclusion about whether a chemical is toxic by testing the significance of the estimated parameters. However, sometimes the null hypothesis cannot be rejected even though the fit is quite good. One possible reason for such cases is that the estimated standard errors of the parameter estimates are extremely large. In this paper, we propose robust ridge regression estimation procedures for nonlinear models to solve this problem. The asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are investigated; in particular, their mean squared errors are derived. The performances of the proposed estimators are compared with several standard estimators using simulation studies. The proposed methodology is also illustrated using high throughput screening assay data obtained from the National Toxicology Program. PMID:25490981

  5. Microfluidic cell chips for high-throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Ahmed, Ah Rezwanuddin; Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Wang, Sihong

    2016-05-01

    The current state of screening methods for drug discovery is still riddled with several inefficiencies. Although some widely used high-throughput screening platforms may enhance the drug screening process, their cost and oversimplification of cell-drug interactions pose a translational difficulty. Microfluidic cell-chips resolve many issues found in conventional HTS technology, providing benefits such as reduced sample quantity and integration of 3D cell culture physically more representative of the physiological/pathological microenvironment. In this review, we introduce the advantages of microfluidic devices in drug screening, and outline the critical factors which influence device design, highlighting recent innovations and advances in the field including a summary of commercialization efforts on microfluidic cell chips. Future perspectives of microfluidic cell devices are also provided based on considerations of present technological limitations and translational barriers. PMID:27071838

  6. Identifying GSK-3β kinase inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease: Virtual screening, enzyme, and cell assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hsin; Hsieh, Yu-Shao; Wu, Yih-Ru; Hsu, Chia-Jen; Chen, Hsuan-Chiang; Huang, Wun-Han; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei; Su, Ming-Tsan; Sun, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen

    2016-06-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) is widely known as a critical target protein for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized virtual screening to search databases for compounds with the potential to be used in drugs targeting GSK-3β kinase, and kinase as well as cell assays to investigate top-scored, selected compounds. Virtual screening of >1.1 million compounds in the ZINC and in-house databases was conducted using an optimized computational protocol in the docking program GOLD. Of the top-ranked compounds, 16 underwent a luminescent kinase assay and a cell assay using HEK293 cells expressing DsRed-tagged ΔK280 in the repeat domain of tau (tauRD). The compounds VB-003 (a potent GSK-3β inhibitor) and VB-008 (AM404, an anandamide transport inhibitor), with determined IC50 values of 0.25 and 5.4μM, respectively, were identified as reducing tau aggregation. Both compounds increased expression of phospho-GSK-3β (Ser9) and reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation at the sites of Ser202, Thr231, and Ser396. In the ∆K280 tauRD-DsRed SH-SY5Y cells, VB-008, but not VB-003, enhanced HSPB1 and GRP78 expression, increased ∆K280 tauRD-DsRed solubility, and promoted neurite outgrowth. Thus VB-008 performed best to the end of the present study. The identified compound VB-008 may guide the identification and synthesis of potential inhibitors analogous to this compound. PMID:27094783

  7. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  8. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  9. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  10. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  11. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  12. The QDREC web server: determining dose–response characteristics of complex macroparasites in phenotypic drug screens

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Daniel; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Suzuki, Brian M.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Singh, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) caused by helminths constitute some of the most common infections of the world’s poorest people. The etiological agents are complex and recalcitrant to standard techniques of molecular biology. Drug screening against helminths has often been phenotypic and typically involves manual description of drug effect and efficacy. A key challenge is to develop automated, quantitative approaches to drug screening against helminth diseases. The quantal dose–response calculator (QDREC) constitutes a significant step in this direction. It can be used to automatically determine quantitative dose–response characteristics and half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values using image-based readouts from phenotypic screens, thereby allowing rigorous comparisons of the efficacies of drug compounds. QDREC has been developed and validated in the context of drug screening for schistosomiasis, one of the most important NTDs. However, it is equally applicable to general phenotypic screening involving helminths and other complex parasites. Availability and implementation: QDREC is publically available at: http://haddock4.sfsu.edu/qdrec2/. Source code and datasets are at: http://tintin.sfsu.edu/projects/phenotypicAssays.html. Contact: rahul@sfsu.edu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25540182

  13. Comparison of three quantification methods for the TZM-bl pseudovirus assay for screening of anti-HIV-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Xing, Liying; Wang, Shunyi; Hu, Qin; Li, Jingtao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The TZM-bl pseudovirus assay is commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of neutralizing antibodies and small molecular inhibitors in HIV-1 research. Here, to determine the optimal measurement method for screening anti-HIV-1 inhibitors, we compared three measurement methods based on firefly luciferase and β-galactosidase activities. The 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of the pseudoviruses were determined using the luciferase, β-galactosidase colorimetric, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining assays. Three commercial reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (azidothymidine, nevirapine, and lamivudine) were tested as reference drugs to compare the reproducibility, linear correlation, and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values determined using these methods. In the TCID50 assay, the sensitivity of β-galactosidase colorimetric assay was almost 562 times lower than that of the other two methods. Reproducible dose-response curves were obtained for the inhibitors with all methods; the IC50 values of the inhibitors were not significantly different. Linear regression analysis showed linear correlation between methods. Compared to the β-galactosidase colorimetric assay, the other two methods have the advantage of high sensitivity and are less affected by interference. In conclusion, the luciferase and X-gal staining assays, which can be applied either alone or combined, are recommended for anti-HIV-1 inhibitor screening. PMID:27016178

  14. Microengineering Methods for Cell Based Microarrays and High-Throughput Drug Screening Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Wu, JinHui; Wang, ShuQi; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Screening for effective therapeutic agents from millions of drug candidates is costly, time-consuming and often face ethical concerns due to extensive use of animals. To improve cost-effectiveness, and to minimize animal testing in pharmaceutical research, in vitro monolayer cell microarrays with multiwell plate assays have been developed. Integration of cell microarrays with microfluidic systems have facilitated automated and controlled component loading, significantly reducing the consumption of the candidate compounds and the target cells. Even though these methods significantly increased the throughput compared to conventional in vitro testing systems and in vivo animal models, the cost associated with these platforms remains prohibitively high. Besides, there is a need for three-dimensional (3D) cell based drug-screening models, which can mimic the in vivo microenvironment and the functionality of the native tissues. Here, we present the state-of-the-art microengineering approaches that can be used to develop 3D cell based drug screening assays. We highlight the 3D in vitro cell culture systems with live cell-based arrays, microfluidic cell culture systems, and their application to high-throughput drug screening. We conclude that among the emerging microengineering approaches, bioprinting holds a great potential to provide repeatable 3D cell based constructs with high temporal, spatial control and versatility. PMID:21725152

  15. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  16. A Replicative In Vitro Assay for Drug Discovery against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Tegazzini, Diana; Díaz, Rosario; Aguilar, Fernando; Peña, Imanol; Presa, Jesús L; Yardley, Vanessa; Martin, Julio J; Coteron, Jose M; Croft, Simon L; Cantizani, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, a disease potentially fatal if not treated. Current available treatments have major limitations, and new and safer drugs are urgently needed. In recent years, advances in high-throughput screening technologies have enabled the screening of millions of compounds to identify new antileishmanial agents. However, most of the compounds identified in vitro did not translate their activities when tested in in vivo models, highlighting the need to develop more predictive in vitro assays. In the present work, we describe the development of a robust replicative, high-content, in vitro intracellular L. donovani assay. Horse serum was included in the assay media to replace standard fetal bovine serum, to completely eliminate the extracellular parasites derived from the infection process. A novel phenotypic in vitro infection model has been developed, complemented with the identification of the proliferation of intracellular amastigotes measured by EdU incorporation. In vitro and in vivo results for miltefosine, amphotericin B, and the selected compound 1 have been included to validate the assay. PMID:27021313

  17. Development and Implementation of a High-Throughput Compound Screening Assay for Targeting Disrupted ER Calcium Homeostasis in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honarnejad, Kamran; Daschner, Alexander; Giese, Armin; Zall, Andrea; Schmidt, Boris; Szybinska, Aleksandra; Kuznicki, Jacek; Herms, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease. PMID:24260442

  18. Application of ORAL.screen saliva drug test for the screening of methamphetamine, MDMA, and MDEA incorporated in hair.

    PubMed

    Miki, Akihiro; Katagi, Munehiro; Shima, Noriaki; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi

    2004-03-01

    By the use of a one-step immunoassay drug test for oral fluid, a convenient and fairly sensitive screening method has been devised for methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) incorporated in hair. These drugs, in a 10-mg portion of hair, were extracted into 5M HCl/methanol (1:20, v/v), and the extract reconstituted in 100 micro L water was assayed with the saliva drug test ORAL.screen trade mark. The limits of detection were 0.5 ng/mg hair for d-MA, 0.8 ng/mg for dl-MDMA, and 1.0 ng/mg for dl-MDEA. The results are in good agreement with those of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination. Although all positive results must be confirmed by either GC-MS or a specific alternative methodology, this method provided a simple screening, suitable for drug enforcement purposes, while requiring only a 10-mg hair specimen. PMID:15068568

  19. Microfluidics-assisted in vitro drug screening and carrier production

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Jonathan H.; Lee, Woohyuk; Pun, Suzie H.; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms provide several unique advantages for drug development. In the production of drug carriers, physical properties such as size and shape, and chemical properties such as drug composition and pharmacokinetic parameters, can be modified simply and effectively by tuning the flow rate and geometries. Large numbers of carriers can then be fabricated with minimal effort and with little to no batch-to-batch variation. Additionally, cell or tissue culture models in microfluidic systems can be used as in vitro drug screening tools. Compared to in vivo animal models, microfluidic drug screening platforms allow for high-throughput and reproducible screening at a significantly lower cost, and when combined with current advances in tissue engineering, are also capable of mimicking native tissues. In this review, various microfluidic platforms for drug and gene carrier fabrication are reviewed to provide guidelines for designing appropriate carriers. In vitro microfluidic drug screening platforms designed for high-throughput analysis and replication of in vivo conditions are also reviewed to highlight future directions for drug research and development. PMID:23856409

  20. Thermodynamic Studies for Drug Design and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Garbett, Nichola C.; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A key part of drug design and development is the optimization of molecular interactions between an engineered drug candidate and its binding target. Thermodynamic characterization provides information about the balance of energetic forces driving binding interactions and is essential for understanding and optimizing molecular interactions. Areas covered This review discusses the information that can be obtained from thermodynamic measurements and how this can be applied to the drug development process. Current approaches for the measurement and optimization of thermodynamic parameters are presented, specifically higher throughput and calorimetric methods. Relevant literature for this review was identified in part by bibliographic searches for the period 2004 – 2011 using the Science Citation Index and PUBMED and the keywords listed below. Expert opinion The most effective drug design and development platform comes from an integrated process utilizing all available information from structural, thermodynamic and biological studies. Continuing evolution in our understanding of the energetic basis of molecular interactions and advances in thermodynamic methods for widespread application are essential to realize the goal of thermodynamically-driven drug design. Comprehensive thermodynamic evaluation is vital early in the drug development process to speed drug development towards an optimal energetic interaction profile while retaining good pharmacological properties. Practical thermodynamic approaches, such as enthalpic optimization, thermodynamic optimization plots and the enthalpic efficiency index, have now matured to provide proven utility in design process. Improved throughput in calorimetric methods remains essential for even greater integration of thermodynamics into drug design. PMID:22458502

  1. Label-free imaging and temporal signature in phenotypic cellular assays: a new approach to high-content screening.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julio

    2010-09-01

    Some drug targets are not amenable to screening because of the lack of a practical or validated biological assay. Likewise, some screening assays may not be predictive of compound activity in a more disease-relevant scenario, or assay development may demand excessive allocation of resources (i.e., time, money or personnel) with limited knowledge of the actual tractability of the target. Label-free methodologies, implemented in microtiter plate format, may help address these issues and complement, simplify, or facilitate assays. Label-free biosensors, based on grating resonance or electrical impedance, are versatile platforms for detecting phenotypic changes in both engineered and native cells. Their non-invasive nature allows for the kinetic monitoring of multiple real-time cellular responses to external stimuli, as well as for the use of successive pharmacological challenges. The temporal signature recorded for a particular stimulus is characteristic of the cell type and the signaling pathway activated upon binding of a ligand to its receptor. Cellular label-free technology is an important technical advance in the study of functional pharmacological selectivity. Described in this overview are some of the hurdles encountered in modern drug discovery and the ways in which label-free technologies can be used to overcome these obstacles. PMID:22294376

