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Sample records for drug screening assay

  1. Multiplexed high content screening assays create a systems cell biology approach to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D Lansing; Giuliano, Kenneth A

    2005-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) has emerged as an important platform technology for early drug discovery from target identification through in vitro ADME/Tox. The focus is now on implementing multiplexed assays, developing and using advanced reagents and developing and harnessing more sophisticated informatics tools. Multiplexed HCS assays have the potential to dramatically improve the early drug discovery process by creating systems cell biology profiles on the activities of compounds. It is predicted that multiplexed HCS assays will accelerate the overall workflow and produce deeper functional knowledge, thereby permitting better decisions on what compounds to pursue.: PMID:24981842

  2. Multiplexed high content screening assays create a systems cell biology approach to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D Lansing; Giuliano, Kenneth A

    2005-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) has emerged as an important platform technology for early drug discovery from target identification through in vitro ADME/Tox. The focus is now on implementing multiplexed assays, developing and using advanced reagents and developing and harnessing more sophisticated informatics tools. Multiplexed HCS assays have the potential to dramatically improve the early drug discovery process by creating systems cell biology profiles on the activities of compounds. It is predicted that multiplexed HCS assays will accelerate the overall workflow and produce deeper functional knowledge, thereby permitting better decisions on what compounds to pursue. PMID:23570162

  3. Formalization, Annotation and Analysis of Diverse Drug and Probe Screening Assay Datasets Using the BioAssay Ontology (BAO)

    PubMed Central

    Vempati, Uma D.; Przydzial, Magdalena J.; Chung, Caty; Abeyruwan, Saminda; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Visser, Ubbo; Lemmon, Vance P.; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2012-01-01

    Huge amounts of high-throughput screening (HTS) data for probe and drug development projects are being generated in the pharmaceutical industry and more recently in the public sector. The resulting experimental datasets are increasingly being disseminated via publically accessible repositories. However, existing repositories lack sufficient metadata to describe the experiments and are often difficult to navigate by non-experts. The lack of standardized descriptions and semantics of biological assays and screening results hinder targeted data retrieval, integration, aggregation, and analyses across different HTS datasets, for example to infer mechanisms of action of small molecule perturbagens. To address these limitations, we created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO). BAO has been developed with a focus on data integration and analysis enabling the classification of assays and screening results by concepts that relate to format, assay design, technology, target, and endpoint. Previously, we reported on the higher-level design of BAO and on the semantic querying capabilities offered by the ontology-indexed triple store of HTS data. Here, we report on our detailed design, annotation pipeline, substantially enlarged annotation knowledgebase, and analysis results. We used BAO to annotate assays from the largest public HTS data repository, PubChem, and demonstrate its utility to categorize and analyze diverse HTS results from numerous experiments. BAO is publically available from the NCBO BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/1533. BAO provides controlled terminology and uniform scope to report probe and drug discovery screening assays and results. BAO leverages description logic to formalize the domain knowledge and facilitate the semantic integration with diverse other resources. As a consequence, BAO offers the potential to infer new knowledge from a corpus of assay results, for example molecular mechanisms of action of perturbagens. PMID:23155465

  4. Application of a human tumor colony-forming assay to new drug screening.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, R H; Wolpert-DeFilippes, M K; Kern, D H; Lieber, M M; Makuch, R W; Melnick, N R; Miller, W T; Salmon, S E; Simon, R M; Venditti, J M

    1985-05-01

    The applicability of a human tumor colony-forming assay to drug screening was investigated in terms of feasibility, validity, and potential for discovering new antitumor drugs. Feasibility was addressed in a pilot study during which basic methods, appropriate assay quality controls, and a standardized protocol for screening were developed. Considerable variability was noted in the availability and colony growth of different tumor types. The majority of the evaluable experiments utilized breast, colorectal, kidney, lung, melanoma, or ovarian tumors. For many tumor types, little evidence of growth was observed, or only rare specimens formed colonies. Colony-forming efficiencies ranged from 0.05 to 0.11% for the six most useful tumors listed above. A set of quality control measures was developed to address technical problems inherent in the assay. Testing of standard agents in the pilot study established that most of these agents could be detected as active. However, it also identified three assay limitations: compounds requiring systemic metabolic activation are inactive; medium constituents may block the activity of certain antimetabolites; and compounds without therapeutic efficacy may be positive in the assay. The assay categorized nontoxic clinically ineffective agents as true negatives with 97% accuracy. Of 79 compounds which were negative in the current National Cancer Institute prescreen (leukemia P388), 14 were active in the assay. Several demonstrated outstanding in vitro activity and are structurally unrelated to compounds already in development or in clinical trials. A subset of these active compounds were found to lack activity in a P388 in vitro colony-forming assay. This indication of differential cytotoxicity to human tumor cells makes this subset of compounds particularly interesting as antitumor drug leads. The demonstrated sensitivity to most standard agents, discrimination of nontoxic compounds, reproducibility of survival values within assays and between laboratories, and evidence of ability to identify active compounds which were negative in the in vivo prescreen suggest that the human tumor colony-forming assay may be a valuable tool for antitumor drug screening. However, because of technical limitations inherent in the current assay methodology, this must be confined to selected tumor types and limited to screening on a moderate scale. PMID:3986767

  5. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

    PubMed

    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if these are potential hits because of their rational design. Therefore, the low throughput rate could be partially balanced by a higher performance when compared to what is done in a robotic high throughput screening where simplification of assay conditions can lead to false negative results. PMID:11258048

  6. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  7. Cell-Based Assay Design for High-Content Screening of Drug Candidates.

    PubMed

    Nierode, Gregory; Kwon, Paul S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kwon, Seok-Joon

    2016-02-28

    To reduce attrition in drug development, it is crucial to consider the development and implementation of translational phenotypic assays as well as decipher diverse molecular mechanisms of action for new molecular entities. High-throughput fluorescence and confocal microscopes with advanced analysis software have simplified the simultaneous identification and quantification of various cellular processes through what is now referred to as highcontent screening (HCS). HCS permits automated identification of modifiers of accessible and biologically relevant targets and can thus be used to detect gene interactions or identify toxic pathways of drug candidates to improve drug discovery and development processes. In this review, we summarize several HCS-compatible, biochemical, and molecular biology-driven assays, including immunohistochemistry, RNAi, reporter gene assay, CRISPR-Cas9 system, and protein-protein interactions to assess a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, morphological changes, protein expression, localization, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. These cell-based assay methods can be applied to not only 2D cell culture but also 3D cell culture systems in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26428732

  8. Alternative to the soft-agar assay that permits high-throughput drug and genetic screens for cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Asaf; Janzer, Andreas; Izar, Benjamin; Ji, Zhe; Doench, John G.; Garraway, Levi A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation in soft agar is the gold-standard assay for cellular transformation in vitro, but it is unsuited for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe an assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the soft-agar assay. Using GILA, we describe high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. Such molecules are unlikely to be found through conventional drug screening, and they include kinase inhibitors and drugs for noncancer diseases. In addition to known oncogenes, the genetic screen identifies genes that contribute to cellular transformation. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of Food and Drug Administration-approved noncancer drugs to selectively kill ovarian cancer cells derived from patients with chemotherapy-resistant disease, suggesting this approach may provide useful information for personalized cancer treatment. PMID:25902495

  9. Cellular impedance assays for predictive preclinical drug screening of kinase inhibitor cardiovascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lamore, Sarah D; Kamendi, Harriet W; Scott, Clay W; Dragan, Yvonne P; Peters, Matthew F

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is a leading contributor to drug attrition. Implementing earlier testing has successfully reduced human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene-related arrhythmias. How- ever, analogous assays targeting functional CV effects remain elusive. Demand to address this gap is particularly acute for kinase inhibitors (KIs) that suffer frequent CV toxicity. The drug class also presents some particularly challenging requirements for assessing functional CV toxicity. Specifically, an assay must sense a downstream response that integrates diverse kinase signaling pathways. In addition, sufficient throughput is essential for handling inherent KI nonselectivity. A new opportunity has emerged with cellular impedance technology, which detects spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes. Impedance assays sense morphology changes downstream of cardiomyocyte contraction. To evaluate cardiomyocyte impedance assays for KI screening, we investigated two distinct KI classes where CV toxicity was discovered late and target risks remain unresolved. Microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK) inhibitors decrease blood pressure in dogs, whereas checkpoint kinase (Chk) inhibitors (AZD7762, SCH900776) exhibit dose-limiting CV toxicities in clinical trials. These in vivo effects manifested in vitro as cardiomyocyte beat cessation. MARK effects were deemed mechanism associated because beat inhibition potencies correlated with kinase inhibition, and gene knockdown and microtubule-targeting agents suppressed beating. MARK inhibitor impedance and kinase potencies aligned with rat blood pressure effects. Chk inhibitor effects were judged off-target because Chk and beat inhibition potencies did not correlate and knockdowns did not alter beating. Taken together, the data demonstrate that cardiomyocyte impedance assays can address three unmet needs-detecting KI functional cardiotoxicity in vitro, determining mechanism of action, and supporting safety structure-activity relationships. PMID:23897988

  10. Cheburator Software for Automatically Calculating Drug Inhibitory Concentrations from In Vitro Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nevozhay, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    In the process of new cancer drug development, as the first step of their assessment, their activities are usually studied in vitro against a panel of cancer cell lines. The results of these in vitro drug screening assays are commonly expressed as inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50): the concentration of the tested agent that inhibits the proliferation of the cancer cell population to 50% of the theoretically possible effect (absolute IC50) or maximum effect practically achieved by the drug (relative IC50). The currently available software for calculating IC50 values requires manual data entry, is time consuming, and is prone to calculation errors. Thus, we have developed open source, free, easy-to-use software for performing standardized data evaluations and automatically calculating the IC50. This software eliminates the laborious and error-prone manual entry of data, substantially reduces the amount of time spent for data analysis. It has been extensively used in our department as the main tool for in vitro data processing during the past several years and can be useful for other research groups working in the area of anticancer drug discovery, either alone or combined with other software packages. The current version of our program, Cheburator, together with sample data, source code, and documentation, is freely available at the following URL: http://www.cheburator.nevozhay.com (it is free for academic use, but a license is required for commercial use). PMID:25184280

  11. Optimization of a Fluorescence-Based Assay for Large-Scale Drug Screening against Babesia and Theileria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Mohamed Alaa; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; El Said, El Said El Shirbini; Elsayed, Gehad; El-Khodery, Sabry; El-Ashker, Maged; Elsify, Ahmed; Omar, Mosaab; Salama, Akram; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and accurate assay for evaluating antibabesial drugs on a large scale is required for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia parasites. In the current study, we evaluated the usefulness of a fluorescence-based assay for determining the efficacies of antibabesial compounds against bovine and equine hemoparasites in in vitro cultures. Three different hematocrits (HCTs; 2.5%, 5%, and 10%) were used without daily replacement of the medium. The results of a high-throughput screening assay revealed that the best HCT was 2.5% for bovine Babesia parasites and 5% for equine Babesia and Theileria parasites. The IC50 values of diminazene aceturate obtained by fluorescence and microscopy did not differ significantly. Likewise, the IC50 values of luteolin, pyronaridine tetraphosphate, nimbolide, gedunin, and enoxacin did not differ between the two methods. In conclusion, our fluorescence-based assay uses low HCT and does not require daily replacement of culture medium, making it highly suitable for in vitro large-scale drug screening against Babesia and Theileria parasites that infect cattle and horses. PMID:25915529

  12. An ex-vivo angiogenesis assay as a screening method for natural compounds and herbal drug preparations.

    PubMed

    Baróniková, Slávka; Apers, Sandra; Vanden Berghe, Dirk; Cos, Paul; Vermeulen, Peter; Van Daele, André; Pieters, Luc; Van Marck, Eric; Vlietinck, Arnold

    2004-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a fundamental component of complex biological processes, including oncogenesis. The aim of this work was to optimise and validate an ex-vivo angiogenesis assay as a quantitative (PC image) biological method for testing promising natural compounds and herbal drug preparations for their pro-/anti-angiogenic activity. The bioassay is based on the principle of wound healing and quantifies the effect of angiogenic agents on neovessel outgrowth of human placental vessels embedded in a three-dimensional fibrin matrix. The assay was validated by using known, well characterised pro- and anti-angiogenic effectors (basic fibroblast growth factor and carboxyamidotriazole, respectively), and an angiogenesis inhibitor of plant origin (green tea leaves extract) was used as a reference product to demonstrate the applicability of the assay for plant extracts. Other standardised plant extracts prepared from olive tree leaves and horse chestnut seeds were tested for their angiogenic potential, but showed only slight inhibitory or no activity, respectively. The results presented here indicate that this human ex-vivo angiogenic assay is "ready to use" for screening of herbal drug preparations and pure compounds. PMID:15490313

  13. Investigating the therapeutic potential of herbal leads against drug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by computational virtual screening and in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Pachiappan, Anitha; Joy, Jeenu; Bhaduri, Rupam; Aier, Imlimaong; S Vasist, Kiran

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a Gram-positive opportunistic food-borne pathogen, naturally resistant to many antibiotics and acquired resistance may be a concern in the nearer future. Hence, there is a scope for screening of novel therapeutic agents and drug targets, toward the treatment of fatal listeria infections. The SecA homologs, SecA1 and SecA2 are the essential components of the general secretion (Sec) pathway, a specialised protein export system, present in L. monocytogenes. This study evaluates the use of botanicals against L. monocytogenes MTCC 1143 by considering SecA proteins as probable drug targets by high-throughput screening approaches. The 3D structure of SecA proteins with good stereochemical validity was generated by comparative modelling. The druglikeness and pharmacokinetic properties of 97 phytoligands identified through the extensive literature survey were predicted for druglikeness and ADMET properties. The inhibitory properties of best candidates were studied by molecular docking. The effect of the selected candidate molecules were further analysed in vitro well diffusion and cell aggregation assays. The antibiotic sensitivity profiling applied to L. monocytogenes MTCC 1143 using clinically relevant antibiotics showed that the bacteria became drug resistant to many tested antibiotics. The virtual screening suggested that .05M cinnamic aldehyde from Cinnamomum camphora and 1, 2-Epoxycyclododecane from Cassia auriculata were identified as potential SecA inhibitors. The well diffusion assays suggested that the selected herbal substances have antibacterial activities. Further, preliminary validation suggested that incorporation of cinnamic aldehyde and methanolic or ethyl acetate extract of C. auriculata in broth medium shows growth reduction, misassembly and cell aggregation. This indicates the inhibition of SecA targets. PMID:25562366

  14. A Novel High Throughput Assay for Anthelmintic Drug Screening and Resistance Diagnosis by Real-Time Monitoring of Parasite Motility

    PubMed Central

    Smout, Michael J.; Kotze, Andrew C.; McCarthy, James S.; Loukas, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Background Helminth parasites cause untold morbidity and mortality to billions of people and livestock. Anthelmintic drugs are available but resistance is a problem in livestock parasites, and is a looming threat for human helminths. Testing the efficacy of available anthelmintic drugs and development of new drugs is hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, drug effect is assessed by observing motility or development of parasites using laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence) that can simply and objectively assess anthelmintic effects by measuring parasite motility in real time in a fully automated high-throughput fashion. We quantitatively assessed motility and determined real time IC50 values of different anthelmintic drugs against several developmental stages of major helminth pathogens of humans and livestock, including larval Haemonchus contortus and Strongyloides ratti, and adult hookworms and blood flukes. The assay enabled quantification of the onset of egg hatching in real time, and the impact of drugs on hatch rate, as well as discriminating between the effects of drugs on motility of drug-susceptible and –resistant isolates of H. contortus. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that this technique will be suitable for discovery and development of new anthelmintic drugs as well as for detection of phenotypic resistance to existing drugs for the majority of helminths and other pathogens where motility is a measure of pathogen viability. The method is also amenable to use for other purposes where motility is assessed, such as gene silencing or antibody-mediated killing. PMID:21103363

  15. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePLUS

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  16. Detectability of new psychoactive substances, 'legal highs', in CEDIA, EMIT, and KIMS immunochemical screening assays for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Beck, Olof; Rausberg, Linnea; Al-Saffar, Yasir; Villen, Tomas; Karlsson, Lennart; Hansson, Therese; Helander, Anders

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of new psychoactive substances made available for recreational drug use has created a challenge for clinical toxicology and drug testing laboratories. As a consequence, the routine immunoassay drug testing may become less effective due to an increased occurrence of false negative and false positive screening results. This work aimed to extend the knowledge about analytical cross-reactivity of new substances in selected CEDIA, EMIT, and KIMS immunoassays for drugs-of-abuse screening. Urine standards were prepared by spiking blank urine with 45 new substances. Authentic urine samples from intoxication cases identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were also studied. Several new psychoactive substances were demonstrated to display cross-reactivity in the immunoassays. CEDIA Amphetamine/Ecstasy and EMIT d.a.u. Amphetamine Class tests showed the highest reactivity towards the new drugs, which was expected since many have amphetamine-like structure and activity. In the samples from authentic cases, five new substances displayed 100% detection rate in the CEDIA Amphetamine/Ecstasy test. In conclusion, cross-reactivity data in routine urine drug screening immunoassays for a number of new psychoactive substances not studied before were reported. In both spiked and authentic urine samples, some new substances showed significant cross-reactivity and are thus detectable in the routine screening methods. PMID:24665024

  17. Rapid identification and drug susceptibility screening of ESAT-6 secreting Mycobacteria by a NanoELIwell assay.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yen H; Ma, Xin; Qin, Lidong

    2012-01-01

    To meet the global needs of tuberculosis (TB) control, a nanoELIwell device was developed as a multifunctional assay for TB diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing. The device integrates on-chip culturing of mycobacteria, immunoassay, and high-resolution fluorescent imaging. Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium kansasii were used as models of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to evaluate device integrity by using antigens, Ag85 and ESAT-6, as biomarkers. As a result, the nanoELIwell device detected antigens released from a single bacterium within 24-48-hour culture. Antimycobacterial drug-treated M. smegmatis showed significant decreased in Ag85 antigen production when treated with ethambutol and no change in antigen production when treated with rifampin, demonstrating drug susceptibility and resistance, respectively. The nanoELIwell assay also distinguished the ESAT-6-secreting M. kansasii from the non-ESAT-6-secreting M. simiae. The combination of microwell technology and ELISA assay holds potential to the development of a rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostics and susceptibility testing of TB. PMID:22957139

  18. Drug-induced Sensitization of Adenylyl Cyclase: Assay Streamlining and Miniaturization for Small Molecule and siRNA Screening Applications

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Jason M.; Brust, Tarsis F.; Xu, Ruqiang; Burris, Kevin D.; Watts, Val J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitization of adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurologic disorders including substance abuse and Parkinson's disease. Acute activation of Gαi/o-linked receptors inhibits AC activity, whereas persistent activation of these receptors results in heterologous sensitization of AC and increased levels of intracellular cAMP. Previous studies have demonstrated that this enhancement of AC responsiveness is observed both in vitro and in vivo following the chronic activation of several types of Gαi/o-linked receptors including D2 dopamine and μ opioid receptors. Although heterologous sensitization of AC was first reported four decades ago, the mechanism(s) that underlie this phenomenon remain largely unknown. The lack of mechanistic data presumably reflects the complexity involved with this adaptive response, suggesting that nonbiased approaches could aid in identifying the molecular pathways involved in heterologous sensitization of AC. Previous studies have implicated kinase and Gbγ signaling as overlapping components that regulate the heterologous sensitization of AC. To identify unique and additional overlapping targets associated with sensitization of AC, the development and validation of a scalable cAMP sensitization assay is required for greater throughput. Previous approaches to study sensitization are generally cumbersome involving continuous cell culture maintenance as well as a complex methodology for measuring cAMP accumulation that involves multiple wash steps. Thus, the development of a robust cell-based assay that can be used for high throughput screening (HTS) in a 384 well format would facilitate future studies. Using two D2 dopamine receptor cellular models (i.e. CHO-D2L and HEK-AC6/D2L), we have converted our 48-well sensitization assay (>20 steps 4-5 days) to a five-step, single day assay in 384-well format. This new format is amenable to small molecule screening, and we demonstrate that this assay design can also be readily used for reverse transfection of siRNA in anticipation of targeted siRNA library screening. PMID:24514897

  19. Quantitative RT-PCR assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of drugs against the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed a qRT-PCR assay to assess drug efficacy on the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro by detecting the levels of parasite 18S rRNA. This approach displayed up to four orders of magnitude of linear dynamic range and was much less labor-intensive than the traditional microscopic methods. However, conventional qRT-PCR protocol is not very amendable to high-throughput analysis when total RNA needs to be purified by lengthy, multi-step procedures. Recently, several commercial reagents are available for preparing cell lysates that could be directly used in downstream qRT-PCR analysis (e.g., Ambion Cell-to-cDNA kit and Bio-Rad iScript sample preparation reagent). Using these reagents, we are able to adapt the qRT-PCR assay into high-throughput screening of drugs in vitro (i.e., 96-well and 384-well formats for the cultivation of parasites and qRT-PCR detection, respectively). This qRT-PCR protocol is able to give a >150-fold linear dynamic range using samples isolated from cells infected with various numbers of parasites. The new assay is also validated by the NIH-recommended intra-plate, inter-plate, and inter-day uniformity tests. The robustness and effectiveness of the assay are also confirmed by evaluating the anti-cryptosporidial efficacy of paromomycin and by a small scale screening of compounds. PMID:26441920

  20. Cross-reactivity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay in drugs-of-abuse screening: influence of dose and metabolites of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jon Andsnes; Schjøtt, Jan; Fossan, Kjell O; Riedel, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA) for buprenorphine is applied for both urine drugs-of-abuse screening and compliance monitoring. Sensitivity, specificity, and optimal cutoff of this assay have differed between studies. This may indicate that cross-reactivity has to be taken into account during assay evaluation. We therefore investigated the performance of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay for use in our patient population and explored the impact of cross-reactivity on assay accuracy. Methods The CEDIA buprenorphine assay and high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry were employed to analyze drugs-of-abuse in urine samples from a healthy drug-naïve male volunteer after intake of two tablets of a prescription drug containing 400 mg paracetamol +30 mg codeine phosphate, and in urine samples (n=2,272) from drug-addicted patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to express the diagnostic accuracy of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. Results CEDIA buprenorphine was positive in one urine sample from the drug-naïve person after intake of the prescription drug. Twenty-five (1.1%) of the patient urine samples were positive for buprenorphine by CEDIA, but negative by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Codeine, morphine, and their respective metabolites were prevalent in samples that were false positive for buprenorphine. The specificity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay increased to 99.7% when the cutoff was increased from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. Conclusion Intake of a therapeutic dose of codeine can yield a false-positive CEDIA buprenorphine result. Additive effects from metabolites of codeine contribute to cross-reactivity in concentrations much lower than listed in the manufacturer’s cross-reactivity guide. Raising the cutoff from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL increased the diagnostic accuracy. Clinicians should be informed about the risk of false-positive results with the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. PMID:26604854

  1. Hydrogel-based diffusion chip with Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) integration for cell viability assay and drug toxicity screening.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong Binh; Cho, Sungbo; Min, Junhong

    2013-12-15

    In this study, we have provided a novel analytical integration between hydrogel-based cell chip and Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) technique to apply to a high-throughput, real-time cell viability assay and drug screening. For simulating the drug diffusion model, we have developed a hydrogel-based tissue-mimicking structure with microfluidic channel, without unwanted flow, to generate a gradient concentration with long-term stability. Along the gradient line, four individual micro-electrodes were installed to record the impedance signal changes, which result from the cell viability under drug effects. By watching for cellular impedance changes, we successfully estimated the cytotoxicity of the treatment corresponding to the various concentration values of stimuli, generated by the diffusion process along the channel. Reliable IC50 values and time-dose relationships were also achieved. With the feature of real-time monitoring capability, the advantages of non-invasion, label-free detection, time saving and simple manipulation, our integrative device has become a promising high throughput cell-based on-chip platform for cell viability assay and drug screening. PMID:23911660

  2. An aptamer-based bio-barcode assay with isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification for cytochrome-c detection and anti-cancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Loo, Jacky F C; Lau, P M; Ho, H P; Kong, S K

    2013-10-15

    Based on a recently reported ultra-sensitive bio-barcode (BBC) assay, we have developed an aptamer-based bio-barcode (ABC) alternative to detect a cell death marker cytochrome-c (Cyto-c) and its subsequent application to screen anti-cancer drugs. Aptamer is a short single-stranded DNA selected from a synthetic DNA library by virtue of its high binding affinity and specificity to its target based on its unique 3D structure from the nucleotide sequence after folding. In the BBC assay, an antigen (Ag) in analytes is captured by a micro-magnetic particle (MMP) coated with capturing antibodies (Abs). Gold nanoparticles (NPs) with another recognition Ab against the same target and hundreds of identical DNA molecules of known sequence are subsequently added to allow the formation of sandwich structures ([MMP-Ab1]-Ag-[Ab2-NP-DNA]). After isolating the sandwiches by a magnetic field, the DNAs hybridized to their complementary DNAs covalently bound on the NPs are released from the sandwiches after heating. Acting as an Ag identification tag, these bio-barcode DNAs with known DNA sequence are then amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and detected by fluorescence. In our ABC assay, we employed a Cyto-c-specific aptamer to substitute both the recognition Ab and barcode DNAs on the NPs in the BBC assay; and a novel isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification for the time-consuming PCR. The detection limit of our ABC assay for the Cyto-c was found to be 10 ng/mL and this new assay can be completed within 3h. Several potential anti-cancer drugs have been tested in vitro for their efficacy to kill liver cancer with or without multi-drug resistance. PMID:24054573

  3. Time-lapse imaging assay using the BioStation CT: Asensitive drug-screening method for three-dimensional cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Ruriko; Rahman, M Mamunur; Shimomura, Manami; Itoh, Manabu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is beneficial for physiological studies of tumor cells, due to its potential to deliver a high quantity of cell culture information that is representative of the cancer microenvironment and predictive of drug responses invivo. Currently, gel-associated or matrix-associated 3D cell culture is comprised of intricate procedures that often result in experimental complexity. Therefore, we developed an innovative anti-cancer drug sensitivity screening technique for 3D cell culture on NanoCulture Plates (NCP) by employing the imaging device BioStation CT. Here, we showed that the human breast cancer cell lines BT474 and T47D form multicellular spheroids on NCP plates and compared their sensitivity to the anti-cancer drugs trastuzumab and paclitaxel using the BioStation CT. The anticancer drugs reduced spheroid migration velocity and suppressed spheroid fusion. In addition, primary cells derived from the human breast cancer tissues B58 and B61 grown on NCP plates also exhibited similar drug sensitivity. These results were in good agreement with the conventional assay method using ATP quantification. We confirmed the antitumor effects of the drugs on cells seeded in 96-well plates using the BioStation CT imaging technique. We expect this method to be useful in research for new antitumor agents and for drug sensitivity tests in individually-tailored cancer treatments. PMID:25865675

  4. Time-lapse imaging assay using the BioStation CT: a sensitive drug-screening method for three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ruriko; Rahman, M Mamunur; Shimomura, Manami; Itoh, Manabu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is beneficial for physiological studies of tumor cells, due to its potential to deliver a high quantity of cell culture information that is representative of the cancer microenvironment and predictive of drug responses invivo. Currently, gel-associated or matrix-associated 3D cell culture is comprised of intricate procedures that often result in experimental complexity. Therefore, we developed an innovative anti-cancer drug sensitivity screening technique for 3D cell culture on NanoCulture Plates (NCP) by employing the imaging device BioStation CT. Here, we showed that the human breast cancer cell lines BT474 and T47D form multicellular spheroids on NCP plates and compared their sensitivity to the anti-cancer drugs trastuzumab and paclitaxel using the BioStation CT. The anticancer drugs reduced spheroid migration velocity and suppressed spheroid fusion. In addition, primary cells derived from the human breast cancer tissues B58 and B61 grown on NCP plates also exhibited similar drug sensitivity. These results were in good agreement with the conventional assay method using ATP quantification. We confirmed the antitumor effects of the drugs on cells seeded in 96-well plates using the BioStation CT imaging technique. We expect this method to be useful in research for new antitumor agents and for drug sensitivity tests in individually-tailored cancer treatments. PMID:25865675

  5. Homogeneous screening assay for human tankyrase.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Mohit; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Lehtiö, Lari

    2012-06-01

    Tankyrase, a member of human PARP protein superfamily, catalyzes a covalent post-translational modification of substrate proteins. This modification, poly(ADP-ribos)ylation, leads to changes in protein interactions and modifies downstream signaling events. Tankyrase 1 is a potential drug target due to its functions in telomere homeostasis and in Wnt signaling. We describe here optimization and application of an activity-based homogenous assay for tankyrase inhibitors in a high-throughput screening format. The method measures the consumption of substrate by the chemical conversion of the remaining NAD(+) into a stable fluorescent condensation product. Conditions were optimized to measure the enzymatic auto-modification of a recombinant catalytic fragment of tankyrase 1. The fluorescence assay is inexpensive, operationally easy and performs well according to the statistical analysis (Z'= 0.7). A validatory screen with a natural product library confirmed suitability of the assay for finding new tankyrase inhibitors. Flavone was the most potent (IC(50)=325 nM) hit from the natural compounds. A flavone derivative, apigenin, and isopropyl gallate showed potency on the micromolar range, but displayed over 30-fold selectivity for tankyrase over the studied isoenzymes PARP1 and PARP2. The assay is robust and will be useful for screening new tankyrase inhibitors. PMID:22357873

  6. Developing a microbiological growth inhibition screening assay for the detection of 27 veterinary drugs from 13 different classes in animal feedingstuffs.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Torsten; Pellet, Terence; Boscher, Aurore; Hoffmann, Lucien

    2013-01-01

    Many regulations prohibit using veterinary drugs in feedingstuffs to protect consumers and animals alike. Within this investigation we developed a simple, cost-efficient primary screening method for detecting antibiotics and coccidiostats in animal feeds. Thirty-two veterinary drugs were originally considered. Following matrix-free testing to optimise detection, an assay based on matrix extraction with methanol/acetonitrile/phosphate buffer followed by inoculation and diffusion in agar plates was developed. Final validation was performed with 14 representative drugs (one per drug class) and four bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC11303 and ATCC27166, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC6538P, Micrococcus luteus ATCC9341) in bovine, lamb and swine fodder, measuring growth inhibition zones. Of the original drugs tested, 27 remained detectable in feed matrices at or below 20 mg kg(-1). Of the 14 validated representatives, two had estimated minimum detectable concentrations of 10-11 mg kg(-1), others of 5 mg kg(-1) or lower, an earlier minimum European Union inclusion rate for many veterinary drugs. No significant matrix effect on inhibition zones was detected. Per cent wrong negative deviations ranged from 0% (nine of 14 compounds) to 20-27% (two of 14), while inter-day precision based on inhibition zones had relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 6-109% (mean of 40%). When setting a 1 mm inhibition zone, the maximum observed for negative controls, as a cut-off level, no false-positives were found. While not all targeted antibiotics were detectable in complex matrices, the majority of veterinary drugs were detected with reasonable sensitivity, indicating that this method could be suitable for screening feedingstuffs prior to further confirmatory investigation of positive findings such as by LC-MS/MS. PMID:24053648

  7. Bioluminescent assays for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Frank; Wood, Keith V

    2007-02-01

    In the development of high throughput screening (HTS) as a central paradigm of drug discovery, fluorescence has generally been adopted as the favored methodology. Nevertheless, luminescence has maintained a prominent position among certain assay formats, most notably genetic reporters. Recently, there has been growing partiality for luminescent assays across a wider range of applications due to their sensitivity, broad linearity, and robustness to library compounds and complex biological samples. This trend has been fostered by the development of several new assay designs for diverse targets such as kinases, cytochrome p450s, proteases, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. This review addresses recent progress made in the use of bioluminescent assays for HTS, highlighting new detection capabilities brought about by engineering luciferase genes, enzymes, and substrates. In genetic reporter applications, modifications to the luciferase genes have improved assay sensitivity by substantially increasing expression efficiency and enhanced response dynamics by reducing expression lifetime. The performance of assays based on detection of ATP and luciferin has been enhanced by modifications to the luciferase enzyme that increase its chemical and physical stability. Detection of ATP allows rapid analysis of cell metabolism and enzymatic processes coupled to ATP metabolism. Because luciferins are not naturally associated with mammalian physiology, assays for luciferin detection utilize synthetic derivatives designed to yield luminescence only when coupled with specific target enzymes. Finally, new methods for modulating the specific activity of luciferases are leading to the development of intracellular biosensors for dynamic detection of physiological processes. PMID:17355205

  8. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  9. LC-MS vs. GC-MS, online extraction systems, advantages of technology for drug screening assays.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews recent applications of mass spectrometry to systematic toxicological analysis (STA), where extended lists of compounds of toxicological interest are screened, as well as to the general unknown screening (GUS), where all exogenous compounds present in a sample are tentatively detected and identified, without any preselection. Many recent improvements in sample preparation, chromatographic separation, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and above all liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques are described, which are applicable or have been applied to STA and/or GUS, generally with promising results. These improvements come from miniaturization and automation of solid-phase extraction, turbulent-flow or ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography, linear ion traps, accurate (e.g., time of flight or orbital trap) mass spectrometry, as well as software refinements to alternate between different ionization modes or automatically interpret the results. It also shows that robust LC-MS/MS techniques already exist for STA or GUS, which are at least as efficient as the traditional techniques used in most toxicology laboratories, such as GC-MS or high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection, as shown by three comparative studies. However, the major drawback of LC-MS/MS in the full-scan mode for STA or GUS is that it still lacks universal reference libraries due to insufficient reproducibility of LC-MS(/MS) mass spectra obtained with different instrument types. PMID:22767104

  10. TOXICITY SCREENING WITH ZEBRAFISH ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed toxicity screening will help EPA to prioritize chemicals for further testing, and it may also alert chemical manufacturers that some of their commercial products may be toxic. The proposed toxicity pathway studies will improve the research community’s abi...

  11. TOXICITY SCREENING WITH ZEBRAFISH ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed toxicity screening will help EPA to prioritize chemicals for further testing, and it may also alert chemical manufacturers that some of their commercial products may be toxic. The proposed toxicity pathway studies will improve the research communitys abi...

  12. In vitro screening for drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Graeme F; Pritchard, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    Drug repositioning or repurposing has received much coverage in the scientific literature in recent years and has been responsible for the generation of both new intellectual property and investigational new drug submissions. The literature indicates a significant trend toward the use of computational- or informatics-based methods for generating initial repositioning hypotheses, followed by focused assessment of biological activity in phenotypic assays. Another viable method for drug repositioning is in vitro screening of known drugs or drug-like molecules, initially in disease-relevant phenotypic assays, to identify and validate candidates for repositioning. This approach can use large compound libraries or can focus on subsets of known drugs or drug-like molecules. In this short review, we focus on ways to generate and validate repositioning candidates in disease-related in vitro and phenotypic assays, and we discuss specific examples of this approach as applied to a variety of disease areas. We propose that in vitro screens offer several advantages over biochemical or in vivo methods as a starting point for drug repositioning. PMID:25527136

  13. A novel Leishmania major amastigote assay in 96-well format for rapid drug screening and its use for discovery and evaluation of a new class of leishmanicidal quinolinium salts.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, Gerhard; Thomale, Katja; Bischof, Sebastian; Schneider, Christoph; Schultheis, Martina; Schwarz, Tobias; Moll, Heidrun; Schurigt, Uta

    2013-07-01

    In most laboratories, the screening for leishmanicidal compounds is carried out with Leishmania promastigotes or axenic amastigotes. However, the best approach to identify leishmanicidal compounds is the use of amastigotes residing in macrophages. Reporter gene-based assays are relatively new tools in the search for drugs against eucaryotic protozoa, permitting the development of faster, more automated assays. In this paper, we report on the establishment of a rapid screening assay in a 96-well format. A luciferase-transgenic (Luc-tg) Leishmania major strain was generated and used to infect bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Amastigote-infected BMDM were treated with different compound concentrations. Cells were lysed with a luciferin-containing buffer, and the resulting luminescence was measured to determine the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50). To validate this new amastigote screening assay, a library of a new class of quinolinium salts was synthesized and tested for leishmanicidal activity. Some of the quinolinium salts showed very promising activities, with IC50s against intracellular amastigotes (IC50 < 1 μg/ml) and selectivity indices (SI > 20) that match the criteria of World Health Organization (WHO) for hits. Compound 21c (IC50 = 0.03 μg/ml; SI = 358) could become a new lead structure for the development of improved chemotherapeutic drugs against L. major. In summary, we describe the establishment of a new 96-well format assay with Luc-transgenic L. major for the rapid screening of compounds for leishmanicidal activity against intracellular amastigotes and its application to the identification of a new class of quinolinium salts with most promising leishmanicidal activity. PMID:23587955

  14. Holographic enzyme inhibition assays for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eu Vian; Lowe, Christopher R

    2009-09-15

    Optical sensors are widely utilized in drug discovery to analyze biomolecular interactions in vitro. Aside from additional time and cost demands, other issues associated with labeled screening methods include signal interference that can arise from the label per se and/or the screened compounds. This report describes an enzyme inhibition-based holographic sensor as a potential label-free detection system, using acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase; EC 3.1.1.7; abbreviated herein AChE) as the model enzyme. pH-responsive reflection holograms, incorporated into "smart" hydrogel films bearing ionizable monomers, were used to monitor the pH change resulting from acetic acid produced by the hydrolysis of the substrate acetylcholine. The enzyme was immobilized on the sensor by an entrapment and in situ cross-linking method; no chemical modification and/or prelabeling of the enzyme (or the substrate) was required. The fully reversible sensor exhibited good operational and storage stability, allowing relatively short assay times and repeated use of a single sensor. Apparent inhibition parameters for several drug inhibitors of the enzyme were determined. The feasibility of adapting these sensors into an array format for prospective high-throughput screening, without compromising their intrinsic optical and functional properties, was also demonstrated. PMID:19681618

  15. The use of toads (Bufo regularis) in a new biological assay for screening chemicals or drugs which induce leukaemia in man.

    PubMed

    Elmofty, M; Abdelmeguid, N; Sadek, I; Essawy, A; Abdelaleem, E

    1997-01-01

    Injection of Egyptian toads Bufo regularis, with adriamycin subcutaneously in the dorsal lymph sac at a dose level of 0.1 mg/toad, once every 3 weeks for 3 months induced pronounced alterations in the blood cells. These alterations were more or less similar to the criteria reported in human leukaemia. These changes were all comparable to those observed after the treatment of the experimental animals with the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. It is speculated that toads (Bufo regularis) can be used as biological test animals for screening chemicals or drugs which induce leukaemia in man. PMID:21590119

  16. Biochanin A Reduces Drug-Induced p75NTR Expression and Enhances Cell Survival: A New In Vitro Assay for Screening Inhibitors of p75NTR Expression

    PubMed Central

    El Touny, Lara H.; Henderson, Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Following spinal cord injury (SCI) or peripheral neuropathy, increased levels of the p75NTR death receptor initiate the signal transduction cascade leading to cell death. Investigations of compounds that may ameliorate neuronal cell death have largely used rodent models, which are time consuming, expensive, and cumbersome to perform. Previous studies had demonstrated that steroids, particularly dexamethasone and its analog methylprednisolone sodium succinate, exhibit limited neuroprotective effects against neuronal injury. Significantly, many naturally occurring nonsteroidal plant compounds exhibit structural overlap with steroids. In this report, we present an in vitro cellular screen model to practically examine the efficacy of various phytoestrogens in modulating the ibuprofen-induced expression of p75NTR and reduced cell survival of CCFSTTG1 and U87MG cells in a rescue (postinjury) or prevention (preinjury) regimen. We show that the phytoestrogen, biochanin A, and, to a lesser extent, genistein are more effective than dexamethasone at reducing p75NTR expression and improving the viability of U87MG and CCFSTTG1 before and after p75NTR induction. Furthermore, these studies implicate biochanin A's inactivation of p38-MAPK as a possible contributor to reducing p75NTR with associated increased cell survival. This new in vitro assay facilitates a more time-efficient screening of compounds to suppress p75NTR expression and increase neuronal cell viability prior to their evaluation in animal models of neurological diseases. PMID:20818983

  17. A Phenotypic Compound Screening Assay for Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Miao; Liu, Ke; Swaroop, Manju; Sun, Wei; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The lysosome is a vital cellular organelle that primarily functions as a recycling center for breaking down unwanted macromolecules through a series of hydrolases. Functional deficiencies in lysosomal proteins due to genetic mutations have been found in over 50 lysosomal storage diseases that exhibit characteristic lipid/macromolecule accumulation and enlarged lysosomes. Recently, the lysosome has emerged as a new therapeutic target for drug development for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases. However, a suitable assay for compound screening against the diseased lysosomes is currently unavailable. We have developed a Lysotracker staining assay that measures the enlarged lysosomes in patient derived cells using both fluorescence intensity readout and fluorescence microscopic measurement. This phenotypic assay has been tested in patient cells obtained from several lysosomal storage diseases and validated utilizing a known compound, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, in primary fibroblast cells derived from Niemann Pick C disease patients. The results demonstrate that the Lysotracker assay can be used in compound screening for the identification of lead compounds that are capable of reducing enlarged lysosomes for drug development. PMID:23983233

  18. Protein Reporter Bioassay Systems for the Phenotypic Screening of Candidate Drugs: A Mouse Platform for Anti-Aging Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Mori, Ryoichi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    Recent drug discovery efforts have utilized high throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical libraries to identify compounds that modify the activity of discrete molecular targets. The molecular target approach to drug screening is widely used in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, because of the amount of knowledge now available regarding protein structure that has been obtained by computer simulation. The molecular target approach requires that the structure of target molecules, and an understanding of their physiological functions, is known. This approach to drug discovery may, however, limit the identification of novel drugs. As an alternative, the phenotypic- or pathway-screening approach to drug discovery is gaining popularity, particularly in the academic sector. This approach not only provides the opportunity to identify promising drug candidates, but also enables novel information regarding biological pathways to be unveiled. Reporter assays are a powerful tool for the phenotypic screening of compound libraries. Of the various reporter genes that can be used in such assays, those encoding secreted proteins enable the screening of hit molecules in both living cells and animals. Cell- and animal-based screens enable simultaneous evaluation of drug metabolism or toxicity with biological activity. Therefore, drug candidates identified in these screens may have increased biological efficacy and a lower risk of side effects in humans. In this article, we review the reporter bioassay systems available for phenotypic drug discovery. PMID:22438730

  19. In vitro screening for drug-induced depression and/or suicidal adverse effects: a new toxicogenomic assay based on CE-SSCP analysis of HTR2C mRNA editing in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Cavarec, Laurent; Vincent, Laurent; Le Borgne, Claudia; Plusquellec, Camille; Ollivier, Nathalie; Normandie-Levi, Priscilla; Allemand, Frédéric; Salvetat, Nicolas; Mathieu-Dupas, Eve; Molina, Franck; Weissmann, Dinah; Pujol, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs in clinical trials, or already on the market, can have psychiatric side effects, independently of their therapeutic indication (e.g., Acomplia, Taranabant, and Roaccutane). There is currently no in vitro or in vivo approved test for the detection/prediction of such adverse effects, and the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) can only issue general alerts on specific therapeutic classes. The development of a screening assay is therefore of real interest. The anti-viral and anti-tumor action of human interferon-alpha (hIFNα) is associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric side effects, including major depression, suicidal ideation and suicide. RNA editing of the serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) is a post-transcriptional modification, the regulation of which is altered in depressed suicide victims. In this study, we show that in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line, hIFNα specifically activates the ADAR1a isoform and thereby modifies the HTR2C mRNA editing profile. As this hIFNα-induced altered profile partly overlaps with that observed in the brain of depressed suicide victims, we investigated whether it could be used as a signature to identify drugs with depression and/or suicidal side effects. By means of the Biocortech proprietary screening assay, which allows the relative quantification of all the edited HTR2C isoforms in a sample, we blind-tested the effect of 50 marketed molecules on HTR2C mRNA editing in SH-SY5Y cells and identified 17 compounds with an IFN-like editing profile. This new toxicogenomic assay can identify compounds with potential psychiatric adverse events with a positive predictive value of 90 %. PMID:22528247

  20. Sensitive radioenzymatic assay for catechol drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Durrett, L.R.; Ziegler, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    This assay measures picogram quantities of catechol drugs and endogenous catecholamines in body tissues and fluids. The catechols are converted to their 3H-O-methyl metabolites during incubation with 3H-S-adenosylmethionine then separated by solvent extraction and thin-layer chromatography. Most drugs containing the catechol structure can be radiolabeled and separated from norepinephrine and epinephrine by this technique to provide simultaneous measurement of endogenous and exogenously administered catechols. The disposition of isoproterenol in tissues and fluids of man and experimental animals is measured to illustrate the utility of this assay. The reactivity of several commonly administered catechol drugs with COMT is described and the possible implications discussed.

  1. Reporting biological assay screening results for maximum impact.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Evan

    2015-07-01

    A very large corpus of biological assay screening results exist in the public domain. The ability to compare and analyze this data is hampered due to missing details and lack of a commonly used terminology to describe assay protocols and assay endpoints. Minimum reporting guidelines exist that, if followed, would greatly enhance the utility of biological assay screening data so it may be independently reproduced, readily integrated, effectively compared, and rapidly analyzed. PMID:26194585

  2. High-throughput screening assays for cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase, the targets for inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Anil; Reddy, T Chandramohan; Reddy, Gorla V; Reddy, D Bharat Kumar; Mahipal, S V K; Sinha, Sudhir; Gaikwad, Anil N; Reddanna, P

    2011-08-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) involves testing of compound libraries against validated drug targets using quantitative bioassays to identify 'hit' molecules that modulate the activity of target, which forms the starting point of a drug discovery effort. Eicosanoids formed via cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) pathways are major players in various inflammatory disorders. As the conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that inhibit both the constitutive (COX-1) and the inducible (COX-2) isoforms have gastric and renal side effects and the recently developed COX-2 selective anti-inflammatory drugs (COXIBs) have cardiac side effects, efforts are being made to develop more potent and safer antiinflammatory drugs. Current assay methods for these enzymes, such as oxygraphic, radioisotopic, spectrophotometric etc. are not compatible for screening of large number of compounds as in drug discovery programs. In the present study, HTS-compatible assays for COX-1, COX-2 and 5-LOX were developed for screening of compound libraries with the view to identify potential anti-inflammatory drug candidates. A spectrophotometric assay involving co-oxidation of tetramethyl-p-phenylene diamine (TMPD) during the reduction of prostaglandin G2 (PGG2) to PGH2 was adopted and standardized for screening of compounds against COX-1 and COX-2. Similarly, the HTS-compatible FOX (ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange) based spectrophotometric assay involving the formation of Fe3+/xylenol orange complex showing absorption in the visible range was developed for screening of compounds against 5-LOX. PMID:22053694

  3. Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for preformulation.

    PubMed

    Alsenz, Jochem; Haenel, Elisabeth; Anedda, Aline; Du Castel, Pauline; Cirelli, Giorgio

    2016-05-25

    This study describes a novel Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for measuring disk intrinsic dissolution rates (DIDR). In MINDISS, compacted mini disks of drugs (2-5mg/disk) are prepared in custom made holders with a surface area of 3mm(2). Disks are immersed, pellet side down, into 0.35ml of appropriate dissolution media per well in 96-well microtiter plates, media are stirred and disk-holders are transferred to new wells after defined periods of time. After filtration, drug concentration in dissolution media is quantified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) and solid state property of the disk is characterized by Raman spectroscopy. MINDISS was identified as an easy-to-use tool for rapid, parallel determination of DIDR of compounds that requires only small amounts of compound and of dissolution medium. Results obtained with marketed drugs in MINDISS correlate well with large scale DIDR methods and indicate that MINDISS can be used for (1) rank-ordering of compounds by intrinsic dissolution in late phase discovery and early development, (2) comparison of polymorphic forms and salts, (3) screening and selection of appropriate dissolution media, and (4) characterization of the intestinal release behavior of compounds along the gastro intestinal tract by changing biorelevant media during experiments. PMID:26360839

  4. Robust versatile tyrosine kinase assay for HTS in drug discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Sudhir S.; Mineyev, I.; Owicki, John C.

    1999-04-01

    A fluorescence polarization assay was developed as an alternative to the radiolabeled SPA assays currently used to monitor the activity of tyrosine kinases in drug discovery. The assay can be used with enzymes having substrate specificity similar to that of the insulin receptor, the EGF receptor and the Src kinase receptor enzymes. The assay is easy to configure in 96, 384 and 1536-well microplates in assay volumes ranging from (mu) L with minimal efforts. The reconstituted reagents are stable for up to 24 hr at ambient temperatures, thereby minimizing the need for replenishing the stock solutions during the course of a high-throughput screen. Because of the stability and equilibrium kinetics, the assay allows the user the luxury of scheduling the reading of plates any time up to 24 hr after the completion of the assay without substantial deterioration in the assay signal. The antibody and the tracer solutions can also be premixed and added as a preformed complex in a single step. The performance of the assay with the insulin receptor kinase is described. In addition, given the diversity of the substrates used in measuring the activity of different tyrosine kinases, LJL's on-going efforts to provide different antibodies of wide ranging specificity and sensitivity are described.

  5. A novel assay for high-throughput screening of anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs to determine their efficacy by real-time monitoring of changes in PC12 cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xue-Qin; Yan, Rong; Yang, Cong; Zhang, Lei; Su, Ru-Yu; Liu, Si-Jun; Zhang, Shi-Jie; He, Wen-Qing; Fang, Shu-Huan; Cheng, Shu-Yi; Su, Zi-Ren; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Qi

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the accumulation of senile plaque and neurofibrilary tangle formation in the brain, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Nowadays, the first-line treatment for AD is the application of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. However, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are basically anti-symptomatic for a limited aspect of AD pathology and are associated with serious side-effects. With the advantage of multiple targets, pathways and systems, Chinese herbal compounds hold promising potential for the development of drugs for the treatment of AD. Over the past few years, with the development of Chinese herbal compounds and in vitro pharmacological studies, cell-based disease models are one of the main methods used to screen Chinese herbal compounds for potential efficacy. Testing the efficacy of possible anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs and the development of new drugs are hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, the assessment of the effects of drugs is usually made by MTT assays, involving laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. Herein, we suggest a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence) that can simply and objectively assess the effective composition of Chinese herbal compounds by assessing amyloid-β peptide Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. We detected the proliferation and motility of the cells using a fully automated high-throughput and real-time system. We quantitatively assessed cell motility and determined the real-time IC50 values of various anti-AD drugs that intervene in several developmental stages of Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, Then, we identified the optimal time phase by curative efficacy. Our data indicate that this technique may aid in the discovery and development of novel anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs. It is possible to utilize a similar technique to measure changes in electrical impedance as cells attach and spread in a culture dish covered with a gold microelectrode array that covers approximately 80% of the area on the bottom of a well. As cells attach and spread on the electrode surface, it leads to an increase in electrical impedance of 9-12. The impedance is displayed as a dimensionless para-meter termed the cell index, which is directly proportional to the total area of tissue culture well that is covered by the cells. Hence, the cell index can be used to monitor cell adhesion, spreading, morphological variation and cell density. PMID:24378397

  6. A novel assay for high-throughput screening of anti-Alzheimer’s disease drugs to determine their efficacy by real-time monitoring of changes in PC12 cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    HOU, XUE-QIN; YAN, RONG; YANG, CONG; ZHANG, LEI; SU, RU-YU; LIU, SI-JUN; ZHANG, SHI-JIE; HE, WEN-QING; FANG, SHU-HUAN; CHENG, SHU-YI; SU, ZI-REN; CHEN, YUN-BO; WANG, QI

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the accumulation of senile plaque and neurofibrilary tangle formation in the brain, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Nowadays, the first-line treatment for AD is the application of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. However, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are basically anti-symptomatic for a limited aspect of AD pathology and are associated with serious side-effects. With the advantage of multiple targets, pathways and systems, Chinese herbal compounds hold promising potential for the development of drugs for the treatment of AD. Over the past few years, with the development of Chinese herbal compounds and in vitro pharmacological studies, cell-based disease models are one of the main methods used to screen Chinese herbal compounds for potential efficacy. Testing the efficacy of possible anti-Alzheimer’s disease drugs and the development of new drugs are hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, the assessment of the effects of drugs is usually made by MTT assays, involving laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. Herein, we suggest a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence) that can simply and objectively assess the effective composition of Chinese herbal compounds by assessing amyloid-β peptide Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. We detected the proliferation and motility of the cells using a fully automated high-throughput and real-time system. We quantitatively assessed cell motility and determined the real-time IC50 values of various anti-AD drugs that intervene in several developmental stages of Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, Then, we identified the optimal time phase by curative efficacy. Our data indicate that this technique may aid in the discovery and development of novel anti-Alzheimer’s disease drugs. It is possible to utilize a similar technique to measure changes in electrical impedance as cells attach and spread in a culture dish covered with a gold microelectrode array that covers approximately 80% of the area on the bottom of a well. As cells attach and spread on the electrode surface, it leads to an increase in electrical impedance of 9–12. The impedance is displayed as a dimensionless parameter termed the cell index, which is directly proportional to the total area of tissue culture well that is covered by the cells. Hence, the cell index can be used to monitor cell adhesion, spreading, morphological variation and cell density. PMID:24378397

  7. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare. PMID:26658480

  8. Leishmania amastigotes as targets for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Monte-Alegre, Adriano; Ouaissi, Ali; Sereno, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Direct drug screening against the mammalian stage of Leishmania has been hampered by cost and the time consuming effort required to accomplish it. The ability to derive transgenic Leishmania expressing reporter genes opened up new possibilities for the development of drug screening tests. Further developments to standardize and gather multiple informations could now be envisionned. We will discuss on such available methodologies that could improve sensitivity, reliability, versatility and the rapidity, of the screen based on intracellular model. PMID:17059597

  9. Leishmania amastigotes as targets for drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Monte-Alegre, Adriano; Ouaissi, Ali; Sereno, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Direct drug screening against the mammalian stage of Leishmania has been hampered by cost and the time consuming effort required to accomplish it. The ability to derive transgenic Leishmania expressing reporter genes opened up new possibilities for the development of drug screening tests. Further developments to standardize and gather multiple informations could now be envisionned. We will discuss on such available methodologies that could improve sensitivity, reliability, versatility and the rapidity, of the screen based on intracellular model. PMID:17059597

  10. Addressing drug effects on cut point determination for an anti-drug antibody assay.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Maria D F S; Gleason, Carol R; Phillips, Kelli R; Berisha, Flora; Stouffer, Bruce; Warrack, Bethanne M; Chen, Guodong

    2012-10-31

    The effect of trough levels of a monoclonal antibody drug (drugB) on screening cut point (CP) determination for an anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay was scrutinized and the conclusions substantiated by data from a phase 3 cancer clinical study. The ADA assay utilized an acid dissociation step and either 0 or 100 μg/ml drugB was added to the samples prior to obtaining the signals used for CP calculations. Serum samples from three different drug-naive populations were tested (healthy individuals, cancer patients enrolled in the drugB clinical trial and cancer patients whose serum samples were available commercially). For the same disease state samples, both the screening CP and confirmation CP were different when calculated during validation or from study sample analysis. It is reasonable to assume that variability was due to the patient heterogeneity, as they could have been at distinct stages of disease progression, and/or taking different medications, amongst other differences. The patients enrolled in the clinical trial were stratified as per protocol and hence represented a more homogeneous population. Drug effects on CP may be population dependent and also assay dependent. PMID:22750627

  11. Automated Triplex (HBV, HCV and HIV) NAT Assay Systems for Blood Screening in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This review is confined to triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays to be used on fully automated platform. Around the world, these assays are being used at various transfusion medicine centres or blood banks to screen blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV. These assay systems can screen up to 1000 blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV simultaneously in a day. This area has been dominated by mainly two manufacturers: M/s Gen-Probe-Novartis and M/s Roche Molecular Systems. The triplex NAT assay systems of both manufacturers are licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. There is not much awareness about the technology and procedures used in these assays. The main objective of this review is to create awareness about the technology and procedure of these assays. PMID:27042485

  12. Developing predictive assays: the phenotypic screening "rule of 3".

    PubMed

    Vincent, Fabien; Loria, Paula; Pregel, Marko; Stanton, Robert; Kitching, Linda; Nocka, Karl; Doyonnas, Regis; Steppan, Claire; Gilbert, Adam; Schroeter, Thomas; Peakman, Marie-Claire

    2015-06-24

    Phenotypic drug discovery approaches can positively affect the translation of preclinical findings to patients. However, not all phenotypic assays are created equal. A critical question then follows: What are the characteristics of the optimal assays? We analyze this question and propose three specific criteria related to the disease relevance of the assay-system, stimulus, and end point-to help design the most predictive phenotypic assays. PMID:26109101

  13. MICROBIOLOGICAL SCREENING ASSAY FOR TYLOSIN IN POLLEN.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tylosin residues have been isolated from pollen samples by adsorption on acidic solid-phase extraction cartridges, with subsequent determination using a disk-diffusion microbiological assay. While not providing identification of individual antibiotics present, the presence of a zone of inhibition pr...

  14. A FRET-based assay for screening SIRT6 modulators.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; You, Ling; Huang, Wenfei; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Hong; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    SIRT6, as one of these seven sirtuins, has been shown to have the therapeutic potentials for treating several human diseases. A fluorogenic assay for SIRT6 has been developed to screen their small molecule modulators based on the recent discovery that SIRT6 is a defatty-acylase (removing long chain fatty acyl groups). However, this assay uses a fluorogenic peptide containing 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (AMC), which becomes the cause of false positive hits from screenings. To overcome this, we have developed an alternative method called a FRET-based assay suitable for screening SIRT6 modulators, which will be reliable and useful in a high-throughput format since no AMC group present in this assay. PMID:25884115

  15. An axenic amastigote system for drug screening.

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, H L; Portal, A C; Devereaux, R; Grogl, M

    1997-01-01

    Currently available primary screens for selection of candidate antileishmanial compounds are not ideal. The choices include screens that are designed to closely reflect the situation in vivo but are labor-intensive and expensive (intracellular amastigotes and animal models) and screens that are designed to facilitate rapid testing of a large number of drugs but do not use the clinically relevant parasite stage (promastigote model). The advent of successful in vitro culture of axenic amastigotes permits the development of a primary screen which is quick and easy like the promastigote screen but still representative of the situation in vivo, since it uses the relevant parasite stage. We have established an axenic amastigote drug screening system using a Leishmania mexicana strain (strain M379). A comparison of the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) drug sensitivity profiles of M379 promastigotes, intracellular amastigotes, and axenic amastigotes for six clinically relevant antileishmanial drugs (sodium stibogluconate, meglumine antimoniate, pentamidine, paromomycin, amphotericin B, WR6026) showed that M379 axenic amastigotes are a good model for a primary drug screen. Promastigote and intracellular amastigote IC50s differed for four of the six drugs tested by threefold or more; axenic amastigote and intracellular amastigote IC50s differed by twofold for only one drug. This shows that the axenic amastigote susceptibility to clinically used reference drugs is comparable to the susceptibility of amastigotes in macrophages. These data also suggest that for the compounds tested, susceptibility is intrinsic to the parasite stage. This contradicts previous hypotheses that suggested that the activities of antimonial agents against intracellular amastigotes were solely a function of the macrophage. PMID:9087496

  16. Adolescents and Drug Abuse: Clinical Use of Urine Drug Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; Moore, David D.

    1997-01-01

    Study examines the use of urine screening as a clinical diagnostic procedure to assess and monitor adolescents in a school-based outpatient program (N=296). Random screening provides little information regarding diagnostic level and pattern of drug use; however it may be helpful in bringing about positive behavior change. (EMK)

  17. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (/sup 47/Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO/sub 3/. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the /sup 47/Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison.

  18. Colorimetric assay for screening compounds against Leishmania amastigotes grown in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Frederick S; Wilson, Aaron J

    2005-05-01

    An estimated 12 million persons throughout the world suffer from the protozoan disease leishmaniasis. Current treatments have liabilities including poor activity against some forms of leishmaniasis, toxicity, or the need for parenteral administration. Higher throughput methods to screen chemical compounds are needed to facilitate the search for new antileishmania drugs. In the mammalian host, Leishmania parasites exist as amastigotes that replicate within macrophages. Therefore, an in vitro screening assay using intramacrophage amastigotes most closely represents the natural infection. We have transfected strains of Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis with the beta-lactamase gene, which catalyzes a colorimetric reaction with the substrate nitrocephin. The growth of these beta-lactamase-expressing Leishmania within macrophages was quantified in 96-well plates using an optical density plate reader, thus simplifying the methodology for scoring inhibitor assays. This simple and relatively inexpensive colorimetric assay helps improve throughput for screening compounds for antileishmania activity. PMID:15891135

  19. [Comparison of four drug interaction screening programs].

