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  1. Parkinson's Drug Shows Promise Against Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155695.html Parkinson's Drug Shows Promise Against Macular Degeneration But more research ... no one is recommending that patients take the drug, levodopa (L-dopa), to thwart eye disease. But ...

  2. New Drug Shows Promise Against Severe Sinusitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157064.html New Drug Shows Promise Against Severe Sinusitis In early ... more severe patients are the target of the new treatment option," explained study author Dr. Claus Bachert, ...

  3. Cuba shows jump in HIV positives.

    PubMed

    Cuba experienced a substantial increase in the number of HIV cases in 1996 due primarily to a growth of foreign tourism and an increase in prostitution, health officials said. The Juventud Rebelde newspaper said that since HIV/AIDS testing began in 1985, government-run hospitals and clinics have detected 1609 HIV-positive cases. In 1995 the total was reported at 1196, meaning that 413 new cases were detected in 1996. This compared with only 97 new cases reported during 1995. HIV infection among the island's 11 million inhabitants has remained relatively low due to a massive testing program and a public health infrastructure that provides universal and free medical treatment. Cuba was a pioneer in the use of interferon on those testing HIV-positive. Cuba produces its own interferon, which prolongs the life expectancy of patients, and also reagents for AIDS testing. There are special sanitariums for AIDS patients in most of Cuba's 12 provinces. Cuban adults who test HIV-positive are required to enter the sanitarium in a policy reminiscent of the way tuberculosis patients were tested in the US earlier in this century. Officials said the isolation of patients in sanitariums has been somewhat relaxed over past years by introducing greater flexibility in allowing persons who are considered reliable to live at home or make prolonged visits. PMID:12292465

  4. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse Could your kids be at risk for substance ... drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has shown the important role that parents ...

  5. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  6. FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTIAIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Anti-Aircraft Gun Position, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  7. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 19. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING BRIDGE IN CLOSED POSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING BRIDGE IN CLOSED POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Niantic Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  9. 38. VIEW SHOWING 'CATFISH' SILO ELEVATOR IN UP POSITION, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. VIEW SHOWING 'CATFISH' SILO ELEVATOR IN UP POSITION, LOOKING NORTHWEST Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 6. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING MOVABLE SPAN IN CLOSED POSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING MOVABLE SPAN IN CLOSED POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Groton Bridge, Spanning Thames River between New London & Groton, New London, New London County, CT

  11. 7. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING MOVABLE SPAN IN OPEN POSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING MOVABLE SPAN IN OPEN POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Groton Bridge, Spanning Thames River between New London & Groton, New London, New London County, CT

  12. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF ROLLER GATE (IN RAISED POSITION), SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF ROLLER GATE (IN RAISED POSITION), SHOWING GATE FLANGES, GATE HEATER (LEFT FOREGROUND), ROLLER TRACK, CHAIN AND BRIDGE GIRDER, LOOKING EAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 3, Red Wing, Goodhue County, MN

  13. 4. VENTILATION FAN SHOWING RELATIVE POSITION IN THE AIR TUNNEL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VENTILATION FAN SHOWING RELATIVE POSITION IN THE AIR TUNNEL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  14. 4. INTERIOR, SHOWING HOIST IN POSITION NEXT TO WINDOW FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR, SHOWING HOIST IN POSITION NEXT TO WINDOW FOR VIEWING TAILINGS PILE, SLOT IN FRONT WALL FOR VIEWING HEADFRAME. - A. D. Wilcox Drift Mine, Boiler Cabin, Linda Creek near Dalton Highway, Bettles, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, AK

  15. New drugs for Gram-positive uropathogens.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Naber, K G

    2004-09-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent nosocomial infections. The bacterial spectrum encompasses Gram-negative but also Gram-positive pathogens in up to 30-40%. The existing treatment for Gram-positive pathogens is not always optimal. Antimicrobials for the treatment of Gram-positive uropathogens comprise older agents, such as aminopenicillins with or without beta-lactamase inhibitors and vancomycin, as well as newer fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin or gatifloxacin. However, resistant bacteria such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (except vancomycin-resistant) are generally also not susceptible to the fluoroquinolones. Therefore new agents need to be assessed in the treatment of UTI. Daptomycin and linezolid are new antimicrobial agents with good efficacy against Gram-positive uropathogens as shown by their minimal inhibitory concentrations. In a phase II study the urinary bactericidal activity of linezolid versus ciprofloxacin in volunteers showed comparable activity of both drugs against fluoroquinolone susceptible Gram-positive uropathogens, whereas linezolid was also as active against fluoroquinolone resistant ones. The pharmacokinetics and the mode of action of these two antibiotics are discussed together with some clinical data in the context of therapeutic use in patients with complicated UTIs. PMID:15364305

  16. 5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ABOVE THE BATHS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  17. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  18. Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. The two (2) arms act as simple spans, a small amount of negative bending is accommodated by the continous top and bottom truss chords due to a continuous condition. Note the inclined end post of each of the simple spans, the operator's house, center/pivot pier and the pivotal pole-line pole placed atop of bridge. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  19. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luis; Martnez-Garca, Marta; Prez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, Jos Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Prez-Victoria, Jos M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  20. Showing partial side view of swing bridge in open position. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Showing partial side view of swing bridge in open position. The operator's house is in the center of the truss bridge, directly over the center/pivot stone masonry pier. Note the two (2) center supports with the truss loads being delivered to the drum by a system of distributing girders. The swing bridge revolved on a cylindrical drum supported by rollers running on a circular track on the center/pivot pier. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  1. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abuse Could your kids be at risk for substance abuse? Families strive to find the best ways to ... drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has shown the important role that parents ...

  2. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  3. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  4. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  5. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  6. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  7. A Parent's Plea: To Keep Kids Off Drugs, Show Them Life's "Hard Realities."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Kimberly

    1983-01-01

    Having witnessed drug use, idleness, and dangerous driving, a parent urges school officials to encourage neighborhood vigilance, follow up on leads, use dogs to sniff out drugs, suspend hard cases, expose second offenders to drug victims in local hospitals, and provide students with positive role models and career goals. (PB)

  8. Is a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy a predictive factor for positive allergy tests to anaesthetics?

    PubMed Central

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman-Ionica, Nadia; Hagau, Denisa; Tranca, Sebastian; Sfichi, Manuela; Longrois, Dan

    2012-01-01

    AIMS International recommendations stipulate not performing screening skin tests to a drug in the absence of a clinical history consistent with that specific drug allergy. Nevertheless, two publications showed that a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy was the only predictive factor for a positive skin test when screening for allergy to anaesthetic drugs was done. We selected from a surgical population 40 volunteers with a prior history of allergy to non-anaesthetic drugs in order to analyse the prevalence of positive allergy tests to anaesthetics. METHODS The selected adult patients were tested for 11 anaesthetic drugs using in vivo tests: skin prick (SPT) and intradermal (IDT) tests and in vitro tests: the basophil activation test (BAT) and detection of drug-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). RESULTS The prevalence for the positive SPT and IDT was 1.6% and 5.8% respectively. The result of flow cytometry agreed with the SPT in five out of seven positive SPT (71%). IgEs confirmed two positive SPT with corresponding positive BAT. Ten per cent of the patients had a positive prick test to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). For midazolam none of the SPT was positive, but 11 patients had positive IDT nonconfirmed by BAT. CONCLUSION The prevalence of positive in vivo and in vitro allergy tests to NMBAs is higher in our study population. This could be an argument for pre-operative SPT to NMBAs for the surgical population with reported non-anaesthetic drug allergies. A larger prospective study is needed to validate changes in clinical practice. PMID:21988224

  9. Studies Show Microenvironment Plays Key Role in Anticancer Drug Resistance | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    As mounting evidence continues to show that evolutionary selective pressure will ultimately drive cancer cells to develop resistance to drug therapies, cancer researchers are looking for new treatment paradigms that might avoid or surmount drug resistance. One promising approach aims to better understand how the microenvironment surrounding a tumor impacts drug resistance and use that knowledge to create novel strategies for attacking tumors.

  10. [A case of drug-induced pulmonary injury showing organizing pneumonia pattern due to S-1].

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroaki; Shinano, Hideki; Kuraya, Daisuke; Fujioka, Yasunori

    2012-06-01

    Reported here is the case of a 76-year-old male with gastric cancer. Distal gastrectomy was performed after his admission to our hospital. Histopathologically, the cancer was determined to be in the advanced stage. Combination chemotherapy with CDDP and S-1 was administered for 6 courses, after which S-1 was used alone. Chest X-ray and CT showed multiple dispersed lesions in the lung. Further examination by bronchoscope was performed. Histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen revealed the lesion to be organizing pneumonia. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) for S-1 proved to be positive. Discontinuation of S-1 administration led to natural improvement of the pneumonia. These results suggest that S-1 had induced the organizing pneumonia. PMID:22705691

  11. Camera position east of CO172CE6, showing more of north and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Camera position east of CO-172-CE-6, showing more of north and east sides of middle east wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Camera position east of CO172CE8, showing east sides of two ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Camera position east of CO-172-CE-8, showing east sides of two most eastern wings and north side of most eastern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Military drug positive rates in the European Theater drug rates in Europe.

    PubMed

    Little, J S; Lukey, B J; Shimomura, E T; Fuhrmann, L S

    1993-03-01

    Urine samples were collected from Air Force and Army service members within the European Theater and analyzed for drugs of abuse employing radioimmunoassay and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). Data collected from January 1985 through December 1991 indicate that the total positive rate decreased from 4.67% to 0.69%. Of the drugs tested, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was the drug abused most in the European Theater during this time period. PMID:8454986

  14. New Drug for Severe Form of Arthritis Shows Promise in Trial

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Shows Promise in Trial Already approved to treat psoriasis, higher dose of Cosentyx helped 60 percent of ... A drug recently approved for the skin condition psoriasis may also help people with a debilitating form ...

  15. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients show a characteristic necrotizing perifascicular myositis.

    PubMed

    Mescam-Mancini, Lnaig; Allenbach, Yves; Hervier, Baptiste; Devilliers, Herv; Mariampillay, Kuberaka; Dubourg, Odile; Maisonobe, Thierry; Gherardi, Romain; Mezin, Paulette; Preusse, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner; Benveniste, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies can be classified as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, sporadic inclusion body myositis or non-specific myositis. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients are assigned to either polymyositis or dermatomyositis suggesting overlapping pathological features. We aimed to determine if anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive myopathy has a specific morphological phenotype. In a series of 53 muscle biopsies of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, relevant descriptive criteria defining a characteristic morphological pattern were identified. They were tested in a second series of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients and compared to 63 biopsies from patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. In anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, necrotic fibres, which strongly clustered in perifascicular regions, were frequently observed. Sarcolemmal complement deposition was detected specifically in perifascicular areas. Inflammation was mainly located in the perimysium and around vessels in 90.6%. Perimysial fragmentation was observed in 90% of cases. Major histocompatibility complex class I staining was diffusely positive, with a perifascicular reinforcement. Multivariate analysis showed that criteria defining perifascicular pathology: perifascicular necrosis, atrophy, and perimysial fragmentation allow the distinction of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, among patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients displayed perifascicular necrosis, whereas dermatomyositis patients exhibited perifascicular atrophy. PMID:26198592

  16. IET. Tank building (TAN627). Plans, elevation, details. shows position of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Tank building (TAN-627). Plans, elevation, details. shows position of tanks within building and concrete supports. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-627-A&S 420. Date: Fabruary 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 035-0627-00-693-106975 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Camera position east of CO172CE7, showing north and east sides ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Camera position east of CO-172-CE-7, showing north and east sides of the two most eastern wings. Note three wall anchors on north side of most eastern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. The anti-trypanosome drug fexinidazole shows potential for treating visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, Susan; Patterson, Stephen; Stojanovski, Laste; Simeons, Frederick R. C.; Norval, Suzanne; Kime, Robert; Read, Kevin D.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Safer and more effective oral drugs are required to treat visceral leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease that kills 50-60,000 people each year. Here we report that fexinidazole, a drug currently in phase I clinical trials for treating African trypanosomiasis, shows promise for treating visceral leishmaniasis. This 2-substituted 5-nitroimidazole drug is rapidly oxidized in vivo in mice, dogs and humans to sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites. Both metabolites of fexinidazole were active against Leishmania donovani amastigotes grown in macrophages, whereas the parent compound was inactive. Pharmacokinetic studies with fexinidazole (200 mg kg?1) showed that fexinidazole sulfone achieves blood concentrations in mice above the EC99 value for at least 24h following a single oral dose. A once daily regimen for 5 days at this dose resulted in a 98.4% suppression of infection in a mouse model of visceral leishmaniasis, equivalent to that seen with the drugs miltefosine and Pentostam, which are currently used clinically to treat visceral leishmaniasis. In African trypanosomes, the mode of action of nitro-drugs involves reductive activation via an NADH-dependent bacterial-like nitroreductase. Overexpression of the leishmanial homologue of this nitroreductase in L. donovani increased sensitivity to fexinidazole by 19-fold indicating that a similar mechanism is involved in both parasites. These findings illustrate the potential of fexinidazole as an oral drug therapy for treating visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:22301556

  19. Urine levels of drugs for which Triage DOA screening was positive.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between urine levels of target drugs of abuse for which Triage DOA gave positive results, as well as the cut-off levels for these drugs. Thirty-eight forensic urine samples positive for commonly abused drugs were involved. Of these samples, 12 were positive for barbiturates (BAR), 11 for benzodiazepines (BZO), 8 for opiates (OPI), 7 for amphetamines (AMP), and 4 for tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). In the BAR-positive urine samples, phenobarbital, amobarbital or barbital was detected at concentrations higher than cut-off levels. In the BZO-positive samples, diazepam, nordiazepam, triazolam, nitrazepam and/or midazolam was detected at concentrations lower than cut-off levels; in the triazolam-involved urine, alpha-hydroxytriazolam, a metabolite of triazolam, showed concentrations higher than cut-off level. In the AMP-positive samples, methamphetamine was detected at concentrations higher than cut-off level. Urine samples positive for OPI contained total dihydrocodeine, codeine or morphine at concentrations higher than cut-off levels. In TCA-positive samples, amitriptyline was detected at concentrations higher or lower than cut-off level, and clomipramine was detected at a concentration much lower than cut-off level. Metabolites of BZO and TCA, which are not typically analyzed by instrumental procedures, may cross-react to varying degrees with the antibodies used for Triage DOA. PMID:19261513

  20. Observational and Clinical Trial Findings on the Comparative Effectiveness of Diabetes Drugs Showed Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Flory, James H; Mushlin, Alvin I

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study compares an observational study of diabetes treatment effectiveness to randomized controlled trials to assess their convergent validity. Study Design and Setting Multivariable models were developed using observational data to describe change in HbA1c (% unit) and weight (kilograms) after addition of a second-line oral diabetes drug to metformin monotherapy. Randomized trials of these scenarios were systematically identified. The models were used to simulate each trial, and simulated and actual results were compared by linear regression and meta-analysis. Results 32 randomized trials of second-line diabetes oral therapy were identified. For all outcomes and drugs studied, simulation and actual results correlated (p < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences between meta-analyzed randomized and simulated results for effect on HbA1c. For effect on weight, results were qualitatively comparable, but for sulfonylureas the simulated weight gain was nominally greater than seen in the randomized controlled trials. Conclusions An observational study of diabetes drug effectiveness showed convergent validity with randomized data. This supports cautious use of the observational research to draw conclusions about drug effectiveness in populations not studied in clinical trials. This approach may be useful in other situations where observational and randomized data need integration. PMID:25432086

  1. FOXP2 targets show evidence of positive selection in European populations.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Qasim; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Chen, Yuan; Xue, Yali; Hu, Min; Vernes, Sonja C; Fisher, Simon E; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2013-05-01

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a highly conserved transcription factor that has been implicated in human speech and language disorders and plays important roles in the plasticity of the developing brain. The pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in FOXP2 in modern populations suggests that it has been the target of positive (Darwinian) selection during recent human evolution. In our study, we searched for evidence of selection that might have followed FOXP2 adaptations in modern humans. We examined whether or not putative FOXP2 targets identified by chromatin-immunoprecipitation genomic screening show evidence of positive selection. We developed an algorithm that, for any given gene list, systematically generates matched lists of control genes from the Ensembl database, collates summary statistics for three frequency-spectrum-based neutrality tests from the low-coverage resequencing data of the 1000 Genomes Project, and determines whether these statistics are significantly different between the given gene targets and the set of controls. Overall, there was strong evidence of selection of FOXP2 targets in Europeans, but not in the Han Chinese, Japanese, or Yoruba populations. Significant outliers included several genes linked to cellular movement, reproduction, development, and immune cell trafficking, and 13 of these constituted a significant network associated with cardiac arteriopathy. Strong signals of selection were observed for CNTNAP2 and RBFOX1, key neurally expressed genes that have been consistently identified as direct FOXP2 targets in multiple studies and that have themselves been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders involving language dysfunction. PMID:23602712

  2. FOXP2 Targets Show Evidence of Positive Selection in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Qasim; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Chen, Yuan; Xue, Yali; Hu, Min; Vernes, Sonja C.; Fisher, Simon E.; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a highly conserved transcription factor that has been implicated in human speech and language disorders and plays important roles in the plasticity of the developing brain. The pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in FOXP2 in modern populations suggests that it has been the target of positive (Darwinian) selection during recent human evolution. In our study, we searched for evidence of selection that might have followed FOXP2 adaptations in modern humans. We examined whether or not putative FOXP2 targets identified by chromatin-immunoprecipitation genomic screening show evidence of positive selection. We developed an algorithm that, for any given gene list, systematically generates matched lists of control genes from the Ensembl database, collates summary statistics for three frequency-spectrum-based neutrality tests from the low-coverage resequencing data of the 1000 Genomes Project, and determines whether these statistics are significantly different between the given gene targets and the set of controls. Overall, there was strong evidence of selection of FOXP2 targets in Europeans, but not in the Han Chinese, Japanese, or Yoruba populations. Significant outliers included several genes linked to cellular movement, reproduction, development, and immune cell trafficking, and 13 of these constituted a significant network associated with cardiac arteriopathy. Strong signals of selection were observed for CNTNAP2 and RBFOX1, key neurally expressed genes that have been consistently identified as direct FOXP2 targets in multiple studies and that have themselves been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders involving language dysfunction. PMID:23602712

  3. [A Case of Brainstem Cavernous Hemangioma Showing False Positive Response to Electromyographic Tracheal Tube].

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Uehara, Hirofumi; Kinoshita, Yuki; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Joyashiki, Takeshi; Watake, Tomoko; Enokida, Kengo

    2015-08-01

    Brainstem cavernous hemangioma is a complex lesion associated with hemorrhage and neurological deficit. The damage of the vagus nerve is a devastating surgical complication. Therefore, intraoperative anatomical and functional evaluation of this nerve is crucial. We used electromyographic tracheal tube (EMG tube)to monitor electromyogram from the vocal cord. We report a case of brainstem cavernous hemangioma showing false positive response to EMG tube. A 66-year-old woman underwent resection of cavernous hemangioma in the pontine tegmentum. General anesthesia was induced with remifentanl, propofol, and suxamethonium, and was maintained with oxygen, air, remifentanil and propofol. We monitored somatosensory evoked potentials, motor evoked potentials, and electromyogram of the vocal cord, orbicularis oculi, orbicularis oris and lateral rectus. When the manipulation reached brainstem, slight spontaneous respiration (SR) appeared on capnogram. Simultaneously, an alarm rang. Exposed nerves were stimulated electrically. However, there was no electromyographic response on the vocal cord. We concluded that the cause was SR accompanied by vocal cord movement. Remifentanil was increased up to 1 μg x kg(-1) x min(-1). SR did not disappear. Remifentanil was not increased any more without hindering the operation. Her operative course was uneventful. It is necessary to pay attention to false positive response caused by SR with EMG tube. PMID:26442411

  4. The T2 Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotype, Predominant in Kampala, Uganda, Shows Negative Correlation with Antituberculosis Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lukoye, Deus; Katabazi, Fred A.; Musisi, Kenneth; Kateete, David P.; Asiimwe, Benon B.; Okee, Moses; Joloba, Moses L.

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of the circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) strains in a given locality is important for understanding tuberculosis (TB) epidemiology. We performed molecular epidemiological studies on sputum smear-positive isolates that were collected for anti-TB drug resistance surveillance to establish the variability of MTC lineages with anti-TB drug resistance and HIV infection. Spoligotyping was performed to determine MTC phylogenetic lineages. We compared patients' MTC lineages with drug susceptibility testing (DST) patterns and HIV serostatus. Out of the 533 isolates, 497 (93.2%) had complete DST, PCR, and spoligotyping results while 484 (90.1%) participants had results for HIV testing. Overall, the frequency of any resistance was 75/497 (15.1%), highest among the LAM (34.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18.5 to 53.2) and lowest among the T2 (11.5%; 95% CI, 7.6 to 16.3) family members. By multivariate analysis, LAM (adjusted odds ratio [ORadj], 5.0; 95% CI, 2.0 to 11.9; P < 0.001) and CAS (ORadj, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.4.0 to 6.3; P = 0.006) families were more likely to show any resistance than was T2. All other MTC lineages combined were more likely to be resistant to any of the anti-TB drugs than were the T2 strains (ORadj, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0 to 2.9; P = 0.040). There were no significant associations between multidrug resistance and MTC lineages, but numbers of multidrug-resistant TB strains were small. No association was established between MTC lineages and HIV status. In conclusion, the T2 MTC lineage negatively correlates with anti-TB drug resistance, which might partly explain the reported low levels of anti-TB drug resistance in Kampala, Uganda. Patients' HIV status plays no role with respect to the MTC lineage distribution. PMID:24777100

  5. New Study Shows Clinicians Under-Prescribing Flu Antiviral Drugs and Possibly Overprescribing Antibiotics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Antiviral Drug Supply Mixing Tamiflu Capsules Drug Resistance Information for Health ... The Flu Season Seasonal Influenza Q&A Vaccine Supply for 2015-2016 Season Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations ...

  6. Mirtazapine as positive control drug in studies examining the effects of antidepressants on driving ability.

    PubMed

    Verster, Joris C; van de Loo, Aurora J A E; Roth, Thomas

    2015-04-15

    The development of effective and safe antidepressant medications is ongoing, and driving studies are critical to assess a drug's safety. The current review summarizes the effects of a sedating effective antidepressant, mirtazapine, on driving ability, and its potential to serve as positive control drug in future driving studies. Three on-road driving studies and four driving simulator studies of mirtazapine were identified. The studies, conducted in healthy volunteers, showed a significant dose-dependent driving impairment, the first day following bedtime administration of mirtazapine. The magnitude of impairment after a single dose of 15 mg or 30 mg mirtazapine was comparable to that observed with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.05%, the legal limit for driving in many countries. After 1 or 2 weeks of daily treatment with mirtazapine, partial tolerance developed to mirtazapine's effects on driving. Driving studies conducted in patients were less informative, as the effect on driving caused by mirtazapine was obscured by a drug-disease interaction and increased variability in patient groups. In conclusion, mirtazapine is useful as positive control drug to assess the potential effects of new antidepressant drugs on driving. Studies in normal healthy volunteers are more sensitive to drug effects than studies in patient populations. PMID:25446559

  7. Legal Position of School Personnel -- Drugs and Narcotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Thomas A.

    California educators have been given broad discretionary powers to control students who misuse drugs or narcotics, and to develop drug education programs. This paper outlines and discusses legislation dealing with disciplinary actions against drug offenders, and delineates school responsibilities for developing and implementing effective drug…

  8. [The false positive reaction of the Triage panel drug-of-abuse by herbal drugs ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae))].

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, M; Kinoshita, H; Higasa, K; Taniguchi, T; Ouchi, H; Minami, T; Marukawa, S; Yoshinaga, K; Yamauchi, J; Aoki, S; Hishida, S

    2001-11-01

    We investigated false-positive reactions obtained from a drug screening test using a Triage panel. We detected 2 cases giving false-positive reaction for AMP (amphetamine, methamphetamine) during the screening of 187 normal subjects. Subsequent follow up testing by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), showed both to be false-positive reactions. As both cases have a history of ingesting the herbal drug, Ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae)), containing ephedrine, we examined the relationship between false-positive reactions on Triage and Ma-huang. All urine samples collected from 7 healthy volunteers following administration of Ma-huang indicated AMP positive on Triage. Also a high ratio of AMP positives was observed in the patients who were administered Ma-huang-containing drugs at the hospital. However, none of them were identified as true-positives by HPLC or gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The extract of Ma-huang contained in herbal drugs, which otherwise contain neither amphetamine nor its derivatives, gives (AMP) positive indications on Triage. We speculate that unidentified components of Ma-huang cause the false-positive reactions. We suggest that follow-up tests by GC/MS or HPLC are needed wherever a positive result is obtained from a screening test by Triage. Furthermore, it will be established to continue collecting information on prescribed and non-prescribed drugs. PMID:11905042

  9. Chiral all-organic nitroxide biradical liquid crystals showing remarkably large positive magneto-LC effects.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuaki; Takemoto, Yusa; Takaoka, Shohei; Taguchi, Koji; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Mazhukin, Dmitrii G; Grigor'ev, Igor A; Tamura, Rui

    2016-03-11

    The liquid crystalline chiral nitroxide biradical (S,S,S,S)-3 synthesized has shown much larger 'positive magneto-LC effects' in the chiral nematic (N*) phase than the monoradical (S,S)-1. PMID:26871609

  10. Novel Drug Delivery System Shows Early Promise for Treating Lupus in Mice

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lupus in Mice A drug delivery system using nanoparticle technology that allows for better targeting of specific ... be effectively programmed to seek specific cells. Although nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been used experimentally to ...

  11. Fatal Crashes from Drivers Testing Positive for Drugs in the U.S., 19932010

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, Jim P.; Pagn, Jos A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Illegal drug use is a persistent problem, prescription drug abuse is on the rise, and there is clinical evidence that drug use reduces driving performance. This study describes trends in characteristics of drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes who test positive for drugs. Methods We used the Fatality Analysis Reporting Systema census of motor vehicle crashes resulting in at least one fatality on U.S. public roadsto investigate suspected drug use for the period 19932010. Results Drugged drivers who were tested for drug use accounted for 11.4% of all drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes in 2010. Drugged drivers are increasingly likely to be older drivers, and the percentage using multiple drugs increased from 32.6% in 1993 to 45.8% in 2010. About half (52.4%) of all drugged drivers used alcohol, but nearly three-quarters of drivers testing positive for cocaine also used alcohol. Prescription drugs accounted for the highest fraction of drugs used by drugged drivers in fatal crashes in 2010 (46.5%), with much of the increase in prevalence occurring since the mid-2000s. Conclusions The profile of a drugged driver has changed substantially over time. An increasing share of these drivers is now testing positive for prescription drugs, cannabis, and multiple drugs. These findings have implications for developing interventions to address the changing nature of drug use among drivers in the U.S. PMID:24982537

  12. Predicting toxicities of reactive metabolite-positive drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Kalgutkar, Amit S; Dalvie, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Because of the inability to predict and quantify the risk of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs) and because reactive metabolites (RMs) are thought to be responsible for the pathogenesis of some IADRs, the potential for RM formation within new chemical entities is routinely examined with the ultimate goal of eliminating or reducing the liability through iterative design. Likewise, avoidance of structural alerts is almost a standard practice in drug design. However, the perceived safety concerns associated with the use of structural alerts and/or RM screening tools as standalone predictors of toxicity risks may be overexaggerated. Numerous marketed drugs form RMs but do not cause idiosyncratic toxicity. In this review article, we present a critique of the structural alert/RM concept as applied in drug discovery and evaluate the evidence linking structural alerts and RMs to observed toxic effects. Pragmatic risk mitigation strategies to aid the advancement of drug candidates that carry a RM liability are also discussed. PMID:25292426

  13. Isoliquiritigenin, a chalcone compound, is a positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors and shows hypnotic effects.

    PubMed

    Cho, Suengmok; Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Yang, Hyejin; Han, Daeseok; Baek, Nam-In; Jo, Jinho; Cho, Chang-Won; Park, Ji-Hae; Shimizu, Makoto; Jin, Young-Ho

    2011-10-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ILTG) is a chalcone compound and has valuable pharmacological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antiallergic activities. Recently, the anxiolytic effect of ILTG has been reported; however, its action mechanism and hypnotic activity have not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, we investigated the hypnotic effect and action mechanism of ILTG. ILTG significantly potentiated the pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice at doses of 25 and 50mg/kg. The hypnotic activity of ILTG was fully inhibited by flumazenil (FLU), a specific gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor antagonist. The binding affinity of ILTG was 0.453 ?M and was found to be higher than that of the reference compound, diazepam (DZP, 0.012 ?M). ILTG (10(-5)M) potentiated GABA-evoked currents to 151% of the control level on isolated dorsal raphe neurons. ILTG has 65 times higher affinity for GABA(A)-BZD receptors than DZP, and the dissociation constant for ILTG was 4.0 10(-10)M. The effect of ILTG on GABA currents was blocked by 10(-7)M FLU and ZK-93426. These results suggest that ILTG produces hypnotic effects by positive allosteric modulation of GABA(A)-BZD receptors. PMID:21945440

  14. Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Elisabet; Ringstrm, Gisela; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Sadik, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the long-term effects of physical activity on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and on quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. METHODS: Seventy-six patients from a previous randomized controlled interventional study on increased physical activity in IBS were asked to participate in this long-term follow-up study. The included patients attended one visit in which they filled out questionnaires and they underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test. The primary end point was the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) at baseline, i.e., before the intervention and at follow-up. The secondary endpoints were changes in quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. RESULTS: A total of 39 [32 women, median age 45 (28-61) years] patients were included in this follow-up. Median follow-up time was 5.2 (range: 3.8-6.2) years. The IBS symptoms were improved compared with baseline [IBS-SSS: 276 (169-360) vs 218 (82-328), P = 0.001]. This was also true for the majority of the dimensions of psychological symptoms such as disease specific quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. The reported time of physical activity during the week before the visit had increased from 3.2 (0.0-10.0) h at baseline to 5.2 (0.0-15.0) h at follow-up, P = 0.019. The most common activities reported were walking, aerobics and cycling. There was no significant difference in the oxygen uptake 31.8 (19.7-45.8) mL per min per kg at baseline vs 34.6 (19.0-54.6) mL/min per kg at follow-up. CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase physical activity has positive long-term effects on IBS symptoms and psychological symptoms. PMID:25593485

  15. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Vronique; Chantme, Aurlie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10M and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl(-) andthe decreased HCO3 (-) concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na-K-2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  16. Design or screening of drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease: what shows the most promise?

    PubMed Central

    Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endemic in Latin America, Chagas disease is now becoming a serious global health problem, and yet has no financial viability for the pharmaceutical industry and remains incurable. In 2012, two antimycotic drugs inhibitors of fungal sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) – posaconazole and ravuconazole – entered clinical trials. Availability of the X-ray structure of the orthologous enzyme from the causative agent of the disease, protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, determined in complexes with posaconazole as well as with several experimental protozoa-specific CYP51 inhibitors opens an excellent opportunity to improve the situation. Areas covered This article summarizes the information available in PubMed and Google on the outcomes of treatment of the chronic Chagas disease. It also outlines the major features of the T. cruzi CYP51 structure and the possible structure-based strategies for rational design of novel T. cruzi specific drugs. Expert opinion There is no doubt that screenings for alternative drug-like molecules as well as mining the T. cruzi genome for novel drug targets are of great value and might eventually lead to groundbreaking discoveries. However, all newly identified molecules must proceed through the long, expensive and low-yielding drug optimization process, and all novel potential drug targets must be validated in terms of their essentiality and druggability. CYP51 is already a well-validated and highly successful target for clinical and agricultural antifungals. With minimal investments into the final stages of their development/trials, T. cruzi-specific CYP51 inhibitors can provide an immediate treatment for Chagas disease, either on their own or in combination with the currently available drugs. PMID:24079515

  17. Social support among HIV positive injection drug users: implications to integrated intervention for HIV positives.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Amy; Hua, Wei; Latkin, Carl

    2004-12-01

    The study compared social support networks of HIV seropositive versus seronegative injection drug users (IDUs). Participants were 635 low income African Americans; 47% were HIV seropositive (of whom 17% had AIDS), 45% female, and 45% current drug users. A social network methodology elicited structural, functional, and relational network components. After controlling for confounders, HIV seropositive compared with HIV seronegative IDUs had larger support networks, including more females, kin and sources of instrumental assistance, and marginally more sources of emotional support, though they were less likely to have a sex partner. There was no difference between HIV status and number of active drug users in support networks. Results suggest that HIV seropositive IDUs had mobilized a range of network support but that they also relied on drug using social influences. Findings may have implications to the development of integrated HIV prevention and care intervention that builds on HIV seropositives' natural support structures. PMID:15690109

  18. Imaging Shows Microenvironment Impacts Tumor Drug Resistance | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    It should be possible to significantly improve the response of common cancers to existing classical chemotherapy drugs, say scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL). Accomplishing this feat will require combining conventional chemotherapy regimes with agents that alter the interaction of cancer cells with their immediate surroundings, called the tumor microenvironment.

  19. NIH-supported trial drug shows benefit in children with previously treated cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Young patients with some types of advanced cancer, for whom standard treatment had failed, had their tumors disappear during treatment with a drug that both targets and blocks a protein associated with their disease. These findings are from a Phase I, mul

  20. Neuropsychological functioning in HIV-positive African-American women with a history of drug use.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, K. I.; Campbell, A.; Hawkins, P.; Madhere, S.; Johnson, K.; Takushi-Chinen, R.

    1998-01-01

    This preliminary investigation examined neuropsychological performance in a sample of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative African-American women with a history of drug use. The study population was comprised of 10 HIV-negative, 9 asymptomatic HIV-positive, 13 symptomatic HIV-positive, and 10 acquired immunodeficiency virus (AIDS) patients. A neuropsychological battery designed to assess attention, psychomotor processing, verbal memory, and visual memory was administered to participants. No evidence of HIV-related cognitive impairment was found in patients in the early stages of HIV infection. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant deficits in psychomotor processing and verbal recall in persons with AIDS. These individuals showed greater difficulty in tasks requiring maintained attention and performed poorly on measures of immediate and delayed verbal recall. In contrast, HIV status was not related to visual memory, verbal recognition, or the number of errors made during a verbal recall task. The pattern of cognitive deficits observed in persons with AIDS resembles that commonly associated with subcortical pathology. The cognitive deficits observed were not related to depression or recentness of drug use. PMID:9828581

  1. Positive-charged solid lipid nanoparticles as paclitaxel drug delivery system in glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Battaglia, Luigi; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Riganti, Chiara; Biasibetti, Elena; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele; Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Filice, Gaetano; Corona, Silvia; Schiffer, Davide

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of behenic acid were prepared with the coacervation technique. Generally, spherical shaped SLN with mean diameters in the range 300600 nm were obtained. The introduction of charged molecules, such as stearylamine and glycol chitosan into the formulation allowed to obtain positive SLN with Zeta potential in the 8-20 mV range and encapsulation efficiency in the 2590% range.Bloodbrain barrier (BBB) permeability, tested in vitro through hCMEC/D3 cells monolayer, showed a significantly increase in the permeation of Coumarin-6, used as model drug, when vehicled in SLN. Positive-charged SLN do not seem to enhance permeation although stearylamine-positive SLN resulted the best permeable formulation after 24 h.Cytotoxicity studies on NO3 glioblastoma cell line demonstrated the maintenance of cytotoxic activity of all paclitaxel-loaded SLN that was always unmodified or greater compared with free drug. No difference in cytotoxicity was noted between neutral and charged SLN.Co-culture experiments with hCMEC/D3 and different glioblastoma cells evidenced that, when delivered in SLN, paclitaxel increased its cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. PMID:25445304

  2. AQ4N: an alkylaminoanthraquinone N-oxide showing bioreductive potential and positive interaction with radiation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, S. R.; Hejmadi, M. V.; McIntyre, I. A.; McAleer, J. J.; Patterson, L. H.

    1995-01-01

    AQ4N (1,4-bis([2-(dimethylamino-N-oxide)ethyl]amino)5,8-dihydroxy- anthracene-9,10-dione) is a novel alkylaminoanthraquinone N-oxide which, on reduction, forms a stable DNA affinic cytotoxic compound AQ4. The in vivo anti-tumour efficacy of AQ4N was investigated in B6D2F1 mice bearing the T50/80 mammary carcinoma. The effect of the drug was evaluated in combination with hypobaric hypoxia and with radiation (single and multiple fractions). Systemic toxicity was assessed by weight loss post treatment. This was low for AQ4N and was less than that obtained with the bioreductive drugs, RSU 1069 (1-[3-aziridinyl-2-hydroxypropyl]-2-nitroimidazole) and SR 4233 (Tirapazamine, 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-dioxide). The anti-tumour effect of AQ4N was potentiated in vivo by combination with hypobaric hypoxia with a dose enhancement ratio of 5.1. This is consistent with the proposal that AQ4N was reduced in vivo to AQ4, resulting in enhanced anti-tumour toxicity. When AQ4N (200 mg kg-1) was combined with single dose radiation (12 Gy) the drug was shown to have an additive interaction with radiation. This was obtained even if the drug was administered from 4 days before to 6 h after radiation treatment. Equivalent anti-tumour activity was also shown when both AQ4N (200 mg kg-1) and radiation (5 x 3 Gy) were administered in fractionated schedules. In conclusion, AQ4N shows significant potential as a bioreductive drug for combination with fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:7599069

  3. Recreational Drug Use Among Primary Care Patients: Implications of a Positive Self-Report

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Judith; Cheng, Debbie M.; Wang, Na; Trilla, Caitlin; Samet, Jeffrey; Saitz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Should recreational drug use raise clinical concern? We examined the association between weekend-only recreational drug use at baseline (yes vs no) and any increase in recreational drug use frequency or severity over 6 months among primary care patients who screen positive for drug use. In the weekend-only recreational drug use group (52/483 [10.8%]), 54% (28/52) started using drugs on weekdays. Compared with use not limited to weekends, weekend-only use was associated with lower odds of increasing drug use frequency (AOR 0.48, P = 0.03) and lower odds (non-significant) of increasing severity (AOR 0.56, P = 0.07). Although weekend-only recreational drug use appears prognostically less severe, the findings nonetheless suggest that continued episodic monitoring may be clinically wise. PMID:25964404

  4. Precursor medications as a source of methamphetamine and/or amphetamine positive drug testing results.

    PubMed

    Cody, John T

    2002-05-01

    Medical Review Officer interpretation of laboratory results is an important component of drug testing programs. The clinical evaluation of laboratory results to assess the possibility of appropriate medical use of a drug is a task with many different facets, depending on the drug class considered. This intercession prevents the reporting of positive results unless it is apparent that drugs were used illicitly. In addition to the commonly encountered prescribed drugs that yield positive drug testing results, other sources of positive results must be considered. This review describes a series of compounds referred to as "precursor" drugs that are metabolized by the body to amphetamine and/or methamphetamine. These compounds lead to positive results for amphetamines even though neither amphetamine nor methamphetamine were used, a possibility that must be considered in the review of laboratory results. Description of the drugs, their clinical indications, and results seen following administration are provided. This information allows for the informed evaluation of results with regard to the potential involvement of these drugs. PMID:12024689

  5. Different policy outcomes of the new drugs and currently listed drugs under the positive list system in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Kyung; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Mi-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Four years have passed since the positive list system was implemented in South Korea. The system was received well because it has fulfilled its intended objective of enhancing the cost-effectiveness of new drugs. With regard to currently listed drugs, however, debate has lingered since the reevaluation of the cost-effectiveness by therapeutic group. This study intended to review the lessons learned and compromises reached in implementing an evidence-based national formulary. Currently listed drugs are very different from new drugs. In terms of effectiveness, the level of existing evidence tends to be lower for currently listed drugs. Also, the evaluation plan was quite delayed because of the vast amount of literature. In the political decision-making process, a coalition was formed by the pharmaceutical companies with physicians, and the government had difficulty responding because of the strong resistance against the reevaluation of currently listed drugs. Although idealistic, it was an attempt to apply the same standard of cost-effectiveness for currently listed drugs as that for new drugs. To successfully implement the system, however, some factors that need to be considered were limitation of available evidence on currently listed drugs and specific strategies employed against political resistance. PMID:22265054

  6. Dysphoric students show higher use of the observer perspective in their retrieval of positive versus negative autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Sabine; Debeer, Elise; Holmes, Emily A; Raes, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are retrieved as images from either a field perspective or an observer perspective. The observer perspective is thought to dull emotion. Positive affect is blunted in depressed mood. Consequently, are positive events recalled from an observer perspective in depressed mood? We investigated the relationship between memory vantage perspective and depressive symptoms in a student sample. Participants completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams & Broadbent, 1986) and assessed the perspective accompanying each memory. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and the Responses to Positive Affect questionnaire (RPA; Feldman, Joormann, & Johnson, 2008) were administered. The results showed a small positive association between depressive symptoms and the use of an observer perspective for positive autobiographical memories, but not for negative memories. Furthermore, comparing a subgroup with clinically significant symptom levels (dysphoric students) with non-dysphoric individuals revealed that dysphoric students used an observer perspective more for positive memories compared with negative memories. This was not the case for non-dysphoric students. The observer perspective in dysphorics was associated with a dampening cognitive style in response to positive experiences. PMID:23083015

  7. Contamination of dietary supplements and positive drug tests in sport.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J

    2005-09-01

    The use of dietary supplements is widespread in sport and most athletes competing at the highest level of competition use some form of dietary supplementation. Many of these supplements confer no performance or health benefit, and some may actually be detrimental to both performance and health when taken in high doses for prolonged periods. Some supplements contain excessive doses of potentially toxic ingredients, while others do not contain significant amounts of the ingredients listed on the label. There is also now evidence that some of the apparently legitimate dietary supplements on sale contain ingredients that are not declared on the label but that are prohibited by the doping regulations of the International Olympic Committee and of the World Anti-Doping Agency. Contaminants that have been identified include a variety of anabolic androgenic steroids (including testosterone and nandrolone as well as the pro-hormones of these compounds), ephedrine and caffeine. This contamination may in most cases be the result of poor manufacturing practice, but there is some evidence of deliberate adulteration of products. The principle of strict liability that applies in sport means that innocent ingestion of prohibited substances is not an acceptable excuse, and athletes testing positive are liable to penalties. Although it is undoubtedly the case that some athletes are guilty of deliberate cheating, some positive tests are likely to be the result of inadvertent ingestion of prohibited substances present in otherwise innocuous dietary supplements. PMID:16195040

  8. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique. PMID:24986836

  9. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  10. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M; Simões, Bruno M; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B; Carrascosa, José L; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2016-02-12

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully  apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro. PMID:26754042

  11. Some problems with the anti-prohibitionist position on legalization of drugs.

    PubMed

    De Leon, G

    1994-01-01

    The pro-legal position has mounted cogent arguments to support conclusions that the existing prohibition policy has failed and that legalization, while not a solution to the drug use problem, will effectively eliminate drug related crime. The premise of this article is that a legalization policy is wrong in that the basic assumptions underlying the anti-prohibitionist position are flawed. Prohibition has operated in a social vacuum. It has been an isolated effort substituting for an integrated and well coordinated approach which includes prevention, treatment as well as enforcement and supported by an educated public resolve against illicit drugs. PMID:8204674

  12. Antithrombotic drug candidate ALX-0081 shows superior preclinical efficacy and safety compared with currently marketed antiplatelet drugs.

    PubMed

    Ulrichts, Hans; Silence, Karen; Schoolmeester, Anne; de Jaegere, Peter; Rossenu, Stefaan; Roodt, Jan; Priem, Sofie; Lauwereys, Marc; Casteels, Peter; Van Bockstaele, Femke; Verschueren, Katrien; Stanssens, Patrick; Baumeister, Judith; Holz, Josefin-Beate

    2011-07-21

    Neutralizing the interaction of the platelet receptor gpIb with VWF is an attractive strategy to treat and prevent thrombotic complications. ALX-0081 is a bivalent Nanobody which specifically targets the gpIb-binding site of VWF and interacts avidly with VWF. Nanobodies are therapeutic proteins derived from naturally occurring heavy-chain-only Abs and combine a small molecular size with a high inherent stability. ALX-0081 exerts potent activity in vitro and in vivo. Perfusion experiments with blood from patients with acute coronary syndrome on standard antithrombotics demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet adhesion after addition of ALX-0081, while in the absence of ALX-0081 residual adhesion was observed. In a baboon efficacy and safety model measuring acute thrombosis and surgical bleeding, ALX-0081 showed a superior therapeutic window compared with marketed antithrombotics. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution experiments demonstrated target-mediated clearance of ALX-0081, which leads to a self-regulating disposition behavior. In conclusion, these preclinical data demonstrate that ALX-0081 combines a high efficacy with an improved safety profile compared with currently marketed antithrombotics. ALX-0081 has entered clinical development. PMID:21576702

  13. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... testing designated positions. 707.7 Section 707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE... designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of...

