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Sample records for drug users treated

  1. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin. PMID:11853137

  2. Treating Prescription Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... View all ​Research Reports Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic (HHS website) NIDA Home Site Map ...

  3. Prevention and Treatment of Hepatitis C in Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Edlin, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Injection drug users constitute the largest group of persons infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the United States, and most new infections occur in drug users. Controlling hepatitis C in the U.S. population, therefore, will require developing, testing, and implementing effective prevention and treatment strategies for persons who inject drugs. Fortunately, a substantial body of research and clinical experience exists on the prevention and management of chronic viral diseases among injection drug users. The need to implement interventions to stop the spread of HCV among drug users is critical. The capacity of substance-use treatment programs need to be expanded to accommodate all who want and need treatment. Physicians and pharmacists should be educated in how to provide access to sterile syringes and to teach safe injection techniques, both of which are lifesaving interventions. The treatment of hepatitis C in drug users requires an interdisciplinary approach that brings together expertise in treating hepatitis and caring for drug users. Treatment decisions should be made individually by patients with their physicians, based on a balanced assessment of risks and benefits and the patient's personal values. Physicians should carefully assess, monitor, and support adherence and mental health in all patients, regardless of whether drug use is known or suspected. Research is needed to better understand how best to prevent and treat hepatitis C in substance users. In the meantime, substantial progress can be made if existing knowledge and resources are brought to bear. PMID:12407596

  4. Understanding and Counseling the Chronic Drug User

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Wayne W.; Vriend, John

    1975-01-01

    The authors present a paradigm of external and internal thinking as these apply as causes for positive and negative emotional shifts. The concepts of internally and externally oriented thinking are discussed, and these are related to counseling the dependent drug user. Strategies for dealing with the dependent drug user are presented. (Author)

  5. Coping with Loneliness: Young Adult Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami; Orzeck, Tricia

    Since there appears to be a connection between substance use (and abuse) and loneliness it is of theoretical and clinical interest to explore the differences of coping with loneliness which drug users employ. The present study examined the manner in which MDMA (Ecstasy) users in comparison with non-MDMA (Non-Ecstasy) users and the general…

  6. Drug patterns in the chronic marijuana user.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, H; Clark, C

    1976-01-01

    The study examined the drug patterns and attitudes of a heavy marijuana user sample drawn from the local "counter-culture." The results indicate that the heavier marijuana user has a different subjective attitude and perception of the drug's effect than a light user. Second, multiple drug usage is, in general, the current and accepted mode within the sample. Finally, it appears that age of initial usage of a specific agent, duration, frequency of usage, and perceived drug effects may be dependent variables with reference to heavy marijuana and multiple drug usage. With respect to these variables, the question arises concerning what proportion of lighter drug using samples may, with time, adopt heavier and more varied drug patterns. PMID:1254370

  7. Physicians’ attitudes and practice toward treating injection drug users infected with hepatitis C virus: Results from a national specialist survey in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Angelique; Mugford, Gerry J; Zhao, Jing; Krahn, Murray; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Canada, more than 70% of new cases of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection per year involve injection drug users (IDUs) and, currently, there is no consensus on how to offer them medical care. OBJECTIVE: To examine the characteristics of Canadian specialist physicians and their likelihood to provide treatment to HCV patients who are IDUs. METHODS: A nationwide, cross-sectional study was conducted in the specialty areas of hepatology, gastroenterology and infectious diseases to examine HCV services. The questionnaire requested information regarding basic demographics, referral pathways and opinions (yes/no), and examined how a physician’s treatment regimen is influenced by factors such as treatment eligibility, HCV care management and barriers to providing quality service. RESULTS: Despite the fact that the majority of prevalent and incident cases of HCV are associated with injection drug use, very few specialist physicians actually provide the necessary therapy to this population. Only 19 (19.79%) comprehensive service providers were likely to provide treatment to a current IDU who uses a needle exchange on a regular basis. The majority of comprehensive service providers (n=86 [89.58%]) were likely to provide treatment to a former IDU who was stable on substitution therapy. On bivariate analysis, factors associated with the likelihood to provide treatment to current IDUs included physicians’ type, ie, infectious disease specialists compared with noninfectious specialists (OR 3.27 [95% CI 1.11 to 9.63]), and the size of the community where they practice (OR 4.16 [95% CI 1.36 to 12.71] [population 500,000 or greater versus less than 500,000]). Results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis were largely consistent with the results observed in the bivariate analyses. After controlling for other confounding variables, only community size was significantly associated with providing treatment to current IDUs (OR 3.89 [95% CI 1.06 to 14