    PubMed

    Ing Lorenzini, K; Reutemann, B; Samer, C F; Guignard, B; Bonnabry, P; Dayer, P; Perrier, A; Desmeules, J

    2012-10-17

    Adverse drug events (ADE) are a major public health issue, with drug-drug interactions (DDI) being one of well-recognized causes of ADE that could be preventable by the use of DDI screening software. We compared the ability of four programs to detect clinically important DDI. We tested 62 drug pairs with and 12 drug pairs without clinically important DDI. Lexi-Interact and Epocrates were the most sensitive (95%) compared to the Compendium and Theriaque (80 and 73%, respectively). The Compendium and Theriaque also showed the lowest negative predictive value. All programs showed high specificity and positive predictive value. The qualitative assessment showed the best performances for Compendium and Lexi-Interact. The last one seems to be the best screening program, but the Compendium is in French and is freely available. PMID:23198652

  20. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  1. Lactate as a Novel Quantitative Measure of Viability in Schistosoma mansoni Drug Sensitivity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Stephanie; Zphel, Dorina; Subbaraman, Harini; Unger, Clemens; Held, Jana; Engleitner, Thomas; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-organism compound sensitivity assays are a valuable strategy in infectious diseases to identify active molecules. In schistosomiasis drug discovery, larval-stage Schistosoma allows the use of a certain degree of automation in the screening of compounds. Unfortunately, the throughput is limited, as drug activity is determined by manual assessment of Schistosoma viability by microscopy. To develop a simple and quantifiable surrogate marker for viability, we targeted glucose metabolism, which is central to Schistosoma survival. Lactate is the end product of glycolysis in human Schistosoma stages and can be detected in the supernatant. We assessed lactate as a surrogate marker for viability in Schistosoma drug screening assays. We thoroughly investigated parameters of lactate measurement and performed drug sensitivity assays by applying schistosomula and adult worms to establish a proof of concept. Lactate levels clearly reflected the viability of schistosomula and correlated with schistosomulum numbers. Compounds with reported potencies were tested, and activities were determined by lactate assay and by microscopy. We conclude that lactate is a sensitive and simple surrogate marker to be measured to determine Schistosoma viability in compound screening assays. Low numbers of schistosomula and the commercial availability of lactate assay reagents make the assay particularly attractive to throughput approaches. Furthermore, standardization of procedures and quantitative evaluation of compound activities facilitate interassay comparisons of potencies and, thus, concerted drug discovery approaches. PMID:25487803

  2. Lactate as a novel quantitative measure of viability in Schistosoma mansoni drug sensitivity assays.

    PubMed

    Howe, Stephanie; Zöphel, Dorina; Subbaraman, Harini; Unger, Clemens; Held, Jana; Engleitner, Thomas; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H; Kreidenweiss, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Whole-organism compound sensitivity assays are a valuable strategy in infectious diseases to identify active molecules. In schistosomiasis drug discovery, larval-stage Schistosoma allows the use of a certain degree of automation in the screening of compounds. Unfortunately, the throughput is limited, as drug activity is determined by manual assessment of Schistosoma viability by microscopy. To develop a simple and quantifiable surrogate marker for viability, we targeted glucose metabolism, which is central to Schistosoma survival. Lactate is the end product of glycolysis in human Schistosoma stages and can be detected in the supernatant. We assessed lactate as a surrogate marker for viability in Schistosoma drug screening assays. We thoroughly investigated parameters of lactate measurement and performed drug sensitivity assays by applying schistosomula and adult worms to establish a proof of concept. Lactate levels clearly reflected the viability of schistosomula and correlated with schistosomulum numbers. Compounds with reported potencies were tested, and activities were determined by lactate assay and by microscopy. We conclude that lactate is a sensitive and simple surrogate marker to be measured to determine Schistosoma viability in compound screening assays. Low numbers of schistosomula and the commercial availability of lactate assay reagents make the assay particularly attractive to throughput approaches. Furthermore, standardization of procedures and quantitative evaluation of compound activities facilitate interassay comparisons of potencies and, thus, concerted drug discovery approaches. PMID:25487803

  3. A rapid screening assay for identifying mycobacteria targeted nanoparticle antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Donnellan, Samantha; Tran, Lang; Johnston, Helinor; McLuckie, Joyce; Stevenson, Karen; Stone, Vicki

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem. Nanotechnology offers enormous potential in medicine, yet there is limited knowledge regarding the toxicity of nanoparticles (NP) for mycobacterial species that cause serious human diseases (e.g. tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy). Mycobacterial diseases are a major global health problem; TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills up to 2 million people annually and there are over 200 000 leprosy cases each year caused by Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). Few drugs are effective against these mycobacteria and increasing antibiotic resistance exacerbates the problem. As such, alternative therapies are urgently needed but most current assays used to assess the effectiveness of therapeutics against mycobacteria are slow and expensive. This study aimed to develop a rapid, low-cost assay which can be used for screening the antimicrobial properties of compounds against pathogenic mycobacteria and to assess the toxicity of three NP (silver [Ag], copper oxide [Cu(II)O], and zinc oxide [ZnO]) against a green fluorescent protein reporter strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, a slow growing, pathogenic mycobacterial species causing paratuberculosis in ruminants. Fluorescence was used to monitor mycobacterial growth over time, with NP concentrations of 6.25-100 μg/mL tested for up to 7 days, and a method of data analysis was designed to permit comparison between results. Mycobacterial sensitivity to the NP was found to be NP composition specific and toxicity could be ranked in the following order: Ag > Cu(II)O > ZnO. PMID:26618564

  4. Sulfonylureas and Glinides as New PPARγ Agonists:. Virtual Screening and Biological Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarsi, Marco; Podvinec, Michael; Roth, Adrian; Hug, Hubert; Kersten, Sander; Albrecht, Hugo; Schwede, Torsten; Meyer, Urs A.; Rücker, Christoph

    2007-12-01

    This work combines the predictive power of computational drug discovery with experimental validation by means of biological assays. In this way, a new mode of action for type 2 diabetes drugs has been unvealed. Most drugs currently employed in the treatment of type 2 diabetes either target the sulfonylurea receptor stimulating insulin release (sulfonylureas, glinides), or target PPARγ improving insulin resistance (thiazolidinediones). Our work shows that sulfonylureas and glinides bind to PPARγ and exhibit PPARγ agonistic activity. This result was predicted in silico by virtual screening and confirmed in vitro by three biological assays. This dual mode of action of sulfonylureas and glinides may open new perspectives for the molecular pharmacology of antidiabetic drugs, since it provides evidence that drugs can be designed which target both the sulfonylurea receptor and PPARγ. Targeting both receptors could in principle allow to increase pancreatic insulin secretion, as well as to improve insulin resistance.

  5. Synthetic Tumor Networks for Screening Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B.; Garson, Charles J.; Mills, Ivy R.; Matar, Majed M.; Fewell, Jason G.; Pant, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle’s physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of “leaky vessels”. Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  6. Development and Validation of a Novel Leishmania donovani Screening Cascade for High-Throughput Screening Using a Novel Axenic Assay with High Predictivity of Leishmanicidal Intracellular Activity.

    PubMed

    Nühs, Andrea; De Rycker, Manu; Manthri, Sujatha; Comer, Eamon; Scherer, Christina A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Gray, David W

    2015-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease of the developing world with a limited arsenal of drugs available for treatment. The existing drugs have significant deficiencies so there is an urgent need for new and improved drugs. In the human host, Leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites which poses particular challenges in terms of drug discovery. To achieve sufficient throughput and robustness, free-living parasites are often used in primary screening assays as a surrogate for the more complex intracellular assays. We and others have found that such axenic assays have a high false positive rate relative to the intracellular assays, and that this limits their usefulness as a primary platform for screening of large compound collections. While many different reasons could lie behind the poor translation from axenic parasite to intracellular parasite, we show here that a key factor is the identification of growth slowing and cytostatic compounds by axenic assays in addition to the more desirable cytocidal compounds. We present a screening cascade based on a novel cytocidal-only axenic amastigote assay, developed by increasing starting density of cells and lowering the limit of detection, and show that it has a much improved translation to the intracellular assay. We propose that this assay is an improved primary platform in a new Leishmania screening cascade designed for the screening of large compound collections. This cascade was employed to screen a diversity-oriented-synthesis library, and yielded two novel antileishmanial chemotypes. The approach we have taken may have broad relevance to anti-infective and anti-parasitic drug discovery. PMID:26407168

  7. Development and Validation of a Novel Leishmania donovani Screening Cascade for High-Throughput Screening Using a Novel Axenic Assay with High Predictivity of Leishmanicidal Intracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nühs, Andrea; De Rycker, Manu; Manthri, Sujatha; Comer, Eamon; Scherer, Christina A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Gray, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease of the developing world with a limited arsenal of drugs available for treatment. The existing drugs have significant deficiencies so there is an urgent need for new and improved drugs. In the human host, Leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites which poses particular challenges in terms of drug discovery. To achieve sufficient throughput and robustness, free-living parasites are often used in primary screening assays as a surrogate for the more complex intracellular assays. We and others have found that such axenic assays have a high false positive rate relative to the intracellular assays, and that this limits their usefulness as a primary platform for screening of large compound collections. While many different reasons could lie behind the poor translation from axenic parasite to intracellular parasite, we show here that a key factor is the identification of growth slowing and cytostatic compounds by axenic assays in addition to the more desirable cytocidal compounds. We present a screening cascade based on a novel cytocidal-only axenic amastigote assay, developed by increasing starting density of cells and lowering the limit of detection, and show that it has a much improved translation to the intracellular assay. We propose that this assay is an improved primary platform in a new Leishmania screening cascade designed for the screening of large compound collections. This cascade was employed to screen a diversity-oriented-synthesis library, and yielded two novel antileishmanial chemotypes. The approach we have taken may have broad relevance to anti-infective and anti-parasitic drug discovery. PMID:26407168

  8. A cell-based assay for screening lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dileep G; Funk, Colin D

    2009-12-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) form a family of lipid peroxidizing enzymes within the plant and animal kingdoms. In humans, six functional lipoxygenase isoforms have been identified. 5-LOX, "platelet-type" 12-LOX (p12-LOX) and 15-LOX type 1 (15-LOX1), originally identified in leukocytes, platelets, and reticulocytes, respectively, generate lipid mediators involved in host cellular functions and in the pathophysiology of asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. The pharmaceutical industry has reinvigorated their programs to develop novel LOX inhibitors in view of recent findings. However, high throughput LOX screening assays to test novel agents against these intracellular enzymes are limited. We describe a cell-based 96-well microplate fluorescence assay tested against several existing LOX inhibitors, and validate the assay by comparing known IC(50) values and HPLC analysis, which may provide a useful screen for novel LOX inhibitors. PMID:19804839

  9. Development of a high throughput screening assay for mitochondrial membrane potential in living cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Gui

    2002-08-01

    The mitochondrion plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. The electrochemical potential across the mitochondrial inner membrane is regulated to cope with cellular energy needs and thus reflects the bioenergetic state of the cell. Traditional assays for mitochondrial membrane potential are not amenable to high-throughput drug screening. In this paper, I describe a high-throughput assay that measures the mitochondrial membrane potential of living cells in 96- or 384-well plates. Cells were first treated with test compounds and then with a fluorescent potentiometric probe, the cationic-lipophilic dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM). The cells were then washed to remove free compounds and probe. The amount of TMRM retained in the mitochondria, which is proportional to the mitochondrial membrane potential, was measured on an LJL Analyst fluorescence reader. Under optimal conditions, the assay measured only the mitochondrial membrane potential. The chemical uncouplers carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone and dinitrophenol decreased fluorescence intensity, with IC(50) values (concentration at 50% inhibition) similar to those reported in the literature. A Z' factor of greater than 0.5 suggests that this cell-based assay can be adapted for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. This assay may be used in screens for drugs to treat metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes, as well as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:12230893

  10. Biomimetic three-dimensional tissue models for advanced high-throughput drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Smith, Alec S.T.; Lone, Saifullah; Kwon, Sunghoon; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Most current drug screening assays used to identify new drug candidates are 2D cell-based systems, even though such in vitro assays do not adequately recreate the in vivo complexity of 3D tissues. Inadequate representation of the human tissue environment during a preclinical test can result in inaccurate predictions of compound effects on overall tissue functionality. Screening for compound efficacy by focusing on a single pathway or protein target, coupled with difficulties in maintaining long-term 2D monolayers, can serve to exacerbate these issues when utilizing such simplistic model systems for physiological drug screening applications. Numerous studies have shown that cell responses to drugs in 3D culture are improved from those in 2D, with respect to modeling in vivo tissue functionality, which highlights the advantages of using 3D-based models for preclinical drug screens. In this review, we discuss the development of microengineered 3D tissue models which accurately mimic the physiological properties of native tissue samples, and highlight the advantages of using such 3D micro-tissue models over conventional cell-based assays for future drug screening applications. We also discuss biomimetic 3D environments, based-on engineered tissues as potential preclinical models for the development of more predictive drug screening assays for specific disease models. PMID:25385716

  11. Rapid screening of protein-protein interaction inhibitors using the protease exclusion assay.

    PubMed

    Nirantar, Saurabh R; Li, Xiang; Siau, Jia Wei; Ghadessy, Farid J

    2014-06-15

    We have previously developed a sensitive and modular homogenous biosensor system using peptides to detect target ligands. By transposing the basic mechanistic principle of the nuclease protection assay into this biosensor framework, we have developed the protease exclusion (PE) assay which can discern antagonists of protein-protein interactions in a rapid, single-step format. We demonstrate the concept with multiple protein-peptide pairs and validate the method by successfully screening a small molecule library for compounds capable of inhibiting the therapeutically relevant p53-Mdm2 interaction. The Protease Exclusion method adds to the compendium of assays available for rapid analyte detection and is particularly suited for drug screening applications. PMID:24508816

  12. Determination of designer drug cross-reactivity on five commercial immunoassay screening kits.

    PubMed

    Regester, Laura E; Chmiel, Jeffrey D; Holler, Justin M; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-03-01

    The detection of new designer drugs is often a difficult issue in forensic urine drug testing as immunoassays are the primary screening methodology for drugs of abuse in many of these laboratories. Cross-reactivity of compounds with immunoassay kits can either aid or complicate the detection of a variety of drug and drug metabolites. For instance, emerging designer drugs that share structural similarities to amphetamines and phencyclidine (PCP) have the potential to cross-react with assays designed to detect these compounds. This study evaluates the cross-reactivity of five commercially available immunoassay reagent kits for 94 designer drugs on a Roche/Hitachi Modular P automated screening instrument. The compounds used in this study are grouped by structural class as follows: 2,5-dimethoxyamphetamines, 2C (2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamines), β-keto amphetamines, substituted amphetamines, piperazines, α-pyrrolidinopropiophenones, tryptamines and PCP analogs. A drug concentration of 100 µg/mL was used to determine cross-reactivity for each assay and resulted in the following positive rates: Microgenics DRI(®) Ecstasy enzyme assay (19%), Microgenics DRI(®) Phencyclidine enzyme assay (20%), Lin-Zhi Methamphetamine enzyme immunoassay (39%), Siemens/Syva(®) EMIT(®)II Plus Amphetamines assay (43%) and CEDIA(®) DAU Amphetamine/Ecstasy assay (57%). Of the 94 designer drugs tested, 14% produced a negative response for all five kits. No designer drug used in this study generated a positive result for all five immunoassay kits. PMID:25492523

  13. Label-Free Cytotoxicity Screening Assay by Digital Holographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Jonas; Shaffer, Etienne; Mena, Julien; Breton, Billy; Parent, Jérôme; Rappaz, Benjamin; Chambon, Marc; Emery, Yves; Magistretti, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian; Marquet, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We introduce a label-free technology based on digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with applicability for screening by imaging, and we demonstrate its capability for cytotoxicity assessment using mammalian living cells. For this first high content screening compatible application, we automatized a digital holographic microscope for image acquisition of cells using commercially available 96-well plates. Data generated through both label-free DHM imaging and fluorescence-based methods were in good agreement for cell viability identification and a Z′-factor close to 0.9 was determined, validating the robustness of DHM assay for phenotypic screening. Further, an excellent correlation was obtained between experimental cytotoxicity dose–response curves and known IC50 values for different toxic compounds. For comparable results, DHM has the major advantages of being label free and close to an order of magnitude faster than automated standard fluorescence microscopy. PMID:23062077

  14. FRET-based assay to screen inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kamal K.; Przybilla, Frédéric; Restle, Tobias; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves

    2016-01-01

    During HIV-1 reverse transcription, the single-stranded RNA genome is converted into proviral double stranded DNA by Reverse Transcriptase (RT) within a reverse transcription complex composed of the genomic RNA and a number of HIV-1 encoded proteins, including the nucleocapsid protein NCp7. Here, we developed a one-step and one-pot RT polymerization assay. In this in vitro assay, RT polymerization is monitored in real-time by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using a commercially available doubly-labeled primer/template DNA. The assay can monitor and quantify RT polymerization activity as well as its promotion by NCp7. Z-factor values as high as 0.89 were obtained, indicating that the assay is suitable for high-throughput drug screening. Using Nevirapine and AZT as prototypical RT inhibitors, reliable IC50 values were obtained from the changes in the RT polymerization kinetics. Interestingly, the assay can also detect NCp7 inhibitors, making it suitable for high-throughput screening of drugs targeting RT, NCp7 or simultaneously, both proteins. PMID:26762982

  15. Statistical evaluation of several methods for cut-point determination of immunogenicity screening assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Meiyu; Dong, Xiaoyu; Tsong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The cut point of the immunogenicity screening assay is the level of response of the immunogenicity screening assay at or above which a sample is defined to be positive and below which it is defined to be negative. The Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Assay Development for Immunogenicity Testing of Therapeutic recommends the cut point to be an upper 95 percentile of the negative control patients. In this article, we assume that the assay data are a random sample from a normal distribution. The sample normal percentile is a point estimate with a variability that decreases with the increase of sample size. Therefore, the sample percentile does not assure at least 5% false-positive rate (FPR) with a high confidence level (e.g., 90%) when the sample size is not sufficiently enough. With this concern, we propose to use a lower confidence limit for a percentile as the cut point instead. We have conducted an extensive literature review on the estimation of the statistical cut point and compare several selected methods for the immunogenicity screening assay cut-point determination in terms of bias, the coverage probability, and FPR. The selected methods evaluated for the immunogenicity screening assay cut-point determination are sample normal percentile, the exact lower confidence limit of a normal percentile (Chakraborti and Li, 2007) and the approximate lower confidence limit of a normal percentile. It is shown that the actual coverage probability for the lower confidence limit of a normal percentile using approximate normal method is much larger than the required confidence level with a small number of assays conducted in practice. We recommend using the exact lower confidence limit of a normal percentile for cut-point determination. PMID:25356783

  16. Hepatic organoids for microfluidic drug screening.

    PubMed

    Au, Sam H; Chamberlain, M Dean; Mahesh, Shruthi; Sefton, Michael V; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2014-09-01

    We introduce the microfluidic organoids for drug screening (MODS) platform, a digital microfluidic system that is capable of generating arrays of individually addressable, free-floating, three-dimensional hydrogel-based microtissues (or 'organoids'). Here, we focused on liver organoids, driven by the need for early-stage screening methods for hepatotoxicity that enable a "fail early, fail cheaply" strategy in drug discovery. We demonstrate that arrays of hepatic organoids can be formed from co-cultures of HepG2 and NIH-3T3 cells embedded in hydrogel matrices. The organoids exhibit fibroblast-dependent contractile behaviour, and their albumin secretion profiles and cytochrome P450 3A4 activities are better mimics of in vivo liver tissue than comparable two-dimensional cell culture systems. As proof of principle for screening, MODS was used to generate and analyze the effects of a dilution series of acetaminophen on apoptosis and necrosis. With further development, we propose that the MODS platform may be a cost-effective tool in a "fail early, fail cheaply" paradigm of drug development. PMID:24984750

  17. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J.; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72 h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15 min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z′ = 0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3 h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47 h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples. PMID:26383544

  18. Electrochemical telomerase assay for screening for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Mana; Kodama, Masaaki; Sato, Shinobu; Tomoeda-Mori, Kumiko; Haraguchi, Kazuya; Habu, Manabu; Takenaka, Shigeori; Tominaga, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase has long been known to be a marker for cancer. We have developed a new method of detecting it: the electrochemical telomerase assay (ECTA). We have previously confirmed that the assay is easier to do and more precise than the conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol, which is currently the most widely used. Here we describe a pilot study made to establish a screening system for oral cancer using ECTA. We evaluated three types of clinical samples obtained from 44 patients with oral cancer and 26 healthy volunteers: exfoliated cells from the whole oral cavity, exfoliated cells from local lesions, and tissue from the lesion itself. The current increase ratio (Δi) obtained by ECTA was significantly higher in the oral cancer group for each type of sampling used. The threshold value for Δi was 19% when calculated by analysis of receiver-operating characteristic curves. Sensitivity and specificity values were 86% and 85% for cells from the oral cavity, 82% and 85% in cells from local lesions, and 95% and 92% in cells from the tumour itself, respectively. There were also no significant differences in sensitivity and specificity associated with age, size of tumour, site of lesion, or degree of malignancy. ECTA therefore seems to be a promising assay for screening for oral cancer. PMID:26821842

  19. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D; Ali, Syed F; Paule, Merle G; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2015-03-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources. PMID:24871937

  20. A highly automated assay for determining the aqueous equilibrium solubility of drug discovery compounds.

    PubMed

    Wenlock, Mark C; Austin, Rupert P; Potter, Tim; Barton, Patrick

    2011-08-01

    Aqueous solubility is an important physicochemical parameter for any potential drug candidate, and high-throughput kinetic assays are frequently used in drug discovery to give an estimate of a compound's aqueous solubility. However, the aqueous solubility data from an equilibrium (thermodynamic) shake-flask technique is considered more relevant, but is slower and more labor intensive to generate. A highly automated aqueous equilibrium solubility shake-flask technique is described and validated on a set of 15 marketed drugs, whose aqueous solubilities cover four orders of magnitude. The assay uses a Tecan Freedom Evo 200 liquid handling robot (Tecan Group Ltd., Männerdorf, Switzerland) with integrated appliances for the transportation, decapping and recapping, and centrifugation of sample tubes. These bespoke automation solutions help overcome the labor intensive steps associated with performing conventional, gold standard, aqueous equilibrium solubility shake-flask measurements, enabling the assay to be used as a primary-wave drug discovery screen. PMID:21764023

  1. Phenotypic screens as a renewed approach for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Thorne, Natasha; McKew, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The significant reduction in the number of newly approved drugs in past decade has been partially attributed to failures in discovery and validation of new targets. Evaluation of recently approved new drugs has revealed that the number of approved drugs discovered through phenotypic screens, an original drug screening paradigm, has exceeded those discovered through the molecular target-based approach. Phenotypic screening is thus gaining new momentum in drug discovery with the hope that this approach may revitalize drug discovery and improve the success rate of drug approval through the discovery of viable lead compounds and identification of novel drug targets. PMID:23850704

  2. [Development of fluorescence imaging based assay for screening compounds with anti-migration activity].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Yi

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, A fluorescent imaging-based high-throughput screening method was developed for identifying anti-migratory compounds with 96-well Transwell plates. The correlation, precision and stability of this method were examined and the incubation time of dye Hoechst 33342 in addition to migration time was optimized. In addition, The inhibitory activity of anti-cancer drug paclitaxel on tumor cell migration was assayed and an IC50 value of 0.717 micromol x L(-1) was obtained. Using this method, 24 components from Rhizoma Alismatis were screened and one component with anti-migration activity was found. These results show that the new proposed method with good precision, stability and linear range has the potential to assay the inhibitory activity of anticancer compounds. PMID:22010348

  3. Advances and perspectives in Leishmania cell based drug-screening procedures.

    PubMed

    Sereno, D; Cordeiro da Silva, A; Mathieu-Daude, F; Ouaissi, A

    2007-03-01

    Efforts for the development of new therapeutics, essential for the control of leishmaniasis rely mainly on screening of potentially effective compounds in pathogen growth/multiplication assays, both in vitro and in vivo. Screenings designed to closely reflect the situation in vivo are currently labor-intensive and expensive, since they require intracellular amastigotes and animal models. Screenings designed to facilitate rapid testing of a large number of drugs are not performed on the clinically relevant parasite stage, but the promastigotes. The ability to select transgenic Leishmania expressing reporter proteins, such as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or the luciferase, opened up new possibilities for the development of drug screening tests. In this review we will focus on available methodologies for direct drug screening purposes against the mammalian stage of the parasite, with emphasis on the future developments that could improve sensitivity, reliability, versatility and the throughput of the intracellular model screening. PMID:17079188

  4. Comparison of rapid screening assays using organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, S.A.; Robideau, R.R.

    1994-12-31

    In a continuation of a study presented last year using metals, the sensitivity of short term toxicity tests is examined using common organic chemicals. In toxicity testing, the focus has shifted from the traditional long-term studies utilizing the mortality of complex, multicellular eukaryotic organisms as the endpoint towards short-term studies in which transformation of biochemical pathways are monitored. The relative sensitivity of aquatic screening techniques are compared to the standardized 48-hr Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia, 96-hr fathead minnow and 96-hr algal acute assays. The short-term test procedures investigated are: dehydrogenase enzyme activity assays utilizing triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) and resazurin as the calorimetric indicators; TOXI-Chromotest, inhibition of {beta}-galactosidase; reduction in bioluminescence output utilizing the Microtox{reg_sign} test; nitrification inhibition assays with a commercial preparation of nitrifying bacteria (Nitroseed{trademark}) and municipal activated sludge; respiration inhibition assays with a commercial preparation of heterotrophic bacteria (Polytox{reg_sign}) and activated sludge; inhibition of root growth in terrestrial plants; and galactosidase inhibition through the use of a fluorometrically tagged substrate with the Daphnia magna IQ{trademark} test. Toxicity values generated by this laboratory on commonly used organic chemicals are compared.

  5. Stool DNA methylation assays in colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyska, Tanya; Nossikoff, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is fourth most common cancer in men and third in women worldwide. Developing a diagnostic panel of sensitive and specific biomarkers for the early detection of CRC is recognised as to be crucial for early initial diagnosis, which in turn leads to better long term survival. Most of the research on novel potential CRC biomarkers in the last 2 decades has been focussed on stool DNA analysis. In this paper, we describe the recent advances in non-invasive CRC screening and more specifically in molecular assays for aberrantly methylated BMP3 and NDRG4 promoter regions. In several research papers these markers showed superior rates for sensitivity and specificity in comparison to previously described assays. These tests detected the majority of adenomas ≥ 1 cm in size and the detection rates progressively increased with larger adenomas. The methylation status of the BMP3 and NDRG4 promoters demonstrated effective detection of neoplasms at all sites throughout the colon and was not affected by common clinical variables. Recently, a multitarget stool DNA test consisting of molecular assays for aberrantly methylated BMP3 and NDRG4 promoter regions, mutant KRAS and immunochemical assay for human haemoglobin has been made commercially available and is currently reimbursed in the United States. Although this is the most sensitive non-invasive CRC screening test, there is the need for further research in several areas - establishment of the best timeframe for repeated DNA stool testing; validation of the results in populations outside of North America; usefulness for surveillance and prognosis of patients; cost-effectiveness of DNA stool testing in real-life populations. PMID:26401070

  6. [Value of plasma assays of psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    François, T; Bonin, B; Vandel, S; Sechter, D; Bizouard, P

    1994-11-01

    An increased use of determinations of psychotropic drug levels has been noted during recent years. The contribution of "biological techniques" has led to a change in the relationship between physician and patient by rationalizing medical prescription and by augmenting the medical nature of this relationship. Follow-up of plasma levels is of interest for psychotropic drugs having therapeutic and (or) side effects that are linked to blood concentrations. Such drugs include the imipraminic antidepressants and regulators of thymic function. There is no consensus concerning the benzodiazepines and neuroleptic drugs. Their clinical effect does not seem to be strictly linked to plasma levels and the range of dosages is greater. Such determinations have proved to be particularly interesting in "resistant" cases, in surveillance of drug interactions and to evaluate treatment compliance. PMID:7984943

  7. Immunoassay screening of diphenhydramine (Benadryl) in urine and blood using a newly developed assay.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Warren C; Castro, Catherine; Catbagan, Philip; Moore, Christine; Wang, Guohong

    2012-03-01

    Diphenhydramine (DPH) is a common over the counter antihistamine that produces drowsiness and has the potential to cause driving under the influence of drugs-related accidents. To date there are no commercially available immunoassay screening kits for its detection in biological fluids such as urine and/or blood. We describe a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screen and report on its utility in the analysis of authentic specimens taken from volunteers. The assay is specific for detection of DPH and does not detect closely related antihistamines like brompheniramine, chlorpheniramine, and doxylamine. There is a varying amount of cross-reactivity seen with certain tricyclic compounds, due to similarities in side chain structure with DPH. Intra- and interday precision of the assay were determined to be less than 10%. The assay is highly sensitive and has a working range from 1 to 500 ng/mL for urine and 1 to 250 ng/mL for blood. The assay was further validated with authentic urine and blood specimens obtained from volunteers and coroner's laboratories. PMID:22337782

  8. Inhibition of Microglia Activation as a Phenotypic Assay in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Complex biological processes such as inflammation, cell death, migration, proliferation, and the release of biologically active molecules can be used as outcomes in phenotypic assays during early stages of drug discovery. Although target-based approaches have been widely used over the past decades, a disproportionate number of first-in-class drugs have been identified using phenotypic screening. This review details phenotypic assays based on inhibition of microglial activation and their utility in primary and secondary screening, target validation, and pathway elucidation. The role of microglia, both in normal as well as in pathological conditions such as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, is reviewed. Methodologies to assess microglia activation in vitro are discussed in detail, and classes of therapeutic drugs known to decrease the proinflammatory and cytotoxic responses of activated microglia are appraised, including inhibitors of glutaminase, cystine/glutamate antiporter, nuclear factor κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. PMID:23945875

  9. Zebrafish embryos and larvae: a new generation of disease models and drug screens.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shaukat; Champagne, Danielle L; Spaink, Herman P; Richardson, Michael K

    2011-06-01

    Technological innovation has helped the zebrafish embryo gain ground as a disease model and an assay system for drug screening. Here, we review the use of zebrafish embryos and early larvae in applied biomedical research, using selected cases. We look at the use of zebrafish embryos as disease models, taking fetal alcohol syndrome and tuberculosis as examples. We discuss advances in imaging, in culture techniques (including microfluidics), and in drug delivery (including new techniques for the robotic injection of compounds into the egg). The use of zebrafish embryos in early stages of drug safety-screening is discussed. So too are the new behavioral assays that are being adapted from rodent research for use in zebrafish embryos, and which may become relevant in validating the effects of neuroactive compounds such as anxiolytics and antidepressants. Readouts, such as morphological screening and cardiac function, are examined. There are several drawbacks in the zebrafish model. One is its very rapid development, which means that screening with zebrafish is analogous to "screening on a run-away train." Therefore, we argue that zebrafish embryos need to be precisely staged when used in acute assays, so as to ensure a consistent window of developmental exposure. We believe that zebrafish embryo screens can be used in the pre-regulatory phases of drug development, although more validation studies are needed to overcome industry scepticism. Finally, the zebrafish poses no challenge to the position of rodent models: it is complementary to them, especially in early stages of drug research. PMID:21671352

  10. Mini-column screening assay for tetracyclines in chicken.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Ali R

    2015-01-01

    A simple, rapid, reliable and economical mini-column (MC) method for the detection of tetracyclines (TCs) residues in chicken meat was developed. The method employs a commonly available Pasteur pipette which is tightly packed with silica gel and anhydrous sodium sulfate. Clean-up and detection of illegal levels can be achieved on the same column. Viewing the developed MC under an ultraviolet lamp revealed that TCs can be detected as a compact golden yellow fluorescent band at the junction between the anhydrous sodium sulfate and silica gel layers. Comparing the yellow band of control extracts with those fortified (100 ng ml(-1)) showed no overlap between analyte and impurities. The limit of detection (LOD) of the MC assay was 1 ng, indicating that the chicken sample containing 10 µg TCs kg(-1) sample could be easily detected. Moreover, the intensity of the yellow band increased whenever TCs levels in the extract increased. Evaluation utility of the method with blind samples as controls or samples fortified with total TCs at various levels indicated that the total blank and spiked samples at levels equal or below the permissible limits were assessed as accepted. The method can provide an alternative to microbial screening assays and could be used as an effective pre-screening technique in public health laboratories. PMID:25430068

  11. Multielectrode Array (MEA) Assay for Profiling Electrophysiological Drug Effects in Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Clements, Mike

    2016-01-01

    More relevant and reliable preclinical cardiotoxicity tests are required to improve drug safety and reduce the cost of drug development. Human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hSC-CMs) provide a potential model for the development of superior assays for preclinical drug safety screening. One such hSC-CM assay that has shown significant potential for enabling more predictive drug cardiac risk assessment is the MEA assay. The Multi-electrode Array (MEA) assay is an electrophysiology-based technique that uses microelectrodes embedded in the culture surface of each well to measure fluctuations in extracellular field potential (FP) generated from spontaneously beating hSC-CMs. Perturbations to the recorded FP waveform can be used as an unbiased method of predicting the identity of ion channel(s) impacted on drug exposure. Here, a higher throughput MEA assay using hSC-CMs in 48-well MEA plates is described for profiling compound-induced effects on cardiomyocyte electrophysiology. Techniques for preparing hSC-CM monolayers in MEA plates and methods to contextualize MEA assay experimental results are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27145112

  12. Brain receptors for antipsychotic drugs and dopamine: direct binding assays.

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, P; Chau-Wong, M; Tedesco, J; Wong, K

    1975-01-01

    In order to test the suggestion that antipsychotic drugs act by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain, the direct effects of such neuroleptic drugs were tested on the stereospecific binding of [3H]dopamine and of [3H]haloperidol to rat brain striata and their subfractions. The stereospecific component of binding was defined as that amount of [3h]dopamine or [3H]haloperidol bound in the presence of (-)-butaclamol (an inactive drug) minus that bound in the presence of (+)-butaclamol (a potent neuroleptic drug); 100 nM butaclamol was used for the [3H]haloperidol assay, while 1 muM butaclamol was used for the [3H]dopamine assay. Various antipsychotic drugs inhibited this stereospecific component in both the dopamine and haloperidol assays. These inhibitory potencies correlated with the clinical doses used for controlling schizophrenia. PMID:1060115

  13. Human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in cellular impedance assays: bringing cardiotoxicity screening to the front line.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew F; Lamore, Sarah D; Guo, Liang; Scott, Clay W; Kolaja, Kyle L

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is a leading cause of drug attrition and withdrawal. Introducing in vitro assays with higher throughput should permit earlier CV hazard identification and enable medicinal chemists to design-out liabilities. Heretofore, development of in vitro CV assays has been limited by the challenge of replicating integrated cardiovascular physiology while achieving the throughput and consistency required for screening. These challenges appear to be met with a combination of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CM) which beat spontaneously and monitoring the response with technology that can assess drug-induced changes in voltage dependent contraction such as cellular impedance which has been validated with excellent predictivity for drug-induced arrhythmia and contractility. Here, we review advances in cardiomyocyte impedance with emphasis on stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte models for toxicity screening. Key perspectives include: the electrical principles of impedance technology, impedance detection of cardiomyocyte beating, beat parameter selection/analysis, validation in toxicity and drug discovery, and future directions. As a conclusion, an in vitro screening cascade is proffered using the downstream, inclusive detection of CM impedance assays as a primary screen followed by complementary CM assays chosen to enable mechanism-appropriate follow-up. The combined approach will enhance testing for CV liabilities prior to traditional in vivo models. PMID:25134468

  14. Bioluminescent whole-cell reporter gene assays as screening tools in the identification of antimicrobial natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    Nybond, Susanna; Karp, Matti; Yrjönen, Teijo; Tammela, Päivi

    2015-07-01

    We describe novel tools, bioluminescent whole-cell reporter gene assays, for facilitating the use of natural products in antimicrobial drug discovery. As proof-of-concept, a plant extract library was screened and follow-up experiments were carried out. Primary results can be obtained in 2-4h with high sensitivity, leading to significant improvements of the process. PMID:25937087

  15. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families. PMID:26880188

  16. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families. PMID:26880188

  17. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays: An Unexpected Challenge for the Choice of an Assay in Primary Cervical Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ejegod, Ditte Møller; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41% tested positive on all four. Agreement was lower in women aged ≥30 years (30%, vs. 49% at <30 years), in primary screening samples (29%, vs. 38% in follow-up samples), and in women with concurrent normal cytology (22%, vs. 68% with abnormal cytology). Among primary screening samples from women aged 30–65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women. PMID:24466262

  18. Comprehensive drug screening in blood for detecting abused drugs or drugs potentially hazardous for traffic safety.

    PubMed

    Lillsunde, P; Michelson, L; Forsstrom, T; Korte, T; Schultz, E; Ariniemi, K; Portman, M; Sihvonen, M L; Seppala, T

    1996-02-01

    A comprehensive drug screening procedure for detecting drugs in the blood samples of car drivers suspected of driving under the influence of drugs, is presented. Amphetamines, cannabinoids, opioids, cocaine and benzodiazepines were screened by an immunological EMIT ETS system after acetone precipitation. Gas chromatographic methods were used to screen and quantitate basic, neutral and acidic drugs. The free amino groups of basic drugs were derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysis was performed by a dual channel gas chromatograph combined with a nitrogen phosphorus and an electron capture detector. Phenyltrimethylammonium hydroxide was used as a methylathing agent for acidic substances before analysis with a gas chromatograph connected to a nitrogen phosphorus detector. A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry was used as a common confirmation method. Tetrahydrocannabinol was quantitated after bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide derivatization, opiates after pentafluoropropionic anhydride derivatization and benzoylecgonine after pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol derivatization. Excluding benzodiazepines, which were confirmed with a gas chromatograph connected to a nitrogen phosphorus and an electron capture detector, the other basic drugs as well as the acidic drugs were confirmed after the same derivatization procedures as in the screening methods. Alcohols were quantitated in triplicate by gas chromatography using three different kinds of columns. Although urine is the most important specimen for screening abused drugs, it has only limited use in forensic toxicology. The described system is most useful for analyzing a wide range of substances, including illicit drugs, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, antidepressants and phenothiazenes in forensic samples when urine is not available. PMID:8819994

  19. Chemical Interrogation of the neuronal kinome using a primary cell-based screening assay

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Schürer, Stephan C.; Lemmon, Vance P.; Bixby, John L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental impediment to functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury is the lack of sufficient axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system. There is thus a need to develop agents that can stimulate axon growth to re-establish severed connections. Given the critical role played by protein kinases in regulating axon growth and the potential for pharmacological intervention, small molecule protein kinase inhibitors present a promising therapeutic strategy. Here, we report a robust cell-based phenotypic assay, utilizing primary rat hippocampal neurons, for identifying small molecule kinase inhibitors that promote neurite growth. The assay is highly reliable and suitable for medium throughput screening, as indicated by its Z′-factor of 0.73. A focused structurally diverse library of protein kinase inhibitors was screened, revealing several compound groups with the ability to strongly and consistently promote neurite growth. The best performing bioassay hit robustly and consistently promoted axon growth in a postnatal cortical slice culture assay. This study can serve as a jumping-off point for structure activity relationship (SAR) and other drug discovery approaches towards the development of drugs for treating SCI and related neurological pathologies. PMID:23480631

  20. Chemical interrogation of the neuronal kinome using a primary cell-based screening assay.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Schürer, Stephan C; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2013-05-17

    A fundamental impediment to functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury is the lack of sufficient axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system. There is thus a need to develop agents that can stimulate axon growth to re-establish severed connections. Given the critical role played by protein kinases in regulating axon growth and the potential for pharmacological intervention, small molecule protein kinase inhibitors present a promising therapeutic strategy. Here, we report a robust cell-based phenotypic assay, utilizing primary rat hippocampal neurons, for identifying small molecule kinase inhibitors that promote neurite growth. The assay is highly reliable and suitable for medium-throughput screening, as indicated by its Z'-factor of 0.73. A focused structurally diverse library of protein kinase inhibitors was screened, revealing several compound groups with the ability to strongly and consistently promote neurite growth. The best performing bioassay hit robustly and consistently promoted axon growth in a postnatal cortical slice culture assay. This study can serve as a jumping-off point for structure activity relationship (SAR) and other drug discovery approaches toward the development of drugs for treating SCI and related neurological pathologies. PMID:23480631

  1. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, M.J.; Armstrong, D.; Abi Gerges, N.; Bridgland-Taylor, M.; Pollard, C.E.; Bowes, J.; Valentin, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies – radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology – was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. - Highlights: • The L-type calcium channel is a significant safety liability during drug discovery. • Radioligand-binding to the L-type calcium channel can be measured in vitro. • The assay can be run at a single test concentration as part of a screening cascade. • This measurement is highly predictive of changes in cardiac myocyte contractility.

  2. High throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Holmén, Anders G

    2009-03-01

    Current advances of new technologies with robotic automated assays combined with highly selective and sensitive LC-MS enable high-speed screening of lead series libraries in many in vitro assays. In this review, we summarize state of the art high throughput assays for screening of key physicochemical properties such as solubility, lipophilicity, pKa, drug-plasma protein binding and brain tissue binding as well as in vitro ADME profiling. We discuss two primary approaches for high throughput screening of solubility, i.e. an automated 96-well plate assay integrated with LC-MS and a rapid multi-wavelength UV plate reader. We address the advantages of newly developed miniaturized techniques for high throughput pKa screening by capillary electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) with automated data analysis flow. Several new lipophilicity approaches other than octanol-water partitioning are critically reviewed, including rapid liquid chromatographic retention based approach, immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) partitioning and liposome, and potential microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) for accurate screening of LogP. We highlight the sample pooling (namely cassette dosing, all-in-one, cocktail) as an efficient approach for high throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling with emphasis on the benefit of on-line quality control. This cassette dosing approach has been widely adapted in drug discovery for rapid screening of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters with significantly increased capacity and dramatically reduced animal usage. PMID:19275537

  3. Testing Tuberculosis Drug Efficacy in a Zebrafish High-Throughput Translational Medicine Screen

    PubMed Central

    Ordas, Anita; Raterink, Robert-Jan; Cunningham, Fraser; Jansen, Hans J.; Wiweger, Malgorzata I.; Jong-Raadsen, Susanne; Bos, Sabine; Bates, Robert H.; Barros, David; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Vreeken, Rob J.; Ballell-Pages, Lluís; Dirks, Ron P.

    2014-01-01

    The translational value of zebrafish high-throughput screens can be improved when more knowledge is available on uptake characteristics of potential drugs. We investigated reference antibiotics and 15 preclinical compounds in a translational zebrafish-rodent screening system for tuberculosis. As a major advance, we have developed a new tool for testing drug uptake in the zebrafish model. This is important, because despite the many applications of assessing drug efficacy in zebrafish research, the current methods for measuring uptake using mass spectrometry do not take into account the possible adherence of drugs to the larval surface. Our approach combines nanoliter sampling from the yolk using a microneedle, followed by mass spectrometric analysis. To date, no single physicochemical property has been identified to accurately predict compound uptake; our method offers a great possibility to monitor how any novel compound behaves within the system. We have correlated the uptake data with high-throughput drug-screening data from Mycobacterium marinum-infected zebrafish larvae. As a result, we present an improved zebrafish larva drug-screening platform which offers new insights into drug efficacy and identifies potential false negatives and drugs that are effective in zebrafish and rodents. We demonstrate that this improved zebrafish drug-screening platform can complement conventional models of in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected rodent assays. The detailed comparison of two vertebrate systems, fish and rodent, may give more predictive value for efficacy of drugs in humans. PMID:25385118

  4. Testing tuberculosis drug efficacy in a zebrafish high-throughput translational medicine screen.

    PubMed

    Ordas, Anita; Raterink, Robert-Jan; Cunningham, Fraser; Jansen, Hans J; Wiweger, Malgorzata I; Jong-Raadsen, Susanne; Bos, Sabine; Bates, Robert H; Barros, David; Meijer, Annemarie H; Vreeken, Rob J; Ballell-Pages, Lluís; Dirks, Ron P; Hankemeier, Thomas; Spaink, Herman P

    2015-02-01

    The translational value of zebrafish high-throughput screens can be improved when more knowledge is available on uptake characteristics of potential drugs. We investigated reference antibiotics and 15 preclinical compounds in a translational zebrafish-rodent screening system for tuberculosis. As a major advance, we have developed a new tool for testing drug uptake in the zebrafish model. This is important, because despite the many applications of assessing drug efficacy in zebrafish research, the current methods for measuring uptake using mass spectrometry do not take into account the possible adherence of drugs to the larval surface. Our approach combines nanoliter sampling from the yolk using a microneedle, followed by mass spectrometric analysis. To date, no single physicochemical property has been identified to accurately predict compound uptake; our method offers a great possibility to monitor how any novel compound behaves within the system. We have correlated the uptake data with high-throughput drug-screening data from Mycobacterium marinum-infected zebrafish larvae. As a result, we present an improved zebrafish larva drug-screening platform which offers new insights into drug efficacy and identifies potential false negatives and drugs that are effective in zebrafish and rodents. We demonstrate that this improved zebrafish drug-screening platform can complement conventional models of in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected rodent assays. The detailed comparison of two vertebrate systems, fish and rodent, may give more predictive value for efficacy of drugs in humans. PMID:25385118

  5. Development of a Fluorescent Quenching Based High Throughput Assay to Screen for Calcineurin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Syeb, Kathleen; Concannon, John; Callegari, Keri; Soto, Claudio; Glicksman, Marcie A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no effective treatment available for major neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's disease. One of most promising therapeutic approaches under development focuses on inhibiting the misfolding and aggregation pathway. However, it is likely that by the time clinical symptoms appear, there is a large accumulation of misfolded aggregates and a very substantial damage to the brain. Thus, it seems that at the clinical stage of the disease it is necessary also to develop strategies aiming to prevent the neuronal damage produced by already formed misfolded aggregates. Chronic activation of calcineurin (CaN), a type IIB phosphatase, has been implicated as a pivotal molecule connecting synaptic loss and neuronal damage to protein misfolding. The fact that the crystal structure of CaN is also well established makes it an ideal target for drug discovery. CaN activity assays for High Throughput Screening (HTS) reported so far are based on absorbance. In this article we report the development of a fluorescent quenching based CaN activity assay suitable for robotic screening of large chemical libraries to find novel inhibitors. The assay yielded a Z score of 0.84 with coefficient of variance ≤ 15%. Our results also show that this assay can be used to identify CaN inhibitors with a wide range of potencies. PMID:26176772

  6. A phenotypic screening assay for modulators of huntingtin-induced transcriptional dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, Giulia; Benicchi, Tiziana; Heitz, Freddy; Magnoni, Letizia; Diamanti, Daniela; Rossini, Lara; Massai, Luisa; Federico, Cesare; Fecke, Wolfgang; Caricasole, Andrea; La Rosa, Salvatore; Porcari, Valentina

    2013-10-01

    Huntington's Disease is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats encoding polyglutamine in the first exon of the huntingtin gene. N-terminal fragments containing polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences aggregate and can bind to cellular proteins, resulting in several pathophysiological consequences for affected neurons such as changes in gene transcription. One transcriptional pathway that has been implicated in HD pathogenesis is the CREB binding protein (CBP)/cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) pathway. We developed a phenotypic assay to screen for compounds that can reverse the transcriptional dysregulation of the pathway caused by induced mutated huntingtin protein (µHtt). 293/T-REx cells were stably co-transfected with an inducible full-length mutated huntingtin gene containing 138 glutamine repeats and with a reporter gene under control of the cAMP responsive element (CRE). One clone, which showed reversible inhibition of µHtt-induced reporter activity upon treatment with the neuroprotective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, was used for the development of a high-throughput phenotypic assay suitable for a primary screening campaign, which was performed on a library of 24,000 compounds. Several hit compounds were identified and validated further in a cell viability adenosine triphosphate assay. The assay has the potential for finding new drug candidates for the treatment of HD. PMID:23562876

  7. Cross-reactivity of designer drugs, including cathinone derivatives, in commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Swortwood, Madeleine J; Hearn, W Lee; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of synthetic heroin, designer drugs have been increasing in prevalence in the United States drug market over the past few decades. Recently, 'legal highs' sold as 'bath salts' have become a household term for one such class of designer drugs. While a number of federal and state bans have been enacted, the abuse of these designer drugs still continues. Few assays have been developed for the comprehensive detection of such compounds, so it is important to investigate how they may or may not react in presumptive screens, i.e. pre-existing commercial immunoassays. In this experiment, 16 different ELISA reagents were evaluated to determine the cross-reactivity of 30 designer drugs, including 24 phenylethylamines (including 8 cathinone derivatives), 3 piperazines, and 3 tryptamines. Cross-reactivity towards most drugs was <4% in assays targeting amphetamine or methamphetamine. Compounds such as MDA, MDMA, ethylamphetamine, and α-methyltryptamine demonstrated cross-reactivities in the range of 30-250%, but data were consistent with both manufacturer's inserts and published literature. When tested against the Randox Mephedrone/Methcathinone kit, cathinone derivatives demonstrated cross-reactivity at concentrations as low as 150 ng/ml. Since this same reagent did not cross-react with other amphetamine-like compounds, it opens the possibility to screen post-mortem specimens without the interference of putrefactive amines. All other assays demonstrated essentially no cross-reactivity towards any of the analytes evaluated. Given these results, a great need exists for more broad-range screening techniques to be applied when analyzing biological specimens by immunoassays for drugs of abuse, specifically the more recent designer drugs. PMID:23677923

  8. Pharmacologically active metabolites, combination screening and target identification-driven drug repositioning in antituberculosis drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kigondu, Elizabeth M; Wasuna, Antonina; Warner, Digby F; Chibale, Kelly

    2014-08-15

    There has been renewed interest in alternative strategies to address bottlenecks in antibiotic development. These include the repurposing of approved drugs for use as novel anti-infective agents, or their exploitation as leads in drug repositioning. Such approaches are especially attractive for tuberculosis (TB), a disease which remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally and, increasingly, is associated with the emergence of drug-resistance. In this review article, we introduce a refinement of traditional drug repositioning and repurposing strategies involving the development of drugs that are based on the active metabolite(s) of parental compounds with demonstrated efficacy. In addition, we describe an approach to repositioning the natural product antibiotic, fusidic acid, for use against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Finally, we consider the potential to exploit the chemical matter arising from these activities in combination screens and permeation assays which are designed to confirm mechanism of action (MoA), elucidate potential synergies in polypharmacy, and to develop rules for drug permeability in an organism that poses a special challenge to new drug development. PMID:24997576

  9. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Morton, M J; Armstrong, D; Abi Gerges, N; Bridgland-Taylor, M; Pollard, C E; Bowes, J; Valentin, J-P

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies - radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology - was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. PMID:24952337

  10. Drug-symptom networking: Linking drug-likeness screening to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue; Zhang, Chao; Li, PiDong; Zhang, FeiLong; Gao, Kuo; Chen, JianXin; Shang, HongCai

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between drugs and symptoms has broad medical consequences, yet a comprehensive description of the drug-symptom associations is currently lacking. Here, 1441 FDA-approved drugs were collected, and PCA was used to extract 122 descriptors which explained 91% of the variance. Then, a k-means++ method was employed to partition the drug dataset into 3 clusters, and 3 corresponding SVDD models (drug-likeness screening models) were constructed with an overall accuracy of up to 95.6%. Furthermore, 6878 herbal molecules from the TcmSP™ database were screened by the above 3 SVDD model to obtain 5309 candidate drug molecules with highly accept classification of 77.19%. To assess the accuracy of the SVDD models, 8559 herbal molecule-symptom co-occurrences were mined from Pubmed abstracts, involving 697 herbal molecules and 314 symptoms. Most of the 697 herbal molecules could be found in the accepted SVDD data (5309 molecules), showing the potential of the SVDD for the screening of drug candidates. Moreover, a herbal molecule-herbal molecule network and a herbal molecule-symptom were constructed. Overall, the results provided a new drug-likeness screening approach independent to abnormal training data, and the comprehensive collection of herbal molecule-symptom associations formed a new data resource for systematic characterization of the symptom-oriented medicines. PMID:26615785

  11. Multiparametric immunotoxicity screening in mice during early drug development.

    PubMed

    Aulí, M; Domènech, A; Andrés, A; Orta, M; Salvà, M; Descotes, J; Prats, N

    2012-10-17

    Evaluation of potential adverse effects on the immune system should be incorporated into drug development prior to phase III clinical trials. In addition to standard toxicity results, T-dependent antibody response (TDAR) assays are widely used to evidence impaired immune function. The present study was aimed at validating a multiparametric screening approach in mice to investigate exaggerated pharmacologic or unintended immunosuppressive effects in early drug development. Male CD1 mice injected with a single IV dose of 2mg KLH displayed a robust anti-KLH IgM response that peaked on day +5. Anti-KLH IgM response, standard haematology parameters, and thymus/spleen weight and histology were examined in mice treated once daily for 4 days with cyclophosphamide (CY; 5-20mg/kg/day), cyclosporine (CS; 10-90mg/kg/day), dexamethasone (DX; 5-20mg/kg/day), prednisolone (PR; 3-30mg/kg/day) or chlorpromazine (CZ; 10-30mg/kg/day). CY and CS decreased anti-KLH IgM response at all dose levels. CY induced a marked decrease in WBC count and thymus/spleen weight with histological changes in both lymphoid organs. CS mainly decreased thymus weight (highest dose), which was associated with lymphoid depletion, without relevant effects on haematology parameters. Neither DX nor PR nor CZ induced significant changes in anti-KLH IgM response. DX and PR decreased lymphocyte counts and thymus/spleen weight, and induced histological changes in both lymphoid organs. CZ (higher doses) decreased lymphocyte count and thymus weight, and induced consistent histological changes in the thymus. This multiparametric study was able to detect 5 human drugs with variable immunosuppressive potency and thus may prove to be a useful early screening tool for predicting drug immunotoxicity. PMID:22944472

  12. Adapting High-Throughput Screening Methods and Assays for Biocontainment Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E. Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.; Noah, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories. PMID:25710545

  13. Adapting high-throughput screening methods and assays for biocontainment laboratories.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories. PMID:25710545

  14. Multidimensional GPCR profiling and screening using impedance-based label-free and real-time assay.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ning; Nguyen, Khanh; Irelan, Jeffery; Abassi, Yama A

    2015-01-01

    GPCRs constitute one of the most sought-after targets in drug discovery because they are associated with conditions ranging from cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, cancer, and diseases of the nervous system. Moreover, they are one of the most amenable targets for drug discovery because they can be modulated by small molecules, peptides, proteins, and antibodies. Therefore it may not come as a surprise that close to 40 % of the drugs that are currently on the market are targeting GPCRs. It has become evident that GPCR signaling is highly complex and may involve multiple or a subset of pathways depending on the interaction of a GPCR with an agonist or antagonist. It is imperative that any functional screening for GPCR activity integrates this complexity. In this assay protocol, we describe how the xCELLigence RTCA HT impedance-based platform which can be used for functional cell-based GPCR assays can be utilized for GPCR screening. PMID:25563187

  15. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  16. Screening for inhibitors of low-affinity epigenetic peptide-protein interactions: an AlphaScreen-based assay for antagonists of methyl-lysine binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Tim J; Herold, J Martin; Senisterra, Guillermo A; Vedadi, Masoud; Kireev, Dmitri B; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frye, Stephen V; Janzen, William P

    2010-01-01

    The histone code comprises many posttranslational modifications that occur mainly in histone tail peptides. The identity and location of these marks are read by a variety of histone-binding proteins that are emerging as important regulators of cellular differentiation and development and are increasingly being implicated in numerous disease states. The authors describe the development of the first high-throughput screening assay for the discovery of inhibitors of methyl-lysine binding proteins that will be used to initiate a full-scale discovery effort for this broad target class. They focus on the development of an AlphaScreen-based assay for malignant brain tumor (MBT) domain-containing proteins, which bind to the lower methylation states of lysine residues present in histone tail peptides. This assay takes advantage of the avidity of the AlphaScreen beads to clear the hurdle to assay development presented by the low micromolar binding constants of the histone binding proteins for their cognate peptides. The assay is applicable to other families of methyl-lysine binding proteins, and it has the potential to be used in screening efforts toward the discovery of novel small molecules with utility as research tools for cellular reprogramming and ultimately drug discovery. PMID:20008125

  17. Urine Drug Screening of Adolescents on Request of Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Forest

    1994-01-01

    Of 100 adolescents screened for drug use, 43% tested positive for drugs of abuse. Twenty-five percent of these adolescents entered treatment, with 8% requiring medical detoxification or inpatient treatment. Urine screening, when done for clinical rather than punitive purposes, appeared to facilitate entry into treatment. (RJM)

  18. Development and application of an automated solution stability assay for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Kerns, Edward H; Chen, Hong; Petusky, Susan L

    2006-02-01

    Screening of solution stability provides an early alert on potential liabilities of drug candidates so that strategies can be developed to overcome the challenges. A fully automated solution stability assay has been developed to accelerate traditional manual operation. The assay uses the advanced capabilities of a high-performance liquid chromatography instrument that is present in many pharmaceutical research laboratories. The samples are prepared automatically by a temperature-controlled autosampler. The samples are delivered to the stability matrices, mixed, incubated, and injected at selected time points during the reaction time course. This automated process occurs without operator intervention, thus allowing 96 experiments to be run with 0.5 h of a scientist's time compared to 8 h for the same study when performed manually. Automation not only eliminates the manual operation but also improves accuracy and throughput. The assay protocol has been optimized to achieve homogenous mixing and eliminate carryover. The assay is robust, flexible, and high throughput. It can be used to study stability for a large number of samples under multiple incubation conditions and has a wide range of applications in drug discovery and development, such as screening compound stability in biological assay media, obtaining a stability-pH profile, surveying compound stability in physiological fluids, and performing development forced degradation and excipient compatibility. PMID:16234336

  19. Evaluation of bioluminescence-based assays of anti-malarial drug activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transgenic Plasmodium falciparum expressing luciferase offers an attractive bioluminescence-based assay platform for the investigation of the pharmacological properties of anti-malarial drugs. Here a side-by-side comparison of bioluminescence and fluorescence-based assays, utilizing a luciferase reporter cassette that confers a strong temporal pattern of luciferase expression during the S-phase of intraerythrocytic development, is reported. Methods Key assay parameters for a range of commercially available luminogenic substrates are determined and compared to those measured using a Malaria Sybr Green I fluorescence assay. In addition, the short-term temporal effects of anti-malarial compounds are evaluated using both bioluminescent and fluorescent assay platforms. Results The Z’, % coefficient of variation and 50% inhibition concentrations are essentially the same for bioluminescent and fluorescent assays in transgenic parasites generated in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant genetic backgrounds. Bioluminescent assays, irrespective of the luminogenic agent employed, do, however, offer significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, the bioluminescent assay is more dynamic in terms of determining temporal effects immediately following drug perturbation. Conclusion This study suggests that opportunities for bioluminescence-based assays lie not in the measurement of 50% inhibition concentrations, where the cheaper fluorescence assay performs excellently and is not restricted by the need to genetically modify the parasite clone under investigation. Instead, assays that use the dynamic response of the luciferase reporter for semi-automated screening of additional pharmacological properties, such as relative rate-of-kill and lethal dose estimation, are a more attractive development opportunity. PMID:23394077

  20. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N; Tuszynski, Jack A; Klassen, John S

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26944280

  1. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  2. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  3. TranScreen-N: Method for rapid screening of trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers.