  14. Oral fluid drug testing of chronic pain patients. I. Positive prevalence rates of licit and illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Heltsley, Rebecca; DePriest, Anne; Black, David L; Robert, Tim; Marshall, Lucas; Meadors, Viola M; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2011-10-01

    Oral fluid compliance monitoring of chronic pain patients is an analytical challenge because of the limited specimen volume and the number of drugs that require detection. This study evaluated oral fluid for monitoring pain patients and compared results to urine studies of similar populations. Oral fluid specimens were analyzed from 6441 pain patients from 231 pain clinics in 20 states. Specimens were screened with 14 ELISA assays and non-negative specimens were confirmed by LC-MS-MS for 40 licit and illicit drugs and metabolites. There was an 83.9% positive screening rate (n=5401) of which 98.7% (n=5329) were confirmed at ? LOQ concentrations for at least one analyte. The prevalence of confirmed positive drug groups was as follows: opiates > oxycodone > benzodiazepines > methadone ? carisoprodol > fentanyl > cannabinoids ? tramadol > cocaine > amphetamines ? propoxyphene ? buprenorphine > barbiturates > methamphetamine. Approximately 11.5% of the study population of pain patients apparently used one or more illicit drugs (cannabis, cocaine, methamphetamine and/or MDMA). Overall, the pattern of licit and illicit drugs and metabolites observed in oral fluid paralleled results reported earlier for urine, indicating that oral fluid is a viable option for use in compliance monitoring programs of chronic pain patients. PMID:22004671

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasmodium vivax Patient Samples Shows Evidence of Direct Evolution in Drug-Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Wang, Tina; Akbari, Ali; Corey, Victoria C.; Gunawan, Felicia; Bright, A. Taylor; Abraham, Matthew; Sanchez, Juan F.; Santolalla, Meddly L.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Rosales, Luis A.; Lescano, Andrés G.; Bafna, Vineet; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax, the parasite that causes the most widespread form of human malaria, is complicated by the lack of a suitable long-term cell culture system for this parasite. In contrast to P. falciparum, which can be more readily manipulated in the laboratory, insights about parasite biology need to be inferred from human studies. Here we analyze the genomes of parasites within 10 human P. vivax infections from the Peruvian Amazon. Using next-generation sequencing we show that some P. vivax infections analyzed from the region are likely polyclonal. Despite their polyclonality we observe limited parasite genetic diversity by showing that three or fewer haplotypes comprise 94% of the examined genomes, suggesting the recent introduction of parasites into this geographic region. In contrast we find more than three haplotypes in putative drug-resistance genes, including the gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase and the P. vivax multidrug resistance associated transporter, suggesting that resistance mutations have arisen independently. Additionally, several drug-resistance genes are located in genomic regions with evidence of increased copy number. Our data suggest that whole genome sequencing of malaria parasites from patients may provide more insight about the evolution of drug resistance than genetic linkage or association studies, especially in geographical regions with limited parasite genetic diversity. PMID:26719854

  16. Brain viral burden, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in HAART-treated HIV positive injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald B; Simmonds, Peter; Bell, Jeanne E

    2014-02-01

    The long-term impact of chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on brain status in injecting drug users (IDU) treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is unknown. Viral persistence in the brain with ongoing neuroinflammation may predispose to Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. In this study, we investigated the brains of ten HAART-treated individuals (six IDU and four non-DU), compared with ten HIV negative controls (six IDU and four non-DU). HIV DNA levels in brain tissue were correlated with plasma and lymphoid tissue viral loads, cognitive status, microglial activation and Tau protein and amyloid deposition. Brain HIV proviral DNA levels were low in most cases but higher in HIV encephalitis (n = 2) and correlated significantly with levels in lymphoid tissue (p = 0.0075), but not with those in plasma. HIV positive subjects expressed more Tau protein and amyloid than HIV negative controls (highest in a 58 year old), as did IDU, but brain viral loads showed no relation to Tau and amyloid. Microglial activation linked significantly to HIV positivity (p = 0.001) and opiate abuse accentuated these microglial changes (p = 0.05). This study confirms that HIV DNA persists in brains despite HAART and that opiate abuse adds to the risk of brain damage in HIV positive subjects. Novel findings in this study show that (1) plasma levels are not a good surrogate indicator of brain status, (2) viral burden in brain and lymphoid tissues is related, and (3) while Tau and amyloid deposition is increased in HIV positive IDU, this is not specifically related to increased HIV burden within the brain. PMID:24420447

  17. In vitro susceptibility of 137 Candida sp. isolates from HIV positive patients to several antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Magaldi, S; Mata, S; Hartung, C; Verde, G; Deibis, L; Roldn, Y; Marcano, C

    2001-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis caused by various species of Candida is one of the most common infections in HIV seropositive or AIDS patients. Drug resistance among these yeasts is an increasing problem. We studied the frequency of resistance profile to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and terbinafine of 137 isolates of Candida sp. From HIV positive or AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at Instituto de Inmunologa, U.C.V. and the Hospital "Jose Ignacio Bald", Caracas Venezuela, using the well diffusion susceptibility test (Magaldi et al.). We found that nearly 10% of C. albicans isolates were primarily fluconazole resistant, 45% of C. albicans isolates from patients with previous treatment were resistant to fluconazole, of which 93% showed cross-resistance to itraconazole, and even about 30% of C. tropicalis (n = 13) were resistant to fluconazole and/or itraconazole. To this respect, several recent reports have been described antifungal cross-resistance among azoles. Therefore, we consider that C. tropicalis should be added to the growing list of yeast in which antifungal drug resistance is common. This report could be useful for therapeutic aspect in AIDS patients with oral candidiasis. PMID:11265163

  18. Genome Wide Nucleosome Mapping for HSV-1 Shows Nucleosomes Are Deposited at Preferred Positions during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F.; Chen, Eric Z.; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W.; Isett, R. Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A.; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  19. Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Enrollees Report Less Positive Experiences Than Their Medicare Advantage Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Marc N; Landon, Bruce E; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Edwards, Carol; Orr, Nathan; Beckett, Megan K; Mallett, Joshua; Cleary, Paul D

    2016-03-01

    Since 2006, Medicare beneficiaries have been able to obtain prescription drug coverage through standalone prescription drug plans or their Medicare Advantage (MA) health plan, options exercised in 2015 by 72percent of beneficiaries. Using data from community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries older than age sixty-four in 700 plans surveyed from 2007 to 2014, we compared beneficiaries' assessments of Medicare prescription drug coverage when provided by standalone plans or integrated into an MA plan. Beneficiaries in standalone plans consistently reported less positive experiences with prescription drug plans (ease of getting medications, getting coverage information, and getting cost information) than their MA counterparts. Because MA plans are responsible for overall health care costs, they might have more integrated systems and greater incentives than standalone prescription drug plans to provide enrollees medications and information effectively, including, since 2010, quality bonus payments to these MA plans under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:26953300

  20. Automated tracking of mitotic spindle pole positions shows that LGN is required for spindle rotation but not orientation maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M; Shrestha, Roshan L; Zulkipli, Ihsan; Hiroi, Noriko; Liu, Yingjun; Tamura, Naoka; Yang, Bing; Patel, Jessica; Funahashi, Akira; Donald, Athene; Draviam, Viji M

    2013-01-01

    Spindle orientation defines the plane of cell division and, thereby, the spatial position of all daughter cells. Here, we develop a live cell microscopy-based methodology to extract spindle movements in human epithelial cell lines and study how spindles are brought to a pre-defined orientation. We show that spindles undergo two distinct regimes of movements. Spindles are first actively rotated toward the cells long-axis and then maintained along this pre-defined axis. By quantifying spindle movements in cells depleted of LGN, we show that the first regime of rotational movements requires LGN that recruits cortical dynein. In contrast, the second regime of movements that maintains spindle orientation does not require LGN, but is sensitive to 2ME2 that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Our study sheds first insight into spatially defined spindle movement regimes in human cells, and supports the presence of LGN and dynein independent cortical anchors for astral microtubules. PMID:23907121

  1. Profiling antibody drug conjugate positional isomers: a system-of-equations approach.

    PubMed

    Le, Lan N; Moore, Jamie M R; Ouyang, Jun; Chen, Xiaoying; Nguyen, Mary D H; Galush, William J

    2012-09-01

    Antibody drug conjugates enable the targeted delivery of potent chemotherapeutic agents directly to cancerous cells. They are made by the chemical conjugation of cytotoxins to monoclonal antibodies, which can be achieved by first reducing interchain disulfide bonds followed by conjugation of the resulting free thiols with drugs. This process yields a controlled, but heterogeneous, population of conjugated products that contains species with various numbers of drugs linked to different former interchain disulfide cysteine residues on the antibodies. We have developed a mathematical approach using inputs from capillary electrophoresis and hydrophobic interaction chromatography to determine the positional isomer distribution within a population of antibody drug conjugates. The results are confirmed by analyzing isolated samples of specific drug-to-antibody ratio species. The procedure is amenable to rapid determination of positional isomer distributions and features low material requirements. A survey of several antibody drug conjugates based on the same IgG framework and small molecule drug combination has shown a very similar distribution of isomers among all of the molecules using this technique, suggesting a robust conjugation process. PMID:22913809

  2. Gene expression analysis of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates show that two-component response systems enhance drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Cui, Zhenling; Sun, Xian; Peng, Jinfu; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Huang, Wenhua; Chu, Kaili; Zhang, Lu; Ge, Baoxue; Li, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Global analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays was performed between a reference strain H37Rv and two clinical extensively drug-resistant isolates in response to three anti-tuberculosis drug exposures (isoniazid, capreomycin, and rifampicin). A deep analysis was then conducted using a combination of genome sequences of the resistant isolates, resistance information, and related public microarray data. Certain known resistance-associated gene sets were significantly overrepresented in upregulated genes in the resistant isolates relative to that observed in H37Rv, which suggested a link between resistance and expression levels of particular genes. In addition, isoniazid and capreomycin response genes, but not rifampicin, either obtained from published works or our data, were highly consistent with the differentially expressed genes of resistant isolates compared to those of H37Rv, indicating a strong association between drug resistance of the isolates and genes differentially regulated by isoniazid and capreomycin exposures. Based on these results, 92 genes of the studied isolates were identified as candidate resistance genes, 10 of which are known resistance-related genes. Regulatory network analysis of candidate resistance genes using published networks and literature mining showed that three two-component regulatory systems and regulator CRP play significant roles in the resistance of the isolates by mediating the production of essential envelope components. Finally, drug sensitivity testing indicated strong correlations between expression levels of these regulatory genes and sensitivity to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings may provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying the emergence and development of drug resistance in resistant tuberculosis isolates and useful clues for further studies on this issue. PMID:25869645

  3. Positive Youth Development: Helping Postsecondary Students Deal with Pressures To Use Alcohol and Other Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthmann, Debra S.; Sandberg, Katherine A.

    Current research shows alcohol and other drugs to be a major problem on postsecondary campuses despite the fact that the purchase and use of alcohol is illegal for many college students and on most campuses. Little is known about drug and alcohol use levels among deaf students, many of whom come to college ill prepared to handle the pressures of…

  4. Cannabinoid receptor 1 is a potential drug target for treatment of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Oesch, Susanne; Walter, Dagmar; Wachtel, Marco; Pretre, Kathya; Salazar, Maria; Guzmn, Manuel; Velasco, Guillermo; Schfer, Beat W

    2009-07-01

    Gene expression profiling has revealed that the gene coding for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is highly up-regulated in rhabdomyosarcoma biopsies bearing the typical chromosomal translocations PAX3/FKHR or PAX7/FKHR. Because cannabinoid receptor agonists are capable of reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in diverse cancer cells such as glioma, breast cancer, and melanoma, we evaluated whether CB1 is a potential drug target in rhabdomyosarcoma. Our study shows that treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonists HU210 and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol lowers the viability of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma cells through the induction of apoptosis. This effect relies on inhibition of AKT signaling and induction of the stress-associated transcription factor p8 because small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of p8 rescued cell viability upon cannabinoid treatment. Finally, treatment of xenografts with HU210 led to a significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo. These results support the notion that cannabinoid receptor agonists could represent a novel targeted approach for treatment of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:19509271

  5. Doxylamine toxicity: seizure, rhabdomyolysis and false positive urine drug screen for methadone.

    PubMed

    Syed, Husnain; Som, Sumit; Khan, Nazia; Faltas, Wael

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the possible adverse effects of doxylamine, a common over the counter sleep aid. Doxylamine is an antihistamine that at toxic doses can cause anticholinergic effects, including seizures, rhabdomyolysis and death. The following case describes a patient with doxylamine toxicity who presented with seizure and confusion. Our patient was managed symptomatically, and remained otherwise stable throughout his hospitalisation. This case is atypical in terms of a delayed rhabdomyolysis and a false positive urine drug screen test for methadone. There is evidence that doxylamine at toxic levels can lead to false positives for methadone and phencyclidine testing using immunoassay-based urine drug screen kits. Urine drug screen testing on patients who are hospitalised is typically performed using immunoassays. However, in certain cases confirmatory secondary testing may be required. Doxylamine is prone to abuse and knowledge of the clinical presentation of its toxicity and the management of acute overdose can be life-saving. PMID:21686586

  6. Doxylamine toxicity: seizure, rhabdomyolysis and false positive urine drug screen for methadone

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Husnain; Som, Sumit; Khan, Nazia; Faltas, Wael

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the possible adverse effects of doxylamine, a common over the counter sleep aid. Doxylamine is an antihistamine that at toxic doses can cause anticholinergic effects, including seizures, rhabdomyolysis and death. The following case describes a patient with doxylamine toxicity who presented with seizure and confusion. Our patient was managed symptomatically, and remained otherwise stable throughout his hospitalisation. This case is atypical in terms of a delayed rhabdomyolysis and a false positive urine drug screen test for methadone. There is evidence that doxylamine at toxic levels can lead to false positives for methadone and phencyclidine testing using immunoassay-based urine drug screen kits. Urine drug screen testing on patients who are hospitalised is typically performed using immunoassays. However, in certain cases confirmatory secondary testing may be required. Doxylamine is prone to abuse and knowledge of the clinical presentation of its toxicity and the management of acute overdose can be life-saving. PMID:21686586

  7. Bacterial vaginosis and inflammatory response showed association with severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-positive women.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Sobrinho, Juara Maria; Rabelo-Santos, Silvia Helena; Fugueiredo-Alves, Rosane Ribeiro; Derchain, Sophie; Sarian, Luis Otvio Z; Pitta, Denise R; Campos, Elisabete A; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Vaginal infections may affect susceptibility to and clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and chronic inflammation has been linked to carcinogenesis. This study aimed to evaluate the association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and inflammatory response (IR) with the severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-infected women. HPV DNA was amplified using PGMY09/11 primers and genotyping was performed using a reverse line blot hybridization assay in 211 cervical samples from women submitted to excision of the transformation zone. The bacterial flora was assessed in Papanicolaou stained smears, and positivity for BV was defined as ?20% of clue cells. Present inflammatory response was defined as ?30 neutrophils per field at 1000 magnification. Age higher than 29 years (OR:1.91 95% CI 1.06-3.45), infections by the types 16 and/or 18 (OR:1.92 95% CI 1.06-3.47), single or multiple infections associated with types 16 and/or 18 (OR: 1.92 CI 95% 1.06-3.47), BV (OR: 3.54 95% CI 1.62-7.73) and IR (OR: 6.33 95% CI 3.06-13.07) were associated with severity of cervical neoplasia (CIN 2 or worse diagnoses), while not smoking showed a protective effect (OR: 0.51 95% CI 0.26-0.98). After controlling for confounding factors, BV(OR: 3.90 95% CI 1.64-9.29) and IR (OR: 6.43 95% CI 2.92-14.15) maintained their association with the severity of cervical neoplasia. Bacterial vaginosis and inflammatory response were independently associated with severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-positive women, which seems to suggest that the microenvironment would relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:80-86. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26644228

  8. Genomic analysis identifies targets of convergent positive selection in drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Maha R; Shapiro, B Jesse; Kieser, Karen J; Sultana, Razvan; Jacobson, Karen R; Victor, Thomas C; Warren, Robin M; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Calver, Alistair; Sloutsky, Alex; Kaur, Devinder; Posey, Jamie E; Plikaytis, Bonnie; Oggioni, Marco R; Gardy, Jennifer L; Johnston, James C; Rodrigues, Mabel; Tang, Patrick K C; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Borowsky, Mark L; Muddukrishna, Bhavana; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Kurepina, Natalia; Galagan, James; Gagneux, Sebastien; Birren, Bruce; Rubin, Eric J; Lander, Eric S; Sabeti, Pardis C; Murray, Megan

    2013-10-01

    M. tuberculosis is evolving antibiotic resistance, threatening attempts at tuberculosis epidemic control. Mechanisms of resistance, including genetic changes favored by selection in resistant isolates, are incompletely understood. Using 116 newly sequenced and 7 previously sequenced M. tuberculosis whole genomes, we identified genome-wide signatures of positive selection specific to the 47 drug-resistant strains. By searching for convergent evolution--the independent fixation of mutations in the same nucleotide position or gene--we recovered 100% of a set of known resistance markers. We also found evidence of positive selection in an additional 39 genomic regions in resistant isolates. These regions encode components in cell wall biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair pathways. Mutations in these regions could directly confer resistance or compensate for fitness costs associated with resistance. Functional genetic analysis of mutations in one gene, ponA1, demonstrated an in vitro growth advantage in the presence of the drug rifampicin. PMID:23995135

  9. Developing and implementing a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in prison-based drug treatment: Project BRITE.

    PubMed

    Burdon, William M; St De Lore, Jef; Prendergast, Michael L

    2011-09-01

    Within prison settings, the reliance on punishment for controlling inappropriate or noncompliant behavior is self-evident. What is not so evident is the similarity between this reliance on punishment and the use of positive reinforcements to increase desired behaviors. However, seldom do inmates receive positive reinforcement for engaging in prosocial behaviors or, for inmates receiving drug treatment, behaviors that are consistent with or support their recovery. This study provides an overview of the development and implementation of a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in male and female prison-based drug treatment programs. The active involvement of institutional staff, treatment staff, and inmates enrolled in the treatment programs in the development of the intervention along with the successful branding of the intervention were effective at promoting support and participation. However, these factors may also have ultimately impacted the ability of the randomized design to reliably demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:22185038

  10. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients. PMID:26527556

  11. Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV positive patients in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Post, Frank A; Grint, Daniel; Werlinrud, Anne Marie; Panteleev, Alexander; Riekstina, Vieja; Malashenkov, Evgeniy A; Skrahina, Alena; Duiculescu, Dan; Podlekareva, Daria; Karpov, Igor; Bondarenko, Vasiliy; Chentsova, Nelly; Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Miro, Jose M

    2014-03-01

    Observational data from Eastern Europe on the management and outcome of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in HIV positive populations remain sparse in the English-language literature. We compared clinical characteristics and outcomes of 55 patients who were diagnosed with HIV and MDR TB in Eastern Europe between 2004 and 2006 to 89 patients whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were susceptible to isoniazid and rifampicin. Patients with HIV and MDR TB were young and predominantly male with high rates of intravenous drug use, imprisonment and hepatitis C co-infection. Eighty-four per cent of patients with MDR TB had no history of previous TB drug exposure suggesting that the majority of MDR TB resulted from transmission of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The use of non-standardized tuberculosis treatment was common, and the use of antiretroviral therapy infrequent. Compared to those with susceptible tuberculosis, patients with MDR TB were less likely to achieve cure or complete tuberculosis treatment (21.8% vs. 62.9%, p<0.0001), and they were more likely to die (65.5% vs. 27.0%, p<0.0001). Our study documents suboptimal management and poor outcomes in HIV positive patients with MDR TB. Implementation of WHO guidelines, rapid TB diagnostics and TB drug susceptibility testing for all patients remain a priority in this region. PMID:24247067

  12. Position paper of Italian rheumatologists on the use of biosimilar drugs.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Sebastiani, Marco; Ricci, Cristian; Celano, Antonella; Gremese, Elisa; Iannone, Florenzo; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Minghetti, Paola; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Lapadula, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The recent availability of biosimilars as a result of the expiry of the patents of first-generation biotechnological drugs may theoretically reduce the direct costs of such treatments, making their use accessible to a larger number of patients. However, the currently available clinical data refer to a relatively small number of patients, and do not provide sufficient information concerning long-term efficacy and safety or the frequency of rare adverse events. Given the importance of the introduction of biosimilar drugs and the limitations of our current knowledge of their efficacy and safety profiles, we believe it is mandatory to draw up a position paper for Italian Rheumatologists. Moreover, in order to guarantee their safety, it is mandatory to indicate behavioural rules for the involved specialists and competent authorities, and perform ad hoc clinical trials and appropriate drug surveillance. PMID:25436597

  13. Drug hypersensitivity in clonal mast cell disorders: ENDA/EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, P; Pagani, M; Aberer, W; Bil, M B; Brockow, K; Oude Elberink, H; Garvey, L; Mosbech, H; Romano, A; Zanotti, R; Torres, M J

    2015-07-01

    Mastocytosis is a clonal disorder characterized by the proliferation and accumulation of mast cells (MC) in different tissues, with a preferential localization in skin and bone marrow (BM). The excess of MC in mastocytosis as well as the increased releasability of MC may lead to a higher frequency and severity of immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Mastocytosis in adults is associated with a history of anaphylaxis in 22-49%. Fatal anaphylaxis has been described particularly following hymenoptera stings, but also occasionally after the intake of drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids and drugs in the perioperative setting. However, data on the frequency of drug hypersensitivity in mastocytosis and vice versa are scarce and evidence for an association appears to be limited. Nevertheless, clonal MC disorders should be ruled out in cases of severe anaphylaxis: basal serum tryptase determination, physical examination for cutaneous mastocytosis lesions, and clinical characteristics of anaphylactic reaction might be useful for differential diagnosis. In this position paper, the ENDA group performed a literature search on immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions in clonal MC disorders using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. PMID:25824492

  14. Positive Classroom Management: A Step-By-Step Guide to Successfully Running the Show without Destroying Student Dignity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiulio, Robert

    This publication provides practical, step-by-step guidance for teachers on becoming more effective in classroom management by using a positive and constructive, rather than negative and punitive, approach to foster prosocial student behavior. The publication is divided into an introduction and three parts. The Introduction examines why effective

  15. An Allosteric Modulator of HIV-1 Protease Shows Equipotent Inhibition of Wild-Type and Drug-Resistant Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    NMR and MD simulations have demonstrated that the flaps of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1p) adopt a range of conformations that are coupled with its enzymatic activity. Previously, a model was created for an allosteric site located between the flap and the core of HIV-1p, called the Eye site (Biopolymers2008, 89, 643−65218381626). Here, results from our first study were combined with a ligand-based, lead-hopping method to identify a novel compound (NIT). NIT inhibits HIV-1p, independent of the presence of an active-site inhibitor such as pepstatin A. Assays showed that NIT acts on an allosteric site other than the dimerization interface. MD simulations of the ligand–protein complex show that NIT stably binds in the Eye site and restricts the flaps. That bound state of NIT is consistent with a crystal structure of similar fragments bound in the Eye site (Chem. Biol. Drug Des.2010, 75, 257−26820659109). Most importantly, NIT is equally potent against wild-type and a multidrug-resistant mutant of HIV-1p, which highlights the promise of allosteric inhibitors circumventing existing clinical resistance. PMID:25062388

  16. DJ Pairing during VDJ Recombination Shows Positional Biases That Vary among Individuals with Differing IGHD Locus Immunogenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Marie J; Jackson, Katherine J L; Boyd, Scott D; Collins, Andrew M

    2016-02-01

    Human IgH diversity is influenced by biases in the pairing of IGHD and IGHJ genes, but these biases have not been described in detail. We used high-throughput sequencing of VDJ rearrangements to explore DJ pairing biases in 29 individuals. It was possible to infer three contrasting IGHD-IGHJ haplotypes in nine of these individuals, and two of these haplotypes include deletion polymorphisms involving multiple contiguous IGHD genes. Therefore, we were able to explore how the underlying genetic makeup of the H chain locus influences the formation of particular DJ pairs. Analysis of nonproductive rearrangements demonstrates that 3' IGHD genes tend to pair preferentially with 5' IGHJ genes, whereas 5' IGHD genes pair preferentially with 3' IGHJ genes; the relationship between IGHD gene pairing frequencies and IGHD gene position is a near linear one for each IGHJ gene. However, striking differences are seen in individuals who carry deletion polymorphisms in the D locus. The absence of different blocks of IGHD genes leads to increases in the utilization frequencies of just a handful of genes, and these genes have no clear positional relationships to the deleted genes. This suggests that pairing frequencies may be influenced by additional complex positional relationships that perhaps arise from chromatin structure. In contrast to IGHD gene usage, IGHJ gene usage is unaffected by the IGHD gene-deletion polymorphisms. Such an outcome would be expected if the recombinase complex associates with an IGHJ gene before associating with an IGHD gene partner. PMID:26700767

  17. Screening pharmaceuticals for possible carcinogenic effects: initial positive results for drugs not previously screened

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gary D.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Chan, James; Quesenberry, Charles P; Habel, Laurel A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We screened commonly used prescription drugs for possible carcinogenic effects. Methods In a large health care program we identified 105 commonly used drugs, not previously screened. Recipients were followed for up to 12 years for incident cancer. Nested case-control analyses of 55 cancer sites and all combined included up to ten matched controls per case, with lag of at least two years between drug dispensing and cancer. Positive associations entailed a relative risk (RR) of 1.50, with p? 0.01 and higher risk for three or more, than for one prescription. Evaluation included further analyses, searches of the literature, and clinical judgment. Results There were 101 associations of interest for 61 drugs. Sixty-six associations were judged to have involved substantial confounding. We found evidence that of the remaining 35, the following associations may not be due to chance: sulindac with gallbladder cancer and leukemia, hyoscyamine with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, nortriptyline with esophageal and hepatic cancer, oxazepam with lung cancer, both fluoxetine and paroxetine with testicular cancer, hydrochlorothiazide with renal and lip cancer, and nifedipine with lip cancer. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that further studies are indicated regarding sulindac, hyoscyamine, nortriptyline, oxazepam, fluoxetine, paroxetine, hydrochlorothiazide and nifedipine. PMID:19582585

  18. TKD peptide as a ligand targeting drug delivery systems to memHsp70-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Zheng, Yufan; Yan, Xueying; Huang, Rongqin

    2016-02-10

    Breast cancer has been considered as a serious threat to females' life. Active targeting drug delivery is a potential strategy in cancer therapy, which however is hindered by the targeting efficiency. Herein, a 14-mer peptide (TKD) derived from the oligomerization domain of membrane heat-shock protein 70 (memHsp70), for the first time, was exploited as a tumor-targeting ligand to modify polymeric micelles. NMR results demonstrated the successful synthesis of TKD-PEG-PLGA polymer. No difference was observed in the drug release between TKD-modified doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles (TKD-D-M) and unmodified counterparts. The modification of TKD mediated apparently higher cellular uptake within memHsp70-positive MCF-7 cells, compared to normal MCF-10A cells. Excessive TKD pretreatment significantly inhibited the cellular uptake of TKD-D-M, indicating the receptor-mediated mechanism. Enhanced accumulation of TKD-D-M within the tumor of MCF-7 bearing mice further demonstrated the targeting ability of TKD in vivo. CCK-8 assay showed that the modification of TKD significantly increase the anti-proliferation effect against MCF-7 cells. The findings demonstrated that TKD peptide is a potential ligand which can target drug delivery systems to memHsp70-positive breast cancer. PMID:26680317

  19. A polyphenylene dendrimer drug transporter with precisely positioned amphiphilic surface patches.

    PubMed

    Stangenberg, René; Wu, Yuzhou; Hedrich, Jana; Kurzbach, Dennis; Wehner, Daniel; Weidinger, Gilbert; Kuan, Seah Ling; Jansen, Malin Insa; Jelezko, Fedor; Luhmann, Heiko J; Hinderberger, Dariush; Weil, Tanja; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-02-18

    The design and synthesis of a polyphenylene dendrimer (PPD 3) with discrete binding sites for lipophilic guest molecules and characteristic surface patterns is presented. Its semi-rigidity in combination with a precise positioning of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups at the periphery yields a refined architecture with lipophilic binding pockets that accommodate defined numbers of biologically relevant guest molecules such as fatty acids or the drug doxorubicin. The size, architecture, and surface textures allow to even penetrate brain endothelial cells that are a major component of the extremely tight blood-brain barrier. In addition, low to no toxicity is observed in in vivo studies using zebrafish embryos. The unique PPD scaffold allows the precise placement of functional groups in a given environment and offers a universal platform for designing drug transporters that closely mimic many features of proteins. PMID:25182694

  20. Predictors of hospitalization for HIV-positive women and men drug users, 1996-2000.

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbaum, Ellie E.; Lo, Yungtai; Floris-Moore, Michelle

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to determine whether health outcomes differed by gender in a cohort of African American, Hispanic American, and white drug users. METHODS: The authors studied hospitalization rates and discharge diagnoses in the HERO Study, an ongoing prospective study of drug users that included HIV-positive and HIV-negative opiate users. The data are from 1996-2000, when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was available. RESULTS: Women had higher rates of hospitalization than men independent of HIV status, and there was no association between ethnicity and hospitalization. Being a woman was an independent risk factor for HIV and non-HIV-related hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Health disparities between men and women extend to HIV. PMID:12435828

  1. Oral fluid testing for drugs of abuse: positive prevalence rates by Intercept immunoassay screening and GC-MS-MS confirmation and suggested cutoff concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; Presley, Lance; Lehrer, Michael; Seiter, William; Smith, Melissa; Kardos, Keith W; Fritch, Dean; Salamone, Sal; Niedbala, R Sam

    2002-01-01

    Draft guidelines for the use of oral fluid for workplace drug testing are under development by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in cooperation with industry and researchers. Comparison studies of the effectiveness of oral fluid testing versus urine testing are needed to establish scientifically reliable cutoff concentrations for oral fluid testing. We present the results of the first large scale database on oral fluid testing in private industry. A total of 77,218 oral fluid specimens were tested over the period of January through October 2001 at LabOne. Specimens were screened by Intercept immunoassay at manufacturer's recommended cutoff concentrations for the five SAMHSA drug categories (marijuana, cocaine, opiates, phencyclidine, and amphetamines). Presumptive positive specimens were confirmed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 3908 positive tests were reported over the 10-month period, representing a positive rate of 5.06%. Of the five drug categories, marijuana and cocaine accounted for 85.75% of the positives. The pattern and frequency of drug positives showed remarkable similarity to urine drug prevalence rates reported for the general workforce according to the Quest Diagnostics' Drug Testing Index over the same general period, suggesting that oral fluid testing produces equivalent results to urine testing. The data on oral fluid testing also revealed a surprisingly high 66.7% prevalence of 6-acetylmorphine confirmations for morphine positives suggesting that oral fluid testing may be superior in some cases to urine testing. Comparison of oral fluid drug concentrations to SAMHSA-recommended cutoff concentrations in Draft Guidelines indicated that adoption of the screening and confirmation cutoff concentrations of Draft Guidelines #3 would produce the most consistent reporting results for all drug classes except amphetamines. Consequently, it is suggested that the final Guidelines adopt the screening and cutoff concentrations listed in Draft Guidelines #3 with the exception of lowering the amphetamines cutoff concentrations (screening/confirmation) to 50/50 ng/mL for amphetamine and methamphetamine. PMID:12501910

  2. Safe syringe disposal is related to safe syringe access among HIV-positive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Phillip O; Latka, Mary H; Latkin, Carl; Wu, Yingfeng; Purcell, David W; Metsch, Lisa; Gomez, Cynthia; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2007-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of syringe acquisition on syringe disposal among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, New York City, and San Francisco (N = 680; mean age 42 years, 62% male, 59% African-American, 21% Hispanic, 12% White). Independent predictors of safe disposal were acquiring syringes through a safe source and ever visiting a syringe exchange program. Weaker predictors included living in San Francisco, living in the area longer, less frequent binge drinking, injecting with an HIV+ partner, peer norms supporting safe injection, and self-empowerment. Independent predictors of safe "handling"-both acquiring and disposing of syringes safely-also included being from New York and being older. HIV-positive IDUs who obtain syringes from a safe source are more likely to safely dispose; peer norms contribute to both acquisition and disposal. Interventions to improve disposal should include expanding sites of safe syringe acquisition while enhancing disposal messages, alternatives, and convenience. PMID:17053854

  3. Genomic Analysis Identifies Targets of Convergent Positive Selection in Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Maha R; Shapiro, B Jesse; Kieser, Karen J; Sultana, Razvan; Jacobson, Karen R; Victor, Thomas C; Warren, Robin M; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Calver, Alistair; Sloutsky, Alex; Kaur, Devinder; Posey, Jamie E; Plikaytis, Bonnie; Oggioni, Marco R; Gardy, Jennifer L; Johnston, James C; Rodrigues, Mabel; Tang, Patrick K C; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Borowsky, Mark L; Muddukrishna, Bhavana; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Kurepina, Natalia; Galagan, James; Gagneux, Sebastien; Birren, Bruce; Rubin, Eric J; Lander, Eric S; Sabeti, Pardis C; Murray, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is successfully evolving antibiotic resistance, threatening attempts at tuberculosis epidemic control. Mechanisms of resistance, including the genetic changes favored by selection in resistant isolates, are incompletely understood. Using 116 newly and 7 previously sequenced M. tuberculosis genomes, we identified genomewide signatures of positive selection specific to the 47 resistant genomes. By searching for convergent evolution, the independent fixation of mutations at the same nucleotide site or gene, we recovered 100% of a set of known resistance markers. We also found evidence of positive selection in an additional 39 genomic regions in resistant isolates. These regions encode pathways of cell wall biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. Mutations in these regions could directly confer resistance or compensate for fitness costs associated with resistance. Functional genetic analysis of mutations in one gene, ponA1, demonstrated an in vitro growth advantage in the presence of the drug rifampicin. PMID:23995135

  4. Novel antimicrobial agents against multi-drug-resistant gram-positive bacteria: an overview.

    PubMed

    Giannakaki, Venetia; Miyakis, Spiros

    2012-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens to compromise the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases. Strains resistant to most (if not all) antibiotics available have emerged. Gram-positive such representatives include strains of Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) and highly-resistant to penicillin Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although the phenomenon of antimicrobial drug resistance is expanding, limited number of new antibiotics has been successfully developed in the last few decades. Several novel antimicrobial agents, however, are currently in diverse phases of development and undergoing clinical trials. This review will summarize the main candidates for novel antibacterial agents active against Gram-positive multi-resistant pathogens along with the discussion of some patents relevant to the topic. PMID:23016758

  5. False positive in the IV drug self-administration test in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, S. Barak

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine C57BL/6J (B6) mice during extinction conditions, following food training, for rates and patterns of operant behavior that appear similar to behavior maintained by IV cocaine injections. The rationale was to evaluate the potential for false positives in the IV self-administration test using protocols common in studies of knockout mice backcrossed to B6. An additional aim was to assess the influence of food- and drug- associated cues and mouse strain. Mice were allowed to acquire lever pressing reinforced by sweetened condensed milk under a fixed ratio (FR) 1 then FR 2 schedule of reinforcement accompanied by a flashing light. A catheter base was then implanted for simulation of IV self-administration conditions. Mice were allowed to lever press with cues remaining the same as during food training but without further scheduled consequences (i.e., no drug or food reinforcers delivered). All mice sustained lever pressing for several weeks, and over half met commonly used criteria for self-administration behavior. Thus B6 mice showed perseveration of a previously reinforced behavior that closely resembled rates and patterns of drug self-administration. This effect in B6 mice was greater than with A/J mice, and the lack of extinction was even more robust in the presence of cocaine-associated cues than with food-associated cues. We suggest that a necessary criteria for positive results in the IV drug self-administration test include an increase in responding when cocaine is made available after extinction with saline self-administration. PMID:21522054

  6. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF A NOVEL POSITIVE ALLOSTERIC MODULATOR OF AMPA RECEPTORS DERIVED FROM A STRUCTURE-BASED DRUG DESIGN STRATEGY

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Jonathan E.; Benveniste, Morris; Maclean, John K. F.; Partin, Kathryn M.; Jamieson, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and can improve various forms of learning and memory. These modulators show promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, ADHD, and mental depression. Three classes of positive modulator, the benzamides, the thiadiazides, and the biarylsulfonamides differentially occupy a solvent accessible binding pocket at the interface between the two subunits that form the AMPA receptor ligand-binding pocket. Here, we describe the electrophysiological properties of a new chemotype derived from a structure-based drug design strategy (SBDD), which makes similar receptor interactions compared to previously reported classes of modulator. This pyrazole amide derivative, JAMI1001A, with a promising developability profile, efficaciously modulates AMPA receptor deactivation and desensitization of both flip and flop receptor isoforms. PMID:22735771

  7. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, Mbj

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety. PMID:25721922

  8. The central nervous system of sea cucumbers (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) shows positive immunostaining for a chordate glial secretion

    PubMed Central

    Mashanov, Vladimir S; Zueva, Olga R; Heinzeller, Thomas; Aschauer, Beate; Naumann, Wilfried W; Grondona, Jesus M; Cifuentes, Manuel; Garcia-Arraras, Jose E

    2009-01-01

    Background Echinoderms and chordates belong to the same monophyletic taxon, the Deuterostomia. In spite of significant differences in body plan organization, the two phyla may share more common traits than was thought previously. Of particular interest are the common features in the organization of the central nervous system. The present study employs two polyclonal antisera raised against bovine Reissner's substance (RS), a secretory product produced by glial cells of the subcomissural organ, to study RS-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of sea cucumbers. Results In the ectoneural division of the nervous system, both antisera recognize the content of secretory vacuoles in the apical cytoplasm of the radial glia-like cells of the neuroepithelium and in the flattened glial cells of the non-neural epineural roof epithelium. The secreted immunopositive material seems to form a thin layer covering the cell apices. There is no accumulation of the immunoreactive material on the apical surface of the hyponeural neuroepithelium or the hyponeural roof epithelium. Besides labelling the supporting cells and flattened glial cells of the epineural roof epithelium, both anti-RS antisera reveal a previously unknown putative glial cell type within the neural parenchyma of the holothurian nervous system. Conclusion Our results show that: a) the glial cells of the holothurian tubular nervous system produce a material similar to Reissner's substance known to be synthesized by secretory glial cells in all chordates studied so far; b) the nervous system of sea cucumbers shows a previously unrealized complexity of glial organization. Our findings also provide significant clues for interpretation of the evolution of the nervous system in the Deuterostomia. It is suggested that echinoderms and chordates might have inherited the RS-producing radial glial cell type from the central nervous system of their common ancestor, i.e., the last common ancestor of all the Deuterostomia. PMID:19538733

  9. Methadone use among HIV-positive injection drug users in a Canadian setting

    PubMed Central

    Pettes, Tyler; Wood, Evan; Guillemi, Silvia; Lai, Calvin; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We examined methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) use among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU) in Vancouver. Among 353 participants, 199 (56.3%) were on MMT at baseline, and 48 initiated MMT during follow-up. Female gender (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.14 2.62) and antiretroviral therapy use (AOR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.46 2.86) were positively associated with MMT use, while frequent heroin injection (AOR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.230.50), public injection (AOR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.59 0.97), syringe borrowing (AOR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.32 0.90), and non-fatal overdose (AOR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.36 0.92) were negatively associated with MMT use. The rate of discontinuation of MMT was 12.46 (95% CI: 8.28 18.00) per 100 person years. Frequent heroin use (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.49, 95%CI: 1.81 11.13) was positively associated with subsequent discontinuation of MMT. These findings demonstrate the benefits of MMT among HIV-positive IDU and the need to improve access to and retention in MMT. PMID:20598827

  10. Positive allosteric modulators to peptide GPCRs: a promising class of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bartfai, Tamas; Wang, Ming-wei

    2013-01-01

    The task of finding selective and stable peptide receptor agonists with low molecular weight, desirable pharmacokinetic properties and penetrable to the blood-brain barrier has proven too difficult for many highly coveted drug targets, including receptors for endothelin, vasoactive intestinal peptide and galanin. These receptors and ligand-gated ion channels activated by structurally simple agonists such as glutamate, glycine and GABA present such a narrow chemical space that the design of subtype-selective molecules capable of distinguishing a dozen of glutamate and GABA receptor subtypes and possessing desirable pharmacokinetic properties has also been problematic. In contrast, the pharmaceutical industry demonstrates a remarkable success in developing 1,4-benzodiazepines, positive allosteric modulators (PMAs) of the GABAA receptor. They were synthesized over 50 years ago and discovered to have anxiolytic potential through an in vivo assay. As exemplified by Librium, Valium and Dormicum, these allosteric ligands of the receptor became the world's first blockbuster drugs. Through molecular manipulation over the past 2 decades, including mutations and knockouts of the endogenous ligands or their receptors, and by in-depth physiological and pharmacological studies, more peptide and glutamate receptors have become well-validated drug targets for which an agonist is sought. In such cases, the pursuit for PAMs has also intensified, and a working paradigm to identify drug candidates that are designed as PAMs has emerged. This review, which focuses on the general principles of finding PAMs of peptide receptors in the 21st century, describes the workflow and some of its resulting compounds such as PAMs of galanin receptor 2 that act as potent anticonvulsant agents. PMID:23624758

  11. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults: Novel Drugs and Catheter Ablation Techniques Show Promise? Systematic Review on Pharmacotherapy and Interventional Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Carlo; Greco, Cesare; Keylani, Abdul M.; D'Agostino, Darrin C.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide an update on pharmacological and interventional strategies for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adults. Currently US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs including prostanoids, endothelin-receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and soluble guanylate-cyclase stimulators. These agents have transformed the prognosis for pulmonary arterial hypertension patients from symptomatic improvements in exercise tolerance ten years ago to delayed disease progression today. On the other hand, percutaneous balloon atrioseptostomy by using radiofrequency perforation, cutting balloon dilatation, or insertion of butterfly stents and pulmonary artery catheter-based denervation, both associated with very low rate of major complications and death, should be considered in combination with specific drugs at an earlier stage rather than late in the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension and before the occurrence of overt right-sided heart failure. PMID:25013799

  12. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Stolfi, Adrienne; Splaingard, Deborah; Earley, Elizabeth; Onadeko, Oluwole; Splaingard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: This is a retrospective study of urine drug screens performed the morning before MSLT in 383 patients < 21 years old referred for EDS. MSLT results were divided into those with (1) (?) urine drug screens, (2) urine drug screens (+) for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or THC plus other drugs, and (3) urine drug screens (+) for drugs other than THC. Groups were compared with Fisher exact tests or one-way ANOVA. Results: 38 (10%) urine drug tests were (+): 14 for THC and 24 for other drugs. Forty-three percent of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy, 0% consistent with idiopathic hypersomnia, 29% other, and 29% normal. This was statistically different from those with (?) screens (24% narcolepsy, 20% idiopathic hypersomnia, 6% other, 50% normal), and those (+) for drugs other than THC (17% narcolepsy, 33% idiopathic hypersomnia, 4% other, 46% normal (p = 0.01). Six percent (6/93) of patients with MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy were drug screen (+) for THC; 71% of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had multiple sleep onset REM periods (SOREMS). There were no (+) urine drug screens in patients < 13 years old. Conclusion: Many pediatric patients with (+) urine drug screens for THC met MSLT criteria for narcolepsy or had multiple SOREMs. Drug screening is important in interpreting MSLT findings for children ? 13 years. Citation: Dzodzomenyo S, Stolfi A, Splaingard D, Earley E, Onadeko O, Splaingard M. Urine toxicology screen in multiple sleep latency test: the correlation of positive tetrahydrocannabinol, drug negative patients, and narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):9399. PMID:25348245

  13. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive

  14. A Retrospective Analysis of Urine Drugs of Abuse Immunoassay True Positive Rates at a National Reference Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Sadler, Aaron J; Genzen, Jonathan R

    2016-03-01

    Urine drug screens are commonly performed to identify drug use or monitor adherence to drug therapy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the true positive and false positive rates of one of our in-house urine drug screen panels. The urine drugs of abuse panel studied consists of screening by immunoassay then positive immunoassay results were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Reagents from Syva and Microgenics were used for the immunoassay screen. The screen was performed on a Beckman AU5810 random access automated clinical analyzer. The percent of true positives for each immunoassay was determined. Agreement with previously validated GC-MS or LC-MS-MS confirmatory methods was also evaluated. There were 8,825 de-identified screening results for each of the drugs in the panel, except for alcohol (N = 2,296). The percent of samples that screened positive were: 10.0% for amphetamine/methamphetamine/3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 12.8% for benzodiazepines, 43.7% for opiates (including oxycodone) and 20.3% for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The false positive rate for amphetamine/methamphetamine was ∼14%, ∼34% for opiates (excluding oxycodone), 25% for propoxyphene and 100% for phencyclidine and MDMA immunoassays. Based on the results from this retrospective study, the true positive rate for THC drug use among adults were similar to the rate of illicit drug use in young adults from the 2013 National Survey; however, our positivity rate for cocaine was higher than the National Survey. PMID:26668238

  15. Spatial analysis of HIV positive injection drug users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alexis N; Mobley, Lee R; Lorvick, Jennifer; Novak, Scott P; Lopez, Andrea; Kral, Alex H

    2014-04-01

    Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914). HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment) across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (1987-1995) and late period (1996-2005). We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time. PMID:24722543

  16. Influenza vaccination of HIV-1-positive and HIV-1-negative former intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Amendola, A; Boschini, A; Colzani, D; Anselmi, G; Oltolina, A; Zucconi, R; Begnini, M; Besana, S; Tanzi, E; Zanetti, A R

    2001-12-01

    The immunogenicity of an anti-influenza vaccine was assessed in 409 former intravenous drug user volunteers and its effect on the levels of HIV-1 RNA, proviral DNA and on CD4+ lymphocyte counts in a subset HIV-1-positive subjects was measured. HIV-1-positive individuals (n = 72) were divided into three groups on the basis of their CD4+ lymphocyte counts, while the 337 HIV-1-negative participants were allocated into group four. Haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) responses varied from 45.8 to 70% in the HIV-1-positive subjects and were significantly higher in group four (80.7% responses to the H1N1 strain, 81.6% to the H3N2 strain, and 83% to the B strain). The percentage of subjects with HI protective antibody titres (> or = 1:40) increased significantly after vaccination, especially in HIV-1 uninfected subjects. Immunization caused no significant changes in CD4+ counts and in neither plasma HIV-1 RNA nor proviral DNA levels. Therefore, vaccination against influenza may benefit persons infected by HIV-1. PMID:11745926

  17. Spatial Analysis of HIV Positive Injection Drug Users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Mobley, Lee R.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Novak, Scott P.; Lopez, Andrea M.; Kral, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914). HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment) across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (19871995) and late period (19962005). We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time. PMID:24722543

  18. Dual Fatty Acid Synthase and HER2 Signaling Blockade Shows Marked Antitumor Activity against Breast Cancer Models Resistant to Anti-HER2 Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Blancafort, Adriana; Gir-Perafita, Ariadna; Oliveras, Glria; Palomeras, Snia; Turrado, Carlos; Campuzano, scar; Carrin-Salip, Dolors; Massaguer, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Palafox, Marta; Gmez-Miragaya, Jorge; Gonzlez-Surez, Eva; Puig, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) leads to apoptosis of HER2-positive breast carcinoma cells. The hypothesis is that blocking FASN, in combination with anti-HER2 signaling agents, would be an effective antitumor strategy in preclinical HER2+ breast cancer models of trastuzumab and lapatinib resistance. We developed and molecularly characterized in vitro HER2+ models of resistance to trastuzumab (SKTR), lapatinib (SKLR) and both (SKLTR). The cellular interactions of combining anti-FASN polyphenolic compounds (EGCG and the synthetic G28UCM) with anti-HER2 signaling drugs (trastuzumab plus pertuzumab and temsirolimus) were analyzed. Tumor growth inhibition after treatment with EGCG, pertuzumab, temsirolimus or the combination was evaluated in two in vivo orthoxenopatients: one derived from a HER2+ patient and another from a patient who relapsed on trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapy. SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR showed hyperactivation of EGFR and p-ERK1/2 and PI3KCA mutations. Dual-resistant cells (SKLTR) also showed hyperactivation of HER4 and recovered levels of p-AKT compared with mono-resistant cells. mTOR, p-mTOR and FASN expression remained stable in SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR. In vitro, anti-FASN compounds plus pertuzumab showed synergistic interactions in lapatinib- and dual- resistant cells and improved the results of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab co-treatment. FASN inhibitors combined with temsirolimus displayed the strongest synergistic interactions in resistant cells. In vivo, both orthoxenopatients showed strong response to the antitumor activity of the combination of EGCG with pertuzumab or temsirolimus, without signs of toxicity. We showed that the simultaneous blockade of FASN and HER2 pathways is effective in cells and in breast cancer models refractory to anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:26107737

  19. Rationally engineered nanoparticles target multiple myeloma cells, overcome cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance, and show enhanced efficacy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kiziltepe, T; Ashley, J D; Stefanick, J F; Qi, Y M; Alves, N J; Handlogten, M W; Suckow, M A; Navari, R M; Bilgicer, B

    2012-01-01

    In the continuing search for effective cancer treatments, we report the rational engineering of a multifunctional nanoparticle that combines traditional chemotherapy with cell targeting and anti-adhesion functionalities. Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated adhesion of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stroma confers MM cells with cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). In our design, we used micellar nanoparticles as dynamic self-assembling scaffolds to present VLA-4-antagonist peptides and doxorubicin (Dox) conjugates, simultaneously, to selectively target MM cells and to overcome CAM-DR. Dox was conjugated to the nanoparticles through an acid-sensitive hydrazone bond. VLA-4-antagonist peptides were conjugated via a multifaceted synthetic procedure for generating precisely controlled number of targeting functionalities. The nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by MM cells and induced cytotoxicity. Mechanistic studies revealed that nanoparticles induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis in MM cells. Importantly, multifunctional nanoparticles overcame CAM-DR, and were more efficacious than Dox when MM cells were cultured on fibronectin-coated plates. Finally, in a MM xenograft model, nanoparticles preferentially homed to MM tumors with ?10 fold more drug accumulation and demonstrated dramatic tumor growth inhibition with a reduced overall systemic toxicity. Altogether, we demonstrate the disease driven engineering of a nanoparticle-based drug delivery system, enabling the model of an integrative approach in the treatment of MM. PMID:22829966

  20. Drug-Tolerant Cancer Cells Show Reduced Tumor-Initiating Capacity: Depletion of CD44+ Cells and Evidence for Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jichao; Li, Hangwen; Liu, Can; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Coletta, Luis Della; Klostergaard, Jim; Fokt, Izabela; Skora, Stanislaw; Priebe, Waldemar; Bi, Yongyi; Tang, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess high tumor-initiating capacity and have been reported to be resistant to therapeutics. Vice versa, therapy-resistant cancer cells seem to manifest CSC phenotypes and properties. It has been generally assumed that drug-resistant cancer cells may all be CSCs although the generality of this assumption is unknown. Here, we chronically treated Du145 prostate cancer cells with etoposide, paclitaxel and some experimental drugs (i.e., staurosporine and 2 paclitaxel analogs), which led to populations of drug-tolerant cells (DTCs). Surprisingly, these DTCs, when implanted either subcutaneously or orthotopically into NOD/SCID mice, exhibited much reduced tumorigenicity or were even non-tumorigenic. Drug-tolerant DLD1 colon cancer cells selected by a similar chronic selection protocol also displayed reduced tumorigenicity whereas drug-tolerant UC14 bladder cancer cells demonstrated either increased or decreased tumor-regenerating capacity. Drug-tolerant Du145 cells demonstrated low proliferative and clonogenic potential and were virtually devoid of CD44+ cells. Prospective knockdown of CD44 in Du145 cells inhibited cell proliferation and tumor regeneration, whereas restoration of CD44 expression in drug-tolerant Du145 cells increased cell proliferation and partially increased tumorigenicity. Interestingly, drug-tolerant Du145 cells showed both increases and decreases in many stemness genes. Finally, evidence was provided that chronic drug exposure generated DTCs via epigenetic mechanisms involving molecules such as CD44 and KDM5A. Our results thus reveal that 1) not all DTCs are necessarily CSCs; 2) conventional chemotherapeutic drugs such as taxol and etoposide may directly target CD44+ tumor-initiating cells; and 3) DTCs generated via chronic drug selection involve epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:21935404

  1. Evaluation of adverse drug reactions in HIV positive patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anshu Kumar; Gadgade, Akash; Shenoy, Ashok K.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advancement and development of new drugs and treatment strategies increase the risk of unusual Adverse Events (AEs) in HIV patients. Aims: The objective of our study was to assess the incidence, types and nature of AEs in HIV positive subjects. Settings and Design: Patients with WHO stage IV disease irrespective of the CD4 cell count, or WHO stage III disease with a CD4 cell count <350 cell/cu. Mm, or, WHO stage I or II disease with a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/cu. mm, and on prior anti-retroviral therapy for not more than six months preceding the observation date, were included in the study. After initiation of therapy, the patients were examined for the occurrence any adverse events including the type and severity, or any other abnormal laboratory findings. Causality assessment of the adverse events was done using the Naranjo's scale. Results: Out of 327 patients studied prospectively, 43 patients developed AEs. Out of these, 23 (53.5%) were males and 20 (46.5%) were females. A total of 53 (16.21%) AEs were reported. Antitubercular drugs caused the maximum AEs (28.3%) followed by zidovudine (20.7%), nevirapine (15.0%) and efavirenz (5.6%). Stavudine, ethambutol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and atazanavir were also responsible for 3.7% of AEs individually. Causality assessment done according to the Naranjo's scale revealed that 66.04% AEs were probable and 33.96% were possible. Conclusions: Anemia, hepatitis and dermatological adverse effects are the most common AEs. Antitubercular drugs contributed significantly for the incidence of AEs in these patients. Frequency of AEs was slightly more in males compared to females. PMID:25657900

  2. Personalized drug combinations to overcome trastuzumab resistance in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thuy; Sliwkowski, Mark X.; Claret, Francois X.