  2. Using constitutive activity to define appropriate high-throughput screening assays for orphan g protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tony; Coleman, James L J; Smith, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Orphan G protein-coupled receptors represent an underexploited resource for drug discovery but pose a considerable challenge for assay development because their cognate G protein signaling pathways are often unknown. In this methodological chapter, we describe the use of constitutive activity, that is, the inherent ability of receptors to couple to their cognate G proteins in the absence of ligand, to inform the development of high-throughput screening assays for a particular orphan receptor. We specifically focus on a two-step process, whereby constitutive G protein coupling is first determined using yeast Gpa1/human G protein chimeras linked to growth and β-galactosidase generation. Coupling selectivity is then confirmed in mammalian cells expressing endogenous G proteins and driving accumulation of transcription factor-fused luciferase reporters specific to each of the classes of G protein. Based on these findings, high-throughput screening campaigns can be performed on the already miniaturized mammalian reporter system. PMID:25563179

  3. Pathophysiologically relevant in vitro tumor models for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Das, Viswanath; Bruzzese, Francesca; Konečný, Petr; Iannelli, Federica; Budillon, Alfredo; Hajdúch, Marián

    2015-07-01

    The alarming rate of failure of clinical trials is a major hurdle in cancer therapy that partly results from the inadequate use of in vitro tumor models for the screening of promising hits and leads in preclinical studies. 2D cultures of cancer cell lines that are primarily used for drug screening do not adequately recapitulate tumor microenvironment (TME) complexities compared with 3D cancer cell cultures and tumor-derived primary cell cultures. In this review, we focus on the potential use of in vitro tumor models that reproduce in vivo tumor complexities for effective drug selection in the preclinical stages of drug development. PMID:25908576

  4. A magnetic bead-based ligand binding assay to facilitate human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kris; Mole, Damian J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Iredale, John P; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    Human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is emerging as an important drug target enzyme in a number of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease states. Recombinant protein production of KMO, and therefore discovery of KMO ligands, is challenging due to a large membrane targeting domain at the C-terminus of the enzyme that causes stability, solubility, and purification difficulties. The purpose of our investigation was to develop a suitable screening method for targeting human KMO and other similarly challenging drug targets. Here, we report the development of a magnetic bead-based binding assay using mass spectrometry detection for human KMO protein. The assay incorporates isolation of FLAG-tagged KMO enzyme on protein A magnetic beads. The protein-bound beads are incubated with potential binding compounds before specific cleavage of the protein-compound complexes from the beads. Mass spectrometry analysis is used to identify the compounds that demonstrate specific binding affinity for the target protein. The technique was validated using known inhibitors of KMO. This assay is a robust alternative to traditional ligand-binding assays for challenging protein targets, and it overcomes specific difficulties associated with isolating human KMO. PMID:25296660

  5. Evaporative edge lithography of a liposomal drug microarray for cell migration assays

    PubMed Central

    Vafai, Nicholas; Lowry, Troy W.; Wilson, Korey A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Lenhert, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Lipid multilayer microarrays are a promising approach to miniaturize laboratory procedures by taking advantage of the microscopic compartmentalization capabilities of lipids. Here, we demonstrate a new method to pattern lipid multilayers on surfaces based on solvent evaporation along the edge where a stencil contacts a surface called evaporative edge lithography (EEL). As an example of an application of this process, we use EEL to make microarrays suitable for a cell-based migration assay. Currently existing cell migration assays require a separate compartment for each drug which is dissolved at a single concentration in solution. An advantage of the lipid multilayer microarray assay is that multiple compounds can be tested on the same surface. We demonstrate this by testing the effect of two different lipophilic drugs, Taxol and Brefeldin A, on collective cell migration into an unpopulated area. This particular assay should be scalable to test of 2000 different lipophilic compounds or dosages on a standard microtiter plate area, or if adapted for individual cell migration, it would allow for high-throughput screening of more than 50,000 compounds per plate.

  6. Progesterone receptor chaperone complex-based highthroughput screening assay: identification of capsaicin as inhibitor of Hsp90 machine

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A.; Alfa, Eyad; Lu, Su; Chadli, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 and its co-chaperones are known to be important for cancer cell survival. The N-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 that are in ongoing clinical trials as anti-tumor agents have unfortunately shown disappointing efficacies in the clinic. Thus, novel inhibitors of the Hsp90 machine with different mechanism of action are urgently needed. We report here the development of a novel high-throughput drug-screening (HTS) assay platform to identify small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones. This assay quantitatively measures the ability of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones to refold/protect the progesterone receptor (PR), a physiological client of Hsp90, in 96-well plate format. We screened the NIH clinical collection drug library and identified capsaicin as a hit molecule. Capsaicin is an FDA-approved drug for topical use in pain management. Cell survival assays showed that capsaicin selectively kills cancer cells and destabilizes several Hsp90 client proteins. Thus, our data may explain the seemingly pleotropic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25184514

  7. Identification of 53 compounds that block Ebola virus-like particle entry via a repurposing screen of approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Sun, Wei; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Tawa, Gregory; Shinn, Paul; Chen, Catherine Z; Schimmer, Aaron; Sanderson, Philip; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    In light of the current outbreak of Ebola virus disease, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics to treat Ebola infection, and drug repurposing screening is a potentially rapid approach for identifying such therapeutics. We developed a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) 1536-well plate assay to screen for entry inhibitors of Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP) and the matrix VP40 protein fused to a beta-lactamase reporter protein and applied this assay for a rapid drug repurposing screen of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We report here the identification of 53 drugs with activity of blocking Ebola VLP entry into cells. These 53 active compounds can be divided into categories including microtubule inhibitors, estrogen receptor modulators, antihistamines, antipsychotics, pump/channel antagonists, and anticancer/antibiotics. Several of these compounds, including microtubule inhibitors and estrogen receptor modulators, had previously been reported to be active in BSL-4 infectious Ebola virus replication assays and in animal model studies. Our assay represents a robust, effective and rapid high-throughput screen for the identification of lead compounds in drug development for the treatment of Ebola virus infection. PMID:26038505

  8. Screening and Brief Intervention for Drug Use in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Saitz, Richard; Palfai, Tibor P. A.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Alford, Daniel P.; Bernstein, Judith A.; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine A.; Meli, Seville M.; Chaisson, Christine E.; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The United States has invested substantially in screening and brief intervention for illicit drug use and prescription drug misuse, based in part on evidence of efficacy for unhealthy alcohol use. However, it is not a recommended universal preventive service in primary care because of lack of evidence of efficacy. OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of 2 brief counseling interventions for unhealthy drug use (any illicit drug use or prescription drug misuse)—a brief negotiated interview (BNI) and an adaptation of motivational interviewing (MOTIV)—compared with no brief intervention. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This 3-group randomized trial took place at an urban hospital-based primary care internal medicine practice; 528 adult primary care patients with drug use (Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test [ASSIST] substance-specific scores of $4) were identified by screening between June 2009 and January 2012 in Boston, Massachusetts. INTERVENTIONS Two interventions were tested: the BNI is a 10- to 15-minute structured interview conducted by health educators; the MOTIV is a 30- to 45-minute intervention based on motivational interviewing with a 20- to 30-minute booster conducted by master’s-level counselors. All study participants received a written list of substance use disorder treatment and mutual help resources. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was number of days of use in the past 30 days of the self-identified main drug as determined by a validated calendar method at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included other self-reported measures of drug use, drug use according to hair testing, ASSIST scores (severity), drug use consequences, unsafe sex, mutual help meeting attendance, and health care utilization. RESULTS At baseline, 63% of participants reported their main drug was marijuana, 19% cocaine, and 17% opioids. At 6 months, 98% completed follow-up. Mean adjusted number of days using the main drug at 6 months was 12 for

  9. COMPARISON OF AN IN VIVO FISH VTG ASSAY WITH YES AND E-SCREEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the efficacy of two in vitro, estrogen-sensitive bioassays to rank the "relative estrogenicity" of five natural, pharmaceutical and xenoestrogens with a newly developed in vivo bioassay. The E-SCREEN (MCF-7 tumor cells) and YES (Yeast Estrogen Screen) assays w...

  10. CELL-FREE NEUROCHEMICAL SCREENING ASSAYS TO PREDICT ADVERSE EFFECTS IN MAMMALS, FISH, AND BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work will result in the establishment of a high-throughput screening assay that can be used to predict reproductive impairment across multiple ecologically relevant species (birds, fish, mammals). Resources exist to adapt this platform to screen 1,000s of toxicants. It...

  11. A click chemistry-based microRNA maturation assay optimized for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Daniel A; Garner, Amanda L

    2016-07-01

    Catalytic enzyme-linked click-chemistry assays (cat-ELCCA) are an emerging class of biochemical assay. Herein we report on expanding the toolkit of cat-ELCCA to include the kinetically superior inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction. The result is a technology with improved sensitivity and reproducibility, enabling automated high-throughput screening. PMID:27284591

  12. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluores...

  13. Potent Human Telomerase Inhibitors: Molecular Dynamic Simulations, Multiple Pharmacophore-Based Virtual Screening, and Biochemical Assays.

    PubMed

    Shirgahi Talari, Faezeh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Golestanian, Sahand; Jarstfer, Michael; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-12-28

    Telomere maintenance is a universal cancer hallmark, and small molecules that disrupt telomere maintenance generally have anticancer properties. Since the vast majority of cancer cells utilize telomerase activity for telomere maintenance, the enzyme has been considered as an anticancer drug target. Recently, rational design of telomerase inhibitors was made possible by the determination of high resolution structures of the catalytic telomerase subunit from a beetle and subsequent molecular modeling of the human telomerase complex. A hybrid strategy including docking, pharmacophore-based virtual screening, and molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) were used to identify new human telomerase inhibitors. Docking methodology was applied to investigate the ssDNA telomeric sequence and two well-known human telomerase inhibitors' (BIBR1532 and MST-312) modes of interactions with hTERT TEN domain. Subsequently molecular dynamic simulations were performed to monitor and compare hTERT TEN domain, TEN-ssDNA, TEN-BIBR1532, TEN-MST-312, and TEN-ssDNA-BIBR1532 behavior in a dynamic environment. Pharmacophore models were generated considering the inhibitors manner in the TEN domain anchor site. These exploratory studies identified several new potent inhibitors whose IC50 values were generated experimentally in a low micromolar range with the aid of biochemical assays, including both the direct telomerase and the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays. The results suggest that the current models of human telomerase are useful templates for rational inhibitor design. PMID:26529120

  14. Luciferase-Based, High-Throughput Assay for Screening and Profiling Transmission-Blocking Compounds against Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Fidock, David A; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new antimalarial drugs able to target both the asexual and gametocyte stages ofPlasmodium falciparumis critical to the success of the malaria eradication campaign. We have developed and validated a robust, rapid, and cost-effective high-throughput reporter gene assay to identify compounds active against late-stage (stage IV and V) gametocytes. The assay, which is suitable for testing compound activity at incubation times up to 72 h, demonstrates excellent quality and reproducibility, with averageZ' values of 0.85 ± 0.01. We used the assay to screen more than 10,000 compounds from three chemically diverse libraries. The screening outcomes highlighted the opportunity to use collections of compounds with known activity against the asexual stages of the parasites as a starting point for gametocytocidal activity detection in order to maximize the chances of identifying gametocytocidal compounds. This assay extends the capabilities of our previously reported luciferase assay, which tested compounds against early-stage gametocytes, and opens possibilities to profile the activities of gametocytocidal compounds over the entire course of gametocytogenesis. PMID:26787698

  15. A simple colorimetric method to screen drug cytotoxicity against Leishmania using the dye Alamar Blue.

    PubMed

    Mikus, J; Steverding, D

    2000-01-01

    A quantitative colorimetric assay using the oxidation-reduction indicator Alamar Blue was developed to measure cytotoxicity of compounds against the protozoan parasite Leishmania. Absorbance increased linearly with the plating density of promastigotes of L. major MRHO/IR/76 vaccine strain up to at least 2.5 x 10(6) cells/ml when parasites were incubated for 72 h in the presence of 10% Alamar Blue. The 50% effective dose values of common drugs (amphotericin B, pentostam and paromomycin) obtained by this assay were in the same range as previously determined by other methods. The Alamar Blue assay permits a simple, reproducible and reliable method for screening antileishmanial drugs. PMID:11227767

  16. Highly sensitive and selective fluorescence assays for rapid screening of endothelin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, N; de Rocquigny, H; Turcaud, S; Romieu, A; Roques, B P