  8. Marathon Group Therapy with Former Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Mannion, John

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the effects of marathon group therapy on attitudes of former drug users in a residential drug treatment center. Experimental group members responded higher on the group counseling evaluative subscale and lower on the guilt evaluative subscale than control members. (Author)

  9. The Parents Of Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Phylis M.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Students' perceptions of their parents were explored as possible correlates of extensive drug usage. Father's coldness, but not mother's, was found related to usage. Perceived parental permissiveness was not found related, but alienation from parental values and life style was correlated with usage. Implications for counseling are suggested.…

  10. Characteristics of Maxillofacial Trauma Among Alcohol and Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Durante, Letícia; de Moraes, Márcio; Asprino, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify and compare the characteristics of maxillofacial trauma in alcohol and drug users with those of nonusers. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of patients treated for facial trauma between April 1999 and March 2012 at the Maxillofacial Surgery Division of the Piracicaba Dental School. The data were analyzed by descriptive analysis, binary logistic regression, and correlational analysis using SPSS 18.0 software. The results were considered relevant at P < 0.05. Medical records of 3724 patients with facial trauma were analyzed, of which 173 were illicit drug users and 19.36% reported alcohol intake. The use of illicit drugs was reported by 4.64%. The prevalent etiological factor among drug and alcohol users was interpersonal violence. The mandible was the face part most affected by fractures. Male patients exhibited increased odds of experiencing fractures (OR = 1.43), as did users of illicit drugs (OR = 1.62), when compared with nonusers. When faced with maxillofacial trauma, male drug users exhibited an increased chance of experiencing fractures. This knowledge should be used as a baseline to implement more efficient prevention strategies for this population. PMID:26595006

  11. [Mental health care technologies for treating crack users].

    PubMed

    Nasi, Cintia; de Oliveira, Gustavo Costa; Lacchini, Annie Jeanninne Bisso; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; de Pinho, Leandro Barbosa

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify mental health care technologies for treating crack users in a Psychosocial Care Center for Alcohol and other Drugs (CAPsad, as per its acronym in Portuguese). A qualitative, evaluative case study was developed in a CAPSad, using fourth generation evaluation. Data collection occurred from January to March 2013 by means of semi-structured interviews applied to 36 subjects, these being health care professionals, patients, patients' relatives and managers. Data analysis identified the category strategies in mental health work. Results showed that recovery programs should provide spaces for dialogue, aiming to clarify the process of psychiatric internment to the user and family, and involve these in the therapy, implementing educational practices and ongoing consideration of mental health activities. In conclusion, it is important to discuss the technologies used in everyday care services, in light of the complexity of crack use. PMID:26098808

  12. 75 FR 12555 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting on the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA). The... FDA to continue collecting user fees for the prescription drug program. The Federal Food, Drug,...

  13. Drug use trajectory patterns among older drug users

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Miriam; Whalen, Thor; Tyndall, Benjamin; Ballard, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    To better understand patterns of drug use trajectories over time, it is essential to have standard measures of change. Our goal here is to introduce measures we developed to quantify change in drug use behaviors. A secondary goal is to provide effective visualizations of these trajectories for applied use. We analyzed data from a sample of 92 older drug users (ages 45 to 65) to identify transition patterns in drug use trajectories across the life course. Data were collected for every year since birth using a mixed methods design. The community-drawn sample of active and former users were 40% female, 50% African American, and 60% reporting some college or greater. Their life histories provided retrospective longitudinal data on the diversity of paths taken throughout the life course and changes in drug use patterns that occurred over time. Bayesian analysis was used to model drug trajectories displayed by innovative computer graphics. The mathematical techniques and visualizations presented here provide the foundation for future models using Bayesian analysis. In this paper we introduce the concepts of transition counts, transition rates and relapse/remission rates, and we describe how these measures can help us better understand drug use trajectories. Depicted through these visual tools, measurements of discontinuous patterns provide a succinct view of individual drug use trajectories. The measures we use on drug use data will be further developed to incorporate contextual influences on the drug trajectory and build predictive models that inform rehabilitation efforts for drug users. Although the measures developed here were conceived to better examine drug use trajectories, the applications of these measures can be used with other longitudinal datasets. PMID:21743792

  14. Drugs for treating urinary schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christine V; Zhang, Fan; Sinclair, David; Olliaro, Piero L