    2014-01-01

    HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer accounts for 18%–20% of all breast cancer cases and has the second poorest prognosis among breast cancer subtypes. Trastuzumab, the first Food and Drug Administration-approved targeted therapy for breast cancer, established the era of personalized treatment for HER2+ metastatic disease. It is well tolerated and improves overall survival and time-to-disease progression; with chemotherapy, it is part of the standard of care for patients with HER2+ metastatic disease. However, many patients do not benefit from it because of resistance. Substantial research has been performed to understand the mechanism of trastuzumab resistance and develop combination strategies to overcome the resistance. In this review, we provide insight into the current pipeline of drugs used in combination with trastuzumab and the degree to which these combinations have been evaluated, especially in patients who have experienced disease progression on trastuzumab. We conclude with a discussion of the current challenges and future therapeutic approaches to trastuzumab-based combination therapy. PMID:25065528

  3. A positive cannabinoids workplace drug test following the ingestion of commercially available hemp seed oil.

    PubMed

    Struempler, R E; Nelson, G; Urry, F M

    1997-01-01

    A commercially available health food product of cold-pressed hemp seed oil ingested by one volunteer twice a day for 4 1/2 days (135 mL total). Urine specimens collected from the volunteer were subjected to standard workplace urine drug testing procedures, and the following concentrations of 11-nor-delta9- tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (9-THCA) were detected: 41 ng/mL 9-THCA at 45 h, 49 ng/mL at 69 h, and 55 ng/mL at 93 h. Ingestion was discontinued after 93 h, and the following concentrations were detected: 68 ng/mL at 108 h, 57 ng/mL at 117 h, 31 ng/mL at 126 h, and 20 ng/mL at 142 h. The first specimen that tested negative (50 ng/mL initial immunoassay test, 15 ng/mL confirmatory gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric test) was at 146 h, which was 53 h after the last hemp seed oil ingestion. Four subsequent specimens taken to 177 h were also negative. This study indicates that a workplace urine drug test positive for cannabinoids may arise from the consumption of commercially available cold-pressed hemp seed oil. PMID:9248945

  4. Role of Catheter's Position for Final Results in Intrathecal Drug Delivery. Analysis Based on CSF Dynamics and Specific Drugs Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Perotti; Vicente, Villanueva; Juan Marcos, Asensio Samper; Gustavo, Fabregat-Cid

    2013-01-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery is an effective and safe option for the treatment of chronic pathology refractory to conventional pain therapies. Typical intrathecal administered drugs are opioids, baclofen, local anesthetics and adjuvant medications. Although knowledge about mechanisms of action of intrathecal drugs are every day more clear many doubt remain respect the correct location of intrathecal catheter in order to achieve the best therapeutic result. We analyze the factors that can affect drug distribution within the cerebrospinal fluid. Three categories of variables were identified: drug features, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and patients features. First category includes physicochemical properties and pharmacological features of intrathecal administered drugs with special attention to drug lipophilicity. In the second category, the variables in CSF flow, are considered that can modify the drug distribution within the CSF with special attention to the new theories of liquoral circulation. Last category try to explain inter-individual difference in baclofen response with difference that are specific for each patients such as the anatomical area to treat, patient posture or reaction to inflammatory stimulus. We conclude that a comprehensive evaluation of the patients, including imaging techniques to study the anatomy and physiology of intrathecal environment and CSF dynamics, could become essential in the future to the purpose of optimize the clinical outcome of intrathecal therapy. PMID:24155999

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Adults in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Dzinjalamala, F. K.; Dimba, A.; Waterhouse, D.; Davies, G.; Zijlstra, E. E.; Molyneux, M. E.; Molyneux, E. M.; Ward, S.

    2015-01-01

    Limited data address the impact of HIV coinfection on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antituberculosis drugs in sub-Saharan Africa. A total of 47 Malawian adults underwent rich pharmacokinetic sampling at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h postdose. Of the subjects, 51% were male, their mean age was 34 years, and 65% were HIV-positive with a mean CD4 count of 268 cells/?l. Antituberculosis drugs were administered as fixed-dose combinations (150 mg rifampin, 75 mg isoniazid, 400 mg pyrazinamide, and 275 mg ethambutol) according to recommended weight bands. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (rifampin and pyrazinamide) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (isoniazid and ethambutol). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and analysis of variance of log-transformed summary parameters. The pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows (median [interquartile range]): for rifampin, maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) of 4.129 ?g/ml (2.474 to 5.596 ?g/ml), area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0?) of 21.32 ?g/ml h (13.57 to 28.60 ?g/ml h), and half-life of 2.45 h (1.86 to 3.08 h); for isoniazid, Cmax of 3.97 ?g/ml (2.979 to 4.544 ?g/ml), AUC024 of 22.5 (14.75 to 34.59 ?g/ml h), and half-life of 3.93 h (3.18 to 4.73 h); for pyrazinamide, Cmax of 34.21 ?g/ml (30.00 to 41.60 ?g/ml), AUC024 of 386.6 ?g/ml h (320.0 to 463.7 ?g/ml h), and half-life of 6.821 h (5.71 to 8.042 h); and for ethambutol, Cmax of 2.278 ?g/ml (1.694 to 3.098 ?g/ml), AUC024 of 20.41 ?g/ml h (16.18 to 26.27 ?g/ml h), and half-life of 7.507 (6.517 to 8.696 h). The isoniazid PK data analysis suggested that around two-thirds of the participants were slow acetylators. Dose, weight, and weight-adjusted dose were not significant predictors of PK exposure, probably due to weight-banded dosing. In this first pharmacokinetic study of antituberculosis drugs in Malawian adults, measures of pharmacokinetic exposure were comparable with those of other studies for all first-line drugs except for rifampin, for which the Cmax and AUC024 values were notably lower. Contrary to some earlier observations, HIV status did not significantly affect the AUC of any of the drugs. Increasing the dose of rifampin might be beneficial in African adults, irrespective of HIV status. Current co-trimoxazole prophylaxis was associated with an increase in the half-life of isoniazid of 41% (P = 0.022). Possible competitive interactions between isoniazid and sulfamethoxazole mediated by the N-acetyltransferase pathway should therefore be explored further. PMID:26248378

  6. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV…

  7. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV

  8. Active and latent tuberculosis among HIV-positive injecting drug users in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Meijerink, Hinta; Wisaksana, Rudi; Lestari, Mery; Meilana, Intan; Chaidir, Lydia; van der Ven, Andre JAM; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injecting drug use (IDU) is associated with tuberculosis but few data are available from low-income settings. We examined IDU in relation to active and latent tuberculosis (LTBI) among HIV-positive individuals in Indonesia, which has a high burden of tuberculosis and a rapidly growing HIV epidemic strongly driven by IDU. Methods Active tuberculosis was measured prospectively among 1900 consecutive antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve adult patients entering care in a clinic in West Java. Prevalence of LTBI was determined cross-sectionally in a subset of 518 ART-experienced patients using an interferon-gamma release assay. Results Patients with a history of IDU (53.1%) more often reported a history of tuberculosis treatment (34.8% vs. 21.9%, p<0.001), more often received tuberculosis treatment during follow-up (adjusted HR=1.71; 95% CI: 1.25–2.35) and more often had bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (OR=1.67; 95% CI: 0.94–2.96). LTBI was equally prevalent among people with and without a history of IDU (29.1 vs. 30.4%, NS). The risk estimates did not change after adjustment for CD4 cell count or ART. Conclusions HIV-positive individuals with a history of IDU in Indonesia have more active tuberculosis, with similar rates of LTBI. Within the HIV clinic, LTBI screening and isoniazid preventive therapy may be prioritized to patients with a history of IDU. PMID:25690530

  9. The benzimidazole based drugs show good activity against T. gondii but poor activity against its proposed enoyl reductase enzyme target

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Craig; McPhillie, Martin J.; Zhou, Ying; Woods, Stuart; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Rawson, Shaun; Khaliq, Farzana; Prigge, Sean T.; Roberts, Craig W.; Rice, David W.; McLeod, Rima; Fishwick, Colin W.; Muench, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The enoyl acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR) enzyme of the apicomplexan parasite family has been intensely studied for antiparasitic drug design for over a decade, with the most potent inhibitors targeting the NAD+ bound form of the enzyme. However, the higher affinity for the NADH co-factor over NAD+ and its availability in the natural environment makes the NADH complex form of ENR an attractive target. Herein, we have examined a benzimidazole family of inhibitors which target the NADH form of Francisella ENR, but despite good efficacy against T. gondii, the IC50 for T. gondii ENR is poor, with no inhibitory activity at 1?M. Moreover similar benzimidazole scaffolds are potent against fungi which lack the ENR enzyme and as such we believe that there maybe significant off target effects for this family of inhibitors. PMID:24398298

  10. Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV-Positive Patients by Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility Assay ?

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dang Thi Minh; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Kiet, Vo Sy; Wolbers, Marcel; Hang, Hoang Thi Thanh; Day, Jeremy; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Tien, Nguyen Anh; An, Pham Thuy; Anh, Truong Thi; Oanh, Do Thi Tuong; Hoa, Chau Luong; Chau, Nguyen Thi Minh; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Binh, Ngo Thanh; Ngoc, Le Hong; Phuong, Doan Thanh; Quyet, Tran Van; Tuyen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Ha, Vo Thi; Nho, Nguyen Thi; Hoa, Dai Viet; Anh, Phan Thi Hoang; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Farrar, Jeremy; Caws, Maxine

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS) is a novel and promising test for the early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated the MODS assay for the early diagnosis of TB in HIV-positive patients presenting to Pham Ngoc Thach Hospital for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in southern Vietnam. A total of 738 consecutive sputum samples collected from 307 HIV-positive individuals suspected of TB were tested by smear, MODS, and the mycobacteria growth indicator tube method (MGIT). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MODS compared to the microbiological gold standard (either smear or MGIT) were 87 and 93%, respectively. The sensitivities of smear, MODS, and MGIT were 57, 71, and 75%, respectively, against clinical gold standard (MODS versus smear, P < 0.001; MODS versus MGIT, P = 0.03). The clinical gold standard was defined as patients who had a clinical examination and treatment consistent with TB, with or without microbiological confirmation. For the diagnosis of smear-negative patients, the sensitivities of MODS and MGIT were 38 and 45%, respectively (P = 0.08). The median times to detection using MODS and MGIT were 8 and 11 days, respectively, and they were 11 and 17 days, respectively, for smear-negative samples. The original bacterial/fungal contamination rate of MODS was 1.1%, while it was 2.6% for MGIT. The cross-contamination rate of MODS was 4.7%. In conclusion, MODS is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test that is appropriate for the detection of HIV-associated TB; its cost and ease of use make it particularly useful in resource-limited settings. PMID:20926704

  11. Construction of an Integrated Positive Youth Development Conceptual Framework for the Prevention of the Use of Psychotropic Drugs among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tak Yan

    2011-01-01

    This is a theoretical paper with an aim to construct an integrated conceptual framework for the prevention of adolescents' use and abuse of psychotropic drugs. This paper first reports the subjective reasons for adolescents' drug use and abuse in Hong Kong and reviews the theoretical underpinnings. Theories of drug use and abuse, including neurological, pharmacological, genetic predisposition, psychological, and sociological theories, were reviewed. It provides a critical re-examination of crucial factors that support the construction of a conceptual framework for primary prevention of adolescents' drug use and abuse building on, with minor revision, the model of victimization and substance abuse among women presented by Logan et al. This revised model provides a comprehensive and coherent framework synthesized from theories of drug abuse. This paper then provides empirical support for integrating a positive youth development perspective in the revised model. It further explains how the 15 empirically sound constructs identified by Catalano et al. and used in a positive youth development program, the Project P.A.T.H.S., relate generally to the components of the revised model to formulate an integrated positive youth development conceptual framework for primary prevention of adolescent drug use. Theoretical and practical implications as well as limitations and recommendations are discussed. PMID:22194671

  12. Characterization and expression of the CXCR1 and CXCR4 in miiuy croaker and evolutionary analysis shows the strong positive selection pressures imposed in mammal CXCR1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjun; Zhu, Zhihuang; Sun, Yuena; Ren, Liping; Wang, Rixin

    2014-05-01

    The innate immune system can recognize non-self, danger signals, and pathogen associated molecular patterns and provides a first line of antimicrobial host defense. Therefore, it plays an instructive role and is pretty important in vertebrates. In innate immune responses, CXCRs act as the main receptors of CXC chemokines and play a vital role in host defense and inflammation. In present study, we cloned two cDNA molecules of CXCR1 and CXCR4 in Miichthys miiuy (miiuy croaker). In these two genes, we found the most highly conserved DRY motif in the second intracellular loop adjacent to the third transmembrane domain. The expressions of CXCR1 and CXCR4 showed that they were ubiquitously expressed in ten normal tissues. After infection with Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio harveyi, the expressions of CXCRs in the immune tissues were significantly regulated in most of tissues except that of CXCR1 in the kidney after V. harveyi injection. Evolutionary analysis showed that only the ancestral lineages of CXCR4 in amphibians underwent positive selection, indicating that the ancestors of amphibians boarded the land and had to further evolve to adapt to terrestrial environments. Multiple ML methods were implemented to detect the robust positively selected candidates for sites. In total, we detected 12 and 3 positively selected sites in the subsets of current mammal and fish CXCR1 genes, and only one site under positive selection was found in mammalian CXCR4 subsets. These positively selected sites were mainly located in the extracellular domains of CXCRs. The sliding window analysis and evolution test tended to favor positive selection acting on the N-terminal domain of CXCR1, which was the critical region for ligand/receptor signaling for neutrophils and receptor-ligand interaction, indicating that the N-terminal of CXCR1 in mammals underwent more positive selection than that of fish. PMID:24333436

  13. Punitive policing and associated substance use risks among HIV-positive people in Russia who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Raj, Anita; Cheng, Debbie M.; Quinn, Emily K.; Bridden, Carly; Blokhina, Elena; Walley, Alexander Y.; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug law enforcement is part of the HIV risk environment among people who inject drugs (PWID). Punitive policing practices such as extrajudicial arrests for needle possession and police planting of drugs have been described anecdotally in Russia, but these experiences and their associations with risky drug behaviours have not been quantified. This study aims to quantify the burden of extrajudicial police arrests among a cohort of HIV-positive PWID in Russia and to explore its links to drug-related health outcomes. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 582 HIV-positive people with lifetime injection drug use (IDU) in St. Petersburg, Russia, we estimated the prevalence of self-reported extrajudicial police arrests. We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate associations between arrests and the following outcomes: overdose, recent IDU and receptive needle sharing. Findings This cohort's mean age was 29.8 years, 60.8% were male; 75.3% reported non-fatal drug overdose, 50.3% recent IDU and 47.3% receptive needle sharing. Extrajudicial arrests were reported by more than half (60.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.564.5) and were associated with higher odds of non-fatal drug overdose (AOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.022.25) but not with recent IDU (AOR 1.17, arrests were associated with receptive needle sharing (AOR 1.84, 95% CI: 1.093.09). Conclusions Extrajudicial police arrests were common among this cohort of Russian HIV-positive PWID and associated with non-fatal overdose and, among those with recent IDU, receptive needle sharing. As a part of the HIV risk environment of PWIDs, these practices might contribute to HIV transmission and overdose mortality. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the operational environment of law enforcement and to better understand how police interventions among PWIDs can improve the HIV risk environment. PMID:25014321

  14. A Tree-Ring Based Reconstruction (1725-present) of the Position of the Summer North Atlantic Jet Shows a 20th Century Northward Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouet, V.; Babst, F.

    2014-12-01

    The position and strength of the Northern Hemisphere polar jet are important modulators of mid-latitude weather extremes and the societal, ecosystem, and economic damage related to them. The position of the North Atlantic jet (NAJ) controls the location of the Atlantic storm track and anomalies in the NAJ position have been related to temperature and precipitation extremes over Europe. In summer, a southern NAJ regime can result in floods in the British Isles (BRIT) and increasing odds of heat waves in the northeastern Mediterranean (NEMED). Variability in the amplitude and speed of the Northern Hemisphere jet stream is hotly debated as a potential mechanism linking recent mid-latitude weather extremes to anthropogenic warming. However, the hypothesis of jet stream variability as a possible mechanism linking Arctic amplification to mid-latitude weather extremes is largely based on data sets with limited temporal extent that do not warrant robust results from a statistical significance perspective. Here, we combined two summer temperature-sensitive tree-ring records from BRIT and NEMED to reconstruct interannual variability in the latitudinal position of the summer NAJ back to 1725. The two well-replicated temperature proxies counter-correlate significantly over the full period and thus illustrate the temperature dipole generated by anomalous NAJ positions. Positive extremes in the NAJ reconstruction correspond to heatwaves recorded in the historical Central England temperature record and negative extremes correspond to reconstructed fire years in Greece. The reconstruction shows a northward shift in the latitudinal NAJ position since the 1930s that is most pronounced in the northern NAJ extremes, suggesting a more frequent occurrence of BRIT hot summers in the 20th century compared to previous centuries.

  15. Thermodynamic origin of the solubility profile of drugs showing one or two maxima against the polarity of aqueous and nonaqueous mixtures: niflumic acid and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Pilar; Navarro, J; Romero, S; Escalera, B

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the origin of the different solubility profiles of drugs against the polarity of solvent mixtures with a common cosolvent. Niflumic acid and caffeine where chosen as model drugs. The solubilities were measured at five or six temperatures in aqueous (ethanol-water) and nonaqueous (ethyl acetate-ethanol) mixtures. The enthalpies of solution were obtained at the harmonic mean of the experimental temperature. Solid phase changes were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry and thermomicroscopy. A single solubility maximum was obtained for niflumic acid against the solubility parameter of both mixtures that is not related to solid phase changes. In contrast, caffeine displays two maxima and anhydrous-hydrate transition occurs at the solubility peak in the amphiprotic mixture. The apparent enthalpies of solution of both drugs show endothermic maxima against solvent composition that are related to hydrophobic hydration. A general explanation for the cosolvent action in aqueous mixtures is proposed. The dominant mechanism shifts from entropy to enthalpy at a certain cosolvent ratio dependent on the hydrophobicity and the solubility parameter of the drug. Niflumic acid and caffeine show enthalpy-entropy compensation in ethanol-water, and this relationship is demonstrated for the first time in nonaqueous mixtures. The results support that enthalpy-entropy compensation is a general effect for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures. The shape of the solubility curves is correlated with the compensation plots. The solubility peaks separate different enthalpy-entropy relationships that also differentiate the solubility behavior of the hydrate and the anhydrous forms of caffeine. PMID:11920772

  16. [Two news drugs (ivacaftor & bedaquiline), one biomarker (florbetapir) and a re-positioned drug (propranolol) on the market].

    PubMed

    Monneret, C

    2014-07-01

    Among the new molecular entities approved by the EMEA and the FDA in 2012, four have caught our attention for their significant contribution to the health of patient. First of all, among the notable 2012 approvals, is ivacaftor or Kalydeco. This is the first treatment that targets one of the gene defects that is underlying cause of cystic fibrosis. This is also an example of the promise of personalized medicine. The benefits with bedaquiline or Sirturo are its ability to likely provide clinically relevant activity as part of multi-drug regimens against tuberculosis (TB) based on clinical data in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) patients, who were defined as being at least resistant against the two major tuberculostatic medicines (isaoniazide and rifampicine). On December 2012 and then, on December 2013, the FDA and European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended granting a conditional marketing authorization for Sirturo (bedaquiline), respectively, for use as part of a combination therapy for pulmonary multidrug resistant tuberculosis in adult patients when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be composed for reasons of resistance or tolerability. Amyvid, which is a solution for injection that contains the active substance florbetapir (18F), is a radiopharmaceutical that emits low amounts of radiation and works by targeting and attaching to ?-amyloid plaques in the brain. This enables doctors to know whether or not significant amount of plaques are present in order to know if the patient is unlikely or not, to have Alzheimer's disease. Finally, the last topics addresses the propranolol, which is a beta-blocker, used alone or together with other medicines to treat high blood pressure. Propranolol is gaining a new lease of life for treating infantile hemangioma. PMID:24997884

  17. Collagen gel droplet-embedded culture-drug sensitivity test and Ki67 expression in estrogen receptor-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tozuka, Katsunori; Horiguchi, Jun; Takata, Daisuke; Rokutanda, Nana; Nagaoka, Rin; Tokiniwa, Hideaki; Kikuchi, Mami; Satou, Ayako; Takei, Hiroyuki; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    Anthracyclines and taxanes are standard anticancer drugs used in breast cancer chemotherapy. In general, the efficacy of chemotherapy is lower in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors compared to patients with ER-negative tumors. Although less chemosensitive, ER-positive disease includes a subset of patients who significantly benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The collagen gel droplet-embedded culture-drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) is an in vitro chemosensitivity test that has several advantages over conventional tests. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between CD-DST and the expression of Ki67, an indicator of tumor proliferation, to evaluate the efficacy of anthracyclines and taxanes in patients with ER-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. CD-DST was performed in 68 patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer between August 2001 and November 2006. The specimens obtained during surgery were used for the CD-DST and immunohistological examination of Ki67 expression. Chemosensitivity to the anticancer drugs adriamycin (ADM), epirubicin (EPI), docetaxel (DOC) and paclitaxel (PTX) was estimated using CD-DST. Results obtained from the CD-DST showed the chemosensitivity to each anticancer drug to be ADM, 23.7%; EPI, 75.0%; DOC, 69.2% and PTX, 43.6%. Ki67 expression was significantly higher in the group that was sensitive to DOC compared to the group that was resistant to DOC (P=0.048) and PTX (P=0.036). In addition, a significant correlation was observed between a Ki67 labeling index (LI) of >30% and chemosensitivity to PTX. In conclusion, results obtained from CD-DST and Ki67 expression levels are able to identify a subset of patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer who exhibit sensitivity to chemotherapy, particularly to taxane therapy. PMID:24649129

  18. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  19. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Test Reactor (ATR); C Production Reactor (C); Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II); Fast Flux...

  20. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Test Reactor (ATR); C Production Reactor (C); Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II); Fast Flux...

  1. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Test Reactor (ATR); C Production Reactor (C); Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II); Fast Flux...

  2. Position Statement: Drug Holiday in Osteoporosis Treatment with Bisphosphonates in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hun; Gong, Hyun Sik; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Si Young; Shin, Jung-Ho; Cho, Sun Wook; Byun, Dong-Won

    2015-11-01

    Bisphosphonates have been widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis with robust data from many placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy in fracture risk reduction over 3 to 5 years of treatment. Although bisphosphonates are generally safe and well tolerated, concerns have emerged about the adverse effects related to its long-term use, including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures. Because bisphosphonates are incorporated into the skeleton and continue to exert an anti-resorptive effect for a period of time after the discontinuation of drugs, the concept of a "drug holiday" has emerged, whereby the risk of adverse effects might be decreased while the patient still benefits from anti-fracture efficacy. As randomized clinical trial evidence is not yet available on who may qualify for a drug holiday, there is considerable controversy regarding the selection of candidates for the drug holiday and monitoring during a drug holiday, both of which should be based on individual assessments of risk and benefit. This statement will provide suggestions for clinicians in South Korea on the identification of possible candidates and monitoring during a bisphosphonate drug holiday. PMID:26713307

  3. Position Statement: Drug Holiday in Osteoporosis Treatment with Bisphosphonates in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun; Gong, Hyun Sik; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Si Young; Shin, Jung-Ho; Cho, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have been widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis with robust data from many placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy in fracture risk reduction over 3 to 5 years of treatment. Although bisphosphonates are generally safe and well tolerated, concerns have emerged about the adverse effects related to its long-term use, including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures. Because bisphosphonates are incorporated into the skeleton and continue to exert an anti-resorptive effect for a period of time after the discontinuation of drugs, the concept of a "drug holiday" has emerged, whereby the risk of adverse effects might be decreased while the patient still benefits from anti-fracture efficacy. As randomized clinical trial evidence is not yet available on who may qualify for a drug holiday, there is considerable controversy regarding the selection of candidates for the drug holiday and monitoring during a drug holiday, both of which should be based on individual assessments of risk and benefit. This statement will provide suggestions for clinicians in South Korea on the identification of possible candidates and monitoring during a bisphosphonate drug holiday. PMID:26713307

  4. Characterization of antibody drug conjugate positional isomers at cysteine residues by peptide mapping LC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Janin-Bussat, Marie-Claire; Dillenbourg, Marina; Corvaia, Nathalie; Beck, Alain; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine

    2015-02-15

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming a major class of oncology therapeutics. Because ADCs combine the monoclonal antibody specificity with the high toxicity of a drug, they can selectively kill tumor cells while minimizing toxicity to normal cells. Most of the current ADCs in clinical trials are controlled, but heterogeneous mixtures of isomers and isoforms. Very few protocols on ADC characterization at the peptide level have been published to date. Here, we report on the improvement of an ADC peptide mapping protocol to characterize the drug-loaded peptides by LC-MS analysis. These methods were developed on brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), a commercial ADC with an average of four drugs linked to interchain cysteine residues of its antibody component. Because of the drug hydrophobicity, all the steps of this protocol including enzymatic digestion were improved to maintain the hydrophobic drug-loaded peptides in solution, allowing their unambiguous identification by LC-MS. For the first time, the payloads positional isomers observed by RP-HPLC after IdeS-digestion and reduction of the ADC were also characterized. PMID:25596378

  5. Aggressive CD5-positive diffuse large B cell lymphoma showing c-myc rearrangements developed in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sonoki, T; Matsuzaki, H; Asou, N; Hata, H; Matsuno, F; Yoshida, M; Nagasaki, A; Kuribayashi, N; Kudo, H; Takatsuki, K

    1996-01-01

    A case of CD5-positive diffuse large cell lymphoma in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is reported. The patient was diagnosed with AIHA in December 1988. Three and a half years later, the patient complained of fever and left sided flank pain. Abnormal lymphocytes appeared in the peripheral blood and were positive for HLA-DR, CD5, CD19, CD20, and surface immunoglobulin (mu, lambda). The pathological diagnosis of the cervical lymphnode was non-Hodgkin lymphoma; diffuse large cell type with a starry sky-like appearance. Although the 8q24 translocation was not detected by karyotypic analysis of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC), Southern blot analysis revealed that the c-myc rearrangements had occurred. This case showed two rearranged bands with Eco RI, Bam HI, or Bgl II digestion, and a germline band with Hin dIII digestion using a second exon fragment of the c-myc gene as a probe. Despite intensive chemotherapy, this patient died 6 months after being diagnosed with malignant lymphoma. We discuss the c-myc rearrangements in this aggressive CD5-positive diffuse large B cell lymphoma. PMID:8713579

  6. Technology transfer through performance management: the effects of graphical feedback and positive reinforcement on drug treatment counselors' behavior.

    PubMed

    Andrzejewski, M E; Kirby, K C; Morral, A R; Iguchi, M Y

    2001-07-01

    After drug treatment counselors at a community-based methadone treatment clinic were trained in implementing a contingency management (CM) intervention, baseline measures of performance revealed that, on average, counselors were meeting the performance criteria specified by the treatment protocol about 42% of the time. Counselors were exposed to graphical feedback and a drawing for cash prizes in an additive within-subjects design to assess the effectiveness of these interventions in improving protocol adherence. Counselor performance measures increased to 71% during the graphical feedback condition, and to 81% during the drawing. Each counselor's performance improved during the intervention conditions. Additional analyses suggested that counselors did not have skill deficits that hindered implementation. Rather, protocol implementation occurred more frequently when consequences were added, thereby increasing the overall proportion of criteria met. Generalizations, however, may be limited due to a small sample size and possible confounding of time and intervention effects. Nonetheless, present results show promise that feedback and positive reinforcement could be used to improve technology transfer of behavioral interventions into community clinic settings. PMID:11376922

  7. Drug response to HER2 gatekeeper T798M mutation in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuli; Li, Yongfeng; Tang, Hongchao; Mao, Weimin; Yang, Hongjian; Wang, Xiaojia; Ding, Xianfeng; Xie, Shangnao

    2016-02-01

    The gatekeeper T798M mutation in HER2 kinase domain has been observed to considerably shift drug sensitivity to HER2 in breast cancer therapy. Here, drug response of clinical tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to the mutation was profiled using a synthetic biology protocol. It was found that TKIs can be grouped into three classes in terms of their response behavior to T798M mutation: class I inhibitors exhibit drug resistance upon the mutation, such as lapatinib, TAK-285 and AEE788; class II inhibitors are insensitive to the mutation, such as erlotinib and gefitinib; and class III inhibitors can be sensitized by the mutation, such as staurosporine. However, kinetic study indicated that the mutation has only a modest effect on the binding of substrate ATP to HER2. Binding free energy analysis revealed that the drug response is primarily determined by direct interaction between the kinase and inhibitors, but not by indirect kinase interaction with competitive ATP. This is different to the molecular mechanism of "generic" drug resistance conferring from EGFR gatekeeper T790M mutation, which is caused by increased ATP affinity upon the mutation. Structural analysis of kinase-inhibitor complexes unraveled that HER2 T798M mutation induces significant steric hindrance to class I inhibitors, but can establish additional nonbonded interactions for class III inhibitors. PMID:26439378

  8. A cost-utility analysis of drug treatments in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Only lamivudine has been included for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in the National List of Essential Drugs (NLED), a pharmaceutical reimbursement list in Thailand. There have also been no economic evaluation studies of CHB drug treatments conducted in Thailand yet. In order to fill this gap in policy research, the objective of this study was to compare the cost-utility of each drug therapy (Figure 1) with palliative care in patients with HBeAg-positive CHB. Methods A cost-utility analysis using an economic evaluation model was performed to compare each drug treatment for HBeAg-positive CHB patients. A Markov model was used to estimate the relevant costs and health outcomes during a lifetime horizon based on a societal perspective. Direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs, and indirect costs were included, and health outcomes were denoted in life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The results were presented as an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) in Thai baht (THB) per LY or QALY gained. One-way sensitivity and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were applied to investigate the effects of model parameter uncertainties. Results The ICER values of providing generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir when drug resistance occurred, generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir based on the road map guideline, and tenofovir monotherapy were -14,000 (USD -467), -8,000 (USD -267) , and -5,000 (USD -167) THB per QALY gained, respectively. However, when taking into account all parameter uncertainties in the model, providing generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir when drug resistance occurred (78% and 75%) and tenofovir monotherapy (18% and 24%) would yield higher probabilities of being cost-effective at the societal willingness to pay thresholds of 100,000 (USD 3,333) and 300,000 (USD 10,000) THB per QALY gained in Thailand, respectively. Conclusions Based on the policy recommendations from this study, the Thai government decided to include tenofovir into the NLED in addition to generic lamivudine which is already on the list. Moreover, the results have shown that the preferred treatment regimen involves using generic lamivudine as the first-line drug with tenofovir added if drug resistance occurs in HBeAg-positive CHB patients. PMID:24731689

  9. [Cardiovascular safety of non-insulin anti-diabetic drugs. Scientific position statement of SEMERGEN].

    PubMed

    Prieto, M ; Comas Samper, J M; Escobar Cervantes, C; Gasull Molinera, V

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. Although reducing plasma glucose levels to recommended targets decreases the risk of microvascular outcomes, the effects of anti-diabetic drugs on macrovascular complications and cardiovascular death are of concern. In fact, it has been suggested that some anti-diabetic agents could even be harmful for cardiovascular outcomes. In this context, several health care regulatory agencies have established the need for performing clinical trials specifically designed to assess the cardiovascular safety of anti-diabetic drugs. The results of 2 clinical trials have recently been published that provide important information on the cardiovascular safety of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. The aim of this document was to review the available evidence on the cardiovascular safety of non-insulin anti-diabetic drugs and provide practical recommendations on their use in this context. PMID:24882393

  10. Introduction of chromosome segment carrying the seed storage protein genes from chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum showed positive effect on bread-making quality of common wheat.

    PubMed

    Ruiqi, Zhang; Mingyi, Zhang; Xiue, Wang; Peidu, Chen

    2014-03-01

    Development of wheat- D. villosum 1V#4 translocation lines; physically mapping the Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 loci; and assess the effects of the introduced Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 on wheat bread-making quality. Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci, located in the chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum, were proved to have positive effects on grain quality. However, there are very few reports about the transfer of the D. villosum-derived seed storage protein genes into wheat background by chromosome manipulation. In the present study, a total of six CS-1V#4 introgression lines with different alien-fragment sizes were developed through ionizing radiation of the mature female gametes of CS--D. villosum 1V#4 disomic addition line and confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), chromosome C-banding, twelve 1V#4-specific EST-STS markers and seed storage protein analysis enabled the cytological physical mapping of Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci to the region of FL 0.50-1.00 of 1V#4S of D. villosum. The Glu-V1 allele of D. villosum was Glu-V1a and its coded protein was V71 subunit. Quality analysis indicated that Glu-V1a together with Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci showed a positive effect on protein content, Zeleny sedimentation value and the rheological characteristics of wheat flour dough. In addition, the positive effect could be maintained when specific Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci were transferred to the wheat genetic background as in the case of T1V#4S-6BS 6BL, T1V#4S 1BL and T1V#4S 1DS translocation lines. These results showed that the chromosome segment carrying the Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci in 1V#4S of D. villosum had positive effect on bread-making quality, and the T1V#4S-6BS 6BL and T1V#4S 1BL translocation lines could be useful germplasms for bread wheat improvement. The developed 1V#4S-specific molecular markers could be used to rapidly identify and trace the alien chromatin of 1V#4S in wheat background. PMID:24408374

  11. Unprotected Sexual Behavior Among Heterosexual HIV-Positive Injection Drug Using Men: Associations by Partner Type and Partner Serostatus

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yuko; Metsch, Lisa R.; Garfein, Richard; Tobin, Karin; Knight, Kelly; Latka, Mary H.

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have examined sexual risk behaviors of HIV-positive, heterosexual, injection drug using (IDU) men. We investigated such behaviors and associations with risk among sexually active, HIV-positive IDU men who reported only female sex partners in the 3months prior to baseline interview. We examined associations separately for four non-exclusive groups of men by crossing partner type (main or casual) and partner serostatus (HIV-positive or HIV-negative/unknown). Of 732 male participants, 469 (64%) were sexually active with only female partners. Of these 469 men, 155 (33%) reported sex with HIV-positive main partners, 127 (27%) with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus main partners, 145 (31%) with HIV-positive casual partners, and 192 (41%) with HIV-negative/unknown serostatus casual partners. Significant multivariate associations for unprotected sex with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus main partners were less self-efficacy to use condoms, weaker partner norms supporting condoms, and more negative condom beliefs. Similar correlates were found for unprotected sex with HIV-positive main and casual partners. In addition, alcohol or drug use during sex was a significant correlate of unprotected sex with HIV-positive main partners, while depression was significant for HIV-positive casual partners. For unprotected sex with HIV-negative/unknown status casual partners, self-efficacy for condom use, sex trade, and education were significant multivariate correlates. A combination of broad and tailored intervention strategies based on the relationship pattern of men's lives may provide the most benefit for reducing unprotected sex with female partners. PMID:16736116

  12. Positively charged polymeric nanoparticle reservoirs of terbinafine hydrochloride: preclinical implications for controlled drug delivery in the aqueous humor of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Saadia Ahmed; El-Nabarawi, Mohamed Ahmed; Tadros, Mina Ibrahim; Abd-Elsalam, Wessam Hamdy

    2013-06-01

    Frequent instillation of terbinafine hydrochloride (T HCl) eye drops (0.25%, w/v) is necessary to maintain effective aqueous humor concentrations for treatment of fungal keratitis. The current approach aimed at developing potential positively charged controlled-release polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) of T HCl. The estimation of the drug pharmacokinetics in the aqueous humor following ocular instillation of the best-achieved NPs in rabbits was another goal. Eighteen drug-loaded (0.50%, w/v) formulae were fabricated by the nanopreciptation method using Eudragit® RS100 and chitosan (0.25%, 0.5%, and 1%, w/v). Soybean lecithin (1%, w/v) and Pluronic® F68 (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%, w/v) were incorporated in the alcoholic and aqueous phases, respectively. The NPs were evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency percentage (EE%), morphological examination, drug release in simulated tear fluid (pH 7.4), Fourier-transform IR (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), physical stability (2 months, 4°C and 25°C), and drug pharmacokinetics in the rabbit aqueous humor relative to an oily drug solution. Spherical, discrete NPs were successfully developed with mean particle size and zeta potential ranging from 73.29 to 320.15 nm and +20.51 to +40.32 mV, respectively. Higher EE% were achieved with Eudragit® RS100-based NPs. The duration of drug release was extended to more than 8 h. FT-IR and XRD revealed compatibility between inactive formulation ingredients and T HCl and permanence of the latter's crystallinity, respectively. The NPs were physically stable, for at least 2 months, when refrigerated. F5-NP suspension significantly (P<0.05) increased drug mean residence time and improved its ocular bioavailability; 1.657-fold. PMID:23615773

  13. Combination of novel HER2-targeting antibody 1E11 with trastuzumab shows synergistic antitumor activity in HER2-positive gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Lee, Sook-Yeon; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Persson, Helena; Rockberg, Johan; Borrebaeck, Carl; Park, Dongeun; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Uhlen, Mathias; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-02-01

    The synergistic interaction of two antibodies targeting the same protein could be developed as an effective anti-cancer therapy. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20-25% of breast and gastric cancer patients, and HER2-targeted antibody therapy using trastuzumab is effective in many of these patients. Nonetheless, improving therapeutic efficacy and patient survival is important, particularly in patients with HER2-positive gastric cancer. Here, we describe the development of 1E11, a HER2-targeted humanized monoclonal antibody showing increased efficacy in a highly synergistic manner in combination with trastuzumab in the HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cell lines NCI-N87 and OE-19. The two antibodies bind to sub-domain IV of the receptor, but have non-overlapping epitopes, allowing them to simultaneously bind HER2. Treatment with 1E11 alone induced apoptosis in HER2-positive cancer cells, and this effect was enhanced by combination treatment with trastuzumab. Combination treatment with 1E11 and trastuzumab reduced the levels of total HER2 protein and those of aberrant HER2 signaling molecules including phosphorylated HER3 and EGFR. The synergistic antitumor activity of 1E11 in combination with trastuzumab indicates that it could be a novel potent therapeutic antibody for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing gastric cancers. PMID:25306393

  14. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    SciTech Connect

    Nadanaciva, Sashi; Aleo, Michael D.; Strock, Christopher J.; Stedman, Donald B.; Wang, Huijun; Will, Yvonne

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify “toxic” and “non-toxic” drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: • NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. • Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. • ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. • Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary.

  15. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes.

    PubMed

    Nadanaciva, Sashi; Aleo, Michael D; Strock, Christopher J; Stedman, Donald B; Wang, Huijun; Will, Yvonne

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify "toxic" and "non-toxic" drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. PMID:23811329

  16. Metabonomics: the use of electrospray mass spectrometry coupled to reversed-phase liquid chromatography shows potential for the screening of rat urine in drug development.

    PubMed

    Plumb, Robert S; Stumpf, Chris L; Gorenstein, Marc V; Castro-Perez, Jose M; Dear, Gordon J; Anthony, Maria; Sweatman, Brian C; Connor, Susan C; Haselden, John N

    2002-01-01

    The application of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) followed by principal components analysis (PCA) has been successfully applied to the screening of rat urine following the administration of three candidate pharmaceuticals. With this methodology it was possible to differentiate the control samples from the dosed samples and to identify the components of the mass spectrum responsible for the separation. These data clearly show that LC/MS is a viable alternative, or complementary, technique to proton NMR for metabonomics applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:12362392

  17. Factors associated with positive HIV serostatus among women who use drugs: continued evidence for expanding factors of influence.