    PubMed

    Murthy, S Narasimha; Vaka, Siva Ram Kiran; Sammeta, Srinivasa Murthy; Nair, Anroop B

    2009-11-01

    Topical monotherapy of nail diseases such as onychomycosis and nail psoriasis has been less successful due to poor permeability of the human nail plate to topically administered drugs. Chemical enhancers are utilized to improve the drug delivery across the nail plate. Choosing the most effective chemical enhancers for the given drug and formulation is highly critical in determining the efficacy of topical therapy of nail diseases. Screening the large pool of enhancers using currently followed diffusion cell experiments would be tedious and expensive. The main objective of this study is to develop TranScreen-N, a high throughput method of screening trans-ungual drug permeation enhancers. It is a rapid microwell plate based method which involves two different treatment procedures; the simultaneous exposure treatment and the sequential exposure treatment. In the present study, several chemicals were evaluated by TranScreen-N and by diffusion studies in the Franz diffusion cell (FDC). Good agreement of in vitro drug delivery data with TranScreen-N data provided validity to the screening technique. In TranScreen-N technique, the enhancers can be grouped according to whether they need to be applied before or simultaneously with drugs (or by either procedures) to enhance the drug delivery across the nail plate. TranScreen-N technique can significantly reduce the cost and duration required to screen trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers. PMID:19363796

  4. Assessing HTS performance using BioAssay Ontology: screening and analysis of a bacterial phospho-N-acetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide translocase campaign.

    PubMed

    Moberg, Andreas; Zander Balderud, Linda; Hansson, Eva; Boyd, Helen

    2014-01-01

    With the public availability of biochemical assays and screening data constantly increasing, new applications for data mining and method analysis are evolving in parallel. One example is BioAssay Ontology (BAO) for systematic classification of assays based on screening setup and metadata annotations. In this article we report a high-throughput screening (HTS) against phospho-N-acetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide translocase (MraY), an attractive antibacterial drug target involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. The screen resulted in novel chemistry identification using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. To address a subset of the false positive hits, a frequent hitter analysis was performed using an approach in which MraY hits were compared with hits from similar assays, previously used for HTS. The MraY assay was annotated according to BAO and three internal reference assays, using a similar assay design and detection technology, were identified. Analyzing the assays retrospectively, it was clear that both MraY and the three reference assays all showed a high false positive rate in the primary HTS assays. In the case of MraY, false positives were efficiently identified by applying a method to correct for compound interference at the hit-confirmation stage. Frequent hitter analysis based on the three reference assays with similar assay method identified additional false actives in the primary MraY assay as frequent hitters. This article demonstrates how assays annotated using BAO terms can be used to identify closely related reference assays, and that analysis based on these assays clearly can provide useful data to influence assay design, technology, and screening strategy. PMID:25415593

  5. Potential impact of drug effects, availability, pharmacokinetics, and screening on estimates of drugs implicated in cases of assault.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lawrence P

    2011-09-01

    Drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) is a serious and troubling crime. It is important to know if and how different drugs might be used to facilitate assault in order to deter such crime. There are a number of ways in which drugs that are used for DFSA might not be detected by routine screens. The purpose of this analysis was to draw reasonable inferences regarding drugs with a high likelihood of being used for DFSA and not being detected by routine screens. National data from poison control centres, hospital emergency rooms, and law enforcement seizures were used to evaluate the relative magnitude of problems and illicit availability associated with different classes of drugs. General drug classes were examined to include additional drugs that might be used for DFSA on the basis of their amnesic effects, widespread availability, and pharmacokinetics (i.e. short half-life). The benzodiazepine-site ligands zolpidem and eszopiclone, 'club drugs' GHB and ketamine, muscle relaxants such as carisoprodol, and antihistamines such as diphenhydramine were identified as drugs that might be used for DFSA and remain undetected by routine screens. Future studies that are designed to examine the role of these drugs in DFSA cases could provide better estimates of their use for DFSA. A better understanding of what is being missed in DFSA cases might help prioritize the development of new assays, provide rationale for the availability of particular assays for routine testing, and inform practitioners and the general public of the potential DFSA risks of certain drugs. PMID:21960542

  6. Athletic Trainers' Attitudes Toward Drug Screening of Intercollegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Chad; Abdenour, Thomas E.; Finnane, David

    1994-01-01

    Since the inception of NCAA-mandated drug screening in 1986, college athletic trainers have found themselves involved at various levels in institutional drug-screening programs. Several legal, moral, and ethical questions have been raised regarding the drug screening of college athletes, and studies have been conducted to rate athletes' attitudes toward this practice. We examined the responses of certified athletic trainers employed in college settings to ascertain their attitudes toward the drug screening of athletes in general, and, specifically, how they view their role in this process. Surveys were distributed to 500 college athletic trainers randomly selected from the membership database maintained by the National Athletic Trainers' Association, Inc (Dallas, TX). The results of this survey indicate that the majority of athletic trainers feel that their association with the drug-screening process places them in the dual role of police and counselor, but that this relationship does not negatively affect their rapport with their athletes. Opinions regarding the drug-screening process and the importance of education in deterring drug use are somewhat dependent upon the athletic trainer's involvement in the drug-screening process. Athletic trainers possess a stronger desire to serve as resource persons who organize substance abuse education programs rather than serving as administrators of the sampling process. PMID:16558274

  7. The validation of an invitro colonic motility assay as a biomarker for gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Christopher; Martinez, Vicente; Ewart, Lorna; Gibbons, Stephen; Grundy, Luke; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Grundy, David

    2010-06-15

    Motility-related gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (GADRs), such as constipation and diarrhea, are some of the most frequently reported adverse events associated with the clinical development of new chemical entities, and for marketed drugs. However, biomarkers capable of detecting such GADRs are lacking. Here, we describe an in vitro assay developed to detect and quantify changes in intestinal motility as a surrogate biomarker for constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. In vitro recordings of intraluminal pressure were used to monitor the presence of colonic peristaltic motor complexes (CPMCs) in mouse colonic segments. CPMC frequency, contractile and total mechanical activity were assessed. To validate the assay, two experimental protocols were conducted. Initially, five drugs with known gastrointestinal effects were tested to determine optimal parameters describing excitation and inhibition as markers for disturbances in colonic motility. This was followed by a 'blinded' evaluation of nine drugs associated with or without clinically identified constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. Concentration-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the effects were compared with their maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration in humans. The assay detected stimulatory and inhibitory responses, likely correlating to the occurrence of diarrhea or constipation. Concentration-related effects were identified and potential mechanisms of action were inferred for several drugs. Based on the results from the fourteen drugs assessed, the sensitivity of the assay was calculated at 90%, with a specificity of 75% and predictive capacity of 86%. These results support the potential use of this assay in screening for motility-related GADRs during early discovery phase, safety pharmacology assessment.

  8. Differentiation of drug and non-drug Cannabis using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay.

    PubMed

    Rotherham, D; Harbison, S A

    2011-04-15

    Cannabis sativa is both an illegal drug and a legitimate crop. The differentiation of illegal drug Cannabis from non-drug forms of Cannabis is relevant in the context of the growth of fibre and seed oil varieties of Cannabis for commercial purposes. This differentiation is currently determined based on the levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adult plants. DNA based methods have the potential to assay Cannabis material unsuitable for analysis using conventional means including seeds, pollen and severely degraded material. The purpose of this research was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for the differentiation of "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis plants. An assay was developed based on four polymorphisms within a 399 bp fragment of the tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase gene, utilising the snapshot multiplex kit. This SNP assay was tested on 94 Cannabis plants, which included 10 blind samples, and was able to differentiate between "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis in all cases, while also differentiating between Cannabis and other species. Non-drug plants were found to be homozygous at the four sites assayed while drug Cannabis plants were either homozygous or heterozygous. PMID:21036496

  9. Phenotypic Screening Approaches to Develop Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marugán, Carlos; Torres, Raquel; Lallena, María José

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mitotic regulators as a strategy to fight cancer implies the development of drugs against key proteins, such as Aurora-A and -B. Current drugs, which target mitosis through a general mechanism of action (stabilization/destabilization of microtubules), have several side effects (neutropenia, alopecia, and emesis). Pharmaceutical companies aim at avoiding these unwanted effects by generating improved and selective drugs that increase the quality of life of the patients. However, the development of these drugs is an ambitious task that involves testing thousands of compounds through biochemical and cell-based assays. In addition, molecules usually target complex biological processes, involving several proteins and different molecular pathways, further emphasizing the need for high-throughput screening techniques and multiplexing technologies in order to identify drugs with the desired phenotype. We will briefly describe two multiplexing technologies [high-content imaging (HCI) and flow cytometry] and two key processes for drug discovery research (assay development and validation) following our own published industry quality standards. We will further focus on HCI as a useful tool for phenotypic screening and will provide a concrete example of HCI assay to detect Aurora-A or -B selective inhibitors discriminating the off-target effects related to the inhibition of other cell cycle or non-cell cycle key regulators. Finally, we will describe other assays that can help to characterize the in vitro pharmacology of the inhibitors. PMID:26779442

  10. The changing face of screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Matthew A

    2012-04-01

    Screening Asia 2011, Singapore, 22–23 November 2011. The meeting covered traditional topics such as high-content screening and assay development, as well as more contemporary, emergent areas involving novel screening platforms and technologies, strategies to deal with biosimilars and biologics, and natural product diversity. Notably, many talks challenged established screening practices and the use of 'combichem' small-molecule libraries. Instead, speakers offered an alternate view of compound library design and screening strategies that could better mimic the target and cell status found in the relevant disease state. PMID:22462783

  11. BioAssay Ontology Annotations Facilitate Cross-Analysis of Diverse High-throughput Screening Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Vempati, Uma; Smith, Robin; Southern, Mark; Lemmon, Vance

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput screening data repositories, such as PubChem, represent valuable resources for the development of small molecule chemical probes and can serve as entry points for drug discovery programs. While the loose data format offered by PubChem allows for great flexibility, important annotations, such as the assay format and technologies employed, are not explicitly indexed. We have previously developed a BioAssay Ontology (BAO) and curated over 350 assays with standardized BAO terms. Here we describe the use of BAO annotations to analyze a large set of assays that employ luciferase- and β-lactamase-based technologies. We identified promiscuous chemotypes pertaining to different sub-categories of assays and specific mechanisms by which these chemotypes interfere in reporter gene assays. Our results show that the data in PubChem can be used to identify promiscuous compounds that interfere non-specifically with particular technologies. Furthermore, we show that BAO is a valuable toolset for the identification of related assays and for the systematic generation of insights that are beyond the scope of individual assays or screening campaigns. PMID:21471461

  12. The role of matrix compliance on cell responses to drugs and toxins: towards predictive drug screening platforms.

    PubMed

    Zustiak, Silviya Petrova

    2015-05-01

    Since the birth of tissue engineering, it has been redefined to include not only the development of tissues for clinical use, but also in vitro models for the study of tissue physiology and pathology. Great strides have been accomplished in the design of in vitro tissue models, yet one area in which they are underrepresented, but where they can have an immediate impact, is the development of platforms for drug screening. By providing more in vivo-like cell environments, such models could address the growing concerns about drug failures due to lack of efficacy or unexpected side effects. This review aims to address the interface between substrate compliance and cell responsiveness to toxins and drugs since compliance has been established as a major determinate of overall cell fate. Here, results from 2D substrates and 3D matrices are discussed. Additionally, examples of biomaterial-based high-throughput stiffness assays in drug screening are presented. PMID:25654999

  13. Assays for the identification and prioritization of drug candidates for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Jonathan J; Kobayashi, Dione T; Lynes, Maureen M; Naryshkin, Nikolai N; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Zaworski, Phillip G; Rubin, Lee L; Jarecki, Jill

    2014-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in degeneration of α-motor neurons of the anterior horn and proximal muscle weakness. It is the leading cause of genetic mortality in children younger than 2 years. It affects ∼1 in 11,000 live births. In 95% of cases, SMA is caused by homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene. In addition, all patients possess at least one copy of an almost identical gene called SMN2. A single point mutation in exon 7 of the SMN2 gene results in the production of low levels of full-length survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein at amounts insufficient to compensate for the loss of the SMN1 gene. Although no drug treatments are available for SMA, a number of drug discovery and development programs are ongoing, with several currently in clinical trials. This review describes the assays used to identify candidate drugs for SMA that modulate SMN2 gene expression by various means. Specifically, it discusses the use of high-throughput screening to identify candidate molecules from primary screens, as well as the technical aspects of a number of widely used secondary assays to assess SMN messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression, localization, and function. Finally, it describes the process of iterative drug optimization utilized during preclinical SMA drug development to identify clinical candidates for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:25147906

  14. Assays for the Identification and Prioritization of Drug Candidates for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Jonathan J.; Kobayashi, Dione T.; Lynes, Maureen M.; Naryshkin, Nikolai N.; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Zaworski, Phillip G.; Rubin, Lee L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in degeneration of α-motor neurons of the anterior horn and proximal muscle weakness. It is the leading cause of genetic mortality in children younger than 2 years. It affects ∼1 in 11,000 live births. In 95% of cases, SMA is caused by homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene. In addition, all patients possess at least one copy of an almost identical gene called SMN2. A single point mutation in exon 7 of the SMN2 gene results in the production of low levels of full-length survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein at amounts insufficient to compensate for the loss of the SMN1 gene. Although no drug treatments are available for SMA, a number of drug discovery and development programs are ongoing, with several currently in clinical trials. This review describes the assays used to identify candidate drugs for SMA that modulate SMN2 gene expression by various means. Specifically, it discusses the use of high-throughput screening to identify candidate molecules from primary screens, as well as the technical aspects of a number of widely used secondary assays to assess SMN messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression, localization, and function. Finally, it describes the process of iterative drug optimization utilized during preclinical SMA drug development to identify clinical candidates for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:25147906

  15. Simple and sensitive antimalarial drug screening in vitro and in vivo using transgenic luciferase expressing Plasmodium berghei parasites.

    PubMed

    Franke-Fayard, B; Djokovic, D; Dooren, M W; Ramesar, J; Waters, A P; Falade, M O; Kranendonk, M; Martinelli, A; Cravo, P; Janse, C J

    2008-12-01

    We report two improved assays for in vitro and in vivo screening of chemicals with potential anti-malarial activity against the blood stages of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodiumberghei. These assays are based on the determination of luciferase activity (luminescence) in small blood samples containing transgenic blood stage parasites that express luciferase under the control of a promoter that is either schizont-specific (ama-1) or constitutive (eef1alphaa). Assay 1, the in vitro drug luminescence (ITDL) assay, measured the success of schizont maturation in the presence of candidate drugs quantifying luciferase activity in mature schizonts only (ama-1 promoter). The ITDL assay generated drug-inhibition curves and EC(50) values comparable to those obtained with standard in vitro drug-susceptibility assays. The second assay, the in vivo drug-luminescence (IVDL) assay, measured parasite growth in vivo in a standard 4-day suppressive drug test, monitored by measuring the constitutive luciferase activity of circulating parasites (eef1alphaa promoter). The IVDL assay generates growth-curves that are identical to those obtained by manual counting of parasites in Giemsa-stained smears. The reading of luminescence assays is rapid, requires a minimal number of handling steps and no experience with parasite morphology or handling fluorescence-activated cell sorters, produces no radioactive waste and test-plates can be stored for prolonged periods before processing. Both tests are suitable for use in larger-scale in vitro and in vivo screening of drugs. The standard methodology of anti-malarial drug screening and validation, which includes testing in rodent models of malaria, can be improved by the incorporation of such assays. PMID:18590736

  16. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  17. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  18. USER S GUIDE FOR THE RANDOM DRUG SCREENING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    McNeany, Karen I

    2013-12-01

    The Random Drug Screening System (RDSS) is a desktop computing application designed to assign nongameable drug testing dates to each member in a population of employees, within a specific time line. The program includes reporting capabilities, test form generation, unique test ID number assignment, and the ability to flag high-risk employees for a higher frequency of drug testing than the general population.

  19. BioAssay Ontology (BAO): a semantic description of bioassays and high-throughput screening results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-throughput screening (HTS) is one of the main strategies to identify novel entry points for the development of small molecule chemical probes and drugs and is now commonly accessible to public sector research. Large amounts of data generated in HTS campaigns are submitted to public repositories such as PubChem, which is growing at an exponential rate. The diversity and quantity of available HTS assays and screening results pose enormous challenges to organizing, standardizing, integrating, and analyzing the datasets and thus to maximize the scientific and ultimately the public health impact of the huge investments made to implement public sector HTS capabilities. Novel approaches to organize, standardize and access HTS data are required to address these challenges. Results We developed the first ontology to describe HTS experiments and screening results using expressive description logic. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO) serves as a foundation for the standardization of HTS assays and data and as a semantic knowledge model. In this paper we show important examples of formalizing HTS domain knowledge and we point out the advantages of this approach. The ontology is available online at the NCBO bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/44531. Conclusions After a large manual curation effort, we loaded BAO-mapped data triples into a RDF database store and used a reasoner in several case studies to demonstrate the benefits of formalized domain knowledge representation in BAO. The examples illustrate semantic querying capabilities where BAO enables the retrieval of inferred search results that are relevant to a given query, but are not explicitly defined. BAO thus opens new functionality for annotating, querying, and analyzing HTS datasets and the potential for discovering new knowledge by means of inference. PMID:21702939

  20. A FRET-based assay for screening SIRT5 specific modulators.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Huang, Wenfei; You, Ling; Xie, Ting; He, Bin

    2015-04-15

    A fluorogenic assay for SIRT5 has been developed to screen their small molecule modulators based on the recent discovery that SIRT5 is a demalonylase and desuccinylase. However, this assay uses a fluorogenic peptide containing 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (AMC), which becomes the cause of false positive hits from the screening. To overcome this, we have developed an alternative method called a FRET-based assay, which will be reliable and useful for screening SIRT5 modulators in a high-throughput format since no AMC group present in this assay. PMID:25818461

  1. Open innovation for phenotypic drug discovery: The PD2 assay panel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonathan A; Chu, Shaoyou; Willard, Francis S; Cox, Karen L; Sells Galvin, Rachelle J; Peery, Robert B; Oliver, Sarah E; Oler, Jennifer; Meredith, Tamika D; Heidler, Steven A; Gough, Wendy H; Husain, Saba; Palkowitz, Alan D; Moxham, Christopher M

    2011-07-01

    Phenotypic lead generation strategies seek to identify compounds that modulate complex, physiologically relevant systems, an approach that is complementary to traditional, target-directed strategies. Unlike gene-specific assays, phenotypic assays interrogate multiple molecular targets and signaling pathways in a target "agnostic" fashion, which may reveal novel functions for well-studied proteins and discover new pathways of therapeutic value. Significantly, existing compound libraries may not have sufficient chemical diversity to fully leverage a phenotypic strategy. To address this issue, Eli Lilly and Company launched the Phenotypic Drug Discovery Initiative (PD(2)), a model of open innovation whereby external research groups can submit compounds for testing in a panel of Lilly phenotypic assays. This communication describes the statistical validation, operations, and initial screening results from the first PD(2) assay panel. Analysis of PD(2) submissions indicates that chemical diversity from open source collaborations complements internal sources. Screening results for the first 4691 compounds submitted to PD(2) have confirmed hit rates from 1.6% to 10%, with the majority of active compounds exhibiting acceptable potency and selectivity. Phenotypic lead generation strategies, in conjunction with novel chemical diversity obtained via open-source initiatives such as PD(2), may provide a means to identify compounds that modulate biology by novel mechanisms and expand the innovation potential of drug discovery. PMID:21521801

  2. Evaluation of high-throughput assays for in vitro drug susceptibility testing of Tritrichomonas foetus trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Bader, Chris; Jesudoss Chelladurai, Jeba; Thompson, Kylie; Hall, Cindy; Carlson, Steve A; Brewer, Matthew T

    2016-06-15

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a sexually transmitted protozoan parasite that causes abortions in cattle and results in severe economic losses. In the United States, there are no safe and effective treatments for this parasite and infected animals are typically culled. In order to expedite drug discovery efforts, we investigated in vitro trophozoite killing assays amenable to high-throughput screening in 96 well plate formats. We evaluated the reduction of resorufin, incorporation of propidium iodide, and a luminescence-based ATP detection assay. Of these methods, reduction of resorufin was found to be the most reliable predictor of trophozoite concentrations. We further validated this method by conducting dose-response experiments suitable for calculation of EC50 values for two established compounds with known activity against trophozoites in vitro, namely, metronidazole and ronidazole. Our results demonstrate that the resorufin method is suitable for high-throughput screening and could be used to enhance efforts targeting new treatments for bovine trichomoniasis. PMID:27198774

  3. Automated fluorescent analysis for drug-induced cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Funa, K; Dawson, N; Jewett, P B; Agren, H; Ruckdeschel, J C; Bunn, P A; Gazdar, A F

    1986-10-01

    The human tumor clonogenic assay has been reported to predict for sensitivity of human tumors to a variety of drugs. However, this assay requires large numbers of viable cells, is time-consuming, and takes at least 2 weeks before results are available. To circumvent these problems, Weisenthal developed a microscope-based dye exclusion assay. Because this method is also time-consuming and subject to observer error, we have developed an automated method of quantitating drug cytotoxicity using a flow cytometric cell sorter (FCM). After incubation of drug-exposed tumor cells, acetaldehyde-fixed duck red blood cells (DRBC) are added. Dead tumor cells and the fixed DRBC are stained by the fluorescent dye propidium iodide, which penetrates dead cell membranes. A two-parameter analysis (cell size as measured by narrow angle light scatter vs propidium iodide fluorescence) enables determination of the live tumor cell:DRBC ratio. There was a strong correlation between the FCM method and manual counting (r = 0.958 for cell lines, r = 0.831 for fresh leukemic cells, P less than 0.0001 in both cases). We conclude that the automatized FCM method gives compatible results to the manual dye exclusion assay and increases efficiency. PMID:3019545

  4. Predicting adverse drug reactions using publicly available PubChem BioAssay data.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Y; Chiang, A P; Butte, A J

    2011-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can have severe consequences, and therefore the ability to predict ADRs prior to market introduction of a drug is desirable. Computational approaches applied to preclinical data could be one way to inform drug labeling and marketing with respect to potential ADRs. Based on the premise that some of the molecular actors of ADRs involve interactions that are detectable in large, and increasingly public, compound screening campaigns, we generated logistic regression models that correlate postmarketing ADRs with screening data from the PubChem BioAssay database. These models analyze ADRs at the level of organ systems, using the system organ classes (SOCs). Of the 19 SOCs under consideration, nine were found to be significantly correlated with preclinical screening data. With regard to six of the eight established drugs for which we could retropredict SOC-specific ADRs, prior knowledge was found that supports these predictions. We conclude this paper by predicting that SOC-specific ADRs will be associated with three unapproved or recently introduced drugs. PMID:21613989

  5. High-throughput screening of FDA-approved drugs using oxygen biosensor plates reveals secondary mitofunctional effects

    PubMed Central

    Sahdeo, Sunil; Tomilov, Alexey; Komachi, Kelly; Iwahashi, Christine; Datta, Sandipan; Hughes, Owen; Hagerman, Paul; Cortopassi, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing of FDA-approved drugs with effects on mitochondrial function might shorten the critical path to mitochondrial disease drug development. We improved a biosensor-based assay of mitochondrial O2 consumption, and identified mitofunctional defects in cell models of LHON and FXTAS. Using this platform, we screened a 1600-compound library of clinically used drugs. The assay identified drugs known to affect mitochondrial function, such as metformin and decoquinate. We also identified several drugs not previously known to affect mitochondrial respiration including acarbose, metaraminol, gallamine triethiodide, and acamprosate. These previously unknown ‘mitoactives’ represent novel links to targets for mitochondrial regulation and potentially therapy, for mitochondrial disease. PMID:25034306

  6. Establishment of a cell model for screening antibody drugs against rheumatoid arthritis with ADCC and CDC

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Hu, Rui; Tu, Song; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng; Ren, Yi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    TNF? played a dominant role in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinical trials proved the efficacies of anti-TNF? agents for curing RA. However, most researchers were concentrating on their abilities of neutralizing TNF?, the potencies of different anti-TNF? agents varied a lot due to the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). For better understanding and differentiating the potentiality of various candidate anti-TNF reagents at the stage of new drug research and development, present study established a cell model expressing the transmembrane TNF? for usage in in vitro ADCC or CDC assay, meanwhile, the assay protocol described here could provide guidelines for screening macromolecular antibody drugs. A stable cell subline bearing transmembrane TNF? was first established by conventional transfection method, the expression of transmembrane TNF? was approved by flow cytometer, and the performance of the stable subline in ADCC and CDC assay was evaluated, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as effector cells, and Adalimumab as the anti-TNF? reagent. The stable cell subline demonstrated high level of surface expression of transmembrane TNF?, and Adalimumab exerted both ADCC and CDC effects on this cell model. In conclusion, the stable cell line we established in present research could be used in ADCC or CDC assay for screening antibody drugs, which would provide in-depth understanding of the potencies of candidate antibody drugs in addition to the traditional TNF? neutralizing assay. PMID:26884918

  7. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  8. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPAs ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  9. A Different Approach to Validating Screening Assays for Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: There continues to be many efforts around the world to develop assays that are shorter than the traditional embryofetal developmental toxicity assay, or use fewer or no mammals, or use less compound, or have all three attributes. Each assay developer needs to test th...

  10. Kinetic assay for high-throughput screening of in vitro transthyretin amyloid fibrillogenesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dolado, Ignacio; Nieto, Joan; Saraiva, Maria João M; Arsequell, Gemma; Valencia, Gregori; Planas, Antoni

    2005-01-01

    Stabilization of tetrameric transthyretin (TTR) by binding of small ligands is a current strategy aimed at inhibiting amyloid fibrillogenesis in transthyretin-associated pathologies, such as senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) and familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP). A kinetic assay is developed for rapid evaluation of compounds as potential in vitro inhibitors in a high-throughput screening format. It is based on monitoring the time-dependent increase of absorbance due to turbidity occurring by acid-induced protein aggregation. The method uses the highly amyloidogenic Y78F mutant of human transthyretin (heterogously expressed in Escherichia coli cells). Initial rates of protein aggregation at different inhibitor concentrations follow a monoexponential dose-response curve from which inhibition parameters are calculated. For the assay development, thyroid hormones and nonsteroidal antiinflamatory drugs were chosen among other reference compounds. Some of them are already known to be in vitro inhibitors of TTR amyloidogenesis. Analysis time is optimized to last 1.5 h, and the method is implemented in microtiter plates for screening of libraries of potential fibrillogenesis inhibitors. PMID:15762752

  11. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay for High-throughput and Mechanistic Genotoxicity Assessment and Screening of Environmental Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiaqi; Gou, Na; Rahman, Sheikh Mokhles; Gao, Ce; He, Miao; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    The ecological and health concern of mutagenicity and carcinogenicity potentially associated with an overwhelmingly large and ever-increasing number of chemicals demands for cost-effective and feasible method for genotoxicity screening and risk assessment. This study proposed a genotoxicity assay using GFP-tagged yeast reporter strains, covering 38 selected protein biomarkers indicative of all the seven known DNA damage repair pathways. The assay was applied to assess four model genotoxic chemicals, eight environmental pollutants and four negative controls across six concentrations. Quantitative molecular genotoxicity end points were derived based on dose response modeling of a newly developed integrated molecular effect quantifier, Protein Effect Level Index (PELI). The molecular genotoxicity end points were consistent with multiple conventional in vitro genotoxicity assays, as well as with in vivo carcinogenicity assay results. Further more, the proposed genotoxicity end point PELI values quantitatively correlated with both comet assay in human cell and carcinogenicity potency assay in mice, providing promising evidence for linking the molecular disturbance measurements to adverse outcomes at a biological relevant level. In addition, the high-resolution DNA damaging repair pathway alternated protein expression profiles allowed for chemical clustering and classification. This toxicogenomics-based assay presents a promising alternative for fast, efficient and mechanistic genotoxicity screening and assessment of drugs, foods, and environmental contaminants. PMID:26855253

  12. 21 CFR 862.3645 - Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system... Test Systems § 862.3645 Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system. (a) Identification. A neuroleptic drugs radioceptor assay test system is a device intended to measure in serum or plasma...

  13. Microfluidic cell chips for high-throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Ahmed, Ah Rezwanuddin; Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Wang, Sihong

    2016-05-01

    The current state of screening methods for drug discovery is still riddled with several inefficiencies. Although some widely used high-throughput screening platforms may enhance the drug screening process, their cost and oversimplification of cell-drug interactions pose a translational difficulty. Microfluidic cell-chips resolve many issues found in conventional HTS technology, providing benefits such as reduced sample quantity and integration of 3D cell culture physically more representative of the physiological/pathological microenvironment. In this review, we introduce the advantages of microfluidic devices in drug screening, and outline the critical factors which influence device design, highlighting recent innovations and advances in the field including a summary of commercialization efforts on microfluidic cell chips. Future perspectives of microfluidic cell devices are also provided based on considerations of present technological limitations and translational barriers. PMID:27071838

  14. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of an enzymatic assay suitable for small molecule screening and profiling: A case-study.

    PubMed

    Sancenon, Vicente; Goh, Wei Hau; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Er, Kai Shih; Johal, Nidhi; Mukhina, Svetlana; Carr, Grant; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar

    2015-06-01

    The successful discovery and subsequent development of small molecule inhibitors of drug targets relies on the establishment of robust, cost-effective, quantitative, and physiologically relevant in vitro assays that can support prolonged screening and optimization campaigns. The current study illustrates the process of developing and validating an enzymatic assay for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors using alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestine as model target. The assay development workflow includes an initial phase of optimization of assay materials, reagents, and conditions, continues with a process of miniaturization and automation, and concludes with validation by quantitative measurement of assay performance and signal variability. The assay is further evaluated for dose-response and mechanism-of-action studies required to support structure-activity-relationship studies. Emphasis is placed on the most critical aspects of assay optimization and other relevant considerations, including the technology, assay materials, buffer constituents, reaction conditions, liquid handling equipment, analytical instrumentation, and quantitative assessments. Examples of bottlenecks encountered during assay development and strategies to address them are provided. PMID:27077032

  15. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of an enzymatic assay suitable for small molecule screening and profiling: A case-study

    PubMed Central

    Sancenon, Vicente; Goh, Wei Hau; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Er, Kai Shih; Johal, Nidhi; Mukhina, Svetlana; Carr, Grant; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar

    2015-01-01

    The successful discovery and subsequent development of small molecule inhibitors of drug targets relies on the establishment of robust, cost-effective, quantitative, and physiologically relevant in vitro assays that can support prolonged screening and optimization campaigns. The current study illustrates the process of developing and validating an enzymatic assay for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors using alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestine as model target. The assay development workflow includes an initial phase of optimization of assay materials, reagents, and conditions, continues with a process of miniaturization and automation, and concludes with validation by quantitative measurement of assay performance and signal variability. The assay is further evaluated for dose–response and mechanism-of-action studies required to support structure–activity-relationship studies. Emphasis is placed on the most critical aspects of assay optimization and other relevant considerations, including the technology, assay materials, buffer constituents, reaction conditions, liquid handling equipment, analytical instrumentation, and quantitative assessments. Examples of bottlenecks encountered during assay development and strategies to address them are provided. PMID:27077032

  16. A Cell-based PDE4 Assay in 1536-well Plate format for High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A.; Li, Xiao; Southall, Noel; Lu, Jianming; Inglese, James; Brasch, Michael; Austin, Christopher P.; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are intracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), to their corresponding 5'-nucleotide monophosphates. These enzymes play an important role in controlling cellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides and thus regulate a variety of cellular signaling events. PDEs are emerging as drug targets for several diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. Though biochemical assays with purified recombinant PDE enzymes and cAMP or cGMP substrate are commonly used for compound screening, cell-based assays would provide a better assessment of compound activity in a more physiological context. Here we report the development and validation of a new cell-based PDE4 assay using a constitutively active GPCR as a driving force for cAMP production and a cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) cation channel as a biosensor in 1536-well plates. PMID:18591513

  17. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Lauren; Ebsworth-Mojica, Katherine; DiDone, Louis; Li, Shao-Gang; Freundlich, Joel S.; Connell, Nancy; Dunman, Paul M.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb. PMID:26098625

  18. Comparison of three quantification methods for the TZM-bl pseudovirus assay for screening of anti-HIV-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Xing, Liying; Wang, Shunyi; Hu, Qin; Li, Jingtao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The TZM-bl pseudovirus assay is commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of neutralizing antibodies and small molecular inhibitors in HIV-1 research. Here, to determine the optimal measurement method for screening anti-HIV-1 inhibitors, we compared three measurement methods based on firefly luciferase and β-galactosidase activities. The 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of the pseudoviruses were determined using the luciferase, β-galactosidase colorimetric, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining assays. Three commercial reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (azidothymidine, nevirapine, and lamivudine) were tested as reference drugs to compare the reproducibility, linear correlation, and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values determined using these methods. In the TCID50 assay, the sensitivity of β-galactosidase colorimetric assay was almost 562 times lower than that of the other two methods. Reproducible dose-response curves were obtained for the inhibitors with all methods; the IC50 values of the inhibitors were not significantly different. Linear regression analysis showed linear correlation between methods. Compared to the β-galactosidase colorimetric assay, the other two methods have the advantage of high sensitivity and are less affected by interference. In conclusion, the luciferase and X-gal staining assays, which can be applied either alone or combined, are recommended for anti-HIV-1 inhibitor screening. PMID:27016178

  19. Thermodynamic Studies for Drug Design and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Garbett, Nichola C.; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A key part of drug design and development is the optimization of molecular interactions between an engineered drug candidate and its binding target. Thermodynamic characterization provides information about the balance of energetic forces driving binding interactions and is essential for understanding and optimizing molecular interactions. Areas covered This review discusses the information that can be obtained from thermodynamic measurements and how this can be applied to the drug development process. Current approaches for the measurement and optimization of thermodynamic parameters are presented, specifically higher throughput and calorimetric methods. Relevant literature for this review was identified in part by bibliographic searches for the period 2004 2011 using the Science Citation Index and PUBMED and the keywords listed below. Expert opinion The most effective drug design and development platform comes from an integrated process utilizing all available information from structural, thermodynamic and biological studies. Continuing evolution in our understanding of the energetic basis of molecular interactions and advances in thermodynamic methods for widespread application are essential to realize the goal of thermodynamically-driven drug design. Comprehensive thermodynamic evaluation is vital early in the drug development process to speed drug development towards an optimal energetic interaction profile while retaining good pharmacological properties. Practical thermodynamic approaches, such as enthalpic optimization, thermodynamic optimization plots and the enthalpic efficiency index, have now matured to provide proven utility in design process. Improved throughput in calorimetric methods remains essential for even greater integration of thermodynamics into drug design. PMID:22458502

  20. Microfluidics-assisted in vitro drug screening and carrier production

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Jonathan H.; Lee, Woohyuk; Pun, Suzie H.; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms provide several unique advantages for drug development. In the production of drug carriers, physical properties such as size and shape, and chemical properties such as drug composition and pharmacokinetic parameters, can be modified simply and effectively by tuning the flow rate and geometries. Large numbers of carriers can then be fabricated with minimal effort and with little to no batch-to-batch variation. Additionally, cell or tissue culture models in microfluidic systems can be used as in vitro drug screening tools. Compared to in vivo animal models, microfluidic drug screening platforms allow for high-throughput and reproducible screening at a significantly lower cost, and when combined with current advances in tissue engineering, are also capable of mimicking native tissues. In this review, various microfluidic platforms for drug and gene carrier fabrication are reviewed to provide guidelines for designing appropriate carriers. In vitro microfluidic drug screening platforms designed for high-throughput analysis and replication of in vivo conditions are also reviewed to highlight future directions for drug research and development. PMID:23856409

  1. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  2. Adapting a Drug Screening Platform to Discover Associations of Molecular Targeted Radiosensitizers with Genomic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Wang, Meng; Kern, Ashley M.; Khaled, Saman; Han, Jing; Yeap, Beow Y.; Hong, Theodore S.; Settleman, Jeff; Benes, Cyril H.; Held, Kathryn D.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Willers, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Large collections of annotated cancer cell lines are powerful tools for precisely matching targeted drugs with genomic alterations that can be tested as biomarkers in the clinic. Whether these screening platforms, which utilize short-term cell survival to assess drug responses, can be applied to precision radiation medicine is not established. To this end, 32 cancer cell lines were screened using 18 targeted therapeutic agents with known or putative radiosensitizing properties (227 combinations). The cell number remaining after drug exposure with or without radiation was assessed by non-clonogenic assays. We derived short-term radiosensitization factors (SRF2Gy) and calculated clonogenic survival assay-based dose enhancement factors (DEFSF0.1). Radiosensitization was characterized by SRF2Gy values of mostly ~1.05-1.2 and significantly correlated with drug-induced changes in apoptosis and senescence frequencies. SRF2Gy was significantly correlated with DEFSF0.1, with a respective sensitivity and specificity of 91.7% and 81.5% for a 3-day endpoint, and 82.8% and 84.2% for a robotic 5-day assay. KRAS mutations (codons 12/13) were found to be a biomarker of radiosensitization by midostaurin in lung cancer, which was pronounced under conditions that enriched for stem cell-like cells. In conclusion, while short-term proliferation/survival assays cannot replace the gold standard clonogenic survival assay for measuring cellular radiosensitivity, they capture with high accuracy the relative change in radiosensitivity that is caused by a radiosensitzing targeted agent. Implications This study supports a paradigm shift regarding the utility of short-term assays for precision radiation medicine, which should facilitate the identification of genomic biomarkers to guide the testing of novel drug/radiation combinations. PMID:25667133

  3. A Replicative In Vitro Assay for Drug Discovery against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Tegazzini, Diana; Díaz, Rosario; Aguilar, Fernando; Peña, Imanol; Presa, Jesús L; Yardley, Vanessa; Martin, Julio J; Coteron, Jose M; Croft, Simon L; Cantizani, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, a disease potentially fatal if not treated. Current available treatments have major limitations, and new and safer drugs are urgently needed. In recent years, advances in high-throughput screening technologies have enabled the screening of millions of compounds to identify new antileishmanial agents. However, most of the compounds identified in vitro did not translate their activities when tested in in vivo models, highlighting the need to develop more predictive in vitro assays. In the present work, we describe the development of a robust replicative, high-content, in vitro intracellular L. donovani assay. Horse serum was included in the assay media to replace standard fetal bovine serum, to completely eliminate the extracellular parasites derived from the infection process. A novel phenotypic in vitro infection model has been developed, complemented with the identification of the proliferation of intracellular amastigotes measured by EdU incorporation. In vitro and in vivo results for miltefosine, amphotericin B, and the selected compound 1 have been included to validate the assay. PMID:27021313

  4. Development and Implementation of a High-Throughput Compound Screening Assay for Targeting Disrupted ER Calcium Homeostasis in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honarnejad, Kamran; Daschner, Alexander; Giese, Armin; Zall, Andrea; Schmidt, Boris; Szybinska, Aleksandra; Kuznicki, Jacek; Herms, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease. PMID:24260442

  5. Identification of 53 compounds that block Ebola virus-like particle entry via a repurposing screen of approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Sun, Wei; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Tawa, Gregory; Shinn, Paul; Chen, Catherine Z; Schimmer, Aaron; Sanderson, Philip; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    In light of the current outbreak of Ebola virus disease, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics to treat Ebola infection, and drug repurposing screening is a potentially rapid approach for identifying such therapeutics. We developed a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) 1536-well plate assay to screen for entry inhibitors of Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP) and the matrix VP40 protein fused to a beta-lactamase reporter protein and applied this assay for a rapid drug repurposing screen of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We report here the identification of 53 drugs with activity of blocking Ebola VLP entry into cells. These 53 active compounds can be divided into categories including microtubule inhibitors, estrogen receptor modulators, antihistamines, antipsychotics, pump/channel antagonists, and anticancer/antibiotics. Several of these compounds, including microtubule inhibitors and estrogen receptor modulators, had previously been reported to be active in BSL-4 infectious Ebola virus replication assays and in animal model studies. Our assay represents a robust, effective and rapid high-throughput screen for the identification of lead compounds in drug development for the treatment of Ebola virus infection. PMID:26038505

  6. Drug preference as a function of arousal and stimulus screening.

    PubMed

    Kern, M F; Kenkel, M B; Templer, D I; Newell, T G

    1986-02-01

    The sedating and arousing central nervous system effects of drugs have long been inferred to be a factor in their illicit use and abuse. The present study provides evidence to support this contention; specifically, preference for a particular drug is, in part, a function of arousal-seeking and stimulus-screening characteristics. In general, the results suggest that individuals who prefer central nervous system stimulants tend to have greater arousal-seeking tendencies and lower external stimulus screening ability than those who prefer central nervous system depressants. Opiate preferrers aligned more closely with stimulant preferrers than alcohol groups. Preferrers of hallucinogens were higher in internal stimulus screening than all other drug preference groups. Trait anxiety does not appear to be related to arousal seeking or to preference for arousing or sedating drugs. PMID:3710650

  7. Genetic Variability of HIV-1 for Drug Resistance Assay Development

    PubMed Central

    Clutter, Dana S.; Sánchez, Patricia Rojas; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    A hybridization-based point-of-care (POC) assay for HIV-1 drug resistance would be useful in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where resistance testing is not routinely available. The major obstacle in developing such an assay is the extreme genetic variability of HIV-1. We analyzed 27,203 reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences from the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database originating from six LMIC regions. We characterized the variability in a 27-nucleotide window surrounding six clinically important drug resistance mutations (DRMs) at positions 65, 103, 106, 181, 184, and 190. The number of distinct codons at each DRM position ranged from four at position 184 to 11 at position 190. Depending on the mutation, between 11 and 15 of the 24 flanking nucleotide positions were variable. Nonetheless, most flanking sequences differed from a core set of 10 flanking sequences by just one or two nucleotides. Flanking sequence variability was also lower in each LMIC region compared with overall variability in all regions. We also describe an online program that we developed to perform similar analyses for mutations at any position in RT, protease, or integrase. PMID:26875985

  8. Genetic Variability of HIV-1 for Drug Resistance Assay Development.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Dana S; Sánchez, Patricia Rojas; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    A hybridization-based point-of-care (POC) assay for HIV-1 drug resistance would be useful in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where resistance testing is not routinely available. The major obstacle in developing such an assay is the extreme genetic variability of HIV-1. We analyzed 27,203 reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences from the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database originating from six LMIC regions. We characterized the variability in a 27-nucleotide window surrounding six clinically important drug resistance mutations (DRMs) at positions 65, 103, 106, 181, 184, and 190. The number of distinct codons at each DRM position ranged from four at position 184 to 11 at position 190. Depending on the mutation, between 11 and 15 of the 24 flanking nucleotide positions were variable. Nonetheless, most flanking sequences differed from a core set of 10 flanking sequences by just one or two nucleotides. Flanking sequence variability was also lower in each LMIC region compared with overall variability in all regions. We also describe an online program that we developed to perform similar analyses for mutations at any position in RT, protease, or integrase. PMID:26875985

  9. Label-free imaging and temporal signature in phenotypic cellular assays: a new approach to high-content screening.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julio

    2010-09-01

    Some drug targets are not amenable to screening because of the lack of a practical or validated biological assay. Likewise, some screening assays may not be predictive of compound activity in a more disease-relevant scenario, or assay development may demand excessive allocation of resources (i.e., time, money or personnel) with limited knowledge of the actual tractability of the target. Label-free methodologies, implemented in microtiter plate format, may help address these issues and complement, simplify, or facilitate assays. Label-free biosensors, based on grating resonance or electrical impedance, are versatile platforms for detecting phenotypic changes in both engineered and native cells. Their non-invasive nature allows for the kinetic monitoring of multiple real-time cellular responses to external stimuli, as well as for the use of successive pharmacological challenges. The temporal signature recorded for a particular stimulus is characteristic of the cell type and the signaling pathway activated upon binding of a ligand to its receptor. Cellular label-free technology is an important technical advance in the study of functional pharmacological selectivity. Described in this overview are some of the hurdles encountered in modern drug discovery and the ways in which label-free technologies can be used to overcome these obstacles. PMID:22294376

  10. AlphaLISA-based high-throughput screening assay to measure levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjie; Nefzi, Adel; Fields, Gregg B; Lakshmana, Madepalli K; Minond, Dmitriy

    2014-08-15

    Activation of nonamyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been hypothesized to be a viable approach for Alzheimer's disease drug discovery. However, until recently, the lack of HTS-compatible assay technologies precluded large scale screening efforts to discover molecules that potentiate nonamyloidogenic pathways. We have developed an HTS-compatible assay based on AlphaLISA technology that quantitatively detects soluble APPα (sAPPα), a marker of nonamyloidogenic processing of APP, released from live cells in low volume, 384-well plates. The assay exhibited good QC parameters (Z'>0.5, S/B>2). A pilot screen of 801 compounds yielded a novel chemotype that increased the release of sAPPα 2-fold at 5μM. These results suggest that the AlphaLISA-based HTS assay is robust and sensitive and can be used to screen large compound collections to discover molecules that potentiate the release of sAPPα. Additionally, we demonstrated that increase of APP processing by nonamyloidogenic pathways will result in decrease of release of amyloidogenic Aβ40 fragments. PMID:24857774

  11. Progesterone receptor chaperone complex-based highthroughput screening assay: identification of capsaicin as inhibitor of Hsp90 machine

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A.; Alfa, Eyad; Lu, Su; Chadli, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 and its co-chaperones are known to be important for cancer cell survival. The N-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 that are in ongoing clinical trials as anti-tumor agents have unfortunately shown disappointing efficacies in the clinic. Thus, novel inhibitors of the Hsp90 machine with different mechanism of action are urgently needed. We report here the development of a novel high-throughput drug-screening (HTS) assay platform to identify small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones. This assay quantitatively measures the ability of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones to refold/protect the progesterone receptor (PR), a physiological client of Hsp90, in 96-well plate format. We screened the NIH clinical collection drug library and identified capsaicin as a hit molecule. Capsaicin is an FDA-approved drug for topical use in pain management. Cell survival assays showed that capsaicin selectively kills cancer cells and destabilizes several Hsp90 client proteins. Thus, our data may explain the seemingly pleotropic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25184514

  12. EFFICIENT DRUG SCREENING AND GENE CORRECTION FOR TREATING LIVER DISEASE USING PATIENT-SPECIFIC STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Su Mi; Kim, Yonghak; Shim, Joong Sup; Park, Joon Tae; Wang, Rui-Hong; Leach, Steven D; Liu, Jun O.; Deng, Chu-Xia; Ye, Zhaohui; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a potential source for developing novel drugand cell- therapies. Although increasing numbers of disease-specific iPSCs have been generated, there has been limited progress in iPSC-based drug screening/discovery for liver diseases, and the low gene targeting efficiency in human iPSCs warrants further improvement. Using iPSC lines from patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, for which there is currently no drug- or gene- therapy available, we established a platform to discover new drug candidates and to correct disease-causing mutation with a high efficiency. A high-throughput format screening assay based on our hepatic differentiation protocol was implemented to facilitate automated quantification of cellular AAT accumulation using a 96-well immunofluorescence reader. To expedite the eventual application of lead compounds to patients, we conducted drug screening utilizing our established library of clinical compounds, the Johns Hopkins Drug Library, with extensive safety profiles. Through a blind large-scale drug screening, five clinical drugs were identified to reduce AAT accumulation in diverse patient iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells. In addition, using the recently developed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology, we achieved high gene targeting efficiency in AAT-deficiency patient iPSCs with 25–33% of the clones demonstrating simultaneous targeting at both diseased alleles. The hepatocyte-like cells derived from the gene-corrected iPSCs were functional without the mutant AAT accumulation. This highly efficient and cost-effective targeting technology will broadly benefit both basic and translational applications. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated the feasibility of effective large-scale drug screening using an iPSC-based disease model and highly robust gene targeting in human iPSCs; both of which are critical for translating the iPSC technology into novel therapies for untreatable diseases. PMID:23325555

  13. A simple colorimetric method to screen drug cytotoxicity against Leishmania using the dye Alamar Blue.

    PubMed

    Mikus, J; Steverding, D

    2000-01-01

    A quantitative colorimetric assay using the oxidation-reduction indicator Alamar Blue was developed to measure cytotoxicity of compounds against the protozoan parasite Leishmania. Absorbance increased linearly with the plating density of promastigotes of L. major MRHO/IR/76 vaccine strain up to at least 2.5 x 10(6) cells/ml when parasites were incubated for 72 h in the presence of 10% Alamar Blue. The 50% effective dose values of common drugs (amphotericin B, pentostam and paromomycin) obtained by this assay were in the same range as previously determined by other methods. The Alamar Blue assay permits a simple, reproducible and reliable method for screening antileishmanial drugs. PMID:11227767

  14. Drug screening for hearing loss: using the zebrafish lateral line to screen for drugs that prevent and cause hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Felipe; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Rubel, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    Several animal models have been used for the study of mechanosensory hair cells and hearing loss. Because of the difficulty of tissue acquisition and large animal size, these traditional models are impractical for high-throughput screening. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful animal model for screening drugs that cause or prevent hair cell death. The unique characteristics of the zebrafish enable rapid in vivo imaging of hair cells and hair cell death. We have used this model to screen for and identify multiple drugs that protect hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced death. Identification of multiple drugs and drug-like compounds that inhibit multiple hair cell death pathways might enable the development of protective cocktails to achieve complete hair cell protection. PMID:20096805

  15. CELL-FREE NEUROCHEMICAL SCREENING ASSAYS TO PREDICT ADVERSE EFFECTS IN MAMMALS, FISH, AND BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work will result in the establishment of a high-throughput screening assay that can be used to predict reproductive impairment across multiple ecologically relevant species (birds, fish, mammals). Resources exist to adapt this platform to screen 1,000s of toxicants. It...

  16. COMPARISON OF AN IN VIVO FISH VTG ASSAY WITH YES AND E-SCREEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the efficacy of two in vitro, estrogen-sensitive bioassays to rank the "relative estrogenicity" of five natural, pharmaceutical and xenoestrogens with a newly developed in vivo bioassay. The E-SCREEN (MCF-7 tumor cells) and YES (Yeast Estrogen Screen) assays w...

  17. Virtual screening and its integration with modern drug design technologies.

    PubMed

    Guido, Rafael V C; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-01-01

    Drug discovery is a highly complex and costly process, which demands integrated efforts in several relevant aspects involving innovation, knowledge, information, technologies, expertise, R&D investments and management skills. The shift from traditional to genomics- and proteomics-based drug research has fundamentally transformed key R&D strategies in the pharmaceutical industry addressed to the design of new chemical entities as drug candidates against a variety of biological targets. Therefore, drug discovery has moved toward more rational strategies based on our increasing understanding of the fundamental principles of protein-ligand interactions. The combination of available knowledge of several 3D protein structures with hundreds of thousands of small-molecules have attracted the attention of scientists from all over the world for the application of structure- and ligand-based drug design approaches. In this context, virtual screening technologies have largely enhanced the impact of computational methods applied to chemistry and biology and the goal of applying such methods is to reduce large compound databases and to select a limited number of promising candidates for drug design. This review provides a perspective of the utility of virtual screening in drug design and its integration with other important drug discovery technologies such as high-throughput screening (HTS) and QSAR, highlighting the present challenges, limitations, and future perspectives in medicinal chemistry. PMID:18220761

  18. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluores...

  19. A simple screening assay for certain fibrinolysis parameters (FIPA).

    PubMed

    Stief, T W; Hinz, F; Kurz, J; Doss, M O; Kretschmer, V

    2000-02-15

    Hemostasis, the system of generation and degradation of thrombi, consists of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Whereas global assays to study coagulation have existed for many years, there has been no simple, rapid, and economic routine test for the plasmatic fibrinolysis parameters plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, alpha2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, and aprotinin. Here a fast functional global assay for these plasmatic fibrinolytic parameters is presented. However, the present assay is not sensitive to physiological concentrations of prourokinase or tissue-type plasminogen activator. The following assay conditions have been found to be optimal: 50 microL of citrated plasma is incubated with 50 microL of 10 IU urinary-type plasminogen activator (urokinase)/mL, 1.1 mmol/L tranexamic acid, 1% polygelin, 0.1% Triton X-100, phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4, for 20 min at 37 degrees C (plasmin generation phase). Then 50 microL of 3 mmol/L HD-Nva-CHA-Lys-pNA, 1.05 mol/L KCl is added, and deltaA (405 nm)/10 min (37 degrees C) is determined, by using a microtiterplate reader (plasmin detection phase). The results are calibrated against pooled normal plasma (100% plasmatic fibrinolytic parameters activity). The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation have been found to be less than 5%. The detection limit (sensitivity) of the functional fibrinolysis assay is 5 % of the normal plasmatic fibrinolysis parameters activity. The normal plasmatic fibrinolysis parameters activity is 100%, sigma = 25%. The plasmatic fibrinolysis parameters activity correlates negatively (r = -0.684) with the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity of patient samples. The plasmatic fibrinolysis parameters assay is a simple, rapid, and economic functional test for several clinical relevant fibrinolysis parameters. PMID:10674410

  20. Luciferase-Based, High-Throughput Assay for Screening and Profiling Transmission-Blocking Compounds against Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Fidock, David A; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new antimalarial drugs able to target both the asexual and gametocyte stages ofPlasmodium falciparumis critical to the success of the malaria eradication campaign. We have developed and validated a robust, rapid, and cost-effective high-throughput reporter gene assay to identify compounds active against late-stage (stage IV and V) gametocytes. The assay, which is suitable for testing compound activity at incubation times up to 72 h, demonstrates excellent quality and reproducibility, with averageZ' values of 0.85 ± 0.01. We used the assay to screen more than 10,000 compounds from three chemically diverse libraries. The screening outcomes highlighted the opportunity to use collections of compounds with known activity against the asexual stages of the parasites as a starting point for gametocytocidal activity detection in order to maximize the chances of identifying gametocytocidal compounds. This assay extends the capabilities of our previously reported luciferase assay, which tested compounds against early-stage gametocytes, and opens possibilities to profile the activities of gametocytocidal compounds over the entire course of gametocytogenesis. PMID:26787698

  1. Amperometric sensors as a basic structures for enzymatic, enzyme-cofactor mediated assays and drugs detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pijanowska, D. G.; Maliszewska-Mazur, M.; Kossakowska, A.; Kazimierczak, B.; Kruk, J.; Torbicz, W.

    2006-10-01

    In this paper preliminary results related to amperometric sensors fabricated in different technologies including thick- and thin-film technology are presented. The three-electrode sensors were designed as disposable ones and for monitoring. Disposable sensors were made by the screen-printing of the electrode material on polymeric foils, the other ones were made by screen-printing on ceramic or by platinum evaporation onto silicon wafer. Potential applications of the developed amperometric sensors for enzymatic, enzyme-cofactor mediated assays and phenothiazine-based drug detection were demonstrated. It was stated that, the PPy layer deposition on Pt electrode might lead to use of this material to decrease an oxidation potential of NADH in the NAD regeneration process.

  2. Sandwich ELISA Microarrays: Generating Reliable and Reproducible Assays for High-Throughput Screens

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Varnum, Susan M.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2009-05-11

    The sandwich ELISA microarray is a powerful screening tool in biomarker discovery and validation due to its ability to simultaneously probe for multiple proteins in a miniaturized assay. The technical challenges of generating and processing the arrays are numerous. However, careful attention to possible pitfalls in the development of your antibody microarray assay can overcome these challenges. In this chapter, we describe in detail the steps that are involved in generating a reliable and reproducible sandwich ELISA microarray assay.

  3. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  4. Quantitative analysis of preservatives in drug preparations by microbiological assay*

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, L.; Naubert, J.