    2014-01-01

    Background Urinary schistosomiasis is caused by an intravascular infection with parasitic Schistosoma haematobium worms. The adult worms typically migrate to the venous plexus of the human bladder and excrete eggs which the infected person passes in their urine. Chronic infection can cause substantial morbidity and long-term complications as the eggs become trapped in human tissues causing inflammation and fibrosis. We summarised evidence of drugs active against the infection. This is new edition of a review first published in 1997. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of drugs for treating urinary schistosomiasis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE and LILACS and reference lists of articles up to 23 May 2014. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antischistosomal drugs and drug combinations compared to placebo, no intervention, or each other. Data collection and analysis Two researchers independently screened the records, extracted the data and assessed risk of bias. The primary efficacy outcomes were parasitological failure (defined as the continued presence of S. haematobium eggs in the urine at time points greater than one month after treatment), and percent reduction of egg counts from baseline. We presented dichotomous data as risk ratios (RR), and continuous data as mean difference (MD), alongside their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where appropriate we combined trials in meta analyses or tables. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included 30 RCTs enrolling 8165 participants in this review. Twenty-four trials were conducted in children in sub-Saharan Africa, and 21 trials were over 20 years old. Many studies were assessed as being at unclear risk of bias due to inadequate descriptions of study methods. Praziquantel On average, a single 40 mg/kg dose of praziquantel reduced the proportion of people still

  15. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera

    PubMed Central

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. Objectives To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are differences between classes of antimicrobials or dosing schedules. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; African Index Medicus; LILACS; Science Citation Index; metaRegister of Controlled Trials; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; conference proceedings; and reference lists to March 2014. Selection criteria Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials in adults and children with cholera that compared: 1) any antimicrobial treatment with placebo or no treatment; 2) different antimicrobials head-to-head; or 3) different dosing schedules or different durations of treatment with the same antimicrobial. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted data from included trials. Diarrhoea duration and stool volume were defined as primary outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) or ratio of means (ROM) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Main results Thirty-nine trials were included in this review with 4623 participants. Antimicrobials versus placebo or no treatment Overall, antimicrobial therapy shortened the mean duration of diarrhoea by about a day and a half compared to placebo or no treatment (MD -36.77 hours, 95% CI -43

  16. Treating drug-dependent patients in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Skene, Loane; Keays, David; Gardner, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    Are hospital staff legally permitted to test drug-dependent patients for drugs or infectious disease without the patient's consent in order to treat the patient or to protect themselves or other patients? What should staff do with "suspicious" items in the patient's possession (drugs, credit cards in different names, firearms)? Can drug-dependent patients lawfully use illicit drugs in hospital? Who should supply and administer them? PMID:12242876

  17. 76 FR 76738 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration... Drug User Fee Act (GDUFA), which will authorize FDA to collect fees and use them for the process...

  18. Managing leg ulceration in intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Jemell

    2015-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulceration is a long-term condition commonly associated with lower-limb injecting and chronic venous hypertension caused by collapsed veins, incompetent valves, deep vein thrombosis and reflux. It is not usually a medical emergency, but intravenous (IV) drug users with leg ulcers can attend emergency departments (EDs) with a different primary complaint such as pain or because they cannot access local primary care or voluntary services. Leg ulceration might then be identified during history taking, so it is important that ED nurses know how to assess and manage these wounds. This article explains how to assess and manage chronic venous leg ulcers in patients with a history of IV drug use, and highlights the importance of referral to specialist services when required, and to local primary care or voluntary services, before discharge to prevent admission and re-attendance. PMID:26344539

  19. Drug Users' Views of Psychosocial Aspects of their Treatment Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penk, W. E.; Robinowitz, R.

    1978-01-01

    Multiple discriminant function analysis indicates that drug users see and want a treatment environment that allows open expression of feeling (spontaneity) and control (staff control). These apparently contradictory environmental dimensions define the dilemma in drug treatment, i.e., how to control drug use and simultaneously cope with drug users'…

  20. Hemoptysis due to a mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysm in an injecting drug user.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Vasilios; Mikroulis, Dimitrios; Chrysafis, Ioannis; Fotakis, Stelios; Pneumatikos, Ioannis

    2014-08-01

    Infected aneurysms of the pulmonary artery are a rare consequence of injected drug use. Hemoptysis of pulmonary arterial origin is also infrequent; however, the mortality is as high as 50%. We report here a case of hemoptysis in an intravenous drug user, caused by a pulmonary artery aneurysm due to septic microemboli, originating from a groin abscess. We highlight the importance of recognizing and treating thromboembolic complications associated with deep venous thrombosis in injecting drug users. PMID:23250844