    PubMed Central

    Theall, Katherine P.; Sterk, Claire E.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Kidder, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with positive HIV serostatus among African American women who smoke crack and/or inject drugs and who are not enrolled in drug treatment or another institutional setting. METHODS: Baseline interviews were conducted from June 1998 to June 2000 with 379 heterosexually active women (ages 18 to 59) who had been recruited for potential enrollment into an HIV intervention trial. RESULTS: Adjusted for age and drug using status, women who expressed more difficulty saying no to sex with male partners were more likely to be HIV-positive (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=3.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.02, 4.83). Similarly, those who indicated greater communication with casual sex partner(s) were less likely to test positive (aOR=0.29, 95% CI 0.10, 0.89). Lower HIV internal control and a history of cuts or burns on lips due to crack smoking were also associated with positive serostatus, and were important confounders in the final multivariate model. A higher level of internal control was associated with a decreased likelihood of positive serostatus, while a history of cuts or burns on the lips was associated with an increased likelihood of HIV antibodies, even after controlling for the amount of oral sex. CONCLUSIONS: A broad array of factors may promote or avert infection with HIV. The degree to which personal attributes and beliefs, and relationship characteristics contribute to the likelihood of infection must continue to be addressed. The importance of oral sex and presence of oral sores and their potential role in transmission was suggested. PMID:12941854

  18. The Drug Enforcement Agency's position on "constructive transfer" under the Controlled Substances Act.

    PubMed

    Pore, R David

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the Drug Enforcement Agency's current interpretation of the Controlled Substances Act as it relates to the "constructive transfer" of certain controlled substances from pharmacist to physician for office administration. The article discusses compliance with the Controlled Substances Act in this context and related legislative and legal activities of individual pharmacists and of the International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists and other groups. PMID:23259358

  19. HER2-positive advanced breast cancer: optimizing patient outcomes and opportunities for drug development.

    PubMed

    Singh, J C; Jhaveri, K; Esteva, F J

    2014-11-11

    Effective targeting of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has changed the natural history of HER2 overexpressing (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer. The initial success of trastuzumab improving time to progression and survival rates led to the clinical development of pertuzumab, ado-trastuzumab emtansine and lapatinib. These biologic therapies represent significant additions to the breast medical oncology armamentarium. However, drug resistance ultimately develops and most tumours progress within 1 year. Ongoing studies are evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to overcome primary and secondary drug resistance in tumours, including inhibition of PI3K/TOR, HSP90, IGF-IR and angiogenesis. Mounting experimental data support the clinical testing of immune checkpoint modulators and vaccines. The central nervous system remains a sanctuary site for HER2+ breast cancer and further studies are needed for the prevention and treatment of brain metastases in this population. Despite efforts to identify predictors of preferential benefit from HER2-targeted therapies (e.g., truncated HER2, PTEN loss and SRC activation), HER2 protein overexpression and/or gene amplification remains the most important predictive factor of response to HER2-targeted therapies. In this article, we review the optimal sequence of HER2-targeted therapies and describe ongoing efforts to improve the outcome of HER2+ advanced breast cancer through rational drug development. PMID:25025958

  20. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis. PMID:26042029

  1. Ethnic hair care products may increase false positives in hair drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, David A; Smith, Frederick P; Shepherd, Arica R

    2015-12-01

    The question of why different races appear more susceptible to hair contamination by external drugs remains controversial. This research studied susceptibility of head hair to external cocaine and methamphetamine when hair products have been applied. Three different chemical classes of ethnic hair products were applied to Caucasian, Asian, and African hair. Some products increased the methamphetamine and cocaine concentrations in all hair types. A unique finding of this research is that certain ethnic hair products can replace moisture as a diffusion medium, thereby increasing the susceptibility to contamination over 100-fold compared to petroleum-based products. PMID:26338354

  2. [Exenatid and its position as antidiabetic drug in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Perusicov, J

    2008-04-01

    'Incretin effect' refers to increased insulin response to oral glucose as compared to i.v. glucose response. Incretin mimetics are a new class of antidiabetic drugs lowering hyperglycaemia. Incretin mimetics mimic the natural human hormones called 'incretins' with blood glucose regulating action. Exenatide is a synthetic analogue GLP-1 which is resistant to enzymatic degradation by DPP IV. Subcutaneously administered exenatide stimulates insulin secretion, suppresses glucagon secretion, slows down stomach evacuation and reduces the weight. Its administration is safe and the most frequent side effect is mild nausea. PMID:18630617

  3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection & risk factors for HCV positivity in injecting & non-injecting drug users attending a de-addiction centre in northern India

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Debasish; Sharma, Arun Kumar; Gupta, Sunil; Nebhinani, Naresh; Kumar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Injecting drug use is a major route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in India, but there may be other risk factors also. This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in injecting drug users (IDUs) vs. non-IDUs (NIDUs), and to study the risk estimates for HCV seropositivity in the total sample of substance users with regard to various demographic, clinical, behavioural and personality factors. Methods: The IDUs (n = 201) and NIDUs (n = 219) were assessed for demographic, clinical and behavioural information, and were rated on instruments for severity of dependence, risk behaviour and personality profiles. Anti-HCV antibody was tested by ELISA and confirmed by recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) test. Results: Almost one-third of the IDUs (64 of 201; 31.8%) were positive for anti-HCV antibody, as opposed to only seven (3.2%) of the NIDUs. The four risk factors strongly associated with HCV positivity in multivariate analysis were sharing syringe [Exp(B) 75.04; 95%CI 18.28-307.96; P<0.001], reuse of injection accessories (16.39; 3.51-76.92; P<0.001), blood transfusion (5.88; 1.63-21.23; P=0.007) and IDU status (3.60; 1.26-10.31; P=0.017). Other variables less strongly but significantly associated with HCV positivity were multiple sex partners, opioid dependence, risk behaviour scores, impulsivity, and lower age of onset of drug use. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed a high seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in IDUs. In the substance users, HCV positivity was significantly and independently associated with several clinical, behavioural, and personality risk factors. PMID:26458347

  4. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Acua-Alonzo, Vctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hnemeier, Tbita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrs; Ortiz-Lpez, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramrez, Hugo; Len-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramrez-Jimnez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de ngeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, Jos; Cedillo-Barrn, Leticia; Gmez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vzquez, Adriana; Gonzlez-Martn, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodrguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusi-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Ctira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 10?11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  5. The SUV39H1 inhibitor chaetocin induces differentiation and shows synergistic cytotoxicity with other epigenetic drugs in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Y-S; Chen, J-Y; Tsai, H-J; Chen, T-Y; Hung, W-C

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifying enzymes have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 by the methyltransferase G9a and SUV39H1 is associated with inhibition of tumor suppressor genes. We studied the effect of G9a and SUV39H1 inhibitors on viability and differentiation of AML cells and tested the cytotoxicity induced by combination of G9a and SUV39H1 inhibitors and various epigenetic drugs. The SUV39H1 inhibitor (chaetocin) and the G9a inhibitor (UNC0638) caused cell death in AML cells at high concentrations. However, only chaetocin-induced CD11b expression and differentiation of AML cells at non-cytotoxic concentration. HL-60 and KG-1a cells were more sensitive to chaetocin than U937 cells. Long-term incubation of chaetocin led to downregulation of SUV39H1 and reduction of H3K9 tri-methylation in HL-60 and KG-1a cells. Combination of chaetocin with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor) or JQ (a BET (bromodomain extra terminal) bromodomain inhibitor) showed synergistic cytotoxicity. Conversely, no synergism was found by combining chaetocin and UNC0638. More importantly, chaetocin-induced differentiation and combined cytotoxicity were also found in the primary cells of AML patients. Collectively, the SUV39H1 inhibitor chaetocin alone or in combination with other epigenetic drugs may be effective for the treatment of AML. PMID:25978433

  6. Intrathyroid epithelial thymoma (ITET) and carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE): CD5-positive neoplasms mimicking squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Kakudo, Kennichi; Bai, Yanhua; Ozaki, Takashi; Homma, Kei-ichi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Miyauchi, Akira

    2013-05-01

    Carcinoma of possible thymic epithelial origin may occur within the thyroid gland, which was first reported by Miyauchi et al. as intrathyroid epithelial thymoma (ITET). ITET is a rare tumor comprising about 0.08% of all primary thyroid malignancies. It is a low-grade thyroid carcinoma with squamous cell differentiation whose overall survival rate was found to be 71%. Lymph node metastasis at surgery was found in 40% and hematogenous metastases developed in bones, liver and lungs. This tumor grows within the thyroid gland and invades into the thyroid parenchyma as well as into the extrathyroid structures. It is a well-circumscribed solid tumor with a sharp tumor border, but is not capsulated. After fixation, the cut surface of the tumor is gray-white in color and is a solid tumor with lobulation. Tumor calcification was not detected in our 15 cases. The tumor cells show solid sheets of growth with occasional keratinization without follicular or papillary structures. Lymphocytic infiltration in the stroma is one of the most characteristic features of this tumor. The tumor cells are polygonal epithelial cells with distinct nucleoli and ill-defined cell border. Positive immunoreactivity for CD5 is a key feature to differentiate it from undifferentiated carcinoma, poorly differentiated carcinoma, medullary (C cell) carcinoma and high-grade squamous cell carcinoma (so-called primary squamous cell carcinoma) of the thyroid. Negative immunoreactivity for calcitonin, TTF1 and thyroglobulin, and positive immunoreactivity for p63 and KIT are also helpful for differential diagnosis. Nuclear atypia is mild and mitoses are less frequent, with an intermediate proliferation index (MIB-1 labeling index is usually less than 20%), which are also helpful to differentiate it from high-grade primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid. The tumors in our 15 cases demonstrate 3 histological subtypes: keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma type, non-keratinizing basaloid cell carcinoma (lymphoepithelioma-like) type and neuroendocrine carcinoma type, which correspond to subtypes of the mediastinal thymic carcinomas. PMID:23233417

  7. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological processes in the soil have been modelled with simulation model SWAP. The experiment started in 2010 and is ongoing. Data, collected so far show that the plots with controlled drainage (all compared with plots equipped with conventional drainage) conserve more rain water (higher groundwater tables in early spring), lower discharges under average weather conditions and storm events, reduce N-loads and saline seepage to surface waters, enhance denitrification, show a different 'first flush' effect and show similar crop yields. The results of the experiments will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of controlled drainage on complex hydrological en geochemical processes in agricultural clay soils, the interaction between ground- en surface water and its effects on drain water quantity, quality and crop yield.

  8. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism gene shows locus homogeneity on chromosome 15q11-q13 and evidence of multiple mutations in southern African negroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kedda, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Manga, P.; Viljoen, C.; Jenkins, T.; Ramsay, M. Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg )

    1994-06-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin pigmentary system. South African ty-pos OCA individuals occur with two distinct phenotypes, with or without darkly pigmented patches (ephelides, or dendritic freckles) on exposed areas of the skin. These phenotypes are concordant within families, suggesting that there may be more than one mutation at the ty-pos OCA locus. Linkage studies carried out in 41 families have shown linkage between markers in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on chromosome 15q11-q13 and ty-pos OCA. Analysis showed no obligatory crossovers between the alleles at the D15S12 locus and ty-pos OCA, suggesting that the D15S12 locus is very close to or part of the disease locus, which is postulated to be the human homologue, P, of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene, p. Unlike caucasoid [open quotes]ty-pos OCA[close quotes] individuals, negroid ty-pos OCA individuals do not show any evidence of locus heterogeneity. Studies of allelic association between the polymorphic alleles detected at the D15S12 locus and ephelus status suggest that there was a single major mutation giving rise to ty-pos OCA without ephelides. There may, however, be two major mutations causing ty-pos OCA with ephelides, one associated with D15S12 allele 1 and the other associated with D15S12 allele 2. The two loci, GABRA5 and D15S24, flanking D15S12, are both hypervariable, and many different haplotypes were observed with the alleles at the three loci on both ty-pos OCA-associated chromosomes and [open quotes]normal[close quotes] chromosomes. No haplotype showed statistically significant association with ty-pos OCA, and thus none could be used to predict the origins of the ty-pos OCA mutations. On the basis of the D15S12 results, there is evidence for multiple ty-pos OCA mutations in southern African negroids. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Philip; Hofmann, Tobias; Ahnis, Anne; Elbelt, Ulf; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Klapp, Burghard F.; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI) and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2), underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI < 17.5 kg/m2) and overweight (obesity with BMI 30–40, 40–50 and >50 kg/m2, n = 14–15/group) and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6 ± 0.3 kg/m2, n = 43). Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, n = 85), psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9–85 kg/m2, n = 74). No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p > 0.05). Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r = −0.30, p = 0.008), while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p > 0.05) in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point toward a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating. PMID:26089773

  10. Comparative Transcriptomics of Eastern African Cichlid Fishes Shows Signs of Positive Selection and a Large Contribution of Untranslated Regions to Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Laura; Santos, M.Emlia; Salzburger, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The hundreds of endemic species of cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi, and Victoria are a prime model system in evolutionary biology. With five genomes currently being sequenced, eastern African cichlids also represent a forthcoming genomic model for evolutionary studies of genotype-to-phenotype processes in adaptive radiations. Here we report the functional annotation and comparative analyses of transcriptome data sets for two eastern African cichlid species, Astatotilapia burtoni and Ophthalmotilapia ventralis, representatives of the modern haplochromines and ectodines, respectively. Nearly 647,000 expressed sequence tags were assembled in more than 46,000 contigs for each species using the 454 sequencing technology, largely expanding the current sequence data set publicly available for these cichlids. Total predicted coverage of their proteome diversity is approximately 50% for both species. Comparative qualitative and quantitative analyses show very similar transcriptome data for the two species in terms of both functional annotation and relative abundance of gene ontology terms expressed. Average genetic distance between species is 1.75% when all transcript types are considered including nonannotated sequences, 1.33% for annotated sequences only including untranslated regions, and decreases to nearly half, 0.95%, for coding sequences only, suggesting a large contribution of noncoding regions to their genetic diversity. Comparative analyses across the two species, tilapia and the outgroup medaka based on an overlapping data set of 1,216 genes (?526 kb) demonstrate cichlid-specific signature of disruptive selection and provide a set of candidate genes that are putatively under positive selection. Overall, these data sets offer the genetic platform for future comparative analyses in light of the upcoming genomes for this taxonomic group. PMID:21617250

  11. Syndemic vulnerability, sexual and injection risk behaviors, and HIV continuum of care outcomes in HIV-positive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuko; Purcell, David W; Knowlton, Amy R; Wilkinson, James D; Gourevitch, Marc N; Knight, Kelly R

    2015-04-01

    Limited investigations have been conducted on syndemics and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Using baseline data from a multi-site, randomized controlled study of HIV-positive injection drug users (n=1,052), we examined whether psychosocial factors co-occurred, and whether these factors were additively associated with behavioral and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Experiencing one type of psychosocial problem was significantly (p<0.05) associated with an increased odds of experiencing another type of problem. Persons with 3 or more psychosocial problems were significantly more likely to report sexual and injection risk behaviors and were less likely to be adherent to HIV medications. Persons with 4 or more problems were less likely to be virally suppressed. Reporting any problems was associated with not currently taking HIV medications. Our findings highlight the association of syndemics not only with risk behaviors, but also with outcomes related to the continuum of care for HIV-positive persons. PMID:25249392

  12. Forfeiture of illegally acquired assets of drug traffickers: the position in India.

    PubMed

    Gujral, B B

    1983-01-01

    Trafficking in drugs and other related crimes generates huge illicit funds which are used to support other criminal activity, corruption, illicit arms trading, the smuggling of goods and currency, and other economic offences. The traditional enforcement techniques aimed only at carriers and confiscation of the seized contraband no longer provide a sufficient deterrent. The problem is international in scope and requires close cooperation of all the agencies concerned. In 1976, India enacted specific legislation providing for the forfeiture of the property and assets of smugglers, including traffickers and foreign-exchange manipulators. This legislation, known as the "Smugglers and Foreign-Exchange Manipulators (Forfeiture of Property) Act, 1976", enables the enforcement authorities to confiscate all property, both movable and immovable, illegally acquired or accumulated, or for which investment is made from unlawful earnings resulting from smuggling and foreign exchange racketeering. It covers all such property held, not only in the names of smugglers and traffickers themselves, but their relatives and associates as well. The Act provides for principles of natural justice to be followed for all forfeiture proceedings and for appeals to a high tribunal. The legislation has enabled forfeiture action in 2,297 cases, covering properties valued at $US 40 million, during the last six years. PMID:6556075

  13. Effect of the position of the cyano-group of cyanopregnenolones on their drug metabolic inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Kourounakis, P N; Rekka, E; Demopoulos, V J; Retsas, S

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the position of the cyano-group of several cyanopregnenolones on the body's resistance to drugs and on drug metabolism was investigated. Female rats were pretreated with 2 alpha-, 6-, 16 alpha-, 17 alpha-cyano- or 16 alpha-cyanomethyl-pregnenolone or with pregnenolone, and the (in vivo) resistance to zoxazolamine, digitoxin and indomethacin, as well as the in vitro drug metabolism (post mitochondrial fraction) of zoxazolamine and ethylmorphine were determined. It was found that the 16-derivative was the most active in this respect, the 2- and 17-cyanopregnenolones were less active but significantly potent compared to controls, while the 6-cyano, the 16-cyanomethyl derivatives and pregnenolone were essentially inactive. These differences were explained in terms of an effective or poor fit of the steroids to their receptor. The poor performance of pregnenolone-16 alpha-acetonitrile was attributed to electronic effects. A hypothesis of some structural features of the receptor site for its interaction with the cyanopregnenolone inducers was presented. PMID:1936067

  14. Positive and negative features of a computer assisted drug treatment program delivered by mentors to homeless drug users living in hostels.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Stevenson, Caral

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores positive and negative features of computer assisted therapy (CAT) delivered by mentors to homeless drug users (HDUs) living in hostels. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 HDUs and 15 mentors (all hostel staff) at the beginning and end of a 12-week CAT program. Findings indicate that successful delivery of the CAT relates to: 'program features' (e.g. its accessibility, flexibility, user-friendly interface); 'delivery context' (e.g. privacy, having appropriate computing equipment), 'client characteristics' (HDUs being recovery-focused and committed to using the program), and 'mentor support' (clients having personalized attention from an encouraging and sympathetic other). It is concluded that CATs can be used with HDUs but are unlikely to replace addiction therapists. Rather, they are more likely to be effective when combined with a strong therapeutic relationship. Services using CATs with HDUs need to provide staff training, support, and time to maximize the potential benefits. PMID:25037480

  15. Penetration into tissues of various drugs active against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kropec, A; Daschner, F D

    1991-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are the most important pathogens causing hospital- and community-acquired infections. We therefore reviewed the penetration of various antibiotics active against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus into tissues, where staphylococcal infections are common. Rifampicin reaches heart valve concentrations of 65% of the simultaneous serum levels. At 8 h after administration blood and tissues concentrations of rifampicin exceeded the MIC90 values for S. aureus as well as for S. epidermidis. After a 2-g intravenous bolus injection of flucloxacillin heart valve concentrations exceeded MIC values for staphylococci for more than 8 h whereas subcutaneous and muscle concentrations declined within the same time to undetectable levels. The MIC90 values of vancomycin for S. epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis are 2.0 and 4.0 mg/l respectively and for S. aureus 1.0 mg/l. This concentration is reached in subcutaneous tissue, heart valves and muscle for at least 4-6 h after administration of 15 mg/kg, however the corresponding value for Enterococcus faecalis in heart valve is maintained only for 3-4 h. After two and three dose regimens of teicoplanin serum and bone levels were significantly higher than fat levels, exceeding the MIC90 values for S. aureus, S. epidermidis and E. faecalis. The ratio of tissue concentration of teicoplanin to serum concentrations was 11% for fat and 65% for bone. PMID:2055819

  16. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  17. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  18. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  19. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  20. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  1. At-Risk Drinking and Injection and Sexual Risk Behaviors of HIV-Positive Injection Drug Users Entering Drug Treatment in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Des Jarlais, Don C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed data from 1253 HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) entering detoxification or methadone maintenance treatment in New York City between 1990 and 2004 to assess HIV risk behaviors and their association with at-risk drinking (defined as more than 14 drinks per week for males or 7 drinks per week for females) and intoxication. Most (81%) of the participants were male, 50% were Hispanic, and 36% African American. The average age of respondents was 40 years. Injection risk behaviors that were examined were distributive sharing of needles/syringes and distributive sharing of needles/syringes with multiple IDUs. Sexual risk behaviors included multiple sex partners, engaging in unprotected sex, and among women, engaging in trade sex. After adjusting for the effects of other variables, at-risk drinking among cocaine injectors was associated with distributive sharing of needles/syringes. At-risk drinkers were also more likely to engage in unprotected sex with a casual partner. Finally, among cocaine injectors alcohol intoxication during the most recent sex episode was associated with unprotected sex with a casual partner. These observations indicate that among HIV-positive IDUs at-risk drinking is associated with higher rates of injection and sexual risk behaviors and that alcohol intoxication is related to unprotected sex. PMID:19591610

  2. [GABAB receptor as therapeutic target for drug addiction: from baclofen to positive allosteric modulators].

    PubMed

    Agabio, Roberta; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The present paper summarizes experimental and clinical data indicating the therapeutic potential of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, in the treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and substance use disorder (SUD). Multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of baclofen to suppress alcohol drinking (including binge- and relapse-like drinking), oral alcohol self-administration, and intravenous self-administration of cocaine, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, morphine, and heroin in rodents. Some randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) and case reports support the efficacy of baclofen in suppressing alcohol consumption, craving for alcohol, and alcohol withdrawal symptomatology in alcohol-dependent patients. Data from RCTs and open studies investigating baclofen efficacy on SUD are currently less conclusive. Interest in testing high doses of baclofen in AUD and SUD treatment has recently emerged. Preclinical research has extended the anti-addictive properties of baclofen to positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor (GABAB PAMs). In light of their more favourable side effect profile (compared to baclofen), GABAB PAMs may represent a major step forward in a GABAB receptor-based pharmacotherapy of AUD and SUD. PMID:26093587

  3. Unsaturated fatty acids show clear elicitation responses in a modified local lymph node assay with an elicitation phase, and test positive in the direct peptide reactivity assay.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guidelines (TG) adopted the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) as stand-alone skin sensitization test methods. However, unsaturated carbon-carbon double-bond and/or lipid acids afforded false-positive results more frequently in the LLNA compared to those in the GPMT and/or in human subjects. In the current study, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, fumaric, maleic, and succinic acid and squalene were tested in a modified LLNA with an elicitation phase (LLNA:DAE), and in a direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) to evaluate their skin-sensitizing potential. Oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic and maleic acid were positive in the LLNA:DAE, of which three, linoleic, linolenic, and maleic acid were positive in the DPRA. Furthermore, the results of the cross-sensitizing tests using four LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals were negative, indicating a chemical-specific elicitation response. In a previous report, the estimated concentration needed to produce a stimulation index of 3 (EC3) of linolenic acid, squalene, and maleic acid in the LLNA was < 10%. Therefore, these chemicals were classified as moderate skin sensitizers in the LLNA. However, the skin-sensitizing potential of all LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals was estimated as weak. These results suggested that oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, and maleic acid had skin-sensitizing potential, and that the LLNA overestimated the skin-sensitizing potential compared to that estimated by the LLNA:DAE. PMID:26558466

  4. The administration of nasal drops in the "Kaiteki" position allows for delivery of the drug to the olfactory cleft: a pilot study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mori, Eri; Merkonidis, Christos; Cuevas, Mandy; Gudziol, Volker; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Systemic treatment with corticosteroids shows therapeutic effects, few patients benefit from intranasal topical drug application, probably due to limited access of the drug to the olfactory epithelium. The aim of the present study was to investigate how drops distribute within the nasal cavity when the "Kaiteki" position is performed. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated. Subjects were lying on the side with the head tilted and the chin turned upward. Blue liquid was used to visualize the intranasal distribution of the nasal drops. The investigation was carried out using photo documentation thorough nasal endoscopy; the intranasal distribution of the dye was judged by two independent observers in both a decongested state and a natural state where no decongestants had been used. With regard to the main criterion of this study, using the "Kaiteki" position, nasal drops reached the olfactory cleft in 96 % of the decongested cases and 75 % of the cases who had not been decongested. However, this difference was not statistically different. Because the "Kaiteki" maneuver is not too difficult to perform, it is more likely that topical steroids can be helpful in cases of olfactory loss. PMID:26141752

  5. Hyaluronic acid-based nanogel-drug conjugates with enhanced anticancer activity designed for the targeting of CD44-positive and drug-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Senanayake, Thulani H; Warren, Galya; Vinogradov, Serguei V

    2013-04-17

    Many drug-resistant tumors and cancer stem cells (CSC) express elevated levels of CD44 receptor, a cellular glycoprotein binding hyaluronic acid (HA). Here, we report the synthesis of nanogel-drug conjugates based on membranotropic cholesteryl-HA (CHA) for efficient targeting and suppression of drug-resistant tumors. These conjugates significantly increased the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs with previously reported activity against CSC, such as etoposide, salinomycin, and curcumin. The small nanogel particles (diameter 20-40 nm) with a hydrophobic core and high drug loads (up to 20%) formed after ultrasonication and demonstrated a sustained drug release following the hydrolysis of biodegradable ester linkage. Importantly, CHA-drug nanogels demonstrated 2-7 times higher cytotoxicity in CD44-expressing drug-resistant human breast and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells compared to that of free drugs and nonmodified HA-drug conjugates. These nanogels were efficiently internalized via CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis and simultaneous interaction with the cancer cell membrane. Anchoring by cholesterol moieties in the cellular membrane after nanogel unfolding evidently caused more efficient drug accumulation in cancer cells compared to that in nonmodified HA-drug conjugates. CHA-drug nanogels were able to penetrate multicellular cancer spheroids and displayed a higher cytotoxic effect in the system modeling tumor environment than both free drugs and HA-drug conjugates. In conclusion, the proposed design of nanogel-drug conjugates allowed us to significantly enhance drug bioavailability, cancer cell targeting, and the treatment efficacy against drug-resistant cancer cells and multicellular spheroids. PMID:23547842

  6. Hyaluronic acid-based nanogel-drug conjugates with enhanced anticancer activity designed for targeting of CD44-positive and drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xin; Senanayake, Thulani H.; Warren, Galya; Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2013-01-01

    Many drug-resistant tumors and cancer stem cells (CSC) express elevated levels of CD44 receptor, a cellular glycoprotein binding hyaluronic acid (HA). Here, we report the synthesis of nanogel-drug conjugates based on membranotropic cholesteryl-HA (CHA) for efficient targeting and suppression of drug-resistant tumors. These conjugates significantly increased the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs with previously reported activity against CSC, such as etoposide, salinomycin, and curcumin. The small nanogel particles (diam. 2040 nm) with a hydrophobic core and high drug loads (up to 20%) formed after ultrasonication and demonstrated a sustained drug release following the hydrolysis of biodegradable ester linkage. Importantly, CHA-drug nanogels demonstrated 27 times higher cytotoxicity in CD44-expressing drug-resistant human breast and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells compared to free drugs and non-modified HA-drug conjugates. These nanogels were efficiently internalized via CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis and simultaneous interaction with the cancer cell membrane. Anchoring by cholesterol moieties in the cellular membrane after nanogel unfolding evidently caused more efficient drug accumulation in cancer cells compared to non-modified HA-drug conjugates. CHA-drug nanogels were able to penetrate multicellular cancer spheroids and displayed higher cytotoxic effect in the system modeling tumor environment than both free drugs and HA-drug conjugates. In conclusion, the proposed design of nanogel-drug conjugates allowed us to significantly enhance drug bioavailability, cancer cell targeting, and the treatment efficacy against drug-resistant cancer cells and multicellular spheroids. PMID:23547842

  7. Surface Proteins of Gram-Positive Pathogens: Using Crystallography to Uncover Novel Features in Drug and Vaccine Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward N.; Proft, Thomas; Kang, Haejoo

    Proteins displayed on the cell surfaces of pathogenic organisms are the front-line troops of bacterial attack, playing critical roles in colonization, infection and virulence. Although such proteins can often be recognized from genome sequence data, through characteristic sequence motifs, their functions are often unknown. One such group of surface proteins is attached to the cell surface of Gram-positive pathogens through the action of sortase enzymes. Some of these proteins are now known to form pili: long filamentous structures that mediate attachment to human cells. Crystallographic analyses of these and other cell surface proteins have uncovered novel features in their structure, assembly and stability, including the presence of inter- and intramolecular isopeptide crosslinks. This improved understanding of structures on the bacterial cell surface offers opportunities for the development of some new drug targets and for novel approaches to vaccine design.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospital admissions and drugsunexpected positive associations: a retrospective general practice cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Timothy H; Seed, Paul T; Jones, Simon; Schofield, Peter; White, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increased prescribing of inhaled long-acting anti-muscarinic (LAMA) and combined inhaled long-acting ?2-agonist and corticosteroid (LABA+ICS) drugs for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has led to hopes of reduced hospital admissions from this disease. Aims: To investigate the impact of rising primary care prescribing of LAMA and LABA+ICS drugs on COPD admissions. Methods: This retrospective cohort study of general practice COPD admission and prescribing data between 2007 and 2010 comprised a representative group of 806 English general practices (population 5,264,506). Outcome measures were practice rates of COPD patient admissions and prescription costs of LAMA and LABA+ICS. General practice characteristics were based on the UK quality and outcomes framework. Results: Rates of COPD admissions remained stable from 2001 to 2010. Practice-prescribing volumes of LAMA per practice patient and LABA+ICS per practice patient increased by 61 and 26%, respectively, between 2007 and 2010. Correlation between costs of LAMA and those of LABA+ICS increased year on year, and was the highest in 2010 (Pearsons r=0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.640.72). Practice COPD admission rates were positively predicted by practice-prescribing volumes of LAMA (2010: B=1.23, 95% CI, 0.611.85) and of LABA+ICS (2010: B=0.32, 95% CI, 0.120.52) when controlling for practice list size, COPD prevalence and deprivation. Conclusion: The increase in the prescribing of LAMA and LABA+ICS inhalers was not associated with the predicted fall in hospital admission rates for COPD patients. The positive correlation between high practice COPD prescribing and high practice COPD admissions was not explained. PMID:24842126

  9. 4H-Chromene-based anticancer agents towards multi-drug resistant HL60/MX2 human leukemia: SAR at the 4th and 6th positions.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Manohar; Zhao, Xinghua; Casemore, Denise; Zhou, Bo; Aridoss, Gopalakrishnan; Narayanapillai, Sreekanth; Xing, Chengguo

    2016-03-15

    4H-Chromene-based compounds, for example, CXL017, CXL035, and CXL055, have a unique anticancer potential that they selectively kill multi-drug resistant cancer cells. Reported herein is the extended structure-activity relationship (SAR) study, focusing on the ester functional group at the 4th position and the conformation at the 6th position. Sharp SARs were observed at both positions with respect to cellular cytotoxic potency and selectivity between the parental HL60 and the multi-drug resistant HL60/MX2 cells. These results provide critical guidance for future medicinal optimization. PMID:26867486

  10. Analysis with Support Vector Machine Shows HIV-Positive Subjects without Infectious Retinitis Have mfERG Deficiencies Compared to Normal Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Goldbaum, Michael H.; Falkenstein, Irina; Kozak, Igor; Hao, Jiucang; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Sejnowski, Terrance; Freeman, William R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To test the following hypotheses: (1) eyes from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have electrophysiologic abnormalities that manifest as multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) abnormalities; (2) the retinal effects of HIV in immune-competent HIV individuals differ from the effects in immune-incompetent HIV individuals; (3) strong machine learning classifiers (MLCs), like support vector machine (SVM), can learn to use mfERG abnormalities in the second-order kernel (SOK) to distinguish HIV from normal eyes; and (4) the mfERG abnormalities fall into patterns that can be discerned by MLCs. We applied a supervised MLC, SVM, to determine if mfERGs in eyes from patients with HIV differ from mfERGs in HIV-negative controls. Methods Ninety-nine HIV-positive patients without visible retinopathy were divided into 2 groups: (1) 59 high-CD4 individuals (H, 104 eyes), 48.5 7.7 years, whose CD4 counts were never observed below 100, and (2) 40 low-CD4 individuals (L, 61 eyes), 46.2 5.6 years, whose CD4 counts were below 100 for at least 6 months. The normal group (N, 82 eyes) had 41 age-matched HIV-negative individuals, 46.8 6.2 years. The amplitude and latency of the first positive curve (P1, hereafter referred to as a) and the first negative curve (N1, referred to as b) in the SOK of 103 hexagon patterns of the central 28 of the retina were recorded from the eyes in each group. SVM was trained and tested with cross-validation to distinguish H from N and L from N. SOK was chosen as a presumed detector of inner retinal abnormalities. Classifier performance was measured with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve to permit comparison of MLCs. Improvement in performance and identification of subsets of the most important features were sought with feature selection by backward elimination. Results In general, the SOK b-parameters separated L from N and H from N better than a-parameters, and latency separated L from N and H from N better than amplitude. In the HIV groups, on average, amplitude was diminished and latency was extended. The parameter that most consistently separated L from N and H from N was b-latency. With b-latency, SVM learned to distinguish L from N (AUROC = 0.7.30 0.044, P = .001 against chance [0.500 0.051]) and H from N (0.732 0.038, P = .0001 against chance) equally well. With best-performing subsets (21 out of 103 hexagons) derived by backward elimination, SVM distinguished L from N (0.869 0.030, P < .00005 against chance) and H from N (0.859 0.029, P <.00005 against chance) better than SVM with the full set of hexagons. Mapping the top 10 hexagon locations for L vs N and H vs N produced no apparent pattern. Conclusions This study confirms that mfERG SOK abnormalities develop in the retina of HIV-positive individuals. The new finding of equal severity of b-latency abnormalities in the low- and high-CD4 groups indicates that good immune status under highly active antiretroviral therapy may not protect against retinal damage and, by extension, damage elsewhere. SOKs are difficult for human experts to interpret. Machine learning classifiers, such as SVM, learn from the data without human intervention, reducing the need to rely on human skills to interpret this test. PMID:19277235

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of PAD1 and FDC1 show a positive relationship with ferulic acid decarboxylation ability among industrial yeasts used in alcoholic beverage production.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Nobuhiko; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2014-07-01

    Among industrial yeasts used for alcoholic beverage production, most wine and weizen beer yeasts decarboxylate ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, which has a smoke-like flavor, whereas sake, shochu, top-fermenting, and bottom-fermenting yeast strains lack this ability. However, the factors underlying this difference among industrial yeasts are not clear. We previously confirmed that both PAD1 (phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase gene, YDR538W) and FDC1 (ferulic acid decarboxylase gene, YDR539W) are essential for the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAD1 and FDC1 in sake, shochu, wine, weizen, top-fermenting, bottom-fermenting, and laboratory yeast strains were examined to clarify the differences in ferulic acid decarboxylation ability between these types of yeast. For PAD1, a nonsense mutation was observed in the gene sequence of standard top-fermenting yeast. Gene sequence analysis of FDC1 revealed that sake, shochu, and standard top-fermenting yeasts contained a nonsense mutation, whereas a frameshift mutation was identified in the FDC1 gene of bottom-fermenting yeast. No nonsense or frameshift mutations were detected in laboratory, wine, or weizen beer yeast strains. When FDC1 was introduced into sake and shochu yeast strains, the transformants exhibited ferulic acid decarboxylation activity. Our findings indicate that a positive relationship exists between SNPs in PAD1 and FDC1 genes and the ferulic acid decarboxylation ability of industrial yeast strains. PMID:24507903

  12. Various adiposity measures show similar positive associations with type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, native Hawaiians, and Japanese Americans: the multiethnic cohort.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Astrid; Heak, Sreang; Morimoto, Yukiko; Grandinetti, Andrew; Kolonel, Larry N; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2015-03-01

    The authors evaluated the association of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and hip circumference (HC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) with diabetes in Caucasians, Native Hawaiians, and Japanese Americans aged 45 to 75 years in the Multiethnic Cohort. Diabetes cases were obtained from self-reports and by linkages with health insurance plans. The authors estimated adjusted prevalence odds ratios (PORs) and compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). All measures were positively associated with diabetes prevalence; the PORs were 1.25 to 1.64 in men and 1.52 to 1.83 in women. In all 3 ethnic groups, the AUCs in men were greater for BMI than for the other measures, whereas in women, the AUCs were greater for combined models than for BMI alone, but the differences were small and not clinically significant. It does not appear that one anthropometric measure best reflects diabetes prevalence or performs better in one ethnic group than in another. PMID:22500038

  13. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia: an autopsy case showing many Bunina bodies, tau-positive neuronal and astrocytic plaque-like pathologies, and pallido-nigral degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Oda, Tatsurou; Ishihara, Takeshi; de Silva, Rohan; Lees, Andrew J; Arai, Tetsuaki; Uchihara, Toshiki; Ishizu, Hideki; Kuroda, Shigetoshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2006-11-01

    We report the case of a 54-year-old woman with mental retardation who developed frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in the presenium. She presented with dementia at age 48, and motor neuron signs developed at age 53. She had no family history of dementia or ALS. Postmortem examination disclosed histopathological features of ALS, including pyramidal tract degeneration, mild loss of motor neurons, and many Bunina bodies immunoreactive for cystatin C, but not ubiquitin-positive inclusions. Unusual features of this case included severe neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and medial globus pallidus. The subthalamic nucleus, limbic system, and cerebral cortex were well preserved. In addition, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) were found in the frontal, temporal, insular, and cingulate cortices, nucleus basalis of Meynert, and locus coeruleus, and to a lesser degree, in the dentate nucleus, cerebellum, hippocampus, and amygdala. No ballooned neurons, tufted astrocytes, or astrocytic plaques were found. Tau immunostaining demonstrated many pretangles rather than NFTs and glial lesions resembling astrocytic plaques in the frontal and temporal cortices. This glial tau pathology predominantly developed in the middle to deep layers in the primary motor cortex, and was frequently associated with the walls of blood vessels. NFTs were immunolabeled with 3-repeat and 4-repeat specific antibodies against tau, respectively. Although the pathophysiological relationship between tau pathology and the selective involvement of motor neurons, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus was unclear, we considered that it might be more than coincidental. PMID:17021751

  14. Flomoxef showed excellent in vitro activity against clinically important gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens causing community- and hospital-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwen; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Zhipeng; Hou, Xin; Xu, Yingchun

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the in vitro activity of flomoxef against clinical pathogens. A total of 545 clinical isolates, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes, were isolated consecutively from clinical specimens from Peking Union Medical College Hospital in 2013. MICs were determined using broth microdilution method. esbl and ampC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Flomoxef showed excellent activity against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis isolates, with susceptibility rate of 88.8%, 88.3%, and 97.7%, separately. Moreover, flomoxef exhibited great activity against extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, with MIC50/MIC90 of 0.125/(0.5-1) ?g/mL. Flomoxef showed MIC50/MIC90 of 0.5/0.5 ?g/mL against MSSA, 0.125/0.25 ?g/mL against S. pyogenes, and 2/16 ?g/mL against S. pneumoniae. In conclusion, flomoxef is one of the cephamycins showing excellent activity against ESBL-producing or ESBL-nonproducing E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis and was also potent against MSSA, S. pyogenes, and S. pneumoniae. PMID:25641126

  15. The Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH): A Comprehensive Review of US and Non-US Studies Shows Predominantly Positive Quality and Cost Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kash, Bita A; Zhang, Yichen; Cline, Kayla M; Menser, Terri; Miller, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Context The evolving concept of more rigorously coordinated and integrated perioperative management, often referred to as the perioperative surgical home (PSH), parallels the well-known concept of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH), as they share a vision of improved clinical outcomes and reductions in cost of care through patient engagement and care coordination. Elements of the PSH and similar surgical care coordination models have been studied in the United States and other countries. Methods This comprehensive review of peer-reviewed literature investigates the history and evolution of PSH and PSH-like models and summarizes the results of studies of PSH elements in the United States and in other countries. We reviewed more than 250 potentially relevant studies. At the conclusion of the selection process, our search had yielded a total of 152 peer-reviewed articles published between 1980 and 2013. Findings The literature reports consistent and significant positive findings related to PSH initiatives. Both US and non-US studies stress the role of anesthesiologists in perioperative patient management. The PSH may have the greatest impact on preparing patients for surgery and ensuring their safe and effective transition to home or other postoperative rehabilitation. There appear to be some subtle differences between US and non-US research on the PSH. The literature in non-US settings seems to focus strictly on the comparison of outcomes from changing policies or practices, whereas US research seems to be more focused on the discovery of innovative practice models and other less direct changes, for example, information technology, that may be contributing to the evolution toward the PSH model. Conclusions The PSH model may have significant implications for policymakers, payers, administrators, clinicians, and patients. The potential for policy-relevant cost savings and quality improvement is apparent across the perioperative continuum of care, especially for integrated care organizations, bundled payment, and value-based purchasing. PMID:25492605

  16. ADX71441, a novel, potent and selective positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, shows efficacy in rodent models of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kalinichev, M; Palea, S; Haddouk, H; Royer-Urios, I; Guilloteau, V; Lluel, P; Schneider, M; Saporito, M; Poli, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces urethral resistance and detrusor overactivity in patients with spasticity. However, baclofen's side effects limit its use for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Here, we tested a novel GABAB positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71441 in models of OAB in mice and guinea pigs. Experimental Approach Mice were left untreated or given (p.o.) vehicle (1= CMC), ADX71441 (1, 3, 10?mg?kg?1) or oxybutynin (100?mg?kg?1; Experiment 1) or vehicle (1= CMC), baclofen (1, 3, 6?mg?kg?1) or oxybutynin (Experiment 2). Treated mice were then overhydrated with water, challenged with furosemide, before being placed into micturition chambers and monitored for urinary parameters. In anaesthetized guinea pigs, intravesical infusion of acetic acid was used to induce OAB and the effects of ADX71441 (1, 3?mg?kg?1) or baclofen (1?mg?kg?1), administered i.v., on cystometric parameters were monitored. Key Results In mice, 10?mg?kg?1 ADX71441 increased urinary latencies, reduced the number of urinary events and the total and average urinary volumes. In guinea pigs, ADX71441 (1 and 3?mg?kg?1) increased the intercontraction interval (ICI) and bladder capacity (BC), and reduced micturition frequency (MF) compared to vehicle. At 3?mg?kg?1 ADX71441 completely inhibited the micturition reflex and induced overflow incontinence in five out of 10 animals. Baclofen slightly increased ICI and BC and reduced MF. Conclusion and Implications Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that a GABAB PAM has potential as a novel approach for the treatment of OAB. PMID:24224799

  17. Combination of pedCAT(®) for 3D Imaging in Standing Position With Pedography Shows No Statistical Correlation of Bone Position With Force/Pressure Distribution.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan; Hahn, Sarah; Naef, Issam; Merschin, David

    2016-01-01

    pedCAT(®) (CurveBeam, Warrington, PA) is a technology for 3-dimensional (3D) imaging with full weightbearing that has been proved to exactly visualize the 3D bone position. For the present study, a customized pedography sensor (Pliance; Novel, Munich, Germany) was inserted into the pedCAT(®). The aim of our study was to analyze the correlation of the bone position and force/pressure distribution. A prospective consecutive study of 50 patients was performed, starting July 28, 2014. All patients underwent a pedCAT(®) scan and simultaneous pedography with full weightbearing in the standing position. The following parameters were measured on the pedCAT(®) image for the right foot by 3 different investigators 3 times: lateral talo-first metatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch angle, and minimum height of the fifth metatarsal base, second to fifth metatarsal heads, and medial sesamoid. From the pedography data, the following parameters were defined using the standardized software algorithm: midfoot contact area, maximum force of midfoot, maximum force of midfoot lateral, maximum force of entire foot, and maximum pressure of first to fifth metatarsal. The values of the corresponding pedCAT(®) and pedographic parameters were correlated (Pearson). The intra- and interobserver reliability of the pedCAT(®) measurements were sufficient (analysis of variance, p > .8 for each, power >0.8). No sufficient correlation was found between the pedCAT(®) and pedographic parameters (r < 0.05 or r > -0.38).3D bone position did not correlate with the force and pressure distribution under the foot sole during simultaneous pedCAT(®) scanning and pedography. Thus, the bone positions measured with pedCAT(®) do not allow conclusions about the force and pressure distribution. However, the static pedographic parameters also do not allow conclusions about the 3D bone position.one position and force/pressure distribution are important parameters for diagnostics, planning, and follow-up examinations in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:26915685

  18. Synergistic cytotoxicity from combination of imatinib and platinum-based anticancer drugs specifically in Bcr-Abl positive leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuming; To, Kenneth K W; Au-Yeung, Steve C F

    2015-12-01

    Imatinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, exhibits potent anticancer activity against leukemia harboring the Bcr-Abl oncogene and some solid tumors overexpressing c-kit and PDGFR. However, its clinical efficacy is severely compromised by the emergence of resistance primarily due to acquired mutations in the Bcr-Abl kinase domain. In this study, we showed that combination of imatinib with platinum (Pt)-based anticancer agents, including cisplatin and oxaliplatin, exhibited synergistic cytotoxic effect specifically in Bcr-Abl(+) human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562 but not in Bcr-Abl(-) RPMI8226 cells. Importantly, the synergistic effect was also found to circumvent imatinib resistance in an imatinib-selected resistant subline K562 ima1.0. The combination treatment increased apoptosis and DNA damage. Mechanistic study revealed that increased inhibition of Bcr-Abl and downstream ERK phosphorylation by the drug combination may contribute to the synergistic effect. PMID:26644081

  19. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best

  20. Novel Imidazoline Antimicrobial Scaffold That Inhibits DNA Replication with Activity against Mycobacteria and Drug Resistant Gram-Positive Cocci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance is an escalating public health threat, yet the current antimicrobial pipeline remains alarmingly depleted, making the development of new antimicrobials an urgent need. Here, we identify a novel, potent, imidazoline antimicrobial compound, SKI-356313, with bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Gram-positive cocci, including vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). SKI-356313 is active in murine models of Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRSA infection and is potently bactericidal for both replicating and nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. Using a combination of genetics, whole genome sequencing, and a novel target ID approach using real time imaging of core macromolecular biosynthesis, we show that SKI-356313 inhibits DNA replication and displaces the replisome from the bacterial nucleoid. These results identify a new antimicrobial scaffold with a novel mechanism of action and potential therapeutic utility against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and antibiotic resistant Gram-positive cocci. PMID:25222597

  1. Drug-positive rates for the Army from fiscal years 1991 to 2000 and for the National Guard from Fiscal years 1997 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Mark R; Okano, Catherine K; Lyons, Timothy P; Lukey, Brian J

    2002-05-01

    This article examines the positive rate by drug for all urinalysis specimens tested by the U.S. Army from fiscal year 1991 (FY91) to FY00 and for the Army National Guard (NG) from FY97 to FY00. The average positive rate for the Army from FY91 to FY00 was 0.84%. In FY00, the Army rate reached a 10-year high of 1.04%. From FY97 to FY00, the NG positive rate declined from 3.4% to 2.16% but was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the Army rate during the same period. Marijuana and cocaine are the most abused drugs for both the Army and NG. The positive rate for marijuana in the Army from FY91 to FY00 was 0.51%, and the cocaine rate was 0.19%. The NG marijuana-positive rate from FY97 to FY00 was 1.70%, and the cocaine rate was 0.51%. The positive rate for all other drugs of abuse tested was less than 0.3% for both the Army and NG during the same periods. The overall positive rate for the Army and NG are below those estimated (6.3%) in the civilian population. PMID:12053845

  2. Antipsychotic Drug-Like Effects of the Selective M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulator VU0152100

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Nellie E; Grannan, Michael; Bubser, Michael; Barry, Robert L; Thompson, Analisa; Rosanelli, John; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Damon, Stephen; Bridges, Thomas M; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Brogan, John T; Avison, Malcolm J; Deutch, Ariel Y; Wess, Jürgen; Wood, Michael R; Lindsley, Craig W; Gore, John C; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activators may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of psychosis. However, previous efforts to develop selective M4 activators were unsuccessful because of the lack of M4 mAChR subtype specificity and off-target muscarinic adverse effects. We recently developed VU0152100, a highly selective M4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) that exerts central effects after systemic administration. We now report that VU0152100 dose-dependently reverses amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats and wild-type mice, but not in M4 KO mice. VU0152100 also blocks amphetamine-induced disruption of the acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex. These effects were observed at doses that do not produce catalepsy or peripheral adverse effects associated with non-selective mAChR agonists. To further understand the effects of selective potentiation of M4 on region-specific brain activation, VU0152100 alone and in combination with amphetamine were evaluated using pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI). Key neural substrates of M4-mediated modulation of the amphetamine response included the nucleus accumbens (NAS), caudate-putamen (CP), hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Functional connectivity analysis of phMRI data, specifically assessing correlations in activation between regions, revealed several brain networks involved in the M4 modulation of amphetamine-induced brain activation, including the NAS and retrosplenial cortex with motor cortex, hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found that VU0152100 reversed amphetamine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine levels in NAS and CP. The present data are consistent with an antipsychotic drug-like profile of activity for VU0152100. Taken together, these data support the development of selective M4 PAMs as a new approach to the treatment of psychosis and cognitive impairments associated with psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:24442096

  3. HIV-1 A1 Subtype Epidemic in Italy Originated from Africa and Eastern Europe and Shows a High Frequency of Transmission Chains Involving Intravenous Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alessia; Bozzi, Giorgio; Franzetti, Marco; Binda, Francesca; Simonetti, Francesco R.; De Luca, Andrea; Micheli, Valeria; Meraviglia, Paola; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Monno, Laura; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Balotta, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background Subtype A accounts for only 12% of HIV-1 infections worldwide but predominates in Russia and Former Soviet Union countries of Eastern Europe. After an early propagation via heterosexual contacts, this variant spread explosively among intravenous drug users. A distinct A1 variant predominates in Greece and Albania, which penetrated directly from Africa. Clade A1 accounts for 12.5% of non-B subtypes in Italy, being the most frequent after F1 subtype. Aim Aim of this study was to investigate the circulation of A1 subtype in Italy and trace its origin and diffusion through phylogenetic and phylodynamic approaches. Results The phylogenetic analysis of 113 A1 pol sequences included in the Italian ARCA database, indicated that 71 patients (62.8%) clustered within 5 clades. A higher probability to be detected in clusters was found for patients from Eastern Europe and Italy (88.9% and 60.4%, respectively) compared to those from Africa (20%) (p < .001). Higher proportions of clustering sequences were found in intravenous drug users with respect to heterosexuals (85.7% vs. 59.3%, p = .056) and in women with respect to men (81.4% vs. 53.2%, p < .006). Subtype A1 dated phylogeny indicated an East African origin around 1961. Phylogeographical reconstruction highlighted 3 significant groups. One involved East European and some Italian variants, the second encompassed some Italian and African strains, the latter included the majority of viruses carried by African and Italian subjects and all viral sequences from Albania and Greece. Conclusions Subtype A1 originated in Central Africa and spread among East European countries in 1982. It entered Italy through three introduction events: directly from East Africa, from Albania and Greece, and from the area encompassing Moldavia and Ukraine. As in previously documented A1 epidemics of East European countries, HIV-1 A1 subtype spread in Italy in part through intravenous drug users. However, Eastern European women contributed to the penetration of such variant, probably through sex work. PMID:26752062

  4. 49 CFR 655.61 - Action when an employee has a verified positive drug test result or has a confirmed alcohol test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Action when an employee has a verified positive... function, the employer shall ensure the employee meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 40 for returning to... DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Consequences 655.61 Action when an employee has a verified...