    1970-01-01

    The stability of a preservative selected for incorporation into a drug preparation can only be determined by suitable tests applied at regular intervals, preferably over long periods. Chemical tests are available for a number of preservatives and some of them appear to be adequate but difficulties have occurred from time to time and studies were undertaken to develop microbiological tests. Chemical methods are usually more precise than biological assays but do not always measure the antimicrobial activity of the preservative as accurately. It is always possible that a preservative may break down, losing some of its effectiveness even though the chemical determinant upon which the test is based remains intact. Two assay methods were studied. One, a plate-diffusion procedure, was found suitable for assaying formol and preservatives containing mercury. Preservatives such as phenol, benzethonium chloride and others do not diffuse in an agar plate and a tube—plate bacterial count procedure was developed for this group. Procedures for both tests are described and some examples given. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 4 PMID:4925827

  5. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  6. Comparative drug screening in NUT midline carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beesley, A H; Stirnweiss, A; Ferrari, E; Endersby, R; Howlett, M; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Charles, A K; Cole, C H; Kees, U R

    2014-01-01

    Background: The NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare but fatal cancer for which systematic testing of therapy options has never been performed. Methods: On the basis of disease biology, we compared the efficacy of the CDK9 inhibitor flavopiridol (FP) with a panel of anticancer agents in NMC cell lines and mouse xenografts. Results: In vitro anthracyclines, topoisomerase inhibitors, and microtubule poisons were among the most cytotoxic drug classes for NMC cells, while efficacy of the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 varied considerably between lines carrying different BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4)NUT (nuclear protein in testis) translocations. Efficacy of FP was comparable to vincristine and doxorubicin, drugs that have been previously used in NMC patients. All three compounds showed significantly better activity than etoposide and vorinostat, agents that have also been used in NMC patients. Statins and antimetabolites demonstrated intermediate single-agent efficacy. In vivo, vincristine significantly inhibited tumour growth in two different NMC xenografts. Flavopiridol in vivo was significantly effective in one of the two NMC xenograft lines, demonstrating the biological heterogeneity of this disease. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that FP may be of benefit to a subset of patients with NMC, and warrant a continued emphasis on microtubule inhibitors, anthracyclines, and topoisomerase inhibitors as effective drug classes in this disease. PMID:24518598

  7. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  8. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Paul, Katie B; Hedge, Joan M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Hornung, Michael W; Crofton, Kevin M; Simmons, Steven O

    2014-03-17

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein, we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluorescent peroxidase substrate, Amplex UltraRed (AUR), were employed in an end-point assay for comparison to the existing kinetic guaiacol (GUA) oxidation assay. Following optimization of assay metrics, including Z', dynamic range, and activity, using methimazole (MMI), the assay was tested with a 21-chemical training set. The potency of MMI-induced TPO inhibition was greater with AUR compared to GUA. The dynamic range and Z' score with MMI were as follows: 127-fold and 0.62 for the GUA assay, 18-fold and 0.86 for the 96-well AUR assay, and 11.5-fold and 0.93 for the 384-well AUR assay. The 384-well AUR assay drastically reduced animal use, requiring one-tenth of the rat thyroid microsomal protein needed for the GUA 96-well format assay. Fourteen chemicals inhibited TPO, with a relative potency ranking of MMI > ethylene thiourea > 6-propylthiouracil > 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-benzophenone > 2-mercaptobenzothiazole > 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole > genistein > 4-propoxyphenol > sulfamethazine > daidzein > 4-nonylphenol > triclosan > iopanoic acid > resorcinol. These data demonstrate the capacity of this assay to detect diverse TPO inhibitors. Seven chemicals acted as negatives: 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, dibutylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, diethylphthalate, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-methanol, methyl 2-methyl-benzoate, and sodium perchlorate. This assay could be used to screen large numbers of chemicals as an integral component of a tiered TH-disruptor screening approach. PMID:24383450

  9. Screening for alcohol and drug use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Grace

    2014-06-01

    The use of alcohol and other substances is not infrequent during pregnancy and may be associated with adverse effects on pregnancy outcome. Many pregnant women may continue these practices throughout pregnancy and even after delivery, unless they are recognized and assessed. Screening may be one way to achieve consistent and early identification. Prenatal health care providers may wish to screen all pregnant patients for their use of alcohol and other drugs using an approach that works best in their setting. A positive screen is an opportunity for the clinician and patient to discuss health practices and behaviors. PMID:24845485

  10. A chromogenic cephalosporin for β-lactamase inhibitor screening assays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sophia; Vosbeek, Amy; Corbella, Katherine; Severson, Jonathan; Schesser, Jacob; Sutton, Larry D

    2012-09-15

    Production of β-lactamases is the primary mechanism of antibiotic resistance employed by gram-negative pathogens. Chromogenic β-lactams are important reagents for detection and assay of β-lactamases, but limited commercial availability and exorbitant pricing of these compounds are prohibitive. Here we describe a straightforward synthesis of a chromogenic cephalosporin for β-lactamase assay that gives an overall yield of 74%. On hydrolysis, its λ(max) undergoes a bathochromic shift that is easy to see and measure spectrophotometrically with a Δε(442 nm) of 14,500 cm⁻¹ M⁻¹. This compound was shown to be a substrate for a variety of β-lactamases. PMID:22709853

  11. A Colloidal Stability Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Ali, M Monsur; Yang, Songtao; Dong, Xiaofei; Pelton, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A library of 32 polystyrene copolymer latexes, with diameters ranging between 53 and 387 nm, was used to develop and demonstrate a high-throughput assay using a 96-well microplate platform to measure critical coagulation concentrations, a measure of colloidal stability. The most robust assay involved an automated centrifugation-decantation step to remove latex aggregates before absorbance measurements, eliminating aggregate interference with optical measurements made through the base of the multiwell plates. For smaller nanoparticles (diameter <150 nm), the centrifugation-decantation step was not required as the interference was less than with larger particles. Parallel measurements with a ChemiDoc MP plate scanner gave indications of aggregation; however, the results were less sensitive than the absorbance measurements. PMID:26857643

  12. An AlphaScreen-based assay for high-throughput screening for specific inhibitors of nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Kylie M; Rawlinson, Stephen M; Hearps, Anna C; Jans, David A

    2011-02-01

    Specific viral proteins enter the nucleus of infected cells to perform essential functions, as part of the viral life cycle. The integrase (IN) molecule of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is of particular interest in this context due to its integral role in integrating the HIV genome into that of the infected host cell. Most IN-based antiviral compounds target the IN/DNA interaction, but since IN must first enter the nucleus before it can perform these critical functions, nuclear transport of IN is also an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Here the authors describe a novel high-throughput screening assay for identifying inhibitors of nuclear import, particularly IN, based on amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (AlphaScreen()) technology, which is high throughput, requires low amounts of material, and is efficient and cost-effective. The authors use the assay to screen for specific inhibitors of the interaction between IN and its nuclear transport receptor importin ?/?, successfully identifying several inhibitors of the IN/importin ?/? interaction. Importantly, they demonstrate that one of the identified compounds, mifepristone, is effective in preventing active nuclear transport of IN in transfected cells and hence may represent a useful anti-HIV therapeutic. The screen also identified broad-spectrum importin ?/? inhibitors such as ivermectin, which may represent useful tools for nuclear transport research in the future. The authors validate the activity and specificity of mifepristone and ivermectin in inhibiting nuclear protein import in living cells, underlining the utility of the screening approach. PMID:21297106

  13. A New Method to Address Verification Bias in Studies of Clinical Screening Tests: Cervical Cancer Screening Assays as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaonan; Kim, Mimi Y; Castle, Philip E; Strickler, Howard D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Studies to evaluate clinical screening tests often face the problem that the “gold standard” diagnostic approach is costly and/or invasive. It is therefore common to verify only a subset of negative screening tests using the gold standard method. However, under-sampling the screen-negatives can lead to substantial overestimation of the sensitivity and underestimation of the specificity of the diagnostic test. Our objective was to develop a simple and accurate statistical method to address this “verification bias”. Study Design and Setting We developed a weighted generalized estimating equation approach to estimate, in a single model, the accuracy (e.g., sensitivity/specificity) of multiple assays as well as simultaneously compare results between assays while addressing verification bias. This approach can be implemented using standard statistical software. Simulations were conducted to assess the proposed method. An example is provided using a cervical cancer screening trial that compared the accuracy of human papillomavirus and Pap tests, with histological data as the gold standard. Results The proposed approach performed well in estimating and comparing the accuracy of multiple assays in the presence of verification bias. Conclusion The proposed approach is an easy to apply and accurate method for addressing verification bias in studies of multiple screening methods. PMID:24332397

  14. Dual-point competition association assay: a fast and high-throughput kinetic screening method for assessing ligand-receptor binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; van Dorp, Erika J H; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Brussee, Johannes; Ijzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2013-03-01

    The concept of ligand-receptor binding kinetics is emerging as an important parameter in the early phase of drug discovery. Since the currently used kinetic assays are laborious and low throughput, we developed a method that enables fast and large format screening. It is a so-called dual-point competition association assay, which measures radioligand binding at two different time points in the absence or presence of unlabeled competitors. Specifically, this assay yields the kinetic rate index (KRI), which is a measure for the binding kinetics of the unlabeled ligands screened. As a prototypical drug target, the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R) was chosen for assay validation and optimization. A screen with 35 high-affinity A(1)R antagonists yielded seven compounds with a KRI value above 1.0, which indicated a relatively slow dissociation from the target. All other compounds had a KRI value below or equal to 1.0, predicting a relatively fast dissociation rate. Several compounds were selected for follow-up kinetic quantifications in classical kinetic assays and were shown to have kinetic rates that corresponded to their KRI values. The dual-point assay and KRI value may have general applicability at other G-protein-coupled receptors, as well as at drug targets from other protein families. PMID:23093571

  15. Validation of accuracy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in hybridoma screening and proposal of an improved screening method.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Glass, Thomas R; Ohmura, Naoya

    2005-04-01

    The 96-well plate format of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the de facto standard in screening hybridomas for active antibody. Despite its widespread use, there have been few or no systematic attempts to validate its accuracy and answer the fundamental question, is it finding all the positives? We report here on a comparison between ELISA and a semiautomated flow-based kinetic exclusion assay (KinExA), both used in screening the same hybridoma cell line. Our finding is that ELISA is both overreporting (false positives) and underreporting (false negatives) compared to the KinExA system. The large number of hybridoma cells (e.g., cultured in six 96-well plates) that must be checked is daunting in considering any method other than ELISA for routine screening. To overcome this, we devised a sampling strategy in which wells are combined in a specified pattern, allowing a significant reduction in the total number of measurements required. PMID:15801721

  16. Advantageous use of HepaRG cells for the screening and mechanistic study of drug-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Jiménez, Nuria; Hervás, David; Jover, Ramiro; Donato, M Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Only a few in vitro assays have been proposed to evaluate the steatotic potential of new drugs. The present study examines the utility of HepaRG cells as a cell-based assay system for screening drug-induced liver steatosis. A high-content screening assay was run to evaluate multiple toxicity-related cell parameters in HepaRG cells exposed to 28 compounds, including drugs reported to cause steatosis through different mechanisms and non-steatotic compounds. Lipid content was the most sensitive parameter for all the steatotic drugs, whereas no effects on lipid levels were produced by non-steatotic compounds. Apart from fat accumulation, increased ROS production and altered mitochondrial membrane potential were also found in the cells exposed to steatotic drugs, which indicates that all these cellular events contributed to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. These findings are of clinical relevance as most effects were observed at drug concentrations under 100-fold of the therapeutic peak plasmatic concentration. HepaRG cells showed increased lipid overaccumulation vs. HepG2 cells, which suggests greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis. An altered expression profile of transcription factors and the genes that code key proteins in lipid metabolism was also found in the cells exposed to drugs capable of inducing liver steatosis. Our results generally indicate the value of HepaRG cells for assessing the risk of liver damage associated with steatogenic compounds and for investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in drug-induced steatosis. PMID:27089845

  17. In situ hybridization assay-based small molecule screening in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lili; Durand, Ellen M.; Ezzio, Catherine; Pagliuca, Stephanie M.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2012-01-01

    In vitro biochemical and cell-based small molecule screens have been widely used to identify compounds that target specific signaling pathways. But the identified compounds frequently fail at the animal testing stage, largely due to the in vivo absorption, metabolism and toxicity of chemicals. Zebrafish has recently emerged as a vertebrate whole organism model for small molecule screening. The in vivo bioactivity and specificity of compounds are examined from the very beginning of zebrafish screens. In addition, zebrafish is suitable for chemical screens at a large scale similar to cellular assays. This protocol describes an approach for in situ hybridization (ISH)-based chemical screening in zebrafish, which, in principle, can be used to screen any gene product. The described protocol has been used to identify small molecules affecting specific molecular pathways and biological processes. It can also be adapted to zebrafish screens with different readouts. PMID:23001521

  18. Multiple animal studies for medical chemical defense program in soldier/patient decontamination and drug development on task 88-36: Development of in vitro screening assays for candidate pretreatment and treatment compounds. Final report, 1 July 1988-1 July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, R.; Dill, G.; Hobson, D.; Blank, J.

    1990-03-01

    A task was instituted at the Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) to develop in vitro assays to screen pretreatment and treatment compounds for their ability to protect or reverse the toxic effects of organophosphates and vesicants. Four vesicant assays and three nerve agent assays were developed. Two of the vesicant assays were for cell viability of keratinocyte, one in the presence of distilled mustard and one lewisite. One assay determines the effect of vesicants on keratinocyte reproduction and the other the effect of distilled mustard on cellular coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide content. The organophosphate assays measure the effects on acetylcholinesterase of selected compounds measured by ability to reactivate, effect on aging rate, and directly. In vitro screen; HD; L; Cellular NAD+ cellular viability; GA; GD; VX; Acetylcholinesterase inhibition; Reactivators; RA 5; Aging rate; Keratinocytes; Treatment and pretreatments; Assaying; Tabun (GA); Sarin (GB); Soman (GD); Organoarsenic; Organophosphates; Chemical Surety Material (CSM); Blisters; Toxicity; Toxic agents; Nerve agents; Chemical warfare agents; G Agents; V Agents; Vesicants; Mustard agents.

  19. An FDA-Drug Library Screen for Compounds with Bioactivities against Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Qiu Ying; Tan, Yoke Yan Fion; Goh, Vanessa Chai Yin; Lee, David Jing Qin; Ng, Fui Mee; Ong, Esther H. Q.; Hill, Jeffrey; Chia, Cheng San Brian

    2015-01-01

    The lack of new antibacterial drugs entering the market and their misuse have resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria, posing a major health crisis worldwide. In particular, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a pathogen responsible for numerous human infections, has become endemic in hospitals worldwide. Drug repurposing, the finding of new therapeutic indications for approved drugs, is deemed a plausible solution to accelerate drug discovery and development in this area. Towards this end, we screened 1163 drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bioactivities against MRSA in a 10 μM single-point assay. After excluding known antibiotics and antiseptics, six compounds were identified and their MICs were determined against a panel of clinical MRSA strains. A toxicity assay using human keratinocytes was also conducted to gauge their potential for repurposing as topical agents for treating MRSA skin infections.

  20. The automated micronucleus assay for early assessment of genotoxicity in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tilmant, K; Gerets, H H J; De Ron, P; Cossu-Leguille, C; Vasseur, P; Dhalluin, S; Atienzar, F A

    2013-02-18

    Recent publications on the automated in vitro micronucleus assay show predictive values higher than 85% for the classification of in vitro aneugens, clastogens and non-genotoxic compounds. In the present work, the CHO-k1 micronucleus assay in combination with cellular imaging was further evaluated. Firstly, the effect of a range of S9 concentrations on micronucleus formation and cytotoxicity was investigated. Subsequently, the reproducibility and predictivity of the micronucleus assay on CHO-k1 cells was investigated with a set of four compounds. Then, a larger set of compounds (n=44) was tested on CHO-k1 cells and inter-laboratory correlation was calculated. Finally, cellular imaging was compared with flow cytometry for in vivo assessment of micronucleus formation. The concentration of S9 had a significant impact on micronucleus formation and cytotoxicity. In addition, calculations of relative cell count (RCC) and cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI) showed to be complementary to cytotoxicity assessment. The CHO-k1 micronucleus assay correctly classified the four reference compounds, with a dose-response relationship and low variability. Based on a larger set of compounds, the assay proved to be reliable with a sensitivity of 94% (n=31) and a specificity of 85% (n=13). A correlation coefficient of 97% was obtained when the lowest observable adverse effect levels (LOAELs) from our study were compared with those published by Diaz et al. (2007) [10]. In conclusion, the in vitro CHO-k1 micronucleus assay combined with cellular imaging is a predictive assay appropriate for genotoxicity screening at early stages of drug development. In addition, for in vivo assessment of micronucleus formation, we preferred to use flow cytometry rather than cell imaging. PMID:23159395

  1. High-throughput screening with nanoimprinting 3D culture for efficient drug development by mimicking the tumor environment.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Waki, Atsuo; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Manabu; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Sogawa, Chizuru; Kiyono, Yasushi; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-05-01

    Anti-cancer drug development typically utilizes high-throughput screening with two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. However, 2D culture induces cellular characteristics different from tumors in vivo, resulting in inefficient drug development. Here, we report an innovative high-throughput screening system using nanoimprinting 3D culture to simulate in vivo conditions, thereby facilitating efficient drug development. We demonstrated that cell line-based nanoimprinting 3D screening can more efficiently select drugs that effectively inhibit cancer growth in vivo as compared to 2D culture. Metabolic responses after treatment were assessed using positron emission tomography (PET) probes, and revealed similar characteristics between the 3D spheroids and in vivo tumors. Further, we developed an advanced method to adopt cancer cells from patient tumor tissues for high-throughput drug screening with nanoimprinting 3D culture, which we termed Cancer tissue-Originated Uniformed Spheroid Assay (COUSA). This system identified drugs that were effective in xenografts of the original patient tumors. Nanoimprinting 3D spheroids showed low permeability and formation of hypoxic regions inside, similar to in vivo tumors. Collectively, the nanoimprinting 3D culture provides easy-handling high-throughput drug screening system, which allows for efficient drug development by mimicking the tumor environment. The COUSA system could be a useful platform for drug development with patient cancer cells. PMID:25771018

  2. Screening of Dengue Virus Antiviral Activity of Marine Seaweeds by an In Situ Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Zanello, Paula Rodrigues; Bianco, Éverson Miguel; Bordignon, Juliano; Nunes Duarte dos Santos, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a significant public health problem worldwide. Despite the important social and clinical impact, there is no vaccine or specific antiviral therapy for prevention and treatment of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Considering the above, drug discovery research for dengue is of utmost importance; in addition natural marine products provide diverse and novel chemical structures with potent biological activities that must be evaluated. In this study we propose a target-free approach for dengue drug discovery based on a novel, rapid, and economic in situ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the screening of a panel of marine seaweed extracts. The in situ ELISA was standardized and validated for Huh7.5 cell line infected with all four serotypes of DENV, among them clinical isolates and a laboratory strain. Statistical analysis showed an average S/B of 7.2 and Z-factor of 0.62, demonstrating assay consistency and reliability. A panel of fifteen seaweed extracts was then screened at the maximum non-toxic dose previously determined by the MTT and Neutral Red cytotoxic assays. Eight seaweed extracts were able to reduce DENV infection of at least one serotype tested. Four extracts (Phaeophyta: Canistrocarpus cervicornis, Padina gymnospora; Rhodophyta: Palisada perforate; Chlorophyta: Caulerpa racemosa) were chosen for further evaluation, and time of addition studies point that they might act at an early stage of the viral infection cycle, such as binding or internalization. PMID:23227238

  3. Comprehensive Urine Drug Screen by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Ramoo, Bheemraj; Funke, Melissa; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Drug screening is an essential component of clinical toxicology laboratory service. Some laboratories use only automated chemistry analyzers for limited screening of drugs of abuse and few other drugs. Other laboratories use a combination of various techniques such as immunoassays, colorimetric tests, and mass spectrometry to provide more detailed comprehensive drug screening. Mass spectrometry, gas or liquid, can screen for hundreds of drugs and is often considered the gold standard for comprehensive drug screening. We describe an efficient and rapid gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for comprehensive drug screening in urine which utilizes a liquid-liquid extraction, sample concentration, and analysis by GC/MS. PMID:26660182

  4. Differential nuclear staining assay for high-throughput screening to identify cytotoxic compounds

    PubMed Central

    LEMA, Carolina; VARELA-RAMIREZ, Armando; AGUILERA, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    As large quantities of novel synthetic molecules continue to be generated there is a challenge to identify therapeutic agents with cytotoxic activity. Here we introduce a Differential Nuclear Staining (DNS) assay adapted to live-cell imaging for high throughput screening (HTS) that utilizes two fluorescent DNA intercalators, Hoechst 33342 and Propidium iodide (PI). Since Hoechst can readily cross cell membranes to stain DNA of living and dead cells, it was used to label the total number of cells. In contrast, PI only enters cells with compromised plasma membranes, thus selectively labeling dead cells. The DNS assay was successfully validated by utilizing well known cytotoxic agents with fast or slow cytotoxic activities. The assay was found to be suitable for HTS with Z′ factors ranging from 0.86 to 0.60 for 96 and 384-well formats, respectively. Furthermore, besides plate-to-plate reproducibility, assay quality performance was evaluated by determining ratios of signal-to-noise and signal-to-background, as well as coefficient of variation, which resulted in adequate values and validated the assay for HTS initiatives. As proof of concept, eighty structurally diverse compounds from a small molecule library were screened in a 96-well plate format using the DNS assay. Using this DNS assay, six hits with cytotoxic properties were identified and all of them were also successfully identified by using the commercially available MTS assay (CellTiter 96® Cell Proliferation Assay). In addition, the DNS and a flow cytometry assay were used to validate the activity of the cytotoxic compounds. The DNS assay was also used to generate dose-response curves and to obtain CC50 values. The results indicate that the DNS assay is reliable and robust and suitable for primary and secondary screens of compounds with potential cytotoxic activity.

  5. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  6. A phenotypic high throughput screening assay for the identification of pharmacoperones for the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Conn, P Michael; Smith, Emery; Spicer, Timothy; Chase, Peter; Scampavia, Louis; Janovick, Jo Ann

    2014-05-01

    We describe a phenotypic high throughput screening (HTS) calcium flux assay designed to identify pharmacoperones for the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR). Pharmacoperones are target-specific, small molecules that diffuse into cells, rescue misfolded protein mutants, and restore them to function. Rescue is based on correcting the trafficking of mutants that would otherwise be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and unable to function correctly. This approach identifies drugs with a significant degree of novelty, relying on cellular mechanisms that are not currently exploited. Development of such assays is important, since the extensive use of agonist/antagonist screens alone means that useful chemical structures may be present in existing libraries but have not been previously identified using existing methods. Our assay utilizes cell lines stably expressing a GnRHR mutant under the control of a tetracycline (OFF) transactivator. This allows us to quantitate the level of functional and properly trafficked G protein coupled receptors present in each test well. Furthermore, since we are able to turn receptor expression on and off, we can rapidly eliminate the majority of false positives from our screening results. Our data show that this approach is likely to be successful in identifying hits from large chemical libraries. PMID:24831790

  7. An Escherichia coli Expression Assay and Screen for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Variants with Decreased Susceptibility to Indinavir

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Laurence; Yang, Shiow-Shong; Rossi, Rick; Zepp, Charlie; Heefner, Donald

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a recombinant Escherichia coli screening system for the rapid detection and identification of amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease associated with decreased susceptibility to the protease inhibitor indinavir (MK-639; Merck & Co.). The assay depends upon the correct processing of a segment of the HIV-1 HXB2 gag-pol polyprotein followed by detection of HIV reverse transcriptase activity by a highly sensitive, colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highly sensitive system detects the contributions of single substitutions such as I84V, L90M, and L63P. The combination of single substitutions further decreases the sensitivity to indinavir. We constructed a library of HIV protease variant genes containing dispersed mutations and, using the E. coli recombinant system, screened for mutants with decreased indinavir sensitivity. The discovered HIV protease variants contain amino acid substitutions commonly associated with indinavir resistance in clinical isolates, including the substitutions L90M, L63P, I64V, V82A, L24I, and I54T. One substitution, W6R, is also frequently found by the screen and has not been reported elsewhere. Of a total of 12,000 isolates that were screened, 12 protease variants with decreased sensitivity to indinavir were found. The L63P substitution, which is also associated with indinavir resistance, increases the stability of the isolated protease relative to that of the native HXB2 protease. The rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of this screen also make it useful for screening for novel inhibitors. We have found the approach described here to be useful for the detection of amino acid substitutions in HIV protease that have been associated with drug resistance as well as for the screening of novel compounds for inhibitory activity. PMID:9835523

  8. Yeast as a Model for Studies on Aβ Aggregation Toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease, Autophagic Responses, and Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Porzoor, Afsaneh; Macreadie, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The Aβ peptide is widely considered a major cause of Alzheimer's disease since it causes neuronal death in an oligomerisation-dependent manner. In order to identify new inhibitors of Aβ that may be chemo preventative for Alzheimer's disease, a yeast assay that qualitatively determines the amounts and state of the human Aβ42 peptide has been developed. Yeast assays such as this can be applied to studies on aggregation toxicity, autophagic responses and drug screening in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26235069

  9. Identification of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein-RNA Binding Inhibitors Using a High-Throughput Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential anti-viral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interaction, we developed a fluorescence polarization-based high-throughput drug screening assay and tested 26,424 chemical compounds for their ability to disrupt an N-RNA complex. From libraries of FDA approved drugs, drug-like molecules and natural products extracts we identified several lead compounds that are promising candidates for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22644268

  10. A Podocyte-Based Automated Screening Assay Identifies Protective Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha Won; Khan, Samia Q; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Wei, Changli; Tardi, Nicholas J; Altintas, Mehmet M; Elshabrawy, Hatem A; Mangos, Steve; Quick, Kevin L; Sever, Sanja; Reiser, Jochen; Gupta, Vineet

    2015-11-01

    Podocyte injury and loss mark an early step in the pathogenesis of various glomerular diseases, making these cells excellent targets for therapeutics. However, cell-based high-throughput screening assays for the rational development of podocyte-directed therapeutics are currently lacking. Here, we describe a novel high-content screening-based phenotypic assay that analyzes thousands of podocytes per assay condition in 96-well plates to quantitatively measure dose-dependent changes in multiple cellular features. Our assay consistently produced a Z' value >0.44, making it suitable for compound screening. On screening with >2100 pharmacologically active agents, we identified 24 small molecules that protected podocytes against injury in vitro (1% hit rate). Among the identified hits, we confirmed an β1-integrin agonist, pyrintegrin, as a podocyte-protective agent. Treatment with pyrintegrin prevented damage-induced decreases in F-actin stress fibers, focal adhesions, and active β1-integrin levels in cultured cells. In vivo, administration of pyrintegrin protected mice from LPS-induced podocyte foot process effacement and proteinuria. Analysis of the murine glomeruli showed that LPS administration reduced the levels of active β1 integrin in the podocytes, which was prevented by cotreatment with pyrintegrin. In rats, pyrintegrin reduced peak proteinuria caused by puromycin aminonucleoside-induced nephropathy. Our findings identify pyrintegrin as a potential therapeutic candidate and show the use of podocyte-based screening assays for identifying novel therapeutics for proteinuric kidney diseases. PMID:25858967

  11. Production of drug metabolites by immobilised Cunninghamella elegans: from screening to scale up.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Laura; Dempsey, Rita; Casey, Eoin; Kane, Ayla; Murphy, Cormac D

    2015-05-01

    Cunninghamella elegans is a fungus that has been used extensively as a microbial model of mammalian drug metabolism, whilst its potential as a biocatalyst for the preparative production of human drug metabolites has been often proposed, little effort has been made to enable this. Here, we describe a workflow for the application of C. elegans for the production of drug metabolites, starting from well-plate screening assays leading to the preparative production of drug metabolites using fungus immobilised either in alginate or as a biofilm. Using 12- and 96-well plates, the simultaneous screening of several drug biotransformations was achieved. To scale up the biotransformation, both modes of immobilisation enabled semi-continuous production of hydroxylated drug metabolites through repeated addition of drug and rejuvenation of the fungus. It was possible to improve the productivity in the biofilm culture for the production of 4'-hydroxydiclofenac from 1 mg/l h to over 4 mg/l h by reducing the incubation time for biotransformation and the number of rejuvenation steps. PMID:25665503

  12. Recommended Immunological Assays to Screen for Ricin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Stéphanie; Worbs, Sylvia; Avondet, Marc-André; Tracz, Dobryan M.; Dano, Julie; Schmidt, Lisa; Volland, Hervé; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Corbett, Cindi R.

    2015-01-01

    Ricin, a toxin from the plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most toxic biological agents known. Due to its availability, toxicity, ease of production and absence of curative treatments, ricin has been classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as category B biological weapon and it is scheduled as a List 1 compound in the Chemical Weapons Convention. An international proficiency test (PT) was conducted to evaluate detection and quantification capabilities of 17 expert laboratories. In this exercise one goal was to analyse the laboratories’ capacity to detect and differentiate ricin and the less toxic, but highly homologuous protein R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Six analytical strategies are presented in this paper based on immunological assays (four immunoenzymatic assays and two immunochromatographic tests). Using these immunological methods “dangerous” samples containing ricin and/or RCA120 were successfully identified. Based on different antibodies used the detection and quantification of ricin and RCA120 was successful. The ricin PT highlighted the performance of different immunological approaches that are exemplarily recommended for highly sensitive and precise quantification of ricin. PMID:26703725

  13. Recommended Immunological Assays to Screen for Ricin-Containing Samples.

    PubMed

    Simon, Stéphanie; Worbs, Sylvia; Avondet, Marc-André; Tracz, Dobryan M; Dano, Julie; Schmidt, Lisa; Volland, Hervé; Dorner, Brigitte G; Corbett, Cindi R

    2015-12-01

    Ricin, a toxin from the plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most toxic biological agents known. Due to its availability, toxicity, ease of production and absence of curative treatments, ricin has been classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as category B biological weapon and it is scheduled as a List 1 compound in the Chemical Weapons Convention. An international proficiency test (PT) was conducted to evaluate detection and quantification capabilities of 17 expert laboratories. In this exercise one goal was to analyse the laboratories' capacity to detect and differentiate ricin and the less toxic, but highly homologuous protein R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Six analytical strategies are presented in this paper based on immunological assays (four immunoenzymatic assays and two immunochromatographic tests). Using these immunological methods "dangerous" samples containing ricin and/or RCA120 were successfully identified. Based on different antibodies used the detection and quantification of ricin and RCA120 was successful. The ricin PT highlighted the performance of different immunological approaches that are exemplarily recommended for highly sensitive and precise quantification of ricin. PMID:26703725

  14. Immune cell-based screening assay for response to anticancer agents: applications in pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Amber; Fedoriw, Yuri; Richards, Kristy; Damania, Blossom; Parks, Bethany; Suzuki, Oscar; Benton, Cristina S; Chan, Emmanuel; Thomas, Russell S; Wiltshire, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Background Interpatient variability in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely due to complex genetic differences and is difficult to ascertain in humans. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at examining interstrain differences in viability on normal, noncancerous immune cells following chemotherapeutic cytotoxic insult. Drug effects were investigated by comparing selective chemotherapeutic agents, such as BEZ-235 and selumetinib, against conventional cytotoxic agents targeting multiple pathways, including doxorubicin and idarubicin. Methods Splenocytes were isolated from 36 isogenic strains of mice using standard procedures. Of note, the splenocytes were not stimulated to avoid attributing responses to pathways involved with cellular stimulation rather than toxicity. Cells were incubated with compounds on a nine-point logarithmic dosing scale ranging from 15 nM to 100 μM (37°C, 5% CO2). At 4 hours posttreatment, cells were labeled with antibodies and physiological indicator dyes and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. Cellular phenotypes (eg, viability) were collected and analyzed using flow cytometry. Dose-response curves with response normalized to the zero dose as a function of log concentration were generated using GraphPad Prism 6. Results Phenotypes were quantified using flow cytometry, yielding interstrain variation for measured endpoints in different immune cells. The flow cytometry assays produced over 16,000 data points that were used to generate dose-response curves. The more targeted agents, BEZ-235 and selumetinib, were less toxic to immune cells than the anthracycline agents. The calculated heritability for the viability of immune cells was higher with anthracyclines than the novel agents, making them better suited for downstream genetic analysis. Conclusion Using this approach, we identify cell lines of variable sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents and aim to identify robust, replicable endpoints of cellular response to drugs that provide the starting point for identifying candidate genes and cellular toxicity pathways for future validation in human studies. PMID:25897258

  15. Toxicity screenings of nanomaterials: challenges due to interference with assay processes and components of classic in vitro tests.

    PubMed

    Guadagnini, Rina; Halamoda Kenzaoui, Blanka; Walker, Laura; Pojana, Giulio; Magdolenova, Zuzana; Bilanicova, Dagmar; Saunders, Margaret; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Marcomini, Antonio; Huk, Anna; Dusinska, Maria; Fjellsbø, Lise M; Marano, Francelyne; Boland, Sonja

    2015-05-01

    Given the multiplicity of nanoparticles (NPs), there is a requirement to develop screening strategies to evaluate their toxicity. Within the EU-funded FP7 NanoTEST project, a panel of medically relevant NPs has been used to develop alternative testing strategies of NPs used in medical diagnostics. As conventional toxicity tests cannot necessarily be directly applied to NPs in the same manner as for soluble chemicals and drugs, we determined the extent of interference of NPs with each assay process and components. In this study, we fully characterized the panel of NP suspensions used in this project (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene oxide [PLGA-PEO], TiO2, SiO2, and uncoated and oleic-acid coated Fe3O4) and showed that many NP characteristics (composition, size, coatings, and agglomeration) interfere with a range of in vitro cytotoxicity assays (WST-1, MTT, lactate dehydrogenase, neutral red, propidium iodide, (3)H-thymidine incorporation, and cell counting), pro-inflammatory response evaluation (ELISA for GM-CSF, IL-6, and IL-8), and oxidative stress detection (monoBromoBimane, dichlorofluorescein, and NO assays). Interferences were assay specific as well as NP specific. We propose how to integrate and avoid interference with testing systems as a first step of a screening strategy for biomedical NPs. PMID:23889211

  16. Evaluation of the NexScreen and DrugCheck Waive RT urine drug detection cups.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ni; Nelson, Gordon J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2013-01-01

    Urine drug testing is an important tool that is commonly used to assess patient compliance with prescription regimens. Point-of-collection immunoassay devices allow for timely availability of laboratory test results to guide therapy during the same office visit. Two waived immunoassay-based urine drug screen cups were evaluated in this study. The NexScreen cup and the DrugCheck Waive RT cup claim to detect 10-12 drug classes of commonly used and/or abused drugs. This study included a sensitivity and precision challenge with 4-6 replicates at concentrations 0-150% of the manufacture's claimed cutoff, using drug-free urine spiked with purified reference standards. The stability of test results was evaluated by reading the results at intervals between five and 1,440 min. Specificity was evaluated by parallel comparison of pooled patients' specimens, representing 56 patients and 41 known drug compounds. When comparing results to validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results, false positives were observed in the NexScreen cups for benzodiazepine, methamphetamine, methadone, opiates and tricyclic antidepressant tests, but there were no false negatives. The DrugCheck Waive RT cups showed false negative results for barbiturates and opiates, but no false positives. Overall, the NexScreen cup demonstrated better sensitivity than claimed, whereas the sensitivity of the DrugCheck Waive RT cup did not meet claims. PMID:23144203

  17. High-Content Assay Multiplexing for Toxicity Screening in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian Alexander; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Sirenko, Oksana; Bittner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cell-based high-content screening (HCS) assays have become an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional in vitro and in vivo testing in pharmaceutical drug development and toxicological safety assessment. The time- and cost-effectiveness of HCS assays, combined with the organotypic nature of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cells, open new opportunities to employ physiologically relevant in vitro model systems to improve screening for potential chemical hazards. In this study, we used two human iPSC types, cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes, to test various high-content and molecular assay combinations for their applicability in a multiparametric screening format. Effects on cardiomyocyte beat frequency were characterized by calcium flux measurements for up to 90 min. Subsequent correlation with intracellular cAMP levels was used to determine if the effects on cardiac physiology were G-protein-coupled receptor dependent. In addition, we utilized high-content cell imaging to simultaneously determine cell viability, mitochondrial integrity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in both cell types. Kinetic analysis indicated that ROS formation is best detectable 30 min following initial treatment, whereas cytotoxic effects were most stable after 24 h. For hepatocytes, high-content imaging was also used to evaluate cytotoxicity and cytoskeletal integrity, as well as mitochondrial integrity and the potential for lipid accumulation. Lipid accumulation, a marker for hepatic steatosis, was most reliably detected 48 h following treatment with test compounds. Overall, our results demonstrate how a compendium of assays can be utilized for quantitative screening of chemical effects in iPSC cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes and enable rapid and cost-efficient multidimensional biological profiling of toxicity. PMID:26539751

  18. High-Content Assay Multiplexing for Toxicity Screening in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Fabian Alexander; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Sirenko, Oksana; Bittner, Michael; Rusyn, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Cell-based high-content screening (HCS) assays have become an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional in vitro and in vivo testing in pharmaceutical drug development and toxicological safety assessment. The time- and cost-effectiveness of HCS assays, combined with the organotypic nature of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cells, open new opportunities to employ physiologically relevant in vitro model systems to improve screening for potential chemical hazards. In this study, we used two human iPSC types, cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes, to test various high-content and molecular assay combinations for their applicability in a multiparametric screening format. Effects on cardiomyocyte beat frequency were characterized by calcium flux measurements for up to 90 min. Subsequent correlation with intracellular cAMP levels was used to determine if the effects on cardiac physiology were G-protein-coupled receptor dependent. In addition, we utilized high-content cell imaging to simultaneously determine cell viability, mitochondrial integrity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in both cell types. Kinetic analysis indicated that ROS formation is best detectable 30 min following initial treatment, whereas cytotoxic effects were most stable after 24 h. For hepatocytes, high-content imaging was also used to evaluate cytotoxicity and cytoskeletal integrity, as well as mitochondrial integrity and the potential for lipid accumulation. Lipid accumulation, a marker for hepatic steatosis, was most reliably detected 48 h following treatment with test compounds. Overall, our results demonstrate how a compendium of assays can be utilized for quantitative screening of chemical effects in iPSC cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes and enable rapid and cost-efficient multidimensional biological profiling of toxicity. PMID:26539751

  19. A new fluorescent based screening system for high throughput screening of drugs targeting HBV-core and HBsAg interaction.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Krishnakumar, K A; Asha, V V

    2015-03-01

    The existing screening systems for anti-hepatitis B virus (anti-HBV) drug discovery is time-consuming mainly due to the laborious detection system it is using. A new fluorescence based screening system for high throughput anti-HBV drug discovery was created by tagging hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) with monomeric red fluorescent protein and hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein. The two constructs were co-transfected on to Hep3B cells and the transfection was stabilized by fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS). The fusion proteins expressed through the secretory protein pathway as evidenced by localization with ER-Tracker and tubulin tracker. The new system has given analogues results like that of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hence it can be of very high potential for large scale drug screening systems. PMID:25776516

  20. GMO detection in food and feed through screening by visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Li, Rong; Quan, Sheng; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin; Yang, Litao

    2015-06-01

    Isothermal DNA/RNA amplification techniques are the primary methodology for developing on-spot rapid nucleic acid amplification assays, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique has been developed and applied in the detection of foodborne pathogens, plant/animal viruses, and genetically modified (GM) food/feed contents. In this study, one set of LAMP assays targeting on eight frequently used universal elements, marker genes, and exogenous target genes, such as CaMV35S promoter, FMV35S promoter, NOS, bar, cry1Ac, CP4 epsps, pat, and NptII, were developed for visual screening of GM contents in plant-derived food samples with high efficiency and accuracy. For these eight LAMP assays, their specificity was evaluated by testing commercial GM plant events and their limits of detection were also determined, which are 10 haploid genome equivalents (HGE) for FMV35S promoter, cry1Ac, and pat assays, as well as five HGE for CaMV35S promoter, bar, NOS terminator, CP4 epsps, and NptII assays. The screening applicability of these LAMP assays was further validated successfully using practical canola, soybean, and maize samples. The results suggested that the established visual LAMP assays are applicable and cost-effective for GM screening in plant-derived food samples. PMID:25822163

  1. High throughput screening assay for negative single stranded RNA virus polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pelet, Thierry; Miazza, Vincent; Mottet, Geneviève; Roux, Laurent

    2005-09-01

    The Paramyxoviridae form a large family of viruses containing many human and veterinary pathogens for which a need for antiviral treatment is emphasized, particularly following the recent emergence of new viruses. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase constitutes an obvious target for antiviral compounds. An in vitro assay was developed that allows high throughput screening of compounds potentially inhibiting the Sendai virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Screening relies on the detection of the Photinus pyralis luciferase produced in a transcription/translation coupled assay using a mini-replicon virus. It contains an internal control for possible adverse effects of the tested compounds on translation or on luciferase activity. It is estimated that the mini-replicon template produced in one fertilized egg is sufficient to run 5000-10,000 reactions. This assay constitutes a simple, sensitive and easily automated method to perform high throughput screening of Paramyxoviridae RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors. PMID:16023521

  2. siRNA Genome Screening Approaches to Therapeutic Drug Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Bakre, Abhijeet; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Bridging high-throughput screening (HTS) with RNA interference (RNAi) has allowed for rapid discovery of the molecular basis of many diseases, and identification of potential pathways for developing safe and effective treatments. These features have identified new host gene targets for existing drugs paving the pathway for therapeutic drug repositioning. Using RNAi to discover and help validate new drug targets has also provided a means to filter and prioritize promising therapeutics. This review summarizes these approaches across a spectrum of methods and targets in the host response to pathogens. Particular attention is given to the utility of drug repurposing utilizing the promiscuous nature of some drugs that affect multiple molecules or pathways, and how these biological pathways can be targeted to regulate disease outcome. PMID:24275945

  3. Discovering novel neuroactive drugs through high-throughput behavior-based chemical screening in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Giancarlo; Lakhani, Parth; Kokel, David

    2014-01-01

    Most neuroactive drugs were discovered through unexpected behavioral observations. Systematic behavioral screening is inefficient in most model organisms. But, automated technologies are enabling a new phase of discovery-based research in central nervous system (CNS) pharmacology. Researchers are using large-scale behavior-based chemical screens in zebrafish to discover compounds with new structures, targets, and functions. These compounds are powerful tools for understanding CNS signaling pathways. Substantial differences between human and zebrafish biology will make it difficult to translate these discoveries to clinical medicine. However, given the molecular genetic similarities between humans and zebrafish, it is likely that some of these compounds will have translational utility. We predict that the greatest new successes in CNS drug discovery will leverage many model systems, including in vitro assays, cells, rodents, and zebrafish. PMID:25104936

  4. Quantitative Screening for Anticestode Drugs Based on Changes in Baseline Enzyme Secretion by Taenia crassiceps

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Elise M.; Nash, Theodore E.

    2013-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain with the larval stage of the Taenia solium tapeworm, is responsible for an estimated one-third of adult-onset epilepsy cases in regions of the world where it is endemic. Currently, anthelmintic drugs used for treatment of NCC are only partially effective, and there is, therefore, a pressing need for new therapeutic agents. Discovery of new anthelmintics with activity against T. solium has been limited by the lack of suitable sensitive assays that allow high-throughput screening. Using an in vitro culture system with Taenia crassiceps metacestodes, we demonstrate that changes in secretion of parasite-associated alkaline phosphatase (AP) and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) can be used to detect and quantify anthelmintic effects of praziquantel (PZQ), a drug with activity against T. solium. We applied two enzyme release assays to screen for anti-T. crassiceps activity in nonconventional antiparasitic drugs and demonstrate that nitazoxanide and artesunate induced release of both AP and PGI in differing time- and dose-related patterns. Furthermore, imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor previously reported to have parasiticidal activity against Schistosoma mansoni, also induced release of both AP and PGI in a dose-dependent manner, similar in pattern to that observed with the other anthelmintics. We also evaluated release of ATP into cyst supernatants as an indicator of drug effects but did not see any differences between treated and untreated cysts. These data provide the basis for rapid and quantitative screening assays for testing for anthelmintic activity in candidate anticestode agents. PMID:23229489

  5. Stabilization of dengue virus polymerase in de novo initiation assay provides advantages for compound screening.

    PubMed

    Niyomrattanakit, Pornwaratt; Wan, Kah Fei; Chung, Ka Yan; Abas, Siti Nurdiana; Seh, Cheah Chen; Dong, Hongping; Lim, Chin Chin; Chao, Alexander Theodore; Lee, Chang Bok; Nilar, Shahul; Lescar, Julien; Shi, Pei-Yong; Beer, David; Lim, Siew Pheng

    2015-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) NS5 protein comprises an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain (RdRp). DENV RdRp is responsible for viral RNA synthesis via a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for anti-viral therapy. Herein we describe the characterization of its de novo initiation activities by PAGE analyses and the knowledge gained was used to develop a fluorescent-based assay. A highly processive and robust assay was achieved by addition of cysteine in the assay buffer. This stabilized the apo-enzyme, and rendered optimal de novo initiation activity while balancing its intrinsic terminal transferase activity. Steady-state kinetic parameters of the NTP and RNA substrates under these optimal conditions were determined for DENV1-4 FL NS5. Heavy metal ions such as Zn(++) and Co(++) as well as high levels of monovalent salts, suppressed DENV polymerase de novo initiation activities. This assay was validated with nucleotide chain terminators and used to screen two diverse small library sets. The screen data obtained was further compared with concurrent screens performed with a DENV polymerase elongation fluorescent assay utilizing pre-complexed enzyme-RNA. A higher hit-rate was obtained for the de novo initiation assay compared to the elongation assay (∼2% versus ∼0.1%). All the hits from the latter assay are also identified in the de novo initiation assay, indicating that the de novo initiation assay performed with the stabilized apo-enzyme has the advantage of providing additional chemical starting entities for inhibiting this enzyme. PMID:25896272

  6. A Drug Combination Screen Identifies Drugs Active against Amoxicillin-Induced Round Bodies of In Vitro Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters from an FDA Drug Library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Although currently recommended antibiotics for Lyme disease such as doxycycline or amoxicillin cure the majority of the patients, about 10–20% of patients treated for Lyme disease may experience lingering symptoms including fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. Under experimental stress conditions such as starvation or antibiotic exposure, Borrelia burgdorferi can develop round body forms, which are a type of persister bacteria that appear resistant in vitro to customary first-line antibiotics for Lyme disease. To identify more effective drugs with activity against the round body form of B. burgdorferi, we established a round body persister model induced by exposure to amoxicillin (50 μg/ml) and then screened the Food and Drug Administration drug library consisting of 1581 drug compounds and also 22 drug combinations using the SYBR Green I/propidium iodide viability assay. We identified 23 drug candidates that have higher activity against the round bodies of B. burgdorferi than either amoxicillin or doxycycline. Eleven individual drugs scored better than metronidazole and tinidazole which have been previously described to be active against round bodies. In this amoxicillin-induced round body model, some drug candidates such as daptomycin and clofazimine also displayed enhanced activity which was similar to a previous screen against stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters not exposure to amoxicillin. Additional candidate drugs active against round bodies identified include artemisinin, ciprofloxacin, nifuroxime, fosfomycin, chlortetracycline, sulfacetamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfathiozole. Two triple drug combinations had the highest activity against amoxicillin-induced round bodies and stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters: artemisinin/cefoperazone/doxycycline and sulfachlorpyridazine/daptomycin/doxycycline. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that certain drug combinations have superior activity against B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro, even when pre-treated with amoxicillin. These findings may have implications for improved treatment of Lyme disease.

  7. Which high-risk HPV assays fulfil criteria for use in primary cervical cancer screening?

    PubMed

    Arbyn, M; Snijders, P J F; Meijer, C J L M; Berkhof, J; Cuschieri, K; Kocjan, B J; Poljak, M

    2015-09-01

    Several countries are in the process of switching to high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing for cervical cancer screening. Given the multitude of available tests, validated assays which assure high-quality screening need to be identified. A systematic review was conducted to answer the question which hrHPV tests fulfil the criteria defined by an international expert team in 2009, based on reproducibility and relative sensitivity and specificity compared to Hybrid Capture-2 or GP5+/6+ PCR-enzyme immunoassay. These latter two hrHPV DNA assays were validated in large randomized trials and cohorts with a follow-up duration of 8 years or more. Eligible studies citing the 2009 guideline were retrieved from Scopus (http://www.scopus.com) and from a meta-analysis assessing the relative accuracy of new hrHPV assays versus the standard comparator tests to detect high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cancer in primary screening. The cobas 4800 HPV test and Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test were consistently validated in two and three studies, respectively, whereas the PapilloCheck HPV-screening test, BD Onclarity HPV assay and the HPV-Risk assay were validated each in one study. Other tests which partially fulfil the 2009 guidelines are the following: Cervista HPV HR Test, GP5+/6+ PCR-LMNX, an in-house E6/E7 RT quantitative PCR and MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight). The APTIMA HPV assay targeting E6/E7 mRNA of hrHPV was also fully validated. However, the cross-sectional equivalency criteria of the 2009 guidelines were set up for HPV DNA assays. Demonstration of a low risk of CIN3+ after a negative APTIMA test over a longer period is awaited to inform us about its utility in cervical cancer screening at 5-year or longer intervals. PMID:25936581

  8. Development of a Screening Assay for Microbial Community Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracle, A. L.; Tilton, F.; Bonheyo, G. T.; McDermott, J.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of subsurface contaminant plumes has been challenging in the aspects of site characterization, design for treatability, and monitoring of treatment efficacy, to name a few. Characterization of physical and geochemical properties can be achieved through advances in sensor technologies, modeling, and well placement. However, the biotic composition within the subsurface is also an important component that adds an additional biochemical contribution that is not currently being assessed. Changes in the environment have impacts to the composition of microbial communities at this solid/fluid phase interface. The introduction of a remediative treatment may provide an abundant food source for microorganisms in the subsurface and alter the community dynamics. Such changes to the microbial community composition may have dramatic effects on bulk community biochemistry, which in turn may affect the quality of the remediative treatment in terms of effectiveness and transport through alteration of the environment. A screening array is being developed based on DNA sequence information from indigenous microorganisms within target sediments to be used to assess microbial community changes throughout remediative treatments and through time. Integration of physical, chemical, and biotic community information will be assessed to determine efficacy of treatment before, during, and after treatment to assess success of treatment, and measure any post-treatment changes.

  9. Chemical & RNAi screening at MSKCC: a collaborative platform to discover & repurpose drugs to fight disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Mahida, Jeni P.; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Ibáñez, Glorymar; Raja, Balajee Somalinga; Calder, Paul A.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) has implemented the creation of a full service state-of-the-art High-throughput Screening Core Facility (HTSCF) equipped with modern robotics and custom-built screening data management resources to rapidly store and query chemical and RNAi screening data outputs. The mission of the facility is to provide oncology clinicians and researchers alike with access to cost-effective HTS solutions for both chemical and RNAi screening, with an ultimate goal of novel target identification and drug discovery. HTSCF was established in 2003 to support the institution’s commitment to growth in molecular pharmacology and in the realm of therapeutic agents to fight chronic diseases such as cancer. This endeavor required broad range of expertise in technology development to establish robust and innovative assays, large collections of diverse chemical and RNAi duplexes to probe specific cellular events, sophisticated compound and data handling capabilities, and a profound knowledge in assay development, hit validation, and characterization. Our goal has been to strive for constant innovation, and we strongly believe in shifting the paradigm from traditional drug discovery towards translational research now, making allowance for unmet clinical needs in patients. Our efforts towards repurposing FDA-approved drugs fructified when digoxin, identified through primary HTS, was administered in the clinic for treatment of stage Vb retinoblastoma. In summary, the overall aim of our facility is to identify novel chemical probes, to study cellular processes relevant to investigator’s research interest in chemical biology and functional genomics, and to be instrumental in accelerating the process of drug discovery in academia. PMID:24661215

  10. Performance characteristics of an ELISA screening assay for urinary synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Eliani; Barnes, Allan J; Young, Sheena; Castaneto, Marisol S; Martin, Thomas M; Klette, Kevin L; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are marketed as legal alternatives to cannabis, as routine urine cannabinoid immunoassays do not detect synthetic cannabinoids. Laboratories are challenged to identify these new designer drugs that are widely available and represent a major public health and safety problem. Immunoassay testing offers rapid separation of presumptive positive and negative specimens, prior to more costly and time-consuming chromatographic confirmation. The Neogen SPICE ELISA kit targets JWH-018 N-pentanoic acid as a marker for urinary synthetic cannabinoids. Assay performance was evaluated by analyzing 2469 authentic urine samples with the Neogen immunoassay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Two immunoassay cut-off concentrations, 5 and 10 µg/L, classified samples as presumptive positive or negative, followed by qualitative LC-MS/MS confirmation for 29 synthetic cannabinoids markers with limits of detection of 0.5-10 µg/L to determine the assay's sensitivity, specificity and efficacy. Challenges at ±25% of each cut-off also were investigated to determine performance around the cut-off and intra- and inter-plate imprecision. The immunoassay was linear from 1 to 250 µg/L (r(2)  = 0.992) with intra- and inter-plate imprecision of ≤5.3% and <9%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency results with the 5 µg/L cut-off were 79.9%, 99.7%, and 97.4% and with the 10 µg/L cut-off 69.3%, 99.8%, and 96.3%, respectively. Cross-reactivity was shown for 18 of 73 synthetic cannabinoids markers evaluated. Good sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency, lack of sample preparation requirements, and rapid semi-automation documented that the Neogen SPICE ELISA kit is a viable method for screening synthetic cannabinoids in urine targeting JWH-018 N-pentanoic acid. PMID:25167963

  11. High throughput miniature drug-screening platform using bioprinting technology.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I; Zhang, Bimeng; Reyna, Daniel; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-09-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, new drugs are tested to find appropriate compounds for therapeutic purposes for contemporary diseases. Unfortunately, novel compounds emerge at expensive prices and current target evaluation processes have limited throughput, thus leading to an increase of cost and time for drug development. This work shows the development of the novel inkjet-based deposition method for assembling a miniature drug-screening platform, which can realistically and inexpensively evaluate biochemical reactions in a picoliter-scale volume at a high speed rate. As proof of concept, applying a modified Hewlett Packard model 5360 compact disc printer, green fluorescent protein expressing Escherichia coli cells along with alginate gel solution have been arrayed on a coverslip chip under a repeatable volume of 180% ± 26% picoliters per droplet; subsequently, different antibiotic droplets were patterned on the spots of cells to evaluate the inhibition of bacteria for antibiotic screening. The proposed platform was compared to the current screening process, validating its effectiveness. The viability and basic function of the printed cells were evaluated, resulting in cell viability above 98% and insignificant or no DNA damage to human kidney cells transfected. Based on the reduction of investment and compound volume used by this platform, this technique has the potential to improve the actual drug discovery process at its target evaluation stage. PMID:22728820

  12. A survey of yeast genomic assays for drug and target discovery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew M.; Ammar, Ron; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the development and application of chemical genomic assays using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided powerful methods to identify the mechanism of action of known drugs and novel small molecules in vivo. These assays identify drug target candidates, genes involved in buffering drug target pathways and also help to define the general cellular response to small molecules. In this review, we examine current yeast chemical genomic assays and summarize the potential applications of each approach. PMID:20546776

  13. DEVELOPMENT, STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF THE MAMMALIAN IN VIVO ASSAYS IN THE PROPOSED TIER I SCREENING BATTERY FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research directly supports the development, standardization and validation of several Tier 1 screening mammalian in vivo assays. Through the development and use of many of these assays for testing specific hypothesis in their respective research programs, these investigato...

  14. Screening for Drug Abuse Among College Students: Modification of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannell, M. Barry; Favazza, Armando R.

    1978-01-01

    Modified version of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test was anonymously given to 245 college students on two Midwestern university campuses. Cutoff score for suspected drug abuse was set at five points. The percent of students scoring five or more points was 25 and 22 from campuses A and B respectively. (Author)

  15. High-content screening of drug-induced mitochondrial impairment in hepatic cells: effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; Carmona, Antonio; Castell, Jos V; Gmez-Lechn, M Jos; Donato, M Teresa

    2015-10-01

    A frequent mechanism for drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is mitochondrial impairment, and early evaluation of new drugs for their potential to cause mitochondrial dysfunction is becoming an important task for drug development. To this end, we designed a high-content screening assay to study mitochondrial-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 cells in detail. Simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial mass and cell viability in cells exposed for 24h to compounds provides preliminary information on the mitochondrial- or nonmitochondrial-related hepatotoxic potential of compounds. To fully address the mechanisms implicated in mitochondrial impairment, prelethal changes in mitochondrial superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial permeability transition, intracellular calcium concentration and apoptotic cell death were studied in cells incubated for 1h with compounds. The assay correctly classified a set of well-known mitochondrial toxicants and negative controls and revealed high sensitivity for the detection of mitochondrial DILI and the establishment of different mitochondrial toxicity risks (low to high). This procedure was used for analysing the potential mitochondrial impairment of six statins to determine their clinical risk. All the tested statins produced mitochondrial impairment, although they showed different levels of toxicity (low-medium toxicity risk). The results suggest that this cell-based assay is a promising in vitro approach to predict the potential of drug candidates to induce mitochondrial-associated hepatotoxicity. PMID:25160661

  16. A Developmental Toxicology Assay Platform for Screening Teratogenic Liability of Pharmaceutical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Augustine-Rauch, Karen; Zhang, Cindy X; Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M

    2016-02-01

    Increasing need for proactive safety optimization of pharmaceutical compounds has led to generation and/or refinement of in vitro developmental toxicology assays. Our laboratory has developed three in vitro developmental toxicology assays to assess teratogenic liability of pharmaceutical compounds. These assays included a mouse molecular embryonic stem cell assay (MESCA), a dechorionated zebrafish embryo culture (ZEC) assay, and a streamlined rat whole embryo culture (rWEC) assay. Individually, the assays presented good (73-82%) predictivity. However, it remains to be determined whether combining or tiering the assays could enhance performance. Seventy-three compounds representing a broad spectrum of pharmaceutical targets and chemistry were evaluated across the assays to generate testing strategies that optimized performance. The MESCA and ZEC assays were found to have two limitations: compound solubility and frequent misclassification of compounds with H1 receptor or GABAnergic activity. The streamlined rWEC assay was found to be a cost-effective stand-alone assay for supporting poorly soluble compounds and/or ones with H1 or GABAnergic activity. For all other compounds, a tiering strategy using the MESCA and ZEC assays additionally optimized throughput, cost, and minimized animal use. The tiered strategy resulted in improved performance achieving 88% overall predictivity and was comparable with 89% overall predictivity achieved with frequency analysis (final teratogenic classification made from most frequent teratogenic classification from each individual assay). Furthermore there were 21 compounds in the test set characterized as definitive or suspect human teratogens and the multiassay approach achieved 95 and 91% correct classification using the tiered or frequency screening approach, respectively. PMID:26729651

  17. A rapid enzymatic assay for high-throughput screening of adenosine-producing strains

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huina; Zu, Xin; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a major local regulator of tissue function and industrially useful as precursor for the production of medicinal nucleoside substances. High-throughput screening of adenosine overproducers is important for industrial microorganism breeding. An enzymatic assay of adenosine was developed by combined adenosine deaminase (ADA) with indophenol method. The ADA catalyzes the cleavage of adenosine to inosine and NH3, the latter can be accurately determined by indophenol method. The assay system was optimized to deliver a good performance and could tolerate the addition of inorganic salts and many nutrition components to the assay mixtures. Adenosine could be accurately determined by this assay using 96-well microplates. Spike and recovery tests showed that this assay can accurately and reproducibly determine increases in adenosine in fermentation broth without any pretreatment to remove proteins and potentially interfering low-molecular-weight molecules. This assay was also applied to high-throughput screening for high adenosine-producing strains. The high selectivity and accuracy of the ADA assay provides rapid and high-throughput analysis of adenosine in large numbers of samples. PMID:25580842

  18. Genome Editing-Enabled HTS Assays Expand Drug Target Pathways for Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation resulting in excess PMP22 protein causes the peripheral neuropathy Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, type 1A. To broadly interrogate chemically sensitive transcriptional pathways controlling PMP22 protein levels, we used the targeting precision of TALEN-mediated genome editing to embed reporters within the genetic locus harboring the Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 (Pmp22) gene. Using a Schwann cell line with constitutively high endogenous levels of Pmp22, we obtained allelic insertion of secreted bioluminescent reporters with sufficient signal to enable a 1536-well assay. Our findings from the quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) of several thousand drugs and clinically investigated compounds using this assay design both overlapped and expanded results from a previous assay using a randomly inserted reporter gene controlled by a single regulatory element of the Pmp22 gene. A key difference was the identification of a kinase-controlled inhibitory pathway of Pmp22 transcription revealed by the activity of the Protein kinase C (PKC)-modulator bryostatin. PMID:25188731

  19. Genome editing-enabled HTS assays expand drug target pathways for Charcot-Marie-tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Inglese, James; Dranchak, Patricia; Moran, John J; Jang, Sung-Wook; Srinivasan, Rajini; Santiago, Yolanda; Zhang, Lei; Guha, Rajarshi; Martinez, Natalia; MacArthur, Ryan; Cost, Gregory J; Svaren, John

    2014-11-21

    Copy number variation resulting in excess PMP22 protein causes the peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 1A. To broadly interrogate chemically sensitive transcriptional pathways controlling PMP22 protein levels, we used the targeting precision of TALEN-mediated genome editing to embed reporters within the genetic locus harboring the Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 (Pmp22) gene. Using a Schwann cell line with constitutively high endogenous levels of Pmp22, we obtained allelic insertion of secreted bioluminescent reporters with sufficient signal to enable a 1536-well assay. Our findings from the quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) of several thousand drugs and clinically investigated compounds using this assay design both overlapped and expanded results from a previous assay using a randomly inserted reporter gene controlled by a single regulatory element of the Pmp22 gene. A key difference was the identification of a kinase-controlled inhibitory pathway of Pmp22 transcription revealed by the activity of the Protein kinase C (PKC)-modulator bryostatin. PMID:25188731

  20. Cellular Impedance Biosensors for Drug Screening and Toxin Detection

    PubMed Central

    Asphahani, Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based impedance biosensing is an emerging technology that can be used to non-invasively and instantaneously detect and analyze cell responses to chemical and biological agents. This article highlights the fabrication and measurement technologies of cell impedance sensors, and their application in toxin detection and anti-cancer drug screening. We start with an introduction that describes the capability and advantages of cell-based sensors over conventional sensing technology, followed by a discussion of the influence of cell adhesion, spreading and viability during cell patterning on the subsequent impedance measurements and sensing applications. We then present an electronic circuit that models the cell-electrode system, by which the cellular changes can be detected in terms of impedance changes of the circuit. Finally, we discuss the current status on using cell impedance sensors for toxin detection and anti-cancer drug screening. PMID:17710258

  1. MAMMALIAN SCREENING ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON MALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAMMALIAN SCREENING ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF POTENTIAL
    ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON MALES.
    Authors: L E Gray 1 , J Furr 1 , M G Price 2 , C J Wolf 3 and J S Ostby 1
    Institutions: 1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NH...

  2. Development of a potato seedling assay to screen for resistance to Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seedling assay was developed for Verticillium wilt (VW) resistance in potato (Solanum tuberosum) in order to provide efficient and rapid screening to identify resistant clones in segregating populations. The method provides uniform inoculum to avoid false negatives and reduces the confusion of sy...