  1. Ibogaine for treating drug dependence. What is a safe dose?

    PubMed

    Schep, L J; Slaughter, R J; Galea, S; Newcombe, D

    2016-09-01

    The indole alkaloid ibogaine, present in the root bark of the West African rain forest shrub Tabernanthe iboga, has been adopted in the West as a treatment for drug dependence. Treatment of patients requires large doses of the alkaloid to cause hallucinations, an alleged integral part of the patient's treatment regime. However, case reports and case series continue to describe evidences of ataxia, gastrointestinal distress, ventricular arrhythmias and sudden and unexplained deaths of patients undergoing treatment for drug dependence. High doses of ibogaine act on several classes of neurological receptors and transporters to achieve pharmacological responses associated with drug aversion; limited toxicology research suggests that intraperitoneal doses used to successfully treat rodents, for example, have also been shown to cause neuronal injury (purkinje cells) in the rat cerebellum. Limited research suggests lethality in rodents by the oral route can be achieved at approximately 263mg/kg body weight. To consider an appropriate and safe initial dose for humans, necessary safety factors need to be applied to the animal data; these would include factors such as intra- and inter-species variability and for susceptible people in a population (such as drug users). A calculated initial dose to treat patients could be approximated at 0.87mg/kg body weight, substantially lower than those presently being administered to treat drug users. Morbidities and mortalities will continue to occur unless practitioners reconsider doses being administered to their susceptible patients. PMID:27426011

  2. Temporal differences in gamma-hydroxybutyrate overdoses involving injecting drug users versus recreational drug users in Helsinki: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) have been profiled as 'party drugs' used mainly at dance parties and in nightclubs on weekend nights. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of injecting drug use among GHB/GBL overdose patients and whether there are temporal differences in the occurrence of GHB/GBL overdoses of injecting drug and recreational drug users. Methods In this retrospective study, the ambulance and hospital records of suspected GHB- and GBL overdose patients treated by the Helsinki Emergency Medical Service from January 1st 2006 to December 31st 2007 were reviewed. According to the temporal occurrence of the overdose, patients were divided in two groups. In group A, the overdose occurred on a Friday-Saturday or Saturday-Sunday night between 11 pm-6 am. Group B consisted of overdoses occurring on outside this time frame. Results Group A consisted of 39 patient contacts and the remaining 61 patient contacts were in group B. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in (group A vs. B, respectively): history of injecting drug abuse (33% vs. 59%, p = 0.012), reported polydrug and ethanol use (80% vs. 62%, p = 0.028), the location where the patients were encountered (private or public indoors or outdoors, 10%, 41%, 41% vs. 25%, 18%, 53%, p = 0.019) and how the knowledge of GHB/GBL use was obtained (reported by patient/bystanders or clinical suspicion, 72%, 28% vs. 85%, 10%, p = 0.023). Practically all (99%) patients were transported to emergency department after prehospital care. Conclusion There appears to be at least two distinct groups of GHB/GBL users. Injecting drug users represent the majority of GHB/GBL overdose patients outside weekend nights. PMID:22296777

  3. 76 FR 79198 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... (76 FR 76738). The document announced a public meeting entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee.'' The...: In FR Doc. 2011-31630, appearing on page 76738 ] in the Federal Register of Thursday, December 8... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Correction...

  4. How do drug users define their progress in harm reduction programs? Qualitative research to develop user-generated outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ruefli, Terry; Rogers, Susan J

    2004-01-01

    Background Harm reduction is a relatively new and controversial model for treating drug users, with little formal research on its operation and effectiveness. In order to advance the study of harm reduction programs and our understanding of how drug users define their progress, qualitative research was conducted to develop outcomes of harm reduction programming that are culturally relevant, incremental, (i.e., capable of measuring change), and hierarchical (i.e., capable of showing how clients improve over time). Methods The study used nominal group technique (NGT) to develop the outcomes (phase 1) and focus group interviews to help validate the findings (phase 2). Study participants were recruited from a large harm-reduction program in New York City and involved approximately 120 clients in 10 groups in phase 1 and 120 clients in 10 focus groups in phase 2. Results Outcomes of 10 life areas important to drug users were developed that included between 10 to 15 incremental measures per outcome. The outcomes included ways of 1) making money; 2) getting something good to eat; 3) being housed/homeless; 4) relating to families; 5) getting needed programs/benefits/services; 6) handling health problems; 7) handling negative emotions; 8) handling legal problems; 9) improving oneself; and 10) handling drug-use problems. Findings also provided insights into drug users' lives and values, as well as a window into understanding how this population envisions a better quality of life. Results challenged traditional ways of measuring drug users based solely on quantity used and frequency of use. They suggest that more appropriate measures are based on the extent to which drug users organize their lives around drug use and how much drug use is integrated into their lives and negatively impacts other aspects of their lives. Conclusions Harm reduction and other programs serving active drug users and other marginalized people should not rely on institutionalized, provider