  5. 49 CFR 655.61 - Action when an employee has a verified positive drug test result or has a confirmed alcohol test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Action when an employee has a verified positive... function, the employer shall ensure the employee meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 40 for returning to... DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Consequences 655.61 Action when an employee has a verified...

  6. 49 CFR 655.61 - Action when an employee has a verified positive drug test result or has a confirmed alcohol test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Action when an employee has a verified positive... function, the employer shall ensure the employee meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 40 for returning to... DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Consequences 655.61 Action when an employee has a verified...

  7. 49 CFR 655.61 - Action when an employee has a verified positive drug test result or has a confirmed alcohol test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Action when an employee has a verified positive... function, the employer shall ensure the employee meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 40 for returning to... DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Consequences 655.61 Action when an employee has a verified...

  8. Structures of substrate- and inhibitor-bound adenosine deaminase from a human malaria parasite show a dramatic conformational change and shed light on drug selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Deng, Wei; Krumm, Brian E.; Napuli, Alberto; Mueller, Natascha; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G. J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites are deficient in purine biosynthesis, relying instead on the salvage of purines from their host environment. Therefore interference with the purine salvage pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. The plasmodial enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays a central role in purine salvage and, unlike mammalian ADA homologs, has a further secondary role in methylthiopurine recycling. For this reason, plasmodial adenosine deaminase accepts a wider range of substrates, as it is responsible for deamination of both adenosine and 5?-methylthioadenosine. The latter substrate is not accepted by mammalian ADA homologs. The structural basis for this natural difference in specificity between plasmodial and mammalian ADA has not been well understood. We now report crystal structures of Plasmodium vivax adenosine deaminase in complex with adenosine, guanosine, and the picomolar inhibitor 2?-deoxycoformycin. These structures highlight a drastic conformational change in plasmodial ADA upon substrate-binding that has not been observed for mammalian ADA enzymes. Further, these complexes illuminate the structural basis for the differential substrate specificity and potential drug selectivity between mammalian and parasite enzymes. PMID:18602399

  9. Structures of substrate- and inhibitor-bound adenosine deaminase from a human malaria parasite show a dramatic conformational change and shed light on drug selectivity.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric T; Deng, Wei; Krumm, Brian E; Napuli, Alberto; Mueller, Natascha; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Buckner, Frederick S; Fan, Erkang; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G J; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Merritt, Ethan A

    2008-09-12

    Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites are deficient in purine biosynthesis, relying instead on the salvage of purines from their host environment. Therefore, interference with the purine salvage pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. The plasmodial enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays a central role in purine salvage and, unlike mammalian ADA homologs, has a further secondary role in methylthiopurine recycling. For this reason, plasmodial ADA accepts a wider range of substrates, as it is responsible for deamination of both adenosine and 5'-methylthioadenosine. The latter substrate is not accepted by mammalian ADA homologs. The structural basis for this natural difference in specificity between plasmodial and mammalian ADA has not been well understood. We now report crystal structures of Plasmodium vivax ADA in complex with adenosine, guanosine, and the picomolar inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin. These structures highlight a drastic conformational change in plasmodial ADA upon substrate binding that has not been observed for mammalian ADA enzymes. Further, these complexes illuminate the structural basis for the differential substrate specificity and potential drug selectivity between mammalian and parasite enzymes. PMID:18602399

  10. Structures of Substrate-And Inhibitor-Bound Adenosine Deaminase From a Human Malaria Parasite Show a Dramatic Conformational Change And Shed Light on Drug Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.T.; Deng, W.; Krumm, B.E.; Napuli, A.; Mueller, N.; Voorhis, W.C.Van; Buckner, F.S.; Fan, E.; Lauricella, A.; DeTitta, G.; Luft, J.; Zucker, F.; Hol, W.G.J.; Verlinde, C.L.M.J.; Merritt, E.A.

    2009-05-20

    Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites are deficient in purine biosynthesis, relying instead on the salvage of purines from their host environment. Therefore, interference with the purine salvage pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. The plasmodial enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays a central role in purine salvage and, unlike mammalian ADA homologs, has a further secondary role in methylthiopurine recycling. For this reason, plasmodial ADA accepts a wider range of substrates, as it is responsible for deamination of both adenosine and 5{prime}-methylthioadenosine. The latter substrate is not accepted by mammalian ADA homologs. The structural basis for this natural difference in specificity between plasmodial and mammalian ADA has not been well understood. We now report crystal structures of Plasmodium vivax ADA in complex with adenosine, guanosine, and the picomolar inhibitor 2{prime}-deoxycoformycin. These structures highlight a drastic conformational change in plasmodial ADA upon substrate binding that has not been observed for mammalian ADA enzymes. Further, these complexes illuminate the structural basis for the differential substrate specificity and potential drug selectivity between mammalian and parasite enzymes.

  11. Multi-residue analysis of drugs of abuse in wastewater and surface water by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baker, David R; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2011-03-25

    A new-multi residue method was developed for the environmental monitoring of 65 stimulants, opiod and morphine derivatives, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, dissociative anaesthetics, drug precursors, human urine indicators and their metabolites in wastewater and surface water. The proposed analytical methodology offers rapid analysis for a large number of compounds, with low limits of quantification and utilises only one solid-phase extraction-ultra performance liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) method, thus overcoming the drawbacks of previously published procedures. The method employed solid phase extraction with the usage of Oasis MCX sorbent and subsequent ultra performance liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry. The usage of a 1.7 ?m particle size column (1 mm150 mm) resulted in very low flow rates (0.04 mLmin(-1)), and as a consequence gave good sensitivity, low mobile phase consumption and short retention times for all compounds (from 2.9 to 23.1 min). High SPE recoveries (>60%) were obtained for the majority of compounds. The mean correlation coefficients of the calibration curves were typically higher than 0.997 and showed good linearity in the range 0-1000 ?gL(-1). The method limits of detection ranged from 0.1 ngL(-1) for compounds including cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norbenzoylecgonine and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD to 100 ngL(-1) for caffeine. Method quantification limits ranged from 0.5 to 154.2 ngL(-1). Intra- and inter-day repeatabilities were on average less than 10%. The method accuracy range was within -33.1 to 30.1%. The new multi-residue method was used to analyse drugs of abuse in wastewater and river water in the UK environment. Of the targeted 65 compounds, 46 analytes were detected at levels above the method quantification limit (MQL) in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent, 43 in WWTP effluent and 36 compounds in river water. PMID:21334631

  12. Sexual Risk Behavior Associated with Co-administration of Methamphetamine and Other Drugs in a Sample of HIV-positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Shirley J.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between sexual risk behavior and co-administration of methamphetamine with other drugs in a sample of 341 HIV-positive MSM. Those who reported methamphetamine co-administration in the past two months (65%) reported significantly more unprotected anal and oral sex and a greater number of casual, anonymous, and paid sex partners in this timeframe compared to men who used methamphetamine alone. Two primary patterns of co-administration were identified: 1) drug combinations motivated by sexual performance and enhancement (e.g., methamphetamine, poppers, sildenafil) and 2) party drug combinations (e.g., methamphetamine, GHB, ketamine). Implications for further research and possible applications to risk-reduction interventions are discussed. PMID:19219667

  13. Nootropic drugs positively modulate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-sensitive glutamate receptors in neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Copani, A; Genazzani, A A; Aleppo, G; Casabona, G; Canonico, P L; Scapagnini, U; Nicoletti, F

    1992-04-01

    Micromolar concentrations of piracetam, aniracetam, and oxiracetam enhanced alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells. Nootropic drugs increased the efficacy but not the potency of AMPA and their action persisted in the presence of the voltage-sensitive calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Potentiation by oxiracetam was specific for AMPA receptor-mediated signal transduction, as the drug changed neither the stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx by kainate or N-methyl-D-aspartate nor the activation of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis elicited by quisqualate or (+-)-1-aminocyclopentane-trans-1,3-dicarboxylic acid. Piracetam, aniracetam, and oxiracetam increased the maximal density of the specific binding sites for [3H]AMPA in synaptic membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Taken collectively, these results support the view that nootropic drugs act as positive modulators of AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors in neurons. PMID:1372342

  14. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ute; Forster, Michael; Rinaldi, Anna; Risch, Thomas; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C; Moorman, Anthony V; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; Weid, Nicolas von der; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-09-01

    TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Using an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. We identified recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 in constellation with the fusion of TCF3 and HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin toward a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics but sensitivity to glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  15. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M.; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I.; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P.; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S.; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; von der Weid, Nicolas; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O.; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    TCF3-HLF-fusion positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Employing an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression, and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. Recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 were identified in constellation with TCF3-HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin towards a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics, but sensitivity towards glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  16. Expanding access to HIV testing and counseling and exploring vulnerabilities among spouses of HIV-positive men who inject drugs in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Salman; Majeed, Mohammad Faisal; Awaan, Ahmad Bakhsh; Mirza, Humayun; Sarfraz, Nasir; Veronese, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the utility of home and community-based HIV testing and counseling (HTC) to increase detection of undiagnosed HIV among female spouses and children of HIV-positive PWID in Punjab province, Pakistan. Design Between March 2014 and March 2015, home-based HTC was provided by a local NGO to spouses of HIV-positive PWID in Lahore, Faisalabad, and Sargodha. Convenience sampling was used to identify 2400 married, HIV-positive men who inject drugs and who were currently registered and receiving harm reduction services from the NGO ‘Roshan Rasta’ and seek consent to approach their wives. Method Trained outreach teams conducted HTC and administered a short sociodemographic and behavioral questionnaire to consenting spouses in their homes. HIV-exposed children were also tested with parental consent. Results of the 2400 married HIV positive male-injecting drug users, only 1959 spouses were approached and 1896 agreed to HTC (96.8%). HIV prevalence was 5.3% (n = 101) among spouses and they had very low level of HIV-related knowledge and protective behaviors Conclusion Home and community-based HTC was effective in identifying undiagnosed HIV among spouses of PWID, the majority of whom reported low rates of prior HIV testing and low HIV-related knowledge. Expansion of HIV prevention services and linkages to treatment and care including PMTCT are urgently needed for this group. PMID:26945140

  17. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Hilary A.; Fennell, Christina E.; Gillison, Maura; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Wentz, Alicia; Kirk, Gregory D.; Mehta, Shruti H.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States. Oral HPV prevalence is associated with immunosuppression, and drug use can be immunosuppressive, but the epidemiology of oral HPV among people who use drugs is not well described. Methods We enrolled men and women with a current or prior history of injection drug use in this cross-sectional sub-study within the AIDS Linked to the Intravenous Experience (ALIVE) cohort. We tested oral rinse samples for 37 types of HPV DNA and collected self-reported risk factor information. We compared oral HPV prevalence across categories using chi-squared statistics and multivariable logistic regression. Results Among 199 subjects, 32% were HIV-positive (median CD4 count 384 cells/μL), 90% were Black, 56% had less than a high school education, 17% had recently used injection drugs, and the median age was 54 years. Most had performed oral sex (82%) but had fewer than 5 lifetime partners (58%). The prevalence of any oral HPV was 29%, and of any oncogenic oral HPV was 13%. Oral HPV prevalence was high among both heterosexual men (30%) and women (20%). After adjustment, odds of oral HPV were increased among HIV-positive individuals with a low CD4 count (<350 cells/μl, aOR = 2.7, 95%CI = 1.2–6.4, vs. HIV-negative individuals), but not among HIV-positive individuals with a higher CD4 cell count. Odds were also elevated for those who had recently performed oral sex on a woman (aOR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.01–4.6) and, even after this adjustment, among bisexual/lesbian females (aOR = 5.6, 95%CI = 1.4–23, vs. heterosexual females). Oral HPV prevalence was not associated with vaginal sex, performing oral sex on a man, or recent drug use. Conclusions Recent drug use was not associated with oral HPV prevalence in our study. However, despite modest numbers of sexual partners, the prevalence of oral HPV among this largely Black population with lower socioeconomic status was high. PMID:26600158

  18. Diagnostic usefulness of the GenoType MTBDRplus assay for detecting drug-resistant tuberculosis using AFB smear-negative specimens with positive TB-PCR result.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Seok; Kang, Hye-Rim; Lee, Si-Hyeong; Kim, Yunmi; Kim, Mi-Yeong; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Moon, Jae Young; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Park, So Young; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Park, Yong Bum; Moon, Soo-Yoon; Oh, Minkyung; Ko, Yousang

    2016-05-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the GenoType MTBDRplus assay in detecting drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) by using acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear-negative specimens with positive TB-PCR results. Methods The MTBDRplus assay was performed with 2 different categories of 117 samples, including AFB smear-positive specimens (n = 53) and AFB smear-negative specimens (n = 64), which exhibited positive TB-PCR results, at a single institution. The results were retrospectively compared with the results of the phenotypic drug susceptibility test (DST), for reference. Results A total of 105 tests were finally analyzed. Of these, 54 tests were conducted using AFB smear-negative specimens with positive TB-PCR results. The MTBDRplus assay for these 54 samples demonstrated a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 98%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 75%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% in detecting rifampicin resistance. With these same species, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV values for the MTBDRplus assay were 83.3%, 97.9%, 83.3%, and 97.9%, respectively, for the detection of isoniazid resistance. The overall correlation between the MTBDRplus assay and phenotypic DST demonstrated excellent agreement for detection of rifampicin resistance (κ = 0.847) and for detection of INH resistance (κ = 0.812), respectively. Conclusions The MTBDRplus assay can be used effectively even on AFB smear-negative specimens from TB patients, when the TB-PCR is positive. This result might help clinicians to manage patients with suspected DR-TB in difficult situations. PMID:26654187

  19. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anufrieva, N V; Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Bazhulina, N P; Manukhov, I V; Degtev, D I; Gnuchikh, E Yu; Rodionov, A N; Zavilgelsky, G B; Demidkina, T V

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 - dependent methionine ?-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patient's body. The enzyme catalyzes the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  20. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Anufrieva, N. V.; Morozova, E. A.; Kulikova, V. V.; Bazhulina, N. P.; Manukhov, I. V.; Degtev, D. I.; Gnuchikh, E. Yu.; Rodionov, A. N.; Zavilgelsky, G. B.; Demidkina, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 dependent methionine ?-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patients body. The enzyme catalyzes the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the ?- and ?-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  1. Phylogenetic and molecular characterization of a 23S rRNA gene positions the genus Campylobacter in the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria and shows that the presence of transcribed spacers is common in Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Trust, T J; Logan, S M; Gustafson, C E; Romaniuk, P J; Kim, N W; Chan, V L; Ragan, M A; Guerry, P; Gutell, R R

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 23S rRNA gene of Campylobacter coli VC167 was determined. The primary sequence of the C. coli 23S rRNA was deduced, and a secondary-structure model was constructed. Comparison with Escherichia coli 23S rRNA showed a major difference in the C. coli rRNA at approximately position 1170 (E. coli numbering) in the form of an extra sequence block approximately 147 bp long. PCR analysis of 31 other strains of C. coli and C. jejuni showed that 69% carried a transcribed spacer of either ca. 147 or ca. 37 bp. Comparison of all sequenced Campylobacter transcribed spacers showed that the Campylobacter inserts were related in sequence and percent G+C content. All Campylobacter strains carrying transcribed spacers in their 23S rRNA genes produced fragmented 23S rRNAs. Other strains which produced unfragmented 23S rRNAs did not appear to carry transcribed spacers at this position in their 23S rRNA genes. At the 1850 region (E. coli numbering), Campylobacter 23S rRNA displayed a base pairing signature most like that of the beta and gamma subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria, but in the 270 region, Campylobacter 23S rRNA displayed a helix signature which distinguished it from the alpha, beta, and gamma subdivisions. Phylogenetic analysis comparing C. coli VC167 23S rRNA and a C. jejuni TGH9011 (ATCC 43431) 23S rRNA with 53 other completely sequenced (eu)bacterial 23S rRNAs showed that the two campylobacters form a sister group to the alpha, beta, and gamma proteobacterial 23S rRNAs, a positioning consistent with the idea that the genus Campylobacter belongs to the epsilon subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. Images PMID:8045890

  2. Resistance to antiretroviral drugs in newly diagnosed, young treatment-nave HIV-positive pregnant women in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Parboosing, R; Naidoo, A; Gordon, M; Taylor, M; Vella, V

    2011-09-01

    In 2004, KwaZulu-Natal initiated one of the world's largest HIV/AIDS treatment programs. Studies in South Africa have shown that patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) develop rapidly and transmit drug resistant mutations. Since resistance testing is not widely available in Kwazulu-Natal, the Department of Health conducted the first HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) threshold survey in 2005, which did not identify any mutations associated with HIVDR. The objective of this study was to conduct a follow-up threshold survey to update the information on HIVDR. This study was conducted in 2009 in five antenatal care sites in Kwazulu-Natal using the HIVDR threshold survey method developed by WHO. Two hundred and thirteen newly-diagnosed HIV positive, drug-nave primigravidae, less than 22 years of age were included in the survey. Of the 82 HIV positive specimens, 17 had insufficient volume for genotyping and, of the remaining 65, 47 were genotyped sequentially. Drug resistance was identified by sequencing the HIV-1 pol gene, using the ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system v2.0. Of the 47 samples that were genotyped, only one presented with a K103N mutation, which equates to a prevalence of transmitted HIVDR of <5%. The low prevalence of transmitted HIVDR is in keeping with statistical models of the early stages of ART rollout. As ART coverage is increasing continuously, there is a need to ensure that vigilance of HIVDR continues so that the emergence and spread of HIVDR is minimized. PMID:21739439

  3. Social-structural contexts of needle and syringe sharing behaviours of HIV-positive injecting drug users in Manipur, India: a mixed methods investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few investigations have assessed risk behaviours and social-structural contexts of risk among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Northeast India, where injecting drug use is the major route of HIV transmission. Investigations of risk environments are needed to inform development of effective risk reduction interventions. Methods This mixed methods study of HIV-positive IDUs in Manipur included a structured survey (n = 75), two focus groups (n = 17), seven in-depth interviews, and two key informant interviews. Results One-third of survey participants reported having shared a needle/syringe in the past 30 days; among these, all the men and about one-third of the women did so with persons of unknown HIV serostatus. A variety of social-structural contextual factors influenced individual risk behaviours: barriers to carrying sterile needles/syringes due to fear of harassment by police and "anti-drug" organizations; lack of sterile needles/syringes in drug dealers' locales; limited access to pharmacy-sold needles/syringes; inadequate coverage by needle and syringe programmes (NSPs); non-availability of sterile needles/syringes in prisons; and withdrawal symptoms superseding concern for health. Some HIV-positive IDUs who shared needles/syringes reported adopting risk reduction strategies: being the 'last receiver' of needles/syringes and not a 'giver;' sharing only with other IDUs they knew to be HIV-positive; and, when a 'giver,' asking other IDUs to wash used needles/syringes with bleach before using. Conclusions Effective HIV prevention and care programmes for IDUs in Northeast India may hinge on several enabling contexts: supportive government policy on harm reduction programmes, including in prisons; an end to harassment by the police, army, and anti-drug groups, with education of these entities regarding harm reduction, creation of partnerships with the public health sector, and accountability to government policies that protect IDUs' human rights; adequate and sustained funding for NSPs to cover all IDU populations, including prisoners; and non-discriminatory access by IDUs to affordable needles/syringes in pharmacies. PMID:21569478

  4. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    PubMed

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA < 50 copies/ml. In unadjusted analyses, self-reported hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users. PMID:24015838

  5. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family.

  6. Packed cell volume Platelet count, PT, PTTK and Fibrinogen concentration of HIV positive patients on antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Osime, Evarista Odaburhine; Oresanja, Omobolaji Oluwole; Okwara, Benson Uchechukwu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This is aimed at investigating some coagulation and haematologic profile of HIV positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in patients attending clinic at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Methods: This is a correlation study comprising fifty (50) HIV positive patients on HAART between 6 – 12 months as test subjects and fifty (50) HIV positive patients who have not began HAART as control subjects. Five millilitres of blood was withdrawn from each group by venepuncture into ethylene diaminetetracetic and sodium citrate anticoagulant containers. Platelet counts were estimated manually using ammonium oxalate solution, packed cell volume by the microhaematocrit method while Prothrombin Time (PT), Activated partial thrombroplastin time and fibrinogen concentration were done by methods described by Monica Chessbrough. Results: This is presented as mean ± standard error of mean. There were reduction in PCV and platelet count between test and control subjects although not statistically significant (P> 0.05) while there was a significant increase in PT and PTTK between test and control groups (P<0.05). No significant change was observed in fibrinogen concentration in HIV patients on HAART and those not on HAART. Conclusion: HAART increases PT and PTTK in HIV infection. PMID:26870130

  7. Irinotecan Plus S-1 Followed by Hepatectomy for a Patient with Initially Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases, Who Showed Severe Drug Rash with Oxaliplatin Plus 5-FU and Leucovorin (FOLFOX)

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Toru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Imai, Katsunori; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    For unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), hepatic resection with or without chemotherapy is the only curative treatment that sufficiently achieves long-term survival. However, occasional severe allergic responses to anticancer drugs necessitate treatment discontinuation. A 45-year-old woman presented with metachronous unresectable colorectal liver metastases. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin plus 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) was initiated, but severe allergic dermatitis developed after the second cycle. Although she reported no prior history of adverse reactions to tegafur-uracil, a drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed an allergic response to 5-FU. We subsequently replaced with Irinotecan plus S-1 (IRIS) chemotherapy which was well tolerated and resulted in a partial response after 3 cycles. As a result, right trisectionectomy was successfully performed and no recurrence was detected in the following 3 years. A severe allergic reaction to intravenous 5-FU-containing drug regimens can be successfully alleviated by switching to S-1-containing regimens such as IRIS or S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX). PMID:25031875

  8. Irinotecan Plus S-1 Followed by Hepatectomy for a Patient with Initially Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases, Who Showed Severe Drug Rash with Oxaliplatin Plus 5-FU and Leucovorin (FOLFOX).

    PubMed

    Komori, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Toru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Imai, Katsunori; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    For unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), hepatic resection with or without chemotherapy is the only curative treatment that sufficiently achieves long-term survival. However, occasional severe allergic responses to anticancer drugs necessitate treatment discontinuation. A 45-year-old woman presented with metachronous unresectable colorectal liver metastases. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin plus 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) was initiated, but severe allergic dermatitis developed after the second cycle. Although she reported no prior history of adverse reactions to tegafur-uracil, a drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed an allergic response to 5-FU. We subsequently replaced with Irinotecan plus S-1 (IRIS) chemotherapy which was well tolerated and resulted in a partial response after 3 cycles. As a result, right trisectionectomy was successfully performed and no recurrence was detected in the following 3 years. A severe allergic reaction to intravenous 5-FU-containing drug regimens can be successfully alleviated by switching to S-1-containing regimens such as IRIS or S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX). PMID:25031875

  9. Differential Predictors of Medication Adherence in HIV: Findings from a Sample of African American and Caucasian HIV-Positive Drug-Using Adults

    PubMed Central

    Moizel, Jennifer; Panos, Stella E.; Patel, Sapna M.; Byrd, Desiree A.; Myers, Hector F.; Wyatt, Gail E.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modest or even occasional nonadherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can result in adverse clinical outcomes. African Americans demonstrate lower rates of adherence than Caucasians or Latinos. Identifying factors that influence medication adherence among African Americans is a critical step toward reducing HIV/AIDS disease progression and mortality. In a sample of 181 African American (n=144) and Caucasian (n=37) HIV-positive drug-using individuals [age (M=42.31; SD=6.6) education (M=13.41; SD=2.1)], we examined the influence of baseline drug use, literacy, neurocognition, depression, treatment-specific social support, and patient satisfaction with health care provider on medication adherence averaged over the course of 6 months (study dates 2002–2006). Our findings suggest differential baseline predictors of medication adherence for African Americans and Caucasians, such that patient satisfaction with provider was the strongest predictor of follow-up medication adherence for African Americans whereas for Caucasians depressive symptoms and treatment-specific social support were predictive of medication adherence (after controlling for duration of drug use). PMID:22889235

  10. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of the GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulator rac-BHFF: Comparison with GABAB Receptor Agonists and Drugs of Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2013-01-01

    GABAB receptor-positive modulators are thought to have advantages as potential medications for anxiety, depression, and drug addiction. They may have fewer side effects than GABAB receptor agonists, because selective enhancement of activated receptors could have effects different from nonselective activation of all receptors. To examine this, pigeons were trained to discriminate the GABAB receptor-positive modulator (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) from its vehicle. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not mimicked by the GABAB receptor agonists baclofen and ?-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), not by diazepam, and not by alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine, whose self-administration has been reported to be attenuated by GABAB receptor-positive modulators. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not antagonized by the GABAB receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl (diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) but were attenuated by the less efficacious GABAB receptor-positive modulator 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl)phenol (CGP7930), suggesting the possibility that rac-BHFF produces its discriminative stimulus effects by directly activating GABAB2 subunits of GABAB receptors. At a dose 10-fold lower than the training dose, rac-BHFF enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. This study provides evidence that the effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators are not identical to those of GABAB receptor agonists. In addition, the results suggest that positive modulation of GABAB receptors does not produce discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of benzodiazepines, alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine. Finally, the finding that rac-BHFF enhanced effects of baclofen but not of GHB is consistent with converging evidence that the populations of GABAB receptors mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical. PMID:23275067

  11. Hepatitis C virus seroconversion among HIV-positive men who have sex with men with no history of injection drug use: Results from a clinical HIV cohort

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, Ann N; Gardner, Sandra L; Mazzulli, Tony; Manno, Michael; Raboud, Janet; Allen, Vanessa G; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Kaul, Rupert; McGee, Frank; Millson, Peggy; Remis, Robert S; Wobeser, Wendy; Cooper, Curtis; Rourke, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internationally, there is a growing recognition that hepatitis C virus (HCV) may be sexually transmitted among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). OBJECTIVE: To report the first Canadian estimate of HCV seroincidence in 2000 to 2010 and its risk factors among HIV-positive MSM with no known history of injection drug use. METHODS: Data from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study, an ongoing cohort of individuals in HIV care in Ontario, were analyzed. Data were obtained from medical charts, interviews and record linkage with the provincial public health laboratories. The analysis was restricted to 1534 MSM who did not report injection drug use and had undergone ?2 HCV antibody tests, of which the first was negative (median 6.1 person-years [PY] of follow-up; sum 9987 PY). RESULTS: In 2000 to 2010, 51 HCV seroconversions were observed, an overall incidence of 5.1 per 1000 PY (95% CI 3.9 to 6.7). Annual incidence varied from 1.6 to 8.9 per 1000 PY, with no statistical evidence of a temporal trend. Risk for seroconversion was elevated among men who had ever had syphilis (adjusted HR 2.5 [95% CI 1.1 to 5.5) and men who had acute syphilis infection in the previous 18 months (adjusted HR 2.8 [95% CI 1.0 to 7.9]). Risk was lower for men who had initiated antiretroviral treatment (adjusted HR 0.49 [95% CI 0.25 to 0.95]). There were no statistically significant effects of age, ethnicity, region, CD4 cell count or HIV viral load. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that periodic HCV rescreening may be appropriate in Ontario among HIV-positive MSM. Future research should seek evidence whether syphilis is simply a marker for high-risk sexual behaviour or networks, or whether it potentiates sexual HCV transmission among individuals with HIV. PMID:25798149

  12. SLC6A14 (ATB0,+) Protein, a Highly Concentrative and Broad Specific Amino Acid Transporter, Is a Novel and Effective Drug Target for Treatment of Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Senthil; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Elangovan, Selvakumar; Babu, Ellappan; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Gurav, Ashish; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P.; Singh, Nagendra; Schoenlein, Patricia V.; Prasad, Puttur D.; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2011-01-01

    SLC6A14, also known as ATB0,+, is an amino acid transporter with unique characteristics. It transports 18 of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids. However, this transporter is expressed only at low levels in normal tissues. Here, we show that the transporter is up-regulated specifically in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, demonstrable with primary human breast cancer tissues and human breast cancer cell lines. SLC6A14 is an estrogen/ER target. The transport features of SLC6A14 include concentrative transport of leucine (an activator of mTOR), glutamine (an essential amino acid for nucleotide biosynthesis and substrate for glutaminolysis), and arginine (an essential amino acid for tumor cells), suggesting that ER-positive breast cancer cells up-regulate SLC6A14 to meet their increased demand for these amino acids. Consequently, treatment of ER-positive breast cancer cells in vitro with ?-methyl-dl-tryptophan (?-MT), a selective blocker of SLC6A14, induces amino acid deprivation, inhibits mTOR, and activates autophagy. Prolongation of the treatment with ?-MT causes apoptosis. Addition of an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine) during ?-MT treatment also induces apoptosis. These effects of ?-MT are specific to ER-positive breast cancer cells, which express the transporter. The ability of ?-MT to cause amino acid deprivation is significantly attenuated in MCF-7 cells, an ER-positive breast cancer cell line, when SLC6A14 is silenced with shRNA. In mouse xenograft studies, ?-MT by itself is able to reduce the growth of the ER-positive ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells. These studies identify SLC6A14 as a novel and effective drug target for the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer. PMID:21771784

  13. SLC6A14 (ATB0,+) protein, a highly concentrative and broad specific amino acid transporter, is a novel and effective drug target for treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Senthil; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Elangovan, Selvakumar; Babu, Ellappan; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Gurav, Ashish; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P; Singh, Nagendra; Schoenlein, Patricia V; Prasad, Puttur D; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2011-09-01

    SLC6A14, also known as ATB(0,+), is an amino acid transporter with unique characteristics. It transports 18 of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids. However, this transporter is expressed only at low levels in normal tissues. Here, we show that the transporter is up-regulated specifically in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, demonstrable with primary human breast cancer tissues and human breast cancer cell lines. SLC6A14 is an estrogen/ER target. The transport features of SLC6A14 include concentrative transport of leucine (an activator of mTOR), glutamine (an essential amino acid for nucleotide biosynthesis and substrate for glutaminolysis), and arginine (an essential amino acid for tumor cells), suggesting that ER-positive breast cancer cells up-regulate SLC6A14 to meet their increased demand for these amino acids. Consequently, treatment of ER-positive breast cancer cells in vitro with ?-methyl-DL-tryptophan (?-MT), a selective blocker of SLC6A14, induces amino acid deprivation, inhibits mTOR, and activates autophagy. Prolongation of the treatment with ?-MT causes apoptosis. Addition of an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine) during ?-MT treatment also induces apoptosis. These effects of ?-MT are specific to ER-positive breast cancer cells, which express the transporter. The ability of ?-MT to cause amino acid deprivation is significantly attenuated in MCF-7 cells, an ER-positive breast cancer cell line, when SLC6A14 is silenced with shRNA. In mouse xenograft studies, ?-MT by itself is able to reduce the growth of the ER-positive ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells. These studies identify SLC6A14 as a novel and effective drug target for the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer. PMID:21771784

  14. The paradigm of universal access to HIV-treatment and human rights violation: how do we treat HIV-positive people who use drugs?

    PubMed

    Malta, Monica; Ralil da Costa, Michelle; Bastos, Francisco Inácio

    2014-03-01

    HIV-positive people who use drugs (PWUDs) are particularly vulnerable for suboptimal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We conducted a systematic review to identify factors associated with suboptimal HAART access among this population. Studies evaluating HAART access among active PWUDs as a primary outcome, presenting multivariate analysis and conducted after January 1997 were included. Of 122 studies matching the search criteria, only 14 (11.4 %) met the inclusion criteria. All selected studies were prospective cohorts and included young adults, 13 were conducted in North America or western Europe and one in Ukraine. Selected studies measured HAART access using different strategies, however, all identified PWUDs as less likely to receive HAART, when compared to those who never used drugs or former PWUDs. Additional factors associated with suboptimal HAART access include: recent incarceration, lack of health insurance, unstable housing, depression, non-white ethnicity, female PWUDs, and health professionals stigma/prejudice. Factors associated with higher rates of HIV-treatment access included: alcohol and/or drug addiction treatment (especially methadone maintenance therapy), regular source of primary care, treatment and care from the same provider (most of the time) and larger physician experience in HIV-management. PWUDs face a synergy of social and structural factors that influence their suboptimal access to HAART, struggling with poor living conditions, inadequate access to specialized care and stigma/discrimination from health professionals. Renewed strategies and effective interventions should be developed and scaled-up, in order to assure equitable HAART access, decrease morbidity and mortality among PWUDs. PMID:24369409

  15. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Demetrio L.; Cabrera, Esperanza C.; Puzon, Juliana Janet M.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID:26741962

  16. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID:26741962

  17. Weakening of negative relative to positive associations with cocaine-paired cues contributes to cue-induced responding after drug removal

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zu-In; Kichaev, Gleb; Wenzel, Jennifer; Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine has been shown to have initial positive (euphoric) and delayed negative (anxiogenic) effects in both humans and animals. Cocaine-paired cues are consequently imbued with mixed positive and negative associations. The current study examines the relative roles of these dual associations in the enhanced drug-seeking observed upon presentation of cocaine-paired cues. Rats ran a straight alley once/day for a single i.v. injection of cocaine (1.0 mg/kg/inj) in the presence of a distinctive olfactory cue (scented cotton swabs placed under the apparatus). An alternate scent was presented in a separate cage 2-hr prior to runway testing. After 15 trials/days, the scents and cocaine reinforcer were removed and a series of extinction trials (lasting for one or three weeks) was initiated. Immediately following extinction, runway responding was tested during a single trial in the presence of the cocaine-paired or non-paired cue. As previously reported, while subjects initiated responding faster over trials (reduced latencies to leave the start box), they exhibited a progressive increase in approach-avoidance conflict behavior (retreats) regarding goal-box entry, reflecting cocaines dual positive + negative effects. Once established, retreat behaviors persisted over the course of 6 and 20 days of extinction. However, both run times and retreats decreased in response to presentation of the cocaine-paired but not the non-paired scent. These data suggest that, after reinforcer removal, cue-induced cocaine-seeking stems in part from a reduction in approach-avoidance conflict; i.e., a greater weakening of the negative relative to the positive associations that animals form with cocaine-paired stimuli. PMID:22005601

  18. Differential Modulation of Thresholds for Intracranial Self-Stimulation by mGlu5 Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulators: Implications for Effects on Drug Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Cleva, Richard M.; Watterson, Lucas R.; Johnson, Meagan A.; Olive, M. Foster

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptor alters various addiction related behaviors such as drug self-administration and the extinction and reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. However, the effects of pharmacological modulation of mGlu5 receptors on brain reward function have not been widely investigated. We examined the effects of acute administration of positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) on brain reward function by assessing thresholds for intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In addition, when acute effects were observed, we examined changes in ICSS thresholds following repeated administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bipolar electrodes into the medial forebrain bundle and trained to respond for ICSS, followed by assessment of effects of mGlu5 ligands on ICSS thresholds using a discrete trials currentintensity threshold determination procedure. Acute administration of the selective mGlu5 NAMs MTEP (0, 0.3, 1, or 3?mg/kg) and fenobam (0, 3, 10, or 30?mg/kg) dose-dependently increased ICSS thresholds (?70% at the highest dose tested), suggesting a deficit in brain reward function. Acute administration of the mGlu5 PAMs CDPPB (0, 10, 30, and 60?mg/kg) or ADX47273 (0, 10, 30, and 60?mg/kg) was without effect at any dose tested. When administered once daily for five consecutive days, the development of tolerance to the ability of threshold-elevating doses of MTEP and fenobam to increase ICSS thresholds was observed. We conclude that mGlu5 PAMs and NAMs differentially affect brain reward function, and that tolerance to the ability of mGlu5 NAMs to reduce brain reward function develops with repeated administration. These brain reward deficits should be taken into consideration when interpreting acute effects of mGlu5 NAMs on drug self-administration, and repeated administration of these ligands may be an effective method to reduce these deficits. PMID:22232603

  19. Relationship of consumers' perceptions of drugs to drug use.

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, J L

    1983-01-01

    To examine consumers' perceptions of nonprescription and prescription drugs and the relationship of these perceptions to drug use, a sample of 200 adult residents of a northern midwestern area who were similar in age and education to the national population was surveyed. Respondents who rated nonprescription drugs as safe and somewhat effective used nearly 90 percent less nonprescription drugs than respondents rating these drugs as safe and ineffective. Respondents who rated prescription drugs as unsafe used approximately 60 percent less of them than respondents rating them as somewhat safe or safe. Data for the study were collected from March 15 to May 15, 1978. The respondents' perceptions of nonprescription and prescription drugs in respect to safety, efficacy, side effects, and overdose effects were measured on a thermometer scale, with anchors at three points (100 degrees for the most positive perception, 50 degrees for the midpoint, and 0 degrees for the most negative perception). Drug use, based on the respondents' recollections, was measured for 2 days before the interview. The respondents rated prescription drugs as safer and more effective than nonprescription drugs, but as having more dangerous overdose effects. Two-way analysis of variance showed that perceptions of the safety and effectiveness of nonprescription drugs and the interaction between these two variables were related to the use of these drugs. Perceptions of the safety of prescription drugs were related to their use. PMID:6828642

  20. Anti-bacterial performance of azithromycin nanoparticles as colloidal drug delivery system against different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Mohammadi, Ghobad; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Azithromycin (AZI) is a new macrolide antibiotic with a better activity against intracellular gram negative bacteria in comparison with Erythromycin. The purpose of this research was to prepare AZI nanoparticles (NPs) using PLGA polymer and to compare the effectiveness of prepared nanoparticles with untreated AZI solution. Methods: AZI NPs were prepared by Modified Quasi-Emulsion Solvent Diffusion method. The antibacterial activities of prepared NPs in comparison with AZI solution were assayed against indicator bacteria of Escherichia coli (PTCC 1330), Haemophilus influenzae (PTCC 1623) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PTCC 1240) using agar well diffusion. Inhibition zone diameters (IZD) of nano-formulation were compared to the corresponding untreated AZI. Mean Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of AZI were also determined using serial dilution method in nutrient broth medium. Results: Mean IZD of nano-formulations for all indicator bacteria were significantly higher than that of untreated AZI (P<0.01). The enhanced antibacterial efficacy was more dominant in the gram positive species. The MIC values of NPs against the tested bacteria were reduced 8 times in comparison to those of untreated AZI. Conclusion: These results indicated an improved potency of AZI NPs which could be attributed to the modified surface characteristics as well as increased drug adsorption and uptake. PMID:24312766

  1. Improving the preclinical models for the study of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity: a Position Paper of the Italian Working Group on Drug Cardiotoxicity and Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Cadeddu, Christian; Deidda, Martino; Mele, Donato; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Pepe, Alessia; Spallarossa, Paolo; Tocchetti, Carlo Gabriele; Zito, Concetta; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Although treatment for heart failure induced by cancer therapy has improved in recent years, the prevalence of cardiomyopathy due to antineoplastic therapy remains significant worldwide. In addition to traditional mediators of myocardial damage, such as reactive oxygen species, new pathways and target cells should be considered responsible for the impairment of cardiac function during anticancer treatment. Accordingly, there is a need to develop novel therapeutic strategies to protect the heart from pharmacologic injury, and improve clinical outcomes in cancer patients. The development of novel protective therapies requires testing putative therapeutic strategies in appropriate animal models of chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. This Position Paper of the Working Group on Drug Cardiotoxicity and Cardioprotection of the Italian Society of Cardiology aims to: (1) define the distinctive etiopatogenetic features of cardiac toxicity induced by cancer therapy in humans, which include new aspects of mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, neuregulin-1 modulation through the ErbB receptor family, angiogenesis inhibition, and cardiac stem cell depletion and/or dysfunction; (2) review the new, more promising therapeutic strategies for cardioprotection, aimed to increase the survival of patients with severe antineoplastic-induced cardiotoxicity; (3) recommend the distinctive pathological features of cardiotoxicity induced by cancer therapy in humans that should be present in animal models used to identify or to test new cardioprotective therapies. PMID:26168714

  2. Back to the basics: identifying positive youth development as the theoretical framework for a youth drug prevention program in rural Saskatchewan, Canada amidst a program evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite endorsement by the Saskatchewan government to apply empirically-based approaches to youth drug prevention services in the province, programs are sometimes delivered prior to the establishment of evidence-informed goals and objectives. This paper shares the 'preptory’ outcomes of our team’s program evaluation of the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services’ Outreach Worker Service (OWS) in eight rural, community schools three years following its implementation. Before our independent evaluation team could assess whether expectations of the OWS were being met, we had to assist with establishing its overarching program goals and objectives and 'at-risk’ student population, alongside its alliance with an empirically-informed theoretical framework. Methods A mixed-methods approach was applied, beginning with in-depth focus groups with the OWS staff to identify the program’s goals and objectives and targeted student population. These were supplemented with OWS and school administrator interviews and focus groups with school staff. Alignment with a theoretical focus was determined though a review of the OWS’s work to date and explored in focus groups between our evaluation team and the OWS staff and validated with the school staff and OWS and school administration. Results With improved understanding of the OWS’s goals and objectives, our evaluation team and the OWS staff aligned the program with the Positive Youth Development theoretical evidence-base, emphasizing the program’s universality, systems focus, strength base, and promotion of assets. Together we also gained clarity about the OWS’s definition of and engagement with its 'at-risk’ student population. Conclusions It is important to draw on expert knowledge to develop youth drug prevention programming, but attention must also be paid to aligning professional health care services with a theoretically informed evidence-base for evaluation purposes. If time does not permit for the establishment of evidence-informed goals and objectives at the start-up of a program, obtaining insight and expertise from program personnel and school staff and administrators can bring the program to a point where this can still be achieved and theoretical linkages made after a program has been implemented. This is a necessary foundation for measuring an intervention’s success. PMID:24148918

  3. Target-independent prediction of drug synergies using only drug lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Weinstein, Zohar B; Meydan, Cem; Akhmetov, Azat; Toprak, Isil; Durmaz, Arda; Iossifov, Ivan; Kazan, Hilal; Roth, Frederick P; Cokol, Murat

    2014-08-25

    Physicochemical properties of compounds have been instrumental in selecting lead compounds with increased drug-likeness. However, the relationship between physicochemical properties of constituent drugs and the tendency to exhibit drug interaction has not been systematically studied. We assembled physicochemical descriptors for a set of antifungal compounds ("drugs") previously examined for interaction. Analyzing the relationship between molecular weight, lipophilicity, H-bond donor, and H-bond acceptor values for drugs and their propensity to show pairwise antifungal drug synergy, we found that combinations of two lipophilic drugs had a greater tendency to show drug synergy. We developed a more refined decision tree model that successfully predicted drug synergy in stringent cross-validation tests based on only lipophilicity of drugs. Our predictions achieved a precision of 63% and allowed successful prediction for 58% of synergistic drug pairs, suggesting that this phenomenon can extend our understanding for a substantial fraction of synergistic drug interactions. We also generated and analyzed a large-scale synergistic human toxicity network, in which we observed that combinations of lipophilic compounds show a tendency for increased toxicity. Thus, lipophilicity, a simple and easily determined molecular descriptor, is a powerful predictor of drug synergy. It is well established that lipophilic compounds (i) are promiscuous, having many targets in the cell, and (ii) often penetrate into the cell via the cellular membrane by passive diffusion. We discuss the positive relationship between drug lipophilicity and drug synergy in the context of potential drug synergy mechanisms. PMID:25026390

  4. Target-Independent Prediction of Drug Synergies Using Only Drug Lipophilicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of compounds have been instrumental in selecting lead compounds with increased drug-likeness. However, the relationship between physicochemical properties of constituent drugs and the tendency to exhibit drug interaction has not been systematically studied. We assembled physicochemical descriptors for a set of antifungal compounds (drugs) previously examined for interaction. Analyzing the relationship between molecular weight, lipophilicity, H-bond donor, and H-bond acceptor values for drugs and their propensity to show pairwise antifungal drug synergy, we found that combinations of two lipophilic drugs had a greater tendency to show drug synergy. We developed a more refined decision tree model that successfully predicted drug synergy in stringent cross-validation tests based on only lipophilicity of drugs. Our predictions achieved a precision of 63% and allowed successful prediction for 58% of synergistic drug pairs, suggesting that this phenomenon can extend our understanding for a substantial fraction of synergistic drug interactions. We also generated and analyzed a large-scale synergistic human toxicity network, in which we observed that combinations of lipophilic compounds show a tendency for increased toxicity. Thus, lipophilicity, a simple and easily determined molecular descriptor, is a powerful predictor of drug synergy. It is well established that lipophilic compounds (i) are promiscuous, having many targets in the cell, and (ii) often penetrate into the cell via the cellular membrane by passive diffusion. We discuss the positive relationship between drug lipophilicity and drug synergy in the context of potential drug synergy mechanisms. PMID:25026390

  5. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds. PMID:26296082

  6. Heterotropic Activation of the Midazolam Hydroxylase Activity of CYP3A by a Positive Allosteric Modulator of mGlu5: In Vitro to In Vivo Translation and Potential Impact on Clinically Relevant Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Blobaum, Anna L.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Byers, Frank W.; Turlington, Mark L.; Mattmann, Margrith E.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Mackie, Claire; Lavreysen, Hilde; Bartolomé, José M.; MacDonald, Gregor J.; Steckler, Thomas; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors has gained considerable attention in the drug discovery arena because it opens avenues to achieve greater selectivity over orthosteric ligands. We recently identified a series of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) for the treatment of schizophrenia that exhibited robust heterotropic activation of CYP3A4 enzymatic activity. The prototypical compound from this series, 5-(4-fluorobenzyl)-2-((3-fluorophenoxy)methyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrazine (VU0448187), was found to activate CYP3A4 to >100% of its baseline intrinsic midazolam (MDZ) hydroxylase activity in vitro; activation was CYP3A substrate specific and mGlu5 PAM dependent. Additional studies revealed the concentration-dependence of CYP3A activation by VU0448187 in multispecies hepatic and intestinal microsomes and hepatocytes, as well as a diminished effect observed in the presence of ketoconazole. Kinetic analyses of the effect of VU0448187 on MDZ metabolism in recombinant P450 or human liver microsomes resulted in a significant increase in Vmax (minimal change in Km) and required the presence of cytochrome b5. The atypical kinetics translated in vivo, as rats receiving an intraperitoneal administration of VU0448187 prior to MDZ treatment demonstrated a significant increase in circulating 1- and 4-hydroxy- midazolam (1-OH-MDZ, 4-OH-MDZ) levels compared with rats administered MDZ alone. The discovery of a potent substrate-selective activator of rodent CYP3A with an in vitro to in vivo translation serves to illuminate the impact of increasing intrinsic enzymatic activity of hepatic and extrahepatic CYP3A in rodents, and presents the basis to build models capable of framing the clinical relevance of substrate-dependent heterotropic activation. PMID:24003250

  7. Positive Proof.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoffrey

    1988-01-01

    Presents experiments which show that in electrostatics there are logical reasons for describing charged materials as positive or negative. Indicates that static and current electricity are not separate areas of physics. Diagrams of experiments and circuits are included. (RT)

  8. Use of Compassionate Supply of Antiretroviral Drugs to Avoid Treatment Interruptions or Delayed Treatment Initiation among HIV-Positive Patients Living in Ontario: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Naccarato, Mark; Gough, Kevin; Lewis, Jordan; Bayoumi, Ahmed M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Without a national pharmacare plan in Canada, HIV-infected patients across the nation differ in their ability to obtain essential HIV therapy. Despite the fact there are public insurance programs in Ontario, patients are unable to access medication. The authors described how frequently patients in their urban clinic could not access medications and why they required a compassionate supply of HIV drugs, with the goals of minimizing treatment delays and avoiding interruptions. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective review and collected information about demographic characteristics, current drug insurance and the challenges encountered. Results: Over one year, the authors provided 2,886 days of free HIV drugs to 42 patients who were predominantly citizens or permanent residents of Canada (88%). The most common obstacles were associated with the Trillium Drug Program and the total value of all drugs supplied was $134,860. Interpretation: This study suggests that Ontario's catastrophic drug insurance plan leaves some patients with significant gaps in drug coverage. PMID:25947034

  9. Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Many drugs of abuse, including cannabinoids, opioids, alcohol and nicotine, can alter the levels of endocannabinoids in the brain. Recent studies show that release of endocannabinoids in the ventral tegmental area can modulate the reward-related effects of dopamine and might therefore be an important neurobiological mechanism underlying drug addiction. There is strong evidence that the endocannabinoid system is involved in drug-seeking behavior (especially behavior that is reinforced by drug-related cues), as well as in the mechanisms that underlie relapse to drug use. The cannabinoid CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant has been shown to reduce the behavioral effects of stimuli associated with drugs of abuse, including nicotine, alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana. Thus, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising target for development of new treatments for drug addiction. PMID:21104390

  10. A Combined Analysis of 48 Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Risk Variants Shows No Discriminative Value to Predict Time to First Prescription of a Glucose Lowering Drug in Danish Patients with Screen Detected Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hornbak, Malene; Allin, Kristine Hjgaard; Jensen, Majken Linnemann; Lau, Cathrine Juel; Witte, Daniel; Jrgensen, Marit Eika; Sandbk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Andersson, sa; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the genetic influence of 48 type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants on disease progression measured as risk of early prescription redemption of glucose lowering drugs in screen-detected patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We studied type 2 diabetes progression in 1,480 patients with screen-detected type 2 diabetes from the ADDITION-Denmark study using information of redeemed prescriptions from the Register of Medicinal Products Statistics from 20012009 in Denmark. Patients were cluster randomized by general practitioners, who were randomized to treat type 2 diabetes according to either a conventional or a multifactorial intensive treatment algorithm. We investigated the genetic influence on diabetes progression by constructing a genetic risk score (GRS) of all 48 validated type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants, a GRS of 11 variants linked to ?-cell function and a GRS of 3 variants linked to insulin sensitivity and assessed the association between number of risk alleles and time from diagnosis until first redeemed prescription of either any glucose lowering drug or an insulin drug. Results The GRS linked to insulin sensitivity only nominally increased the risk of an early prescription redemption with an insulin drug by 39% (HR [95% C.I.]?=?1.39 [1.091.77], p?=?0.009] in patients randomized to the intensive treatment group. Furthermore, the strongest univariate predictors of diabetes progression for the intensive treatment group (measured as time to first insulin) were younger age (HR [95% C.I.]?=?0.96 [0.930.99]), increased BMI (1.05 [1.011.09]), increased HbA1c (1.50 [1.36.66]), increased TG (1.24 [1.111.39]) and reduced fasting serum HDL (0.37 [0.170.80]) at baseline. Similar results were obtained for the conventional treatment group. Conclusion Higher levels of HbA1c, fasting circulating levels of triglyceride, lower HDL, larger BMI and younger age are significant determinants of early pharmacological intervention in type 2 diabetes. However, known common type 2 diabetes-associated gene variants do not appear to significantly affect disease progression. PMID:25157406

  11. 49 CFR 655.61 - Action when an employee has a verified positive drug test result or has a confirmed alcohol test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Immediately after receiving notice from a Breath Alcohol Technician (BAT) that a covered employee has a... function, the employer shall ensure the employee meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 40 for returning to... drug test result or has a confirmed alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater, or refuses to submit to...