  3. Towards novel therapeutics for HIV through fragment-based screening and drug design.

    PubMed

    Tiefendbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C David

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has been applied with varying levels of success to a number of proteins involved in the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) life cycle. Fragment-based approaches have led to the discovery of novel binding sites within protease, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and gp41. Novel compounds that bind to known pockets within CCR5 have also been identified via fragment screening, and a fragment-based approach to target the TAR-Tat interaction was explored. In the context of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), fragment-based approaches have yielded fragment hits with mid-μM activity in an in vitro activity assay, as well as fragment hits that are active against drug-resistant variants of RT. Fragment-based drug discovery is a powerful method to elucidate novel binding sites within proteins, and the method has had significant success in the context of HIV proteins. PMID:25455312

  4. Screening Pools of Compounds against Multiple Endogenously Expressed Targets in a Chemoproteomics Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elsa; Nixon, Elizabeth; Drewes, Gerard; Reinhard, Friedrich; Bergamini, Giovanna; Rau, Christina

    2016-02-01

    Chemoproteomics-based competition-binding assays allow the screening of compounds against endogenous proteins in cell or tissue extracts, but these assays are hampered by low throughput and high cost. Using compound pools rather than single compounds in a screening campaign holds the promise of increased efficiency and substantial cost reduction. Previous attempts to screen compounds in pools often fell short due to complex data tracking, deconvolution issues, compound interferences, and automation problems. The desire to screen compounds in a high-throughput chemoproteomics format sparked a reassessment of compound pooling. Through the integration of acoustic dispensing, we enabled a flexible pooling process, allowing mixture creation by combining randomized or specific samples to create defined pools. Automation enabled end-to-end tracking, using barcode scan check points and output files to track data and ensure integrity during the mixture creation process. The compound pooling approach proved to be highly compatible with the chemoproteomics assay technology. Pools of 10 compounds in a single well did not show compound interference effects or increased false-positive/negative rates. In the present study, four targets, TBK1, PI3Kδ, PI3Kγ, and mTOR, were screened using a chemoproteomics approach against pools of 10 compounds per well, resulting in robust hit identification. PMID:26169024

  5. High efficacy vasopermeability drug candidates identified by screening in an ex ovo chorioallantoic membrane model

    PubMed Central

    Pink, Desmond; Luhrs, Keith A.; Zhou, Longen; Schulte, Wendy; Chase, Jennifer; Frosch, Christian; Haberl, Udo; Nguyen, Van; Roy, Aparna I.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries; Parseghian, Missag H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of rodent models to evaluate efficacy during testing is accompanied by significant economic and regulatory hurdles which compound the costs of screening for promising drug candidates. Vasopermeation Enhancement Agents (VEAs) are a new class of biologics that are designed to increase the uptake of cancer therapeutics at the tumor site by modifying vascular permeability in the tumor to increase the therapeutic index of co-administered drugs. To evaluate the efficacy of a panel of VEA clinical candidates, we compared the rodent Miles assay to an equivalent assay in the ex ovo chicken embryo model. Both model systems identified the same candidate (PVL 10) as the most active promoter of vasopermeation in non-tumor tissues. An ex ovo chicken embryo system was utilized to test each candidate VEA in two human tumor models at a range of concentrations. Vasopermeation activity due to VEA was dependent on tumor type, with HEp3 tumors displaying higher levels of vasopermeation than MDA-MB-435. One candidate (PVL 10) proved optimal for HEp3 tumors and another (PVL 2) for MDA-MB-435. The use of the ex ovo chicken embryo model provides a rapid and less costly alternative to the use of rodent models for preclinical screening of drug candidates. PMID:26510887

  6. Development and application of a universal Hemoplasma screening assay based on the SYBR green PCR principle.

    PubMed

    Willi, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Lüthy, Ruedi; Honegger, Hanspeter; Wengi, Nicole; Hoelzle, Ludwig E; Reusch, Claudia E; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2009-12-01

    Hemotropic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) are the causative agents of infectious anemia in several mammalian species. Their zoonotic potential has recently been substantiated by the identification of a feline hemoplasma isolate in an immunocompromised human patient. Although species-specific diagnostic molecular methods have been developed, their application as screening tools is limited due to the species diversity of hemoplasmas. The goals of this study were to develop a universal hemoplasma screening assay with broad specificity based on the SYBR green PCR principle, to compare the assay with hemoplasma-specific TaqMan PCR, and to analyze potential tick vectors and human blood samples to address the zoonotic potential. The newly developed PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene amplified feline, canine, bovine, porcine, camelid, and murine hemoplasmas, as well as Mycoplasma penetrans and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The lower detection limit for feline and canine hemoplasmas was 1 to 10 copies/PCR. The assay exhibited 98.2% diagnostic sensitivity and 92.1% diagnostic specificity for feline hemoplasmas. All 1,950 Ixodes ticks were PCR negative, suggesting that Ixodes ticks are not relevant vectors for the above-mentioned hemoplasma species in Switzerland. None of the 414 blood samples derived from anemic or immunocompromised human patients revealed a clear positive result. The SYBR green PCR assay described here is a suitable tool to screen for known and so-far-undiscovered hemoplasma species. Positive results should be confirmed by specific TaqMan PCR or sequencing. PMID:19828748

  7. A cell-based screening assay for Natural Killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Blom, W Marty; van Nielen, Wim G L; de Groene, Els M; Albers, Ruud

    2009-06-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are important in the first response against viruses and tumours. Compounds that modulate human NK cell activity offer interesting prophylactic and therapeutic options, however, a systematic screening tool is lacking. Development of suitable NK cell lines or receptor-based assays is hindered by the highly complicated regulation of the different NK cell subsets by multiple receptors. Here, we describe a cell-based flowcytometric activity assay adapted to identify NK cell modulating compounds. Fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were incubated with NK-sensitive K562 target cells labelled with 5-(6)-carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester, followed by DNA-labelling with propidium iodide to identify dead cells. The assay demonstrated a good performance with an average Z'-factor of 0.6 and over 95% of the assays fulfilled the quality criteria, suggesting that it is possible to use a complex system with two different cell types to screen compounds. A large number of (natural) compounds and extracts were tested and normalized to the positive control, Interleukin-2. Promising and less promising compounds were distinguished. Effectiveness of compounds was based on the augmentation of NK cell activity as well as the number of responding subjects. To conclude the assay is robust, reliable and can be used for functional screening of natural compounds modulating NK cell activity. PMID:19293002

  8. Phenotypic assays to identify agents that induce reactive gliosis: a counter-screen to prioritize compounds for preclinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Samuel R; Jimenez, Joaquin E; Shi, Yan; Al-Ali, Hassan; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2015-09-01

    Astrocyte phenotypes change in a process called reactive gliosis after traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury. Astrogliosis is characterized by expansion of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) cytoskeleton, adoption of stellate morphologies, and differential expression of some extracellular matrix molecules. The astrocytic response immediately after injury is beneficial, but in the chronic injury phase, reactive astrocytes produce inhibitory factors (i.e., chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans [CSPGs]) that limit the regrowth of injured axons. There are no drugs that promote axon regeneration or functional recovery after CNS trauma in humans. To develop novel therapeutics for the injured CNS, we screened various libraries in a phenotypic assay to identify compounds that promote neurite outgrowth. However, the effects these compounds have on astrocytes are unknown. Specifically, we were interested in whether compounds could alter astrocytes in a manner that mimics the glial reaction to injury. To test this hypothesis, we developed cell-based phenotypic bioassays to measure changes in (1) GFAP morphology/localization and (2) CSPG expression/immunoreactivity from primary astrocyte cultures. These assays were optimized for six-point dose-response experiments in 96-well plates. The GFAP morphology assay is suitable for counter-screening with a Z-factor of 0.44±0.03 (mean±standard error of the mean; N=3 biological replicates). The CSPG assay is reproducible and informative, but does not satisfy common metrics for a "screenable" assay. As proof of principle, we tested a small set of hit compounds from our neurite outgrowth bioassay and identified one that can enhance axon growth without exacerbating the deleterious characteristics of reactive gliosis. PMID:26230074

  9. Tools for diagnosis, monitoring and screening of Schistosoma infections utilizing lateral-flow based assays and upconverting phosphor labels

    PubMed Central

    CORSTJENS, PAUL L. A. M.; DE DOOD, CLAUDIA J.; KORNELIS, DIEUWKE; FAT, ELISA M. TJON KON; WILSON, R. ALAN; KARIUKI, THOMAS M.; NYAKUNDI, RUTH K.; LOVERDE, PHILIP T.; ABRAMS, WILLIAM R.; TANKE, HANS J.; VAN LIESHOUT, LISETTE; DEELDER, ANDRÉ M.; VAN DAM, GOVERT J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The potential of various quantitative lateral flow (LF) based assays utilizing up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporters for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis is reviewed including recent developments. Active infections are demonstrated by screening for the presence of regurgitated worm antigens (genus specific polysaccharides), whereas anti-Schistosoma antibodies may indicate ongoing as well as past infections. The circulating anodic antigen (CAA) in serum or urine (and potentially also saliva) is identified as the marker that may allow detection of single-worm infections. Quantitation of antigen levels is a reliable method to study effects of drug administration, worm burden and anti-fecundity mechanisms. Moreover, the ratio of CAA and circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) is postulated to facilitate identification of either Schistosoma mansoni or Schistosoma haematobium infections. The UCP-LF assays allow simultaneous detection of multiple targets on a single strip, a valuable feature for antibody detection assays. Although antibody detection in endemic regions is not a useful tool to diagnose active infections, it gains potential when the ratio of different classes of antibody specific for the parasite/disease can be determined. The UCP-LF antibody assay format allows this type of multiplexing, including testing a linear array of up to 20 different targets. Multiple test spots would allow detection of specific antibodies, e.g. against different Schistosoma species or other pathogens as soil-transmitted helminths. Concluding, the different UCP-LF based assays for diagnosis of schistosomiasis provide a collection of tests with relatively low complexity and high sensitivity, covering the full range of diagnostics needed in control programmes for mapping, screening and monitoring. PMID:24932595

  10. Tools for diagnosis, monitoring and screening of Schistosoma infections utilizing lateral-flow based assays and upconverting phosphor labels.

    PubMed

    Corstjens, Paul L A M; De Dood, Claudia J; Kornelis, Dieuwke; Fat, Elisa M Tjon Kon; Wilson, R Alan; Kariuki, Thomas M; Nyakundi, Ruth K; Loverde, Philip T; Abrams, William R; Tanke, Hans J; Van Lieshout, Lisette; Deelder, André M; Van Dam, Govert J

    2014-12-01

    The potential of various quantitative lateral flow (LF) based assays utilizing up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporters for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis is reviewed including recent developments. Active infections are demonstrated by screening for the presence of regurgitated worm antigens (genus specific polysaccharides), whereas anti-Schistosoma antibodies may indicate ongoing as well as past infections. The circulating anodic antigen (CAA) in serum or urine (and potentially also saliva) is identified as the marker that may allow detection of single-worm infections. Quantitation of antigen levels is a reliable method to study effects of drug administration, worm burden and anti-fecundity mechanisms. Moreover, the ratio of CAA and circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) is postulated to facilitate identification of either Schistosoma mansoni or Schistosoma haematobium infections. The UCP-LF assays allow simultaneous detection of multiple targets on a single strip, a valuable feature for antibody detection assays. Although antibody detection in endemic regions is not a useful tool to diagnose active infections, it gains potential when the ratio of different classes of antibody specific for the parasite/disease can be determined. The UCP-LF antibody assay format allows this type of multiplexing, including testing a linear array of up to 20 different targets. Multiple test spots would allow detection of specific antibodies, e.g. against different Schistosoma species or other pathogens as soil-transmitted helminths. Concluding, the different UCP-LF based assays for diagnosis of schistosomiasis provide a collection of tests with relatively low complexity and high sensitivity, covering the full range of diagnostics needed in control programmes for mapping, screening and monitoring. PMID:24932595

  11. The microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay: the role of a drug-induced apoptosis assay in drug development and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Bosserman, Linda; Prendergast, Franklyn; Herbst, Roy; Fleisher, Martin; Salom, Emery; Strickland, Steven; Raptis, Anastasios; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Rajurkar, Swapnil; Karimi, Misagh; Rogers, Karl; Davidson, Dirk; Willis, Carl; Penalver, Manuel; Homesley, Howard; Burrell, Matthew; Garrett, Audrey; Rutledge, James; Chernick, Michael; Presant, Cary A

    2012-08-15

    A drug-induced apoptosis assay, termed the microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay, has been developed. Blinded clinical trials have shown higher response rates and longer survival in groups of patients with acute myelocytic leukemia and epithelial ovarian cancer who have been treated with drugs that show high apoptosis in the MiCK assay. Unblinded clinical trials in multiple tumor types have shown that the assay will be used frequently by clinicians to determine treatment, and when used, results in higher response rates, longer times to relapse, and longer survivals. Model economic analyses suggest possible cost savings in clinical use based on increased generic drug use and single-agent substitution for combination therapies. Two initial studies with drugs in development are promising. The assay may help reduce costs and speed time to drug approval. Correlative studies with molecular biomarkers are planned. This assay may have a role both in personalized clinical therapy and in more efficient drug development. PMID:22865459

  12. Screening assay of residual antibiotics in livestock samples by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takayuki; Sasamoto, Takeo; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Kanda, Maki; Takeba, Kazue; Kanai, Setsuko; Kusano, Tomoko; Matsushima, Yoko; Takano, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    A LC-MS/MS screening assay of multi-class antibiotics was developed for 19 residual antibiotics in livestock samples. Sample preparation employed the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach using 0.5% formic acid in acetonitrile-methanol (8 : 2), with salting-out using magnesium sulfate, trisodium citrate and sodium chloride. Recovery values from 5 different livestock samples ranged from 45.5 to 121.6%, and the RSDs were under 18% at two concentration levels. The limit of quantification values of 19 analytes were under 10 µg/kg in all livestock samples, and the procedure can detect almost all analytes under the MRL. Screening capability was confirmed by employing spiked samples. This new screening assay for residual antibiotics in livestock samples is expected to be useful for routine laboratory tests. PMID:22688024

  13. Identification and validation of novel human pregnane X receptor activators among prescribed drugs via ligand-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Kim, Gregory; Ekins, Sean; Wang, Hongbing; Swaan, Peter W

    2011-02-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) plays a key role in regulating metabolism and clearance of endogenous and exogenous substances. Identification of novel hPXR activators among commercial drugs may aid in avoiding drug-drug interactions during coadministration. We applied ligand-based computational approaches for virtual screening of a commonly prescribed drug database (SCUT). Bayesian classification models were generated with a training set comprising 177 compounds using Fingerprints and 117 structural descriptors. A cell-based luciferase reporter assay was used for evaluation of chemical-mediated hPXR activation in HepG2 cells. All compounds were tested at 10 μM concentration with rifampicin and dimethyl sulfoxide as positive and negative controls, respectively. The Bayesian models showed specificity and overall prediction accuracy up to 0.92 and 0.69 for test set compounds. Screening the SCUT database with this model retrieved 105 hits and 17 compounds from the top 25 hits were chosen for in vitro testing. The reporter assay confirmed that nine drugs, i.e., fluticasone, nimodipine, nisoldipine, beclomethasone, finasteride, flunisolide, megestrol, secobarbital, and aminoglutethimide, were previously unidentified hPXR activators. Thus, the present study demonstrates that novel hPXR activators can be efficiently identified among U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved and commonly prescribed drugs, which should lead to detection and prevention of potential drug-drug interactions. PMID:21068194

  14. Identification and Validation of Novel Human Pregnane X Receptor Activators among Prescribed Drugs via Ligand-Based Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Kim, Gregory; Ekins, Sean; Wang, Hongbing

    2011-01-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) plays a key role in regulating metabolism and clearance of endogenous and exogenous substances. Identification of novel hPXR activators among commercial drugs may aid in avoiding drug-drug interactions during coadministration. We applied ligand-based computational approaches for virtual screening of a commonly prescribed drug database (SCUT). Bayesian classification models were generated with a training set comprising 177 compounds using Fingerprints and 117 structural descriptors. A cell-based luciferase reporter assay was used for evaluation of chemical-mediated hPXR activation in HepG2 cells. All compounds were tested at 10 μM concentration with rifampicin and dimethyl sulfoxide as positive and negative controls, respectively. The Bayesian models showed specificity and overall prediction accuracy up to 0.92 and 0.69 for test set compounds. Screening the SCUT database with this model retrieved 105 hits and 17 compounds from the top 25 hits were chosen for in vitro testing. The reporter assay confirmed that nine drugs, i.e., fluticasone, nimodipine, nisoldipine, beclomethasone, finasteride, flunisolide, megestrol, secobarbital, and aminoglutethimide, were previously unidentified hPXR activators. Thus, the present study demonstrates that novel hPXR activators can be efficiently identified among U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved and commonly prescribed drugs, which should lead to detection and prevention of potential drug-drug interactions. PMID:21068194

  15. A cell-based luciferase assay amenable to high-throughput screening of inhibitors of arenavirus budding

    PubMed Central

    Capul, Althea A.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Several Arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans for which there are no licensed vaccines, and current therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin (Rib) that is only partially effective and associated with significant side effects. In addition, compelling evidence indicates that the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Therefore, it is important to develop novel and effective antiarenaviral drugs. The arenavirus Z protein is the driving force of arenavirus budding, and PPPY and PTAP late (L) domain motifs within Z are critical for Z-mediated budding, which involves the interaction of Z with a variety of host cellular factors. Compounds capable of inhibiting these virus-host cell interactions represent candidate anti-arenaviral drugs. The identification of these candidate compounds would be facilitated by the availability of a Z budding assay amenable to high throughput screens (HTS). To this end, we have developed a novel assay that allows for rapid and quantitative assessment of Z-mediated budding. We provide evidence that this novel assay is amenable to HTS to identify small molecule inhibitors of Z-mediated budding, as well as to uncover cellular genes contributing to arenavirus budding. PMID:18929379

  16. Recent developments in cell-based assays and stem cell technologies for botulinum neurotoxin research and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kiris, Erkan; Kota, Krishna P; Burnett, James C; Soloveva, Veronica; Kane, Christopher D; Bavari, Sina

    2014-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are exceptionally potent inhibitors of neurotransmission, causing muscle paralysis and respiratory failure associated with the disease botulism. Currently, no drugs are available to counter intracellular BoNT poisoning. To develop effective medical treatments, cell-based assays provide a valuable system to identify novel inhibitors in a time- and cost-efficient manner. Consequently, cell-based systems including immortalized cells, primary neurons and stem cell-derived neurons have been established. Stem cell-derived neurons are highly sensitive to BoNT intoxication and represent an ideal model to study the biological effects of BoNTs. Robust immunoassays are used to quantify BoNT activity and play a central role during inhibitor screening. In this review, we examine recent progress in physiologically relevant cell-based assays and high-throughput screening approaches for the identification of both direct and indirect BoNT inhibitors. PMID:24450833

  17. Recent developments in cell-based assays and stem cell technologies for Botulinum neurotoxin research and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kiris, Erkan; Kota, Krishna P.; Burnett, James C.; Soloveva, Veronica; Kane, Christopher D.; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are exceptionally potent inhibitors of neurotransmission, causing muscle paralysis and respiratory failure associated with the disease botulism. Currently, no drugs are available to counter intracellular BoNT poisoning. To develop effective medical treatments, cell-based assays provide a valuable system to identify novel inhibitors in a time- and cost-efficient manner. Consequently, cell-based systems including immortalized cells, primary neurons, and stem-cell derived neurons have been established. Stem cell-derived neurons are highly sensitive to BoNT intoxication and represent an ideal model to study the biological effects of BoNTs. Robust immunoassays are used to quantify BoNT activity and play a central role during inhibitor screening. In this review, we examine recent progress in physiologically relevant cell-based assays and high-throughput screening approaches for the identification of both direct and indirect BoNT inhibitors. PMID:24450833

  18. A High-Throughput Screen for Antibiotic Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Thomas C.; Dostal, Sarah M.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultra-high-throughput screening platform enabling discovery and/or engineering of natural product antibiotics. The methodology involves creation of hydrogel-in-oil emulsions in which recombinant microorganisms are co-emulsified with bacterial pathogens; antibiotic activity is assayed by use of a fluorescent viability dye. We have successfully utilized both bulk emulsification and microfluidic technology for the generation of hydrogel microdroplets that are size-compatible with conventional flow cytometry. Hydrogel droplets are ~25 pL in volume, and can be synthesized and sorted at rates exceeding 3,000 drops/s. Using this technique, we have achieved screening throughputs exceeding 5 million clones/day. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate efficient selection of antibiotic-secreting yeast from a vast excess of negative controls. In addition, we have successfully used this technique to screen a metagenomic library for secreted antibiotics that kill the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our results establish the practical utility of the screening platform, and we anticipate that the accessible nature of our methods will enable others seeking to identify and engineer the next generation of antibacterial biomolecules. PMID:23955804

  19. A high-throughput screen for antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Thomas C; Dostal, Sarah M; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-02-01

    We describe an ultra-high-throughput screening platform enabling discovery and/or engineering of natural product antibiotics. The methodology involves creation of hydrogel-in-oil emulsions in which recombinant microorganisms are co-emulsified with bacterial pathogens; antibiotic activity is assayed by use of a fluorescent viability dye. We have successfully utilized both bulk emulsification and microfluidic technology for the generation of hydrogel microdroplets that are size-compatible with conventional flow cytometry. Hydrogel droplets are ∼25 pL in volume, and can be synthesized and sorted at rates exceeding 3,000 drops/s. Using this technique, we have achieved screening throughputs exceeding 5 million clones/day. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate efficient selection of antibiotic-secreting yeast from a vast excess of negative controls. In addition, we have successfully used this technique to screen a metagenomic library for secreted antibiotics that kill the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our results establish the practical utility of the screening platform, and we anticipate that the accessible nature of our methods will enable others seeking to identify and engineer the next generation of antibacterial biomolecules. PMID:23955804

  20. Novel screening techniques for ion channel targeting drugs.

    PubMed

    Obergrussberger, Alison; Stlzle-Feix, Sonja; Becker, Nadine; Brggemann, Andrea; Fertig, Niels; Mller, Clemens

    2015-11-01

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that regulate the flux of ions across the cell membrane. They are involved in nearly all physiological processes, and malfunction of ion channels has been linked to many diseases. Until recently, high-throughput screening of ion channels was limited to indirect, e.g. fluorescence-based, readout technologies. In the past years, direct label-free biophysical readout technologies by means of electrophysiology have been developed. Planar patch-clamp electrophysiology provides a direct functional label-free readout of ion channel function in medium to high throughput. Further electrophysiology features, including temperature control and higher-throughput instruments, are continually being developed. Electrophysiological screening in a 384-well format has recently become possible. Advances in chip and microfluidic design, as well as in cell preparation and handling, have allowed challenging cell types to be studied by automated patch clamp. Assays measuring action potentials in stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, relevant for cardiac safety screening, and neuronal cells, as well as a large number of different ion channels, including fast ligand-gated ion channels, have successfully been established by automated patch clamp. Impedance and multi-electrode array measurements are particularly suitable for studying cardiomyocytes and neuronal cells within their physiological network, and to address more complex physiological questions. This article discusses recent advances in electrophysiological technologies available for screening ion channel function and regulation. PMID:26556400

  1. Novel screening techniques for ion channel targeting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Obergrussberger, Alison; Stölzle-Feix, Sonja; Becker, Nadine; Brüggemann, Andrea; Fertig, Niels; Möller, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that regulate the flux of ions across the cell membrane. They are involved in nearly all physiological processes, and malfunction of ion channels has been linked to many diseases. Until recently, high-throughput screening of ion channels was limited to indirect, e.g. fluorescence-based, readout technologies. In the past years, direct label-free biophysical readout technologies by means of electrophysiology have been developed. Planar patch-clamp electrophysiology provides a direct functional label-free readout of ion channel function in medium to high throughput. Further electrophysiology features, including temperature control and higher-throughput instruments, are continually being developed. Electrophysiological screening in a 384-well format has recently become possible. Advances in chip and microfluidic design, as well as in cell preparation and handling, have allowed challenging cell types to be studied by automated patch clamp. Assays measuring action potentials in stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, relevant for cardiac safety screening, and neuronal cells, as well as a large number of different ion channels, including fast ligand-gated ion channels, have successfully been established by automated patch clamp. Impedance and multi-electrode array measurements are particularly suitable for studying cardiomyocytes and neuronal cells within their physiological network, and to address more complex physiological questions. This article discusses recent advances in electrophysiological technologies available for screening ion channel function and regulation. PMID:26556400

  2. Using molecular similarity to highlight the challenges of routine immunoassay-based drug of abuse/toxicology screening in emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D; Pizon, Anthony F; Siam, Mohamed G; Giannoutsos, Spiros; Iyer, Manisha; Ekins, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Background Laboratory tests for routine drug of abuse and toxicology (DOA/Tox) screening, often used in emergency medicine, generally utilize antibody-based tests (immunoassays) to detect classes of drugs such as amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, opiates, and tricyclic antidepressants, or individual drugs such as cocaine, methadone, and phencyclidine. A key factor in assay sensitivity and specificity is the drugs or drug metabolites that were used as antigenic targets to generate the assay antibodies. All DOA/Tox screening immunoassays can be limited by false positives caused by cross-reactivity from structurally related compounds. For immunoassays targeted at a particular class of drugs, there can also be false negatives if there is failure to detect some drugs or their metabolites within that class. Methods Molecular similarity analysis, a computational method commonly used in drug discovery, was used to calculate structural similarity of a wide range of clinically relevant compounds (prescription and over-the-counter medications, illicit drugs, and clinically significant metabolites) to the target ('antigenic') molecules of DOA/Tox screening tests. These results were compared with cross-reactivity data in the package inserts of immunoassays marketed for clinical testing. The causes for false positives for phencyclidine and tricyclic antidepressant screening immunoassays were investigated at the authors' medical center using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as a confirmatory method. Results The results illustrate three major challenges for routine DOA/Tox screening immunoassays used in emergency medicine. First, for some classes of drugs, the structural diversity of common drugs within each class has been increasing, thereby making it difficult for a single assay to detect all compounds without compromising specificity. Second, for some screening assays, common 'out-of-class' drugs may be structurally similar to the target compound so that they account for a high frequency of false positives. Illustrating this point, at the authors' medical center, the majority of positive screening results for phencyclidine and tricyclic antidepressants assays were explained by out-of-class drugs. Third, different manufacturers have adopted varying approaches to marketed immunoassays, leading to substantial inter-assay variability. Conclusion The expanding structural diversity of drugs presents a difficult challenge for routine DOA/Tox screening that limit the clinical utility of these tests in the emergency medicine setting. PMID:19400959

  3. A stereospecific solid-phase screening assay for colonies expressing both (R)- and (S)-selective ω-aminotransferases.

    PubMed

    Willies, Simon C; Galman, James L; Slabu, Iustina; Turner, Nicholas J

    2016-02-28

    A novel solid-phase screening assay was developed for colonies expressing both (R)- and (S)-selective ω-aminotransferases. This high-throughput assay can be used to screen rapidly large variant libraries with enhanced substrate selectivity and enantioselectivities. PMID:26755753

  4. Recombinant virus assay: a rapid, phenotypic assay for assessment of drug susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kellam, P; Larder, B A

    1994-01-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility assays for clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are required to monitor the development of drug resistance during clinical trials and antiretroviral drug therapy. First-generation phenotypic assays possess a number of drawbacks, not least the selection of unrepresentative virus populations during cocultivation. Here we describe a rapid phenotypic assay for the assessment of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. This procedure, called the recombinant virus assay, allows the generation of viable virus by homologous recombination of a PCR-derived pool of RT coding sequences into an RT-deleted, noninfectious proviral clone, pHIV delta BstEII. A nested PCR procedure has been optimized to allow the amplification of an RT pool from both uncultured and cocultured infected patient peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) DNA for subsequent use in the creation of recombinant viruses. Analysis of two patients during the course of zidovudine therapy showed that this approach produced viruses which accurately exhibited the same genotype and phenotype as that of the original infected PBL DNA. The recombinant virus assay can be performed in approximately 3 weeks without the use of donor PBLs and therefore represents a rapid, nonselective procedure for the assay of clinical isolates. Images PMID:8141575

  5. Development of a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for cholesterol efflux using a fluorescent mimic of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Cai, Sutang; Peterson, Blake R; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Heuvel, John P Vanden

    2011-04-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport is the process by which extrahepatic cells, including macrophage-derived foam cells in arterial atherosclerotic plaque, transport excessive cholesterol back to the liver for bile acid synthesis and excretion, thus lowering the peripheral lipid burden. Cholesterol efflux from peripheral cells is the first step in this process, and finding drugs and interventions that promote this event is an important endeavor. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol traditionally has been employed in measuring efflux efficiency, but this reagent has limitations for high-throughput screening. We developed an alternative method to measure cholesterol efflux in macrophage-derived foam cells using a novel fluorescent cholesterol mimic comprising the Pennsylvania Green fluorophore, attached by a linker containing a glutamic acid residue, to a derivative of N-alkyl-3?-cholesterylamine. Compared with the traditional radioisotope-based assay, this fluorescence-based assay gave similar results in the presence of known modulators of cholesterol efflux, such as cyclic AMP, and different cholesterol acceptors. When the fluorescent probe was employed in a high-throughput screening format, a variety of chemicals and bioactive compounds with known and unknown effects on cholesterol efflux could be tested simultaneously by plate-reader in a short period of time. Treatment of THP-1-derived macrophages with inhibitors of the membrane transporter ATP-binding cassette A1, such as glyburide or a specific antibody, significantly reduced the export of this fluorescent compound, indicating that ATP-binding cassette A1 represents the primary mediator of its cellular efflux. This fluorescent mimic of cholesterol provides a safe, sensitive, and reproducible alternative to radioactive assays in efflux experiments and has great potential as a valuable tool when incorporated into a drug discovery program. PMID:21050070

  6. Evaluation of a lymph node proliferation assay for its ability to detect pharmaceuticals with potential to cause immune-mediated drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, James L; Chapdelaine, Joan M; Descotes, Jacques; Germolec, Dori; Holsapple, Mike; House, Robert; Lebrec, Herve; Meade, Jean; Pieters, Raymond; Hastings, Kenneth L; Dean, Jack H

    2005-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to systemically administered drugs cannot be predicted using available preclinical models. This research is a collaborative project to evaluate the ability of the Lymph Node Proliferation Assay (LNPA) to predict systemic hypersensitivity caused by pharmaceuticals. The assay design is a modification of the Local Lymph Node Assay with the major modification being injection of the test substance subcutaneously to achieve a known systemic exposure to the drug. Fourteen compounds were evaluated in the LNPA. These were two clinically negative drugs (Metformin, phenobarbital), an assay positive control (streptozotocin), eight human hypersensitivity positive drugs (sulfamethoxazole, procainamide, clonidine, ofloxacin, nevirapine, abacavir, lamotrigine, zomepirac), and 3 investigational drugs (CM40874, CM40954 and CM40420), one of which caused hypersensitivity in primates. Hypersensitivity-positive drugs were classified as such based on at least two of three independent data sources: U.S. FDA postmarketing database, drug labeling information, and clinical trial data. All drugs were tested in multiple laboratories for a total of 2-12 evaluations per compound. The pure drug substance was used for testing if it could be obtained commercially, otherwise the marketed drug formulation was used. Neither of the negative control drugs showed a positive reaction in the test system. Four of the eight hypersensitivity positive drugs showed a mixed or positive reaction. Two of the three investigational compounds gave a positive response. A smaller number of LNPAs were run concurrently using footpad injection and evaluation of the popliteal lymph node and gave generally comparable results. Additional development may increase the reproducibility of the assay and facilitate detection of drugs that require metabolic activation to become allergenic, or drugs for which there is dose-limiting toxicity. The data suggest that this method might be useful as a first-line screen to identify candidate drugs that are more likely to cause a high prevalence of human drug hypersensitivity. PMID:18958655

  7. A novel assay of bacterial peptidoglycan synthesis for natural product screening.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryo; Muramatsu, Yasunori; Minami, Emiko; Masuda, Kayoko; Sakaida, Yoshiharu; Endo, Shuichi; Suzuki, Takashi; Ishida, Osamu; Takatsu, Toshio; Miyakoshi, Shunichi; Inukai, Masatoshi; Isono, Fujio

    2009-03-01

    Although a large number of microbial metabolites have been discovered as inhibitors of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis, only a few inhibitors were reported for the pathway of UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide formation, partly because of the lack of assays appropriate for natural product screening. Among the pathway enzymes, D-Ala racemase (Alr), D-Ala:D-Ala ligase (Ddl) and UDP-MurNAc-tripeptide:D-Ala-D-Ala transferase (MurF) are particularly attractive as antibacterial targets, because these enzymes are essential for growth and utilize low-molecular-weight substrates. Using dansylated UDP-MurNAc-tripeptide and L-Ala as the substrates, we established a cell-free assay to measure the sequential reactions of Alr, Ddl and MurF coupled with translocase I. This assay is sensitive and robust enough to screen mixtures of microbial metabolites, and enables us to distinguish the inhibitors for D-Ala-D-Ala formation, MurF and translocase I. D-cycloserine, the D-Ala-D-Ala pathway inhibitor, was successfully detected by this assay (IC(50)=1.7 microg ml(-1)). In a large-scale screening of natural products, we have identified inhibitors for D-Ala-D-Ala synthesis pathway, MurF and translocase I. PMID:19229285

  8. An Enzymatic Assay for High-Throughput Screening of Cytidine-Producing Microbial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huina; Liu, Yongfei; Zu, Xin; Li, Ning; Li, Feiran; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Cytidine is an industrially useful precursor for the production of antiviral compounds and a variety of industrial compounds. Interest in the microbial production of cytidine has grown recently and high-throughput screening of cytidine over-producers is an important approach in large-scale industrial production using microorganisms. An enzymatic assay for cytidine was developed combining cytidine deaminase (CDA) and indophenol method. CDA catalyzes the cleavage of cytidine to uridine and NH3, the latter of which can be accurately determined using the indophenol method. The assay was performed in 96-well plates and had a linear detection range of cytidine of 0.058 - 10 mM. This assay was used to determine the amount of cytidine in fermentation flasks and the results were compared with that of High Perfomance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method. The detection range of the CDA method is not as wide as that of the HPLC, furthermore the correlation factor of CDA method is not as high as that of HPLC. However, it was suitable for the detection of large numbers of crude samples and was applied to high-throughput screening for high cytidine-producing strains using 96-well deep-hole culture plates. This assay was proved to be simple, accurate, specific and suitable for cytidine detection and high-throughput screening of cytidine-producing strains in large numbers of samples (96 well or more). PMID:25816248

  9. High-Throughput Assay of 9 Lysosomal Enzymes for Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Spacil, Zdenek; Tatipaka, Haribabu; Barcenas, Mariana; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is interest in newborn screening of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) because of the availability of treatments. Pilot studies have used tandem mass spectrometry with flow injection of samples to achieve multiplex detection of enzyme products. We report a multiplexing method of 9 enzymatic assays that uses HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). METHODS The assay of 9 enzymes was carried out in 1 or 2 buffers with a cassette of substrates and internal standards and 1 or 2 punches of a dried blood spot (DBS) from a newborn screening card as the source of enzymes. The pre–HPLC-MS/MS sample preparation required only 4 liquid transfers before injection into a dual-column HPLC equipped with switching valves to direct the flow to separation and column equilibration. Product-specific and internal standard–specific ion fragmentations were used for MS/MS quantification in the selected reaction monitoring mode. RESULTS Analysis of blood spots from 58 random newborns and lysosomal storage disease–affected patients showed that the assay readily distinguished affected from nonaffected individuals. The time per 9-plex analysis (1.8 min) was sufficiently short to be compatible with the workflow of newborn screening laboratories. CONCLUSIONS HPLC-MS/MS provides a viable alternative to flow-injection MS/MS for the quantification of lysosomal enzyme activities. It is possible to assay 9 lysosomal enzymes using 1 or 2 reaction buffers, thus minimizing the number of separate incubations necessary. PMID:23315484

  10. Ethical aspects of workplace urine screening for drug abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, A R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the ethical and legal implications of the involvement of medical practitioners in workplace screening for drug misuse. CONCLUSIONS: Workplace screening for drugs of abuse raises many ethical issues. If screening is considered as being part of medical practice with the involvement of occupational health physicians, as suggested by the Faculty of Occupational Medicine, then the ethical requirements of a normal medical consultation are fully applicable. The employee's full and informed consent to the process must be obtained and the employee should have an unfettered right of access to all the relevant records and to the urine sample he/she has provided in the event that he/she wishes to challenge the opinion expressed by the physician. If the process is not part of medical practice then employees should have the same rights as they would have if required to provide intimate body samples in the course of a criminal investigation, given the potentially serious consequences of an erroneous positive finding for their livelihood. PMID:9055156

  11. Newborn Hearing Screening in Neonates Exposed to Psychoactive Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bruna Salazar Castro da; Machado, Márcia Salgado; Zanini, Cláudia Fernandes Costa; Paniz, Tatiana de Carvalho; Menegotto, Isabela Hoffmeister

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In pregnancy, the mother and fetus share body structures based on the maternal organism. Exposure to psychoactive drugs in this period may have repercussions on the baby's hearing. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate this association. Aim Analyze the results of newborn hearing screening (NHS), the occurrence of associated risk factors, and the incidence of hearing loss in newborn exposed to psychoactive drugs during pregnancy. Methods This is an observational retrospective study done from a database analysis. From this database, records were selected about the use of psychoactive drugs by mothers during pregnancy, then the neonates were divide into two groups: the study group (146 babies exposed to drugs) and the control group (500 babies not exposed to drugs). The NHS failure rate, the presence of risk factors for hearing loss, and need for audiological diagnosis were analyzed in both groups. From these variables, absolute frequency and prevalence rates were calculated and the results compared between groups. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the comparison of NHS failure rates between the groups (p = 0.267). The occurrence of risk factors for hearing loss was greater in babies exposed to drugs (p < 0.0001). There was only one diagnosis of hearing loss, which occurred in the control group (p = 0.667). Conclusion The use of psychoactive drugs by mothers during pregnancy did not affect the NHS failure rate of this sample. However, the occurrence of significant risk factors in the study group showed a possible sensitivity of babies exposed to psychoactive drugs during pregnancy. PMID:25992062

  12. A 1536-well Fluorescence Polarization Assay to Screen for Modulators of the MUSASHI Family of RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Minuesa, Gerard; Antczak, Christophe; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Li, Yueming; Djaballah, Hakim; Kharas, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) can act as stem cell modulators and oncogenic drivers, but have been largely ignored by the pharmaceutical industry as potential therapeutic targets for cancer. The MUSASHI (MSI) family has recently been demonstrated to be an attractive clinical target in the most aggressive cancers. Therefore, the discovery and development of small molecule inhibitors could provide a novel therapeutic strategy. In order to find novel compounds with MSI RNA binding inhibitory activity, we have developed a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay and optimized it for high throughput screening (HTS) in a 1536-well microtiter plate format. Using a chemical library of 6,208 compounds, we performed pilot screens, against both MSI1 and MSI2, leading to the identification of 7 molecules for MSI1, 15 for MSI2 and 5 that inhibited both. A secondary FP dose-response screen validated 3 MSI inhibitors with IC50 below 10μM. Out of the 25 compounds retested in the secondary screen only 8 demonstrated optical interference due to high fluorescence. Utilizing a SYBR-based RNA electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), we further verified MSI inhibition of the top 3 compounds. Surprisingly, even though several aminoglycosides were present in the library, they failed to demonstrate MSI inhibitor activity challenging the concept that these compounds are pan-active against RBPs. In summary, we have developed an in vitro strategy to identify MSI specific inhibitors using an FP HTS platform, which will facilitate novel drug discovery for this class of RBPs. PMID:24912481

  13. Comparison of Automated Treponemal and Nontreponemal Test Algorithms as First-Line Syphilis Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae-Woo; Park, Seong Yeon; Chae, Seok Lae

    2016-01-01

    Background Automated Mediace Treponema pallidum latex agglutination (TPLA) and Mediace rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assays are used by many laboratories for syphilis diagnosis. This study compared the results of the traditional syphilis screening algorithm and a reverse algorithm using automated Mediace RPR or Mediace TPLA as first-line screening assays in subjects undergoing a health checkup. Methods Samples from 24,681 persons were included in this study. We routinely performed Mediace RPR and Mediace TPLA simultaneously. Results were analyzed according to both the traditional algorithm and reverse algorithm. Samples with discordant results on the reverse algorithm (e.g., positive Mediace TPLA, negative Mediace RPR) were tested with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA). Results Among the 24,681 samples, 30 (0.1%) were found positive by traditional screening, and 190 (0.8%) by reverse screening. The identified syphilis rate and overall false-positive rate according to the traditional algorithm were lower than those according to the reverse algorithm (0.07% and 0.05% vs. 0.64% and 0.13%, respectively). A total of 173 discordant samples were tested with TPPA by using the reverse algorithm, of which 140 (80.9%) were TPPA positive. Conclusions Despite the increased false-positive results in populations with a low prevalence of syphilis, the reverse algorithm detected 140 samples with treponemal antibody that went undetected by the traditional algorithm. The reverse algorithm using Mediace TPLA as a screening test is more sensitive for the detection of syphilis. PMID:26522755

  14. Key Learnings from the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Tier 1 Rodent Uterotrophic and Hershberger Assays

    PubMed Central

    Marty, M Sue; O'Connor, John C

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, companies began screening compounds using the US Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). EDSP has two tiers: Tier 1 includes 11 assays to identify compounds with potential endocrine activity. This article describes two laboratories' experiences conducting Tier 1 uterotrophic and Hershberger assays. The uterotrophic assay detects estrogen receptor agonists through increases in uterine weight. The advantages of the uterotrophic rat models (immature vs. adult ovariectomized) and exposure routes are discussed. Across 29 studies, relative differences in uterine weights in the vehicle control group and 17α-ethynylestradiol–positive control group were reasonably reproducible. The Hershberger assay detects androgen receptor (AR) agonists, antagonists, and 5α-reductase inhibitors through changes in accessory sex tissue (AST) weights. Across 23 studies, AST weights were relatively reproducible for the vehicle groups (baseline), testosterone propionate (TP) groups (androgenic response), and flutamide + TP groups (antiandrogenic response). In one laboratory, one and four compounds were positive in the androgenic and antiandrogenic portions of the assay, respectively. Each compound was also positive for AR binding. In the other laboratory, three compounds showed potential antiandrogenic activity, but each compound was negative for AR binding and did not fit the profile for 5α-reductase inhibition. These compounds induced hepatic enzymes that enhanced testosterone metabolism/clearance, resulting in lower testosterone and decreased capacity to maintain AST weights. The Hershberger androgenic and antiandrogenic performance criteria were generally attainable. Overall, the uterotrophic and Hershberger assays were easily adopted and function as described for EDSP screening, although the mode of action for positive results may not be easily determined. PMID:24515841

  15. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis.

    PubMed

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-07-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 "borderline" samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  16. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 “borderline” samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  17. Unveiling new biological relationships using shared hits of chemical screening assay pairs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueping; Campillos, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Although the integration and analysis of the activity of small molecules across multiple chemical screens is a common approach to determine the specificity and toxicity of hits, the suitability of these approaches to reveal novel biological information is less explored. Here, we test the hypothesis that assays sharing selective hits are biologically related. Results: We annotated the biological activities (i.e. biological processes or molecular activities) measured in assays and constructed chemical hit profiles with sets of compounds differing on their selectivity level for 1640 assays of ChemBank repository. We compared the similarity of chemical hit profiles of pairs of assays with their biological relationships and observed that assay pairs sharing non-promiscuous chemical hits tend to be biologically related. A detailed analysis of a network containing assay pairs with the highest hit similarity confirmed biological meaningful relationships. Furthermore, the biological roles of predicted molecular targets of the shared hits reinforced the biological associations between assay pairs. Contact: monica.campillos@helmholtz-muenchen.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161250

  18. High Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E.; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green-fluorescent-protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug ‘hits’ that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wildtype-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. ‘Hits’ of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant-IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients. PMID:26795471

  19. Engineering Xenopus embryos for phenotypic drug discovery screening.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Stefan M; Gull, Mazhar; Brändli, André W

    2014-04-01

    Many rare human inherited diseases remain untreatable despite the fact that the disease causing genes are known and adequate mouse disease models have been developed. In vivo phenotypic drug screening relies on isolating drug candidates by their ability to produce a desired therapeutic phenotype in whole organisms. Embryos of zebrafish and Xenopus frogs are abundant, small and free-living. They can be easily arrayed in multi-well dishes and treated with small organic molecules. With the development of novel genome modification tools, such a zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR/Cas, it is now possible to efficiently engineer non-mammalian models of inherited human diseases. Here, we will review the rapid progress made in adapting these novel genome editing tools to Xenopus. The advantages of Xenopus embryos as in vivo models to study human inherited diseases will be presented and their utility for drug discovery screening will be discussed. Being a tetrapod, Xenopus complements zebrafish as an indispensable non-mammalian animal model for the study of human disease pathologies and the discovery of novel therapeutics for inherited diseases. PMID:24576445

  20. New high throughput screening method for drug release measurements.

    PubMed

    Pelczarska, Aleksandra; Delie, Florence; Domańska, Urszula; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Martel, Sophie

    2013-09-01

    In the field of drug delivery systems, microparticles made of polymeric matrix appear as an attractive approach. The in vitro release kinetic profile is crucial information when developing new particulate formulations. These data are essential for batch to batch comparison, quality control as well as for anticipation of in vivo behavior to select the best formulation to go further in preclinical investigations. The methods available present common drawbacks such as the time- and compound-consumption that does not fit with formulation screening requirements in early development stages. In this study, a new microscale high throughput screening (HTS) method has been developed to investigate drug release kinetic from piroxicam-loaded polylactic acid (PLA) and polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microparticles. The method is a sample- and separation-based method where separation is performed by filtration using 96-well micro filter plates. 96 experiments can therefore be performed on one plate in one time in a fully automated way and with a very low sample and particle consumption. The influence of different parameters controlling release profiles was also investigated using this technique. The HTS method gave the same release profile than the standard dialysis method. Shaking, particle concentration, and the nature of the release medium were found to be of influence. The HTS method appears as a reliable method to evaluate drug release from particles with smaller standard deviation and less consumption of material. PMID:23958326

  1. Screening for Noise in Gene Expression Identifies Drug Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Hosmane, Nina N.; Arkin, Michelle R.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic fluctuations are inherent to gene expression and can drive cell-fate specification. We used such fluctuations to modulate reactivation of HIV from latency—a quiescent state that is a major barrier to an HIV cure. By screening a diverse library of bioactive small molecules, we identified over 80 compounds that modulated HIV gene-expression fluctuations (i.e. ‘noise’), without changing mean expression. These noise-modulating compounds would be neglected in conventional screens and strikingly they synergized with conventional transcriptional activators. Noise enhancers reactivated latent cells significantly better than existing best-in-class reactivation cocktails (and with reduced off-target cytotoxicity), while noise suppressors stabilized latency. Noise-modulating chemicals may provide novel probes for the physiological consequences of noise and an unexplored axis for drug discovery, allowing enhanced control over diverse cell-fate decisions. PMID:24903562

  2. Quantification of cell viability and rapid screening anti-cancer drug utilizing nanomechanical fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shangquan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiarong; Liang, Xin M; Gao, Dayong; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-15

    Cancer is a serious threat to human health. Although numerous anti-cancer drugs are available clinically, many have shown toxic side effects due to poor tumor-selectivity, and reduced effectiveness due to cancers rapid development of resistance to treatment. The development of new highly efficient and practical methods to quantify cell viability and its change under drug treatment is thus of significant importance in both understanding of anti-cancer mechanism and anti-cancer drug screening. Here, we present an approach of utilizing a nanomechanical fluctuation based highly sensitive microcantilever sensor, which is capable of characterizing the viability of cells and quantitatively screening (within tens of minutes) their responses to a drug with the obvious advantages of a rapid, label-free, quantitative, noninvasive, real-time and in-situ assay. The microcantilever sensor operated in fluctuation mode was used in evaluating the paclitaxel effectiveness on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This study demonstrated that the nanomechanical fluctuations of the microcantilever sensor are sensitive enough to detect the dynamic variation in cellular force which is provided by the cytoskeleton, using cell metabolism as its energy source, and the dynamic instability of microtubules plays an important role in the generation of the force. We propose that cell viability consists of two parts: biological viability and mechanical viability. Our experimental results suggest that paclitaxel has little effect on biological viability, but has a significant effect on mechanical viability. This new method provides a new concept and strategy for the evaluation of cell viability and the screening of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26406457

  3. Magnetically optimized SERS assay for rapid detection of trace drug-related biomarkers in saliva and fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianxi; Guo, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hui; Fu, Shuyue; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-06-15

    New developments in the fields of human healthcare and social security call for the exploration of an easy and on-field method to detect drug-related biomarkers. In this paper, Au nanoparticles dotted magnetic nanocomposites (AMN) modified with inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) were used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to quickly monitor trace drug-related biomarkers in saliva and to on-site screen a trace drug biomarker in fingerprints. Due to inducing with an external magnet, such substrate presented a huge SERS activity, which has met the sensitivity requirement for assay to detect the drug biomarkers in saliva from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and also the limit of detection for drug biomarker in fingerprint reached 100 nM. In addition, this AMN-based SERS assay was successfully conducted using a portable Raman spectrometer, which could be used to on-site and accurately differentiate between the smokers and drug addicts in near future. PMID:25603400

  4. Antiprotozoan lead discovery by aligning dry and wet screening: prediction, synthesis, and biological assay of novel quinoxalinones.

    PubMed

    Martins Alho, Miriam A; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J; Meneses-Marcel, Alfredo; Machado Tugores, Yanetsy; Montero-Torres, Alina; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Nogal, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Rory N; Vega, María Celeste; Rolón, Miriam; Martínez-Fernández, Antonio R; Escario, José A; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Garcia-Domenech, Ramón; Rivera, Norma; Mondragón, Ricardo; Mondragón, Mónica; Ibarra-Velarde, Froylán; Lopez-Arencibia, Atteneri; Martín-Navarro, Carmen; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Cabrera-Serra, Maria Gabriela; Piñero, Jose; Tytgat, Jan; Chicharro, Roberto; Arán, Vicente J

    2014-03-01

    Protozoan parasites have been one of the most significant public health problems for centuries and several human infections caused by them have massive global impact. Most of the current drugs used to treat these illnesses have been used for decades and have many limitations such as the emergence of drug resistance, severe side-effects, low-to-medium drug efficacy, administration routes, cost, etc. These drugs have been largely neglected as models for drug development because they are majorly used in countries with limited resources and as a consequence with scarce marketing possibilities. Nowadays, there is a pressing need to identify and develop new drug-based antiprotozoan therapies. In an effort to overcome this problem, the main purpose of this study is to develop a QSARs-based ensemble classifier for antiprotozoan drug-like entities from a heterogeneous compounds collection. Here, we use some of the TOMOCOMD-CARDD molecular descriptors and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to derive individual linear classification functions in order to discriminate between antiprotozoan and non-antiprotozoan compounds as a way to enable the computational screening of virtual combinatorial datasets and/or drugs already approved. Firstly, we construct a wide-spectrum benchmark database comprising of 680 organic chemicals with great structural variability (254 of them antiprotozoan agents and 426 to drugs having other clinical uses). This series of compounds was processed by a k-means cluster analysis in order to design training and predicting sets. In total, seven discriminant functions were obtained, by using the whole set of atom-based linear indices. All the LDA-based QSAR models show accuracies above 85% in the training set and values of Matthews correlation coefficients (C) vary from 0.70 to 0.86. The external validation set shows rather-good global classifications of around 80% (92.05% for best equation). Later, we developed a multi-agent QSAR classification system, in which the individual QSAR outputs are the inputs of the aforementioned fusion approach. Finally, the fusion model was used for the identification of a novel generation of lead-like antiprotozoan compounds by using ligand-based virtual screening of 'available' small molecules (with synthetic feasibility) in our 'in-house' library. A new molecular subsystem (quinoxalinones) was then theoretically selected as a promising lead series, and its derivatives subsequently synthesized, structurally characterized, and experimentally assayed by using in vitro screening that took into consideration a battery of five parasite-based assays. The chemicals 11(12) and 16 are the most active (hits) against apicomplexa (sporozoa) and mastigophora (flagellata) subphylum parasites, respectively. Both compounds depicted good activity in every protozoan in vitro panel and they did not show unspecific cytotoxicity on the host cells. The described technical framework seems to be a promising QSAR-classifier tool for the molecular discovery and development of novel classes of broad-antiprotozoan-spectrum drugs, which may meet the dual challenges posed by drug-resistant parasites and the rapid progression of protozoan illnesses. PMID:24513185

  5. Antiprotozoan lead discovery by aligning dry and wet screening: prediction, synthesis, and biological assay of novel quinoxalinones.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Martins Alho MA; Marrero-Ponce Y; Barigye SJ; Meneses-Marcel A; Machado Tugores Y; Montero-Torres A; Gómez-Barrio A; Nogal JJ; García-Sánchez RN; Vega MC; Rolón M; Martínez-Fernández AR; Escario JA; Pérez-Giménez F; Garcia-Domenech R; Rivera N; Mondragón R; Mondragón M; Ibarra-Velarde F; Lopez-Arencibia A; Martín-Navarro C; Lorenzo-Morales J; Cabrera-Serra MG; Piñero J; Tytgat J; Chicharro R; Arán VJ

    2014-03-01

    Protozoan parasites have been one of the most significant public health problems for centuries and several human infections caused by them have massive global impact. Most of the current drugs used to treat these illnesses have been used for decades and have many limitations such as the emergence of drug resistance, severe side-effects, low-to-medium drug efficacy, administration routes, cost, etc. These drugs have been largely neglected as models for drug development because they are majorly used in countries with limited resources and as a consequence with scarce marketing possibilities. Nowadays, there is a pressing need to identify and develop new drug-based antiprotozoan therapies. In an effort to overcome this problem, the main purpose of this study is to develop a QSARs-based ensemble classifier for antiprotozoan drug-like entities from a heterogeneous compounds collection. Here, we use some of the TOMOCOMD-CARDD molecular descriptors and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to derive individual linear classification functions in order to discriminate between antiprotozoan and non-antiprotozoan compounds as a way to enable the computational screening of virtual combinatorial datasets and/or drugs already approved. Firstly, we construct a wide-spectrum benchmark database comprising of 680 organic chemicals with great structural variability (254 of them antiprotozoan agents and 426 to drugs having other clinical uses). This series of compounds was processed by a k-means cluster analysis in order to design training and predicting sets. In total, seven discriminant functions were obtained, by using the whole set of atom-based linear indices. All the LDA-based QSAR models show accuracies above 85% in the training set and values of Matthews correlation coefficients (C) vary from 0.70 to 0.86. The external validation set shows rather-good global classifications of around 80% (92.05% for best equation). Later, we developed a multi-agent QSAR classification system, in which the individual QSAR outputs are the inputs of the aforementioned fusion approach. Finally, the fusion model was used for the identification of a novel generation of lead-like antiprotozoan compounds by using ligand-based virtual screening of 'available' small molecules (with synthetic feasibility) in our 'in-house' library. A new molecular subsystem (quinoxalinones) was then theoretically selected as a promising lead series, and its derivatives subsequently synthesized, structurally characterized, and experimentally assayed by using in vitro screening that took into consideration a battery of five parasite-based assays. The chemicals 11(12) and 16 are the most active (hits) against apicomplexa (sporozoa) and mastigophora (flagellata) subphylum parasites, respectively. Both compounds depicted good activity in every protozoan in vitro panel and they did not show unspecific cytotoxicity on the host cells. The described technical framework seems to be a promising QSAR-classifier tool for the molecular discovery and development of novel classes of broad-antiprotozoan-spectrum drugs, which may meet the dual challenges posed by drug-resistant parasites and the rapid progression of protozoan illnesses.

  6. Tumorsphere as an effective in vitro platform for screening anti-cancer stem cell drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Che-Hsin; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Wang, Bing-Yen; Chang, Wen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of cells within cancer tissues with tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis properties. CSCs also have been considered as the main cause of cancer recurrence. Targeting CSCs have been suggested as the key for successful treatment against cancer. Tumorsphere cultivation is based on culturing cancer cells onto ultralow attachment surface in serum-free media under the supplementation with growth factors such as epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Tumorsphere cultivation is widely used to analyze the self-renewal capability of CSCs and to enrich these cells from bulk cancer cells. This method also provides a reliable platform for screening potential anti-CSC agents. The in vitro anti-proliferation activity of potential agents selected from tumorsphere assay is more translatable into in vivo anti-tumorigenic activity compared with general monolayer culture. Tumorsphere assay can also measure the outcome of clinical trials for potential anti-cancer agents. In addition, tumorsphere assay may be a promising strategy in the innovation of future cancer therapeutica and may help in the screening of anti-cancer small-molecule chemicals. PMID:26527320

  7. Microplate alamar blue assay versus BACTEC 460 system for high-throughput screening of compounds against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, L; Franzblau, S G

    1997-01-01

    In response to the need for rapid, inexpensive, high-throughput assays for antimycobacterial drug screening, a microplate-based assay which uses Alamar blue reagent for determination of growth was evaluated. MICs of 30 antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, and Mycobacterium avium were determined in the microplate Alamar blue assay (MABA) with both visual and fluorometric readings and compared to MICs determined in the BACTEC 460 system. For all three mycobacterial strains, there was < or = 1 dilution difference between MABA and BACTEC median MICs in four replicate experiments for 25 to 27 of the 30 antimicrobics. Significant differences between MABA and BACTEC MICs were observed with 0, 2, and 5 of 30 antimicrobial agents against H37Rv, H37Ra, and M. avium, respectively. Overall, MICs determined either visually or fluorometrically in MABA were highly correlated with those determined in the BACTEC 460 system, and visual MABA and fluorometric MABA MICs were highly correlated. MICs of rifampin, rifabutin, minocycline, and clarithromycin were consistently lower for H37Ra compared to H37Rv in all assays but were similar for most other drugs. M. tuberculosis H37Ra may be a suitable surrogate for the more virulent H37Rv strain in primary screening of compounds for antituberculosis activity. MABA is sensitive, rapid, inexpensive, and nonradiometric and offers the potential for screening, with or without analytical instrumentation, large numbers of antimicrobial compounds against slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:9145860

  8. A high-throughput screening assay to identify bacterial antagonists against Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput antagonistic assay was developed to screen for bacterial isolates capable of controlling the maize fungal phytopathogen Fusarium verticillioides. This assay combines a straightforward methodology, in which the fungus is challenged with bacterial isolates in liquid medium, with a novel approach that uses the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) coupled to a fluorophore (Alexa-Fluor® 488) under the commercial name of WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. The assay is performed in a 96-well plate format, which reduces the required laboratory space and streamlines quantitation and automation of the process, making it fast and accurate. The basis of our assay is that fungal biomass can be assessed by WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate staining, which recognizes the chitin in the fungal cell wall and thus permits the identification of potential antagonistic bacteria that inhibit fungal growth. This principle was validated by chitin-competition binding assays against WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate; confocal laser microscopy confirmed that the fluorescent WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate binds to the chitin of the fungal cell wall. The majority of bacterial isolates did not bind to the WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. Furthermore, including washing steps significantly reduced any bacterial staining to background levels, even in the rare cases where bacterial isolates were capable of binding to WGA. Confirmatory conventional agar plate antagonistic assays were also conducted to validate our technique. We are now successfully employing this large-scale antagonistic assay as a pre-screening step for potential fungal antagonists in extensive bacteria collections (on the order of thousands of isolates). PMID:23787812

  9. Screening and identification of inhibitors against influenza A virus from a US drug collection of 1280 drugs.

    PubMed

    An, Liwei; Liu, Rui; Tang, Wei; Wu, Jian-Guo; Chen, Xulin

    2014-09-01

    Infection with influenza A virus is still a global concern since it causes significant mortality, morbidity and economic loss. New burst pandemics and rapid emergence of drug-resistance strains in recent years call for novel antiviral therapies. One promising way to overcome this problem is searching new inhibitors among thousands of drugs approved in the clinic for the treatment of different diseases or approved to be safe by clinical trials. In the present work, a collection of 1280 compounds, most of which have been clinically used in human or animal, were screened for anti-influenza activity and 41 hits (SI>4.0) were obtained. Next the 18 hit compounds with SI >10.0 were tested for antiviral activity against 7 other influenza virus strains in canine-originated MDCK cells, 9 compounds exhibited broad antiviral spectrum. The antiviral effects of the 9 compounds were also confirmed in human-originated A549 cells and chicken-originated DF1 cells, by infectious virus yield reduction assay and indirect immunofluorescent assay. Results from the time of addition assay showed that the 9 candidates impaired different stages of influenza virus life cycle, indicating they are novel inhibitors with different mechanisms compared with the existing M2 ion-channel blockers or neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors. Taken together, our findings provide 9 novel drug candidates for the treatment of influenza virus infection. Further mechanism of action study of these inhibitors may lead to the discovery of new anti-influenza targets and structure-activity relationship (SAR) study can be initiated to improve the efficacy of these new classes of influenza inhibitors. PMID:24971493

  10. Human Papillomavirus Assays and Cytology in Primary Cervical Screening of Women Aged 30 Years and Above.

    PubMed

    Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    In women aged ≥30 years, Human Papillomavirus testing will replace cytology for primary cervical screening. We compared Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART, and APTIMA HPV assays with cytology on 2869 SurePath samples from women undergoing routine screening at 30-65 years in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women with cytological abnormalities were managed according to routine recommendations, with 92% completeness. Those with cytology-normal/HPV-positive samples (on any of the four assays) were invited for repeated cytology and HPV testing in 1.5 year, and 58% had additional testing. HPV testing detected more ≥CIN3 than cytology (HC2: 35, cobas, CLART: 37, APTIMA: 34, cytology: 31), although statistically the differences were not significant. Cobas and CLART detected significantly more ≥CIN2 than cytology (cobas, CLART: 49, cytology: 39). The proportion of women with false-positive test results (positive test results without ≥CIN3) varied between 3.3% with cytology and 14.9% with cobas. All HPV assays led to significantly more false-positive tests, whereas compared to HC2 cobas and CLART were associated with a significantly higher and APTIMA with a significantly lower proportion. Detection of CIN1 was particularly increased for the three DNA assays. With APTIMA combined with cytological triage, about 20% more women were referred for colposcopy than with cytology screening. With the three DNA assays, the increase was ≥50%. The number of women with repeated testing was twice as high with APTIMA and almost five times as high with cobas compared to cytology. To our knowledge, Horizon was the only study set in routine practice that compared more than two HPV assays in the same women while also ascertaining the histological status of women with normal cytology/HPV-positive test results. HPV-based screening of Danish women aged 30-65 detected more high-grade CIN but decreased the screening specificity, and increased the demand for additional testing. PMID:26789267

  11. Human Papillomavirus Assays and Cytology in Primary Cervical Screening of Women Aged 30 Years and Above

    PubMed Central

    Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    In women aged ≥30 years, Human Papillomavirus testing will replace cytology for primary cervical screening. We compared Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART, and APTIMA HPV assays with cytology on 2869 SurePath samples from women undergoing routine screening at 30–65 years in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women with cytological abnormalities were managed according to routine recommendations, with 92% completeness. Those with cytology-normal/HPV-positive samples (on any of the four assays) were invited for repeated cytology and HPV testing in 1.5 year, and 58% had additional testing. HPV testing detected more ≥CIN3 than cytology (HC2: 35, cobas, CLART: 37, APTIMA: 34, cytology: 31), although statistically the differences were not significant. Cobas and CLART detected significantly more ≥CIN2 than cytology (cobas, CLART: 49, cytology: 39). The proportion of women with false-positive test results (positive test results without ≥CIN3) varied between 3.3% with cytology and 14.9% with cobas. All HPV assays led to significantly more false-positive tests, whereas compared to HC2 cobas and CLART were associated with a significantly higher and APTIMA with a significantly lower proportion. Detection of CIN1 was particularly increased for the three DNA assays. With APTIMA combined with cytological triage, about 20% more women were referred for colposcopy than with cytology screening. With the three DNA assays, the increase was ≥50%. The number of women with repeated testing was twice as high with APTIMA and almost five times as high with cobas compared to cytology. To our knowledge, Horizon was the only study set in routine practice that compared more than two HPV assays in the same women while also ascertaining the histological status of women with normal cytology/HPV-positive test results. HPV-based screening of Danish women aged 30–65 detected more high-grade CIN but decreased the screening specificity, and increased the demand for additional testing. PMID:26789267

  12. Novel Phenotypic Outcomes Identified for a Public Collection of Approved Drugs from a Publicly Accessible Panel of Assays

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Sarah; Willard, Francis S.; Heidler, Steven; Peery, Robert B.; Oler, Jennifer; Chu, Shaoyou; Southall, Noel; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Smallwood, Jeffrey; Huang, Ruili; Guha, Rajarshi; Jadhav, Ajit; Cox, Karen; Austin, Christopher P.; Simeonov, Anton; Sittampalam, G. Sitta; Husain, Saba; Franklin, Natalie; Wild, David J.; Yang, Jeremy J.; Sutherland, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic assays have a proven track record for generating leads that become first-in-class therapies. Whole cell assays that inform on a phenotype or mechanism also possess great potential in drug repositioning studies by illuminating new activities for the existing pharmacopeia. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) pharmaceutical collection (NPC) is the largest reported collection of approved small molecule therapeutics that is available for screening in a high-throughput setting. Via a wide-ranging collaborative effort, this library was analyzed in the Open Innovation Drug Discovery (OIDD) phenotypic assay modules publicly offered by Lilly. The results of these tests are publically available online at www.ncats.nih.gov/expertise/preclinical/pd2 and via the PubChem Database (https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) (AID 1117321). Phenotypic outcomes for numerous drugs were confirmed, including sulfonylureas as insulin secretagogues and the anti-angiogenesis actions of multikinase inhibitors sorafenib, axitinib and pazopanib. Several novel outcomes were also noted including the Wnt potentiating activities of rotenone and the antifolate class of drugs, and the anti-angiogenic activity of cetaben. PMID:26177200

  13. Rapid screening for high-titer retroviral packaging cell lines using an in situ fluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Green, Bronwyn J; Rasko, John E J

    2002-06-10

    The production of high-titer recombinant retrovirus is a major determinant of the efficiency of target cell transduction. Titer assessment for producer clones that contain vectors encoding proteins that can be detected using fluorescence is typically performed by flow cytometry. However, this method is both costly and labor intensive, severely limiting the number of clones that can be screened for each construct. In this report we describe a rapid, high-throughput screening method for viral quantitation of producer clone supernatant on target cells using a 96-well format. Plates were assayed using a multichannel fluorescent reader to determine the percentage of target cells expressing green (EGFP), cyan (ECFP), yellow (EYFP) or red (DsRed) fluorescent reporter genes, or their combinations. The relative fluorescence counts of target cells incubated with viral supernatant from each packaging cell clone correlated with the level of transduction, and hence, viral titer. Correlation of cell fluorescence between the fluorescent plate reader assay and flow cytometric assessment was high (r(2) = 0.96). Independent detection of different fluorescent reporters enabled multiplex assays to be performed. Simultaneous cell density analysis using alamarBlue fluorescence was proportional to cell number per well (r(2) = 1.0). In situ titer assessment of 66 FLYRD packaging cells encoding the EGFP reporter gene identified clones (>10(7) colony forming units per milliliter [CFU/ml]) that provided titers up to sevenfold over the parent population. The application of this rapid, high-throughput screening method overcomes many limitations imposed by the current flow cytometric screening method. This robust assay maximizes the chance of identifying rare high-titer packaging clones and offers a further opportunity to optimize gene transfer protocols. PMID:12067434

  14. Emerging Approaches to GPCR Ligand Screening for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Punita; Ghosh, Eshan; Shukla, Arun K

    2015-11-01

    The superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents the largest class of cell surface receptors and, thus, a prominent family of drug targets. Recently, there has been significant progress in determination of GPCR crystal structures. The structure-based ligand discovery of GPCRs is emerging as a powerful path to drug development. Sensor surface-immobilized GPCRs can identify direct receptor-ligand interactions of a range of chemical libraries. This type of screening shows great promise as an alternative strategy for ligand discovery. Here, we summarize the most recent developments of structure- and sensor-based GPCR ligand discovery. We also highlight certain areas where GPCRs harbor great potential for the development of novel therapeutics, emphasizing the strategic approaches that may yield significant breakthroughs. PMID:26481827

  15. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  16. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  17. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  19. Monitoring drug target engagement in cells and tissues using the cellular thermal shift assay.