    2001-01-01

    The highly potent vasoconstrictor peptide endothelin (ET) is generated from an inactive precursor, big endothelin (bET), by endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE). ECE is a phosphoramidon-sensitive zinc metallopeptidase, which is closely related to neprilysin (neutral endopeptidase). It is possible that compounds which inhibit the formation of ET may be used as new drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Such an approach requires a fast, simple and selective assay to measure ECE activity, allowing rapid screening of inhibitors. We describe here two new ECE substrates based on the concept of 'intramolecularly quenched fluorescence' which may fulfill this aim. One, S(1) [Pya(21)-Nop(22)-bET-1(19--35)], is the (19--35) fragment of the natural peptide big-ET-1(1--38), which is modified by introducing the fluorescent amino acid, pyrenylalanine (Pya), in position 21 and a quencher, p-nitrophenylalanine (Nop), in position 22. The second substrate (S(2)) is a small peptide, Ac-Ser-Gly-Pya-Lys-Ala-Phe-Ala-Nop-Gly-Lys-NH(2), from a biased substrate peptide library. The recombinant, hECE-1c, cleaved both Pya(21)-Nop(22)-bET-1(19--35) and the natural substrate selectively between residues 21 and 22, whereas cleavage occurred between alanine and phenylalanine in the small peptide. In both cases, this generated intense fluorescence emission. The synthesis and kinetic parameters of these substrates are described. These assays, which can be used directly on tissue homogenates, are the most sensitive and selective described to date for ECE, and are easily automated for a high-throughput screening of inhibitors. PMID:11389689

  17. Fluorimetric screening assay for protein carbonyl evaluation in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Stocker, P; Ricquebourg, E; Vidal, N; Villard, C; Lafitte, D; Sellami, L; Pietri, S

    2015-08-01

    Many assays are available for the detection of protein carbonyls (PCs). Currently, the measurement of PC groups after their derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenol hydrazine (DNPH) is widely used for measuring protein oxidation in biological samples. However, this method includes several washing steps. In this context, we have developed a rapid, sensitive, and accurate fluorimetric method adapted to 96-well microplates for the convenient assessment of protein carbonyl level in biological samples. The method reported here is based on the reaction of carbonyl content in proteins with 7-hydrazino-4-nitrobenzo-2,1,3-oxadiazole (NBDH) to form highly fluorescent derivatives via hydrazone formation. PCs were determined using the DNPH and NBDH assays in fully reduced bovine serum albumin (BSA) and plasma and liver homogenates obtained from healthy control rats up the addition of various amounts of HOCl-oxidized BSA (OxBSA). Using the NBDH assay, PC concentrations as low as 0.2 nmol/mg were detected with precision as low as 5%. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy was used to successfully identify the formation of the NBDH adducts after derivatization with standard oxidized peptides. Finally, the two methods were further used for PC determination in plasma and liver samples from diabetic and normal rats, showing that the NBDH assay can be reliably used in biological experiments. PMID:25933703

  18. Drug screening for hearing loss: using the zebrafish lateral line to screen for drugs that prevent and cause hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Felipe; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Rubel, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    Several animal models have been used for the study of mechanosensory hair cells and hearing loss. Because of the difficulty of tissue acquisition and large animal size, these traditional models are impractical for high-throughput screening. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful animal model for screening drugs that cause or prevent hair cell death. The unique characteristics of the zebrafish enable rapid in vivo imaging of hair cells and hair cell death. We have used this model to screen for and identify multiple drugs that protect hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced death. Identification of multiple drugs and drug-like compounds that inhibit multiple hair cell death pathways might enable the development of protective cocktails to achieve complete hair cell protection. PMID:20096805

  19. Cellular Biomechanics in Drug Screening and Evaluation: Mechanopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Park, Jin-Ah; Seow, Chun Y.; Lee, Peter V-S.; Stewart, Alastair G.

    2016-01-01

    The study of mechanobiology is now widespread. The impact of cell and tissue mechanics on cellular responses is well appreciated. However, knowledge of the impact of cell and tissue mechanics on pharmacological responsiveness, and its application to drug screening and mechanistic investigations, have been very limited in scope. We emphasize the need for a heightened awareness of the important bidirectional influence of drugs and biomechanics in all living systems. We propose that the term ‘mechanopharmacology’ be applied to approaches that employ in vitro systems, biomechanically appropriate to the relevant (patho)physiology, to identify new drugs and drug targets. This article describes the models and techniques that are being developed to transform drug screening and evaluation, ranging from a 2D environment to the dynamic 3D environment of the target expressed in the disease of interest. PMID:26651416

  20. Virtual screening and its integration with modern drug design technologies.

    PubMed

    Guido, Rafael V C; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-01-01

    Drug discovery is a highly complex and costly process, which demands integrated efforts in several relevant aspects involving innovation, knowledge, information, technologies, expertise, R&D investments and management skills. The shift from traditional to genomics- and proteomics-based drug research has fundamentally transformed key R&D strategies in the pharmaceutical industry addressed to the design of new chemical entities as drug candidates against a variety of biological targets. Therefore, drug discovery has moved toward more rational strategies based on our increasing understanding of the fundamental principles of protein-ligand interactions. The combination of available knowledge of several 3D protein structures with hundreds of thousands of small-molecules have attracted the attention of scientists from all over the world for the application of structure- and ligand-based drug design approaches. In this context, virtual screening technologies have largely enhanced the impact of computational methods applied to chemistry and biology and the goal of applying such methods is to reduce large compound databases and to select a limited number of promising candidates for drug design. This review provides a perspective of the utility of virtual screening in drug design and its integration with other important drug discovery technologies such as high-throughput screening (HTS) and QSAR, highlighting the present challenges, limitations, and future perspectives in medicinal chemistry. PMID:18220761

  1. Development of a Novel Phosphorylated AMPK Protection Assay for High-Throughput Screening Using TR-FRET Assay.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yazhou; Wang, Yunjie; Xu, Yuan; Li, Jia; Liao, Hong; Zhang, Luyong; Pang, Tao

    2015-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a conserved heterotrimeric kinase, serves as an energy sensor maintaining energy balance at both cellular and whole-body levels and plays multiple beneficial roles in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, which makes AMPK an attractive target for diabetes and other metabolic disorders. To date, establishment of the physiologically relevant biochemical assay for AMPK has not been reported. Here we developed a phosphorylated AMPK protection assay based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay, using the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) to dephosphorylate AMPK. The partially dephosphorylated AMPK by PP2A had lower activity than phosphorylated AMPK. This specific TR-FRET assay for AMPK was optimized in the 384-well format and produced similar EC(50) values for AMPK activators AMP and A769662 and a similar IC(50) value for AMPK inhibitor compound C, as previously reported. Under the optimized conditions, the assay Z' factor calculated over 160 data points has an optimal value greater than 0.5, which is suitable for high-throughput screening. In conclusion, this phosphorylated AMPK protection assay we developed is very robust, sensitive, and simple to perform and may be useful as a high-throughput assay for identifying AMPK activators with the ability of preventing activated AMPK against dephosphorylation by phosphatase in the physiological conditions. PMID:25956678

  2. Development of fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assays: choice of appropriate instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, David J.; Alder, Elisabeth; Fan, Yi-Hong; McKeegan, Evelyn; Warrior, Usha; Beutel, Bruce

    1998-04-01

    Fluorescence-based assays have become increasingly popular in high throughput screening for a variety of reasons (e.g. sensitivity). However, new screening technologies are pushing the limits of conventional fluorescence plate readers. For example, instruments that have optical sensitivities beyond most of the commercially available plate readers are required to reproducibly measure the fluorescence generated by the green fluorescent protein (GFP)--a novel reporter gene. Also, miniaturization of screening formats (with densities higher than the conventional 96-well plate) requires high resolution instrumentation to measure fluorescence. Several assays based on optical fluorescence measurements have been developed and screened in our Biological Screening group. These assays include various fluorescence-based protease assays (standard end-point and kinetic modes) and a functional cell-based screen using the green fluorescent protein as a reporter gene. The choice of instrumentation was the critical factor in the performance and success of each of these arrays. Data will be presented for the cell- based reporter assay including the type of instrumentation (fluorescence plate readers; fluorescence imaging systems) used for detection of GFP fluorescence.

  3. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  4. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  5. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Paul, Katie B; Hedge, Joan M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Hornung, Michael W; Crofton, Kevin M; Simmons, Steven O

    2014-03-17

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein, we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluorescent peroxidase substrate, Amplex UltraRed (AUR), were employed in an end-point assay for comparison to the existing kinetic guaiacol (GUA) oxidation assay. Following optimization of assay metrics, including Z', dynamic range, and activity, using methimazole (MMI), the assay was tested with a 21-chemical training set. The potency of MMI-induced TPO inhibition was greater with AUR compared to GUA. The dynamic range and Z' score with MMI were as follows: 127-fold and 0.62 for the GUA assay, 18-fold and 0.86 for the 96-well AUR assay, and 11.5-fold and 0.93 for the 384-well AUR assay. The 384-well AUR assay drastically reduced animal use, requiring one-tenth of the rat thyroid microsomal protein needed for the GUA 96-well format assay. Fourteen chemicals inhibited TPO, with a relative potency ranking of MMI > ethylene thiourea > 6-propylthiouracil > 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-benzophenone > 2-mercaptobenzothiazole > 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole > genistein > 4-propoxyphenol > sulfamethazine > daidzein > 4-nonylphenol > triclosan > iopanoic acid > resorcinol. These data demonstrate the capacity of this assay to detect diverse TPO inhibitors. Seven chemicals acted as negatives: 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, dibutylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, diethylphthalate, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-methanol, methyl 2-methyl-benzoate, and sodium perchlorate. This assay could be used to screen large numbers of chemicals as an integral component of a tiered TH-disruptor screening approach. PMID:24383450

  6. A chromogenic cephalosporin for β-lactamase inhibitor screening assays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sophia; Vosbeek, Amy; Corbella, Katherine; Severson, Jonathan; Schesser, Jacob; Sutton, Larry D

    2012-09-15

    Production of β-lactamases is the primary mechanism of antibiotic resistance employed by gram-negative pathogens. Chromogenic β-lactams are important reagents for detection and assay of β-lactamases, but limited commercial availability and exorbitant pricing of these compounds are prohibitive. Here we describe a straightforward synthesis of a chromogenic cephalosporin for β-lactamase assay that gives an overall yield of 74%. On hydrolysis, its λ(max) undergoes a bathochromic shift that is easy to see and measure spectrophotometrically with a Δε(442 nm) of 14,500 cm⁻¹ M⁻¹. This compound was shown to be a substrate for a variety of β-lactamases. PMID:22709853

  7. A Colloidal Stability Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Ali, M Monsur; Yang, Songtao; Dong, Xiaofei; Pelton, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A library of 32 polystyrene copolymer latexes, with diameters ranging between 53 and 387 nm, was used to develop and demonstrate a high-throughput assay using a 96-well microplate platform to measure critical coagulation concentrations, a measure of colloidal stability. The most robust assay involved an automated centrifugation-decantation step to remove latex aggregates before absorbance measurements, eliminating aggregate interference with optical measurements made through the base of the multiwell plates. For smaller nanoparticles (diameter <150 nm), the centrifugation-decantation step was not required as the interference was less than with larger particles. Parallel measurements with a ChemiDoc MP plate scanner gave indications of aggregation; however, the results were less sensitive than the absorbance measurements. PMID:26857643

  8. In situ hybridization assay-based small molecule screening in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lili; Durand, Ellen M.; Ezzio, Catherine; Pagliuca, Stephanie M.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2012-01-01

    In vitro biochemical and cell-based small molecule screens have been widely used to identify compounds that target specific signaling pathways. But the identified compounds frequently fail at the animal testing stage, largely due to the in vivo absorption, metabolism and toxicity of chemicals. Zebrafish has recently emerged as a vertebrate whole organism model for small molecule screening. The in vivo bioactivity and specificity of compounds are examined from the very beginning of zebrafish screens. In addition, zebrafish is suitable for chemical screens at a large scale similar to cellular assays. This protocol describes an approach for in situ hybridization (ISH)-based chemical screening in zebrafish, which, in principle, can be used to screen any gene product. The described protocol has been used to identify small molecules affecting specific molecular pathways and biological processes. It can also be adapted to zebrafish screens with different readouts. PMID:23001521

  9. Syphilis detection: evaluation of serological screening and pilot reverse confirmatory assay algorithm in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sommese, Linda; Paolillo, Rossella; Sabia, Chiara; Costa, Dario; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Iannone, Carmela; Esposito, Antonella; Schiano, Concetta; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Serological assays are still considered the most useful tests in the diagnosis of syphilis. Since no single serological assay is able to provide a satisfactory result, in our laboratory we have evaluated the usefulness of a commercially-available immunoblot to diagnose syphilis infection among blood donors. From October 2012 to June 2013, 4572 blood donors were screened for syphilis with an automated chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). To confirm the presence of treponemal antibodies, CMIA-reactive sera were tested by standard Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA). In addition, an alternative confirmatory test - the immunoblot INNO-LIA assay was introduced in our laboratory. Since two additional positives among CMIA-reactive-TPHA-negative samples were found, we concluded that the INNO-LIA immunoblot allowed a better detection of syphilis compared to TPHA. A confirmatory strategy based on the use of two treponemal assays could meet the screening requirements for blood donors as well as in our centre. PMID:26068964

  10. Assessment of the Microscreen phage-induction assay for screening hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, V.S.; DeMarini, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The Microscreen phage-induction assay, which quantitatively measures the induction of prophage lambda in Escherichia coli WP2s(lambda), was used to test 14 crude (unfractionated) hazardous industrial waste samples for genotoxic activity in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Eleven of the 14 wastes induced prophage, and induction was observed at concentrations as low as 0.4 picograms per ml. Comparisons between the mutagenicity of these waste samples in Salmonella and their ability to induce prophage lambda indicate that the Microscreen phage-induction assay detected genotoxic activity in all but one of the wastes that were mutagenic in Salmonella. Moreover, the Microscreen assay detected as genotoxic 5 additional wastes that were not detected in the Salmonella assay. The applicability of the Microscreen phage-induction assay for screening hazardous wastes for genotoxic activity is discussed along with some of the problems associated with screening highly toxic wastes containing toxic volatile compounds.