  12. Club Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Spotlight / Club Drugs / Club Drugs IN THE SPOTLIGHT Club Drugs "Club drugs are a pharmacologically heterogeneous group of psychoactive drugs ... at bars, nightclubs, concerts, and parties." ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Summary Examples ...

  13. A systematic review of acute pancreatitis as an adverse event of type 2 diabetes drugs: from hard facts to a balanced position.

    PubMed

    Giorda, C B; Nada, E; Tartaglino, B; Marafetti, L; Gnavi, R

    2014-11-01

    The question whether antidiabetes drugs can cause acute pancreatitis dates back to the 1970s. Recently, old concerns have re-emerged following claims that use of incretins, a new class of drugs for type 2 diabetes, might increase the relative risk of acute pancreatitis up to 30-fold. Given that diabetes is per se a potent risk factor for acute pancreatitis and that drug-related acute pancreatitis is rare and difficult to diagnose, we searched the medical databases for information linking acute pancreatitis and type 2 diabetes drugs. Among the biguanides, both phenformin and metformin (the latter in patients with renal insufficiency) have been cited in case reports as a potential cause of acute pancreatitis. Sulphonylureas, as both entire class and single compound (glibenclamide), have also been found in cohort studies to increase its risk. No direct link was found between pancreatic damage and therapy with metaglinide, acarbose, pramlintide or SGLT-2 inhibitors. In animal models, thiazolinediones have demonstrated proprieties to attenuate pancreatic damage, opening perspectives for their use in treating acute pancreatitis in humans. Several case reports and the US Food and Drug Administration pharmacovigilance database indicate an association between acute pancreatitis and incretins, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and GLP-1 receptor agonists. To date, however, a clear-cut odds ratio for this association has been reported in only one of eight pharmacoepidemiological studies. Finally, none of the intervention trials investigating these compounds, including two large randomized controlled trials with cardiovascular endpoints, confirmed the purportedly increased risk of acute pancreatitis with incretin use. PMID:24702687

  14. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  15. STAR Trial Shows Lower Toxicities from Raloxifene

    Cancer.gov

    Initial results in 2006 of the NCI-sponsored Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) showed that a common osteoporosis drug, raloxifene, prevented breast cancer to the same degree, but with fewer serious side-effects, than the drug tamoxifen that had bee

  16. The Art Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scolarici, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    This article describes what once was thought to be impossible--a formal art show extravaganza at an elementary school with 1,000 students, a Department of Defense Dependent School (DODDS) located overseas, on RAF Lakenheath, England. The dream of this this event involved the transformation of the school cafeteria into an elegant art show

  17. Simultaneous determination of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization and its application in therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lei; Wang, Tingting; Shi, Meiyun; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xiaojun; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai

    2016-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantitation of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma has been developed and validated. The method required only 10 μL of plasma. After simple protein precipitation using acetonitrile, the analytes and internal standard diphenhydramine were separated on a Zorbax SB-C18 column (50 × 4.6 mm, 2.7 μm) using acetonitrile/water as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The total run time was 6 min for each sample. The validation results of specificity, matrix effects, recovery, linearity, precision, and accuracy were satisfactory. The lower limit of quantification was 0.04 μg/mL for carbamazepine, 0.02 μg/mL for lamotrigine, 0.01 μg/mL for oxcarbazepine, 0.4 μg/mL for 10-hydroxycarbazepine, 0.1 μg/mL for carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, 0.15 μg/mL for levetiracetam, 0.06 μg/mL for phenytoin, 0.3 μg/mL for valproic acid, 0.03 μg/mL for topiramate, and 0.15 μg/mL for phenobarbital. The intraday precision and interday precision were less than 7.6%, with the accuracy ranging between -8.1 and 7.9%. The method was successfully applied to therapeutic drug monitoring of 1237 patients with epilepsy after administration of standard antiepileptic drugs. The method has been proved to meet the high-throughput requirements in therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:26711223

  18. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  19. Assemblage of drug release modules: effect of module shape and position in the assembled systems on floating behavior and release rate.

    PubMed

    Hascicek, C; Rossi, A; Colombo, P; Massimo, G; Strusi, O L; Colombo, G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the clindamycin release kinetics from floating delivery systems consisting of two modules assembled in void configuration, according to the modified release technology platform known as Dome Matrix. Two modules differently shaped, i.e., female and male, formulated as swellable matrices and containing clindamycin, were assembled by friction interlocking. Then, by stacking additional female modules without drug on the assembled two-module floating system, modulation of clindamycin release rate and kinetics was attained. The additional modules stacked on the assembled system acted as a transient barrier to clindamycin release from the void configuration. Inertness, dissolution/erosion or swelling behavior characterized their performance as matrices in simulated gastric fluid. In particular, we found that stacking additional barrier modules on the bases of void configuration, the drug release rate and kinetics of the assembled system were modified in dependence on the composition of module added. In particular, the quickly soluble module exerted an influence on the release rate in the late time of delivery. The swellable module produced a significant reduction in release rate of void assembly, but the release mechanism remained the same. Finally, the inert module led to a substantial linearization of the release profile with a minimal reduction in release rate. PMID:21087663

  20. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  1. Obesity in show cats.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. PMID:24612018

  2. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became

  3. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  4. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  5. Show Them the Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elliott

    2002-01-01

    Strategies to help garner community support in school technology growth or maintenance include the following: (1) consider a "current state of technology" report; (2) forget five-year plans; (3) develop annual technology reports; (4) look to your website; (5) seek constructive opportunities to share technology, and (6) show off best examples at

  6. Complete republication: National Association of Medical Examiners position paper: Recommendations for the investigation, diagnosis, and certification of deaths related to opioid drugs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gregory G

    2014-03-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology and the National Association of Medical Examiners convened an expert panel to generate evidence-based recommendations for the practice of death investigation and autopsy, toxicological analysis, interpretation of toxicology findings, and death certification to improve the precision of death certificate data available for public health surveillance. The panel finds the following: 1. A complete autopsy is necessary for optimal interpretation of toxicology results, which must also be considered in the context of the circumstances surrounding death, medical history, and scene findings. 2. A complete scene investigation extends to reconciliation of prescription information and pill counts. 3. Blood, urine, and vitreous humor, when available, should be retained in all cases. Blood from the femoral vein is preferable to blood from other sites. 4. A toxicological panel should be comprehensive and include opioid and benzodiazepine analytes, as well as other potent depressant, stimulant, and anti-depressant medications. 5. Interpretation of postmortem opioid concentrations requires correlation with medical history, scene investigation, and autopsy findings. 6. If death is attributed to any drug or combination of drugs (whether as cause or contributing factor), the certifier should list all the responsible substances by generic name in the autopsy report and on the death certificate. 7. The best classification for manner of death in deaths due to the misuse or abuse of opioids without any apparent intent of self-harm is "accident." Reserve "undetermined" as the manner for the rare cases in which evidence exists to support more than one possible determination. PMID:24132519

  7. P1 and P1' para-fluoro phenyl groups show enhanced binding and favorable predicted pharmacological properties: structure-based virtual screening of extended lopinavir analogs against multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-01

    Crystal structure of multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate 769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease in complex with lopinavir (LPV) (PDB ID: 1RV7) showed altered binding orientation of LPV in the expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts and decrease in potency. In the current study, with a goal to restore the lost contacts, three libraries of LPV analogs containing extended P1 and/or P1' phenyl groups were designed and docked into the expanded active site cavity of the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The compounds were then ranked based on three criteria: binding affinity, overall binding profile and predicted pharmacological properties. Among the twelve proposed extensions in different combinations, compound 14 (consists of para-fluoro phenyl group as both P1 and P1' moieties) was identified as a lead with improved binding profile, binding affinity against the MDR protease and favorable predicted pharmacological properties comparable to those of LPV. The binding affinity of 14 against wild type (NL4-3) HIV-1 protease was comparable to that of LPV and was better than LPV against an ensemble of MDR HIV-1 protease variants. Thus, 14 shows enhanced binding affinity by restoring lost contacts in the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants suggesting that it may have higher potency compared to that of LPV and hence should be further synthesized and evaluated against NL4-3 as well as MDR variants of HIV-1. PMID:24291501

  8. Let the show begin

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-27

    Major changes should occur in the European polyolefins industry this year. BASF's (Ludwigshafen) polypropylene (PP) deal with ICI is expected to be followed by that of Hoechst (Frankfurt) and Petrofina (Brussels). The two are engaged in feasibility studies for a possible joint venture in PP and are expected to make a decision in the second quarter of this year. Shell and Himont are on track to complete their feasibility study in the first quarter for a polyolefins joint venture. And Huels and PCD are still in talks. But two new possible deals, a polyolefins merger between Nests (Helsinki) and Statoil (Stavanger) and an alliance in PP involving Appryl, the Elf Atochem (51%)/BP Chemicals (49%) joint venture, and Solvay have been denied. The Hoechst/Fina venture would initially encompass only the two companies European plants - Hoechst's 550,000-m.t./year and Fina's 180,000 m.t./year. In addition, Fina would either build or acquire another PP plant. In the second stage, the partners could bring in their overseas plants. Fina has plants in the US, and Hoechst has a combined 100,000 m.t./year in south Africa and Australia. Neste's board member Jukka Viinanen says the only talks between Nests and Statoil center on renegotiations of ethylene supply contract at Stenungsund, Sweden. Nests wants a more flexible deal on quantity and price. It needs 400,000 m.t./year of ethylene for its downstream plants. Viinanen adds that he is worried about the European petrochemical industry and producers need to do everything to improve margins through pricing policies and obtaining a balance between supply and demand. On the possibility of a future link with Statoil he comments, One can never say never. It would take time. We don't feel in a very vulnerable position right now.

  9. Fluency of pharmaceutical drug names predicts perceived hazardousness, assumed side effects and willingness to buy.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Simone; Siegrist, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The impact of pharmaceutical drug names on people's evaluations and behavioural intentions is still uncertain. According to the representativeness heuristic, evaluations should be more positive for complex drug names; in contrast, fluency theory suggests that evaluations should be more positive for simple drug names. Results of three experimental studies showed that complex drug names were perceived as more hazardous than simple drug names and negatively influenced willingness to buy. The results are of particular importance given the fact that there is a worldwide trend to make more drugs available for self-medication. PMID:23740259

  10. Obesity in show dogs.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2012-08-11

    Obesity is an important disease with a growing incidence. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, and decreases life span, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain breeds is often suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, we investigated 1379 dogs of 128 different breeds by determining their body condition score (BCS). Overall, 18.6% of the show dogs had a BCS >5, and 1.1% of the show dogs had a BCS>7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be correlated to the breed standards. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and judges in order to come to different interpretations of the standards to prevent overweight conditions from being the standard of beauty. PMID:22882163

  11. 5-(Bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA): showing a strategy of designing drug to block lung metastasis of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Taiping; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Jianhui; Yang, Jian; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    Early metastasis is still the most recalcitrant factor in the treatment of lung cancer patients. By analyzing the structures and comparing the docking scores of the known pharmacophores, the authors of this paper designed 5-(bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA) as a promising lead compound to develop metastasis inhibitors. In vitro 5, 10, and 20 µM of BHIMHA concentration dependently inhibited the migration and invasion of A549 cells. In vivo 0.4, 2.0, and 8.9 µmol/kg of BHIMHA dose dependently inhibited the metastasis of LLC (Lewis Lung Carcinoma) toward lung. In vivo, 2 µmol/kg of BHIMHA showed additional actions of slowing the growth of the primary tumor of C57BL/6 mice and S180 mice as well as inhibiting xylene-induced ear edema of the mice. Therefore, BHIMHA simultaneously blocked tumor metastasis toward lung, slowed the primary tumor growth, and limited the inflammation. These pharmacological actions were correlated with the inhibition of PKCα and NF-κB expression. PMID:26937173

  12. 5-(Bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA): showing a strategy of designing drug to block lung metastasis of tumors.

    PubMed

    Gan, Taiping; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Jianhui; Yang, Jian; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    Early metastasis is still the most recalcitrant factor in the treatment of lung cancer patients. By analyzing the structures and comparing the docking scores of the known pharmacophores, the authors of this paper designed 5-(bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA) as a promising lead compound to develop metastasis inhibitors. In vitro 5, 10, and 20 µM of BHIMHA concentration dependently inhibited the migration and invasion of A549 cells. In vivo 0.4, 2.0, and 8.9 µmol/kg of BHIMHA dose dependently inhibited the metastasis of LLC (Lewis Lung Carcinoma) toward lung. In vivo, 2 µmol/kg of BHIMHA showed additional actions of slowing the growth of the primary tumor of C57BL/6 mice and S180 mice as well as inhibiting xylene-induced ear edema of the mice. Therefore, BHIMHA simultaneously blocked tumor metastasis toward lung, slowed the primary tumor growth, and limited the inflammation. These pharmacological actions were correlated with the inhibition of PKCα and NF-κB expression. PMID:26937173

  13. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 ?g/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ? 0.78 ?g/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 ?g/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 ?g/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  14. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Rajamuthiah R; Fuchs BB; Conery AL; Kim W; Jayamani E; Kwon B; Ausubel FM; Mylonakis E

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 ?g/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ? 0.78 ?g/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 ?g/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 ?g/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  15. Repurposing Salicylanilide Anthelmintic Drugs to Combat Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L.; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  16. Pharmacokinetics and bactericidal rates of daptomycin and vancomycin in intravenous drug abusers being treated for gram-positive endocarditis and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rybak, M J; Bailey, E M; Lamp, K C; Kaatz, G W

    1992-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bactericidal killing rates (BR) of daptomycin (D) and vancomycin (V) in 12 intravenous drug abusers (6 treated with daptomycin and 6 treated with vancomycin) were evaluated. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from multiple serum samples drawn at steady state over a 12-h dosing interval after intravenous infusions of 3 mg of D per kg of body weight and 1,000 mg of V. The BRs were determined from the 1- and 6-h serum samples by using four isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (three methicillin susceptible and one methicillin resistant) obtained from the patients enrolled in the study. Peak serum daptomycin concentrations were lower and volumes of distribution were higher than reported in healthy volunteers. Although not statistically different, D clearance was 22% higher than reported in healthy volunteers. V pharmacokinetics were similar to those reported in previous studies. Daptomycin's BRs, although comparable to those of V in patients' serum, were significantly decreased compared with those found in broth. This may be related to the high degree of protein binding of D (93% versus 50% for V). Conversely, the BRs of V in serum were significantly greater than those in broth. The BRs of D and V in broth were greater when killing curves were performed with test strains in logarithmic versus stationary-phase growth. The ability to kill organisms in stationary phase may be an important factor in determining the performance of an antibiotic in deep-seated infections such as endocarditis.3+ PMID:1324637

  17. "Show me" bioethics and politics.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Myra J

    2007-10-01

    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy positions; and to serve as a neutral convener and provider of a public forum for discussion. In this article, the Center's work on early stem cell research is a case study through which to argue that not only the Center, but also the field of bioethics has a critical role in the politics of public health policy. PMID:17926217

  18. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Libault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  19. Nasal Carriage of Multi-Drug Resistant Panton-Valentine Leucocidin-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Children in Tripoli-Libya

    PubMed Central

    Al-haddad, Omaima H.; Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Sifaw Ghenghesh, Khalifa

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonized children are at an increased risk of developing infections than methicillin-sensitive S. aureus colonized children. Nasal specimens from inpatient children, mothers of inpatient children, healthcare workers, and outpatient children at Tripoli Children Hospital (TCH) were examined for MRSA by chromogenic MRSA ID medium. Susceptibility of MRSA isolates to antibiotics was determined by the disc diffusion method. The nasal carriage rate of MRSA among inpatient children (8.3%, 24 of 289), their mothers (11%, 22 of 200), and healthcare workers (12.4%, 22 of 178) was significantly higher than among outpatient children (2.2%, 2 of 91) (P < 0.05, P < 0.02, and P < 0.006, respectively). Of the examined MRSA isolates (N = 35) 10 (28.6%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leucocidin genes by polymerase chain reaction. Multidrug resistance was found in 24.3% (17 of 70) of MRSA isolates. Nasal carriage of multidrug-resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive MRSA is not uncommon among inpatient children and their mothers in Tripoli. PMID:24493673

  20. [Identification of drug abuse].

    PubMed

    Skender, L

    1997-12-01

    Drug abuse poses health and safety hazards, both in the workplace and in the wider community. There is increasing pressure to use urine drug tests to determine the prevalence of drug abuse, to deter illicit use of drugs, and to identify drug abusers for rehabilitation. Drug-abuse testing programs have been implemented for employees, job applicants, policemen, firemen, enlisted personnel of the army, athletes, and workers in occupations that are considered critical to public safety and health, such as those in nuclear power plants and the transportation industry. Since the consequences of a positive test can be quite severe, there is a need to develop uniform and internationally recognized methods for identifying drug abuse. The paper discusses selection of biological specimens for drug-abuse testing, main characteristics of drugs of abuse and recommended analytical techniques for their determination. The importance of a quality assurance program for drug-testing laboratories is emphasised. PMID:9721459

  1. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer, which allows astronomers to scrutinise objects with a precision equivalent to that of a 130-m telescope, is proving itself an unequalled success every day. One of the latest instruments installed, AMBER, has led to a flurry of scientific results, an anthology of which is being published this week as special features in the research journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. ESO PR Photo 06a/07 ESO PR Photo 06a/07 The AMBER Instrument "With its unique capabilities, the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) has created itself a niche in which it provide answers to many astronomical questions, from the shape of stars, to discs around stars, to the surroundings of the supermassive black holes in active galaxies," says Jorge Melnick (ESO), the VLT Project Scientist. The VLTI has led to 55 scientific papers already and is in fact producing more than half of the interferometric results worldwide. "With the capability of AMBER to combine up to three of the 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes, we can really achieve what nobody else can do," added Fabien Malbet, from the LAOG (France) and the AMBER Project Scientist. Eleven articles will appear this week in Astronomy & Astrophysics' special AMBER section. Three of them describe the unique instrument, while the other eight reveal completely new results about the early and late stages in the life of stars. ESO PR Photo 06b/07 ESO PR Photo 06b/07 The Inner Winds of Eta Carinae The first results presented in this issue cover various fields of stellar and circumstellar physics. Two papers deal with very young solar-like stars, offering new information about the geometry of the surrounding discs and associated outflowing winds. Other articles are devoted to the study of hot active stars of particular interest: Alpha Arae, Kappa Canis Majoris, and CPD -57o2874. They provide new, precise information about their rotating gas envelopes. An important new result concerns the enigmatic object Eta Carinae. Using AMBER with its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave coming from the nova. The stream of results from the VLTI and AMBER

  2. Tranexamic Acid-Induced Fixed Drug Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Natsuko; Hanami, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary. PMID:26288438

  3. Mirazid shows insignificant activity against ovine fascioliasis.

    PubMed

    Botros, S S; El-Lakkany, N M; Badawy, A A; Mahmoud, S S; Ebeid, F A; Fenwick, A

    2009-10-01

    In a recent study, the fasciolicidal activity of Mirazid (a myrrh-derived drug) and its effect on the function and histopathology of host liver were investigated in Egyptian sheep, with triclabendazole (TCBZ) used as the positive control. Sheep were infected with metacercariae (150/animal) and treated 3 months later, either with Mirazid (10 mg/kg/day for six consecutive days) or TCBZ (a single dose of 10 mg/kg), or left untreated, as controls. When the animals were killed 4 weeks after the end of treatment, no Fasciola flukes or eggs could be found in the animals given TCBZ but the number of flukes found in the Mirazid-treated animals was only 6% lower than that recorded in the untreated sheep (a statistically insignificant difference). In terms of their Fasciola egg loads, serum concentrations of hepatic enzymes and hepatic histopathological changes, the Mirazid-treated sheep appeared very similar to the untreated, infected animals. The TCBZ-treated animals, in contrast, showed remarkably little evidence of hepatic pathology. It therefore appears that, in the treatment of ovine fascioliasis, at least some batches of Mirazid have little, if any, value. PMID:19825282

  4. New Drug Shows Mixed Results Against Early Alzheimer's

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Women with Alzheimers A Few Cups of Coffee a Day May Lower Alzheimers Risk Chocolate May ... May Be Less Likely to Get Alzheimers Drinking Coffee in Mid-Life May Help Ward Off Alzheimers ...

  5. New Drug Shows Mixed Results Against Early Alzheimer's

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Care Obesity at Midlife May Speed Alzheimer’s Onset Hello from my mom Easing the Behavior Problems of ... Managers Continuing Care FOR MORE ARTICLES CLICK HERE Hello from my mom Common Estate Planning Errors Alzheimer’s ...

  6. Swedish high-school pupils attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Jimmefors, Alexander; Archer, Trevor; Ewalds-Kvist, Batrice

    2014-01-01

    Background. Illicit drug use influences peoples lives and elicits unwanted behaviour. Current research shows that there is an increase in young peoples drug use in Sweden. The aim was to investigate Swedish high-school pupils attitudes, impulsiveness and gender differences linked to drug use. Risk and protective factors relative to drug use were also a focus of interest. Method. High school pupils (n = 146) aged 1721 years, responded to the Adolescent Health and Development Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and Knowledge, and the Attitudes and Beliefs. Direct logistic, multiple regression analyses, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance were used to analyze the data. Results. Positive Attitudes towards drugs were predicted by risk factors (odds ratio = 37.31) and gender (odds ratio = .32). Risk factors (odds ratio = 46.89), positive attitudes towards drugs (odds ratio = 4.63), and impulsiveness (odds ratio = 1.11) predicted drug usage. Risk factors dimensions Family, Friends and Individual Characteristic were positively related to impulsiveness among drug users. Moreover, although boys reported using drugs to a greater extent, girls expressed more positive attitude towards drugs and even reported more impulsiveness than boys. Conclusion. This study reinforces the notion that research ought to focus on gender differences relative to pro-drug attitudes along with testing for differences in the predictors of girls and boys delinquency and impulsiveness. Positive attitudes towards drugs among adolescents seem to be part of a vicious circle including risk factors, such as friendly drug environments (e.g., friends who use drugs) and unsupportive family environments, individual characteristics, and impulsiveness. PMID:24949233

  7. Barriers and Facilitators of Adherence to Antiretroviral Drug Therapy and Retention in Care among Adult HIV-Positive Patients: A Qualitative Study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Bimirew, Mekides A.; Kassie, Desalew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the countrys ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. Results Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. Conclusions Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved patient outcomes. PMID:24828585

  8. Effects of PEMF on a murine osteosarcoma cell line: drug-resistant (P-glycoprotein-positive) and non-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, N; Sato, K; Rong, Y; Yamamura, S; Katagiri, H; Kobayashi, K; Iwata, H

    2000-02-01

    After pulsed exposure of Dunn osteosarcoma cells (nonresistant cells) to Adriamycin (ADR) at increasing concentrations and single-cell cloning of surviving cells, ADR-resistant cells were obtained. These resistant cells expressed P-glycoprotein and had resistance more than 10 times that of their nonresistant parent cells. Compared to the nonresistant cells not exposed to pulsing electromagnetic fields (PEMF) in ADR-free medium, their growth rates at ADR concentrations of 0.01 and 0.02 micrograms/ml, which were below IC50, were 83.0% and 61.8%, respectively. On the other hand, in the nonresistant cells exposed to PEMF (repetition frequency, 10 Hz; rise time, 25 microsec, peak magnetic field intensity, 0.4-0.8 mT), the growth rate was 111.9% in ADR-free medium, 95.5% at an ADR concentration of 0.01 micrograms/ml, and 92.2% at an ADR concentration of 0.02 micrograms/ml. This promotion of growth by PEMF is considered to be a result of mobilization of cells in the non-proliferative period of the cell cycle due to exposure to PEMF. However, at ADR concentrations above the IC50, the growth rate tended to decrease in the cells not exposed to PEMF. This may be caused by an increase in cells sensitive to ADR resulting from mobilization of cells in the non-proliferative period to the cell cycle. The growth rate in the resistant cells exposed to PEMF was significantly lower than that in the non-exposed resistant cells at all ADR concentrations, including ADR-free culture (Pshows the potentiality of PEMF as an adjunctive treatment method for malignant tumors. PMID:10653622

  9. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive

  10. Drug Usage and Attitude Toward Drugs Among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Herbert J.; Keir, Richard G.

    1971-01-01

    Results of the data presented suggest that there is considerable experimentation among college students with illegal drugs, especially marijuana. Their attitudes toward other drugs still seems cautious. Marijuana, however, seems-to be accepted and generally positively evaluated. (Author)

  11. Drug Arrests and Injection Drug Deterrence

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Enrique R.; Chatterjee, Sudip; Cleland, Charles M.; Tempalski, Barbara; Brady, Joanne E.; Cooper, Hannah L. F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the hypothesis that higher rates of previous hard drugrelated arrests predict lower rates of injection drug use. Methods. We analyzed drug-related arrest data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program for 93 large US metropolitan statistical areas in 1992 to 2002 to predict previously published annual estimates of the number of injection drug users (IDUs) per 10 000 population. Results. In linear mixed-effects regression, hard drugrelated arrest rates were positively associated (parameter = +1.59; SE = 0.57) with the population rate of IDUs in 1992 and were not associated with change in the IDU rate over time (parameter = ?0.15; SE = 0.39). Conclusions. Deterrence-based approaches to reducing drug use seem not to reduce IDU prevalence. Alternative approaches such as harm reduction, which prevents HIV transmission and increases referrals to treatment, may be a better foundation for policy. PMID:21164088

  12. [Drugs and drug abusers].

    PubMed

    Schlatter, J; Sitbon, N; Saulnier, J L

    2001-02-17

    DRUG ABUSERS: Drugs are widely used by toxicomaniacs to reproduce drug effects. Drug abusers generally start with psychotrops, but other abuse drug classes. Toxicomanic behavior leads to addictive practices that are difficult to control. BARBITURATES: Both the oral and intravenous routes are used. The expected result is a state of ecstasy with a feeling of comfort. Intoxication may cause respiratory depression. Barbiturates induce physical and psychic dependence. Abuse is not widespread with this class of drugs. BENZODIAZEPINES: Drug abuses widely use benzodiazepines orally or intravenously. They search for a flash effect, with sedation and a feeling of comfort. All benzodiazepines induce physical and psychic dependence. Death may result from combinations leading to respiratory depression. Flunitrazepam is the most widely abused benzodiazepine in France. It induces serious neuropsychic disorders. ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Few are used, mostly at high doses. OPIATES: Administration gives the same effect as heroine injection. Opiates induce physical and psychic dependence. The adverse effects are similar to those of morphine with a higher risk of respiratory depression. AMPHETAMINES: Few are used, either orally or intravenously. They induce a flash with excitation, euphoria, and a period of invincibility. This is followed by a period of depression with risk of suicide. Psychic dependence is high. ANTICHOLINERGIC ANTIPARKINSONIANS: These drugs are well known to abusers for their hallucinatory effect. They induce atropinic adverse effects and physical and psychic dependence. GAMMA-HYDROXYBUTYRATE: This anesthetic is used for its euphoria and sedation effects. It may induce falling sickness or coma, with a risk of respiratory depression. KETAMINE: Administered via the intranasal route, ketamine induces a state of indifference. Death has been observed. ANABOLIC AND ANDROGENIC STEROIDS: These drugs are used for their physical and psychic stimulating effect. They induce potentially dangerous adverse effects such as cardiovascular, hepatic, neurological and psychiatric disorders. Clinical signs of addiction and weaning are observed. OTHERS: Several other drug classes are used by abusers, including analgics, beta-adrenergic agents, nasal vasoconstrictors and corticosteroids. PMID:11252979

  13. Young drug addicts and the drug scene.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, R

    1985-01-01

    The drug scene generally comprises the following four distinct categories of young people: neophytes, addicts who enjoy a high status vis--vis other addicts, multiple drug addicts, and non-addicted drug dealers. It has its own evolution, hierarchy, structure and criteria of success and failure. The members are required to conform to the established criteria. The integration of the young addict into the drug scene is not voluntary in the real sense of the word, for he is caught between the culture that he rejects and the pseudo-culture of the drug scene. To be accepted into the drug scene, the neophyte must furnish proof of his reliability, which often includes certain forms of criminal activities. The addict who has achieved a position of importance in the drug world serves as a role model for behaviour to the neophyte. In a more advanced phase of addiction, the personality of the addict and the social functions of the drug scene are overwhelmed by the psychoactive effects of the drug, and this process results in the social withdrawal of the addict. The life-style of addicts and the subculture they develop are largely influenced by the type of drug consumed. For example, it is possible to speak of a heroin subculture and a cocaine subculture. In time, every drug scene deteriorates so that it becomes fragmented into small groups, which is often caused by legal interventions or a massive influx of new addicts. The fragmentation of the drug scene is followed by an increase in multiple drug abuse, which often aggravates the medical and social problems of drug addicts. PMID:4075000

  14. Club Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and basic facts about different drugs within this classification of drugs. En Español Methamphetamine (Research Reports) Published ... and basic facts about different drugs within this classification of drugs. Read more NIDA's Publication Series Brain ...

  15. Drug Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  16. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... tested for drugs if they are above the legal limit for alcohol because there is already enough ...

  17. Drug allergies

    MedlinePLUS

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... Adverse reactions to drugs are common. (adverse means unwanted or unexpected.) Almost any drug can cause an adverse reaction. Reactions range from irritating ...

  18. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prescription and non-prescription (over-the-counter) drugs, recreational drugs, herbal products, or food. This is called a “ ... rifampin Other drugs to watch out for include recreational drugs. There are no careful studies of interactions, but ...

  19. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breast with your other hand. The Clutch or Football Hold This is also a good position for ... same time may also choose this position. The football hold allows babies to take milk more easily ...

  20. Drug therapy smartens up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  1. Predicting the short-term risk of diabetes in HIV-positive patients: the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study

    PubMed Central

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W; Fontas, Eric; Weber, Rainer; De Wit, Stephane; Bruyand, Mathias; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Monforte, Antonella D'Arminio; Friis-Mller, Nina; Lundgren, Jens D; Law, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) frequently experience metabolic complications such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, as well as lipodystrophy, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Rates of DM and other glucose-associated disorders among HIV-positive patients have been reported to range between 2 and 14%, and in an ageing HIV-positive population, the prevalence of DM is expected to continue to increase. This study aims to develop a model to predict the short-term (six-month) risk of DM in HIV-positive populations and to compare the existing models developed in the general population. Methods All patients recruited to the Data Collection on Adverse events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study with follow-up data, without prior DM, myocardial infarction or other CVD events and with a complete DM risk factor profile were included. Conventional risk factors identified in the general population as well as key HIV-related factors were assessed using Poisson-regression methods. Expected probabilities of DM events were also determined based on the Framingham Offspring Study DM equation. The D:A:D and Framingham equations were then assessed using an internal-external validation process; area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve and predicted DM events were determined. Results Of 33,308 patients, 16,632 (50%) patients were included, with 376 cases of new onset DM during 89,469 person-years (PY). Factors predictive of DM included higher glucose, body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride levels, and older age. Among HIV-related factors, recent CD4 counts of<200 cells/L and lipodystrophy were predictive of new onset DM. The mean performance of the D:A:D and Framingham equations yielded AUROC of 0.894 (95% CI: 0.849, 0.940) and 0.877 (95% CI: 0.823, 0.932), respectively. The Framingham equation over-predicted DM events compared to D:A:D for lower glucose and lower triglycerides, and for BMI levels below 25 kg/m2. Conclusions The D:A:D equation performed well in predicting the short-term onset of DM in the validation dataset and for specific subgroups provided better estimates of DM risk than the Framingham. PMID:23078769

  2. Drugs, drugs--who has the drugs?

    PubMed

    Blair, James

    2012-01-01

    Drug diversion, although on the increase, is not the only problem involving drugs that hospital security officials should be concerned with. Growing drug shortages, offshore production, counterfeiting, and weaknesses in the drug supply chain in case of a world-wide pandemic, are even greater causes for concern, the author claims. PMID:22423518

  3. Gender differences in psychopathy links to drug use.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Nicole; Murphy, Brett; Verona, Edelyn

    2016-04-01

    Although the relationship between psychopathic personality traits and substance use has received some attention (Hart & Hare, 1989; Smith & Newman, 1990), gender differences have not been thoroughly assessed. The current study examined whether gender modified the relationship between 2 criminally relevant constructs, (a) psychopathy and its factors and (b) drug use. A sample of 318 participants with criminal histories and recent substance use was assessed for psychopathy using the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version and for illicit drug use using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. As expected, the impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy were positively related to a number of drug use characteristics (symptoms, age of drug initiation, extent of drug experimentation), whereas the interpersonal-affective traits (Factor 1) showed a negative relationship with drug abuse symptoms and a positive relationship with age of first use. In terms of gender differences, analyses revealed that women showed a stronger association between Factor 1 traits and later age of initiation compared to men, and that Factor 2, and the antisocial facet in particular, were more strongly related to drug abuse in women than men. These findings suggest that psychopathic traits serve as both protective (Factor 1) and risk (Factor 2) correlates of illicit drug use, and Factor 1 may be especially protective in terms of initiation of drug use among women. These conclusions add to the growing literature on potential routes to substance use and incarceration in women. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26571339

  4. Photon beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, T.; Nakajima, T.; Kurihama, T.

    1989-07-01

    A highly sensitive beam position monitor has been designed for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This beam position monitor consists of two gas-flow ionization chambers having three parallel plate conductors. The incident beam is divided by a central plate. Therefore, a displacement of the beam position is detected with the two outside ionization chambers. The position monitor was tested at the BL6Cl beamline of the Photon Factory (PF). The results show a good performance.

  5. Scaring Kids' Shows Off TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspberry, William

    1980-01-01

    Presents the view that activist groups whose attitude is that television advertising is bad for children are scaring off the advertisers and making it difficult for positive children's programs to obtain funding. (SS)

  6. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported

  7. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  8. Positioning Agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Nilay; Abrahamsson, Pekka; Conboy, Kieran

    Agile methods are increasingly adopted by European companies. Academics too are conducting numerous studies on different tenets of agile methods. Companies often feel proud in marketing themselves as ‘agile’. However, the true notion of ‘being agile’ seems to have been overlooked due to lack of positioning of oneself for agility. This raises a call for more research and interactions between academia and the industry. The proposed workshop refers to this call. It will be highly relevant to participants, interested in positioning their company’s agility from organizational, group or project perspectives. The positioning of agility will help companies to better align their agile practices with stakeholder values. Results of the workshop will be shared across participants and they will also have opportunity to continue their work on agile positioning in their companies. At broader level, the work done in this workshop will contribute towards developing Agile Positioning System.

  9. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePLUS

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  10. Drugs in oral fluid in randomly selected drivers.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Olaf H; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Chu, Mark; Swann, Philip; Boorman, Martin; Cairns, Ian

    2007-08-01

    There were 13,176 roadside drug tests performed in the first year of the random drug-testing program conducted in the state of Victoria. Drugs targeted in the testing were methamphetamines and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). On-site screening was conducted by the police using DrugWipe, while the driver was still in the vehicle and if positive, a second test on collected oral fluid, using the Rapiscan, was performed in a specially outfitted "drug bus" located adjacent to the testing area. Oral fluid on presumptive positive cases was sent to the laboratory for confirmation with limits of quantification of 5, 5, and 2 ng/mL for methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), and THC, respectively. Recovery experiments conducted in the laboratory showed quantitative recovery of analytes from the collector. When oral fluid could not be collected, blood was taken from the driver and sent to the laboratory for confirmation. These roadside tests gave 313 positive cases following GC-MS confirmation. These comprised 269, 118, and 87 cases positive to MA, MDMA, and THC, respectively. The median oral concentrations (undiluted) of MA, MDMA, and THC was 1136, 2724, and 81 ng/mL. The overall drug positive rate was 2.4% of the screened population. This rate was highest in drivers of cars (2.8%). The average age of drivers detected with a positive drug reading was 28 years. Large vehicle (trucks over 4.5 t) drivers were older; on average at 38 years. Females accounted for 19% of all positives, although none of the positive truck drivers were female. There was one false positive to cannabis when the results of both on-site devices were considered and four to methamphetamines. PMID:17658711

  11. Antitumor drugs as photochemotherapeutic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoni, Alessandra; Colasanti, Alberto; Kisslinger, Annamaria; Malatesta, Vincenzo; Mastrocinque, Michele; Roberti, Giuseppe

    1991-11-01

    Irradiation with 86 J/cm2 of cultures of Fisher-rate thyroid cells (FRTL5) in the presence of daunomycin derivatives at wavelengths between 488 and 595 nm i.e., in the visible- absorption bands of these drugs, is shown to enhance their cytotoxicity. Daunomycin, its 4- demethoxy derivative, 5-iminodaunomycin, and two amino-substituted 4-demethoxy derivatives of daunomycin are tested. While a 2-h exposure to the drugs in the dark produces 50 short-term cell mortality at dosages (LD50) in the range 23 to 138 (mu) g/ml, irradiation administered during the cell exposure to the drugs is found to lower the LD50 values down to the range 45 to 289 ng/ml. Furthermore, while the LD50 values for all drugs in the absence of photoactivation are similar, if light is administered those for the 4- demethoxy compounds are lowered by 3 orders of magnitude and those for the other derivatives by 2 orders of magnitude. Microfluorimetric investigations reveal that photoactivation causes fading of the drug fluorescence in the perinuclear cytoplasm. The effect is more pronounced for drugs with higher photosensitizing properties. The nonfluorescent photoproducts which are formed in the cells during photoactivation exhibit a cytotoxic activity that is, at long term, lower than that of the original drug. The authors cannot yet assess which excited-state property of anthracyclines plays the key role in the photosensitized reaction(s) responsible for both short-term cell kill and long-term toxic effects. The show, however, that such property is strongly affected by the removal of the methoxy group from the C4 position.

  12. 10. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING MOUNTINGS FROM TUNING DEVICE. VIEW SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING MOUNTINGS FROM TUNING DEVICE. VIEW SHOWS COPPER SHEETING ON WALLS. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Helix House, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  13. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  14. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ... a mother. As you become more used to breastfeeding your baby, you can try different positions or ...