    PubMed

    Martinez Molina, Daniel; Jafari, Rozbeh; Ignatushchenko, Marina; Seki, Takahiro; Larsson, E Andreas; Dan, Chen; Sreekumar, Lekshmy; Cao, Yihai; Nordlund, Pr

    2013-07-01

    The efficacy of therapeutics is dependent on a drug binding to its cognate target. Optimization of target engagement by drugs in cells is often challenging, because drug binding cannot be monitored inside cells. We have developed a method for evaluating drug binding to target proteins in cells and tissue samples. This cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) is based on the biophysical principle of ligand-induced thermal stabilization of target proteins. Using this assay, we validated drug binding for a set of important clinical targets and monitored processes of drug transport and activation, off-target effects and drug resistance in cancer cell lines, as well as drug distribution in tissues. CETSA is likely to become a valuable tool for the validation and optimization of drug target engagement. PMID:23828940

  20. Investigation of the incidence of "undesirable" molecular moieties for high-throughput screening compound libraries in marketed drug compounds.

    PubMed

    Axerio-Cilies, Peter; Castañeda, Ivan P; Mirza, Amin; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2009-03-01

    A database of 1070 marketed drug compounds was compiled and analyzed in order to assess the occurrence of moieties described in the literature as "undesirable" for high-throughput screening compound libraries due to their ability to perturb assay formats. The study revealed a total of 277 compounds, 26% of the database, contained at least one of the moieties. As some of the drug compounds contained more than one "undesirable" moiety, the total number was 352. Electrophilic reactive groups, particularly aliphatic esters, were the most abundant type with 55% of the total. Half of the drug compounds incorporating the "undesirable" moieties were synthetic organic molecules. These findings suggest that "undesirable" moieties do not pose a major hindrance during clinical trials, the most expensive phase of drug development. In addition, their early elimination in the preclinical stage excludes large regions of known drug space due to the reliance on biochemical and cell-based assays. In general, it can be concluded that compounds with "undesirable" moieties should not simply be eliminated from compound screening libraries but rather be flagged as potentially problematic. A possible solution is to segregate the compounds containing suspect moieties and screen them when deemed appropriate. PMID:18692938

  1. Miniature Short Hairpin RNA Screens to Characterize Antiproliferative Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kittanakom, Saranya; Arnoldo, Anthony; Brown, Kevin R.; Wallace, Iain; Kunavisarut, Tada; Torti, Dax; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Surendra, Anuradha; Moffat, Jason; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2013-01-01

    The application of new proteomics and genomics technologies support a view in which few drugs act solely by inhibiting a single cellular target. Indeed, drug activity is modulated by complex, often incompletely understood cellular mechanisms. Therefore, efforts to decipher mode of action through genetic perturbation such as RNAi typically yields “hits” that fall into several categories. Of particular interest to the present study, we aimed to characterize secondary activities of drugs on cells. Inhibiting a known target can result in clinically relevant synthetic phenotypes. In one scenario, drug perturbation could, for example, improperly activate a protein that normally inhibits a particular kinase. In other cases, additional, lower affinity targets can be inhibited as in the example of inhibition of c-Kit observed in Bcr-Abl−positive cells treated with Gleevec. Drug transport and metabolism also play an important role in the way any chemicals act within the cells. Finally, RNAi per se can also affect cell fitness by more general off-target effects, e.g., via the modulation of apoptosis or DNA damage repair. Regardless of the root cause of these unwanted effects, understanding the scope of a drug’s activity and polypharmacology is essential for better understanding its mechanism(s) of action, and such information can guide development of improved therapies. We describe a rapid, cost-effective approach to characterize primary and secondary effects of small-molecules by using small-scale libraries of virally integrated short hairpin RNAs. We demonstrate this principle using a “minipool” composed of shRNAs that target the genes encoding the reported protein targets of approved drugs. Among the 28 known reported drug−target pairs, we successfully identify 40% of the targets described in the literature and uncover several unanticipated drug−target interactions based on drug-induced synthetic lethality. We provide a detailed protocol for performing such screens and for analyzing the data. This cost-effective approach to mammalian knockdown screens, combined with the increasing maturation of RNAi technology will expand the accessibility of similar approaches in academic settings. PMID:23797109

  2. Cellular LanthaScreen and beta-lactamase reporter assays for high-throughput screening of JAK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robers, Matthew B; Machleidt, Thomas; Carlson, Coby B; Bi, Kun

    2008-08-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 pathway is responsible for regulation of cellular responses to a number of cytokines and growth factors. In hematopoietic cells, growth factors such as granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, interleukin-3, and erythropoietin induce the activation of JAK2, which leads to the phosphorylation, dimerization, and transactivation of STAT5 proteins. Dysregulation of JAK2 by activating mutations such as JAK2V617F results in constitutive phosphorylation of STAT5 and has been linked to numerous myeloproliferative disorders such as polycythemia vera. A cellular LanthaScreen (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA) time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer assay for wild-type JAK2 activity was developed. This assay utilized the growth factor-dependent human erythroleukemia TF1 cell line engineered to express a green fluorescent protein-STAT5 fusion protein. Furthermore, a complementary beta-lactamase reporter gene assay was developed to analyze the transcriptional activity of STAT5 downstream of JAK2 in TF1 cells. The same technologies were applied to the development of cellular assays for the interrogation of the disease-relevant JAK2V617F activating mutant. A small molecule inhibitor and Stealth (Invitrogen Corp.) RNA interference oligonucleotides were used to confirm the involvement of JAK2. Our results suggest that these cellular assays and validation tools represent powerful integrated methods for the analysis of physiological and disease-relevant JAK/STAT pathways within the physiological cellular context. PMID:18694336

  3. Continuous colorimetric assay that enables high-throughput screening of N-acetylamino acid racemases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carrón, Guiomar; Fleming, Toni; Holt-Tiffin, Karen E; Campopiano, Dominic J

    2015-04-01

    N-Acetyl amino acid racemases (NAAARs) have demonstrated their potential in the enzymatic synthesis of chiral amino acids, molecules of significant biotechnology interest. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes by engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. Previous engineering of the NAAAR from Amycolatopsis Ts-1-60 was achieved by relying on an in vivo selection system that linked the viability of an E. coli L-methionine auxotroph to the activity of the improved enzyme. However, this assay was only suitable for the screening of N-acetyl-D-methionine, therefore limiting the potential to evolve this enzyme toward other natural or non-natural acetylated amino acids. Here, we report the optimization and application of a spectrophotometric microtiter-plate-based assay for NAAAR. The assay is based on the detection of the amino acid reaction product formed by hydrolysis of the N-acylated substrate by an L-amino acid acylase and its subsequent oxidation by an FAD-dependent L-amino acid oxidase (L-AAO). Cofactor recycling of the L-AAO leads to the formation of hydrogen peroxide which is easily monitored using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and o-dianisidine. This method allowed for the determination of the kinetic parameters of NAAAR and led to the identification of N-acetyl-D-naphthylalanine as a novel NAAAR substrate. This robust method is also suitable for the high-throughput screening of NAAAR mutant gene libraries directly from cell lysates. PMID:25716802

  4. Application of the E-screen assay to test for oestrogenically active substances in swine feed.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, N; Körner, W; Postupka, S; Brunn, H

    2001-12-01

    A pig breeder in central Hesse (Germany) noticed the occurrence of enlarged vulvae in female piglets. Intoxication with oestrogenically active substances by contamination of two feed mixes ingested by the mother sows appeared to be a possible cause. Using a combined technique of the DFG analytical method S19 and the E-screen assay, two feed samples were found to contain powerful oestrogenically active compounds. By co-incubation with the anti-oestrogen tamoxifen it could be clearly demonstrated that the oestrogenic activity was mediated by the oestrogen receptor. These results demonstrate that use of the E-screen assay in combination with the DFG analytical method S19 provides a simple and readily usable prescreening method for the routine detection of oestrogenically active compounds in animal feed. The results from the E-screen assay show that the sows ingested 10-80 microg oestradiol equivalents per day in their feed. Because of the bioavailability of these substances, the oestrogenic active compounds seem to be transferred into the milk and passed to the piglets via suckling. The milk of the dam appears to contain this substance in biologically active form and at such high concentrations that the female piglets had enlarged vulvae. PMID:11906561

  5. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  6. Bringing the light to high throughput screening: use of optogenetic tools for the development of recombinant cellular assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agus, Viviana; Di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, Jean Francois; Mondini, Anna; Tremolada, Sara; Montag, Katharina; Scarabottolo, Lia; Redaelli, Loredana; Lohmer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The use of light-activated proteins represents a powerful tool to control biological processes with high spatial and temporal precision. These so called "optogenetic" technologies have been successfully validated in many recombinant systems, and have been widely applied to the study of cellular mechanisms in intact tissues or behaving animals; to do that, complex, high-intensity, often home-made instrumentations were developed to achieve the optimal power and precision of light stimulation. In our study we sought to determine if this optical modulation can be obtained also in a miniaturized format, such as a 384-well plate, using the instrumentations normally dedicated to fluorescence analysis in High Throughput Screening (HTS) activities, such as for example the FLIPR (Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader) instrument. We successfully generated optogenetic assays for the study of different ion channel targets: the CaV1.3 calcium channel was modulated by the light-activated Channelrhodopsin-2, the HCN2 cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel was modulated by the light activated bPAC adenylyl cyclase, and finally the genetically encoded voltage indicator ArcLight was efficiently used to measure potassium, sodium or chloride channel activity. Our results showed that stable, robust and miniaturized cellular assays can be developed using different optogenetic tools, and efficiently modulated by the FLIPR instrument LEDs in a 384-well format. The spatial and temporal resolution delivered by this technology might enormously advantage the early stages of drug discovery, leading to the identification of more physiological and effective drug molecules.

  7. A Data Analysis Pipeline Accounting for Artifacts in Tox21 Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Sedykh, Alexander; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    A main goal of the U.S. Tox21 program is to profile a 10K-compound library for activity against a panel of stress-related and nuclear receptor signaling pathway assays using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. However, assay artifacts, including nonreproducible signals and assay interference (e.g., autofluorescence), complicate compound activity interpretation. To address these issues, we have developed a data analysis pipeline that includes an updated signal noise–filtering/curation protocol and an assay interference flagging system. To better characterize various types of signals, we adopted a weighted version of the area under the curve (wAUC) to quantify the amount of activity across the tested concentration range in combination with the assay-dependent point-of-departure (POD) concentration. Based on the 32 Tox21 qHTS assays analyzed, we demonstrate that signal profiling using wAUC affords the best reproducibility (Pearson's r = 0.91) in comparison with the POD (0.82) only or the AC50 (i.e., half-maximal activity concentration, 0.81). Among the activity artifacts characterized, cytotoxicity is the major confounding factor; on average, about 8% of Tox21 compounds are affected, whereas autofluorescence affects less than 0.5%. To facilitate data evaluation, we implemented two graphical user interface applications, allowing users to rapidly evaluate the in vitro activity of Tox21 compounds. PMID:25904095

  8. A Data Analysis Pipeline Accounting for Artifacts in Tox21 Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Sedykh, Alexander; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    A main goal of the U.S. Tox21 program is to profile a 10K-compound library for activity against a panel of stress-related and nuclear receptor signaling pathway assays using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. However, assay artifacts, including nonreproducible signals and assay interference (e.g., autofluorescence), complicate compound activity interpretation. To address these issues, we have developed a data analysis pipeline that includes an updated signal noise-filtering/curation protocol and an assay interference flagging system. To better characterize various types of signals, we adopted a weighted version of the area under the curve (wAUC) to quantify the amount of activity across the tested concentration range in combination with the assay-dependent point-of-departure (POD) concentration. Based on the 32 Tox21 qHTS assays analyzed, we demonstrate that signal profiling using wAUC affords the best reproducibility (Pearson's r = 0.91) in comparison with the POD (0.82) only or the AC(50) (i.e., half-maximal activity concentration, 0.81). Among the activity artifacts characterized, cytotoxicity is the major confounding factor; on average, about 8% of Tox21 compounds are affected, whereas autofluorescence affects less than 0.5%. To facilitate data evaluation, we implemented two graphical user interface applications, allowing users to rapidly evaluate the in vitro activity of Tox21 compounds. PMID:25904095

  9. Validation of FRET Assay for the Screening of Growth Inhibitors of Escherichia coli Reveals Elongasome Assembly Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    van der Ploeg, René; Goudelis, Spyridon Theodoros; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria demands the development of new antibiotics against preferably new targets. The common approach is to test compounds for their ability to kill bacteria or to design molecules that inhibit essential protein activities in vitro. In the first case, the mode of action of the drug is unknown and in the second case, it is not known whether the compound will pass the impermeable barrier of the bacterial envelope. We developed an assay that detects the target of a compound, as well as its ability to pass the membrane(s) simultaneously. The Escherichia coli cytoskeletal protein MreB recruits protein complexes (elongasomes) that are essential for cell envelope growth. An in cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) assay was developed to detect the interaction between MreB molecules and between MreB and the elongasome proteins RodZ, RodA and PBP2. Inhibition of the polymerization of MreB by S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl) isothiourea (A22) or of the activity of PBP2 by mecilinam resulted in loss or reduction of all measured interactions. This suggests that the interactions between the elongasome proteins are governed by a combination of weak affinities and substrate availability. This validated in cell FRET assay can be used to screen for cell envelope growth inhibitors. PMID:26263980

  10. Development of a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for ATM kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kexiao; Shelat, Anang A; Guy, R Kiplin; Kastan, Michael B

    2014-04-01

    The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein kinase is a major regulator of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA lesions that can be caused by ionizing irradiation (IR), oxidative damage, or exposure to certain chemical agents. In response to DSBs, the ATM kinase is activated and subsequently phosphorylates numerous downstream substrates, including p53, Chk2, BRCA1, and KAP1, which affect processes such as cell cycle progression and DNA repair. Numerous studies have demonstrated that loss of ATM function results in enhanced sensitivity to ionizing irradiation in clinically relevant dose ranges, suggesting that ATM kinase is an attractive therapeutic target for enhancing tumor cell kill with radiotherapy. Previously identified small-molecule ATM kinase inhibitors, such as CP466722 and Ku55933, were identified using in vitro kinase assays carried out with recombinant ATM kinase isolated from mammalian cells. Since it has not been feasible to express full-length recombinant ATM in bacterial or baculovirus systems, a robust in vitro screening tool has been lacking. We have developed a cell-based assay that is robust, straightforward, and sensitive. Using this high-throughput assay, we screened more than 7000 compounds and discovered additional small molecules that inhibit the ATM kinase and further validated these hits by secondary assays. PMID:24464432

  11. Screening applications in drug discovery based on microfluidic technology.

    PubMed

    Eribol, P; Uguz, A K; Ulgen, K O

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics has been the focus of interest for the last two decades for all the advantages such as low chemical consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, better control of mass and heat transfer, downsizing a bench-top laboratory to a chip, i.e., lab-on-a-chip, and many others it has offered. Microfluidic technology quickly found applications in the pharmaceutical industry, which demands working with leading edge scientific and technological breakthroughs, as drug screening and commercialization are very long and expensive processes and require many tests due to unpredictable results. This review paper is on drug candidate screening methods with microfluidic technology and focuses specifically on fabrication techniques and materials for the microchip, types of flow such as continuous or discrete and their advantages, determination of kinetic parameters and their comparison with conventional systems, assessment of toxicities and cytotoxicities, concentration generations for high throughput, and the computational methods that were employed. An important conclusion of this review is that even though microfluidic technology has been in this field for around 20 years there is still room for research and development, as this cutting edge technology requires ingenuity to design and find solutions for each individual case. Recent extensions of these microsystems are microengineered organs-on-chips and organ arrays. PMID:26865904

  12. Development of an Evidence biochip array kit for the multiplex screening of more than 20 anthelmintic drugs.

    PubMed

    Porter, J; O'Loan, N; Bell, B; Mahoney, J; McGarrity, M; McConnell, R I; Fitzgerald, S P

    2012-07-01

    Anthelmintic drugs are used in clinical and veterinary practice for the treatment of infections caused by parasitic worms. Their extensive use in food-producing animals can cause the presence of residues in food. For consumer protection it is necessary to monitor the levels of anthelmintic residues to ensure that they remain within the legally permitted maximum acceptable concentrations. For this purpose, the use of multiplex screening methods is advantageous. Biochip array technology allows the simultaneous determination of multiple analytes from a single sample at a single point in time. This study reports the development of an Evidence biochip array for the multiplex screening of anthelmintic drugs. Simultaneous competitive chemiluminescent immunoassays are employed. The solid support and vessel is the biochip, which contains an array of discrete test sites. The assays were applied to the semiautomated bench-top analyser Evidence Investigator. The aminobenzimidazoles assay detected aminomebendazole, albendazole 2-aminosulphone and aminoflubendazole, the avermectins assay detected emamectin benzoate, eprinomectin, abamectin, ivermectin and doramectin, the benzimidazoles assay detected albendazole sulphone, albendazole, albendazole sulphoxide, oxibendazole, oxfendazole and flubendazole, the thiabendazole assay detected cambendazole, thiabendazole and 5-hydroxythiabendazole and the triclabendazole assay detected ketotriclabendazole, triclabendazole and triclabendazole sulphoxide. The limits of detection ranged from 0.3 ppb (aminobenzimidazoles) to 2.0 ppb (levamisole) in milk and from 0.15 ppb (aminobenzimidazoles) to 6.5 ppb (levamisole) in tissue. The average recovery range was 71-135 %. This multianalytical approach on a biochip platform is applicable to the screening of more than 20 anthelmintic drugs in different food matrices, leading to consolidation of tests and enhancement of the test result output. PMID:22566198

  13. Screening and quantitative determination of drugs of abuse in diluted urine by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Hermansson, Sigurd; Betnér, Ingvar; Spigset, Olav; Falch, Berit Margrethe Hasle

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a fast, robust and specific UPLC-MS/MS screening platform for the determination and quantification of a variety of commonly used drugs of abuse in urine, i.e. a high-throughput quantitative analysis. Substances in the drug classes opioids, central nervous system stimulants and benzodiazepines and related agents were included in addition to cannabis and pregabalin, a total of 35 different analytes. Based on the concentrations and the physico-chemical properties of the substances, three UPLC-MS/MS methods were developed in parallel. Prior to analysis, sample preparation consisted of two different simple dilutions with 60 and 100 μL urine, respectively, using a Tecan Freedom Evo pipetting robot platform. A Waters Xevo TQ-S tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to a Waters I-class UPLC was used for quantitative analysis of one quantitative and one qualifying MRM transition for each analyte, except for tramadol for which the metabolite O-desmethyl-tramadol was included in the MRM method to confirm tramadol identity. Deuterated analogs were included as internal standards. The between-assay relative standard deviations varied from 2% to 11% and the limits of quantification were in the range 1-200 ng/mL for the various analytes. After development and initial testing, the method has been successfully implemented and routinely used at our hospital for quantitative screening of drugs of abuse in more than 35,000 urinary samples. PMID:24413020

  14. Assessment of the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network Standardized Procedure for In Vitro Malaria Drug Sensitivity Testing Using SYBR Green Assay for Field Samples with Various Initial Parasitemia Levels.

    PubMed

    Cheruiyot, Agnes C; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Lee, Patricia J; Yeda, Redemptah A; Okello, Charles O; Leed, Susan E; Talwar, Mayank; Murthy, Tushar; Gaona, Heather W; Hickman, Mark R; Akala, Hoseah M; Kamau, Edwin; Johnson, Jacob D

    2016-04-01

    The malaria SYBR green assay, which is used to profilein vitrodrug susceptibility ofPlasmodium falciparum, is a reliable drug screening and surveillance tool. Malaria field surveillance efforts provide isolates with various low levels of parasitemia. To be advantageous, malaria drug sensitivity assays should perform reproducibly among various starting parasitemia levels rather than at one fixed initial value. We examined the SYBR green assay standardized procedure developed by the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) for its sensitivity and ability to accurately determine the drug concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50% (IC50) in samples with a range of initial parasitemia levels. The initial sensitivity determination of the WWARN procedure yielded a detection limit of 0.019% parasitemia.P. falciparumlaboratory strains and field isolates with various levels of initial parasitemia were then subjected to a range of doses of common antimalarials. The IC50s were comparable for laboratory strains with between 0.0375% and 0.6% parasitemia and for field isolates with between 0.075% and 0.6% parasitemia for all drugs tested. Furthermore, assay quality (Z') analysis indicated that the WWARN procedure displays high robustness, allowing for drug testing of malaria field samples within the derived range of initial parasitemia. The use of the WWARN procedure should allow for the inclusion of more malaria field samples in malaria drug sensitivity screens that would have otherwise been excluded due to low initial parasitemia levels. PMID:26856829

  15. A high-throughput screening microplate test for the interaction of drugs with P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Garrigues, Alexia; Nugier, Jérôme; Orlowski, Stéphane; Ezan, Eric

    2002-06-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a multidrug transporter responsible for resistance to anticancer chemotherapy and physiologically involved in absorption, distribution, and excretion of a large number of hydrophobic xenobiotics. P-gp exhibits both an ATPase activity correlated with its drug transport function and a basal ATPase activity in the absence of any drug. We have developed a high-throughput screening test to detect specific interactions between drugs and P-gp. We took into account the existence of multiple binding sites on P-gp to propose and validate an optimized strategy, based on the modulation of the basal ATPase activity of P-gp and of the ATPase activity stimulated by three reference substrates (verapamil, vinblastine, and progesterone). The ATPase activity measurements were performed on P-gp-containing membrane vesicles from actinomycin-D-selected hamster DC-3F lung fibroblasts by a spectrophotometric method based on continuous monitoring of ADP formation, regenerated in ATP by a coupled enzyme system. This assay may be performed on 96- or 384-well microtiter plates. When applying this ATPase assay to 41 compounds known from the literature for their interaction with P-gp, 95% of them were found to be positive, whereas only 78% were positive when considering solely the modulation of the basal activity. PMID:12018951

  16. High Throughput Screening in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Drug Discovery to Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gintjee, Thomas J.J.; Magh, Alvin S.H.; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25405319

  17. Estrogenic activity of constituents of underarm deodorants determined by E-Screen assay.

    PubMed

    Lange, Claudia; Kuch, Bertram; Metzger, Jörg W

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether different kinds of underarm deodorants commercially available in Germany might contain substances with estrogenic potential which after use enter the aquatic environment via wastewater. Twenty five deodorants produced by ten different manufacturers in the form of sprays, roll-ons and sticks were investigated using an in vitro-test system (E-Screen assay) for the determination of estrogenic activity based on the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Seven out of ten spray deodorant samples showed a quantifiable estrogenic activity. In the case of the sticks and roll-ons it was only one out of six and one out of nine, respectively. The 17β-estradiol equivalent concentrations (EEQs) of the samples ranged from 0.1 ng g(-1) to 9 ng g(-1) deodorant. Spray deodorant samples showed the highest activities in the E-Screen assay compared to the stick and roll-on deodorants. In order to identify substances possibly contributing to the observed biological activity the samples were additionally analyzed by GC/MS. The obtained results of this non-target screening led to the selection of 62 single substances present in the deodorants which for their part were analyzed by E-Screen assay. Eight of these single substances, all of them fragrances, showed estrogenic effects with estradiol equivalence factors (EEFs) similar to parabens, a group of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters commonly used as preservatives in personal care products, which are known to have a slight estrogenic effect. Thus, these fragrances are obviously responsible to a substantial degree for the observed estrogenic activity of the deodorants. PMID:24875918

  18. Use of external metabolizing systems when testing for endocrine disruption in the T-screen assay

    SciTech Connect

    Taxvig, Camilla Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Nellemann, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Although, it is well-established that information on the metabolism of a substance is important in the evaluation of its toxic potential, there is limited experience with incorporating metabolic aspects into in vitro tests for endocrine disrupters. The aim of the current study was a) to study different in vitro systems for biotransformation of ten known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDs): five azole fungicides, three parabens and 2 phthalates, b) to determine possible changes in the ability of the EDs to bind and activate the thyroid receptor (TR) in the in vitro T-screen assay after biotransformation and c) to investigate the endogenous metabolic capacity of the GH3 cells, the cell line used in the T-screen assay, which is a proliferation assay used for the in vitro detection of agonistic and antagonistic properties of compounds at the level of the TR. The two in vitro metabolizing systems tested the human liver S9 mix and the PCB-induced rat microsomes gave an almost complete metabolic transformation of the tested parabens and phthalates. No marked difference the effects in the T-screen assay was observed between the parent compounds and the effects of the tested metabolic extracts. The GH3 cells themselves significantly metabolized the two tested phthalates dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). Overall the results and qualitative data from the current study show that an in vitro metabolizing system using liver S9 or microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic and toxicokinetic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects.

  19. Strategies for absorption screening in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Bohets, H; Annaert, P; Mannens, G; Van Beijsterveldt, L; Anciaux, K; Verboven, P; Meuldermans, W; Lavrijsen, K

    2001-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the current approaches to evaluate drug absorption potential in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Methods discussed include in silico models, artificial membranes as absorption models, in vitro models such as the Ussing chamber and Caco-2 monolayers, in situ rat intestinal perfusion and in vivo absorption studies. In silico models such as iDEA can help optimizing chemical synthesis since the fraction absorbed (Fa) can be predicted based on structural characteristics only. A more accurate prediction of Fa can be obtained by feeding the iDEA model with Caco-2 permeability data and solubility data at various pH's. Permeability experiments with artificial membranes such as the filter-IAM technology are high-throughput and offer the possibility to group compounds according to a low and a high permeability. Highly permeable compounds, however, need to be further evaluated in Caco-2 cells, since artificial membranes lack active transport systems and efflux mechanisms such as P-glycoprotein (PgP). Caco-2 and other "intestinal-like" cell lines (MDCK, TC-7, HT29-MTX, 2/4/A1) permit to perform mechanistic studies and identify drug-drug interactions at the level of PgP. The everted sac and Ussing chamber techniques are more advanced models in the sense that they can provide additional information with respect to intestinal metabolism. In situ rat intestinal perfusion is a reliable technique to investigate drug absorption potential in combination with intestinal metabolism, however, it is time consuming, and therefore not suited for screening purposes. Finally, in vivo absorption in animals can be estimated from bioavailability studies (ratio of the plasma AUC after oral and i.v. administration). The role of the liver in affecting bioavailability can be evaluated by portal vein sampling experiments in dogs. PMID:11899103

  20. Comparison of three assays for genetic effects of antineoplastic drugs on cancer patients and their nurses

    SciTech Connect

    Krepinsky, A. ); Bryant, D.W.; Davison, L.; McCalla, D.R. ); Young, B. ); Heddle, J. ); Douglas, G. ); Michalko, K. )

    1990-01-01

    Three assays have been compared for their ability to detect genetic damage caused by antineoplastic drugs in cancer patients and possible damage in the nurses who administered these drugs. The assays were sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay on urine. Three comparisons were made: (1) patients before versus after treatment; (2) the administering nurses immediately after their work period versus after a few days off that followed (work and off-work); (3) the exposed nurses versus other nurses who did not administer antineoplastic drugs (controls). The SCE assay did not distinguish between the work and off-work samples in either the exposed or control nurses. Chromosomal aberration was the only assay which showed significant difference between the two samples of the exposed nurses and, consequently, between the exposed and control nurses. There is no evidence that the increase was connected to occupational exposure.

  1. Virtual screen for repurposing approved and experimental drugs for candidate inhibitors of EBOLA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Veljkovic, Veljko; Loiseau, Philippe M.; Figadere, Bruno; Glisic, Sanja; Veljkovic, Nevena; Perovic, Vladimir R.; Cavanaugh, David P.; Branch, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus epidemic has presented numerous challenges with respect to control and treatment because there are no approved drugs or vaccines for the Ebola virus disease (EVD). Herein is proposed simple theoretical criterion for fast virtual screening of molecular libraries for candidate inhibitors of Ebola virus infection. We performed a repurposing screen of 6438 drugs from DrugBank using this criterion and selected 267 approved and 382 experimental drugs as candidates for treatment of EVD including 15 anti-malarial drugs and 32 antibiotics. An open source Web server allowing screening of molecular libraries for candidate drugs for treatment of EVD was also established. PMID:25717373

  2. Evaluation of the AID TB resistance line probe assay for rapid detection of genetic alterations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Ritter, C; Lucke, K; Sirgel, F A; Warren, R W; van Helden, P D; Böttger, E C; Bloemberg, G V

    2014-03-01

    The rapid accurate detection of drug resistance mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential for optimizing the treatment of tuberculosis and limiting the emergence and spread of drug-resistant strains. The TB Resistance line probe assay from Autoimmun Diagnostika GmbH (AID) (Strassburg, Germany) was designed to detect the most prevalent mutations that confer resistance to isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, amikacin, capreomycin, fluoroquinolones, and ethambutol. This assay detected resistance mutations in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates from areas with low and high levels of endemicity (Switzerland, n=104; South Africa, n=52) and in selected Mycobacterium bovis BCG 1721 mutant strains (n=5) with 100% accuracy. Subsequently, the line probe assay was shown to be capable of rapid genetic assessment of drug resistance in MGIT broth cultures, the results of which were in 100% agreement with those of DNA sequencing and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. Finally, the line probe assay was assessed for direct screening of smear-positive clinical specimens. Screening of 98 clinical specimens demonstrated that the test gave interpretable results for >95% of them. Antibiotic resistance mutations detected in the clinical samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. We conclude that the AID TB Resistance line probe assay is an accurate tool for the rapid detection of resistance mutations in cultured isolates and in smear-positive clinical specimens. PMID:24403306

  3. Development of HTS Assays and Pilot Screen for Inhibitors of Metalloproteases Meprin α and β

    PubMed Central

    Madoux, Franck; Tredup, Claudia; Spicer, Timothy P.; Scampavia, Louis; Chase, Peter S.; Hodder, Peter S.; Fields, Gregg B.; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Minond, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Zinc metalloproteinases meprin α and meprin β are implicated in a variety of diseases, such as fibrosis, inflammation and neurodegeneration, however, there are no selective small molecule inhibitors that would allow to study their role in these processes. To address this lack of molecular tools we have developed high throughput screening (HTS) assays to enable discovery of inhibitors of both meprin α and meprin β and screened a collection of well characterized pharmaceutical agents (LOPAC, n = 1,280 compounds). Two compounds (PPNDS, NF449) confirmed their activity and selectivity for meprin β. Kinetic studies revealed competitive (PPNDS) and mixed competitive/non-competitive (NF449) inhibition mechanisms suggesting that binding occurs in meprin β active site. Both PPNDS and NF449 exhibited low nanomolar IC50 and Ki values making them the most potent and selective inhibitors of meprin β reported to the date. These results demonstrate the ability of meprin α and β assays to identify selective compounds and discard artifacts of primary screening. PMID:25048711

  4. Identification of APC mutations and evaluation of their expression level using a functional screening assay

    SciTech Connect

    Varesco, L.; Gismondi, V.; Bafico, A.

    1994-09-01

    A functional screen for chain-terminating mutations in the APC gene recently has been developed. It is based on the PCR and cloning of a segment of the gene in-frame with a colorimetric marker gene (lacz) followed by screening for the level of activity of the marker polypeptide (beta-galactosidase). This method scores colony number with different blue colors that are produced by bacteria containing normal and mutant APC segments. In the present work this method was used to screen the entire APC coding region by using eight primer pairs. DNA segments with known APC mutations at different positions in the gene were used as controls and were clearly identifiable with this assay. In addition, the entire APC coding region has been examined in 21 APC patients in whom PCR-SSCP did not identify an APC mutation. Novel mutations (n=14) were identified by the blue/white assay and were all confirmed by sequence analysis. This method also was used to quantitate the expression of paternal and maternal APC alleles taking advantage of an RsaI site polymorphism at position 1458 in a small number of informative individuals. Differential expression of some known mutant APC mRNAs was observed.

  5. In Vitro Reporter Assays for Screening of Chemicals That Disrupt Androgen Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paul Khurana, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs) modulate hormone signaling and cause developmental and reproductive anomalies. Today, there is a global concern regarding endocrine disruption effects, particularly those mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Androgen or male hormones are critical for the development and maintenance of male characteristics and numerous EDCs exist in the environment with the potential to disrupt androgen action. The threat is more during critical developmental windows when there is increased sensitivity to these compounds. Timely screening and detection of the EDCs is essential to minimize deleterious effects produced by these toxic chemicals. As a first line of screening, in vitro transcription assays are very useful due to their speed, convenience, and cost effectiveness. In this paper, recent in vitro reporter assays for detecting androgenic or antiandrogenic activity of EDCs have been reviewed. Two important cell systems used for this purpose, namely, the mammalian or yeast cell systems, have been discussed. Use of reporter genes such as bacterial luciferase (lux) and green fluorescent protein (gfp) has significantly improved speed and sensitivity of detection. Also, many of the current reporter assay systems can be used in a high throughput format allowing speedy evaluation of multiple potential EDCs at a lower price. PMID:25435875

  6. Research Resource: Modulators of Glucocorticoid Receptor Activity Identified by a New High-Throughput Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, John A.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Dougherty, Edward J.; Pradhan, Madhumita; Shen, Min; Li, Zhuyin; Auld, Douglas S.; Chow, Carson C.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoid steroids affect almost every type of tissue and thus are widely used to treat a variety of human pathological conditions. However, the severity of numerous side effects limits the frequency and duration of glucocorticoid treatments. Of the numerous approaches to control off-target responses to glucocorticoids, small molecules and pharmaceuticals offer several advantages. Here we describe a new, extended high-throughput screen in intact cells to identify small molecule modulators of dexamethasone-induced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity. The novelty of this assay is that it monitors changes in both GR maximal activity (Amax) and EC50 (the position of the dexamethasone dose-response curve). Upon screening 1280 chemicals, 10 with the greatest changes in the absolute value of Amax or EC50 were selected for further examination. Qualitatively identical behaviors for 60% to 90% of the chemicals were observed in a completely different system, suggesting that other systems will be similarly affected by these chemicals. Additional analysis of the 10 chemicals in a recently described competition assay determined their kinetically defined mechanism and site of action. Some chemicals had similar mechanisms of action despite divergent effects on the level of the GR-induced product. These combined assays offer a straightforward method of identifying numerous new pharmaceuticals that can alter GR transactivation in ways that could be clinically useful. PMID:24850414

  7. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of TonB-Dependent Iron Transport.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mathew; Jordan, Lorne D; Shipelskiy, Yan; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2016-03-01

    The TonB-dependent Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein FepA actively transports the siderophore ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) into the periplasm. We developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that observes FeEnt uptake through FepA in living Escherichia coli, by monitoring fluorescence quenching that occurs upon binding of FeEnt, and then unquenching as the bacteria deplete it from solution by transport. We optimized the labeling and spectroscopic methods to screen for inhibitors of TonB-dependent iron uptake through the outer membrane. The assay works like a molecular switch that is on in the presence of TonB activity and off in its absence. It functions in 96-well microtiter plates, in a variety of conditions, with Z factors of 0.8-1.0. TonB-dependent iron transport is energy dependent, and the inhibitory effects of the metabolic inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, cyanide, and arsenate on FeEnt uptake were readily detected by the assay. Because iron acquisition is a determinant of bacterial pathogenesis, HTS with this method may identify inhibitors that block TonB function and constitute novel therapeutics against infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26518031

  8. An Efficient and Economical Assay to Screen for Triclosan Binding to FabI.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Robel D; Kabre, Pauline; Tuntland, Micheal L; Fung, Leslie W-M

    2016-04-01

    Triclosan is an effective inhibitor for enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) in fatty acid biosynthesis. Triclosan-resistant mutants of ENR have emerged. Thus, it is important to detect these triclosan-resistant mutations in ENR. Generally, enzyme activity assays on the mutants are used to determine the effect of triclosan on ENR activity. Since the substrates are linked to acyl carrier protein (ACP), the assays are challenging due to the need to prepare the ACP and link it to the substrates. Non-ACP-linked (coenzyme A [CoA]-linked) substrates can be used in some ENR, but not in all. Consequently, screening for triclosan-resistant mutants is also challenging. We have developed a simple thermal shift assay, which does not use ACP-linked substrates, to determine the binding ability of triclosan to the ENR active site, and thus it can be used for screening for triclosan-resistant mutants. Staphylococcus aureus FabI enzyme and its mutants were used to demonstrate the binding ability of triclosan with NADP(+) to FabI. The direct correlation between the binding ability and enzyme activity was demonstrated with Francisella tularensis FabI. This method may also be applied to select effective triclosan analogues that inhibit ENR activity. PMID:26538431

  9. The trade-off between accuracy and accessibility of syphilis screening assays.

    PubMed

    Smit, Pieter W; Mabey, David; Changalucha, John; Mngara, Julius; Clark, Benjamin; Andreasen, Aura; Todd, Jim; Urassa, Mark; Zaba, Basia; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of rapid and sensitive methods to diagnose syphilis facilitates screening of pregnant women, which is one of the most cost-effective health interventions available. We have evaluated two screening methods in Tanzania: an enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and a point-of-care test (POCT). We evaluated the performance of each test against the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA) as the reference method, and the accessibility of testing in a rural district of Tanzania. The POCT was performed in the clinic on whole blood, while the other assays were performed on plasma in the laboratory. Samples were also tested by the rapid plasma Reagin (RPR) test. With TPPA as reference assay, the sensitivity and specificity of EIA were 95.3% and 97.8%, and of the POCT were 59.6% and 99.4% respectively. The sensitivity of the POCT and EIA for active syphilis cases (TPPA positive and RPR titer ≥ 1/8) were 82% and 100% respectively. Only 15% of antenatal clinic attenders in this district visited a health facility with a laboratory capable of performing the EIA. Although it is less sensitive than EIA, its greater accessibility, and the fact that treatment can be given on the same day, means that the use of POCT would result in a higher proportion of women with syphilis receiving treatment than with the EIA in this district of Tanzania. PMID:24066175

  10. Development of the First Fluorescence Screening Assay for the SLC39A2 Zinc Transporter.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marie-Christine; Simonin, Alexandre; Graeter, Stefanie; Hediger, Matthias A; Kovacs, Gergely

    2014-07-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is crucial for many vital cellular functions such as DNA and protein synthesis, metabolism, and intracellular signaling. Therefore, the intracellular zinc concentration is tightly regulated by zinc transporters and zinc-binding proteins. The members of the SCL39 transporter family transport zinc into the cytosol. The SLC39A2 (hZIP2) protein is highly expressed in prostate epithelial cells and was found to be involved in prostate cancer development. Thus far, there is no specific modulator available for the SLC39 transporters. The aim of this study was to develop a screening assay for compound screening targeting hZIP2. Employing the pIRES2-DsRed Express 2 bicistronic vector, we detected human ZIP2 expression at the plasma membrane in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Using the FLIPR Tetra fluorescence plate reader, we demonstrated that ZIP2 transports Cd(2+)with an apparent Kmvalue of 53.96 nM at an extracellular pH of 6.5. The cadmium influx via hZIP2 was inhibited by zinc in a competitive manner. We found that hZIP2 activity can be measured using cadmium in the range of 0.1 to 10 µM with our assay. In summary, for the first time we developed an assay for human ZIP2 that can be adapted to other zinc transporters. PMID:24619115

  11. In vitro screening assay for teratogens using growth inhibition of human embryonic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.M.; Willis, W.D.

    1985-09-01

    The authors have tested 35 teratogenic and 20 nonteratogenic chemicals or drugs in a short-term, in vitro assay that identifies teratogens by their ability to inhibit growth of an established line of human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells. Only those chemicals that exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth at concentrations less than 1 mM were classified as inhibitory. An Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9 system was effective in metabolizing cyclophosphamide to its teratogenic form in culture. The authors suggest that this assay, along with the complementary tumor cell-attachment assay of Braun may be useful as a short-term in vitro battery for assessment of the teratogenic potential in environmental agents and to prioritize those chemicals which merit further testing in vivo.

  12. Screening for drugs in oral fluid: illicit drug use and drug driving in a sample of Queensland motorists.

    PubMed

    Davey, J; Leal, N; Freeman, J

    2007-05-01

    Police Services in a number of Australian states have indicated random roadside drug testing will be implemented to target drug driving. This paper outlines research conducted to provide an estimate of the prevalence of drug driving in a sample of Queensland drivers. Oral fluid samples were collected from 781 drivers who volunteered to participate at Random Breath Testing (RBT) sites in a large Queensland regional area. Illicit substances tested for included cannabis (delta 9 tetrahydrocannibinol [THC]), amphetamine type substances, heroin and cocaine. Drivers also completed a self-report questionnaire regarding their drug-related driving behaviour. Samples that were drug-positive at initial screening were sent to a government laboratory for confirmation. Oral fluid samples from 27 participants (3.5%) were confirmed positive for at least one illicit substance. The most common drugs detected in oral fluid were cannabis (delta 9 THC) (n = 13) followed by amphetamine type substances (n = 11). A key finding was that cannabis was also confirmed as the most common self-reported drug combined with driving and that individuals who tested positive to any drug through oral fluid analysis were also more likely to report the highest frequency of drug driving. Furthermore, a comparison between drug vs drink driving detection rates for the study period revealed a higher detection rate for drug driving (3.5%) vs drink driving (0.8%). This research provides evidence that drug driving is relatively prevalent on Queensland Roads. The paper will further outline the study findings and present possible directions for future drug driving research. PMID:17454020

  13. Optical oxygen sensing systems for drug discovery applications: Respirometric Screening Technology (RST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Hynes, James; Fernandes, Richard

    2005-11-01

    Quenched-fluorescence oxygen sensing allows non-chemical, reversible, real-time monitoring of molecular oxygen and rates of oxygen consumption in biological samples. Using this approach we have developed Respirometric Screening Technology (RST); a platform which facilitates the convenient analysis of cellular oxygen uptake. This in turn allows the investigation of compounds and processes which affect respiratory activity. The RST platform employs soluble phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probes, which may be assessed in standard microtitter plates on a fluorescence plate reader. New formats of RST assays and time-resolved fluorescence detection instrumentation developed by Luxcel provide improvements in assay sensitivity, miniaturization and overall performance. RST has a diverse range of applications in drug discovery area including high throughput analysis of mitochondrial function; studies of mechanisms of toxicity and apoptosis; cell and animal based screening of compound libraries and environmental samples; and, sterility testing. RST has been successfully validated with a range of practical targets and adopted by several leading pharmaceutical companies.

  14. Use of cartilage derived from murine induced pluripotent stem cells for osteoarthritis drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Vincent P.; Diekman, Brian O.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Objective The discovery of novel disease-modifying drugs for osteoarthritis (OA) is limited by the lack of adequate genetically-defined cartilage tissues for application in high-throughput screening systems. We addressed this need by synthesizing cartilage from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to establish and validate an in vitro model of OA. Methods iPSC-derived or native mouse cartilage samples were treated with the cytokine interleukin-1? (IL-1?) for 3 days to model the inflammatory environment of OA. Biochemical content, mechanical properties, and gene expression of the resulting tissues were assayed. In addition, the inflammatory and catabolic environment of the media was assessed. To establish high-throughput capability, we utilized a 96-well plate format and conducted a screen of previously identified candidate OA drugs. Glycosaminoglycan release into the media was used as the primary output for screening. Results Treatment of iPSC-derived or native cartilage with IL-1? induced characteristic features of OA in a rapid and dose-dependent manner. In addition to the loss of glycosaminoglycans and tissue mechanical properties, IL-1? treatment induced expression of matrix metalloproteinases and increased production of the inflammatory mediators nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. In the high-throughput screen validation, all candidate OA therapeutics provided some benefit, but only the NF-?B inhibitor SC-514 effectively reduced cartilage loss in response to IL-1?. Conclusions This work demonstrates the utility of iPSCs for studying cartilage pathology, and provides a platform for identifying novel, patient-specific therapeutics that prevent cartilage degradation and modify the course of OA development. PMID:25047145

  15. Decimal assay for additivity of drugs permits delineation of synergy and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C C; Sanders, W E; Moland, E S

    1993-02-01

    Although there are many in vitro tests for drug interactions, few possess a linear, predictable dose-dependent end point or have a precise definition for additivity. Therefore, a new test with both of these features, the decimal assay for additivity, was developed. This test is based on a disk diffusion assay and the strict linear relationship between drug mass and size of the inhibition zone. When the decimal assay for additivity was applied to combinations known on a mechanistic basis to be additive, synergistic, or antagonistic, results of the new test always reflected the expected drug interaction. For example, synergy between trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole was detected in tests with Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae, as was antagonism between cefoxitin and cefotaxime in tests with Enterobacter cloacae. Quinolones plus chloramphenicol appeared to be antagonistic. In addition to correctly identifying the drug interaction, the decimal assay for additivity identified the drug ratio producing the maximal drug interaction. These results suggest that the decimal assay for additivity should prove very useful in future studies of drug interactions. PMID:8452356

  16. High-Throughput Screening Using a Whole-Cell Virus Replication Reporter Gene Assay to Identify Inhibitory Compounds against Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Koushikul; Baudin, Maria; Eriksson, Jonas; Öberg, Christopher; Habjan, Matthias; Weber, Friedemann; Överby, Anna K; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging virus that causes serious illness in humans and livestock. There are no approved vaccines or treatments for humans. The purpose of the study was to identify inhibitory compounds of RVFV infection without any preconceived idea of the mechanism of action. A whole-cell-based high-throughput drug screening assay was developed to screen 28,437 small chemical compounds targeting RVFV infection. To accomplish both speed and robustness, a replication-competent NSs-deleted RVFV expressing a fluorescent reporter gene was developed. Inhibition of fluorescence intensity was quantified by spectrophotometry and related to virus infection in human lung epithelial cells (A549). Cell toxicity was assessed by the Resazurin cell viability assay. After primary screening, 641 compounds were identified that inhibited RVFV infection by ≥80%, with ≥50% cell viability at 50 µM concentration. These compounds were subjected to a second screening regarding dose-response profiles, and 63 compounds with ≥60% inhibition of RVFV infection at 3.12 µM compound concentration and ≥50% cell viability at 25 µM were considered hits. Of these, six compounds with high inhibitory activity were identified. In conclusion, the high-throughput assay could efficiently and safely identify several promising compounds that inhibited RVFV infection. PMID:26762502

  17. A live-cell high-throughput screening assay for identification of fatty acid uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Black, Paul N; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2005-01-01

    We developed a live-cell high-throughput assay system using the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to screen for chemical compounds that will inhibit fatty acid uptake. The target for the inhibitors is a mammalian fatty acid transport protein (mmFATP2), which is involved in the fatty acid transport and activation pathway. The mmFATP2 was expressed in a S. cerevisiae mutant strain deficient in Fat1p-dependent fatty acid uptake and reduced in long-chain fatty acid activation, fat1Deltafaa1Delta. To detect fatty acid import, a fluorescent fatty acid analog, 4,4-difluoro-5-methyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-dodecanoic acid (C1-BODIPY-C12), was incubated with cells expressing FATP2 in a 96-well plate. The mmFATP2-dependent C1-BODIPY-C12 uptake was monitored by measuring intracellular C1-BODIPY-C12 fluorescence on a microtiter plate reader, whereas extracellular fluorescence was quenched by a cell viability dye, trypan blue. Using this high-throughput screening method, we demonstrate that the uptake of the fluorescent fatty acid ligand was effectively competed by the natural fatty acid oleate. Inhibition of uptake was also demonstrated to occur when cells were pretreated with sodium azide or Triacsin C. This yeast live-cell-based assay is rapid to execute, inexpensive to implement, and has adequate sensitivity for high-throughput screening. The assay basis and limitations are discussed. PMID:15582553

  18. A KV2.1 gating modifier binding assay suitable for high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Schmalhofer, William A; Ratliff, Kevin S; Weinglass, Adam; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L; Herrington, James

    2009-11-01

    Gating modifier peptides alter gating of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels by binding to the voltage sensor paddle and changing the energetics of channel opening. Since the voltage sensor paddle is a modular motif with low sequence similarity across families, targeting of this region should yield highly specific channel modifiers. To test this idea, we developed a binding assay with the KV2.1 gating modifier, GxTX-1E. Monoiodotyrosine-GxTX-1E (125I-GxTX-1E) binds with high affinity (IC50 = 4 nM) to CHO cells stably expressing hKV2.1 channels, but not to CHO cells expressing Maxi-K channels. Binding of 125I-GxTX-1E to KV2.1 channels is inhibited by another KV2.1 gating modifier, stromatoxin (IC50 = 30 nM), but is not affected by iberiotoxin or charybdotoxin, pore blocking peptides of other types of potassium channels, or by ProTx-II, a selective gating modifier peptide of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7. Specific 125I-GxTX-1E binding is not detectable when CHO-KV2.1 cells are placed in high external potassium, suggesting that depolarization favors dissociation of the peptide. The binding assay was adapted to a 384-well format, allowing high throughput screening of large compound libraries. Interestingly, we discovered that compounds related to PAC, a di-substituted cyclohexyl KV channel blocker, displayed inhibitory binding activity. These data establish the feasibility of screening large libraries of compounds in an assay that monitors the displacement of a gating modifier from the channel's voltage sensor. Future screens using this approach will ultimately test whether the voltage sensor of KV channels can be selectively targeted by small molecules to modify channel function. PMID:21150283

  19. An AlphaScreen Assay for the Discovery of Synthetic Chemical Inhibitors of Glucagon Production.

    PubMed

    Evans, Matthew R; Wei, Shuguang; Posner, Bruce A; Unger, Roger H; Roth, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Glucose homeostasis is primarily controlled by two opposing hormones, insulin and glucagon, and diabetes results when insulin fails to inhibit glucagon action. Recent efforts to control glucagon in diabetes have focused on antagonizing the glucagon receptor, which is effective in lowering blood glucose levels but leads to hyperglucogonemia in rodents. An alternative strategy would be to control glucagon production with small molecules. In pursuit of this goal, we developed a homogeneous AlphaScreen assay for measuring glucagon in cell culture media and used this in a high-throughput screen to discover synthetic compounds that inhibited glucagon secretion from an alpha cell-like cell line. Some of these compounds inhibited transcription of the glucagon gene. PMID:26676097

  20. A First Application of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Screening Cyclodiene Insecticides in Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dombrowski, T.R.; Thurman, E.M.; Mohrman, G.B.

    1996-01-01

    A commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plate kit for screening of cyclodiene insecticides (aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, endosulfan, endrin, and heptachlor) was evaluated for sensitivity, cross reactivity, and overall performance using groundwater samples from a contaminated site. Ground-water contaminants included several pesticide compounds and their manufacturing byproducts, as well as many other organic and inorganic compounds. Cross-reactivity studies were carried out for the cyclodiene compounds, and results were compared to those listed by the manufacturer. Data obtained were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the ELISA kit to the cyclodiene compounds in ground water samples with a contaminated matrix. The method quantitation limit for the ELISA kit was 15 ??g/L (as chlordane). Of the 56 ground-water samples analyzed using the ELISA plate kits, more than 85% showed cyclodiene insecticide contamination. The ELISA kit showed excellent potential as a screening tool for sites with suspected groundwater contamination by insecticides.

  1. Modular real-time PCR screening assay for common European animal families.

    PubMed

    Naue, J; Lutz-Bonengel, S; Sänger, T; Schlauderer, N; Schmidt, U

    2014-01-01

    A screening assay based on real-time PCR and melt curve analysis was developed to detect DNA from nine common European animal families/species and human. The assay consists of a 10-cycle universal pre-amplification followed by specific nested PCR and was designed to exploit the different melting temperatures (T m) of family/species-specific 12S ribosomal ribonucleic acid and cytochrome b fragments, which are amplified in duplex reactions. Case-related modular application is possible. Beyond determination of the animal family and discrimination from human DNA, evaluation of the melt curve in some cases additionally allows for species determination (e.g. cat vs. lynx). The method presents a quick, flexible and sample-saving approach to assess non-human DNA at low expenses, and it is especially useful in resolution of DNA mixtures. PMID:23613031

  2. Solution ELISA as a platform of choice for development of robust, drug tolerant immunogenicity assays in support of drug development.