  11. Comparative drug screening in NUT midline carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beesley, A H; Stirnweiss, A; Ferrari, E; Endersby, R; Howlett, M; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Charles, A K; Cole, C H; Kees, U R

    2014-01-01

    Background: The NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare but fatal cancer for which systematic testing of therapy options has never been performed. Methods: On the basis of disease biology, we compared the efficacy of the CDK9 inhibitor flavopiridol (FP) with a panel of anticancer agents in NMC cell lines and mouse xenografts. Results: In vitro anthracyclines, topoisomerase inhibitors, and microtubule poisons were among the most cytotoxic drug classes for NMC cells, while efficacy of the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 varied considerably between lines carrying different BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4)–NUT (nuclear protein in testis) translocations. Efficacy of FP was comparable to vincristine and doxorubicin, drugs that have been previously used in NMC patients. All three compounds showed significantly better activity than etoposide and vorinostat, agents that have also been used in NMC patients. Statins and antimetabolites demonstrated intermediate single-agent efficacy. In vivo, vincristine significantly inhibited tumour growth in two different NMC xenografts. Flavopiridol in vivo was significantly effective in one of the two NMC xenograft lines, demonstrating the biological heterogeneity of this disease. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that FP may be of benefit to a subset of patients with NMC, and warrant a continued emphasis on microtubule inhibitors, anthracyclines, and topoisomerase inhibitors as effective drug classes in this disease. PMID:24518598

  12. Multiple animal studies for medical chemical defense program in soldier/patient decontamination and drug development on task 88-36: Development of in vitro screening assays for candidate pretreatment and treatment compounds. Final report, 1 July 1988-1 July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, R.; Dill, G.; Hobson, D.; Blank, J.

    1990-03-01

    A task was instituted at the Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) to develop in vitro assays to screen pretreatment and treatment compounds for their ability to protect or reverse the toxic effects of organophosphates and vesicants. Four vesicant assays and three nerve agent assays were developed. Two of the vesicant assays were for cell viability of keratinocyte, one in the presence of distilled mustard and one lewisite. One assay determines the effect of vesicants on keratinocyte reproduction and the other the effect of distilled mustard on cellular coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide content. The organophosphate assays measure the effects on acetylcholinesterase of selected compounds measured by ability to reactivate, effect on aging rate, and directly. In vitro screen; HD; L; Cellular NAD+ cellular viability; GA; GD; VX; Acetylcholinesterase inhibition; Reactivators; RA 5; Aging rate; Keratinocytes; Treatment and pretreatments; Assaying; Tabun (GA); Sarin (GB); Soman (GD); Organoarsenic; Organophosphates; Chemical Surety Material (CSM); Blisters; Toxicity; Toxic agents; Nerve agents; Chemical warfare agents; G Agents; V Agents; Vesicants; Mustard agents.

  13. An Escherichia coli Expression Assay and Screen for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Variants with Decreased Susceptibility to Indinavir

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Laurence; Yang, Shiow-Shong; Rossi, Rick; Zepp, Charlie; Heefner, Donald

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a recombinant Escherichia coli screening system for the rapid detection and identification of amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease associated with decreased susceptibility to the protease inhibitor indinavir (MK-639; Merck & Co.). The assay depends upon the correct processing of a segment of the HIV-1 HXB2 gag-pol polyprotein followed by detection of HIV reverse transcriptase activity by a highly sensitive, colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highly sensitive system detects the contributions of single substitutions such as I84V, L90M, and L63P. The combination of single substitutions further decreases the sensitivity to indinavir. We constructed a library of HIV protease variant genes containing dispersed mutations and, using the E. coli recombinant system, screened for mutants with decreased indinavir sensitivity. The discovered HIV protease variants contain amino acid substitutions commonly associated with indinavir resistance in clinical isolates, including the substitutions L90M, L63P, I64V, V82A, L24I, and I54T. One substitution, W6R, is also frequently found by the screen and has not been reported elsewhere. Of a total of 12,000 isolates that were screened, 12 protease variants with decreased sensitivity to indinavir were found. The L63P substitution, which is also associated with indinavir resistance, increases the stability of the isolated protease relative to that of the native HXB2 protease. The rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of this screen also make it useful for screening for novel inhibitors. We have found the approach described here to be useful for the detection of amino acid substitutions in HIV protease that have been associated with drug resistance as well as for the screening of novel compounds for inhibitory activity. PMID:9835523

  14. A Phenotypic High Throughput Screening Assay for the Identification of Pharmacoperones for the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emery; Spicer, Timothy; Chase, Peter; Scampavia, Louis; Janovick, Jo Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe a phenotypic high throughput screening (HTS) calcium flux assay designed to identify pharmacoperones for the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR). Pharmacoperones are target-specific, small molecules that diffuse into cells, rescue misfolded protein mutants, and restore them to function. Rescue is based on correcting the trafficking of mutants that would otherwise be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and unable to function correctly. This approach identifies drugs with a significant degree of novelty, relying on cellular mechanisms that are not currently exploited. Development of such assays is important, since the extensive use of agonist/antagonist screens alone means that useful chemical structures may be present in existing libraries but have not been previously identified using existing methods. Our assay utilizes cell lines stably expressing a GnRHR mutant under the control of a tetracycline (OFF) transactivator. This allows us to quantitate the level of functional and properly trafficked G protein coupled receptors present in each test well. Furthermore, since we are able to turn receptor expression on and off, we can rapidly eliminate the majority of false positives from our screening results. Our data show that this approach is likely to be successful in identifying hits from large chemical libraries. PMID:24831790

  15. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  16. Advantageous use of HepaRG cells for the screening and mechanistic study of drug-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Jiménez, Nuria; Hervás, David; Jover, Ramiro; Donato, M Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Only a few in vitro assays have been proposed to evaluate the steatotic potential of new drugs. The present study examines the utility of HepaRG cells as a cell-based assay system for screening drug-induced liver steatosis. A high-content screening assay was run to evaluate multiple toxicity-related cell parameters in HepaRG cells exposed to 28 compounds, including drugs reported to cause steatosis through different mechanisms and non-steatotic compounds. Lipid content was the most sensitive parameter for all the steatotic drugs, whereas no effects on lipid levels were produced by non-steatotic compounds. Apart from fat accumulation, increased ROS production and altered mitochondrial membrane potential were also found in the cells exposed to steatotic drugs, which indicates that all these cellular events contributed to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. These findings are of clinical relevance as most effects were observed at drug concentrations under 100-fold of the therapeutic peak plasmatic concentration. HepaRG cells showed increased lipid overaccumulation vs. HepG2 cells, which suggests greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis. An altered expression profile of transcription factors and the genes that code key proteins in lipid metabolism was also found in the cells exposed to drugs capable of inducing liver steatosis. Our results generally indicate the value of HepaRG cells for assessing the risk of liver damage associated with steatogenic compounds and for investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in drug-induced steatosis. PMID:27089845

  17. Recommended Immunological Assays to Screen for Ricin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Stéphanie; Worbs, Sylvia; Avondet, Marc-André; Tracz, Dobryan M.; Dano, Julie; Schmidt, Lisa; Volland, Hervé; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Corbett, Cindi R.

    2015-01-01

    Ricin, a toxin from the plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most toxic biological agents known. Due to its availability, toxicity, ease of production and absence of curative treatments, ricin has been classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as category B biological weapon and it is scheduled as a List 1 compound in the Chemical Weapons Convention. An international proficiency test (PT) was conducted to evaluate detection and quantification capabilities of 17 expert laboratories. In this exercise one goal was to analyse the laboratories’ capacity to detect and differentiate ricin and the less toxic, but highly homologuous protein R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Six analytical strategies are presented in this paper based on immunological assays (four immunoenzymatic assays and two immunochromatographic tests). Using these immunological methods “dangerous” samples containing ricin and/or RCA120 were successfully identified. Based on different antibodies used the detection and quantification of ricin and RCA120 was successful. The ricin PT highlighted the performance of different immunological approaches that are exemplarily recommended for highly sensitive and precise quantification of ricin. PMID:26703725

  18. Recommended Immunological Assays to Screen for Ricin-Containing Samples.

    PubMed

    Simon, Stéphanie; Worbs, Sylvia; Avondet, Marc-André; Tracz, Dobryan M; Dano, Julie; Schmidt, Lisa; Volland, Hervé; Dorner, Brigitte G; Corbett, Cindi R

    2015-12-01

    Ricin, a toxin from the plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most toxic biological agents known. Due to its availability, toxicity, ease of production and absence of curative treatments, ricin has been classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as category B biological weapon and it is scheduled as a List 1 compound in the Chemical Weapons Convention. An international proficiency test (PT) was conducted to evaluate detection and quantification capabilities of 17 expert laboratories. In this exercise one goal was to analyse the laboratories' capacity to detect and differentiate ricin and the less toxic, but highly homologuous protein R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Six analytical strategies are presented in this paper based on immunological assays (four immunoenzymatic assays and two immunochromatographic tests). Using these immunological methods "dangerous" samples containing ricin and/or RCA120 were successfully identified. Based on different antibodies used the detection and quantification of ricin and RCA120 was successful. The ricin PT highlighted the performance of different immunological approaches that are exemplarily recommended for highly sensitive and precise quantification of ricin. PMID:26703725

  19. An FDA-Drug Library Screen for Compounds with Bioactivities against Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Qiu Ying; Tan, Yoke Yan Fion; Goh, Vanessa Chai Yin; Lee, David Jing Qin; Ng, Fui Mee; Ong, Esther H. Q.; Hill, Jeffrey; Chia, Cheng San Brian

    2015-01-01

    The lack of new antibacterial drugs entering the market and their misuse have resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria, posing a major health crisis worldwide. In particular, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a pathogen responsible for numerous human infections, has become endemic in hospitals worldwide. Drug repurposing, the finding of new therapeutic indications for approved drugs, is deemed a plausible solution to accelerate drug discovery and development in this area. Towards this end, we screened 1163 drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bioactivities against MRSA in a 10 μM single-point assay. After excluding known antibiotics and antiseptics, six compounds were identified and their MICs were determined against a panel of clinical MRSA strains. A toxicity assay using human keratinocytes was also conducted to gauge their potential for repurposing as topical agents for treating MRSA skin infections. PMID:27025633

  20. Identification of Druggable Targets for Radiation Mitigation Using a Small Interfering RNA Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zellefrow, Crystal D.; Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Epperly, Michael W.; Reese, Celeste E.; Shun, Tongying; Lira, Ana; Greenberger, Joel S.; Lazo, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there is a serious absence of pharmaceutically attractive small molecules that mitigate the lethal effects of an accidental or intentional public exposure to toxic doses of ionizing radiation. Moreover, cellular systems that emulate the radiobiologically relevant cell populations and that are suitable for high-throughput screening have not been established. Therefore, we examined two human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell lines for use in an unbiased phenotypic small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay to identify proteins with the potential of being drug targets for the protection of human cell populations against clinically relevant ionizing radiation doses that cause acute radiation syndrome. Of the two human cell lines tested, NCCIT cells had optimal growth characteristics in a 384 well format, exhibited radiation sensitivity (D0 = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.0 ± 0.6) comparable to the radiosensitivity of stem cell populations associated with human death within 30 days after total-body irradiation. Moreover, they internalized siRNA after 4 Gy irradiation enabling siRNA library screening. Therefore, we used the human NCCIT cell line for the radiation mitigation study with a siRNA library that silenced 5,520 genes known or hypothesized to be potential therapeutic targets. Exploiting computational methodologies, we identified 113 siRNAs with potential radiomitigative properties, which were further refined to 29 siRNAs with phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 1 (p85α) being among the highest confidence candidate gene products. Colony formation assays revealed radiation mitigation when the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was given after irradiation of 32D cl 3 cells (D0 = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.3 ± 0.3 for the vehicle control treated cells compared to D0 = 1.2 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 6.0 ± 0.8 for the LY294002 treated cells, P = 0.0004). LY294002 and two other PI3K inhibitors, PI 828 and GSK 1059615, also mitigated radiation