  15. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  16. The prevalence of drugs in injured drivers.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Olaf H; Kourtis, Irene; Beyer, Jochen; Tayler, Penny; Boorman, Martin; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri

    2012-02-10

    In mid 2009 Victoria introduced compulsory drug testing of blood taken from all injured drivers taken to hospital. ?(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), methylamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methylamphetamine (MDMA) are prohibited and if drivers are positive to any amount an automatic penalty is enforced. Laboratory screens were conducted on preserved blood using ELISA testing for cannabis metabolite and methylamphetamines and a fully validated LC-MS/MS method for 105 drugs including THC, amphetamines, opioids, benzodiazepines, antidepressants and antipsychotics and a number of other psychoactive substances using a minimum of two transitions per drug. Conventional GC-testing for ethanol was used to screen and quantify the presence of alcohol. 1714 drivers were tested and showed alcohol in 29% (? 0.01 g/100mL) and drugs in 35%. The positive rate for the three drugs prohibited by legislation was 12.5%. The prevalence of THC, MA and MDMA was 9.8%, 3.1%, and 0.8%, respectively. The range of THC concentrations in blood was 2-42 ng/mL (median 7) of which 70% had a concentration of 10 ng/mL or higher. The range of concentrations for MA and MDMA was 0.02-0.4 and 0.03-0.3mg/L (median for both drugs was 0.05 mg/L). Drugs of any type were detected in 35% of cases. The other drugs were largely prescribed drugs such as the antidepressants (9.3%) and benzodiazepines (8.9%). Neither 6-acetylmorphine nor cocaine (or benzoylecgonine) was detected in these cases. PMID:21377816

  17. Relationships Between Illicit Drug Use and Body Mass Index Among Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Sarah R; Herrmann, Lynn K

    2016-02-01

    Prior research has established associations between body mass index (BMI) and use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. However, little research has been done investigating the relationship between other common illicit drugs and BMI trends. The present study investigated whether adolescents who reported using illicit drugs showed differences in BMI compared to peers who reported no drug use. There was a positive relationship between drug use and BMI as well as the number of drugs used and BMI. The results suggested that the positive relationship between the use of illicit drugs and BMI is largely due to smoking. Further research needs to ascertain whether smoking, illicit drug use, or both are among the first of many unhealthy behaviors that can subsequently lead to greater gains in BMI. Implications for health educators are discussed. PMID:25842387

  18. Positive Prevention: Successful Approaches To Preventing Youthful Drug and Alcohol Use [and] La Prevencion Positiva: Metodos que han tenido exito en la prevencion del uso de drogas y alcohol entre la juventud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    The United States has the highest rate of youthful drug abuse of any industrialized country in the world. There is a growing awareness that drug and alcohol use are closely connected to other problems such as teenage suicide, adolescent pregnancy, traffic fatalities, juvenile delinquency, poor school performance, runaways, and dropouts. Youthful

  19. Overview of Selected Drug Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Edgar H.; And Others

    This document begins with a brief overview of findings from national surveys conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse which show increasing drug use throughout the 1970s and a decreasing trend in drug use during the 1980s. In spite of this decline, drug use in the U.S. is described as still constituting a major public health problem that…

  20. Entry time effects and follow-on drug competition.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Sermet, Catherine; Pichetti, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical firms have been criticized for concentrating efforts of R&D on the so-called me-too or follow-on drugs. There have been many comments for and against the dissemination of these incremental innovations but few papers have broached the subject from an econometric point of view, possibly because identification of me-too or follow-on drugs is not so obvious. This paper focuses on the impact of entry order on follow-on drug competition in the French market between the years 2001 and 2007. More precisely, this study examines the effects on market share of first entrants in the follow-on drug market and how this possible competitive advantage changes over time. First results are coherent with theoretical microeconomic issues concerning the importance of being first. We find evidence that first movers in the follow-on drug market have the ability to capture and maintain greater market share for a long period of time. The hierarchical market position of follow-on drugs does not seem to be affected by generic drug emergence. From a dynamic perspective, our analysis shows that market share is positively correlated with the ability of follow-on drugs to set prices higher than the average follow-on drug prices in a specific therapeutic class, which means that market power remains considerably important for first movers. Moreover, we found that the optimum level of innovation to maximize market share is the highest one. PMID:25501258

  1. One size does not fit all: Challenging some dogmas and taboos in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Chai, Christina Ll; Mtyus, Pter

    2016-01-01

    Advances in genetics, biology, chemical synthesis and computational methods have contributed to the understanding of diseases and drugs and with all of the above, there is an expectation that we are in a better position than ever before to create effective medicines for our needs. The reality is, however, disconnected from the expectation - US FDA drug approval statistics show that the number of approved drugs, especially the first-in-class drugs, is not commensurate with our improved knowledge. In this perspective, we offer our views on the possible reasons for this, focusing on small-molecule drugs and suggest some ideas for further considerations. PMID:26689236

  2. Effects of Drugs and Alcohol on Behavior, Job Performance, and Workplace Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Karen; Shelley, Kyna

    2006-01-01

    A study of records for 1 large U.S. company revealed that employees with positive drug screens were fired, whereas workers who self-disclosed drug/alcohol problems remained employed. Both groups were offered substance abuse intervention, and some previously fired workers were rehired after they received treatment. Accident results showed that

  3. Position indicator

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, David E. (Poway, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described in which a position indicator is provided for detecting and indicating the position of a movable element inside a pressure vessel. The movable element may be a valve element or similar device which moves about an axis. Light from a light source is transmitted from a source outside the pressure vessel to a first region inside the pressure vessel in alignment with the axis of the movable element. The light is redirected by a reflector prism to a second region displaced radially from the first region. The reflector prism moves in response to movement of the movable element about its axis such that the second region moves arcuately with respect to the first region. Sensors are arrayed in an arc corresponding to the arc of movement of the second region and signals are transmitted from the sensors to the exterior of the reactor vessel to provide indication of the position of the movable element.

  4. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money What is a generic drug? A generic is a copy of a brand-name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When ... benefit to your health, and you will save money. 7KH IHGHUDO )RRG DQG 'UXJ $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ UHJXODWHV ERWK ...

  5. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Show Them You Really Want the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Showing that one really "wants" the job entails more than just really wanting the job. An interview is part Broadway casting call, part intellectual dating game, part personality test, and part, well, job interview. When there are 300 applicants for a position, many of them will "fit" the required (and even the preferred) skills listed in the job…

  7. Show Them You Really Want the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Showing that one really "wants" the job entails more than just really wanting the job. An interview is part Broadway casting call, part intellectual dating game, part personality test, and part, well, job interview. When there are 300 applicants for a position, many of them will "fit" the required (and even the preferred) skills listed in the job

  8. Gender Differences in Psychopathy Links to Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Nicole; Murphy, Brett; Verona, Edelyn

    2015-01-01

    While the relationship between psychopathic personality traits and substance use has received some attention (Hart & Hare, 1989; Smith & Newman, 1990), gender differences have not been thoroughly assessed. The current study examined whether gender modified the relationship between two criminally-relevant constructs, a) psychopathy and its factors and b) drug use. A sample of 318 participants with criminal histories and recent substance use was assessed for psychopathy using the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version and for illicit drug use using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. As expected, the impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy were positively related to a number of drug use characteristics (symptoms, age of drug initiation, extent of drug experimentation), whereas the interpersonal-affective traits (Factor 1) showed a negative relationship with drug abuse symptoms and a positive relationship with age of first use. In terms of gender differences, analyses revealed that women showed a stronger association between Factor 1 traits and later age of initiation compared to men, and that Factor 2, and antisocial facet in particular, were more strongly related to drug abuse in women than men. These findings suggest that psychopathic traits serve as both protective (Factor 1) and risk (Factor 2) correlates of illicit drug use, and in women, Factor 1 may be especially protective in terms of initiation. These conclusions add to the growing literature on potential routes to substance use and incarceration in women. PMID:26571339

  9. Drug diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  10. Drug diversion.

    PubMed

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  11. Rings in drugs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard D; MacCoss, Malcolm; Lawson, Alastair D G

    2014-07-24

    We have analyzed the rings, ring systems, and frameworks in drugs listed in the FDA Orange Book to understand the frequency, timelines, molecular property space, and the application of these rings in different therapeutic areas and target classes. This analysis shows that there are only 351 ring systems and 1197 frameworks in drugs that came onto the market before 2013. Furthermore, on average six new ring systems enter drug space each year and approximately 28% of new drugs contain a new ring system. Moreover, it is very unusual for a drug to contain more than one new ring system and the majority of the most frequently used ring systems (83%) were first used in drugs developed prior to 1983. These observations give insight into the chemical novelty of drugs and potentially efficient ways to assess compound libraries and develop compounds from hit identification to lead optimization and beyond. PMID:24471928

  12. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  13. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  14. Why do we take drugs? From the drug-reinforcement theory to a novel concept of drug instrumentalization.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    The drug-reinforcement theory explains why humans get engaged in drug taking behavior. This theory posits that drugs of abuse serve as biological rewards by activating the reinforcement system. Although from a psychological and neurobiological perspective this theory is extremely helpful, it does not tell us about the drug-taking motives and motivation of an individual. The definition of drug instrumentalization goals will improve our understanding of individual drug-taking profiles. PMID:22074976

  15. The designer drug situation in Ibiza.

    PubMed

    Lora-Tamayo, C; Tena, T; Rodrguez, A; Moreno, D; Sancho, J R; Enseat, P; Muela, F

    2004-03-10

    A total of 137 urine samples and 46 serum samples, corresponding to 154 self-confessed designer drugs consumers in Ibiza island, were analyzed for the presence of designer drugs: amphetamine and amphetamine derivatives (methamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), p-methoxymethylamphetamine (PMMA), p-methoxyamphetamine (PMA), etc.), ketamine and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid. Among this population, coming both from the forensic clinic and from the emergency room of a hospital, a total of 99 cases were found positive for some designer drug. This study shows the prevalence of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) among designer drug users, sole or in association with other drugs. Also, the mixture of MDMA with other designer drugs, ethanol and/or cocaine is shown to be more likely to produce toxic symptoms requiring clinical attendance in a hospital emergency room. These findings along with the consumption history, the concentrations of drugs and metabolites in urine and serum and the toxicological significance for the interpretation of some MDMA metabolites such as 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA) are discussed in this study. PMID:15036441

  16. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact…

  17. Hey Teacher, Your Personality's Showing!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A study of 30 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers and 300 of their students showed that a teacher's age, sex, and years of experience did not relate to students' mathematics achievement, but that more effective teachers showed greater "freedom from defensive behavior" than did less effective teachers. (DT)

  18. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact

  19. Positive Psychologists on Positive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001). In their article, the authors offered compelling evidence that constructs such as forgiveness and optimism can have both beneficial and adverse consequences, depending on the context. Their caution about labeling particular psychological processes as "positive" is…

  20. Positive Psychologists on Positive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001). In their article, the authors offered compelling evidence that constructs such as forgiveness and optimism can have both beneficial and adverse consequences, depending on the context. Their caution about labeling particular psychological processes as "positive" is

  1. Preclinical validation of Aurora kinases-targeting drugs in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tavanti, E; Sero, V; Vella, S; Fanelli, M; Michelacci, F; Landuzzi, L; Magagnoli, G; Versteeg, R; Picci, P; Hattinger, C M; Serra, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aurora kinases are key regulators of cell cycle and represent new promising therapeutic targets in several human tumours. Methods: Biological relevance of Aurora kinase-A and -B was assessed on osteosarcoma clinical samples and by silencing these genes with specific siRNA in three human osteosarcoma cell lines. In vitro efficacy of two Aurora kinases-targeting drugs (VX-680 and ZM447439) was evaluated on a panel of four drug-sensitive and six drug-resistant human osteosarcoma cell lines. Results: Human osteosarcoma cell lines proved to be highly sensitive to both drugs. A decreased drug sensitivity was observed in doxorubicin-resistant cell lines, most probably related to ABCB1/MDR1 overexpression. Both drugs variably induced hyperploidy and apoptosis in the majority of cell lines. VX-680 also reduced in vitro cell motility and soft-agar cloning efficiency. Drug association experiments showed that VX-680 positively interacts with all conventional drugs used in osteosarcoma chemotherapy, overcoming the cross-resistance observed in the single-drug treatments. Conclusion: Aurora kinase-A and -B represent new candidate therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma. In vitro analysis of the Aurora kinases inhibitors VX-680 and ZM447439 indicated in VX-680 a new promising drug of potential clinical usefulness in association with conventional osteosarcoma chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24129234

  2. Deuterated Drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2015-09-01

    Many drugs are carbon-based, and carbon-hydrogen bonding is particularly relevant for understanding important properties of drug molecules. Deuteration refers to the selective replacement of protium hydrogen isotope atoms in small-molecule drugs with deuterium hydrogen isotope atoms. Deuteration of a drug is most likely to affect pharmacokinetic properties, such as metabolism, rather than its pharmacodynamic effects. For this reason, the metabolism of certain drugs may be favorably influenced when deuterium is substituted for protium, resulting in improved safety, tolerability, or efficacy. Examples of deuterated drugs that have been evaluated in clinical studies include paroxetine, tetrabenazine, and dextromethorphan. PMID:26325169

  3. TRK Inhibitor Shows Early Promise.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Results from a phase I study show that the TRK inhibitor LOXO-101 is well tolerated and effective, with patients whose tumors bear NTRK fusions responding well and durably to this targeted therapy. PMID:26603524

  4. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  5. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, ron R.; Szalay, Kristf Z.; Trei, Dnes; Mdos, Dezs?; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmros, Tams; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates. PMID:25960144

  6. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, M.A.; Alter, P.

    1983-07-07

    An apparatus is provided for precisely adjusting the position of an article relative to a beam emerging from a neutron source disposed in a housing. The apparatus includes a support pivotably mounted on a movable base plate and freely suspended therefrom. The support is gravity biased toward the housing and carries an article holder movable in a first direction longitudinally of the axis of said beam and normally urged into engagement against said housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the suspended holder in two mutually perpendicular directions, respectively, normal to the axis of the beam.

  7. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A. (Kennewick, WA); Alter, Paul (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  8. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  9. Maximum entropy principle for predicting response to multiple-drug exposure in bacteria and human cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kevin; Nishida, Satoshi; Sontag, Eduardo; Cluzel, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    Drugs are commonly used in combinations larger than two for treating infectious disease. However, it is generally impossible to infer the net effect of a multi-drug combination on cell growth directly from the effects of individual drugs. We combined experiments with maximum entropy methods to develop a mechanism-independent framework for calculating the response of both bacteria and human cancer cells to a large variety of drug combinations comprised of anti-microbial or anti-cancer drugs. We experimentally show that the cellular responses to drug pairs are sufficient to infer the effects of larger drug combinations in gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, and also human breast cancer and melanoma cell lines. Remarkably, the accurate predictions of this framework suggest that the multi-drug response obeys statistical rather than chemical laws for combinations larger than two. Consequently, these findings offer a new strategy for the rational design of therapies using large drug combinations.

  10. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  11. Club Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    Club drugs are group of psychoactive drugs. They act on the central nervous system and can cause changes ... K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known as Roofies Methamphetamine, also known as Speed, Ice, Chalk, Meth, Crystal, ...

  12. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... and decrease motor coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  13. Drug Facts

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can ...

  14. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Trends Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  15. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  16. Arches showing UV flaring activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The UVSP data obtained in the previous maximum activity cycle show the frequent appearance of flaring events in the UV. In many cases these flaring events are characterized by at least two footpoints which show compact impulsive non-simultaneous brightenings and a fainter but clearly observed arch developes between the footpoints. These arches and footpoints are observed in line corresponding to different temperatures, as Lyman alpha, N V, and C IV, and when observed above the limb display large Doppler shifts at some stages. The size of the arches can be larger than 20 arcsec.

  17. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug abuse in the first place. NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

  18. Homelessness and drug misuse in developing countries: A mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunu, C. P.

    2014-06-01

    Homelessness and drug-misuse are known to exist like siamese twins. We present a model to capture the dynamics in the growth in the number of homeless (street kids and street adults) and drug misusers. The reproduction numbers of the model are determined and analyzed. Results from this study suggests that adult peer pressure plays a more significant role in the growth of drug-misuse and the number of street kids. This result suggests that in resource constrained settings intervention strategies should be tailor made to target adults whose behaviour influence others to misuse drugs and abuse children. Furthermore, numerical simulations show that homelessness and drug-misuse positively enhances, the growth of each other. Thus, to effectively control these two social problems require strategies targeting both of them.

  19. Who Tests which Athletes for What Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Sarah L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This article reviews trends in sports organizations' drug testing policies and procedures for its members, including which drugs are tested, who gets tested within the organizations, when tests are conducted, and penalties for those who test positive. (CB)

  20. [Drug deaths].

    PubMed

    Gerber, A

    1976-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany there exist no statistical datas concerning death related to drug dependence until now. We propose to define death in connexion with drug dependence as the death of a drug dependent person caused by direct or indirect effect of the drug used. We first report on several international investigations; then the results of our own investigation in 40 cases of death in connexion with drug dependence in the district of Nordbaden are presented in detail. As a result it seems necessary to register drug dependent persons and to isolate those who are resistent to any therapy and thus represent a focus for further expansion of drug consuming. PMID:962461

  1. ENVITEC shows off air technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ENVITEC International Trade Fair for Environmental Protection and Waste Management Technologies, held in June in Duesseldorf, Germany, is the largest air pollution exhibition in the world and may be the largest environmental technology show overall. Visitors saw thousands of environmental solutions from 1,318 companies representing 29 countries and occupying roughly 43,000 square meters of exhibit space. Many innovations were displayed under the category, ``thermal treatment of air pollutants.`` New technologies include the following: regenerative thermal oxidizers; wet systems for removing pollutants; biological scrubbers;electrostatic precipitators; selective adsorption systems; activated-coke adsorbers; optimization of scrubber systems; and air pollution monitors.

  2. Predicting the Onset of Sexual and Drug Risk Behaviors in HIV-Negative Youths with HIV-Positive Mothers: The Role of Contextual, Self-Regulation, and Social-Interaction Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude A.; Dolezal, Curtis; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Ouzama; Warne, Patricia; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV-negative, inner-city adolescents with HIV-infected parents are considered to be at high risk for acquiring HIV themselves. Using a modified theory of health behavior, this study examined the effects of maternal HIV infection and psychosocial variables on the onset of sexual and drug risk behavior in 144 HIV-negative adolescents with and…

  3. Drug-Path: a database for drug-induced pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Qiu, Chengxiang; Cui, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Some databases for drug-associated pathways have been built and are publicly available. However, the pathways curated in most of these databases are drug-action or drug-metabolism pathways. In recent years, high-throughput technologies such as microarray and RNA-sequencing have produced lots of drug-induced gene expression profiles. Interestingly, drug-induced gene expression profile frequently show distinct patterns, indicating that drugs normally induce the activation or repression of distinct pathways. Therefore, these pathways contribute to study the mechanisms of drugs and drug-repurposing. Here, we present Drug-Path, a database of drug-induced pathways, which was generated by KEGG pathway enrichment analysis for drug-induced upregulated genes and downregulated genes based on drug-induced gene expression datasets in Connectivity Map. Drug-Path provides user-friendly interfaces to retrieve, visualize and download the drug-induced pathway data in the database. In addition, the genes deregulated by a given drug are highlighted in the pathways. All data were organized using SQLite. The web site was implemented using Django, a Python web framework. Finally, we believe that this database will be useful for related researches. PMID:26130661

  4. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  5. ShowMe3D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  6. Phoenix Scoop Inverted Showing Rasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows the silver colored rasp protruding from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm scoop. The scoop is inverted and the rasp is pointing up.

    Shown with its forks pointing toward the ground is the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, at the lower right. The Robotic Arm Camera is pointed toward the ground.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Patents Associated with High-Cost Drugs in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew F.; Dent, Chris; McIntyre, Peter; Wilson, Lachlan; Studdert, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Australia, like most countries, faces high and rapidly-rising drug costs. There are longstanding concerns about pharmaceutical companies inappropriately extending their monopoly position by evergreening blockbuster drugs, through misuse of the patent system. There is, however, very little empirical information about this behaviour. We fill the gap by analysing all of the patents associated with 15 of the costliest drugs in Australia over the last 20 years. Specifically, we search the patent register to identify all the granted patents that cover the active pharmaceutical ingredient of the high-cost drugs. Then, we classify the patents by type, and identify their owners. We find a mean of 49 patents associated with each drug. Three-quarters of these patents are owned by companies other than the drug's originator. Surprisingly, the majority of all patents are owned by companies that do not have a record of developing top-selling drugs. Our findings show that a multitude of players seek monopoly control over innovations to blockbuster drugs. Consequently, attempts to control drug costs by mitigating misuse of the patent system are likely to miss the mark if they focus only on the patenting activities of originators. PMID:23577165

  8. Magnetically Actuated Soft Capsule With the Multimodal Drug Release Function

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sehyuk; Goyal, Kartik; Sitti, Metin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetically actuated multimodal drug release mechanism using a tetherless soft capsule endoscope for the treatment of gastric disease. Because the designed capsule has a drug chamber between both magnetic heads, if it is compressed by the external magnetic field, the capsule could release a drug in a specific position locally. The capsule is designed to release a drug in two modes according to the situation. In the first mode, a small amount of drug is continuously released by a series of pulse type magnetic field (0.010.03 T). The experimental results show that the drug release can be controlled by the frequency of the external magnetic pulse. In the second mode, about 800 mm3 of drug is released by the external magnetic field of 0.07 T, which induces a stronger magnetic attraction than the critical force for capsules collapsing. As a result, a polymeric coating is formed around the capsule. The coated area is dependent on the drug viscosity. This paper presents simulations and various experiments to evaluate the magnetically actuated multimodal drug release capability. The proposed soft capsules could be used as minimally invasive tetherless medical devices with therapeutic capability for the next generation capsule endoscopy. PMID:25378896

  9. Magnetically Actuated Soft Capsule With the Multimodal Drug Release Function.

    PubMed

    Yim, Sehyuk; Goyal, Kartik; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetically actuated multimodal drug release mechanism using a tetherless soft capsule endoscope for the treatment of gastric disease. Because the designed capsule has a drug chamber between both magnetic heads, if it is compressed by the external magnetic field, the capsule could release a drug in a specific position locally. The capsule is designed to release a drug in two modes according to the situation. In the first mode, a small amount of drug is continuously released by a series of pulse type magnetic field (0.01-0.03 T). The experimental results show that the drug release can be controlled by the frequency of the external magnetic pulse. In the second mode, about 800 mm(3) of drug is released by the external magnetic field of 0.07 T, which induces a stronger magnetic attraction than the critical force for capsule's collapsing. As a result, a polymeric coating is formed around the capsule. The coated area is dependent on the drug viscosity. This paper presents simulations and various experiments to evaluate the magnetically actuated multimodal drug release capability. The proposed soft capsules could be used as minimally invasive tetherless medical devices with therapeutic capability for the next generation capsule endoscopy. PMID:25378896

  10. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug’s mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  11. Towards one trillion positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haist, Tobias; Gronle, Marc; Bui, Duc Anh; Jiang, Bofan; Pruss, Christof; Schaal, Frederik; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    How accurately can you determine positions using a non-expensive imaging system? We demonstrate a system, that has the potential to achieve position detections over a large measurement field (200 x 200 mm) for one million times one million 2D positions. Non-expensive telecentric imaging of the large object field is achieved using a large diffractive front element in combination with two small off-the-shelf lenses. The position measurement itself is considerably improved using a simple replication technique: the point to be measured is replicated N-times and the centers of gravity of the N points are averaged. By this approach discretization errors and camera noise are reduced by the square root of the number of points. We describe the system, discuss the error model and show experimental results for the DOE-based telecentric imaging and the position detection sensing.

  12. Marijuana and Children. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endsley, Patricia; Embrey, Mary Louise

    2014-01-01

    Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) promote wellness and disease prevention to improve health outcomes for our nation's children. It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the marijuana plant remain under the United States Drug Enforcement Agency's (DEA) Schedule I…

  13. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  14. Characteristics of injection drug users who participate in drug dealing: implications for drug policy.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Thomas; Small, William; Johnston, Caitlin; Li, Kathy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2008-06-01

    So-called "balanced" drug policy couples enforcement initiatives targeting drug dealers with health-focused interventions serving addicted individuals. There are few evaluations of this approach, and little is known about how these two populations may overlap. We evaluated factors associated with drug dealing among injection drug users (IDUs) in Vancouver, Canada, and examined self-reported drug-dealing roles and reasons for dealing. Among 412 IDUs seen from March through December 2005, 68 (17%) had dealt drugs during the previous six months. Variables independently associated with drug dealing included: recent incarceration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.9; 95%CI: 1.4-6.0); frequent heroin injection (AOR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.4-4.6); frequent cocaine injection (AOR = 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.8); and recent overdose (AOR = 2.7; 95%CI: 1.0-7.3). The most common drug-dealing roles were direct selling (82%), middling (35%), and steering (19%), while the most common reasons for dealing included obtaining drugs (49%) and money (36%). Drug dealing among IDUs was predicted by several markers of higher intensity addiction, and drug-dealing IDUs tended to occupy the most dangerous positions in the drug-dealing hierarchy. These findings suggest that elements of "balanced" drug policies may undermine each other and indicate the need for alternative interventions. PMID:18720663

  15. Qualitative measurement of drugs.

    PubMed

    Westerman, S T; Golz, A; Komorowski, F S; Gilbert, L M

    1984-02-01

    It has been noted for several years that certain drugs produce abnormal test results in patients who are administered the electronystagmograph (ENG) test. Drug specific waveforms, termed drug evoked potentials (DEP), have been identified by using the ENG for alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, tranquilizers, amphetamines, barbiturates, opiates, hallucinogens, caffeine, aminophylline, dopamine, several gases and approximately 75 combinations of drugs (N = 821). Tests for double blind diagnosis of drug intake as well as tests for repeatability within the same subject were conducted. Subjects included surgical candidates, healthy volunteers, and neonates (N = 248). Drugs tested were ketamine hydrochloride, fentanyl, sodium pentothal, cocaine, dextroamphetamine, sodium seconal, morphine sulfate, phenobarbital, and meperidine. Placebos of dextrose in water and sucrose tablets were also used (N = 25). Analysis of the waveforms produced by surgical candidates and healthy volunteers revealed no false negatives or false positives. Analysis of waveforms produced by neonates whose mothers had been administered meperidine demonstrated a diminishing effect over the course of a 3 day period. Results of repeated studies revealed reliability within subject. One subject who was administered dextroamphetamine did not produce a wave consistent with amphetamine with a dosage of 5 mg. He did, however, produce an amphetamine wave when administered 10 mg of dextroamphetamine. These findings suggest a dose related effect, indicating the need for establishment of minimal levels of detection. Results indicate that with refinement and further research, this method could be used for identification of drugs diagnostically. PMID:6694484

  16. Substance use - prescription drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... use disorder - prescription drugs; Substance abuse - prescription drugs; Drug abuse - prescription drugs; Drug use - prescription drugs ... LifeRing - lifering.org National Coalition Against Prescription Drug Abuse - ... Your workplace employee assistance program (EAP) is ...

  17. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  18. Drug shortage.

    PubMed

    Conde, Crystal

    2011-10-01

    Calcium gluconate, neostigmine, propofol, epinephrine, furosemide, and a host of sterile injectables, as well as antibiotics and other medications, are among the drugs on an expansive list of shortages tracked by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A record 246 drugs were in short supply as of June, according to FDA. That figure has many Texas physicians worried about potential risks to patient safety and quality of care. PMID:21971836

  19. Alcohol, Drugs and Young Drivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voas, Robert B.

    This paper reviews the research literature on the relationship of drugs, alcohol, and driving among young people, university students, and a group of young criminals. The data show that young people use drugs more than adults do, and that they drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol, especially at night, more often than adults do, and

  20. Study Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... messages back and forth by releasing chemicals called neurotransmitters. Prescription stimulants have chemical structures that are similar to some neurotransmitters. When someone takes them, the drugs boost the ...

  1. [Drugs cardiotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Capilla, Elonore; Poyet, Raphael; Brocq, Francois-Xavier; Pons, Frdric; Kerebel, Sbastien; Jego, Christophe; Laurent, Pierre; Cellarier, Gilles Rolland

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to science advances, cancer is no longer synonymous with death. Life expectancy improvement reveals a new problem: cancer treatment toxicity, including cardiovascular complications, responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Media scandal of drug-induced valvular heart disease did revise the risk-benefit balance of drugs used (often off-label) as anorectics. Today's society uses drugs heavily but does not accept their side effects. Knowledge and information of these complications is essential. Coronary toxicity of some treatments or drugs commonly used must be known. PMID:26153088

  2. Pattern of primary tuberculosis drug resistance and associated treatment outcomes in Transnistria, Moldova

    PubMed Central

    Obevzenco, N.; Padalco, O.; Pankrushev, S.; Ramsay, A.; Van den Bergh, R.; Manzi, M.; Denisiuk, O.; Zachariah, R.

    2014-01-01

    This cohort study assessed drug susceptibility testing (DST) patterns and associated treatment outcomes from Transnistria, Moldova, from 2009 to 2012. Of 1089 newly registered tuberculosis (TB) patients with available DST results, 556 (51%) had some form of drug resistance, while 369 (34%) had multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). There were four cases of extensively drug-resistant TB. MDR-TB patients had poor treatment success (45%); human immunodeficiency virus positivity and a history of incarceration were associated with an unfavourable treatment outcome. This first study from Trans-nistria shows a high level of drug-resistant TB, which constitutes a major public health problem requiring urgent attention. PMID:26393101

  3. Influences of Motivational Contexts on Prescription Drug Misuse and Related Drug Problems

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C.; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Vuolo, Mike; Wells, Brooke E.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse has emerged as a significant problem among young adults. While the effects of motivational contexts have been demonstrated for illicit drugs, the role of motivational contexts in prescription drug misuse remains understudied. Using data from 400 young adults recruited via time-space sampling, we examined the role of motivational contexts in the frequency of misuse of three prescription drug types as well as drug-related problems and symptoms of dependency. Both negative and positive motivations to use drugs are associated with increases in prescription drug misuse frequency. Only negative motivations are associated directly with drug problems and drug dependence, as well as indirectly via prescription pain killer misuse. Addressing positive and negative motivational contexts of prescription drug misuse may not only provide a means to reduce misuse and implement harm reduction measures, but may also inform the content of treatment plans for young adults with prescription drug misuse problems. PMID:25115134

  4. Positioning and Position Error of Petroleum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerde, Tony; Eidsvik, Jo; Nyrnes, Erik; Bruun, Bjrn

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the estimation of positional uncertainty of petroleum wells. The model uses a heavy tailed normal inverse Gaussian distribution for the errors in Earth's magnetic field reference values. These references are required for calculating the position of a well using magnetic directional surveying. The results show that the normal inverse Gaussian distribution gives a more realistic fit to the Earth's magnetic field reference values than the normal distribution, which is the current state of art. Errors in surveying sensors and reference errors are propagated along the well path to obtain the positioning uncertainty. The positional uncertainty is important for the probability of collisions between wells and for drilling accurate relief wells when an eventual collision has resulted in a blow-out situation. We compare results of the normal model used in the petroleum industry with our proposed model. The comparison is made for anti-collision calculations between drilled wells and a planned well. The results indicate a higher risk of collisions for certain well geometries when using the normal distribution, while a collision is avoided in the normal inverse Gaussian situation. We find clear differences between an approximate normal test and a Monte Carlo test.

  5. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  6. Sex, drugs and moral goals: reproductive strategies and views about recreational drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kurzban, Robert; Dukes, Amber; Weeden, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Humans, unlike most other species, show intense interest in the activities of conspecifics, even when the activities in question pose no obvious fitness threat or opportunity. Here, we investigate one content domain in which people show substantial interest, the use of drugs for non-medical purposes. Drawing from two subject populations—one undergraduate and one Internet-based—we look at the relationships among (i) abstract political commitments; (ii) attitudes about sexuality; and (iii) views surrounding recreational drugs. Whereas some theories suggest that drug views are best understood as the result of abstract political ideology, we suggest that these views can be better understood in the context of reproductive strategy. We show that, as predicted by a strategic construal, drug attitudes are best predicted by sexual items rather than abstract political commitments and, further, that the relationship between factors such as political ideology and drugs, while positive, are reduced to zero or nearly zero when items assessing sexuality are controlled for. We conclude that considering morality from the standpoint of strategic interests is a potentially useful way to understand why humans care about third party behaviour. PMID:20554547

  7. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  8. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  9. Interoception and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Stewart, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The role of interoception and its neural basis with relevance to drug addiction is reviewed. Interoception consists of the receiving, processing, and integrating body-relevant signals with external stimuli to affect ongoing motivated behavior. The insular cortex is the central nervous system hub to process and integrate these signals. Interoception is an important component of several addiction relevant constructs including arousal, attention, stress, reward, and conditioning. Imaging studies with drug-addicted individuals show that the insular cortex is hypo-active during cognitive control processes but hyperactive during cue reactivity and drug-specific, reward-related processes. It is proposed that interoception contributes to drug addiction by incorporating an “embodied” experience of drug uses together with the individual’s predicted versus actual internal state to modulate approach or avoidance behavior, i.e. whether to take or not to take drugs. This opens the possibility of two types of interventions. First, one may be able to modulate the embodied experience by enhancing insula reactivity where necessary, e.g. when engaging in drug seeking behavior, or attenuating insula when exposed to drug-relevant cues. Second, one may be able to reduce the urge to act by increasing the frontal control network, i.e. inhibiting the urge to use by employing cognitive training. PMID:23855999

  10. Probabilistic drug connectivity mapping

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of connectivity mapping is to match drugs using drug-treatment gene expression profiles from multiple cell lines. This can be viewed as an information retrieval task, with the goal of finding the most relevant profiles for a given query drug. We infer the relevance for retrieval by data-driven probabilistic modeling of the drug responses, resulting in probabilistic connectivity mapping, and further consider the available cell lines as different data sources. We use a special type of probabilistic model to separate what is shared and specific between the sources, in contrast to earlier connectivity mapping methods that have intentionally aggregated all available data, neglecting information about the differences between the cell lines. Results We show that the probabilistic multi-source connectivity mapping method is superior to alternatives in finding functionally and chemically similar drugs from the Connectivity Map data set. We also demonstrate that an extension of the method is capable of retrieving combinations of drugs that match different relevant parts of the query drug response profile. Conclusions The probabilistic modeling-based connectivity mapping method provides a promising alternative to earlier methods. Principled integration of data from different cell lines helps to identify relevant responses for specific drug repositioning applications. PMID:24742351

  11. Voice of the psychonauts: coping, life purpose, and spirituality in psychedelic drug users.

    PubMed

    Móró, Levente; Simon, Katalin; Bárd, Imre; Rácz, József

    2011-01-01

    Psychoactive drug use shows great diversity, but due to a disproportionate focus on problematic drug use, predominant nonproblematic drug use remains an understudied phenomenon. Historic and anecdotal evidence shows that natural sources of "psychedelic" drugs (e.g., mescaline and psilocybin) have been used in religious and spiritual settings for centuries, as well as for psychological self-enhancement purposes. Our study assessed a total of 667 psychedelic drug users, other drug users, and drug nonusers by online questionnaires. Coping, life purpose, and spirituality were measured with the Psychological Immune Competence Inventory, the Purpose in Life test, and the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale, respectively. Results indicate that the use of psychedelic drugs with a purpose to enhance self-knowledge is less associated with problems, and correlates positively with coping and spirituality. Albeit the meaning of "spirituality" may be ambiguous, it seems that a spiritually-inclined attitude in drug use may act as a protective factor against drug-related problems. The autognostic use of psychedelic drugs may be thus hypothesized as a "training situation" that promotes self-enhancement by rehearsing personal coping strategies and by gaining self-knowledge. However, to assess the actual efficiency and the speculated long-term benefits of these deliberately provoked exceptional experiences, further qualitative investigations are needed. PMID:22111402

  12. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:26594139

  13. Projecting future drug expenditures--1998.

    PubMed

    Mehl, B; Santell, J P

    1998-01-15

    Drug cost projections for 1998, factors that directly influence drug costs, and tools for projecting drug expenditures are discussed. The producer price index indicates that prices for drugs and pharmaceuticals increased 2.1% between January and June 1997; the increase for prescription preparations was 2.7%. Medi-Span data show an average increase for all drug products of 1.02% during the first six months of 1997; First Data-Bank reports a 1.7% increase for the same period. IMS America data, which take account of weighting for individual drugs or drug classes, show the prices of all drugs increasing 2.3% between the second quarters of 1996 and 1997. Drug industry analysts project the overall price increase in the next 12 months at 2-4%. Group purchasing organizations predict an average increase over the next 12 months of 0.56% for contracted drugs and 3.6% for noncontracted drugs. Various health care provider indexes suggest that increases in drug costs could be smaller over the next few years. The current trend of takeovers and mergers of pharmaceutical companies and health systems is likely to continue into 1998. As a result of generic competition and the loss of patent protection for many pharmaceutical products, the number of drugs to be introduced onto the market and the number of drugs in development are expected to escalate until the year 2000. These and other major changes in the health care environment, including changes in drug distribution and controversies over the use of formularies, will make future forecasting difficult. Compared with previous years, smaller increases in drug costs have been projected for 1998 and beyond, but changes in the health care environment mean that greater knowledge will be required to forecast future drug expenditures. PMID:9465976

  14. Multifunctional High Drug Loading Nanocarriers for Cancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Erlei

    2011-12-01

    Most anticancer drugs have poor water-solubility, rapid blood clearance, low tumor-selectivity and severe systemic toxicity to healthy tissues. Thus, polymeric nanocarriers have been widely explored for anticancer drugs to solve these problems. However, polymer nanocarriers developed to date still suffer drawbacks including low drug loading contents, premature drug release, slow cellular internalization, slow intracellular drug release and thereby low therapeutic efficiency in cancer thermotherapy. Accordingly, in this dissertation, functional nanocapsules and nanoparticles including high drug loading liposome-like nanocapsules, high drug loading phospholipid-mimic nanocapsules with fast intracellular drug release, high drug loading charge-reversal nanocapsules, TAT based long blood circulation nanoparticles and charge-reversal nuclear targeted nanoparticles are designed and synthesized. These functional carriers have advantages such as high drug loading contents without premature drug release, fast cellular internalization and intracellular drug release, nuclear targeted delivery and long blood circulation. As a result, all these drug carriers show much higher in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities.

  15. [Drug of abuse].

    PubMed

    Ueki, Makoto

    2002-02-01

    Recent development of various dietary supplements after enforcement of "Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA)" in the USA enabled better availability of the products through the Internet in Japan as well. Because of differences in the definitions of the term "dietary supplement" and drug control laws between the USA and Japan, health risks due to uncontrolled use of a drug-based foreign dietary supplement without a medical doctor's advice, and side effects due to co-administration of any problematic supplements with prescription drugs has become a problem in Japan. Classes of typical dietary supplements, the method of distribution, and known problems during use or overuse of these products with prescription drugs are discussed. Several recent positive cases are known to be due to the use of contaminated food supplements, which were sold not only to athletes but also to the general public as memory enhancing or anti-aging drugs. These phenomena indicate that trends in drug use in sports and in society becoming increasingly similar. PMID:11925852

  16. ABT-199 shows effectiveness in CLL.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    A phase I trial found that drug ABT-199 controls chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients whose previous treatments failed. In about a quarter of patients, the drug, which blocks Bcl-2 and triggers cancer cell apoptosis, restored indicators of illness to normal. PMID:25185206

  17. Nanotopography applications in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Laura A; Allen, Jessica L; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-12-01

    Refinement of micro- and nanofabrication in the semiconductor field has led to innovations in biomedical technologies. Nanotopography, in particular, shows great potential in facilitating drug delivery. The flexibility of fabrication techniques has created a diverse array of topographies that have been developed for drug delivery applications. Nanowires and nanostraws deliver drug cytosolically for in vitro and ex vivo applications. In vivo drug delivery is limited by the barrier function of the epithelium. Nanowires on microspheres increase adhesion and residence time for oral drug delivery, while also increasing permeability of the epithelium. Low aspect ratio nanocolumns increase paracellular permeability, and in conjunction with microneedles increase transdermal drug delivery of biologics in vivo. In summary, nanotopography is a versatile tool for drug delivery. It can deliver directly to cells or be used for in vivo delivery across epithelial barriers. This editorial highlights the application of nanotopography in the field of drug delivery. PMID:26512871

  18. Neural Effects of Positive and Negative Incentives during Marijuana Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Filbey, Francesca M.; Dunlop, Joseph; Myers, Ursula S.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of evidence suggesting two possible mechanisms related to drug-seeking behavior, namely reward-seeking and harm avoidance, much of the addiction literature has focused largely on positive incentivization mechanisms associated with addiction. In this study, we examined the contributing neural mechanisms of avoidance of an aversive state to drug-seeking behavior during marijuana withdrawal. To that end, marijuana users were scanned while performing the monetary incentive delay task in order to assess positive and negative incentive processes. The results showed a group x incentive interaction, such that marijuana users had greater response in areas that underlie reward processes during positive incentives while controls showed greater response in the same areas, but to negative incentives. Furthermore, a negative correlation between withdrawal symptoms and response in the amygdala during negative incentives was found in the marijuana users. These findings suggest that although marijuana users have greater reward sensitivity and less harm avoidance than controls, that attenuated amygdala response, an area that underlies fear and avoidance, was present in marijuana users with greater marijuana withdrawal symptoms. This is concordant with models of drug addiction that involve multiple sources of reinforcement in substance use disorders, and suggests the importance of strategies that focus on respective mechanisms. PMID:23690923

  19. Contribution of Saccadic Motion to Intravitreal Drug Transport: Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Ram K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The vitreous humor liquefies with age and readily sloshes during eye motion. The objective was to develop a computational model to determine the effect of sloshing on intravitreal drug transport for transscleral and intra-vitreal drug sources at various locations Methods A finite element model based on a telescopic implicit envelope tracking scheme was developed to model drug dispersion. Flow velocities due to saccadic oscillations were solved for and were used to simulate drug dispersion. Results Saccades induced a three-dimensional flow field that indicates intense drug dispersion in the vitreous. Model results showed that the time scale for transport decreased for the sloshing vitreous when compared to static vitreous. Macular concentrations for the sloshing vitreous were found be much higher than that for the static vitreous. For low viscosities the position of the intravitreal source did not have a big impact on drug distribution. Conclusion Model results show that care should be taken when extrapolating animal data, which are mostly done on intact vitreous, to old patients whose vitreous might be a liquid. The decrease in drug transport time scales and changes in localized concentrations should be considered when deciding on treatment modalities and dosing strategies. PMID:21258958

  20. Utilising Discursive Positioning in Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslade, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Foucault's concern with the production of subjectivity has led to the development of positioning theory, as it has been called by Bronwyn Davies, Rom Harr and Luk van Langenhve. The concept of discursive positioning has particular value for counselling because it shows how people are positioned in discourse in particular moments by their own and

  1. Discontinued drugs in 2012: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Min; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2013-11-01

    The continued high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has attracted wide concern and great attention of pharmaceutical industry. In order to reduce the attrition of cardiovascular drug R&D, it might be helpful recapitulating previous failures and identifying the potential factors to success. This perspective mainly analyses the 30 cardiovascular drugs dropped from clinical development in 2012. Reasons causing the termination of the cardiovascular drugs in the past 5 years are also tabulated and analysed. The analysis shows that the attrition is highest in Phase II trials and financial and strategic factors and lack of clinical efficacy are the principal reasons for these disappointments. To solve the four problems (The 'better than the Beatles' problem, the 'cautious regulator' problem, the 'throw money at it' tendency and the 'basic researchbrute force' bias) is recommended as the main measure to increase the number and quality of approvable products. PMID:23992034

  2. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  3. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your ... notice during a check-up: Changes in lab test results Abnormal heartbeat What will my doctor do if ...

  4. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly) Methamphetamine (Meth) Prescription Depressant ... for Teens Guest Blogger Healthy Minds and Bodies Marijuana National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week NIDA News ...

  5. [Alexithymia, depression and drug addiction].

    PubMed

    F farges; Corcos, M; Speranza, M; Loas, G; Perez-Diaz, F; Venisse, J-L; Lang, F; Bizouard, P; Halfon, O; Flament, M; Jeammet, Ph

    2004-01-01

    Alexithymia is a multidimensional concept associating an emotional component focused on the difficulty in identifying and describing feelings and a cognitive one centred on the use of a concrete and poorly introspective way of thinking. Alexithymia can be assessed by self-assessment instruments and in particular by the 20 items version of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). Depressive disorders have complex relationships with the construct of alexithymia and there exist few experimental works on the subject. Epidemiological studies frequently raise an overlap between alexithymia and depression, in particular in the context of addiction. The main aim of this study was to confirm the high prevalence of alexithymia among drug addicted patients taking into account socio-demographic variables (sex, age, social and economic categories). The second aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between alexithymia and depression among drug addicted patients. A sample of 128 drug addicted patients answering DSM IV criteria of dependence to a psycho-active substance (alcohol excluded) was paired according to socio-demographic variables to a control sample of 128 normal subjects. Diagnostic assessment was made using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Alexithymia and depression were assessed with the TAS-20 and with the short version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13). The results confirm the high prevalence of alexithymia among drug addicted patients (43.5%) compared to controls (24.6%). This difference is based namely on the emotional component of alexithymia, the cognitive component failing to show any difference between the two samples. Moreover, alexithymia appears to be independent from socio-demographic variables in our sample of drug addicted patients; 66.4% of drug addicted patients presents a depressive symptomatology (which is significantly more important in female patients), compared to 26% of the controls. Studies using the TAS and the BDI with 21 items have shown that from 10 to 20% of the variance of alexithymia is explained by depression. Our own results show a shared variance of 20% between the TAS-20 and the BDI, going in the direction of a moderated correlation between alexithymia and depressive symptomatology. Moreover, when we retain only subjects without depressive symptomatology at BDI, drug addicted (n=42) are not any more alexithymic than controls (n=114). Our results plead for a positive association between depression and alexithymia in drug addicted, depressed or healthy subjects. Alexithymia and depression would be two associated dimensions, the emotional component explaining alone this association. The emotional component of the alexithymia would be thymo-dependent, whereas the cognitive component (externally oriented thought) would be independent and constitute a stable clinical feature. These results are concordant with other studies in the literature suggesting that alexithymia in its emotional component is supported by depression. Alexithymia thus did not appear as an autonomous dimension which would discriminate between drug addicted and controls, independently of the absence of a depressive state. The Authors discuss the complexity of the relationships between alexithymia and depression and the correlations between TAS and BDI scales especially for the factor Difficulty Identifying Feelings. These results deserve further studies. The cross-sectional nature of this study do not allow to establish if alexithymia is a subjacent and preexistent in the form of a psychopathological dimension in addictive behaviours, so supporting its emergence, and/or if it develops once the dependence is installed and chronicized. Longitudinal studies remain to be realised. PMID:15235517

  6. Membrane raft lipid constituents affect drug susceptibilities of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pasrija, R; Prasad, T; Prasad, R

    2005-11-01

    By exploiting the biosynthetic pathways of raft lipid constituents, in this study we demonstrate that fluctuations in either sphingolipid or ergosterol levels result in increased drug sensitivity and morphological defects in Candida albicans cells. We show that any change in either ergosterol composition by conditionally disrupting ERG1 or in sphingolipid composition by homozygously disrupting its biosynthetic gene IPT1 leads to improper surface localization of a major ABC (ATP-binding cassette) drug efflux protein, Cdr1p. Results suggest that sterol/sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains play an important role in positioning and functional maintenance of the integral efflux protein. The impaired ability of erg1/ipt1 mutant cells to efflux drugs mediated through Cdr1p appears to be the main cause of increased drug sensitivity of Candida cells. PMID:16246085

  7. Tunable drug loading and release from polypeptide multilayer nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun

    2009-01-01

    Polypeptide multilayer nanofilms were prepared using electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly nanotechnology. Small charged drug molecules (eg, cefazolin, gentamicin, and methylene blue) were loaded in polypeptide multilayer nanofilms. Their loading and release were found to be pH-dependent and could also be controlled by changing the number of film layers and drug incubation time, and applying heat-treatment after film formation. Antibioticloaded polypeptide multilayer nanofilms showed controllable antibacterial properties against Staphylococcus aureus. The developed biodegradable polypeptide multilayer nanofilms are capable of loading both positively- and negatively-charged drug molecules and promise to serve as drug delivery systems on biomedical devices for preventing biomedical device-associated infection, which is a significant clinical complication for both civilian and military patients. PMID:19421369

  8. Tunable drug loading and release from polypeptide multilayer nanofilms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun

    2009-01-01

    Polypeptide multilayer nanofilms were prepared using electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly nanotechnology. Small charged drug molecules (eg, cefazolin, gentamicin, and methylene blue) were loaded in polypeptide multilayer nanofilms. Their loading and release were found to be pH-dependent and could also be controlled by changing the number of film layers and drug incubation time, and applying heat-treatment after film formation. Antibioticloaded polypeptide multilayer nanofilms showed controllable antibacterial properties against Staphylococcus aureus. The developed biodegradable polypeptide multilayer nanofilms are capable of loading both positively- and negatively-charged drug molecules and promise to serve as drug delivery systems on biomedical devices for preventing biomedical device-associated infection, which is a significant clinical complication for both civilian and military patients. PMID:19421369

  9. Educational Outreach: The Space Science Road Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    The poster presented will give an overview of a study towards a "Space Road Show". The topic of this show is space science. The target group is adolescents, aged 12 to 15, at Dutch high schools. The show and its accompanying experiments would be supported with suitable educational material. Science teachers at schools can decide for themselves if they want to use this material in advance, afterwards or not at all. The aims of this outreach effort are: to motivate students for space science and engineering, to help them understand the importance of (space) research, to give them a positive feeling about the possibilities offered by space and in the process give them useful knowledge on space basics. The show revolves around three main themes: applications, science and society. First the students will get some historical background on the importance of space/astronomy to civilization. Secondly they will learn more about novel uses of space. On the one hand they will learn of "Views on Earth" involving technologies like Remote Sensing (or Spying), Communication, Broadcasting, GPS and Telemedicine. On the other hand they will experience "Views on Space" illustrated by past, present and future space research missions, like the space exploration missions (Cassini/Huygens, Mars Express and Rosetta) and the astronomy missions (Soho and XMM). Meanwhile, the students will learn more about the technology of launchers and satellites needed to accomplish these space missions. Throughout the show and especially towards the end attention will be paid to the third theme "Why go to space"? Other reasons for people to get into space will be explored. An important question in this is the commercial (manned) exploration of space. Thus, the questions of benefit of space to society are integrated in the entire show. It raises some fundamental questions about the effects of space travel on our environment, poverty and other moral issues. The show attempts to connect scientific with community thought. The difficulty with a show this elaborate and intricate is communicating on a level understandable for teenagers, whilst not treating them like children. Professional space scientists know how easy it is to lose oneself in technical specifics. This would, of course, only confuse young people. The author would like to discuss the ideas for this show with a knowledgeable audience and hopefully get some (constructive) feedback.