    PubMed

    Mikulskis, Alvydas; Yeung, Dave; Subramanyam, Meena; Amaravadi, Lakshmi

    2011-02-28

    Humanized monoclonal antibody therapeutics are in many ways indistinguishable from the anti-therapeutic/anti-drug antibodies generated in humans. Therefore, immunogenicity assessments to such therapeutics pose unique challenges in clinical trials especially when significant drug interference is encountered. There are several technology platforms based on the bridging immunogenicity assay format, which have been successfully used for detection and quantification of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) in serum or plasma samples. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay formats are among the most popular technology platforms. Pretreatment of samples with acid can also be used to lower drug interference. While ECL technology platform offered many advantages over traditional solid-phase ELISA methods, reliance on a single (or limited) vendor source became a significant concern within the biopharmaceutical industry especially for immunogenicity assays that need to be implemented over a period of many years in support of a single drug development program. We describe herein a systematic evaluation of solid-phase ELISA, GYROS, AlphaLISA, ECL Immunoassay, and solution ELISA platforms for detection of anti-drug antibodies with the goal of selection and development of a robust technology platform that meets the desired performance characteristics for most immunogenicity assays and can be easily implemented in a typical immunoassay laboratory. As part of this effort the Design of Experiments (DOE) approach was utilized in optimization of sample acid treatment conditions in order to improve drug tolerance in the evaluated assay platforms. After the initial evaluation of various technology platforms, a solution ELISA format was chosen for further development to support clinical trials for a humanized therapeutic antibody. As part of the assay development, flexible use of digoxigenin and 6-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) aminohexanoic acid (DNP) for labeling antibodies was evaluated and is presented in this manuscript. In addition, simple methods for evaluation and qualification of streptavidin-coated plates and overcoming soluble target interference in solution ELISA have also been investigated and highlights of these investigations are discussed. The selection of the solution ELISA format was based on availability of generic reagents, achievement of optimal drug tolerance and robust assay performance on a platform that is readily available in many laboratories. This approach removed the heavy reliance on specialized equipment sourced from a single vendor and assay conditions described here are broadly applicable to other immunogenicity assays across many biologics both during clinical development setting and in the post-marketing arena. PMID:21130095

  3. The Lumipulse G HBsAg-Quant assay for screening and quantification of the hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Song, Guangjun; Guan, Wenli; Wang, Qian; Liu, Yan; Wei, Lai

    2016-02-01

    Qualitative HBsAg assay is used to screen HBV infection for decades. The utility of quantitative assay is also rejuvenated recently. We aimed to evaluate and compare the performance of a novel ultra-sensitive and quantitative assay, the Lumipulse assay, with the Architect and Elecsys assays. As screening methods, specificity was compared using 2043 consecutive clinical routine samples. As quantitative assays, precision and accuracy were assessed. Sera from 112 treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B patients, four patients undergoing antiviral therapy and one patient with acute infection were tested to compare the correlations. Samples with concurrent HBsAg/anti-HBs were also quantified. The Lumipulse assay precisely quantified ultra-low level of HBsAg (0.004 IU/mL). It identified additional 0.98% (20/2043) clinical samples with trance amount of HBsAg. Three assays displayed excellent linear correlations irrespective of genotypes and S-gene mutations (R(2)>0.95, P<0.0001), while minor quantitative biases existed. The Lumipulse assay did not yield higher HBsAg concentrations in samples with concomitant anti-HBs. Compared with other assays, the Lumipulse assay is sensitive and specific for detecting HBsAg. The interpretation of the extremely low-level results, however, is challenging. Quantitative HBsAg results by different assays are highly correlated, but they should be interpreted interchangeably only after conversion to eliminate the biases. PMID:26615803

  4. Current status of drug screening and disease modelling in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Divya; Matsa, Elena; Kalra, Spandan; Crutchley, James; Patel, Asha; George, Vinoj; Denning, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The emphasis in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) technologies has shifted from cell therapy to in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. This review examines why this shift has occurred, and how current technological limitations might be overcome to fully realise the potential of hPSCs. Details are provided for all disease-specific human induced pluripotent stem cell lines spanning a dozen dysfunctional organ systems. Phenotype and pharmacology have been examined in only 17 of 63 lines, primarily those that model neurological and cardiac conditions. Drug screening is most advanced in hPSC-cardiomyocytes. Responses for almost 60 agents include examples of how careful tests in hPSC-cardiomyocytes have improved on existing in vitro assays, and how these cells have been integrated into high throughput imaging and electrophysiology industrial platforms. Such successes will provide an incentive to overcome bottlenecks in hPSC technology such as improving cell maturity and industrial scalability whilst reducing cost. PMID:22886688

  5. Whole-cell microtiter plate screening assay for terminal hydroxylation of fatty acids by P450s.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Martin J; Notonier, Sandra; Lang, Sarah-Luise; Otte, Konrad B; Herter, Susanne; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    A readily available galactose oxidase (GOase) variant was used to develop a whole cell screening assay. This endpoint detection system was applied in a proof-of-concept approach by screening a focussed mutant library. This led to the discovery of the thus far most active P450 Marinobacter aquaeolei mutant catalysing the terminal hydroxylation of fatty acids. PMID:27074906

  6. Results of drug screening from a producer's view.

    PubMed

    Adams, J B

    1994-07-01

    The dairy industry is faced with increasing governmental and public concern about the safety of the nation's milk supply. New regulations under the Grade A Pasteurized Milk Ordinance require that prescription drugs be properly labeled and that all tanker loads of milk be tested for beta-lactam antimicrobial residues. Concern over the use of animal drugs in an extralabel manner has prompted the National Milk Producers Federation and the American Veterinary Medical Association to develop a quality assurance program for on-farm residue prevention known as the Dairy Quality Assurance 10-Point Milk and Dairy Beef Residue Prevention Protocol. The program promotes the concept of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points, applied to a pre-harvest farm environment. Screening limitations at point of milk receipt necessitates widespread adoption of the Dairy Quality Assurance protocol to address controlled use of all animal medications under a valid relationship among veterinarian, client, and animals, thus minimizing the potential for violative residues in the milk and meat supply. PMID:7929955

  7. A fluorescence polarization assay using an engineered human respiratory syncytial virus F protein as a direct screening platform.

    PubMed

    Park, Minyoung; Matsuura, Hisae; Lamb, Robert A; Barron, Annelise E; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2011-02-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) typically affects newborns and young children. Even though it can cause severe and, in some cases, lifelong respiratory infections, there are currently no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutics that control this virus. The hRSV F protein facilitates viral fusion, a critical extracellular event that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention by disrupting the assembly of a postfusion 6-helix bundle (6HB) within the hRSV F protein. Here we report the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay using an engineered hRSV F protein 5-helix bundle (5HB). We generated the 5HB and validated its ability to form a 6HB in an FP assay. To test the potential of 5HB as a screening tool, we then investigated a series of truncated peptides derived from the "missing" sixth helix. Using this FP-based 5HB system, we have successfully demonstrated that short peptides can prevent 6HB formation and serve as potential hRSV fusion inhibitors. We anticipate that this new 5HB system will provide an effective tool to identify and study potential antivirals to control hRSV infection. PMID:20971054

  8. Fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant HIV mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinchang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; El-Mahdy, Ahmed F. M.; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Convenient drug-resistance testing of viral mutants is indispensable to effective treatment of viral infection. We developed a novel fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant mutants of human immunodeficiency virus-I protease (HIV-PR) which uses enzymatic and peptide-specific fluorescence (FL) reactions and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of three HIV-PR substrates. This assay protocol enables use of non-purified enzyme sources and multiple substrates for the enzymatic reaction. In this study, susceptibility of HIV mutations to drugs was evaluated by selective formation of three FL products after the enzymatic HIV-PR reaction. This proof-of-concept study indicates that the present HPLC-FL method could be an alternative to current phenotypic assays for the evaluation of HIV drug resistance. PMID:25988960

  9. Drug activity screening based on microsomes-hydrogel system in predicting metabolism induced antitumor effect of oroxylin A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiying; Li, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yuanting; Zhou, Lu; Tong, Shanshan; Zhao, Bei; Cai, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    A novel microsomes-hydrogel added cell culture system (MHCCS) was employed in the antitumor activity screening of natural compounds, aiming to achieve drug screening with better in vivo correlation, higher initiative to explore the potential active metabolites, and investigation of the antitumor mechanism from the perspective of metabolism. MTT assay and cell apoptosis detection showed that test drug oroxylin A (OA) had enhanced cytotoxicity and wogonin (W) with reduced cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell line upon MHCCS incubation. In vivo antitumor evaluations also demonstrated that OA induced higher tumor inhibition than W at the same dosage. To explore the reasons, nine major metabolites of OA were separated and collected through UPLC-Q-TOF and semi-preparative HPLC. Metabolites M318 exhibited higher cytotoxicity than OA and other metabolites by MTT assay. (1)H NMR spectrums, HPLC and TOF MS/MS results revealed that OA was catalyzed into its active metabolite M318 via a ring-opening reaction. M318 induced significant cell apoptosis and S-phase arrest through affecting tumor survival related genes after mechanism study. In conclusion, our MHCCS could be a useful tool for drug activity screening from a perspective of metabolism. PMID:26905263

  10. Drug activity screening based on microsomes-hydrogel system in predicting metabolism induced antitumor effect of oroxylin A

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiying; Li, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yuanting; Zhou, Lu; Tong, Shanshan; Zhao, Bei; Cai, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    A novel microsomes-hydrogel added cell culture system (MHCCS) was employed in the antitumor activity screening of natural compounds, aiming to achieve drug screening with better in vivo correlation, higher initiative to explore the potential active metabolites, and investigation of the antitumor mechanism from the perspective of metabolism. MTT assay and cell apoptosis detection showed that test drug oroxylin A (OA) had enhanced cytotoxicity and wogonin (W) with reduced cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell line upon MHCCS incubation. In vivo antitumor evaluations also demonstrated that OA induced higher tumor inhibition than W at the same dosage. To explore the reasons, nine major metabolites of OA were separated and collected through UPLC-Q-TOF and semi-preparative HPLC. Metabolites M318 exhibited higher cytotoxicity than OA and other metabolites by MTT assay. 1H NMR spectrums, HPLC and TOF MS/MS results revealed that OA was catalyzed into its active metabolite M318 via a ring-opening reaction. M318 induced significant cell apoptosis and S-phase arrest through affecting tumor survival related genes after mechanism study. In conclusion, our MHCCS could be a useful tool for drug activity screening from a perspective of metabolism. PMID:26905263

  11. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures. PMID:24141454

  12. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  13. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    Timm, David M; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Raphael, Robert M; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Killian, T C; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures. PMID:24141454

  14. Evaluation of a fluorescence-based method for antibabesial drug screening.

    PubMed

    Guswanto, Azirwan; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; Elsayed, Shimaa Abd Elsalam; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; ElSaid, ElSaid El Shirbini; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2014-08-01

    In vitro evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia and Theileria parasites has become routine, and the effectiveness of these chemicals is usually determined by comparing the parasitemia dynamics of untreated and treated parasites. Although microscopy is widely used to calculate parasitemia, several disadvantages are associated with this technique. The present study evaluated a fluorescence-based method using SYBR green I stain (SG I) to screen antibabesial agents in in vitro cultures of Babesia bovis. The linearity between relative fluorescence units (RFU) and parasitemia was found to be well correlated with a 0.9944 goodness-of-fit (r(2)) value. Subsequently, 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated for 3 antiprotozoan agents, diminazene aceturate, nimbolide, and gedunin, by this method. For diminazene aceturate and nimbolide, the IC(50)s determined by the fluorescence-based method (408 nM and 8.13 μM, respectively) and microscopy (400.3 nM and 9.4 μM, respectively) were in agreement. Furthermore, the IC50 of gedunin determined by the fluorescence-based method (19 μM) was similar to the recently described microscopy-based value (21.7 μM) for B. bovis. Additionally, the Z' factor (0.80 to 0.90), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio (44.15 to 87.64), coefficient of variation at the maximum signal (%CVmax) (0.50 to 2.85), and coefficient of variation at the minimum signal (%CVmin) (1.23 to 2.21) calculated for the fluorescence method using diminazene aceturate were comparable to those previously determined in malaria research for this assay. These findings suggest that the fluorescence-based method might be useful for antibabesial drug screening and may have potential to be developed into a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. PMID:24914124

  15. Multiparametric assay using HepaRG cells for predicting drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tomida, Takafumi; Okamura, Hayao; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Konno, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    The utility of HepaRG cells as an in vitro cell-based assay system for assessing drug-induced liver injury (DILI) risk was investigated. Seventeen DILI-positive and 15 DILI-negative drugs were selected for the assay. HepaRG cells were treated with each drug for 24h at concentrations that were 1.6-, 6.3-, 25-, and 100-fold the therapeutic maximum plasma concentration (Cmax). After treatment, the cell viability, glutathione content, caspase 3/7 activity, lipid accumulation, leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, and albumin secretion were measured. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated to assess the ability of the assay to predict DILI. Our multiparametric assay using HepaRG cells exhibited a 67% sensitivity and 73% specificity at a 100-fold concentration of Cmax and a 41% sensitivity and 87% specificity at a 25-fold concentration of Cmax. When a 25-fold Cmax cut-off was applied, approximately 70% of drugs exhibiting positive responses were classified into the high DILI risk category. HepaRG cells distinguished relatively safe drugs from their high-risk analogs. Our study indicates that HepaRG cells may be of use to (1) prioritize drug analogs, (2) analyze the mechanism of DILI, and (3) assess the risk for DILI in the early drug discovery stage. PMID:25934330

  16. Fluorometric assay of erythrocyte protoporphyrin: simple screening test for lead poisoning and iron deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Paton, T. J.; Cembrowski, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels are high in lead poisoning, iron deficiency and erythropoietic porphyria. On-site fluorometric assay was used to screen for raised blood levels in three groups of children in one city: 166 who were severely mentally retarded and lived in an institution, 88 who were moderately to severely mentally retarded and attending special schools but lived at home, and 128 who were of normal intelligence and attended a regular school. High erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels (40 micrograms/dl [0.7 mumol/l] or greater) were found in 14 of the children, each of whom was tested for further evidence of lead poisoning and iron deficiency. The two children found to have high blood lead levels (above 30 micrograms/dl [1.5 mumol/l]) were both living in the institution, were ambulatory and had pica. Of the other 12 children 8 had evidence of iron deficiency, though in 4 the probability of a true deficiency was low. The fluorometric assay of erythrocyte protoporphyrin may prove to be a simple method of screening for lead poisoning and iron deficiency. PMID:7139505

  17. A simple liposome assay for the screening of zinc ionophore activity of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Clergeaud, Gael; Dabbagh-Bazarbachi, Husam; Ortiz, Mayreli; Fernández-Larrea, Juan B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-04-15

    An efficient liposomal system for screening the zinc ionophore activity of a selected library consisting of the most relevant dietary polyphenols is presented. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated by exploring the use of zinc-specific fluorophore FluoZin-3 loaded liposomes as simple membrane tools that mimic the cell membrane. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated as the capacity of polyphenols to transport zinc cations across the liposome membrane and increase the zinc-specific fluorescence of the encapsulated fluorophore FluoZin-3. In addition, the zinc chelation strength of the polyphenols was also tested in a competition assay based on the fluorescence quenching of zinc-dependent fluorescence emitted by zinc-FluoZin-3 complex. Finally, the correlation between the chelation capacity and ionophore activity is demonstrated, thus underlining the sequestering or ionophoric activity that the phenolic compounds can display, thus, providing better knowledge of the importance of the structural conformation versus their biological activity. Furthermore, the assays developed can be used as tools for rapid, high-throughput screening of families of polyphenols towards different biometals. PMID:26617034

  18. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  19. Cell-based screening assay for anti-inflammatory activity of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Kees; Vonk, Roel J; Priebe, Marion G; Roelofsen, Han

    2015-01-01

    Excess dietary intake may induce metabolic inflammation which is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Recent evidence indicates that dietary bioactive compounds may diminish metabolic inflammation. To identify anti-inflammatory bioactives, we developed a screening assay using the human H293-NF-?B-RE-luc2P reporter cell line. Under optimised conditions we determined the anti-inflammatory activity of vegetables and purified bioactives, by monitoring their potency to inhibit TNF-?-induced NF-?B activity, as assessed by sensitive chemiluminescence detection in a 96-well assay format. Minced broccoli seedlings reduced NF-?B activity by 16%, while sulphoraphane, the dominant bioactive in broccoli seedlings, inhibited NF-?B activity with an IC?? of 5.11 ?mol/l. Short-chain fatty acids also reduced NF-?B activity in the order butyrate>propionate?acetate with IC?? of 51, 223, and 1300 ?mol/l, respectively. The H293-NF-?B-RE-luc2P reporter cell line is a sensitive tool for rapid high-throughput screening for bioactives with anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25053041

  20. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tony J; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei; Andrews, David W

    2015-11-01

    A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose-response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  1. Discovery of New E-Selectin Inhibitors by Virtual Screening, Fluorescence Binding Assays, and STD NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Barra, Pabla A; Jiménez, Verónica A; Gavin, José A; Daranas, Antonio H; Alderete, Joel B

    2016-05-01

    E-selectin is an endothelial protein that participates in the adhesion of metastatic cancer cells, and is therefore a relevant target for antitumor therapeutic intervention. In this work, virtual screening was used to identify new E-selectin inhibitors from a subset of drug-like molecules retrieved from the ZINC database, including the physiological ligand sLe(x) as reference structure (PDB ID: 1G1T). Four hits were chosen and subjected to molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence binding assays, which led to the determination of experimental dissociation constants between 333 and 1012 μm. The candidate with the highest affinity was studied by saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments and complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix analysis of saturation transfer (CORCEMA-ST), aimed at identifying the preferable binding mode with E-selectin. Our results revealed that this new inhibitor binds more strongly than sLe(x) in the E-selectin binding site, in good agreement with simulation predictions. These properties will prove valuable for the future design of drugs that target E-selectin. PMID:26999373

  2. Rapid Polymerase Chain Reaction-based Screening Assay for Bacterial Biothreat Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samuel; Rothman, Richard E.; Hardick, Justin; Kuroki, Marcos; Hardick, Andrew; Doshi, Vishal; Ramachandran, Padmini; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To design and evaluate a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for detecting Eubacteria and performing early screening for selected Class A biothreat bacterial pathogens. Methods The authors designed a two-step PCR-based algorithm consisting of an initial broad-based universal detection step, followed by specific pathogen identification targeted for identification of the Class A bacterial biothreat agents. A region in the bacterial 16S rRNA gene containing a highly variable sequence flanked by clusters of conserved sequences was chosen as the target for the PCR assay design. A previously described highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon was selected as the universal probe (UniProbe, Integrated DNA Technology, Coralville, IA). Pathogen-specific TaqMan probes were designed for Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Performance of the assay was assessed using genomic DNA extracted from the aforementioned biothreat-related organisms (inactivated or surrogate) and other common bacteria. Results The UniProbe detected the presence of all tested Eubacteria (31 / 31) with high analytical sensitivity. The biothreat-specific probes accurately identified organisms down to the closely related species and genus level, but were unable to discriminate between very close surrogates, such as Yersinia philomiragia and Bacillus cereus. Conclusions A simple, two-step PCR-based assay proved capable of both universal bacterial detection and identification of select Class A bacterial biothreat and biothreat-related pathogens. Although this assay requires confirmatory testing for definitive species identification, the method has great potential for use in ED-based settings for rapid diagnosis in cases of suspected Category A bacterial biothreat agents. PMID:18370996

  3. Molecular modeling on streptolysin-O of multidrug resistant Streptococcus pyogenes and computer aided screening and in vitro assay for novel herbal inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Narayan, Naik Sowmyalaxmi; Aggimath, Tejaswini S; Nagaraj, Sushmitha; Reddy, Monika S; Narayanappa, Rajeswari

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a notorious pathogenic bacterium which causes various human diseases ranging from localized infections to life threatening invasive diseases. Streptolysin-O (SLO), pore-forming thiol-activated cytolysin, is the major virulent factor for streptococcal infections. Present therapies against streptococcal infections are limited as most of the strains have developed multi-drug resistance to present generation of drugs. Hence, there is a need for alternative therapeutic substances. Structure based virtual screening is a novel platform to select lead molecules with better pharmacokinetic properties. The 3D structure of SLO (not available in native form), essential for such studies, was computationally generated and this homology model was used as probable drug target. Based on literature survey, several phytoligands from 25 medicinal plants were selected. Out of these, leads from 11 plants showed better pharmacokinetic properties. The best lead molecules were screened based on computer aided drug likeness and pharmacokinetic predictions. The inhibitory properties of selected herbal leads against SLO were studied by molecular docking. An in vitro assay was further carried out and variations observed were found to be significant (p<0.05). Antibiotic sensitivity testing was also performed with the clinical strain of Streptococcus pyogenes with conventional drugs. The clinical strain showed multi-drug resistance to conventional drugs. Our study revealed that numerous phytoligands have better inhibitory properties towards the toxin. We noticed that incorporation of selected herbal extracts in blood agar medium showed significant reduction in hemolysis (MIC 300μl/plate), indicating inhibition of SLO. Furthermore, the butanol extracts of selected herbal preparation based on computer aided screening showed significant inhibitory properties at 250 mcg/disc concentration. We also noticed that selected herbal formulations have better antimicrobial properties at MIC range of 300- 400μl. Hence, our study suggests that these herbal extracts have better inhibitory properties against the toxin as well as drug resistant Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:24694051

  4. Automated assay for screening the enzymatic release of reducing sugars from micronized biomass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To reduce the production cost of bioethanol obtained from fermentation of the sugars provided by degradation of lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., second generation bioethanol), it is necessary to screen for new enzymes endowed with more efficient biomass degrading properties. This demands the set-up of high-throughput screening methods. Several methods have been devised all using microplates in the industrial SBS format. Although this size reduction and standardization has greatly improved the screening process, the published methods comprise one or more manual steps that seriously decrease throughput. Therefore, we worked to devise a screening method devoid of any manual steps. Results We describe a fully automated assay for measuring the amount of reducing sugars released by biomass-degrading enzymes from wheat-straw and spruce. The method comprises two independent and automated steps. The first step is the making of "substrate plates". It consists of filling 96-well microplates with slurry suspensions of micronized substrate which are then stored frozen until use. The second step is an enzymatic activity assay. After thawing, the substrate plates are supplemented by the robot with cell-wall degrading enzymes where necessary, and the whole process from addition of enzymes to quantification of released sugars is autonomously performed by the robot. We describe how critical parameters (amount of substrate, amount of enzyme, incubation duration and temperature) were selected to fit with our specific use. The ability of this automated small-scale assay to discriminate among different enzymatic activities was validated using a set of commercial enzymes. Conclusions Using an automatic microplate sealer solved three main problems generally encountered during the set-up of methods for measuring the sugar-releasing activity of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes: throughput, automation, and evaporation losses. In its present set-up, the robot can autonomously process 120 triplicate wheat-straw samples per day. This throughput can be doubled if the incubation time is reduced from 24 h to 4 h (for initial rates measurements, for instance). This method can potentially be used with any insoluble substrate that is micronizable. A video illustrating the method can be seen at the following URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFg6TxjuMWU PMID:20637080

  5. Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility Assay for Rapid Diagnosis of Lymph Node Tuberculosis and Detection of Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Gilman, Robert H.; Caviedes, Luz; Rizvi, Hasan; Ticona, Eduardo; Chavez, Gonzalo; Cabrera, José Luis; Matos, Eduardo D.; Evans, Carlton A.; Moore, David A. J.; Friedland, Jon S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 132 patients with lymphadenopathy were investigated. Fifty-two (39.4%) were diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB). The microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay provided rapid (13 days), accurate diagnosis (sensitivity, 65.4%) and reliable drug susceptibility testing (DST). Despite its lower sensitivity than that of other methods, its faster results and simultaneous DST are advantageous in resource-poor settings, supporting the incorporation of MODS into diagnostic algorithms for extrapulmonary TB. PMID:26511739

  6. Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility Assay for Rapid Diagnosis of Lymph Node Tuberculosis and Detection of Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Daniela E; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Gilman, Robert H; Caviedes, Luz; Rizvi, Hasan; Ticona, Eduardo; Chavez, Gonzalo; Cabrera, José Luis; Matos, Eduardo D; Evans, Carlton A; Moore, David A J; Friedland, Jon S

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 132 patients with lymphadenopathy were investigated. Fifty-two (39.4%) were diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB). The microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay provided rapid (13 days), accurate diagnosis (sensitivity, 65.4%) and reliable drug susceptibility testing (DST). Despite its lower sensitivity than that of other methods, its faster results and simultaneous DST are advantageous in resource-poor settings, supporting the incorporation of MODS into diagnostic algorithms for extrapulmonary TB. PMID:26511739

  7. Characterizing the Diversity and Biological Relevance of the MLPCN Assay Manifold and Screening Set

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Lushington, Gerald H.; Huan, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The NIH Molecular Libraries Initiative (MLI), launched in 2004 with initial goals of identifying chemical probes for characterizing gene function and druggability, has produced PubChem, a chemical genomics knowledgebase for fostering translation of basic research into new therapeutic strategies. This paper assesses progress toward these goals by evaluating MLI target novelty and propensity for undergoing biochemically or therapeutically relevant modulations and the degree of chemical diversity and biogenic bias inherent in the MLI screening set. Our analyses suggest that while MLI target selection has not yet been fully optimized for biochemical diversity, it covers biologically interesting pathway space that complements established drug targets. We find the MLI screening set to be chemically diverse and to have greater biogenic bias than comparable collections of commercially available compounds. Biogenic enhancements such as incorporation of more metabolite-like chemotypes are suggested. PMID:21568288

  8. Minimizing DILI risk in drug discovery - A screening tool for drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Schadt, S; Simon, S; Kustermann, S; Boess, F; McGinnis, C; Brink, A; Lieven, R; Fowler, S; Youdim, K; Ullah, M; Marschmann, M; Zihlmann, C; Siegrist, Y M; Cascais, A C; Di Lenarda, E; Durr, E; Schaub, N; Ang, X; Starke, V; Singer, T; Alvarez-Sanchez, R; Roth, A B; Schuler, F; Funk, C

    2015-12-25

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of acute hepatic failure and a major reason for market withdrawal of drugs. Idiosyncratic DILI is multifactorial, with unclear dose-dependency and poor predictability since the underlying patient-related susceptibilities are not sufficiently understood. Because of these limitations, a pharmaceutical research option would be to reduce the compound-related risk factors in the drug-discovery process. Here we describe the development and validation of a methodology for the assessment of DILI risk of drug candidates. As a training set, 81 marketed or withdrawn compounds with differing DILI rates - according to the FDA categorization - were tested in a combination of assays covering different mechanisms and endpoints contributing to human DILI. These include the generation of reactive metabolites (CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibition and glutathione adduct formation), inhibition of the human bile salt export pump (BSEP), mitochondrial toxicity and cytotoxicity (fibroblasts and human hepatocytes). Different approaches for dose- and exposure-based calibrations were assessed and the same parameters applied to a test set of 39 different compounds. We achieved a similar performance to the training set with an overall accuracy of 79% correctly predicted, a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 82%. This test system may be applied in a prospective manner to reduce the risk of idiosyncratic DILI of drug candidates. PMID:26407524

  9. Evaluation of an in silico cardiac safety assay: using ion channel screening data to predict QT interval changes in the rabbit ventricular wedge.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Beattie KA; Luscombe C; Williams G; Munoz-Muriedas J; Gavaghan DJ; Cui Y; Mirams GR

    2013-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Drugs that prolong the QT interval on the electrocardiogram present a major safety concern for pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies. Despite a range of assays performed to assess compound effects on the QT interval, QT prolongation remains a major cause of attrition during compound development. In silico assays could alleviate such problems. In this study we evaluated an in silico method of predicting the results of a rabbit left-ventricular wedge assay.METHODS: Concentration-effect data were acquired from either: the high-throughput IonWorks/FLIPR; the medium-throughput PatchXpress ion channel assays; or QSAR, a statistical IC50 value prediction model, for hERG, fast sodium, L-type calcium and KCNQ1/minK channels. Drug block of channels was incorporated into a mathematical differential equation model of rabbit ventricular myocyte electrophysiology through modification of the maximal conductance of each channel by a factor dependent on the IC50 value, Hill coefficient and concentration of each compound tested. Simulations were performed and agreement with experimental results, based upon input data from the different assays, was evaluated.RESULTS: The assay was found to be 78% accurate, 72% sensitive and 81% specific when predicting QT prolongation (>10%) using PatchXpress assay data (77 compounds). Similar levels of predictivity were demonstrated using IonWorks/FLIPR data (121 compounds) with 78% accuracy, 73% sensitivity and 80% specificity. QT shortening (<-10%) was predicted with 77% accuracy, 33% sensitivity and 90% specificity using PatchXpress data and 71% accuracy, 42% sensitivity and 81% specificity using IonWorks/FLIPR data. Strong quantitative agreement between simulation and experimental results was also evident.DISCUSSION: The in silico action potential assay demonstrates good predictive ability, and is suitable for very high-throughput use in early drug development. Adoption of such an assay into cardiovascular safety assessment, integrating ion channel data from routine screens to infer results of animal-based tests, could provide a cost- and time-effective cardiac safety screen.

  10. Evaluation of an in silico cardiac safety assay: Using ion channel screening data to predict QT interval changes in the rabbit ventricular wedge

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Kylie A.; Luscombe, Chris; Williams, Geoff; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Gavaghan, David J.; Cui, Yi; Mirams, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drugs that prolong the QT interval on the electrocardiogram present a major safety concern for pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies. Despite a range of assays performed to assess compound effects on the QT interval, QT prolongation remains a major cause of attrition during compound development. In silico assays could alleviate such problems. In this study we evaluated an in silico method of predicting the results of a rabbit left-ventricular wedge assay. Methods Concentration–effect data were acquired from either: the high-throughput IonWorks/FLIPR; the medium-throughput PatchXpress ion channel assays; or QSAR, a statistical IC50 value prediction model, for hERG, fast sodium, L-type calcium and KCNQ1/minK channels. Drug block of channels was incorporated into a mathematical differential equation model of rabbit ventricular myocyte electrophysiology through modification of the maximal conductance of each channel by a factor dependent on the IC50 value, Hill coefficient and concentration of each compound tested. Simulations were performed and agreement with experimental results, based upon input data from the different assays, was evaluated. Results The assay was found to be 78% accurate, 72% sensitive and 81% specific when predicting QT prolongation (>10%) using PatchXpress assay data (77 compounds). Similar levels of predictivity were demonstrated using IonWorks/FLIPR data (121 compounds) with 78% accuracy, 73% sensitivity and 80% specificity. QT shortening (<−10%) was predicted with 77% accuracy, 33% sensitivity and 90% specificity using PatchXpress data and 71% accuracy, 42% sensitivity and 81% specificity using IonWorks/FLIPR data. Strong quantitative agreement between simulation and experimental results was also evident. Discussion The in silico action potential assay demonstrates good predictive ability, and is suitable for very high-throughput use in early drug development. Adoption of such an assay into cardiovascular safety assessment, integrating ion channel data from routine screens to infer results of animal-based tests, could provide a cost- and time-effective cardiac safety screen. PMID:23624022

  11. The E-screen assay: a comparison of different MCF7 cell stocks.

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, M; Olea, N; Brotons, J A; Olea-Serrano, M F; Ruiz de Almodovar, J M; Pedraza, V

    1995-01-01

    MCF7 human breast cancer cells have been studied extensively as a model for hormonal effects on breast cancer cell growth and specific protein synthesis. Because the proliferative effect of natural estrogen is considered the hallmark of estrogen action, it was proposed that this property be used to determine whether a substance is an estrogen. The E-screen assay, developed for this purpose, is based on the ability of MCF7 cells to proliferate in the presence of estrogens. The aim of our study was to characterize the response of four MCF7 cell stocks (BUS, ATCC, BB, and BB104) and determine which of them performed best in the E-screen test. The four stocks assayed were distinguishable by their biological behavior. In the absence of estrogen, MCF7 BUS cells stopped proliferating and accumulated in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle; estrogen receptors increased, progesterone receptors decreased, and small amounts of pS2 protein were secreted. Of all the MCF7 stocks tested, MCF7 BUS cells showed the highest proliferative response to estradiol-17 beta: cell yields increased up to sixfold over those of nontreated cells in a 144-hr period. The differences between estrogen-supplemented and nonsupplemented MCF7 BUS cells were due mostly to G0/G1 proliferative arrest mediated by charcoal dextran-stripped serum. MCF7 BUS cell stocks and others showing a similar proliferative pattern should be chosen for use in the E-screen test, or whenever a proliferative effect of estrogen is to be demonstrated. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 1. D Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 5. D PMID:7498097

  12. Screening American Indian Youth for Referral to Drug Abuse Prevention and Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Dewolfe, Jerome; Graham, Donald

    2006-01-01

    The development and psychometric properties of a brief screening tool for use with American Indian youth suspected of abusing substances is described. The Indian Health Service-Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (IHS-PESQ) is a brief questionnaire that screens for drug abuse problem severity, response distortion tendencies, and

  13. Simultaneous detection of four nitrofuran metabolites in honey using a multiplexing biochip screening assay.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, John; Moloney, Mary; McConnell, Robert I; Benchikh, El O; Lowry, Philip; Furey, Ambrose; Danaher, Martin

    2011-06-15

    A chemiluminescence-based biochip array sensing technique has been developed and applied to the screening of honey samples for residues of banned nitrofuran antibiotics. Using a multiplex approach, metabolites of the four main nitrofuran antibiotics could be simultaneously detected. Individual antibodies specific towards the metabolites were spotted onto biochips. A competitive assay format, with chemiluminescent response, was employed. The method was validated in accordance with EU legislation (2002/657/EC, 2002), and assessed by comparison with UHPLC-MS/MS testing of 134 honey samples of worldwide origin. A similar extraction method, based on extraction of the analytes on Oasis™ SPE cartridges, followed by derivatisation with nitrobenzaldehyde and partition into ethyl acetate, was used for both screening and LC-MS/MS methods. The biochip array method was capable of detecting all four metabolites below the reference point for action of 1 μg kg(-1). The detection capability was below 0.5 μg kg(-1) for the metabolites AHD, AOZ and AMOZ; it was below 0.9 μg kg(-1) for SEM. IC(50) values ranged from 0.14 μg kg(-1) (AMOZ) to 2.19 μg kg(-1) (SEM). This biosensor method possesses the potential to be a fit-for-purpose screening technique in the arena of food safety technology. PMID:21515040

  14. Generation of orientation tools for automated zebrafish screening assays using desktop 3D printing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The zebrafish has been established as the main vertebrate model system for whole organism screening applications. However, the lack of consistent positioning of zebrafish embryos within wells of microtiter plates remains an obstacle for the comparative analysis of images acquired in automated screening assays. While technical solutions to the orientation problem exist, dissemination is often hindered by the lack of simple and inexpensive ways of distributing and duplicating tools. Results Here, we provide a cost effective method for the production of 96-well plate compatible zebrafish orientation tools using a desktop 3D printer. The printed tools enable the positioning and orientation of zebrafish embryos within cavities formed in agarose. Their applicability is demonstrated by acquiring lateral and dorsal views of zebrafish embryos arrayed within microtiter plates using an automated screening microscope. This enables the consistent visualization of morphological phenotypes and reporter gene expression patterns. Conclusions The designs are refined versions of previously demonstrated devices with added functionality and strongly reduced production costs. All corresponding 3D models are freely available and digital design can be easily shared electronically. In combination with the increasingly widespread usage of 3D printers, this provides access to the developed tools to a wide range of zebrafish users. Finally, the design files can serve as templates for other additive and subtractive fabrication methods. PMID:24886511

  15. High-throughput Functional Screening using a Homemade Dual-glow Luciferase Assay

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jessica M.; Boyce, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a rapid and inexpensive high-throughput screening protocol to identify transcriptional regulators of alpha-synuclein, a gene associated with Parkinson's disease. 293T cells are transiently transfected with plasmids from an arrayed ORF expression library, together with luciferase reporter plasmids, in a one-gene-per-well microplate format. Firefly luciferase activity is assayed after 48 hr to determine the effects of each library gene upon alpha-synuclein transcription, normalized to expression from an internal control construct (a hCMV promoter directing Renilla luciferase). This protocol is facilitated by a bench-top robot enclosed in a biosafety cabinet, which performs aseptic liquid handling in 96-well format. Our automated transfection protocol is readily adaptable to high-throughput lentiviral library production or other functional screening protocols requiring triple-transfections of large numbers of unique library plasmids in conjunction with a common set of helper plasmids. We also present an inexpensive and validated alternative to commercially-available, dual luciferase reagents which employs PTC124, EDTA, and pyrophosphate to suppress firefly luciferase activity prior to measurement of Renilla luciferase. Using these methods, we screened 7,670 human genes and identified 68 regulators of alpha-synuclein. This protocol is easily modifiable to target other genes of interest. PMID:24962249

  16. Eco-genotoxicity of six anticancer drugs using comet assay in daphnids.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Alfredo; Lavorgna, Margherita; Criscuolo, Emma; Russo, Chiara; Isidori, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The eco-genotoxicity of six anti-neoplastic drugs, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, and imatinib, belonging to five classes of anatomical therapeutic classification (ATC), was studied applying the in vivo comet assay on cells from whole organisms of Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia. For the first time, this test was performed in C. dubia. In addition, to have a wider genotoxic/mutagenic profile of the anticancer drugs selected, SOS chromotest and Salmonella mutagenicity assay were performed. The comet results showed that all drugs induced DNA damage, in both Cladocerans, with environmental concern; indeed Doxorubicin induced DNA damage in the order of tens of ng L(-1) in both crustaceans, as well as 5-flurouracil in C. dubia and cisplatin in D. magna. In the SOS Chromotest all drugs, except imatinib, were able to activate the repair system in Escherichia coli PQ37 while in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay, doxorubicin was the only drug able to cause direct and indirect frameshift and base-pair substitution mutations. Comet assay was the most sensitive tool of genotoxic exposure assessment, able to detect in vivo the adverse effects at concentration lower than those evaluated in vitro by bacterial assays. PMID:25638790

  17. Characterization of electrochemically active bacteria utilizing a high-throughput voltage-based screening assay.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin; Ribbens, Meghann; Ringeisen, Bradley; Pietron, Jeremy; Finkel, Steven; Nealson, Kenneth

    2009-02-01

    Metal reduction assays are traditionally used to select and characterize electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) for use in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, correlating the ability of a microbe to generate current from an MFC to the reduction of metal oxides has not been definitively established in the literature. As these metal reduction assays may not be generally reliable, here we describe a four- to nine-well prototype high throughput voltage-based screening assay (VBSA) designed using MFC engineering principles and a universal cathode. Bacterial growth curves for Shewanella oneidensis strains DSP10 and MR-1 were generated directly from changes in open circuit voltage and current with five percent deviation calculated between each well. These growth curves exhibited a strong correlation with literature doubling times for Shewanella indicating that the VBSA can be used to monitor distinct fundamental properties of EAB life cycles. In addition, eight different organic electron donors (acetate, lactate, citrate, fructose, glucose, sucrose, soluble starch, and agar) were tested with S. oneidensis MR-1 in anode chambers exposed to air. Under oxygen exposure, we found that current was generated in direct response to additions of acetate, lactate, and glucose. PMID:18767193

  18. Silicon microphysiometer for high-throughput drug screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Katarina; Baert, Christiaan; Puers, Bob; Sansen, Willy; Simaels, Jeannine; Van Driessche, Veerle; Hermans, Lou; Mertens, Robert P.

    1999-06-01

    We report on a micromachined silicon chip that is capable of providing a high-throughput functional assay based on calorimetry. A prototype twin microcalorimeter based on the Seebeck effect has been fabricated by IC technology and micromachined postprocessing techniques. A biocompatible liquid rubber membrane supports two identical 0.5 X 2 cm2 measurement chambers, situated at the cold and hot junction of a 666-junction aluminum/p+-polysilicon thermopile. The chambers can house up to 106 eukaryotic cells cultured to confluence. The advantage of the device over microcalorimeters on the market, is the integration of the measurement channels on chip, rendering microvolume reaction vessels, ranging from 10 to 600 (mu) l, in the closest possible contact with the thermopile sensor (no springs are needed). Power and temperature sensitivity of the sensor are 23 V/W and 130 mV/K, respectively. The small thermal inertia of the microchannels results in the short response time of 70 s, when filled with 50 (mu) l of water. Biological experiments were done with cultured kidney cells of Xenopus laevis (A6). The thermal equilibration time of the device is 45 min. Stimulation of transport mechanisms by reducing bath osmolality by 50% increased metabolism by 20%. Our results show that it is feasible to apply this large-area, small- volume whole-cell biosensor for drug discovery, where the binding assays that are commonly used to provide high- throughput need to be complemented with a functional assay. Solutions are brought onto the sensor by a simple pipette, making the use of an industrial microtiterplate dispenser feasible on a nx96-array of the microcalorimeter biosensor. Such an array of biosensors has been designed based on a new set of requirements as set forth by people in the field as this project moved on. The results obtained from the prototype large-area sensor were used to obtain an accurate model of the calorimeter, checked for by the simulation software ANSYS. At present, the sensor chip has been designed. Future publication(s) will deal with this part of the work.

  19. Bioluminescence-Based Neuraminidase Inhibition Assay for Monitoring Influenza Virus Drug Susceptibility in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Marjuki, Henju; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Sleeman, Katrina; Okomo-Adhiambo, Margaret; Sheu, Tiffany G.; Guo, Lizheng; Xu, Xiyan

    2013-01-01

    The QFlu prototype bioluminescence-based neuraminidase (NA) inhibition (NI) assay kit was designed to detect NA inhibitor (NAI)-resistant influenza viruses at point of care. Here, we evaluated its suitability for drug susceptibility assessment at a surveillance laboratory. A comprehensive panel of reference viruses (n = 14) and a set of 90 seasonal influenza virus A and B isolates were included for testing with oseltamivir and/or zanamivir in the QFlu assay using the manufacturer-recommended protocol and a modified version attuned to surveillance requirements. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) generated were compared with those of NI assays currently used for monitoring influenza drug susceptibility, the fluorescent (FL) and chemiluminescent (CL) assays. To provide proof of principle, clinical specimens (n = 235) confirmed by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to contain influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 and prescreened for the oseltamivir resistance marker H275Y using pyrosequencing were subsequently tested in the QFlu assay. All three NI assays were able to discriminate the reference NA variants and their matching wild-type viruses based on the difference in their IC50s. Unless the antigenic types were first identified, certain NA variants (e.g., H3N2 with E119V) could be detected among seasonal viruses using the FL assays only. Notably, the QFlu assay identified oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses carrying the H275Y marker directly in clinical specimens, which is not feasible with the other two phenotypic assays, which required prior virus culturing in cells. Furthermore, The QFlu assay allows detection of the influenza virus A and B isolates carrying established and potential NA inhibitor resistance markers and may become a useful tool for monitoring drug resistance in clinical specimens. PMID:23917311

  20. Development of an aequorin luminescence calcium assay for high-throughput screening using a plate reader, the LumiLux.

    PubMed

    Menon, Veena; Ranganathn, Arun; Jorgensen, Vincent H; Sabio, Michael; Christoffersen, Claus T; Uberti, Michelle A; Jones, Kenneth A; Babu, Poda Suresh

    2008-12-01

    A luminescence assay using a new plate reader, the LumiLux (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA), has been validated for high-throughput screening (HTS). In this study, we compared the aequorin luminescence-based calcium mobilization assay to the fluorescence-based calcium assay. A cell line stably co-expressing apo-aequorin, a chimeric G-protein, and a G-protein-coupled dopamine receptor was used to screen a collection of 8,106 compounds using the Hamamatsu Photonics (Bridgewater, NJ) FDSS6000 and LumiLux as the plate readers. The assay parameters evaluated included hit rate correlation, signal-to-noise ratio, and overall assay performance calculated by Z and standard deviation. The average Z values and hit rates were comparable between assay platforms;however, the standard deviation for the agonist aequorin assay was significantly smaller. There was also a significant decrease in the number of false-positives with the aequorin assay. These results suggest that the aequorin assay in combination with the new plate reader, LumiLux, provides a simple, cost-effective, robust, and sensitive assay for HTS PMID:19090690

  1. Adaptation of High-Throughput Screening in Drug Discovery—Toxicological Screening Tests

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Paweł; Markowicz, Magdalena; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is one of the newest techniques used in drug design and may be applied in biological and chemical sciences. This method, due to utilization of robots, detectors and software that regulate the whole process, enables a series of analyses of chemical compounds to be conducted in a short time and the affinity of biological structures which is often related to toxicity to be defined. Since 2008 we have implemented the automation of this technique and as a consequence, the possibility to examine 100,000 compounds per day. The HTS method is more frequently utilized in conjunction with analytical techniques such as NMR or coupled methods e.g., LC-MS/MS. Series of studies enable the establishment of the rate of affinity for targets or the level of toxicity. Moreover, researches are conducted concerning conjugation of nanoparticles with drugs and the determination of the toxicity of such structures. For these purposes there are frequently used cell lines. Due to the miniaturization of all systems, it is possible to examine the compound’s toxicity having only 1–3 mg of this compound. Determination of cytotoxicity in this way leads to a significant decrease in the expenditure and to a reduction in the length of the study. PMID:22312262

  2. Animal models for screening anxiolytic-like drugs: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bourin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological psychiatry uses experimental animal models to increase our understanding of affective disorder pathogenesis. Modern anxiolytic drug discovery mainly targets specific pathways and molecular determinants within a single phenotypic domain. However, greater understanding of the mechanisms of action is possible through animal models. Primarily developed with rats, animal models in anxiety have been adapted with mixed success for mice, easy-to-use mammals with better genetic possibilities than rats. In this review, we focus on the three most common animal models of anxiety in mice used in the screening of anxiolytics. Both conditioned and unconditioned models are described, in order to represent all types of animal models of anxiety. Behavioral studies require careful attention to variable parameters linked to environment, handling, or paradigms; this is also discussed. Finally, we focus on the consequences of re-exposure to the apparatus. Test-retest procedures can provide new answers, but should be intensively studied in order to revalidate the entire paradigm as an animal model of anxiety. PMID:26487810

  3. Drug and bioactive molecule screening based on a bioelectrical impedance cell culture platform.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Sakthivel; Bennet, Devasier; Kim, Sanghyo

    2014-01-01

    This review will present a brief discussion on the recent advancements of bioelectrical impedance cell-based biosensors, especially the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system for screening of various bioactive molecules. The different technical integrations of various chip types, working principles, measurement systems, and applications for drug targeting of molecules in cells are highlighted in this paper. Screening of bioactive molecules based on electric cell-substrate impedance sensing is a trial-and-error process toward the development of therapeutically active agents for drug discovery and therapeutics. In general, bioactive molecule screening can be used to identify active molecular targets for various diseases and toxicity at the cellular level with nanoscale resolution. In the innovation and screening of new drugs or bioactive molecules, the activeness, the efficacy of the compound, and safety in biological systems are the main concerns on which determination of drug candidates is based. Further, drug discovery and screening of compounds are often performed in cell-based test systems in order to reduce costs and save time. Moreover, this system can provide more relevant results in in vivo studies, as well as high-throughput drug screening for various diseases during the early stages of drug discovery. Recently, MEMS technologies and integration with image detection techniques have been employed successfully. These new technologies and their possible ongoing transformations are addressed. Select reports are outlined, and not all the work that has been performed in the field of drug screening and development is covered. PMID:25525360

  4. Drug and bioactive molecule screening based on a bioelectrical impedance cell culture platform

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Sakthivel; Bennet, Devasier; Kim, Sanghyo

    2014-01-01

    This review will present a brief discussion on the recent advancements of bioelectrical impedance cell-based biosensors, especially the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system for screening of various bioactive molecules. The different technical integrations of various chip types, working principles, measurement systems, and applications for drug targeting of molecules in cells are highlighted in this paper. Screening of bioactive molecules based on electric cell-substrate impedance sensing is a trial-and-error process toward the development of therapeutically active agents for drug discovery and therapeutics. In general, bioactive molecule screening can be used to identify active molecular targets for various diseases and toxicity at the cellular level with nanoscale resolution. In the innovation and screening of new drugs or bioactive molecules, the activeness, the efficacy of the compound, and safety in biological systems are the main concerns on which determination of drug candidates is based. Further, drug discovery and screening of compounds are often performed in cell-based test systems in order to reduce costs and save time. Moreover, this system can provide more relevant results in in vivo studies, as well as high-throughput drug screening for various diseases during the early stages of drug discovery. Recently, MEMS technologies and integration with image detection techniques have been employed successfully. These new technologies and their possible ongoing transformations are addressed. Select reports are outlined, and not all the work that has been performed in the field of drug screening and development is covered. PMID:25525360

  5. A Cell-Based Internalization and Degradation Assay with an Activatable Fluorescence-Quencher Probe as a Tool for Functional Antibody Screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Peter Corbett; Shen, Yang; Snavely, Marshall D; Hiraga, Kaori

    2015-08-01

    For the development of therapeutically potent anti-cancer antibody drugs, it is often important to identify antibodies that internalize into cells efficiently, rather than just binding to antigens on the cell surface. Such antibodies can mediate receptor endocytosis, resulting in receptor downregulation on the cell surface and potentially inhibiting receptor function and tumor growth. Also, efficient antibody internalization is a prerequisite for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into target cells and is critical for the development of antibody-drug conjugates. Here we describe a novel activatable fluorescence-quencher pair to quantify the extent of antibody internalization and degradation in the target cells. In this assay, candidate antibodies were labeled with a fluorescent dye and a quencher. Fluorescence is inhibited outside and on the surface of cells, but activated upon endocytosis and degradation of the antibody. This assay enabled the development of a process for rapid characterization of candidate antibodies potentially in a high-throughput format. By employing an activatable secondary antibody, primary antibodies in purified form or in culture supernatants can be screened for internalization and degradation. Because purification of candidate antibodies is not required, this method represents a direct functional screen to identify antibodies that internalize efficiently early in the discovery process. PMID:26024945

  6. A Cell-Based Internalization and Degradation Assay with an Activatable Fluorescence–Quencher Probe as a Tool for Functional Antibody Screening

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peter Corbett; Shen, Yang; Snavely, Marshall D.; Hiraga, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    For the development of therapeutically potent anti-cancer antibody drugs, it is often important to identify antibodies that internalize into cells efficiently, rather than just binding to antigens on the cell surface. Such antibodies can mediate receptor endocytosis, resulting in receptor downregulation on the cell surface and potentially inhibiting receptor function and tumor growth. Also, efficient antibody internalization is a prerequisite for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into target cells and is critical for the development of antibody–drug conjugates. Here we describe a novel activatable fluorescence–quencher pair to quantify the extent of antibody internalization and degradation in the target cells. In this assay, candidate antibodies were labeled with a fluorescent dye and a quencher. Fluorescence is inhibited outside and on the surface of cells, but activated upon endocytosis and degradation of the antibody. This assay enabled the development of a process for rapid characterization of candidate antibodies potentially in a high-throughput format. By employing an activatable secondary antibody, primary antibodies in purified form or in culture supernatants can be screened for internalization and degradation. Because purification of candidate antibodies is not required, this method represents a direct functional screen to identify antibodies that internalize efficiently early in the discovery process. PMID:26024945

  7. Continuous colorimetric screening assays for the detection of specific L- or D-α-amino acid transaminases in enzyme libraries.

    PubMed

    Heuson, Egon; Petit, Jean-Louis; Debard, Adrien; Job, Aurélie; Charmantray, Franck; de Berardinis, Véronique; Gefflaut, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    In the course of a project devoted to the stereoselective synthesis of non-proteinogenic α-amino acids using α-transaminases (α-TA), we report the design and optimization of generic high-throughput continuous assays for the screening of α-TA libraries. These assays are based on the use of L- or D-cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA) as irreversible amino donor and subsequent sulfite titration by colorimetry. The assays' quality was assessed under screening conditions. Hit selection thresholds were accurately determined for every couple of substrates and a library of 232 putative transaminases expressed in Escherichia coli host cells was screened. The reported high throughput screening assays proved very sensitive allowing the detection with high confidence of activities as low as 10 μU (i.e., 0.01 nmol substrate converted per min). The assays were also evidenced to be stereochemically discriminant since L-CSA and D-CSA allowed the exclusive detection of L-TA and D-TA, respectively. These generic assays thus allow testing the stereoselective conversion of a wide range of α-keto acids into α-amino acids of interest. As a proof of principle, the use of 2-oxo-4-phenylbutyric acid as acceptor substrate led to the identification of 54 new α-TA offering an access to valuable L- or D-homophenylalanine. PMID:26452497

  8. Pralatrexate Monitoring Using a Commercially Available Methotrexate Assay to Avoid Potential Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Jordan P; Vrontikis, Alaina; Sedillo, Courtney; Halwani, Ahmad S; Gilreath, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Pralatrexate (PDX) is a folate antagonist structurally similar to methotrexate (MTX). Unlike MTX, it is currently not known whether PDX exhibits delayed clearance and heightened toxicity in the setting of fluid overload. A specific serum assay for PDX is not commercially available. To our knowledge, we report the first case using an MTX serum assay as a surrogate for PDX concentrations to avoid a potential drug-drug interaction with pralatrexate. We describe a 76-year-old man with refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma who began therapy with weekly PDX 15 mg/m(2) intravenous infusions on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. He subsequently developed mucositis, a moderate right-sided pleural effusion, and peripheral edema over the next 5 weeks. Aggressive diuresis with furosemide was initiated, which was then withheld the day before his next PDX dose to avoid a potential drug-drug interaction between PDX and furosemide. His baseline MTX/PDX concentration (measured prior to administration of the cycle 2, week 2 PDX dose) was less than 0.20 μmol/L (i.e., undetectable). After PDX administration, his 1-hour peak MTX/PDX concentration increased to 0.58 μmol/L. Aggressive diuresis was withheld until his MTX/PDX concentration was undetectable, 43.5 hours later. PDX is more potent than MTX and displays similar pharmacokinetic properties. PDX concentrations using the serum MTX assay reflect lower values than those reported from PDX-specific assays in clinical studies. Because PDX is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of uncommon malignancies, it is unlikely that a specific assay will be commercially developed. We propose that the MTX serum assay has merit for use in determining when to reinstate possible interacting drug therapies such as loop diuretics. PMID:26809959

  9. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2015-10-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 10(2) to 4.30 × 10(3) IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(-) or IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(+)), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection. PMID:26202109

  10. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Knabbe, C.; Dreier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 102 to 4.30 × 103 IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA+/IgM+/IgG− or IgA+/IgM+/IgG+), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection. PMID:26202109

  11. Detection of abused drugs in human blood by using the on-site drug-screening device Oratect III.

    PubMed

    Toubou, Hirokazu; Namera, Akira; Arima, Yousuke; Uchida, Yukie; Torikoshi, Aiko; Moriya, Fumio; Nagao, Masataka

    2014-09-01

    A simple and precise drug screening method was developed for the detection of abused drugs in whole blood by using the Oratect III device that is usually employed for the detection of drugs in saliva. Whole blood was acidified with phosphoric acid, following which the hemolyzed solution was filtered through the ultrafiltration column Vivaspin 2 Hydrosart. The filtrate was then tested for the presence of drugs using Oratect III. The detection limit of the device for methamphetamine, amphetamine, morphine, codeine, dihydrocodeine, diazepam, alprazolam, estazolam, and prazepam in whole blood was 125, 125, 50, 50, 50, 25, 60, 15, and 75ng/mL, respectively. The concentration range detected was between therapeutic and toxic drug levels; therefore, the proposed method can be applied for detecting the presence of abused drugs in blood. Our method is a novel, optimized technique for use in forensic laboratories to screen whole blood for drugs of abuse. PMID:24877596

  12. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay is a rapid, cheap, screening test for the in vitro anti-tuberculous activity of chalcones.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Suventha; Koorbanally, Neil A; Moodley, Thrineshen; Ramjugernath, Deresh; Pillay, Manormoney

    2014-09-01

    Rapid and reliable drug susceptibility testing facilitates replenishment of the TB drug pipeline in the fight against drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study compared the performance of the MTT and MABA assays on the anti-tuberculous activity of a set of chalcones. Twenty seven chalcones and chromenochalcones were screened against the laboratory strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv, using a microtitre plate MTT assay at 7 days. The MIC for 20 active compounds was subsequently determined using the MABA, MTT and the Macroscopic broth assays at 7, 14 and 21 days. No significant difference in the MICs, or increase in the MICs was observed over time between the MABA (p=0.209) and the MTT (p=0.207) assays, in contrast to the gold standard, the Macroscopic broth assay (p=0.000). The MICs (16 to >128μg/ml) were much higher than the currently used TB drugs. In conclusion, the MTT assay is a cost effective method (R0.06/well) for the rapid in vitro screening of chalcones against M. tuberculosis, producing reliable results in 8 days. The chalcone with a MIC of 16μg/mL shows promise as a potential lead compound and should be investigated further. PMID:24978593

  13. Detection and prevalence of drug use in arrested drivers using the Dräger Drug Test 5000 and Affiniton DrugWipe oral fluid drug screening devices.

    PubMed

    Logan, Barry K; Mohr, Amanda L A; Talpins, Stephen K

    2014-09-01

    The use of oral fluid (OF) drug testing devices offers the ability to rapidly obtain a drug screening result at the time of a traffic stop. We describe an evaluation of two such devices, the Dräger Drug Test 5000 and the Affiniton DrugWipe, to detect drug use in a cohort of drivers arrested from an investigation of drug impaired driving (n = 92). Overall, 41% of these drivers were ultimately confirmed positive by mass spectrometry for the presence of one or more drugs. The most frequently detected drugs were cannabinoids (30%), benzodiazepines (11%) and cocaine (10%). Thirty-nine percent of drivers with blood alcohol concentrations >0.08 g/100 mL were found to be drug positive. Field test results obtained from OF samples were compared with collected OF and urine samples subsequently analyzed in the laboratory by gas or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Dräger Drug Test 5000 (DDT5000) and DrugWipe returned overall sensitivities of 51 and 53%, and positive predictive values of 93 and 63%, respectively. The most notable difference in performance was the DDT5000's better sensitivity in detecting marijuana use. Both devices failed to detect benzodiazepine use. Oral fluid proved to be a more effective confirmatory specimen, with more drugs being confirmed in OF than urine. PMID:24894458

  14. Imaging-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay To Identify New Molecules with Transmission-Blocking Potential against Plasmodium falciparum Female Gamete Formation

    PubMed Central

    Miguel-Blanco, Celia; Lelièvre, Joël; Delves, Michael J.; Bardera, Ana I.; Presa, Jesús L.; López-Barragán, María José; Ruecker, Andrea; Marques, Sara; Sinden, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    In response to a call for the global eradication of malaria, drug discovery has recently been extended to identify compounds that prevent the onward transmission of the parasite, which is mediated by Plasmodium falciparum stage V gametocytes. Lately, metabolic activity has been used in vitro as a surrogate for gametocyte viability; however, as gametocytes remain relatively quiescent at this stage, their ability to undergo onward development (gamete formation) may be a better measure of their functional viability. During gamete formation, female gametocytes undergo profound morphological changes and express translationally repressed mRNA. By assessing female gamete cell surface expression of one such repressed protein, Pfs25, as the readout for female gametocyte functional viability, we developed an imaging-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify transmission-blocking compounds. This assay, designated the P. falciparum female gametocyte activation assay (FGAA), was scaled up to a high-throughput format (Z′ factor, 0.7 ± 0.1) and subsequently validated using a selection of 50 known antimalarials from diverse chemical families. Only a few of these agents showed submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations in the assay: thiostrepton, methylene blue, and some endoperoxides. To determine the best conditions for HTS, a robustness test was performed with a selection of the GlaxoSmithKline Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS) and the final screening conditions for this library were determined to be a 2 μM concentration and 48 h of incubation with gametocytes. The P. falciparum FGAA has been proven to be a robust HTS assay faithful to Plasmodium transmission-stage cell biology, and it is an innovative useful tool for antimalarial drug discovery which aims to identify new molecules with transmission-blocking potential. PMID:25801574

  15. Mutagenicity studies with praziquantel, a new anthelmintic drug: tissue-, host-, and urine-mediated mutagenicity assays.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, J; Frohberg, H

    1977-09-28

    Praziquantel, a new anthelmintic drug with activity against all species of schistosomes pathogenic to man, and against a wide range of Cestodes, was tested for mutagenic potential. For the detection of both base substitutions and frameshift mutations, Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 and TA 98 were used as tester strains. Using the plate assay with and without added S-9, host-mediated assay and urine-mediated assay without and after incubation with beta-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase, no mutagenic activity could be detected. PMID:334117

  16. A High Throughput Screening Assay System for the Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of gsp

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Hu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z.; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Marugan, Juan J.; Southall, Noel; Neumann, Susanne; Northup, John K.; Ferrer, Marc; Collins, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT) or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H). Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT) or higher (R201C and R201H) cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)–based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses. PMID:24667240

  17. An interactive visualization-based approach for high throughput screening information management in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Pui Shan Chan, Tammy; Malik, Preeti; Singh, Rahul

    2006-01-01

    While high throughput screening (HTS) techniques are capable of generating large amounts of biologically significant data, assimilating and mining this information can be extremely complex and potentially crucial information patterns can easily be lost in the mounds of data. The predominantly life-science oriented scientific training of the researchers in this area furthermore, precludes their using complex querying or data-mining algorithms. Keeping in account these challenges, our goal in this paper is to provide a highly intuitive environment for storing and interacting with large amounts of HTS assay data. The principal modes of user-data interactions supported in the proposed paradigm are interaction and visualization rich. Moreover, they span the heterogeneous data modalities common to drug discovery, including but not limited to chemical structures, high-throughput assay formats, graphical information, and alpha-numeric data types. Case studies and experiments demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in terms of its ease of use as well as its capability to discern complex information patterns in the data. PMID:17947168

  18. Cell-Based Hepatitis C Virus Infection Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Assay for Antiviral Compound Screening

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuemei; Uprichard, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects an estimated 3% of the population and is a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Since HCV therapeutic and preventative options are limited, the development of new HCV antivirals has become a global health care concern. This has spurred the development of cell-based infectious HCV high-throughput screening assays to test the ability of compounds to inhibit HCV infection. This unit describes methods that may be used to assess the in vitro efficacy of HCV antivirals using a cell-based high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) HCV infection screening assay, which allows for the identification of inhibitors that target HCV at any step in the viral life cycle. Basic protocols are provided for compound screening during HCV infection and analysis of compound efficacy using an HCV FRET assay. Support protocols are provided for propagation of infectious HCV and measurement of viral infectivity. PMID:20812217

  19. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Bryan T.; Eastman, Richard T.; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S.; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R.; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D.; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A.; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R.; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D.; Su, Xin-zhuan; Thomas, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  20. Evaluation of a Benchtop HIV Ultradeep Pyrosequencing Drug Resistance Assay in the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Girshengorn, Shirley; Matus, Natalia; Talio, Hadass; Achsanov, Svetlana; Zeldis, Irene; Fratty, Ilana S.; Katchman, Eugene; Brosh-Nissimov, Tal; Hassin, David; Alon, Danny; Bentwich, Zvi; Yust, Israel; Amit, Sharon; Forer, Relly; Vulih Shultsman, Ina; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Detection of low-abundance drug resistance mutations (DRMs) of HIV-1 is an evolving approach in clinical practice. Ultradeep pyrosequencing has shown to be effective in detecting such mutations. The lack of a standardized commercially based assay limits the wide use of this method in clinical settings. 454 Life Sciences (Roche) is developing an HIV ultradeep pyrosequencing assay for their benchtop sequencer. We assessed the prototype plate in the clinical laboratory. Plasma samples genotyped by the standardized TruGene kit were retrospectively tested by this assay. Drug-treated subjects failing therapy and drug-naive patients were included. DRM analysis was based on the International AIDS Society USA DRM list and the Stanford algorithm. The prototype assay detected all of the DRMs detected by TruGene and additional 50 low-abundance DRMs. Several patients had low-abundance D67N, K70R, and M184V reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations that persisted long after discontinuation of the drug that elicited these mutations. Additional patient harbored low-abundance V32I major protease inhibitor mutation, which under darunavir selection evolved later to be detected by TruGene. Stanford analysis suggested that some of the low-abundance DRMs were likely to affect the resistance burden in these subjects. The prototype assay performs at least as well as TruGene and has the advantage of detecting low-abundance drug resistance mutations undetected by TruGene. Its ease of use and lab-scale platform will likely facilitate its use in the clinical laboratory. The extent to which the detection of low-abundance DRMs will affect patient management is still unknown, but it is hoped that use of such an assay in clinical practice will help resolve this important question. PMID:23284027

  1. Cost-effectiveness of interferon-gamma release assay for entry tuberculosis screening in prisons.

    PubMed

    Kowada, A

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of active tuberculosis (TB) and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in inmates and prison staff is higher than that in the general population. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) provide more accurate diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection with higher specificity than the tuberculin skin test (TST). To assess the cost effectiveness of QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) compared to TST, TST followed by QFT and chest X-ray, we constructed Markov models using a societal perspective on the lifetime horizon. The main outcome measure of effectiveness was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. The incremental cost-effectiveness was compared. The QFT-alone strategy was the most cost-effective for entry TB screening in prisons in developed countries. Cost-effectiveness was not sensitive to the rates of BCG vaccination, LTBI, TB, HIV infection and multidrug-resistant TB. Entry TB screening using an IGRA in prisons should be considered on the basis of its cost-effectiveness by public health intervention. PMID:23286364

  2. Electrochemical assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening in cell medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Ying; Wang, Xiaonan; Chen, Yangyang; Li, Genxi

    2015-12-15

    An electrochemical method is established in this work for the assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening through one-step displacement reaction, which can be directly used in cell medium. The displacement reaction can be achieved via strong binding of 4-aminophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (pAPG)/magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to pyrene boric acid (PBA) immobilized on the surface of graphite electrode (GE), compared to that of dopamine (DA)/sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Since α-glucosidase can specifically catalyze MNPs/pAPG into MNPs/pAP which has no binding capacity with PBA, the activity of both isolated and membrane bound enzyme can be well evaluated by using this proposed method. Meanwhile, signal amplification can be accomplished via the immobilization of DA at the outer layer of AgNPs, and the accuracy can be strengthened through magnetic separation. Moreover, this method can also be utilized for inhibitor screening not only in the medium containing the enzyme but also in cell medium. With good precision and accuracy, it may be extended to other proteases and their inhibitors as well. PMID:26201984

  3. Implementation of an interferon-gamma release assay to screen for tuberculosis in refugees and immigrants.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Terri; Tomaro, Julie; Jobb, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Despite increased use and accuracy of interferon-gamma release assays to detect latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in foreign-born arrivals in the United States, risk characteristics associated with positive results are not well characterized. We conducted a retrospective record review of 541 refugees and immigrants screened for LTBI with QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT) at the Spokane Public Health Clinic from January 2, 2008, through June 5, 2009. Overall, 24 % of the arrivals had a positive QFT-IT, with the greatest frequency of positive results occurring in arrivals from Liberia (100 %) and Bhutan (39 %). More than the expected number of Burmese had indeterminate QFT-IT results. A positive QFT-IT was associated with age, race, ethnicity, and extent of TB burden in the country of origin. QFT-IT is useful to screen for LTBI in foreign-born arrivals, particularly middle-aged adults from high-burden countries. However, the QFT-IT may not yield meaningful results in groups with significant immunocompromise. PMID:23179470

  4. A Fluorescence-Based Assay for Proteinuria Screening in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Hanke, Nils; King, Benjamin L; Vaske, Bernhard; Haller, Hermann; Schiffer, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of genes compromising the glomerular filtration barrier in rodent models using transgenic or knockdown approaches is time- and resource-consuming and often leads to unsatisfactory results. Therefore, it would be beneficial to have a selection tool indicating that your gene of interest is in fact associated with proteinuria. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a rapid screening tool to study effects in glomerular filtration barrier integrity after genetic manipulation. We use either injection of high-molecular-weight dextrans or a transgenic fluorescent fish line [Tg(l-fabp:DBP:EGFP)] expressing a vitamin D-binding protein fused with eGFP for indirect detection of proteinuria. A loss of high-molecular-weight proteins from the circulation of the fish into the urine can be identified by monitoring fluorescence intensity in the zebrafish eye. Paired with an optimized analysis method, this assay provides an effective screening solution to detect filtration barrier damage with proteinuria before moving to a mammalian system. PMID:26125680

  5. Non-invasive screening of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in children using a dipstick immunocapture assay.