  1. Identification of druggable targets for radiation mitigation using a small interfering RNA screening assay.

    PubMed

    Zellefrow, Crystal D; Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Epperly, Michael W; Reese, Celeste E; Shun, Tongying; Lira, Ana; Greenberger, Joel S; Lazo, John S

    2012-09-01

    Currently, there is a serious absence of pharmaceutically attractive small molecules that mitigate the lethal effects of an accidental or intentional public exposure to toxic doses of ionizing radiation. Moreover, cellular systems that emulate the radiobiologically relevant cell populations and that are suitable for high-throughput screening have not been established. Therefore, we examined two human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell lines for use in an unbiased phenotypic small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay to identify proteins with the potential of being drug targets for the protection of human cell populations against clinically relevant ionizing radiation doses that cause acute radiation syndrome. Of the two human cell lines tested, NCCIT cells had optimal growth characteristics in a 384 well format, exhibited radiation sensitivity (D(0) = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.0 ± 0.6) comparable to the radiosensitivity of stem cell populations associated with human death within 30 days after total-body irradiation. Moreover, they internalized siRNA after 4 Gy irradiation enabling siRNA library screening. Therefore, we used the human NCCIT cell line for the radiation mitigation study with a siRNA library that silenced 5,520 genes known or hypothesized to be potential therapeutic targets. Exploiting computational methodologies, we identified 113 siRNAs with potential radiomitigative properties, which were further refined to 29 siRNAs with phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 1 (p85α) being among the highest confidence candidate gene products. Colony formation assays revealed radiation mitigation when the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was given after irradiation of 32D cl 3 cells (D(0) = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.3 ± 0.3 for the vehicle control treated cells compared to D(0) = 1.2 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 6.0 ± 0.8 for the LY294002 treated cells, P = 0.0004). LY294002 and two other PI3K inhibitors, PI 828 and GSK 1059615, also mitigated radiation

  2. High-Content Assay Multiplexing for Toxicity Screening in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian Alexander; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Sirenko, Oksana; Bittner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cell-based high-content screening (HCS) assays have become an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional in vitro and in vivo testing in pharmaceutical drug development and toxicological safety assessment. The time- and cost-effectiveness of HCS assays, combined with the organotypic nature of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cells, open new opportunities to employ physiologically relevant in vitro model systems to improve screening for potential chemical hazards. In this study, we used two human iPSC types, cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes, to test various high-content and molecular assay combinations for their applicability in a multiparametric screening format. Effects on cardiomyocyte beat frequency were characterized by calcium flux measurements for up to 90 min. Subsequent correlation with intracellular cAMP levels was used to determine if the effects on cardiac physiology were G-protein-coupled receptor dependent. In addition, we utilized high-content cell imaging to simultaneously determine cell viability, mitochondrial integrity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in both cell types. Kinetic analysis indicated that ROS formation is best detectable 30 min following initial treatment, whereas cytotoxic effects were most stable after 24 h. For hepatocytes, high-content imaging was also used to evaluate cytotoxicity and cytoskeletal integrity, as well as mitochondrial integrity and the potential for lipid accumulation. Lipid accumulation, a marker for hepatic steatosis, was most reliably detected 48 h following treatment with test compounds. Overall, our results demonstrate how a compendium of assays can be utilized for quantitative screening of chemical effects in iPSC cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes and enable rapid and cost-efficient multidimensional biological profiling of toxicity. PMID:26539751

  3. Yeast as a Model for Studies on Aβ Aggregation Toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease, Autophagic Responses, and Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Porzoor, Afsaneh; Macreadie, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The Aβ peptide is widely considered a major cause of Alzheimer's disease since it causes neuronal death in an oligomerisation-dependent manner. In order to identify new inhibitors of Aβ that may be chemo preventative for Alzheimer's disease, a yeast assay that qualitatively determines the amounts and state of the human Aβ42 peptide has been developed. Yeast assays such as this can be applied to studies on aggregation toxicity, autophagic responses and drug screening in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26235069

  4. GMO detection in food and feed through screening by visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Li, Rong; Quan, Sheng; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin; Yang, Litao

    2015-06-01

    Isothermal DNA/RNA amplification techniques are the primary methodology for developing on-spot rapid nucleic acid amplification assays, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique has been developed and applied in the detection of foodborne pathogens, plant/animal viruses, and genetically modified (GM) food/feed contents. In this study, one set of LAMP assays targeting on eight frequently used universal elements, marker genes, and exogenous target genes, such as CaMV35S promoter, FMV35S promoter, NOS, bar, cry1Ac, CP4 epsps, pat, and NptII, were developed for visual screening of GM contents in plant-derived food samples with high efficiency and accuracy. For these eight LAMP assays, their specificity was evaluated by testing commercial GM plant events and their limits of detection were also determined, which are 10 haploid genome equivalents (HGE) for FMV35S promoter, cry1Ac, and pat assays, as well as five HGE for CaMV35S promoter, bar, NOS terminator, CP4 epsps, and NptII assays. The screening applicability of these LAMP assays was further validated successfully using practical canola, soybean, and maize samples. The results suggested that the established visual LAMP assays are applicable and cost-effective for GM screening in plant-derived food samples. PMID:25822163

  5. Fluorescence anisotropy (polarization): from drug screening to precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hairong; Wu, Qian; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is one of the major established methods accepted by industry and regulatory agencies for understanding the mechanisms of drug action and selecting drug candidates utilizing a high-throughput format. Areas covered This review covers the basics of FA and complementary methods, such as fluorescence lifetime anisotropy and their roles in the drug discovery process. The authors highlight the factors affecting FA readouts, fluorophore selection, and instrumentation. Furthermore, the authors describe the recent development of a successful, commercially valuable FA assay for Long QT syndrome drug toxicity to illustrate the role that FA can play in the early stages of drug discovery. Expert opinion Despite the success in drug discovery, the FA-based technique experiences competitive pressure from other homogeneous assays. That being said, FA is an established yet rapidly developing technique, recognized by academic institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, and regulatory agencies across the globe. The technical problems encountered in working with small molecules in homogeneous assays are largely solved, and new challenges come from more complex biological molecules and nanoparticles. With that, FA will remain one of the major work-horse techniques leading to precision (personalized) medicine. PMID:26289575

  6. A Screen of FDA-Approved Drugs for Inhibitors of Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Nicholas J; Campos, Rafael K; Powell, Steven T; Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Schott-Lerner, Geraldine; Soto-Acosta, Ruben; Galarza-Muñoz, Gaddiel; McGrath, Erica L; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Gao, Junling; Wu, Ping; Menon, Ramkumar; Saade, George; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Rossi, Shannan L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Routh, Andrew; Bradrick, Shelton S; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2016-08-10

    Currently there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We interrogated a library of FDA-approved drugs for their ability to block infection of human HuH-7 cells by a newly isolated ZIKV strain (ZIKV MEX_I_7). More than 20 out of 774 tested compounds decreased ZIKV infection in our in vitro screening assay. Selected compounds were further validated for inhibition of ZIKV infection in human cervical, placental, and neural stem cell lines, as well as primary human amnion cells. Established anti-flaviviral drugs (e.g., bortezomib and mycophenolic acid) and others that had no previously known antiviral activity (e.g., daptomycin) were identified as inhibitors of ZIKV infection. Several drugs reduced ZIKV infection across multiple cell types. This study identifies drugs that could be tested in clinical studies of ZIKV infection and provides a resource of small molecules to study ZIKV pathogenesis. PMID:27476412

  7. Mind the gap: Concerns using endpoints from endocrine screening assays in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Weltje, Lennart; Green, Richard M

    2014-08-01

    Endocrine screening assays not only provide mechanistic information on the potential of a substance to interact with the endocrine system, but also data potentially relevant for risk assessment. However, these screening assays have a number of limitations that should be considered before the direct use of such data for risk assessment purposes. This paper discusses the limitations that should be considered for both human and environmental risk assessment. A proposal is made to provide an objective and transparent process in order to consider which endpoint(s) might be incorporated into a risk assessment, and when more definitive studies may be of value. The proposal is complemented with an easy-to-follow flowchart to aid industry scientists and regulators when evaluating the relevance of these data. Such an approach is necessary to ensure the appropriate use of screening data to further our understanding of the eco/toxicological profile of substances undergoing screening. PMID:24887212

  8. Development of a Screening Assay for Microbial Community Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracle, A. L.; Tilton, F.; Bonheyo, G. T.; McDermott, J.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of subsurface contaminant plumes has been challenging in the aspects of site characterization, design for treatability, and monitoring of treatment efficacy, to name a few. Characterization of physical and geochemical properties can be achieved through advances in sensor technologies, modeling, and well placement. However, the biotic composition within the subsurface is also an important component that adds an additional biochemical contribution that is not currently being assessed. Changes in the environment have impacts to the composition of microbial communities at this solid/fluid phase interface. The introduction of a remediative treatment may provide an abundant food source for microorganisms in the subsurface and alter the community dynamics. Such changes to the microbial community composition may have dramatic effects on bulk community biochemistry, which in turn may affect the quality of the remediative treatment in terms of effectiveness and transport through alteration of the environment. A screening array is being developed based on DNA sequence information from indigenous microorganisms within target sediments to be used to assess microbial community changes throughout remediative treatments and through time. Integration of physical, chemical, and biotic community information will be assessed to determine efficacy of treatment before, during, and after treatment to assess success of treatment, and measure any post-treatment changes.

  9. Which high-risk HPV assays fulfil criteria for use in primary cervical cancer screening?

    PubMed

    Arbyn, M; Snijders, P J F; Meijer, C J L M; Berkhof, J; Cuschieri, K; Kocjan, B J; Poljak, M

    2015-09-01

    Several countries are in the process of switching to high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing for cervical cancer screening. Given the multitude of available tests, validated assays which assure high-quality screening need to be identified. A systematic review was conducted to answer the question which hrHPV tests fulfil the criteria defined by an international expert team in 2009, based on reproducibility and relative sensitivity and specificity compared to Hybrid Capture-2 or GP5+/6+ PCR-enzyme immunoassay. These latter two hrHPV DNA assays were validated in large randomized trials and cohorts with a follow-up duration of 8 years or more. Eligible studies citing the 2009 guideline were retrieved from Scopus (http://www.scopus.com) and from a meta-analysis assessing the relative accuracy of new hrHPV assays versus the standard comparator tests to detect high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cancer in primary screening. The cobas 4800 HPV test and Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test were consistently validated in two and three studies, respectively, whereas the PapilloCheck HPV-screening test, BD Onclarity HPV assay and the HPV-Risk assay were validated each in one study. Other tests which partially fulfil the 2009 guidelines are the following: Cervista HPV HR Test, GP5+/6+ PCR-LMNX, an in-house E6/E7 RT quantitative PCR and MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight). The APTIMA HPV assay targeting E6/E7 mRNA of hrHPV was also fully validated. However, the cross-sectional equivalency criteria of the 2009 guidelines were set up for HPV DNA assays. Demonstration of a low risk of CIN3+ after a negative APTIMA test over a longer period is awaited to inform us about its utility in cervical cancer screening at 5-year or longer intervals. PMID:25936581

  10. Optimization and validation of two miniaturized glucocerebrosidase enzyme assays for high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Urban, Daniel J; Zheng, Wei; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Jadhav, Ajit; Lamarca, Mary E; Inglese, James; Sidransky, Ellen; Austin, Christopher P

    2008-12-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GC) catalyzes the hydrolysis of beta-glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide in lysosomes. Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) result in Gaucher disease, an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Many of the mutations encountered in patients with Gaucher disease are missense alterations that may cause misfolding, decreased stability and/or mistrafficking of this lysosomal protein. Some inhibitors of GC have been shown to act as chemical chaperones, stabilizing the conformation of mutant proteins and thus restoring their function. High throughput screening (HTS) of small molecule libraries for such compounds with potential for chaperone therapy requires an accurate, reproducible and sensitive assay method. We have adapted and optimized two fluorogenic GC enzyme assays and miniaturized them into the 1536-well plate format for HTS. The two substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucopyranoside and resorufin beta-D-glucopyranoside, have K(m) values of 768 microM and 33 microM, respectively, and different emission spectra. Paired screening with the two assays helps to eliminate false inference of activity due to autofluorescence or fluorescence quenching by the screened compounds. Test screens with the LOPAC library indicated that both assays were robust for HTS, and gave comparable results for GC inhibitor activities. These two assays can be used to identify both GC activators and inhibitors with potential therapeutic value. PMID:19075603

  11. Optimization and Validation of Two Miniaturized Glucocerebrosidase Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Daniel J.; Zheng, Wei; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Jadhav, Ajit; LaMarca, Mary E.; Inglese, James; Sidransky, Ellen; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GC) catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide in lysosomes. Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) result in Gaucher disease, an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Many of the mutations encountered in patients with Gaucher disease are missense alterations that may cause misfolding, decreased stability and/or mistrafficking of this lysosomal protein. Some inhibitors of GC have been shown to act as chemical chaperones, stabilizing the conformation of mutant proteins and thus restoring their function. High-throughput screening (HTS) of small molecule libraries for such compounds with potential for chaperone therapy requires an accurate, reproducible and sensitive assay method. We have adapted and optimized two fluorogenic GC enzyme assays and miniaturized them into the 1536-well plate format for HTS. The two substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl β-D-glucopyranoside and resorufin β-D-glucopyranoside, have Km values of 768 μM and 33 μM, respectively, and different emission spectra. Paired screening with the two assays helps to eliminate false inference of activity due to autofluorescence or fluorescence quenching by the screened compounds. Test screens with the LOPAC library indicated that both assays were robust for HTS, and gave comparable results for GC inhibitor activities. These two assays can be used to identify both GC activators and inhibitors with potential therapeutic value. PMID:19075603

  12. Phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay and EpiSkin® in assessment of drug therapies destined for skin administration.