  10. [Is drug advertising reliable?].

    PubMed

    Spigset, O

    1998-12-10

    In order to assess the quality of pharmaceutical advertising in Norway, we conducted a review of advertisements for selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors published in the Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association and the journal Legemidler og samfunn during the period 1995-97. 18 advertisements with 38 reference citations were identified. In six citations (16%), errors made it impossible to identify the source with certainty solely on the basis of the advertisement. Under Norwegian drug advertisement regulations, a total of 56 statements should have been followed by a reference citation. In 18 of these (33%), it was debatable whether the statements were in accordance with the regulations. This review indicates that a significant proportion of the statements in drug advertisements is inaccurate and gives a too positive picture of the properties of the drug. PMID:9914744

  11. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  12. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles. PMID:26455677

  13. Resolving anaphoras for the extraction of drug-drug interactions in pharmacological documents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug-drug interactions are frequently reported in the increasing amount of biomedical literature. Information Extraction (IE) techniques have been devised as a useful instrument to manage this knowledge. Nevertheless, IE at the sentence level has a limited effect because of the frequent references to previous entities in the discourse, a phenomenon known as 'anaphora'. DrugNerAR, a drug anaphora resolution system is presented to address the problem of co-referring expressions in pharmacological literature. This development is part of a larger and innovative study about automatic drug-drug interaction extraction. Methods The system uses a set of linguistic rules drawn by Centering Theory over the analysis provided by a biomedical syntactic parser. Semantic information provided by the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is also integrated in order to improve the recognition and the resolution of nominal drug anaphors. Besides, a corpus has been developed in order to analyze the phenomena and evaluate the current approach. Each possible case of anaphoric expression was looked into to determine the most effective way of resolution. Results An F-score of 0.76 in anaphora resolution was achieved, outperforming significantly the baseline by almost 73%. This ad-hoc reference line was developed to check the results as there is no previous work on anaphora resolution in pharmalogical documents. The obtained results resemble those found in related-semantic domains. Conclusions The present approach shows very promising results in the challenge of accounting for anaphoric expressions in pharmacological texts. DrugNerAr obtains similar results to other approaches dealing with anaphora resolution in the biomedical domain, but, unlike these approaches, it focuses on documents reflecting drug interactions. The Centering Theory has proved being effective at the selection of antecedents in anaphora resolution. A key component in the success of this framework is the analysis provided by the MMTx program and the DrugNer system that allows to deal with the complexity of the pharmacological language. It is expected that the positive results of the resolver increases performance of our future drug-drug interaction extraction system. PMID:20406499

  14. Nucleosome Positioning with Set of Key Positions and Nucleosome Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Weina

    2014-01-01

    The formation and precise positioning of nucleosome in chromatin occupies a very important role of study in life process. Today, many researchers discover that the positioning where the location of a DNA sequence fragment wraps around a histone in genome is not random but regular. However, the positioning is closely relevant to the concrete sequence of core DNA. So in this paper, we analyzed the relation between the affinity and sequence structure of core DNA sequence, and extracted the set of key positions. In these positions, the nucleotide sequences probably occupied mainly action in the binding. First, we simplified and formatted the experimental data by the affinity. Then, to find the key positions in the wrapping, we used neural network to analyze the positive and negative effect of nucleosome generation for every position in core DNA sequences. However, we reached a class of weights with every position to describe this effect. Finally, based on the positions with high weights, we analyzed the reason why the chosen positions are key positions, and used these positions to construct a model of nucleosome positioning predict. Experimental results show the effectiveness of our method. PMID:26322141

  15. A Randomized Pilot Study of the Engaging Moms Program for Family Drug Court

    PubMed Central

    Dakof, Gayle A.; Cohen, Jeri B.; Henderson, Craig E.; Duarte, Eliette; Boustani, Maya; Blackburn, Audra; Venzer, Ellen; Hawes, Sam

    2010-01-01

    In response to the need for effective drug court interventions, the effectiveness of the Engaging Moms Program (EMP) versus intensive case management services (ICMS) on multiple outcomes for mothers enrolled in family drug court was investigated. In this intent-to-treat study, mothers (N = 62) were randomly assigned to either usual drug court care or the Engaging Moms drug court program. Mothers were assessed at intake, and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months following intake. Results indicated that at 18 months post drug court enrollment, 77% of mothers assigned to EMP versus 55% of mothers assigned to ICMS had positive child welfare dispositions. There were statistically significant time effects for both intervention groups on multiple outcomes including substance use, mental health, parenting practices, and family functioning. EMP showed equal or better improvement than ICMS on all outcomes. The results suggest that EMP in family drug court is a viable and promising intervention approach to reduce maternal addiction and child maltreatment. PMID:20116961

  16. Studies Of Positive-Position-Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James L.; Caughey, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses theoretical and experimental studies of positive-position-feedback control for suppressing vibrations in large flexible structures. Positive-position-feedback control involves placement of actuators and sensors on structure; control voltages applied to actuators in response to outputs of sensors processed via compensator algorithm. Experiments demonstrate feasibility of suppressing vibrations by positive position feedback, and spillover of vibrational energy into uncontrolled modes has stabilizing effect if control gain sufficiently small.

  17. Correlation between Drug Market Withdrawals and Socioeconomic, Health, and Welfare Indicators Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kye Hwa; Kim, Grace Juyun

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the number of withdrawn/restricted drugs and socioeconomic, health, and welfare indicators were investigated in a comprehensive review of drug regulation information in the United Nations (UN) countries. A total of of 362 drugs were withdrawn and 248 were restricted during 1950-2010, corresponding to rates of 12.02±13.07 and 5.77±8.69 (mean±SD), respectively, among 94 UN countries. A socioeconomic, health, and welfare analysis was performed for 33 OECD countries for which data were available regarding withdrawn/restricted drugs. The gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, GDP per hour worked, health expenditure per GDP, and elderly population rate were positively correlated with the numbers of withdrawn and restricted drugs (P<0.05), while the out-of-pocket health expenditure payment rate was negatively correlated. The number of restricted drugs was also correlated with the rate of drug-related deaths (P<0.05). The World Bank data cross-validated the findings of 33 OECD countries. The lists of withdrawn/restricted drugs showed markedly poor international agreement between them (Fleiss's kappa=-0.114). Twenty-seven drugs that had been withdrawn internationally by manufacturers are still available in some countries. The wide variation in the numbers of drug withdrawals and restrictions among countries indicates the need to improve drug surveillance systems and regulatory communication networks. PMID:26538999

  18. Correlation between Drug Market Withdrawals and Socioeconomic, Health, and Welfare Indicators Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kye Hwa; Kim, Grace Juyun; Kim, Ju Han

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between the number of withdrawn/restricted drugs and socioeconomic, health, and welfare indicators were investigated in a comprehensive review of drug regulation information in the United Nations (UN) countries. A total of of 362 drugs were withdrawn and 248 were restricted during 1950-2010, corresponding to rates of 12.0213.07 and 5.778.69 (meanSD), respectively, among 94 UN countries. A socioeconomic, health, and welfare analysis was performed for 33 OECD countries for which data were available regarding withdrawn/restricted drugs. The gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, GDP per hour worked, health expenditure per GDP, and elderly population rate were positively correlated with the numbers of withdrawn and restricted drugs (P<0.05), while the out-of-pocket health expenditure payment rate was negatively correlated. The number of restricted drugs was also correlated with the rate of drug-related deaths (P<0.05). The World Bank data cross-validated the findings of 33 OECD countries. The lists of withdrawn/restricted drugs showed markedly poor international agreement between them (Fleiss's kappa=-0.114). Twenty-seven drugs that had been withdrawn internationally by manufacturers are still available in some countries. The wide variation in the numbers of drug withdrawals and restrictions among countries indicates the need to improve drug surveillance systems and regulatory communication networks. PMID:26538999

  19. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1971 STREETSCAPE SHOWING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1971 STREETSCAPE SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATIONS OF LOVE AND BILGER TIN SHOP (FAR LEFT), SACHS BROTHERS STORE, NEUBER'S JEWELRY STORE, KAHLER'S DRUG STORE, BEEKMAN BANK, UNITED STATES HOTEL. - Neuber's Jewelry Store, 130 West California Street, Jacksonville, Jackson County, OR

  20. Transplant Problems That May Show Up Later

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The drugs used during transplant can also damage sperm, so men should use birth control to avoid ... men as well. Men might consider storing their sperm before having a transplant. This process can take ...

  1. Spirit Wiggles into Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit completed a difficult, rocky ascent en route to reaching a captivating rock outcrop nicknamed 'Hillary' at the summit of 'Husband Hill.' At the end of the climb the robotic geologist was tilted almost 30 degrees. To get the rover on more solid footing for deploying the instrument arm, rover drivers told Spirit to wiggle its wheels one at a time. This animation shows Spirit's position before and after completing the wheel wiggle, during which the rover slid approximately 1 centimeter (0.4 inch) downhill. Rover drivers decided this position was too hazardous for deploying the instrument arm and subsequently directed Spirit to a more stable position before conducting analyses with instruments on the rover's arm.

    Spirit took these images with its front hazard-avoidance camera on martian day, or sol, 625 (Oct. 6, 2005).

  2. Teens and Prescription Drugs: An Analysis of Recent Trends on the Emerging Drug Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report synthesizes a number of national studies that show the intentional abuse of prescription drugs to get high is a growing concern, particularly among teens. The analysis shows that teens are turning away from street drugs and using prescription drugs to get high. New users of prescription drugs have caught up with new users of marijuana.

  3. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare professionals should reassess ongoing treatments and, if necessary, replace these drugs with proven treatments. Without waiting for the authorities to remove them from the market in a timely manner, as the accumulation of data showing that they are more harmful than beneficial would require. PMID:23662325

  4. Anthelmintic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    C. elegans is sensitive to the majority of anthelmintic drugs that are used against parasitic worm infections of humans and livestock. This has provided the opportunity to use molecular genetic techniques in the worm for mode of action studies. These approaches continue to be of considerable value to the field of parasitology. In addition, there are numerous examples of anthelmintic drugs providing exceptionally useful pharmacological tools to delineate fundamental aspects of cell signalling in C. elegans. This has primarily been achieved through the use of anthelmintics in forward genetic screens followed by the mapping and characterization of genes that confer altered susceptibility to the drug. Less fruitful so far, but nonetheless useful, has been the direct use of C. elegans for anthelmintic discovery programmes. In this brief review we provide an introduction to the use of C. elegans as a 'model parasite', outline the actions of the main classes of anthelmintics, and highlight approaches that have been of particular value. PMID:17988075

  5. Detection and prevalence of drug use in arrested drivers using the Dräger Drug Test 5000 and Affiniton DrugWipe oral fluid drug screening devices.

    PubMed

    Logan, Barry K; Mohr, Amanda L A; Talpins, Stephen K

    2014-09-01

    The use of oral fluid (OF) drug testing devices offers the ability to rapidly obtain a drug screening result at the time of a traffic stop. We describe an evaluation of two such devices, the Dräger Drug Test 5000 and the Affiniton DrugWipe, to detect drug use in a cohort of drivers arrested from an investigation of drug impaired driving (n = 92). Overall, 41% of these drivers were ultimately confirmed positive by mass spectrometry for the presence of one or more drugs. The most frequently detected drugs were cannabinoids (30%), benzodiazepines (11%) and cocaine (10%). Thirty-nine percent of drivers with blood alcohol concentrations >0.08 g/100 mL were found to be drug positive. Field test results obtained from OF samples were compared with collected OF and urine samples subsequently analyzed in the laboratory by gas or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Dräger Drug Test 5000 (DDT5000) and DrugWipe returned overall sensitivities of 51 and 53%, and positive predictive values of 93 and 63%, respectively. The most notable difference in performance was the DDT5000's better sensitivity in detecting marijuana use. Both devices failed to detect benzodiazepine use. Oral fluid proved to be a more effective confirmatory specimen, with more drugs being confirmed in OF than urine. PMID:24894458

  6. 36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS FROM OPERATOR'S POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  7. 9. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING TRACK WITH BRIDGE IN OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING TRACK WITH BRIDGE IN OPEN POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Groton Bridge, Spanning Thames River between New London & Groton, New London, New London County, CT

  8. 8. VIEW LOOKING EAST, SHOWING COUNTERWEIGHT WITH BRIDGE IN OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING EAST, SHOWING COUNTERWEIGHT WITH BRIDGE IN OPEN POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Groton Bridge, Spanning Thames River between New London & Groton, New London, New London County, CT

  9. 10. VIEW FROM ABOVE SHOWING TRACK WITH BRIDGE IN OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW FROM ABOVE SHOWING TRACK WITH BRIDGE IN OPEN POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Groton Bridge, Spanning Thames River between New London & Groton, New London, New London County, CT

  10. 6. VIEW FROM WESTERN ABUTMENT, SHOWING SIDE ELEVATION OF BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW FROM WESTERN ABUTMENT, SHOWING SIDE ELEVATION OF BRIDGE No. Z-6 IN OPEN POSITION. - Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, Bridge No. Z-6, Spanning North Branch of Chicago River, South of Cortland Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  11. 37. HANGAR FROM RAILROAD DECK TELESCOPED IN COLUMN & SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. HANGAR FROM RAILROAD DECK TELESCOPED IN COLUMN & SHOWING PIN WHICH TRANSFERS LOAD FROM RAILROAD DECK TO TRUSS WHEN IN DOWN POSITION - Armour, Swift, Burlington Bridge, Kansas City, Jackson County, MO

  12. RIVER AND ROAD VIEW SHOWING METAL CRIB RETAINING WALLS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RIVER AND ROAD VIEW SHOWING METAL CRIB RETAINING WALLS AT RIGHT, FACING SOUTHWEST. PHOTO IS TAKEN FROM SAME POSITION AS PHOTO NO. 84, BUT WITH LONG LENS - Generals Highway, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  13. Show Horse Welfare: The Viewpoints of Judges, Stewards, and Show Managers.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Melissa; Hiney, Kristina; Croney, Candace; Waite, Karen; Borron, Abigail; Brady, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the current state of stock-type show horse welfare based on the perceptions of show officials and to identify potential means of preventing and intervening in compromises to show horse welfare. Thirteen horse show officials, including judges, stewards, and show managers, were interviewed. Findings revealed the officials had an incomplete understanding of nonhuman animal welfare and a high level of concern regarding the public's perception of show horse welfare. The officials attributed most of the frequently observed compromises to show horse welfare to (a) novices', amateurs', and young trainers' lack of experience or expertise, and (b) trainers' and owners' unrealistic expectations and prioritization of winning over horse welfare. The officials emphasized a need for distribution of responsibility among associations, officials, and individuals within the industry. Although the officials noted recent observable positive changes in the industry, they emphasized the need for continued improvements in equine welfare and greater educational opportunities for stakeholders. PMID:26742585

  14. Teenagers and drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and drugs; Symptoms of drug use in teenagers; Drug abuse - teenagers; Substance abuse - teenagers ... likely your teen's drug use will turn into drug abuse . You can find more information at teens.drugabuse. ...

  15. Postmarket Drug Safety Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health and Human Services FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration Protecting and Promoting Your Health A to ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Drug Safety and Availability Postmarket Drug ...

  16. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Prescription Drug Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Prescription Drug Abuse Print ... street drugs. Why Do Some People Abuse Prescription Drugs? Some people experiment with prescription drugs because they ...

  17. Drug Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  18. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then

  19. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors interact and put them at risk. Personal information. Doctors take into account a person's weight, how long they've been prescribed the medication, and what other medications they are taking. Someone abusing prescription drugs may overload their system or put themselves at risk for ...

  20. Drug residues.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Philip T

    2010-01-01

    The use of veterinary drugs in animal production is necessary for the prevention and treatment of disease; however, such use may result in residues. Regulatory authorities administer legislative frameworks which ensure that foods derived from animals treated with approved veterinary drugs are safe for human consumption. A human food safety evaluation is conducted as follows: it estimates the risk to human health and safety--based on scientific assessment of the available information and data--formulates measures for controlling the risks identified, and communicates the findings and implications of the risk assessment to interested parties. Foods derived from animals are monitored for the presence of drug residues. The reported incidence of illegal residues from these programmes is very low. These findings reassure the public that veterinary drugs are effectively regulated and that food obtained from treated animals does not contain residues that might constitute a health hazard to consumers. Non-regulatory organizations, including the veterinary pharmaceutical industry, producer organisations, veterinarians and food processors, all contribute to a safe food supply. The food safety risk analysis framework is continually refined to ensure that the health of all consumers is protected. PMID:20204591

  1. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5780 Light beam patient...

  2. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5780 Light beam patient...

  3. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5780 Light beam patient...

  4. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5780 Light beam patient...

  5. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5780 Light beam patient...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  7. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  9. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  10. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  11. Positive position control of robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Gumusel, L.

    1989-01-01

    The present, simple and accurate position-control algorithm, which is applicable to fast-moving and lightly damped robot arms, is based on the positive position feedback (PPF) strategy and relies solely on position sensors to monitor joint angles of robotic arms to furnish stable position control. The optimized tuned filters, in the form of a set of difference equations, manipulate position signals for robotic system performance. Attention is given to comparisons between this PPF-algorithm controller's experimentally ascertained performance characteristics and those of a conventional proportional controller.

  12. Intradermal Tests for Diagnosis of Drug Allergy are not Affected by a Topical Anesthetic Patch

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Diana; Ferreira, Ana; Cernadas, Josefina R.

    2014-01-01

    The use of topical anesthesia to perform intradermal tests (IDTs) for drug allergy diagnosis was never investigated. We aimed to determine the effects of a topical anesthetic patch containing prilocaine-lidocaine on wheal size of IDT with drugs. Patients who had positive IDT as part of their investigation process of suspected drug hypersensitivity were selected. IDT were performed according to guidelines. Anesthetic patch (AP) was placed and the same prior positive IDT, as well as positive histamine skin prick test (SPT) and negative (saline IDT) controls, were performed in the anesthetized area. Patients with negative IDT were also included to check for false positives with AP. Increase in wheals after 20 minutes both with and without AP was recorded and compared. 45 IDT were performed (36 patients), of which 37 have been previously positive (14 antibiotics, 10 general anesthetics, 6 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 3 iodinated contrasts, 3 anti-Hi-histamines and 1 ranitidine). Mean histamine SPT size without the AP was 4.7 mm [95%CI (4.4-5.1]), and 4.6 mm [95%CI(4.2-5.0)] with anesthesia. Mean wheal increase in IDT for drugs without the anesthesia was 4.5 mm [95%CI(3.3-5.7)] and with anesthesia was 4.3 mm [95%CI(2.8-5.8)]. No statistical significant differences were observed between skin tests with or without AP for histamine SPT (P=0.089), IDT with saline (P=0.750), and IDT with drugs (P=0.995). None of the patients with negative IDT showed positivity with the AP, or vice-versa. The use of an AP containing prilocaine-lidocaine does not interfere with IDT to diagnose drug allergy, and no false positive tests were found. PMID:25229004

  13. Temperature Data Shows Warming in 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    TThe figure above depicts how much air temperatures near the Earth's surface changed relative to the global mean temperature from 1951 to 1980. NASA researchers used maps of urban areas derived from city lights data to account for the 'heat island' effect of cities. The red and orange colors show that temperatures are warmer in most regions of the world when compared to the 1951 to 1980 'normal' temperatures. Warming around the world has been widespread, but it is not present everywhere. The largest warming is in Northern Canada, Alaska and Siberia, as indicated by the deeper red colors. The lower 48 United States have become warmer recently, but only enough to make the temperatures comparable to what they were in the 1930s. The scale on the bottom of these temperature anomaly images represent degrees in Celsius. The negative numbers represent cooling and the positive numbers depict warming. Overall, the air temperature near the Earth's surface has warmed by 1oF (0.6oC) globally, on average, over the last century. For more information and additional images, read Satellites Shed Light on a Warmer World. Image courtesy Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS).

  14. Significant drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Kirk, J K

    1995-04-01

    Many nutrients substantially interfere with pharmacotherapeutic goals. The presence of certain nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract affects the bioavailability and disposition of many oral medications. Drug-nutrient interactions can also have positive effects that result in increased drug absorption or reduced gastrointestinal irritation. Knowing the significant drug-nutrient interactions can help the clinician identify the nutrients to avoid with certain medications, as well as the therapeutic agents that should be administered with food. This information can be used to educate patients and optimize pharmacotherapy. PMID:7709893

  15. [Evaluation of potential drug interactions in primary health care prescriptions in Vitria da Conquista, Bahia (Brazil)].

    PubMed

    Leo, Danyllo Fbio Lessa; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; de Medeiros, Danielle Souto

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are risk factors for the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The risk for drug interactions includes factors related to prescription that are intrinsic to the patient. This study sought to evaluate the potential drug interactions in primary care prescriptions in Vitria da Conquista in the state of Bahia to fill the knowledge gap on this topic in Brazil. Information about several variables derived from the primary health care prescriptions was collected and drug interactions were evaluated based on information from Medscape and Micromedex(R) databases. Polypharmacy frequency and its association with the occurrence of drug interactions were also evaluated. Results revealed a 48,9% frequency of drug interactions, 74,9% of moderate or greater severity, 8,6% of prescriptions in polypharmacy that in the chi-square test showed a positive association with the occurrence of drug interactions (p < 0,001). Prescriptions from primary care in Vitria da Conquista in the state of Bahia showed a high frequency of drug interactions, however it is necessary to analyze other risk factors for their occurrence at this level of health care. PMID:24473627

  16. DRUG NAME (INSERT DRUG NAME)

    Cancer.gov

    First, choose a quiet working space away from food, windows, fans or heat ducts. Clean the working space with damp paper towels, and place a pad or paper towel on the clean working space. Next, place all needed items and drug on the pad or paper towel. Then, wash your hands with soap and water, and put on gloves.

  17. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880... Devices 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a device used to hold an infant or a child in a desired position for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes,...

  18. 21 CFR 868.6820 - Patient position support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient position support. 868.6820 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6820 Patient position support. (a) Identification. A patient position support is a device intended to maintain the position of an...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880... Devices 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a device used to hold an infant or a child in a desired position for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes,...

  20. 21 CFR 868.6820 - Patient position support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Patient position support. 868.6820 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6820 Patient position support. (a) Identification. A patient position support is a device intended to maintain the position of an...

  1. 21 CFR 868.6820 - Patient position support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient position support. 868.6820 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6820 Patient position support. (a) Identification. A patient position support is a device intended to maintain the position of an...

  2. 21 CFR 868.6820 - Patient position support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient position support. 868.6820 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6820 Patient position support. (a) Identification. A patient position support is a device intended to maintain the position of an...

  3. 21 CFR 868.6820 - Patient position support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Patient position support. 868.6820 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6820 Patient position support. (a) Identification. A patient position support is a device intended to maintain the position of an...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880... Devices 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a device used to hold an infant or a child in a desired position for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes,...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880... Devices 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a device used to hold an infant or a child in a desired position for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes,...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880... Devices 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a device used to hold an infant or a child in a desired position for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes,...

  7. Can aging be 'drugged'?

    PubMed

    Riera, Celine E; Dillin, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The engines that drive the complex process of aging are being identified by model-organism research, thereby providing potential targets and rationale for drug studies. Several studies of small molecules have already been completed in animal models with the hope of finding an elixir for aging, with a few compounds showing early promise. What lessons can we learn from drugs currently being tested, and which pitfalls can we avoid in our search for a therapeutic for aging? Finally, we must also ask whether an elixir for aging would be applicable to everyone, or whether we age differently, thus potentially shortening lifespan in some individuals. PMID:26646496

  8. Prevalence of psychotropic drug use in military police units.

    PubMed

    Costa, Srgio Henrique Nascente; Yonamine, Maurcio; Ramos, Andrea Luciana Martins; Oliveira, Fernando Gomes Ferreira; Rodrigues, Caroline Rego; da Cunha, Luiz Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to verify the prevalence of psychoactive drug use (amphetamines, methamphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opioids and benzodiazepines) among military police officers in the state of Gois. Data were obtained from urine samples voluntarily provided by the officers participating in the study, who were informed of the study methods and signed a free and informed consent form. The samples were subject to screening analysis by immunochromatography (Multi-DrugOneStep Test), with positive tests confirmed by gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and data analyzed by descriptive statistics. The results indicated the presence of the following drugs: amphetamines (0.33%), cannabinoids (0.67%) and benzodiazepines (1.34%); 97.66% showed negative results. The positive cases were distributed as follows: benzodiazepines (57.1%); cannabinoids (28.6%) and amphetamines (14.3%). In conclusion, the detection of psychoactive substances in voluntary sampling of military police officers indicates the need to implement drug testing among active military officers and preventive public policies aimed at eliminating the abusive consumption of psychotropic drugs. PMID:26060962

  9. 2 Experimental Drugs Offer Hope Against Psoriasis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 154898.html 2 Experimental Drugs Offer Hope Against Psoriasis: Studies Targeted therapies produce significant results, researchers say ... News) -- Two experimental drugs show promise in treating psoriasis and a related condition, psoriatic arthritis, new studies ...

  10. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G. Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-06-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL.

  11. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Argov, Z; Mastaglia, F L

    1979-01-01

    Review of the various drugs in current clinical use showed that over 50 of them may cause a purely sensory or mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. These include antimicrobials, such as isoniazid, ethambutol, ethionamide, nitrofurantoin, and metronidazole; antineoplastic agents, particularly vinca alkaloids; cardiovascular drugs, such as perhexiline and hydrallazine; hypnotics and psychotropics, notable methaqualone; antirheumatics, such as gold, indomethacin, and chloroquine; anticonvulsants, particularly phenytoin; and other drugs, including disulfiram, calcium carbimide, and dapsone. Patients receiving drug treatment who complain of paraesthesie, pain, muscle cramps, or other abnormal sensations and those without symptoms who are receiving drugs that are known or suspected to be neurotoxic should undergo neurological examination and studies of motor and sensory nerve conduction. This will allow the incidence of drug-induced peripheral neuropathy to be determined more precisely. PMID:219931

  12. Drug models of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831

  13. Drug models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Stone, James M

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831

  14. Sustainable tuberculosis drug development.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Six new antituberculosis compounds in 4 classes are presently in clinical trials. Although these show substantial promise for drug-resistant (DR) tuberculosis, the presently planned studies of these compounds will not inform their optimal use, as each will be tested singly vs placebo with existing drugs, rather than in new regimens. Each successive regulatory approval will increase the size, cost, and complexity of trials for those that follow, causing delays during which suboptimal use will occur and resistance will emerge. This paper proposes the development of a novel regimen with the potential for use in both drug-sensitive (DS) and DR tuberculosis. Adaptive licensing for DR tuberculosis based on 2-month sputum culture would shorten time to initial approval by several years. A global outcomes registry would confirm safety and effectiveness in both DS and DR tuberculosis, making possible the second transformation of tuberculosis treatment. We should do our utmost to see it succeed. PMID:23042970

  15. Co-lethality studied as an asset against viral drug escape: the HIV protease case

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Co-lethality, or synthetic lethality is the documented genetic situation where two, separately non-lethal mutations, become lethal when combined in one genome. Each mutation is called a "synthetic lethal" (SL) or a co-lethal. Like invariant positions, SL sets (SL linked couples) are choice targets for drug design against fast-escaping RNA viruses: mutational viral escape by loss of affinity to the drug may induce (synthetic) lethality. Results From an amino acid sequence alignment of the HIV protease, we detected the potential SL couples, potential SL sets, and invariant positions. From the 3D structure of the same protein we focused on the ones that were close to each other and accessible on the protein surface, to possibly bind putative drugs. We aligned 24,155 HIV protease amino acid sequences and identified 290 potential SL couples and 25 invariant positions. After applying the distance and accessibility filter, three candidate drug design targets of respectively 7 (under the flap), 4 (in the cantilever) and 5 (in the fulcrum) amino acid positions were found. Conclusions These three replication-critical targets, located outside of the active site, are key to our anti-escape strategy. Indeed, biological evidence shows that 2/3 of those target positions perform essential biological functions. Their mutational variations to escape antiviral medication could be lethal, thus limiting the apparition of drug-resistant strains. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Shamil Sunyaev and Claus Wilke. PMID:20565756

  16. 28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED POSITION WITH THE EXTREME UPPER PORTION OF THE BASCULE RACK GEAR SHOWING IN THE LOWER RIGHT PORTION OF THE PHOTOGRAPH - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. Compulsory licensing and access to drugs.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulou, Charitini; Valletti, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Compulsory licensing allows the use of a patented invention without the owner's consent, with the aim of improving access to essential drugs. The pharmaceutical sector argues that, if broadly used, it can be detrimental to innovation. We model the interaction between a company in the North that holds the patent for a certain drug and a government in the South that needs to purchase it. We show that both access to drugs and pharmaceutical innovation depend largely on the Southern country's ability to manufacture a generic version. If the manufacturing cost is too high, compulsory licensing is not exercised. As the cost decreases, it becomes a credible threat forcing prices down, but reducing both access and innovation. When the cost is low enough, the South produces its own generic version and access reaches its highest value, despite a reduction in innovation. The global welfare analysis shows that the overall impact of compulsory licensing can be positive, even when accounting for its impact on innovation. We also consider the interaction between compulsory licensing and the strength of intellectual property rights, which can have global repercussions in other markets beyond the South. PMID:24408475

  18. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  19. Two cholesterol derivative-based PEGylated liposomes as drug delivery system, study on pharmacokinetics and drug delivery to retina.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shengyong; Yang, Bin; Wang, Guowu; Qin, Geng; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2014-07-11

    In this study, two cholesterol derivatives, (4-cholesterocarbonyl-4'-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4'-(N,N-diethylamine butyloxyl) azobenzene (ACB), one of which is positively charged while the other is neutral, were synthesized and incorporated with phospholipids and cholesterol to form doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposomes. PEGylation was achieved by including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatiylethanol-amine-N-[methoxy-(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Our results showed that PEGylated liposomes displayed significantly improved stability and the drug leakage was decreased compared to the non-PEGylated ones in vitro. The in vivo study with rats also revealed that the pharmacokinetics and circulation half-life of DOX were significantly improved when liposomes were PEGylated (p < 0.05). In particular, the neutral cholesterol derivative ACB played some role in improving liposomes' stability in systemic circulation compared to the conventional PC liposome and the positively charged CAB liposome, with or without PEGylation. In addition, in the case of local drug delivery, the positively charged PEG-liposome not only delivered much more of the drug into the rats' retinas (p < 0.001), but also maintained much longer drug retention time compared to the neutral PEGylated liposomes. PMID:24960297

  20. Two cholesterol derivative-based PEGylated liposomes as drug delivery system, study on pharmacokinetics and drug delivery to retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Shengyong; Yang, Bin; Wang, Guowu; Qin, Geng; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2014-07-01

    In this study, two cholesterol derivatives, (4-cholesterocarbonyl-4?-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4?-(N,N-diethylamine butyloxyl) azobenzene (ACB), one of which is positively charged while the other is neutral, were synthesized and incorporated with phospholipids and cholesterol to form doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposomes. PEGylation was achieved by including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatiylethanol-amine-N-[methoxy-(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Our results showed that PEGylated liposomes displayed significantly improved stability and the drug leakage was decreased compared to the non-PEGylated ones in vitro. The in vivo study with rats also revealed that the pharmacokinetics and circulation half-life of DOX were significantly improved when liposomes were PEGylated (p < 0.05). In particular, the neutral cholesterol derivative ACB played some role in improving liposomes stability in systemic circulation compared to the conventional PC liposome and the positively charged CAB liposome, with or without PEGylation. In addition, in the case of local drug delivery, the positively charged PEG-liposome not only delivered much more of the drug into the rats retinas (p < 0.001), but also maintained much longer drug retention time compared to the neutral PEGylated liposomes.

  1. [Emergent drugs (I): smart drugs].

    PubMed

    Burillo-Putze, G; Daz, B Climent; Pazos, J L Echarte; Mas, P Munn; Mir, O; Puiguriguer, J; Dargan, P

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a series of new drugs, known as smart drugs or legal highs, have gaining in popularity. They are easily obtainable through online shops. This is happening amongst younger segments of the population and is associated with recreational consumption, at weekends. In general, they are synthetic derivatives of natural products. There has been hardly any clinical research into them and they are not detectable in hospital laboratories. Three of these products, BZP (1- benzylpiperazine), mefedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) and Spice are probably the most widely used in Europe. The first two are consumed as an alternative to ecstasy and cocaine and are characterized by their producing a clinical profile of a sympathetic mimetic type; on occasion, they have serious consequences, with convulsions and even death. Spice (a mixture of herbs with synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-018, JWH-073 and CP 47497-C8) is giving rise to profiles of dependence and schizophrenia. Although the emergent drugs have an aura of safety, there is an increasing amount of experience on their secondary effects. PMID:21904408

  2. Religiosity and Drug Use among Inmates in Boot Camp: Testing a Theoretical Model with Reciprocal Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benda, Brent B.; Toombs, Nancy J.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the effects of religiosity within a theoretical model with reciprocal relationships of drug use among boot camp inmates. Findings show that attachment to caregivers is inversely related to associations with peers who engage in illicit behavior, whereas being abused by an adult is positively related to these associations. These…

  3. Sustained Drug Release on Temperature-Responsive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-Integrated Hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon ); Liu, Jun; Chang, Jeong H.; Exarhos, Gregory J.)

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid temperature-responsive hydroxyapatite-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (HAP-PNIPAAm) gel has been synthesized by the interpenetration of PNIPAAm into a sintered HAP disk through a radical-initiated polymerization of NIPAAm monomers under N2 atmosphere, and shows sustained positive thermo-responsive drug release profile over a month at PBS buffer.

  4. Ultrasonic drug delivery in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Udroiu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted drug delivery is an emerging technique that has the advantage of being non-invasive, efficiently and specifically targeted and controllable. While systemic drugs often show detrimental side effects, their ultrasound-triggered local release at the selected tissue may improve safety and specifity of therapy. An increasing amount of animal and preclinical studies demonstrates how ultrasound can also be used for increasing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug release to solid tumors. In particular, this technique may be functional to reach uniform delivery of chemotherapeutic agents throughout tumors, which is naturally restricted by their abnormal vascularization and interstitial pressure. This review deals with the physical mechanisms of ultrasound, the different kinds of drug carriers (microbubbles, liposomes and micelles) and the biological phenomena useful for cancer treatment (hyperthermia, sonoporation, enhanced extravasation, sonophoresis and blood-brain barrier disruption), showing how much ultrasonic drug delivery is a promising method in the oncological field. PMID:26011326

  5. Antiplatelet Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Jack; Spencer, Frederick A.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin, dipyridamole, cilostazol, the thienopyridines, and the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. The relationships among dose, efficacy, and safety are discussed along with a mechanistic overview of results of randomized clinical trials. The article does not provide specific management recommendations but highlights important practical aspects of antiplatelet therapy, including optimal dosing, the variable balance between benefits and risks when antiplatelet therapies are used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs in different clinical settings, and the implications of persistently high platelet reactivity despite such treatment. PMID:22315278

  6. [The use of drugs to improve athletic performance].

    PubMed

    Kuipers, H; Hartgens, F

    1997-10-11

    In sports, medical drugs are applied for supposedly ergogenic effects. Forbidden drug use (doping) implies that the drug enhances performance, which is not always the case. Amphetamines are ergogenic particularly during short-term, explosive exercise. Amphetamines exert an ergolytic effect on high-intensity endurance exercise. Caffeine has an ergogenic effect on endurance performance in dosages of 3 to 6 mg/kg. Doping regulations allow a small amount of caffeine intake. Androgenic and anabolic steroids elicit an increase in muscle growth and strength. In females low doses appear to be ergogenic in all sport types. beta 2-adrenergic agonists appear to have a positive effect on strength and muscle growth. The effects on endurance performance are still unknown. Although growth hormone is used in sports, scientific studies show that compared with placebo no difference in strength and muscle volume is observed. Blood doping and administration of erythropoietin are effective in enhancing endurance performance. PMID:9550746

  7. Systems-level antimicrobial drug and drug synergy discovery.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Terry; Boone, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Here, we review the 'target-centric' genomic strategy to antimicrobial discovery and share our perspective on identification, validation and prioritization of potential antimicrobial drug targets in the context of emerging chemical biology, genomics and phenotypic screening strategies. We propose that coupling the dual processes of antimicrobial small-molecule screening and target identification in a whole-cell context is essential to empirically annotate 'druggable' targets and advance early stage antimicrobial discovery. We also advocate a systems-level approach to annotating synthetic-lethal genetic interactions comprehensively within yeast and bacteria models. The resulting genetic interaction networks provide a landscape to rationally predict and exploit drug synergy between cognate inhibitors. We posit that synergistic combination agents provide an important and largely unexploited strategy to 'repurpose' existing chemical space and simultaneously address issues of potency, spectrum, toxicity and drug resistance in early stages of antimicrobial drug discovery. PMID:23508188

  8. Human egocentric position estimation.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Gagliardi, Celia

    2015-01-01

    The study of egocentric position estimation may shed light on visuospatial memory processes, such as physical space representation in our visual system. However, little has been done to test egocentric position estimation in humans and the few studies to date have investigated egocentric position estimation with context to ground or other stable visual cues. In this study, human participants are introduced to a three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) generated by a 120 Hz projector with a polarization filter and polarizing glasses that separated left and right eye images in a frame sequential stereoscopic configuration. Participants were placed in the center of a VR cylinder where 5,000 sesame dots were distributed at random distances (112cm to 168cm) from the participant, azimuth (+/- 29.12), and height (120cm to 188cm from the floor). Nine possible targets were located on a horizontal plane 50cm from the participant's eye level on a three by three matrix at right, left, center azimuths (+/- 18.64, 0), and near, middle, and far distances (126cm, 137cm, 147cm from the participant). Participants were presented with one randomly selected target for 3 to 5 seconds before the target was relocated to a random location within the sesame dot field. The task was to reposition the target back to the original position. Depth was induced using disparity and size cues, except for sesame dots that had only disparity cues. Errors in distance repositioning occurred along the line of sight and repositioning showed an attraction bias toward the relocated target. Elevation repositioning was higher for farther targets (P < 0.05, F = 3.19). Azimuth repositioning for left targets were significantly shifted to the right (P< 0.01, F= 18.42). Standard deviations for distance repositioning were invariant against target distance, suggesting that egocentric visuospatial representation is based on Cartesian metrics rather than polar coordinates. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326643

  9. On a national drug policy for Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, N

    1984-01-01

    On April 27, 1982 the Ministry of Health of the government of Bangladesh, set up an 8-man expert committee to evaluate all the registered pharmaceutical products presently available, and to formulate a draft National Drug Policy. Objectives are: 1) to provide support for ensuring quality and availability of drugs; 2) to reduce drug prices; 3) to eliminate useless, nonessential, and harmful drugs from the market; 4) to promote local production of finished drugs; 5) to ensure coordination among government branches; 6) to develop a drug monitoring and information system; 7) to promote the scientific development and application of unani, ayurvedic, and homeopathic medicines; 8) to improve the standard of hospital and retail pharmacies; and 9) to insure good manufacturing practices. 16 criteria were agreed on as guidelines for evaluating the drugs on the country's market. Drugs in Bangladesh have been classified into 3 categories. The 1st is drugs that are positively harmful. They should be banned immediately and withdrawn from the market. There are 265 locally manufactured drugs and 40 imported drugs in this category. The 2nd, drugs to be slightly reformulated by eliminating some of their requirements. There are 134 drugs in this category. The 3rd is drugs that do not conform to 1 or more of the 16 criteria/guidelines. There are over 500 drugs in this category. The new drug policy will produce a saving of 800 million taka (US $32.4 million). Drug supply in Bangladesh is a problem. The public sector distributes 20% of the total. In the private sector, drugs are supplied through import and local production. Investment for research by the pharmaceutical companies is essential. The principles laid down by the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Associations for the supply of good medicine needs to be put into practice. PMID:6729960

  10. Pattern of Drug Resistance and Risk Factors Associated with Development of Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Irfan; Javaid, Arshad; Tahir, Zarfishan; Ullah, Obaid; Shah, Aamer Ali; Hasan, Fariha; Ayub, Najma

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a major public health problem in developing countries such as Pakistan. Objective The current study was conducted to assess the frequency of drug resistant tuberculosis including multi drug resistance (MDR- TB) as well as risk factors for development of DR-TB, in Punjab, Pakistan. Methodology Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed, using proportion method, for 2367 culture positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) cases that were enrolled from January 2012 to December 2013 in the province of Punjab, Pakistan, against first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The data was analyzed using statistical software; SPSS version 18. Results Out of 2367 isolates, 273 (11.5%) were resistant to at least one anti-TB drug, while 221 (9.3%) showed MDR- TB. Risk factors for development of MDR-TB were early age (ranges between 10–25 years) and previously treated TB patients. Conclusion DR-TB is a considerable problem in Pakistan. Major risk factors are previous history of TB treatment and younger age group. It emphasizes the need for effective TB control Program in the country. PMID:26809127

  11. Superhydrophobic coating to delay drug release from drug-loaded electrospun fibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Botao; Xu, Shichen; Shi, Suqing; Jia, Pengxiang; Xu, Qing; Hu, Gaoli; Zhang, Hongxin; Wang, Cuiyu

    2015-12-01

    The drug-loaded electrospun fibrous materials showed attractive applications in biomedical fields; however, the serve burst release of drug from this kind of drug carrier limited its further applications. In this study, inspired by water strong repellency of superhydrophobic surface, the drug-loaded electrospun fibrous mat coated with superhydrophobic layer was constructed to retard and control drug release. The results indicated that the superhydrophobic coating could be simply fabricated on the drug-loaded electrospun mat by the electrospray approach, and the thickness of the superhydrophobic coating could be finely controlled by varying the deposition time. It was further found that, as compared with drug-loaded electrospun mats, drug released sustainably from the samples coated with superhydrophobic layer, and the drug release rate could be controlled by the thickness of superhydrophobic layer. In summary, the current approach of coating a superhydrophobic layer on the drug-loaded electrospun fibrous materials offered a fundament for drug sustained release.

  12. The heart of Daphnia magna: effects of four cardioactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Navarro, Arturo; Rosas-L, Esperanza; Reyes, Jos L

    2003-10-01

    We used Daphnia magna bioassays to determine the LC(50) and the effects on the heart of the cardioactive drugs ouabain, verapamil, metaproterenol and metoprolol. Distinctions were made between the pharmacological and toxicological effects of these drugs and the adequacy of physicochemical characteristics of its habitat (reconstituted water). Video microscopy and digital image processing were used to study the pharmacological effects on the heart. D. magna exhibited the expected sensitivity to the reference toxicant sodium dodecyl sulfate with a LC(50) of 15.6+/-4.5 mg/l. All drugs were toxic with 48 h-LC(50) of 2.03 mg/l ouabain, 7.04 mg/l verapamil, 32.45 mg/l metaproterenol and 76.21 mg/l metoprolol. Ouabain was the most toxic and caused a positive concentration-dependent inotropic effect. Verapamil caused positive chronotropic and inotropic effects, while metaproterenol showed positive concentration-dependent chronotropic effects at high concentrations (10(-3) and 10(-4) M). Metoprolol induced a positive chronotropic effect at low concentrations (10(-8), 10(-7), 10(-6) M) and a negative chronotropic effect at high concentration (10(-4) M). Ouabain, metaproterenol and metoprolol in D. magna caused similar effects to those produced in mammals. In contrast, verapamil caused opposite effects. The results suggest the presence of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase receptors to verapamil and of non-specific adrenergic receptors in heart of D. magna. PMID:14559294

  13. Drug abuse first aid

    MedlinePLUS

    Drug abuse is the misuse or overuse of any medication or drug, including alcohol. This article discusses first ... use of these drugs is a form of drug abuse. Legitimate medications can be abused by people who ...

  14. Effects of Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What To Say if You Were Once Addicted Drug Abuse Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share You are here Home » Effects of Drugs Effects of Drug Abuse Listen Drug abuse hurts the people who take ...

  15. Medication/Drug Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information > Condition Information > Allergens > Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because ... allergy symptoms. Learn more. Doctors Who Treat Medication/Drug Allergy Rohit K. Katial Harold S. Nelson Richard W. ...

  16. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePLUS

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  20. [A case of tuberculous meningitis complicated with multiple drug hypersensitivity to antituberculosis agents].

    PubMed

    Arai, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Multiple drug hypersensitivity (MDH) is an allergy to two or more chemically unrelated drugs. We present a case of MDH caused by antituberculosis agents during the treatment of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). A 64-year-old man without a history of drug allergy developed fever and severe headache. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid showed lymphocytosis, a low glucose level, and a high ADA activity, suggestive of TBM. The patient was treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and his symptoms resolved quickly. However, 20 days after the initiation of therapy, he developed remittent fever without mucocutaneous lesions. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test was positive for isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide, which was consistent with a diagnosis of MDH. All the antituberculosis drugs were replaced with levofloxacin and ethionamide, both of which have excellent cerebrospinal fluid penetration, and the fever subsided. The patient made a full recovery from TBM. Because standard antituberculosis regimens include three or four antituberculosis drugs, it is difficult to determine the culprit drug when hypersensitivity occurs. Moreover, there can be multiple causative drugs as illustrated by the present case. During a time-consuming desensitization therapy, TBM could flare up, leading to permanent neurological damage. Thus, treatment with suitable alternative drugs should be started immediately. PMID:25746078