    PubMed

    Rodinová, M; Trefilová, E; Honzík, T; Tesařová, M; Zeman, J; Hansíková, H

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is among the most common childhood mitochondrial disorders. The diagnosis of this deficiency is complex, and muscle biopsy is used as the gold standard of diagnosis. Our aim was to minimize the patient burden and to test the use of a dipstick immunocapture assay (DIA) to determine the amount of CIV in non-invasively obtained buccal epithelial cells. Buccal smears were obtained from five children with Leigh syndrome including three children exhibiting a previously confirmed CIV deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts and two children who were clinical suspects for CIV deficiency; the smear samples were analysed using CI and CIV human protein quantity dipstick assay kits. Samples from five children of similar age and five adults were used as controls. Analysis of the controls demonstrated that only samples of buccal cells that were frozen for a maximum of 4 h after collection provide accurate results. All three patients with confirmed CIV deficiency due to mutations in the SURF1 gene exhibited significantly lower amounts of CIV than the similarly aged controls; significantly lower amounts were also observed in two new patients, for whom later molecular analysis also confirmed pathologic mutations in the SURF1 gene. We conclude that DIA is a simple, fast and sensitive method for the determination of CIV in buccal cells and is suitable for the screening of CIV deficiency in non-invasively obtained material from children who are suspected of having mitochondrial disease. PMID:25629267

  6. A high-throughput in vivo micronucleus assay for genome instability screening in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Karp, Natasha A; Ng, Bee Ling; Jackson, Stephen P; Adams, David J; McIntyre, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    We describe a sensitive, robust, high-throughput method for quantifying the formation of micronuclei, markers of genome instability, in mouse erythrocytes. Micronuclei are whole chromosomes or chromosome segments that have been separated from the nucleus. Other methods of detection rely on labour-intensive, microscopy-based techniques. Here, we describe a 2-d, 96-well plate-based flow cytometric method of micronucleus scoring that is simple enough for a research technician experienced in flow cytometry to perform. The assay detects low levels of genome instability that cannot be readily identified by classic phenotyping, using 25 μl of blood. By using this assay, we have screened >10,000 blood samples and discovered novel genes that contribute to vertebrate genome maintenance, as well as novel disease models and mechanisms of genome instability disorders. We discuss experimental design considerations, including statistical power calculation, we provide troubleshooting tips, and we discuss factors that contribute to a false-positive increase in the number of micronucleated red blood cells and to experimental variability. PMID:25551665

  7. GeneChip{sup {trademark}} screening assay for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Cronn, M.T.; Miyada, C.G.; Fucini, R.V.

    1994-09-01

    GeneChip{sup {trademark}} assays are based on high density, carefully designed arrays of short oligonucleotide probes (13-16 bases) built directly on derivatized silica substrates. DNA target sequence analysis is achieved by hybridizing fluorescently labeled amplification products to these arrays. Fluorescent hybridization signals located within the probe array are translated into target sequence information using the known probe sequence at each array feature. The mutation screening assay for cystic fibrosis includes sets of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect numerous different mutations that have been described in 14 exons and one intron of the CFTR gene. Each mutation site is addressed by a sub-array of at least 40 probe sequences, half designed to detect the wild type gene sequence and half designed to detect the reported mutant sequence. Hybridization with homozygous mutant, homozygous wild type or heterozygous targets results in distinctive hybridization patterns within a sub-array, permitting specific discrimination of each mutation. The GeneChip probe arrays are very small (approximately 1 cm{sup 2}). There miniature size coupled with their high information content make GeneChip probe arrays a useful and practical means for providing CF mutation analysis in a clinical setting.

  8. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. PMID:26707064

  9. Network-based in silico drug efficacy screening.

    PubMed

    Guney, Emre; Menche, Jörg; Vidal, Marc; Barábasi, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    The increasing cost of drug development together with a significant drop in the number of new drug approvals raises the need for innovative approaches for target identification and efficacy prediction. Here, we take advantage of our increasing understanding of the network-based origins of diseases to introduce a drug-disease proximity measure that quantifies the interplay between drugs targets and diseases. By correcting for the known biases of the interactome, proximity helps us uncover the therapeutic effect of drugs, as well as to distinguish palliative from effective treatments. Our analysis of 238 drugs used in 78 diseases indicates that the therapeutic effect of drugs is localized in a small network neighborhood of the disease genes and highlights efficacy issues for drugs used in Parkinson and several inflammatory disorders. Finally, network-based proximity allows us to predict novel drug-disease associations that offer unprecedented opportunities for drug repurposing and the detection of adverse effects. PMID:26831545

  10. Network-based in silico drug efficacy screening

    PubMed Central

    Guney, Emre; Menche, Jörg; Vidal, Marc; Barábasi, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    The increasing cost of drug development together with a significant drop in the number of new drug approvals raises the need for innovative approaches for target identification and efficacy prediction. Here, we take advantage of our increasing understanding of the network-based origins of diseases to introduce a drug-disease proximity measure that quantifies the interplay between drugs targets and diseases. By correcting for the known biases of the interactome, proximity helps us uncover the therapeutic effect of drugs, as well as to distinguish palliative from effective treatments. Our analysis of 238 drugs used in 78 diseases indicates that the therapeutic effect of drugs is localized in a small network neighborhood of the disease genes and highlights efficacy issues for drugs used in Parkinson and several inflammatory disorders. Finally, network-based proximity allows us to predict novel drug-disease associations that offer unprecedented opportunities for drug repurposing and the detection of adverse effects. PMID:26831545

  11. A Drug Screening Method Based on the Autophagy Pathway and Studies of the Mechanism of Evodiamine against Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jian-Ping; Li, Wei-Zhong; Zhao, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Ge-Fei; Yang, Jia-Cai; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Xiao-Xuan; Xu, Yan-Xuan; Li, Kang-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    In this research, we have established a drug screening method based on the autophagy signal pathway using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation - fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET) technique to develop novel anti-influenza A virus (IAV) drugs. We selected Evodia rutaecarpa Benth out of 83 examples of traditional Chinese medicine and explored the mechanisms of evodiamine, the major active component of Evodia rutaecarpa Benth, on anti-IAV activity. Our results showed that evodiamine could significantly inhibit IAV replication, as determined by a plaque inhibition assay, an IAV vRNA promoter luciferase reporter assay and the Sulforhodamine B method using cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction. Additionally, evodiamine could significantly inhibit the accumulation of LC3-II and p62, and the dot-like aggregation of EGFP-LC3. This compound also inhibited the formation of the Atg5-Atg12/Atg16 heterotrimer, the expressions of Atg5, Atg7 and Atg12, and the cytokine release of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 after IAV infection. Evodiamine inhibited IAV-induced autophagy was also dependent on its action on the AMPK/TSC2/mTOR signal pathway. In conclusion, we have established a new drug screening method, and selected evodiamine as a promising anti-IAV compound. PMID:22900043

  12. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dinday, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  13. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Dinday, Matthew T; Baraban, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  14. Extending matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry enzyme screening assays to targets with small molecule substrates.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Rakesh; Corr, Jay J; Lebre, Daniel T; Seibel, William L; Greis, Kenneth D

    2009-10-30

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput screening (HTS) has tremendous potential as an alternative to current screening methods due to its speed, sensitivity, reproducibility and label-free readout. We recently reported that a new generation matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization triple quadrupole (MALDI-QqQ) mass spectrometer is ideally suited for a variety of enzyme assays and screening protocols. However, all the targets measured to date had peptide substrates that were easily monitored by selected ion monitoring (SIM) without interference from the MALDI matrix. To further extend the application to enzymes with small molecule, non-peptide substrates, we evaluated this method for measuring enzyme activity and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Due to the potential of MALDI matrix interference, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was investigated for selective MS/MS transitions and to accurately measure the conversion of acetylcholine into choline. Importantly, ionization, detection and MRM transition efficiency differences between the substrate and product can be overcome by pre-balancing the MRM transitions during method development, thus allowing for a direct readout of the enzyme activity using the ratio of the substrate and product signals. Further validation of the assay showed accurate concentration-dependent inhibition measurements of AChE with several known inhibitors. Finally, a small library of 1008 drug-like compounds was screened at a single dose (10 microM) and the top 10 inhibitors from this primary screen were validated in a secondary screen to determine the rank order of inhibitory potency for each compound. Collectively, these data demonstrate that a MALDI-QqQMS-based readout platform is amenable to measuring small molecule substrates and products and offers significant advantages over current HTS methods in terms of speed, sensitivity, reproducibility and reagent costs. PMID:19757451

  15. Screening and identification of proteins interacting with IL-24 by the yeast two-hybrid screen, Co-IP, and FRET assays.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui; Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiaojiao; Yu, Fang; Liu, Huilin; Zuo, Zhenyu; Yang, Zhonghua; Fan, Handong

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is an ideal tumor-suppressor gene, but the mechanisms underlying its antitumor specificity remain to be elucidated. The best way to investigate these problems is to begin from the initiation of corresponding signaling cascades activated by IL-24 with screening and identifying those proteins that interacted with IL-24. With the aim of identifying these initial interactions, a yeast two-hybrid screening was performed by transforming AH109 cells containing PGBKT7-IL-24 with a liver cDNA plasmid library. These cells were then plated on synthetic nutrient medium (SD/-Trp/-Leu/-His) for the first screening and on quadruple dropout medium containing X-α-gal for the second screening. Positive colonies were further verified by repeating the MATE experiments, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays in vitro. Following the yeast two-hybrid screening, 15 genes were selected for sequencing, with two genes, HLA-C and NDUFA13, further verified using Co-IP assays and FRET assays. Both HLA-C and NDUFA13 were found to interact with IL-24. We found that HLA-C and NDUFA13 could interact with IL-24 and it may be involved in the signal induced by IL-24. Overall, this study contributes further insight into the cancer-specific apoptosis-inducing abilities of IL-24 to potentially enhance its therapeutic potential, and it also provides outlets for other biological functions of IL-24. PMID:26930462

  16. Evaluation of Screening Assays for the Detection of Influenza A Virus Serum Antibodies in Swine.

    PubMed

    Goodell, C K; Prickett, J; Kittawornrat, A; Johnson, J; Zhang, J; Wang, C; Zimmerman, J J

    2016-02-01

    Increased surveillance of influenza A virus (IAV) infections in human and swine populations is mandated by public health and animal health concerns. Antibody assays have proven useful in previous surveillance programmes because antibodies provide a record of prior exposure and the technology is inexpensive. The objective of this research was to compare the performance of influenza serum antibody assays using samples collected from pigs (vaccinated or unvaccinated) inoculated with either A/Swine/OH/511445/2007 γ H1N1 virus or A/Swine/Illinois/02907/2009 Cluster IV H3N2 virus and followed for 42 days. Weekly serum samples were tested for anti-IAV antibodies using homologous and heterologous haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays, commercial swine influenza H1N1 and H3N2 indirect ELISAs, and a commercial influenza nucleoprotein (NP)-blocking ELISA. The homologous HIs showed 100% diagnostic sensitivity, but largely failed to detect infection with the heterologous virus. With diagnostic sensitivities of 1.4% and 4.9%, respectively, the H1N1 and H3N2 indirect ELISAs were ineffective at detecting IAV antibodies in swine infected with the contemporary influenza viruses used in the study. At a cut-off of S/N ≤ 0.60, the sensitivity and specificity of the NP-blocking ELISA were estimated at 95.5% and 99.6%, respectively. Statistically significant factors which affected S/N results include vaccination status, inoculum (virus subtype), day post-inoculation and the interactions between those factors (P < 0.0001). Serum antibodies against NP provide an ideal universal diagnostic screening target and could provide a cost-effective approach for the detection and surveillance of IAV infections in swine populations. PMID:24571447

  17. Study on microvisualizing assay of delivered drug infiltration using 2-color optical coherence dosigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamichi, Yu; Saeki, Souichi; Saito, Takashi; Hiro, Takafumi; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2009-02-01

    Recently, clinical treatments applying drug delivery system (DDS) have been being developed. However, it is quite difficult to in vivo diagnose spatiotemporal distribution of drug infiltration, so the validation study should be too insufficient to progress the DDS development. In this study, we propose a visualizing assay of DDS, namely 2-Color Optical Coherence Dosigraphy (2C-OCD). 2C-OCD is based on optical coherence tomography using two waveband "2-Color" light sources having different optical absorbance of drug. This can simultaneously provide microscale tomographic images of scatterer density and drug concentration. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this technique, this was applied to drug-diffusion phenomena in microchannel and lipidrich plaques of rabbit with drug administration, respectively. As a result of diffusion experiment, it was confirmed that 2C-OCD can visualize a cross-sectional map of drug concentration, with spatial resolution 5 micro m × 10 μm and accuracy plus-minus 13.0 μM. In ex vivo animal experiment, the enhancement of absorptivity could be observed inside lipidrich plaques, in which DDS drug could be therein uptaken by drug administration. The absorption maps corresponding to drug concentration were calculated, comparing with their histological images. Consequently, they had good coincidence with histological examinations, therefore, it was concluded that 2C-OCD could visualize drug infiltration in biological tissue with almost the same spatial resolution as OCT system.

  18. In vitro screening of clinical drugs identifies sensitizers of oncolytic viral therapy in glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Berghauser Pont, L M E; Balvers, R K; Kloezeman, J J; Nowicki, M O; van den Bossche, W; Kremer, A; Wakimoto, H; van den Hoogen, B G; Leenstra, S; Dirven, C M F; Chiocca, E A; Lawler, S E; Lamfers, M L M

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) have broad potential as an adjuvant for the treatment of solid tumors. The present study addresses the feasibility of clinically applicable drugs to enhance the oncolytic potential of the OV Delta24-RGD in glioblastoma. In total, 446 drugs were screened for their viral sensitizing properties in glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) in vitro. Validation was done for 10 drugs to determine synergy based on the Chou Talalay assay. Mechanistic studies were undertaken to assess viability, replication efficacy, viral infection enhancement and cell death pathway induction in a selected panel of drugs. Four viral sensitizers (fluphenazine, indirubin, lofepramine and ranolazine) were demonstrated to reproducibly synergize with Delta24-RGD in multiple assays. After validation, we underscored general applicability by testing candidate drugs in a broader context of a panel of different GSCs, various solid tumor models and multiple OVs. Overall, this study identified four viral sensitizers, which synergize with Delta24-RGD and two other strains of OVs. The viral sensitizers interact with infection, replication and cell death pathways to enhance efficacy of the OV. PMID:26196249

  19. Developing highER-throughput zebrafish screens for in-vivo CNS drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of brain disorders and the lack of their efficient treatments necessitate improved in-vivo pre-clinical models and tests. The zebrafish (Danio rerio), a vertebrate species with high genetic and physiological homology to humans, is an excellent organism for innovative central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and small molecule screening. Here, we outline new strategies for developing higher-throughput zebrafish screens to test neuroactive drugs and predict their pharmacological mechanisms. With the growing application of automated 3D phenotyping, machine learning algorithms, movement pattern- and behavior recognition, and multi-animal video-tracking, zebrafish screens are expected to markedly improve CNS drug discovery. PMID:25729356

  20. Developing highER-throughput zebrafish screens for in-vivo CNS drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of brain disorders and the lack of their efficient treatments necessitate improved in-vivo pre-clinical models and tests. The zebrafish (Danio rerio), a vertebrate species with high genetic and physiological homology to humans, is an excellent organism for innovative central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and small molecule screening. Here, we outline new strategies for developing higher-throughput zebrafish screens to test neuroactive drugs and predict their pharmacological mechanisms. With the growing application of automated 3D phenotyping, machine learning algorithms, movement pattern- and behavior recognition, and multi-animal video-tracking, zebrafish screens are expected to markedly improve CNS drug discovery. PMID:25729356

  1. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets. PMID:26691755

  2. A novel assay to assess the effectiveness of antiangiogenic drugs in human breast cancer.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cytotoxic drugs maintain antiangiogenic properties, but there are no human, tumor-based assays to evaluate their antiangiogenic potential. We used a fibrin-thrombin clot-based angiogenesis model to evaluate the angiogenic response of human breast cancer to various cytotoxic agents commonly used...

  3. A GFP-tagged nucleoprotein-based aggregation assay for anti-influenza drug discovery and antibody development.

    PubMed

    Antony, Helma; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2013-10-21

    Influenza is a viral pandemic that affects millions of people worldwide. Seasonal variations due to genetic shuffling and antigenic drifts in the influenza viruses have necessitated continual updating of therapeutics. The growing resistance to current influenza drugs has increased demand for new antivirals. The highly conserved nature of NP, a multi-functional viral protein that is serotypically distinct and abundantly expressed during infection, has led to its use in developing universal biotherapeutics and vaccines that could be effective against the virus, irrespective of its strain variations. Compounds causing aggregation of NP have recently been shown to be potent antivirals but require the development of new high-throughput assays capable of screening compounds with similar modes of action. Here, we describe the development of a new bioassay for the Influenza A nucleoprotein (NP). The assay was developed to quantify ligand-induced aggregation of a GFP-tagged NP and was validated with aggregation-inducing compounds such as nucleozin and a NP-specific antibody. The new NP-GFP aggregation assay can be performed with partially purified or mixtures of proteins and is amenable to a high-throughput format. Using this assay, we demonstrate the potential of a new anti-NP polyclonal antibody that we have obtained from chicken. This cost-effective high-yield source of anti-NP IgY has potential for large-scale production and development of therapeutic antibodies. The simplicity, speed and flexibility of this assay make it an invaluable tool for timely development of effective antivirals that can help to control future epidemics. PMID:23961535

  4. New drug susceptibility test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the hybridization protection assay.

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, J; Koga, H; Kohno, S; Tashiro, T; Hara, K

    1996-01-01

    We developed a novel method for early detection of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by using the hybridization protection assay (HPA). The number of viable bacteria during the incubation period correlated well with the number of relative light units measured by the HPA. In addition, the relative light unit values of susceptible strains on the first, third and fifth days of incubation were significantly different from those of resistant strains for both isoniazid and rifampin. Our results suggest that after isolation of the organism from clinical specimens, drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis are accurately detected by the HPA even after 1 day of incubation with the drug. PMID:8727932

  5. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit or their first unbooked visit to the maternity ward were recruited during a 4-month study period in 2011. The participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographic information, a single question on illicit drug use during pregnancy and the DAST-10. Urine samples screened positive by the urine Point-of-Care Test were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. DAST-10 performance was compared with three different gold standards: urinalysis, self-reported drug use, and evidence of drug use by urinalysis or self-report. 1214 Chinese pregnant women participated in the study and 1085 complete DAST-10 forms were collected. Women who had used illicit drugs had significantly different DAST-10 scores than those who had not. The sensitivity of DAST-10 for identify illicit drug use in pregnant women ranged from 79.2% to 33.3% and specificity ranged from 67.7% to 99.7% using cut-off scores from ≥1 to ≥3. The ~80% sensitivity of DAST-10 using a cut-off score of ≥1 should be sufficient for screening of illicit drug use in Chinese pregnant women, but validation tests for drug use are needed. PMID:26091290

  6. Automated drug screening with contractile muscle tissue engineered from dystrophic myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vandenburgh, Herman; Shansky, Janet; Benesch-Lee, Frank; Skelly, Kirsten; Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Saponjian, Yero; Tseng, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of factors that improve muscle function in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) could lead to an improved quality of life. To establish a functional in vitro assay for muscle strength, mdx murine myoblasts, the genetic homologue of DMD, were tissue engineered in 96-microwell plates into 3-dimensional muscle constructs with parallel arrays of striated muscle fibers. When electrically stimulated, they generated tetanic forces measured with an automated motion tracking system. Thirty-one compounds of interest as potential treatments for patients with DMD were tested at 3 to 6 concentrations. Eleven of the compounds (insulin-like growth factor-1, creatine, β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate, trichostatin A, lisinopril, and 6 from the glucocorticoid family) significantly increased tetanic force relative to placebo-treated controls. The glucocorticoids methylprednisolone, deflazacort, and prednisone increased tetanic forces at low doses (EC50 of 6, 19, and 56 nM, respectively), indicating a direct muscle mechanism by which they may be benefitting DMD patients. The tetanic force assay also identified beneficial compound interactions (arginine plus deflazacort and prednisone plus creatine) as well as deleterious interactions (prednisone plus creatine inhibited by pentoxifylline) of combinatorial therapies taken by some DMD patients. Since mdx muscle in vivo and DMD patients respond in a similar manner to many of these compounds, the in vitro assay will be a useful tool for the rapid identification of new potential treatments for muscle weakness in DMD and other muscle disorders.—Vandenburgh, H., Shansky, J., Benesch-Lee, F., Skelly, K., Spinazzola, J.M., Saponjian, Y., Tseng, B.S. Automated drug screening with contractile muscle tissue engineered from dystrophic myoblasts. PMID:19487307

  7. Identification of allosteric ERK2 inhibitors through in silico biased screening and competitive binding assay.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Sugiyama, Hajime; Mori, Yurika; Takahashi, Naruhide; Tomonaga, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is a drug target for type 2 diabetes mellitus. A peptide-type ERK2 inhibitor (PEP) was discovered in the previous study through the knowledge-based method and showed physiological effects on the db/db mice model of type 2 diabetes. Here, the crystal structure showed that PEP bound to the allosteric site without the interruption of the ATP competitive inhibitor binding to ERK2. An in silico biased-screening using the focused library rendered three compounds with inhibitory activity of IC50 <100μM. Among them, two compounds revealed the concentration-dependent competition with PEP and could be lead compounds for antidiabetic medicine. PMID:26733474

  8. The E-SCREEN assay as a tool to identify estrogens: an update on estrogenic environmental pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C; Chung, K L; Fernandez, M F; Olea, N; Serrano, F O

    1995-01-01

    Estrogens are defined by their ability to induce the proliferation of cells of the female genital tract. The wide chemical diversity of estrogenic compounds precludes an accurate prediction of estrogenic activity on the basis of chemical structure. Rodent bioassays are not suited for the large-scale screening of chemicals before their release into the environment because of their cost, complexity, and ethical concerns. The E-SCREEN assay was developed to assess the estrogenicity of environmental chemicals using the proliferative effect of estrogens on their target cells as an end point. This quantitative assay compares the cell number achieved by similar inocula of MCF-7 cells in the absence of estrogens (negative control) and in the presence of 17 beta-estradiol (positive control) and a range of concentrations of chemicals suspected to be estrogenic. Among the compounds tested, several "new" estrogens were found; alkylphenols, phthalates, some PCB congeners and hydroxylated PCBs, and the insecticides dieldrin, endosulfan, and toxaphene were estrogenic by the E-SCREEN assay. In addition, these compounds competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor and increased the levels of progesterone receptor and pS2 in MCF-7 cells, as expected from estrogen mimics. Recombinant human growth factors (bFGF, EGF, IGF-1) and insulin did not increase in cell yields. The aims of the work summarized in this paper were a) to validate the E-SCREEN assay; b) to screen a variety of chemicals present in the environment to identify those that may be causing reproductive effects in wildlife and humans; c) to assess whether environmental estrogens may act cumulatively; and finally d) to discuss the reliability of this and other assays to screen chemicals for their estrogenicity before they are released into the environment. PMID:8593856

  9. The E-screen assay as a tool to identify estrogens: An update on estrogenic environmental pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, A.M.; Sonnenschein, C.; Chung, K.L.; Fernandez, M.F.

    1995-10-01

    Estrogens are defined by their ability to induce the proliferation of cells of the female genital tract. The wide chemical diversity of estrogenic compounds precludes an accurate prediction of estrogenic activity on the basis of chemical structure. Rodent bioassays are not suited for the large-scale screening of chemicals before their release into the environment because of their cost, complexity, and ethical concerns. The E-SCREEN assay was developed to assess the estrogenicity of environmental chemicals using the proliferative effect of estrogens on their target cells as an end point. This quantitative assay compares the cell number achieved by similar inocula of MCF-7 cells in the absence of estrogens (negative control) and in the presence of 17{beta}-estradiol (positive control) and a range of concentrations of chemicals suspected to be estrogenic. Among the compounds tested, several {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} estrogens were found; alkylphenols, phthalates, some PCB congeners and hydroxylated PCBs, and the insecticides dieldrin, endosulfan, and toxaphene were estrogenic by the E-SCREEN assay. In addition, these compounds competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor and increased the levels of progesterone receptor and pS2 in MCF-7 cells, as expected from estrogen mimics. Recombinant human growth factors (bFGF, EGF, IGF-1) and insulin did not increase cell yields. The aims of the work summarized in this paper were (a) to validate the E-SCREEN assay; (b) to screen a variety of chemicals present in the environment to identify those that may be causing reproductive effects in wildlife and humans; (c) to assess whether environmental estrogens may act cumulatively; and finally (d) to discuss the reliability of this and other assays to screen chemicals for their estrogenicity before they are released into the environment. 57 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Using a Non-Image-Based Medium-Throughput Assay for Screening Compounds Targeting N-myristoylation in Intracellular Leishmania Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Daniel; Bell, Andrew S.; Heal, William P.; Hutton, Jennie A.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tate, Edward W.; Smith, Deborah F.

    2014-01-01

    We have refined a medium-throughput assay to screen hit compounds for activity against N-myristoylation in intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania donovani. Using clinically-relevant stages of wild type parasites and an Alamar blue-based detection method, parasite survival following drug treatment of infected macrophages is monitored after macrophage lysis and transformation of freed amastigotes into replicative extracellular promastigotes. The latter transformation step is essential to amplify the signal for determination of parasite burden, a factor dependent on equivalent proliferation rate between samples. Validation of the assay has been achieved using the anti-leishmanial gold standard drugs, amphotericin B and miltefosine, with EC50 values correlating well with published values. This assay has been used, in parallel with enzyme activity data and direct assay on isolated extracellular amastigotes, to test lead-like and hit-like inhibitors of Leishmania N-myristoyl transferase (NMT). These were derived both from validated in vivo inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei NMT and a recent high-throughput screen against L. donovani NMT. Despite being a potent inhibitor of L. donovani NMT, the activity of the lead T. brucei NMT inhibitor (DDD85646) against L. donovani amastigotes is relatively poor. Encouragingly, analogues of DDD85646 show improved translation of enzyme to cellular activity. In testing the high-throughput L. donovani hits, we observed macrophage cytotoxicity with compounds from two of the four NMT-selective series identified, while all four series displayed low enzyme to cellular translation, also seen here with the T. brucei NMT inhibitors. Improvements in potency and physicochemical properties will be required to deliver attractive lead-like Leishmania NMT inhibitors. PMID:25522361

  11. Data quality in drug discovery: the role of analytical performance in ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Wätzig, Hermann; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Steinicke, Franziska; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Baumann, Knut; Exner, Thomas; Böckler, Frank M; El Deeb, Sami

    2015-09-01

    Despite its importance and all the considerable efforts made, the progress in drug discovery is limited. One main reason for this is the partly questionable data quality. Models relating biological activity and structures and in silico predictions rely on precisely and accurately measured binding data. However, these data vary so strongly, such that only variations by orders of magnitude are considered as unreliable. This can certainly be improved considering the high analytical performance in pharmaceutical quality control. Thus the principles, properties and performances of biochemical and cell-based assays are revisited and evaluated. In the part of biochemical assays immunoassays, fluorescence assays, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and affinity capillary electrophoresis are discussed in details, in addition radiation-based ligand binding assays, mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and microscale thermophoresis are briefly evaluated. In addition, general sources of error, such as solvent, dilution, sample pretreatment and the quality of reagents and reference materials are discussed. Biochemical assays can be optimized to provide good accuracy and precision (e.g. percental relative standard deviation <10 %). Cell-based assays are often considered superior related to the biological significance, however, typically they cannot still be considered as really quantitative, in particular when results are compared over longer periods of time or between laboratories. A very careful choice of assays is therefore recommended. Strategies to further optimize assays are outlined, considering the evaluation and the decrease of the relevant error sources. Analytical performance and data quality are still advancing and will further advance the progress in drug development. PMID:26070362

  12. AlphaScreen HTS and Live Cell Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) Assays for Identification of Tau–Fyn SH3 Interaction Inhibitors for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, J. Nicholas; Diggs, Pauleatha V.; Nebane, N. Miranda; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E. Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Maddry, Joseph A.; Suto, Mark J.; Roberson, Erik D.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and with Americans’ increasing longevity it is becoming an epidemic. There are currently no effective treatments for this disorder. Abnormalities of Tau track more closely with cognitive decline than the most studied therapeutic target in AD, amyloid-beta, but the optimal strategy for targeting Tau has not yet been identified. Based on considerable preclinical data from AD models, we hypothesize that interactions between Tau and the Src-family tyrosine kinase, Fyn, are pathogenic in AD. Genetically reducing either Tau or Fyn is protective in AD mouse models, and a dominant negative fragment of Tau that alters Fyn localization is also protective. Here, we describe a new AlphaScreen assay and a live-cell BRET assay using a novel BRET pair for quantifying the Tau–Fyn interaction. We used these assays to map the binding site on Tau for Fyn to the 5th and 6th PXXP motifs, to show that AD-associated phosphorylation at MARK sites increase the affinity of the Tau–Fyn interaction, and to identify Tau–Fyn interaction inhibitors by HTS. This screen has identified a variety of chemically tractable hits, suggesting that the Tau–Fyn interaction may represent a good drug target for AD. PMID:25156556

  13. A 96-well microtiter plate assay for high-throughput screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoxia; Sha, Shanshan; Liu, Likun; Li, Xin; Ma, Yufang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (RmlB) is the second enzyme for the biosynthesis of dTDP-l-rhamnose, which is a sugar donor to the synthesis of the cell wall linker, d-N-acetylglucosamine-l-rhamnose. RmlB is essential to mycobacterial growth and is not found in humans; therefore, it is a potential target for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. So far, there has been no suitable method for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. Here, the recombinant M. tuberculosis RmlB was purified and an absorbance-based microtiter plate assay was developed for RmlB activity. It could be used for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. The kinetic properties of M. tuberculosis RmlB, including optimal pH, optimal temperature, the effect of metal ions, and the kinetic parameters, were determined with this assay. The inhibitory effects of dTTP and dTDP on M. tuberculosis RmlB were also studied with the assay. PMID:26778528

  14. Using adverse outcome pathway analysis to guide development of high-throughput screening assays for thyroid-disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Adverse Outcome Pathway Analysis to Guide Development of High-Throughput Screening Assays for Thyroid-Disruptors Katie B. Paul1,2, Joan M. Hedge2, Daniel M. Rotroff4, Kevin M. Crofton4, Michael W. Hornung3, Steven O. Simmons2 1Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Post...

  15. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  16. Screening ToxCast Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  17. High-throughput micro-plate HCL-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum contains tannin which is a phenolic compound that offers health promoting antioxidant capacity. The HCl-vanillin assay is a common and time consuming method for determining tannin content, but is not efficient for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeding ...

  18. A new HBsAg screening assay designed for sensitive detection of HBsAg subtypes and variants.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, M H; de Jong, J J; Haenen, W; Jacobs, T; Couwenberg, F; Ahlers-de Boer, G J C M; Hellings, J A

    2006-01-01

    The design of a new HBsAg screening assay, the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra is based on the use of monoclonal antibodies raised against native wild-type HBsAg and reactive with HBsAg in which the common 'a'-determinant is modified by site-directed mutagenesis of four of the cysteine moieties. The design was checked using the same cysteine variants and samples from patients known to be infected with HBsAg variants. The results found were compared with other state-of-the-art commercial screening assays. The design of the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra enabled detection of all variant HBsAg-positive samples in contrast to the other commercial assays. An additional 980 samples were tested to assess the specificity and sensitivity of the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra. Screening of presumed negative serum and plasma samples resulted in a specificity of 100%. This makes the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra the first screening assay with a design able to detect HBsAg variants with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:16428888

  19. Maintaining Specimen Integrity for G6PD Screening by Cytofluorometric Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Maria; Ward, Walter H. J.; LaRue, Nicole; Kalnoky, Michael; Pal, Sampa

    2015-01-01

    Cytochemical staining remains an efficient way of identifying females who are heterozygous for the X chromosome-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene. G6PD is highly polymorphic with certain alleles resulting in low intracellular G6PD activity in red blood cells. Low intracellular G6PD activity is associated with a risk of severe hemolysis when exposed to an oxidative stress such as fava beans, certain drugs and infections. Heterozygous females express the enzyme from both X-chromosome alleles resulting in two red blood cell populations each with G6PD enzyme characteristics representative of each allele; for example, normal and deficient. Cytochemical staining is the only way to determine the relative representation of each allele in red blood cells, a feature that is critical when assessing the risk for severe hemolysis when exposed to an oxidant such as the anti-malarial drug primaquine. This letter discusses red blood cell integrity with respect to the cytofluorometric assays for G6PD activity. An approach to making this test more robust is suggested. The approach makes this test more reliable and extends its use to a broader range of blood specimens. PMID:25786434

  20. CARS based label-free assay for assessment of drugs by monitoring lipid droplets in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Steuwe, Christian; Patel, Imran I; Ul-Hasan, Mahmud; Schreiner, Alexander; Boren, Joan; Brindle, Kevin M; Reichelt, Stefanie; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2014-11-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is becoming an established tool for label-free multi-photon imaging based on molecule specific vibrations in the sample. The technique has proven to be particularly useful for imaging lipids, which are abundant in cells and tissues, including cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LD), which are recognized as dynamic organelles involved in many cellular functions. The increase in the number of lipid droplets in cells undergoing cell proliferation is a common feature in many neoplastic processes [1] and an increase in LD number also appears to be an early marker of drug-induced cell stress and subsequent apoptosis [3]. In this paper, a CARS-based label-free method is presented to monitor the increase in LD content in HCT116 colon tumour cells treated with the chemotherapeutic drugs Etoposide, Camptothecin and the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine. Using CARS, LDs can easily be distinguished from other cell components without the application of fluorescent dyes and provides a label-free non-invasive drug screening assay that could be used not only with cells and tissues ex vivo but potentially also in vivo. PMID:24343869

  1. A yeast-based assay identifies drugs that interfere with immune evasion of the Epstein-Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Voisset, Cécile; Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Mazars, Anne; Arbach, Hratch; Le Cann, Marie; Soubigou, Flavie; Apcher, Sébastien; Fåhraeus, Robin; Blondel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is tightly associated with certain human cancers, but there is as yet no specific treatment against EBV-related diseases. The EBV-encoded EBNA1 protein is essential to maintain viral episomes and for viral persistence. As such, EBNA1 is expressed in all EBV-infected cells, and is highly antigenic. All infected individuals, including individuals with cancer, have CD8+ T cells directed towards EBNA1 epitopes, yet the immune system fails to detect and destroy cells harboring the virus. EBV immune evasion depends on the capacity of the Gly-Ala repeat (GAr) domain of EBNA1 to inhibit the translation of its own mRNA in cis, thereby limiting the production of EBNA1-derived antigenic peptides presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathway. Here we establish a yeast-based assay for monitoring GAr-dependent inhibition of translation. Using this assay we identify doxorubicin (DXR) as a compound that specifically interferes with the GAr effect on translation in yeast. DXR targets the topoisomerase-II–DNA complexes and thereby causes genomic damage. We show, however, that the genotoxic effect of DXR and various analogs thereof is uncoupled from the effect on GAr-mediated translation control. This is further supported by the observation that etoposide and teniposide, representing another class of topoisomerase-II–DNA targeting drugs, have no effect on GAr-mediated translation control. DXR and active analogs stimulate, in a GAr-dependent manner, EBNA1 expression in mammalian cells and overcome GAr-dependent restriction of MHC class I antigen presentation. These results validate our approach as an effective high-throughput screening assay to identify drugs that interfere with EBV immune evasion and, thus, constitute candidates for treating EBV-related diseases, in particular EBV-associated cancers. PMID:24558096

  2. High resolution melting curve assay for rapid detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuhki; Iwade, Yoshito; Hayakawa, Eri; Nakano, Manabu; Sakai, Takashi; Mitarai, Satoshi; Katayama, Masahiko; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    We developed and evaluated a high resolution melting (HRM) curve assay by using real-time PCR for the detection of the most frequent mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which are responsible for the resistance of four anti-TB drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin. The HRM assay was successfully used for the detection of dominant mutations: A516V, H526A, H526T, S531L, L533P, and A516G/S531L in rpoB; S315T, and S315A in katG; -15C/T, and -8T/C in mab-inhA; M306I in embB; K88Q and K43R in rpsL; and 513A/C in rrs. We were able to discriminate the mutant from the wild type by analyzing the melting-curve shape in 40 clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and the results of the HRM assay were completely consistent with those of DNA sequencing. This HRM assay is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method that can be performed in a closed tube. Therefore, our assay is a potentially useful tool for the rapid detection of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. PMID:23793795

  3. A Microplate Format Assay for Real-Time Screening for New Aldolases that Accept Aryl-Substituted Acceptor Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huan; Enugala, Thilak Reddy; Widersten, Mikael

    2015-12-01

    Aldolases are potentially important biocatalysts for asymmetric synthesis of polyhydroxylated compounds. Fructose 6-phosphate aldolase (FSA) is of particular interest by virtue of its unusually relaxed dependency on phosphorylated substrates. FSA has been reported to be a promising catalyst of aldol addition involving aryl-substituted acceptors such as phenylacetaldehyde that can react with donor ketones such as hydroxyacetone. Improvement of the low intrinsic activity with bulky acceptor substrates of this type is of great interest but has been hampered by the lack of powerful screening protocols applicable in directed evolution strategies. Here we present a new screen allowing for direct spectrophotometric recording of retro-aldol cleavage. The assay utilizes an aldehyde reductase produced in vitro by directed evolution; it reduces the aldehyde product formed after cleavage of the aldol by FSA. The assay is suitable both for steady-state enzyme kinetics and for real-time activity screening in a 96-well format. PMID:26449620

  4. A sensitive and high throughput bacterial luminescence assay for assessing aquatic toxicity--the BLT-Screen.

    PubMed

    van de Merwe, Jason P; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2015-05-01

    Bioassays using naturally luminescent bacteria are commonly used to assess the toxicity of environmental contaminants, detected by a decrease in luminescence. Typically, this has involved the use of commercial test kits such as Microtox and ToxScreen. These commercial assays, however, have limitations for routine environmental monitoring, including the need for specialized equipment, a low throughput and high on-going costs. There is therefore a need to develop a bacteria bioassay that is sensitive, high-throughput and cost effective. This study presents the development and application of the BLT-Screen (Bacterial Luminescence Toxicity Screen), a 96-well plate bioassay using Photobacterium leiognathi. During development of the method, the concentration of the phosphate buffer in the experimental medium was adjusted to maximize the sensitivity of the assay, and protocols for analyzing both solid-phase extracts and raw water samples were established. A range of organic compounds and metals were analyzed in the assay, as well as extracts of various water samples, including drinking water, wastewater effluent and river water. The IC50 values of the organic compounds and metals tested in the BLT-Screen were comparable to previously published ToxScreen and Microtox data. In addition, the assay was sensitive enough to detect toxicity in all water types tested, and performed equally well for both solid-phase extracts and raw water samples. The BLT-Screen therefore presents a cost-effective, sensitive and high throughput method for testing the toxicity of environmental contaminants in a range of water types that has widespread applications for research, as well as for routine monitoring and operation of wastewater and drinking water plants. PMID:25845535

  5. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Stolfi, Adrienne; Splaingard, Deborah; Earley, Elizabeth; Onadeko, Oluwole; Splaingard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: This is a retrospective study of urine drug screens performed the morning before MSLT in 383 patients < 21 years old referred for EDS. MSLT results were divided into those with (1) (−) urine drug screens, (2) urine drug screens (+) for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or THC plus other drugs, and (3) urine drug screens (+) for drugs other than THC. Groups were compared with Fisher exact tests or one-way ANOVA. Results: 38 (10%) urine drug tests were (+): 14 for THC and 24 for other drugs. Forty-three percent of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy, 0% consistent with idiopathic hypersomnia, 29% other, and 29% normal. This was statistically different from those with (−) screens (24% narcolepsy, 20% idiopathic hypersomnia, 6% other, 50% normal), and those (+) for drugs other than THC (17% narcolepsy, 33% idiopathic hypersomnia, 4% other, 46% normal (p = 0.01). Six percent (6/93) of patients with MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy were drug screen (+) for THC; 71% of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had multiple sleep onset REM periods (SOREMS). There were no (+) urine drug screens in patients < 13 years old. Conclusion: Many pediatric patients with (+) urine drug screens for THC met MSLT criteria for narcolepsy or had multiple SOREMs. Drug screening is important in interpreting MSLT findings for children ≥ 13 years. Citation: Dzodzomenyo S, Stolfi A, Splaingard D, Earley E, Onadeko O, Splaingard M. Urine toxicology screen in multiple sleep latency test: the correlation of positive tetrahydrocannabinol, drug negative patients, and narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):93–99. PMID:25348245

  6. High Throughput Screening for Small Molecule Enhancers of the Interferon Signaling Pathway to Drive Next-Generation Antiviral Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhara A.; Patel, Anand C.; Nolan, William C.; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN) signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z′>0.7). Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs) led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify small molecules that might achieve this therapeutic benefit. PMID:22574190

  7. Development of a Fluorescence-based Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51 Inhibition Assay for Effective Compound Triaging in Drug Discovery Programmes for Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jennifer; Brand, Stephen; Voice, Michael; Caballero, Ivan; Calvo, David; Read, Kevin D

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), is a life threatening global health problem with only two drugs available for treatment (benznidazole and nifurtimox), both having variable efficacy in the chronic stage of the disease and high rates of adverse drug reactions. Inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) have proven effective against T. cruzi in vitro and in vivo in animal models of Chagas disease. Consequently two azole inhibitors of CYP51 (posaconazole and ravuconazole) have recently entered clinical development by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative. Further new drug treatments for this disease are however still urgently required, particularly having a different mode of action to CYP51 in order to balance the overall risk in the drug discovery portfolio. This need has now been further strengthened by the very recent reports of treatment failure in the clinic for both posaconazole and ravuconazole. To this end and to prevent enrichment of drug candidates against a single target, there is a clear need for a robust high throughput assay for CYP51 inhibition in order to evaluate compounds active against T. cruzi arising from phenotypic screens. A high throughput fluorescence based functional assay using recombinantly expressed T. cruzi CYP51 (Tulahuen strain) is presented here that meets this requirement. This assay has proved valuable in prioritising medicinal chemistry resource on only those T. cruzi active series arising from a phenotypic screening campaign where it is clear that the predominant mode of action is likely not via inhibition of CYP51. PMID:26394211

  8. Development of a Fluorescence-based Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51 Inhibition Assay for Effective Compound Triaging in Drug Discovery Programmes for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Jennifer; Brand, Stephen; Voice, Michael; Caballero, Ivan; Calvo, David; Read, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), is a life threatening global health problem with only two drugs available for treatment (benznidazole and nifurtimox), both having variable efficacy in the chronic stage of the disease and high rates of adverse drug reactions. Inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) have proven effective against T. cruzi in vitro and in vivo in animal models of Chagas disease. Consequently two azole inhibitors of CYP51 (posaconazole and ravuconazole) have recently entered clinical development by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative. Further new drug treatments for this disease are however still urgently required, particularly having a different mode of action to CYP51 in order to balance the overall risk in the drug discovery portfolio. This need has now been further strengthened by the very recent reports of treatment failure in the clinic for both posaconazole and ravuconazole. To this end and to prevent enrichment of drug candidates against a single target, there is a clear need for a robust high throughput assay for CYP51 inhibition in order to evaluate compounds active against T. cruzi arising from phenotypic screens. A high throughput fluorescence based functional assay using recombinantly expressed T. cruzi CYP51 (Tulahuen strain) is presented here that meets this requirement. This assay has proved valuable in prioritising medicinal chemistry resource on only those T. cruzi active series arising from a phenotypic screening campaign where it is clear that the predominant mode of action is likely not via inhibition of CYP51. PMID:26394211

  9. Real-time PCR TaqMan assay for rapid screening of bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis is one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity. The rapid detection of pathogens in blood of septic patients is essential for adequate antimicrobial therapy and better prognosis. This study aimed to accelerate the detection and discrimination of Gram-positive (GP) and Gram-negative (GN) bacteria and Candida species in blood culture samples by molecular methods. Methods The Real-GP®, -GN®, and -CAN® real-time PCR kit (M&D, Wonju, Republic of Korea) assays use the TaqMan probes for detecting pan-GP, pan-GN, and pan-Candida species, respectively. The diagnostic performances of the real-time PCR kits were evaluated with 115 clinical isolates, 256 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottle samples, and the data were compared to results obtained from conventional blood culture. Results Eighty-seven reference strains and 115 clinical isolates were correctly identified with specific probes corresponding to GP-bacteria, GN-bacteria and Candida, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the real-time PCR kit with blood culture samples were 99.6% and 89.5%, respectively. Conclusions The Real-GP®, -GN®, and -CAN® real-time PCR kits could be useful tools for the rapid and accurate screening of bloodstream infections (BSIs). PMID:24393579

  10. Expedient screening for HIV-1 protease inhibitors using a simplified immunochromatographic assay.

    PubMed

    Kitidee, Kuntida; Khamaikawin, Wannisa; Thongkum, Weeraya; Tawon, Yardpiroon; Cressey, Tim R; Jevprasesphant, Rachaneekorn; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2016-05-15

    A colloidal gold-based immunochromatographic (IC) strip test was developed and validated for the detection of HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) activity and inhibitory effect of HIV-PR inhibitors (PIs). It is a unique 'two-step' process requiring the combination of proteolysis of HIV-PR and an immunochromatographic reaction. Monoclonal antibodies to the free C-terminus of HIV matrix protein (HIV-MA) conjugated to gold particles and a monoclonal antibody against intact and cleaved forms of the HIV-MA are immobilized on the 'Test'-line of the IC strip. Using lopinavir, a potent HIV protease inhibitor, the IC-strip was optimized to detect inhibitory activity against HIV-protease. At a lopinavir concentration of 1000ng/mL (its suggested minimum effective concentration), a HIV-PRH6 concentration of 6mg/mL and incubation period of 60min were the optimal conditions. A preliminary comparison between a validated high-performance liquid chromatography assay and the IC-strip to semi-quantify HIV protease inhibitor concentrations (lopinavir and atazanavir) demonstrated good agreement. This simplified method is suitable for the rapid screening of novel protease inhibitors for future therapeutic use. Moreover, the IC strip could also be optimized to semi-quantify PIs concentrations in plasma samples. PMID:26490422

  11. Development a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening carotenoids in eggs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dapeng; Liao, Feng; Pan, Yuanhu; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) with broad-specificity against several carotenoid analogs with equal or similar efficacy was prepared. The obtained mAb C11, with the IgG1 isotype, showed cross-reactivity (CR) with canthaxanthin (100%), β-ionone acid (140.4%), β-carotene (92.9%), capsanthin (90.1%), β-apo-8'-carotenal (92.7%), and xanthophyll (95.8%). Using the mAb C11, a highly sensitive and inexpensive indirect competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) was developed with a simple sample preparation procedure for the simultaneous detection of these carotenoid compounds in eggs. The limit of detection of the various carotenoids ranged from 1.31mgkg(-1) to 1.48mgkg(-1). Recoveries from egg yolks spiked with the above carotenoids ranged from 91.8% to 113.3%, with coefficients of variation (CVs) of less than 14.8%. These results suggest that the developed ic-ELISA is a sensitive, specific, accurate, and inexpensive method that is suitable for the screening of carotenoid residues in routine monitoring. PMID:26920278

  12. Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 as an Assay System for Screening of Pharmacological Chaperones for Phenylketonuria Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Min; Yang, Yun Gyeong; Kim, Hye-Lim; Park, Young Shik

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed an assay system for missense mutations in human phenylalanine hydroxylases (hPAHs). To demonstrate the reliability of the system, eight mutant proteins (F39L, K42I, L48S, I65T, R252Q, L255V, S349L, and R408W) were expressed in a mutant strain (pah(-)) of Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 disrupted in the indigenous gene encoding PAH. The transformed pah- cells grown in FM minimal medium were measured for growth rate and PAH activity to reveal a positive correlation between them. The protein level of hPAH was also determined by western blotting to show the impact of each mutation on protein stability and catalytic activity. The result was highly compatible with the previous ones obtained from other expression systems, suggesting that Dictyostelium is a dependable alternative to other expression systems. Furthermore, we found that both the protein level and activity of S349L and R408W, which were impaired severely in protein stability, were rescued in HL5 nutrient medium. Although the responsible component(s) remains unidentified, this unexpected finding showed an important advantage of our expression system for studying unstable proteins. As an economic and stable cell-based expression system, our development will contribute to mass-screening of pharmacological chaperones for missense PAH mutations as well as to the in-depth characterization of individual mutations. PMID:25563416

  13. A fluorescence-based helicase assay: application to the screening of G-quadruplex ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Oscar; Gueddouda, Nassima Meriem; Boul, Jean-Baptiste; Bourdoncle, Anne; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Helicases, enzymes that unwind DNA or RNA structure, are present in the cell nucleus and in the mitochondrion. Although the majority of the helicases unwind DNA or RNA duplexes, some of these proteins are known to resolve unusual structures such as G-quadruplexes (G4) in vitro. G4 may form stable barrier to the progression of molecular motors tracking on DNA. Monitoring G4 unwinding by these enzymes may reveal the mechanisms of the enzymes and provides information about the stability of these structures. In the experiments presented herein, we developed a reliable, inexpensive and rapid fluorescence-based technique to monitor the activity of G4 helicases in real time in a 96-well plate format. This system was used to screen a series of G4 structures and G4 binders for their effect on the Pif1 enzyme, a 5? to 3? DNA helicase. This simple assay should be adaptable to analysis of other helicases and G4 structures. PMID:25765657

  14. High-throughput screening assay for the environmental water samples using cellular response profiles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tianhong; Li, Haoran; Khare, Swanand; Huang, Biao; Yu Huang, Dorothy; Zhang, Weiping; Gabos, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Chemical and physical analyses are commonly used as screening methods for the environmental water. However, these methods can only look for the targeted substance but may miss unexpected toxicants. Furthermore, the synergistic effects of mixture cannot be detected. In order to set up the assay criteria for determining various biological activities at a cellular level that could potentially lead to toxicity of environmental water samples, a novel test based on cellular response by using Real-Time Cellular Analyzer (RTCA) is proposed in this study. First, the water sample is diluted to a series of strengths (80%, 60%, 40%, 30%, 20% and 10%) to get the multi-concentration cellular response profile. Then, the area under the cellular response profile (AUCRP) is calculated. Comparing to the normal cell growth of negative control, a new biological activity index named Percentage of Effect (PoE) has been presented which reflects the cumulative inhibitory activity of cell growth over the log-phase. Finally, a synthetical index PoE50 is proposed to evaluate the intensity of biological activities in water samples. The biological experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25637748

  15. Tuberculin Skin Tests versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in Tuberculosis Screening among Immigrant Visa Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Chuke, Stella O.; Yen, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Laserson, Kayla F.; Phuoc, Nguyen Huu; Trinh, Nguyen An; Nhung, Duong Thi Cam; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Qui, An Dang; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Loan, Le Thien Huong; Jones, Warren G.; Whitworth, William C.; Shah, J. Jina; Painter, John A.; Mazurek, Gerald H.; Maloney, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Use of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) as part of tuberculosis (TB) screening among immigrants from high TB-burden countries has not been fully evaluated. Methods. Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTBI) based on TST, or the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-G), was determined among immigrant applicants in Vietnam bound for the United States (US); factors associated with test results and discordance were assessed; predictive values of TST and QFT-G for identifying chest radiographs (CXRs) consistent with TB were calculated. Results. Of 1,246 immigrant visa applicants studied, 57.9% were TST positive, 28.3% were QFT-G positive, and test agreement was 59.4%. Increasing age was associated with positive TST results, positive QFT-G results, TST-positive but QFT-G-negative discordance, and abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. Positive predictive values of TST and QFT-G for an abnormal CXR were 25.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Conclusion. The estimated prevalence of MTBI among US-bound visa applicants in Vietnam based on TST was twice that based on QFT-G, and 14 times higher than a TST-based estimate of MTBI prevalence reported for the general US population in 2000. QFT-G was not better than TST at predicting abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. PMID:24738031

  16. A High-Content Biosensor Based Screen Identifies Cell Permeable Activators and Inhibitors of EGFR Function: Implications in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Antczak, Christophe; Mahida, Jeni P.; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Calder, Paul A.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    Early success of kinase inhibitors has validated their use as drugs. However, discovery efforts have also suffered from high attrition rates; due to lack of cellular activity. We reasoned that screening for such candidates in live cells would identify novel cell permeable modulators for development. For this purpose, we have used our recently optimized EGFR biosensor (EGFRB) assay to screen for modulators of EGFR activity. Here, we report on its validation under HTS conditions displaying a S/N ratio of 21 and a Z’ value of 0.56; attributes of a robust cell based assay. We performed a pilot screen against a library of 6,912 compounds demonstrating good reproducibility and identifying 82 inhibitors and 66 activators with initial hit rates of 1.2% and 0.95 %, respectively. Follow up dose response studies revealed that 12 out of the 13 known EGFR inhibitors in the library confirmed as hits. ZM-306416, a VEGFR antagonist, was identified as a potent inhibitor of EGFR function. Flurandrenolide, beclomethasone and ebastine were confirmed as activators of EGFR function. Taken together, our results validate this novel approach and demonstrate its utility in the discovery of novel kinase modulators with potential use in the clinic. PMID:22573732

  17. New colorimetric screening assays for the directed evolution of fungal laccases to improve the conversion of plant biomass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungal laccases are multicopper oxidases with huge applicability in different sectors. Here, we describe the development of a set of high-throughput colorimetric assays for screening laccase libraries in directed evolution studies. Results Firstly, we designed three colorimetric assays based on the oxidation of sinapic acid, acetosyringone and syringaldehyde with λmax of 512, 520 and 370 nm, respectively. These syringyl-type phenolic compounds are released during the degradation of lignocellulose and can act as laccase redox mediators. The oxidation of the three compounds by low and high-redox potential laccases evolved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced quantifiable and linear responses, with detection limits around 1 mU/mL and CV values below 16%. The phenolic substrates were also suitable for pre-screening mutant libraries on solid phase format. Intense colored-halos were developed around the yeast colonies secreting laccase. Furthermore, the oxidation of violuric acid to its iminoxyl radical (λmax of 515 nm and CV below 15%) was devised as reporter assay for laccase redox potential during the screening of mutant libraries from high-redox potential laccases. Finally, we developed three dye-decolorizing assays based on the enzymatic oxidation of Methyl Orange (470 nm), Evans Blue (605 nm) and Remazol Brilliant Blue (640 nm) giving up to 40% decolorization yields and CV values below 18%. The assays were reliable for direct measurement of laccase activity or to indirectly explore the oxidation of mediators that do not render colored products (but promote dye decolorization). Every single assay reported in this work was tested by exploring mutant libraries created by error prone PCR of fungal laccases secreted by yeast. Conclusions The high-throughput screening methods reported in this work could be useful for engineering laccases for different purposes. The assays based on the oxidation of syringyl-compounds might be valuable tools for tailoring laccases precisely enhanced to aid biomass conversion processes. The violuric assay might be useful to preserve the redox potential of laccase whilst evo