    PubMed

    Engesland, André; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2015-03-01

    Cost-effective and efficient methods for permeability screening are crucial during early development of drugs, drug formulations, and cosmeceuticals. Alternatives to animal experiments are impelled for both economical and ethical reasons. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of the phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay (PVPA) to assess the effect of different formulations on drug permeability and thus establish its utility in formulation development. Three model drugs were tested in solutions and as liposomal formulations. The permeability results for the PVPA models were compared with the results for the reconstructed human skin model, EpiSkin(®). The drugs were ranked based on their estimated penetration potentials, and the results were in accordance with what was expected considering the physicochemical properties of the drugs. PVPAs (E-80, ceramide, cholesterol, cholesteryl sulfate, and palmitic acid) was able to distinguish between drug solutions and liposomal formulations; however, EpiSkin(®) detected only small differences between the drugs in solution and formulations. In contrast with EpiSkin(®), which is limited by a 3-day testing window, PVPA barriers can be stored frozen for up to 2 weeks or even up to 16 months, depending on their compositions. The PVPA models are thus more cost effective and efficient than the EpiSkin(®) model for permeability screening during early drug development. PMID:25558045

  13. Performance characteristics of an ELISA screening assay for urinary synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Eliani; Barnes, Allan J; Young, Sheena; Castaneto, Marisol S; Martin, Thomas M; Klette, Kevin L; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are marketed as legal alternatives to cannabis, as routine urine cannabinoid immunoassays do not detect synthetic cannabinoids. Laboratories are challenged to identify these new designer drugs that are widely available and represent a major public health and safety problem. Immunoassay testing offers rapid separation of presumptive positive and negative specimens, prior to more costly and time-consuming chromatographic confirmation. The Neogen SPICE ELISA kit targets JWH-018 N-pentanoic acid as a marker for urinary synthetic cannabinoids. Assay performance was evaluated by analyzing 2469 authentic urine samples with the Neogen immunoassay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Two immunoassay cut-off concentrations, 5 and 10 µg/L, classified samples as presumptive positive or negative, followed by qualitative LC-MS/MS confirmation for 29 synthetic cannabinoids markers with limits of detection of 0.5-10 µg/L to determine the assay's sensitivity, specificity and efficacy. Challenges at ±25% of each cut-off also were investigated to determine performance around the cut-off and intra- and inter-plate imprecision. The immunoassay was linear from 1 to 250 µg/L (r(2)  = 0.992) with intra- and inter-plate imprecision of ≤5.3% and <9%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency results with the 5 µg/L cut-off were 79.9%, 99.7%, and 97.4% and with the 10 µg/L cut-off 69.3%, 99.8%, and 96.3%, respectively. Cross-reactivity was shown for 18 of 73 synthetic cannabinoids markers evaluated. Good sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency, lack of sample preparation requirements, and rapid semi-automation documented that the Neogen SPICE ELISA kit is a viable method for screening synthetic cannabinoids in urine targeting JWH-018 N-pentanoic acid. PMID:25167963

  14. Discovering novel neuroactive drugs through high-throughput behavior-based chemical screening in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Giancarlo; Lakhani, Parth; Kokel, David

    2014-01-01

    Most neuroactive drugs were discovered through unexpected behavioral observations. Systematic behavioral screening is inefficient in most model organisms. But, automated technologies are enabling a new phase of discovery-based research in central nervous system (CNS) pharmacology. Researchers are using large-scale behavior-based chemical screens in zebrafish to discover compounds with new structures, targets, and functions. These compounds are powerful tools for understanding CNS signaling pathways. Substantial differences between human and zebrafish biology will make it difficult to translate these discoveries to clinical medicine. However, given the molecular genetic similarities between humans and zebrafish, it is likely that some of these compounds will have translational utility. We predict that the greatest new successes in CNS drug discovery will leverage many model systems, including in vitro assays, cells, rodents, and zebrafish. PMID:25104936

  15. siRNA Genome Screening Approaches to Therapeutic Drug Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Bakre, Abhijeet; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Bridging high-throughput screening (HTS) with RNA interference (RNAi) has allowed for rapid discovery of the molecular basis of many diseases, and identification of potential pathways for developing safe and effective treatments. These features have identified new host gene targets for existing drugs paving the pathway for therapeutic drug repositioning. Using RNAi to discover and help validate new drug targets has also provided a means to filter and prioritize promising therapeutics. This review summarizes these approaches across a spectrum of methods and targets in the host response to pathogens. Particular attention is given to the utility of drug repurposing utilizing the promiscuous nature of some drugs that affect multiple molecules or pathways, and how these biological pathways can be targeted to regulate disease outcome. PMID:24275945

  16. Virtual screening in drug discovery -- a computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A Srinivas; Pati, S Priyadarshini; Kumar, P Praveen; Pradeep, H N; Sastry, G Narahari

    2007-08-01

    Virtual screening emerged as an important tool in our quest to access novel drug like compounds. There are a wide range of comparable and contrasting methodological protocols available in screening databases for the lead compounds. The number of methods and software packages which employ the target and ligand based virtual screening are increasing at a rapid pace. However, the general understanding on the applicability and limitations of these methodologies is not emerging as fast as the developments of various methods. Therefore, it is extremely important to compare and contrast various protocols with practical examples to gauge the strength and applicability of various methods. The review provides a comprehensive appraisal on several of the available virtual screening methods to-date. Recent developments of the docking and similarity based methods have been discussed besides the descriptor selection and pharmacophore based searching. The review touches upon the application of statistical, graph theory based methods machine learning tools in virtual screening and combinatorial library design. Finally, several case studies are undertaken where the virtual screening technology has been applied successfully. A critical analysis of these case studies provides a good platform to estimate the applicability of various virtual screening methods in the new lead identification and optimization. PMID:17696867

  17. A Drug Combination Screen Identifies Drugs Active against Amoxicillin-Induced Round Bodies of In Vitro Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters from an FDA Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Although currently recommended antibiotics for Lyme disease such as doxycycline or amoxicillin cure the majority of the patients, about 10-20% of patients treated for Lyme disease may experience lingering symptoms including fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. Under experimental stress conditions such as starvation or antibiotic exposure, Borrelia burgdorferi can develop round body forms, which are a type of persister bacteria that appear resistant in vitro to customary first-line antibiotics for Lyme disease. To identify more effective drugs with activity against the round body form of B. burgdorferi, we established a round body persister model induced by exposure to amoxicillin (50 μg/ml) and then screened the Food and Drug Administration drug library consisting of 1581 drug compounds and also 22 drug combinations using the SYBR Green I/propidium iodide viability assay. We identified 23 drug candidates that have higher activity against the round bodies of B. burgdorferi than either amoxicillin or doxycycline. Eleven individual drugs scored better than metronidazole and tinidazole which have been previously described to be active against round bodies. In this amoxicillin-induced round body model, some drug candidates such as daptomycin and clofazimine also displayed enhanced activity which was similar to a previous screen against stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters not exposure to amoxicillin. Additional candidate drugs active against round bodies identified include artemisinin, ciprofloxacin, nifuroxime, fosfomycin, chlortetracycline, sulfacetamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfathiozole. Two triple drug combinations had the highest activity against amoxicillin-induced round bodies and stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters: artemisinin/cefoperazone/doxycycline and sulfachlorpyridazine/daptomycin/doxycycline. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that certain drug combinations have superior activity against B. burgdorferi

  18. A Drug Combination Screen Identifies Drugs Active against Amoxicillin-Induced Round Bodies of In Vitro Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters from an FDA Drug Library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Although currently recommended antibiotics for Lyme disease such as doxycycline or amoxicillin cure the majority of the patients, about 10–20% of patients treated for Lyme disease may experience lingering symptoms including fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. Under experimental stress conditions such as starvation or antibiotic exposure, Borrelia burgdorferi can develop round body forms, which are a type of persister bacteria that appear resistant in vitro to customary first-line antibiotics for Lyme disease. To identify more effective drugs with activity against the round body form of B. burgdorferi, we established a round body persister model induced by exposure to amoxicillin (50 μg/ml) and then screened the Food and Drug Administration drug library consisting of 1581 drug compounds and also 22 drug combinations using the SYBR Green I/propidium iodide viability assay. We identified 23 drug candidates that have higher activity against the round bodies of B. burgdorferi than either amoxicillin or doxycycline. Eleven individual drugs scored better than metronidazole and tinidazole which have been previously described to be active against round bodies. In this amoxicillin-induced round body model, some drug candidates such as daptomycin and clofazimine also displayed enhanced activity which was similar to a previous screen against stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters not exposure to amoxicillin. Additional candidate drugs active against round bodies identified include artemisinin, ciprofloxacin, nifuroxime, fosfomycin, chlortetracycline, sulfacetamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfathiozole. Two triple drug combinations had the highest activity against amoxicillin-induced round bodies and stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters: artemisinin/cefoperazone/doxycycline and sulfachlorpyridazine/daptomycin/doxycycline. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that certain drug combinations have superior activity against B. burgdorferi

  19. A survey of yeast genomic assays for drug and target discovery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew M.; Ammar, Ron; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the development and application of chemical genomic assays using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided powerful methods to identify the mechanism of action of known drugs and novel small molecules in vivo. These assays identify drug target candidates, genes involved in buffering drug target pathways and also help to define the general cellular response to small molecules. In this review, we examine current yeast chemical genomic assays and summarize the potential applications of each approach. PMID:20546776

  20. DEVELOPMENT, STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF THE MAMMALIAN IN VIVO ASSAYS IN THE PROPOSED TIER I SCREENING BATTERY FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research directly supports the development, standardization and validation of several Tier 1 screening mammalian in vivo assays. Through the development and use of many of these assays for testing specific hypothesis in their respective research programs, these investigato...

  1. A quantitative microfluidic angiogenesis screen for studying anti-angiogenic therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong; Kasuya, Junichi; Jeon, Jessie; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy, which suppresses tumor growth by disrupting oxygen and nutrient supply from blood to the tumor, is now widely accepted as a treatment for cancer. To investigate the mechanisms of action of these anti-angiogenesis drugs, new three dimensional (3D) cell culture-based drug screening models are increasingly employed. However, there is no in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) angiogenesis assay that can provide uniform culture conditions for the quantitative assessment of physiological responses to chemoattractant reagents under various concentrations of anti-angiogenesis drugs. Here we describe a method for screening and quantifying the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced chemotactic response on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured with different concentrations of bortezomib, a selective 26S proteasome inhibitor. With this quantitative microfluidic angiogenesis screen (QMAS), we demonstrate that bortezomib-induced endothelial cell death is preceded by a series of morphological changes that develop over several days. We also explore the mechanisms by which bortezomib can inhibit angiogenesis. PMID:25370780

  2. Chemical & RNAi screening at MSKCC: a collaborative platform to discover & repurpose drugs to fight disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Mahida, Jeni P.; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Ibáñez, Glorymar; Raja, Balajee Somalinga; Calder, Paul A.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) has implemented the creation of a full service state-of-the-art High-throughput Screening Core Facility (HTSCF) equipped with modern robotics and custom-built screening data management resources to rapidly store and query chemical and RNAi screening data outputs. The mission of the facility is to provide oncology clinicians and researchers alike with access to cost-effective HTS solutions for both chemical and RNAi screening, with an ultimate goal of novel target identification and drug discovery. HTSCF was established in 2003 to support the institution’s commitment to growth in molecular pharmacology and in the realm of therapeutic agents to fight chronic diseases such as cancer. This endeavor required broad range of expertise in technology development to establish robust and innovative assays, large collections of diverse chemical and RNAi duplexes to probe specific cellular events, sophisticated compound and data handling capabilities, and a profound knowledge in assay development, hit validation, and characterization. Our goal has been to strive for constant innovation, and we strongly believe in shifting the paradigm from traditional drug discovery towards translational research now, making allowance for unmet clinical needs in patients. Our efforts towards repurposing FDA-approved drugs fructified when digoxin, identified through primary HTS, was administered in the clinic for treatment of stage Vb retinoblastoma. In summary, the overall aim of our facility is to identify novel chemical probes, to study cellular processes relevant to investigator’s research interest in chemical biology and functional genomics, and to be instrumental in accelerating the process of drug discovery in academia. PMID:24661215

  3. A Developmental Toxicology Assay Platform for Screening Teratogenic Liability of Pharmaceutical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Augustine-Rauch, Karen; Zhang, Cindy X; Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M

    2016-02-01

    Increasing need for proactive safety optimization of pharmaceutical compounds has led to generation and/or refinement of in vitro developmental toxicology assays. Our laboratory has developed three in vitro developmental toxicology assays to assess teratogenic liability of pharmaceutical compounds. These assays included a mouse molecular embryonic stem cell assay (MESCA), a dechorionated zebrafish embryo culture (ZEC) assay, and a streamlined rat whole embryo culture (rWEC) assay. Individually, the assays presented good (73-82%) predictivity. However, it remains to be determined whether combining or tiering the assays could enhance performance. Seventy-three compounds representing a broad spectrum of pharmaceutical targets and chemistry were evaluated across the assays to generate testing strategies that optimized performance. The MESCA and ZEC assays were found to have two limitations: compound solubility and frequent misclassification of compounds with H1 receptor or GABAnergic activity. The streamlined rWEC assay was found to be a cost-effective stand-alone assay for supporting poorly soluble compounds and/or ones with H1 or GABAnergic activity. For all other compounds, a tiering strategy using the MESCA and ZEC assays additionally optimized throughput, cost, and minimized animal use. The tiered strategy resulted in improved performance achieving 88% overall predictivity and was comparable with 89% overall predictivity achieved with frequency analysis (final teratogenic classification made from most frequent teratogenic classification from each individual assay). Furthermore there were 21 compounds in the test set characterized as definitive or suspect human teratogens and the multiassay approach achieved 95 and 91% correct classification using the tiered or frequency screening approach, respectively. PMID:26729651

  4. Human Papillomavirus Assays and Cytology in Primary Cervical Screening of Women Aged 30 Years and Above.

    PubMed

    Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    In women aged ≥ 30 years, Human Papillomavirus testing will replace cytology for primary cervical screening. We compared Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART, and APTIMA HPV assays with cytology on 2869 SurePath samples from women undergoing routine screening at 30-65 years in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women with cytological abnormalities were managed according to routine recommendations, with 92% completeness. Those with cytology-normal/HPV-positive samples (on any of the four assays) were invited for repeated cytology and HPV testing in 1.5 year, and 58% had additional testing. HPV testing detected more ≥ CIN3 than cytology (HC2: 35, cobas, CLART: 37, APTIMA: 34, cytology: 31), although statistically the differences were not significant. Cobas and CLART detected significantly more ≥ CIN2 than cytology (cobas, CLART: 49, cytology: 39). The proportion of women with false-positive test results (positive test results without ≥ CIN3) varied between 3.3% with cytology and 14.9% with cobas. All HPV assays led to significantly more false-positive tests, whereas compared to HC2 cobas and CLART were associated with a significantly higher and APTIMA with a significantly lower proportion. Detection of CIN1 was particularly increased for the three DNA assays. With APTIMA combined with cytological triage, about 20% more women were referred for colposcopy than with cytology screening. With the three DNA assays, the increase was ≥ 50%. The number of women with repeated testing was twice as high with APTIMA and almost five times as high with cobas compared to cytology. To our knowledge, Horizon was the only study set in routine practice that compared more than two HPV assays in the same women while also ascertaining the histological status of women with normal cytology/HPV-positive test results. HPV-based screening of Danish women aged 30-65 detected more high-grade CIN but decreased the screening specificity, and increased the demand for additional testing. PMID:26789267

  5. Development of multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) culture from breast cancer cell and a high throughput screening method using the MTT assay.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    In comparison to monolayer cells, MCTS has been claimed as more suitable candidate for studying drug penetration due to the high resemblance to solid tumors. However, the cultivation of MCTS is cumbersome, time consuming, and most technique fail to generate spheroids with uniform sizes. Therefore, the application of spheroid cultures in high throughput screening has been rather limiting. Besides, the lack of a well established screening protocol method that is applicable to spheroid could also be attributed to this limitation. Here we report a simple way of cultivating homogenous MCTS cultures with compact and rigid structure from the MCF-7 cells. Besides, we had also made some modifications to the standard MTT assay to realize high throughput screening of these spheroids. Using the modified protocol, tamoxifen showed cytotoxicity effect towards MCTS cultures from MCF-7 with high consistency. The results correlated well with the cultures' response assessed by LDH release assay but the latter assay was not ideal for detecting a wide range of cytotoxicity due to high basal background reading. The MTT assay emerged as a better indicator to apoptosis event in comparison to the LDH release assay. Therefore, the method for spheroid generation and the modified MTT assay we reported here could be potentially applied to high throughput screening for response of spheroid cultures generated from MCF-7 as well as other cancer cell lines towards cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:22970274

  6. A Microscopic Phenotypic Assay for the Quantification of Intracellular Mycobacteria Adapted for High-throughput/High-content Screening

    PubMed Central

    Iantomasi, Raffaella; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Deboosère, Nathalie; Landry, Valérie; Baulard, Alain; Brodin, Priscille

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of therapy and vaccine, tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most deadly and widespread bacterial infections in the world. Since several decades, the sudden burst of multi- and extensively-drug resistant strains is a serious threat for the control of tuberculosis. Therefore, it is essential to identify new targets and pathways critical for the causative agent of the tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and to search for novel chemicals that could become TB drugs. One approach is to set up methods suitable for the genetic and chemical screens of large scale libraries enabling the search of a needle in a haystack. To this end, we developed a phenotypic assay relying on the detection of fluorescently labeled Mtb within fluorescently labeled host cells using automated confocal microscopy. This in vitro assay allows an image based quantification of the colonization process of Mtb into the host and was optimized for the 384-well microplate format, which is proper for screens of siRNA-, chemical compound- or Mtb mutant-libraries. The images are then processed for multiparametric analysis, which provides read out inferring on the pathogenesis of Mtb within host cells. PMID:24473237

  7. High throughput miniature drug-screening platform using bioprinting technology.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I; Zhang, Bimeng; Reyna, Daniel; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-09-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, new drugs are tested to find appropriate compounds for therapeutic purposes for contemporary diseases. Unfortunately, novel compounds emerge at expensive prices and current target evaluation processes have limited throughput, thus leading to an increase of cost and time for drug development. This work shows the development of the novel inkjet-based deposition method for assembling a miniature drug-screening platform, which can realistically and inexpensively evaluate biochemical reactions in a picoliter-scale volume at a high speed rate. As proof of concept, applying a modified Hewlett Packard model 5360 compact disc printer, green fluorescent protein expressing Escherichia coli cells along with alginate gel solution have been arrayed on a coverslip chip under a repeatable volume of 180% ± 26% picoliters per droplet; subsequently, different antibiotic droplets were patterned on the spots of cells to evaluate the inhibition of bacteria for antibiotic screening. The proposed platform was compared to the current screening process, validating its effectiveness. The viability and basic function of the printed cells were evaluated, resulting in cell viability above 98% and insignificant or no DNA damage to human kidney cells transfected. Based on the reduction of investment and compound volume used by this platform, this technique has the potential to improve the actual drug discovery process at its target evaluation stage. PMID:22728820

  8. Screening for Drug Abuse Among College Students: Modification of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannell, M. Barry; Favazza, Armando R.

    1978-01-01

    Modified version of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test was anonymously given to 245 college students on two Midwestern university campuses. Cutoff score for suspected drug abuse was set at five points. The percent of students scoring five or more points was 25 and 22 from campuses A and B respectively. (Author)

  9. Genome Editing-Enabled HTS Assays Expand Drug Target Pathways for Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation resulting in excess PMP22 protein causes the peripheral neuropathy Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, type 1A. To broadly interrogate chemically sensitive transcriptional pathways controlling PMP22 protein levels, we used the targeting precision of TALEN-mediated genome editing to embed reporters within the genetic locus harboring the Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 (Pmp22) gene. Using a Schwann cell line with constitutively high endogenous levels of Pmp22, we obtained allelic insertion of secreted bioluminescent reporters with sufficient signal to enable a 1536-well assay. Our findings from the quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) of several thousand drugs and clinically investigated compounds using this assay design both overlapped and expanded results from a previous assay using a randomly inserted reporter gene controlled by a single regulatory element of the Pmp22 gene. A key difference was the identification of a kinase-controlled inhibitory pathway of Pmp22 transcription revealed by the activity of the Protein kinase C (PKC)-modulator bryostatin. PMID:25188731

  10. Development of Tyrosinase Promoter-Based Fluorescent Assay for Screening of Anti-melanogenic Agents.

    PubMed

    Lee, JaeHo; Lee, SeungJun; Lee, ByungMan; Roh, KyungBaeg; Park, DeokHoon; Jung, EunSun

    2015-01-01

    For screening of skin-whitening ingredients that modulate inhibition of melanogenesis, tyrosinase promoter-based assay using a three-dimensional (3D) spheroid culture technique is a beneficial tool to improve the accuracy of raw material screening in cosmetics through mimicking of the in vivo microenvironment. Although the advantages of high-throughput screening (HTS) are widely known, there has been little focus on specific cell-based promoter assays for HTS in identifying skin-whitening ingredients that inhibit accumulation of melanin. The aim of this study was therefore to develop a large-scale compatible assay through pTyr-EGFP, an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-based tyrosinase-specific promoter, to seek potential melanogenesis inhibitors for cosmetic use. Herein, a stably transfected human melanoma cell line expressing EGFP under the control of a 2.2-kb fragment derived from the tyrosinase gene was generated. Spontaneous induction of the tyrosinase promoter by 3D spheroid culture resulted in increased expression of EGFP, providing a significant correlation with the tyrosinase mRNA level, and subsequent inhibition of tyrosinase activity. Importantly, the pTyr-EGFP system provided successful tracking of the changes in the live image and real-time monitoring. Thus tyrosinase promoter-based fluorescent assay using a 3D spheroid culture can be useful as a screening system for exploring the efficiency of anti-melanogenesis ingredients. PMID:26179334

  11. MAMMALIAN SCREENING ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON MALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAMMALIAN SCREENING ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF POTENTIAL
    ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON MALES.
    Authors: L E Gray 1 , J Furr 1 , M G Price 2 , C J Wolf 3 and J S Ostby 1
    Institutions: 1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NH...

  12. Development of a potato seedling assay to screen for resistance to Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seedling assay was developed for Verticillium wilt (VW) resistance in potato (Solanum tuberosum) in order to provide efficient and rapid screening to identify resistant clones in segregating populations. The method provides uniform inoculum to avoid false negatives and reduces the confusion of sy...

  13. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    PubMed

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  14. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kremastinou, J.; Polymerou, V.; Lavranos, D.; Aranda Arrufat, A.; Harwood, J.; Martínez Lorenzo, M. J.; Ng, K. P.; Queiros, L.; Vereb, I.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum. The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  15. Phenotypic assays to identify agents that induce reactive gliosis: a counter-screen to prioritize compounds for preclinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Samuel R; Jimenez, Joaquin E; Shi, Yan; Al-Ali, Hassan; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2015-09-01

    Astrocyte phenotypes change in a process called reactive gliosis after traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury. Astrogliosis is characterized by expansion of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) cytoskeleton, adoption of stellate morphologies, and differential expression of some extracellular matrix molecules. The astrocytic response immediately after injury is beneficial, but in the chronic injury phase, reactive astrocytes produce inhibitory factors (i.e., chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans [CSPGs]) that limit the regrowth of injured axons. There are no drugs that promote axon regeneration or functional recovery after CNS trauma in humans. To develop novel therapeutics for the injured CNS, we screened various libraries in a phenotypic assay to identify compounds that promote neurite outgrowth. However, the effects these compounds have on astrocytes are unknown. Specifically, we were interested in whether compounds could alter astrocytes in a manner that mimics the glial reaction to injury. To test this hypothesis, we developed cell-based phenotypic bioassays to measure changes in (1) GFAP morphology/localization and (2) CSPG expression/immunoreactivity from primary astrocyte cultures. These assays were optimized for six-point dose-response experiments in 96-well plates. The GFAP morphology assay is suitable for counter-screening with a Z-factor of 0.44±0.03 (mean±standard error of the mean; N=3 biological replicates). The CSPG assay is reproducible and informative, but does not satisfy common metrics for a "screenable" assay. As proof of principle, we tested a small set of hit compounds from our neurite outgrowth bioassay and identified one that can enhance axon growth without exacerbating the deleterious characteristics of reactive gliosis. PMID:26230074

  16. Saliva Polymerase-Chain-Reaction Assay for Cytomegalovirus Screening in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Boppana, Suresh B.; Ross, Shannon A.; Shimamura, Masako; Palmer, April L.; Ahmed, Amina; Michaels, Marian G.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bernstein, David I.; Tolan, Robert W.; Novak, Zdenek; Chowdhury, Nazma; Britt, William J.; Fowler, Karen B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an important cause of hearing loss, and most infants at risk for CMV-associated hearing loss are not identified early in life because of failure to test for the infection. The standard assay for newborn CMV screening is rapid culture performed on saliva specimens obtained at birth, but this assay cannot be automated. Two alternatives — real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR)–based testing of a liquid-saliva or dried-saliva specimen obtained at birth — have been developed. METHODS In our prospective, multicenter screening study of newborns, we compared real-time PCR assays of liquid-saliva and dried-saliva specimens with rapid culture of saliva specimens obtained at birth. RESULTS A total of 177 of 34,989 infants (0.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4 to 0.6) were positive for CMV, according to at least one of the three methods. Of 17,662 newborns screened with the use of the liquid-saliva PCR assay, 17,569 were negative for CMV, and the remaining 85 infants (0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.6) had positive results on both culture and PCR assay. The sensitivity and specificity of the liquid-saliva PCR assay were 100% (95% CI, 95.8 to 100) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values were 91.4% (95% CI, 83.8 to 96.2) and 100% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. Of 17,327 newborns screened by means of the dried-saliva PCR assay, 74 were positive for CMV, whereas 76 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.5) were found to be CMV-positive on rapid culture. Sensitivity and specificity of the dried-saliva PCR assay were 97.4% (95% CI, 90.8 to 99.7) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 90.2% (95% CI, 81.7 to 95.7) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9 to 100), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Real-time PCR assays of both liquid- and dried-saliva specimens showed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting CMV infection and should be

  17. 21 CFR 862.3645 - Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system. 862.3645 Section 862.3645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3645 - Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system. 862.3645 Section 862.3645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3645 - Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system. 862.3645 Section 862.3645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3645 - Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system. 862.3645 Section 862.3645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3645 - Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system. 862.3645 Section 862.3645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. Screening for noise in gene expression identifies drug synergies.

    PubMed

    Dar, Roy D; Hosmane, Nina N; Arkin, Michelle R; Siliciano, Robert F; Weinberger, Leor S

    2014-06-20

    Stochastic fluctuations are inherent to gene expression and can drive cell-fate specification. We used such fluctuations to modulate reactivation of HIV from latency-a quiescent state that is a major barrier to an HIV cure. By screening a diverse library of bioactive small molecules, we identified more than 80 compounds that modulated HIV gene-expression fluctuations (i.e., "noise"), without changing mean expression. These noise-modulating compounds would be neglected in conventional screens, and yet, they synergized with conventional transcriptional activators. Noise enhancers reactivated latent cells significantly better than existing best-in-class reactivation drug combinations (and with reduced off-target cytotoxicity), whereas noise suppressors stabilized latency. Noise-modulating chemicals may provide novel probes for the physiological consequences of noise and an unexplored axis for drug discovery, allowing enhanced control over diverse cell-fate decisions. PMID:24903562

  3. Towards novel therapeutics for HIV through fragment-based screening and drug design.

    PubMed

    Tiefendbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C David

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has been applied with varying levels of success to a number of proteins involved in the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) life cycle. Fragment-based approaches have led to the discovery of novel binding sites within protease, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and gp41. Novel compounds that bind to known pockets within CCR5 have also been identified via fragment screening, and a fragment-based approach to target the TAR-Tat interaction was explored. In the context of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), fragment-based approaches have yielded fragment hits with mid-μM activity in an in vitro activity assay, as well as fragment hits that are active against drug-resistant variants of RT. Fragment-based drug discovery is a powerful method to elucidate novel binding sites within proteins, and the method has had significant success in the context of HIV proteins. PMID:25455312

  4. A critical evaluation of in vitro cell culture models for high-throughput drug screening and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Astashkina, Anna; Mann, Brenda; Grainger, David W

    2012-04-01

    Drug candidate and toxicity screening processes currently rely on results from early-stage in vitro cell-based assays expected to faithfully represent essential aspects of in vivo pharmacology and toxicology. Several in vitro designs are optimized for high throughput to benefit screening efficiencies, allowing the entire libraries of potential pharmacologically relevant or possible toxin molecules to be screened for different types of cell signals relevant to tissue damage or to therapeutic goals. Creative approaches to multiplexed cell-based assay designs that select specific cell types, signaling pathways and reporters are routine. However, substantial percentages of new chemical and biological entities (NCEs/NBEs) that fail late-stage human drug testing, or receive regulatory "black box" warnings, or that are removed from the market for safety reasons after regulatory approvals all provide strong evidence that in vitro cell-based assays and subsequent preclinical in vivo studies do not yet provide sufficient pharmacological and toxicity data or reliable predictive capacity for understanding drug candidate performance in vivo. Without a reliable translational assay tool kit for pharmacology and toxicology, the drug development process is costly and inefficient in taking initial in vitro cell-based screens to in vivo testing and subsequent clinical approvals. Commonly employed methods of in vitro testing, including dissociated, organotypic, organ/explant, and 3-D cultures, are reviewed here with specific focus on retaining cell and molecular interactions and physiological parameters that determine cell phenotypes and their corresponding responses to bioactive agents. Distinct advantages and performance challenges for these models pertinent to cell-based assay and their predictive capabilities required for accurate correlations to in vivo mechanisms of drug toxicity are compared. PMID:22252140

  5. High efficacy vasopermeability drug candidates identified by screening in an ex ovo chorioallantoic membrane model

    PubMed Central

    Pink, Desmond; Luhrs, Keith A.; Zhou, Longen; Schulte, Wendy; Chase, Jennifer; Frosch, Christian; Haberl, Udo; Nguyen, Van; Roy, Aparna I.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries; Parseghian, Missag H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of rodent models to evaluate efficacy during testing is accompanied by significant economic and regulatory hurdles which compound the costs of screening for promising drug candidates. Vasopermeation Enhancement Agents (VEAs) are a new class of biologics that are designed to increase the uptake of cancer therapeutics at the tumor site by modifying vascular permeability in the tumor to increase the therapeutic index of co-administered drugs. To evaluate the efficacy of a panel of VEA clinical candidates, we compared the rodent Miles assay to an equivalent assay in the ex ovo chicken embryo model. Both model systems identified the same candidate (PVL 10) as the most active promoter of vasopermeation in non-tumor tissues. An ex ovo chicken embryo system was utilized to test each candidate VEA in two human tumor models at a range of concentrations. Vasopermeation activity due to VEA was dependent on tumor type, with HEp3 tumors displaying higher levels of vasopermeation than MDA-MB-435. One candidate (PVL 10) proved optimal for HEp3 tumors and another (PVL 2) for MDA-MB-435. The use of the ex ovo chicken embryo model provides a rapid and less costly alternative to the use of rodent models for preclinical screening of drug candidates. PMID:26510887

  6. Tubulin-binding drug screening by MALDI-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Hannewald, Paul; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2006-07-01

    Despite a large amount of drugs available to treat cancer, none is totally satisfactory with respect to its tolerance or side effects. It is very important to discover new compounds that exhibit specific features such as binding to proteic targets. Given the clinical successes of the poisons of the mitotic spindle chemotherapeutic agent class, it is often considered that tubulin represents one of the best cancer targets identified so far, and it seems likely that discovering new drugs of this class will significantly improve the range of active chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this work is to present the new screening test that has been developed in our laboratory in order to study the binding of compounds to tubulin. We have developed a screening protocol involving three sampling strategies before the MALDI-TOFMS analysis. The three strategies give very accurate and reproducible results and could therefore possibly be used in screening campaigns. We have also proved that no unspecific binding can provide a loss of specificity of the test. Our protocol presents all the requirements for being a useful tool to screen the binding of compounds to tubulin. PMID:16808446

  7. Building a Tiered Approach to In Vitro Predictive Toxicity Screening: A Focus on Assays with In Vivo Relevance

    PubMed Central

    McKim, James M

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry today is the failure of promising new drug candidates due to unanticipated adverse effects discovered during preclinical animal safety studies and clinical trials. Late stage attrition increases the time required to bring a new drug to market, inflates development costs, and represents a major source of inefficiency in the drug discovery/development process. It is generally recognized that early evaluation of new drug candidates is necessary to improve the process. Building in vitro data sets that can accurately predict adverse effects in vivo would allow compounds with high risk profiles to be deprioritized, while those that possess the requisite drug attributes and a lower risk profile are brought forward. In vitro cytotoxicity assays have been used for decades as a tool to understand hypotheses driven questions regarding mechanisms of toxicity. However, when used in a prospective manner, they have not been highly predictive of in vivo toxicity. Therefore, the issue may not be how to collect in vitro toxicity data, but rather how to translate in vitro toxicity data into meaningful in vivo effects. This review will focus on the development of an in vitro toxicity screening strategy that is based on a tiered approach to data collection combined with data interpretation. PMID:20053163

  8. A stereospecific solid-phase screening assay for colonies expressing both (R)- and (S)-selective ω-aminotransferases.

    PubMed

    Willies, Simon C; Galman, James L; Slabu, Iustina; Turner, Nicholas J

    2016-02-28

    A novel solid-phase screening assay was developed for colonies expressing both (R)- and (S)-selective ω-aminotransferases. This high-throughput assay can be used to screen rapidly large variant libraries with enhanced substrate selectivity and enantioselectivities. PMID:26755753

  9. Recombinant virus assay: a rapid, phenotypic assay for assessment of drug susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kellam, P; Larder, B A

    1994-01-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility assays for clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are required to monitor the development of drug resistance during clinical trials and antiretroviral drug therapy. First-generation phenotypic assays possess a number of drawbacks, not least the selection of unrepresentative virus populations during cocultivation. Here we describe a rapid phenotypic assay for the assessment of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. This procedure, called the recombinant virus assay, allows the generation of viable virus by homologous recombination of a PCR-derived pool of RT coding sequences into an RT-deleted, noninfectious proviral clone, pHIV delta BstEII. A nested PCR procedure has been optimized to allow the amplification of an RT pool from both uncultured and cocultured infected patient peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) DNA for subsequent use in the creation of recombinant viruses. Analysis of two patients during the course of zidovudine therapy showed that this approach produced viruses which accurately exhibited the same genotype and phenotype as that of the original infected PBL DNA. The recombinant virus assay can be performed in approximately 3 weeks without the use of donor PBLs and therefore represents a rapid, nonselective procedure for the assay of clinical isolates. Images PMID:8141575

  10. An Enzymatic Assay for High-Throughput Screening of Cytidine-Producing Microbial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huina; Liu, Yongfei; Zu, Xin; Li, Ning; Li, Feiran; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Cytidine is an industrially useful precursor for the production of antiviral compounds and a variety of industrial compounds. Interest in the microbial production of cytidine has grown recently and high-throughput screening of cytidine over-producers is an important approach in large-scale industrial production using microorganisms. An enzymatic assay for cytidine was developed combining cytidine deaminase (CDA) and indophenol method. CDA catalyzes the cleavage of cytidine to uridine and NH3, the latter of which can be accurately determined using the indophenol method. The assay was performed in 96-well plates and had a linear detection range of cytidine of 0.058 - 10 mM. This assay was used to determine the amount of cytidine in fermentation flasks and the results were compared with that of High Perfomance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method. The detection range of the CDA method is not as wide as that of the HPLC, furthermore the correlation factor of CDA method is not as high as that of HPLC. However, it was suitable for the detection of large numbers of crude samples and was applied to high-throughput screening for high cytidine-producing strains using 96-well deep-hole culture plates. This assay was proved to be simple, accurate, specific and suitable for cytidine detection and high-throughput screening of cytidine-producing strains in large numbers of samples (96 well or more). PMID:25816248