  5. 78 FR 46977 - Generic Drug User Fee-Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, Drug Master...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rate for the abbreviated new drug application (ANDA), prior approval supplement to an approved ANDA (PAS), drug master file (DMF), generic drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees related to the Generic Drug User Fee Program for fiscal year (FY) 2014. The Federal Food, Drug, and......

  6. The drug-of-choice phenomenon psychological differences among drug users who preferred different drugs.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, L E; Berry, J W; Morrison, A; Brown, S

    1995-04-01

    The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Sensation Seeking Scale, and the Brief Symptom Inventory were administered to 125 recovering drug users with three or more months abstinent from drugs. Subjects were divided according to drug preference: opiates, stimulants, marijuana, alcohol, and a polydrug preference. Opiate users were significantly higher in Susceptibility to Boredom. Alcohol misusers compared to a combined stimulant, opiate, and polydrug group were significantly lower in Extroversion and Susceptibility to Boredom. Subjects raised in drug/alcohol-using families scored significantly higher on Neuroticism and on the Positive Symptom Total of the BSI, and had a higher rate of suicidality. PMID:7601576

  7. Rural Drug Users: Factors Associated with Substance Abuse Treatment Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Carrie B.; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Tindall, Michele Staton; Garrity, Thomas F.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a modified version of Andersen’s (1968, 1995) Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to identify the correlates of the number of substance abuse treatment episodes received by rural drug users. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with 711 drug users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Descriptive analyses examine rural drug users’ substance use histories and retrospective substance abuse treatment service utilization patterns. A negative binomial regression model indicated that selected predisposing, historical health, and enabling factors were significantly associated with the utilization of substance abuse treatment among rural drug users. Despite high levels of recent and lifetime self-reported substance use among these rural drug users, treatment services were underutilized. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of the health care system and characteristics of the external environment associated with rural substance abuse treatment in order to increase utilization among drug users. PMID:20463206

  8. Clostridium novyi causing necrotising fasciitis in an injecting drug user

    PubMed Central

    Noone, M; Tabaqchali, M; Spillane, J B

    2002-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis with pronounced local oedema is described in an injecting drug user. Clostridium novyi was an unexpected single pathogen isolated from infected tissue. The patient was among a cluster of cases, all injecting drug users, presenting with toxaemia and soft tissue infection. The causal role and pathogenicity of C novyi is discussed. PMID:11865011

  9. An Approach for Casual Drug Users. Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Erwin S., Ed.

    This publication was written to respond to the fact that many drug treatment centers receive inappropriate referrals of casual or recreational marihuana users from the courts for "treatment" as an alternative to jail. A drug abuse task force recommended that agencies give priority to abusers of the high-risk categories and to compulsive users of…

  10. Marathon Group Counseling with Illicit Drug Users: Analysis of Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Wills, Judy

    1983-01-01

    Summarized a 16-hour marathon group for illicit drug users (N=12) in residential treatment. Content analysis showed the group spent more time on interpersonal relationships and relatively little time on group process. Drug users were able to successfully participate in therapeutic group discussions involving self-investment. (JAC)

  11. Drug-Related HIV Risk Behaviors and Cocaine Preference among Injection Drug Users in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longshore, Douglas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared drug-related risk behavior of drug users whose preferred injection drug was cocaine and users with preference for heroin or no preference between the two drugs (total n=422). Found cocaine preference unrelated to likelihood of needle sharing overall, needle sharing with strangers, needle sharing at shooting galleries, and failure to use…

  12. Psychological Status of Student Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Nicholas; Stone, Donald R.

    1975-01-01

    This study was performed to determine how a child's self-concept influences their drug attitudes and behaviors. "Anti-Social Tendencies" and "Family Relations" correlated significantly and negatively with the use of almost all substances and positively with drug attitude. "Feeling of Belonging" was related negatively to the use of dangerous drugs.…

  13. Estimating the total mortality among problem drug users.

    PubMed

    Cruts, Guus; Buster, Marcel; Vicente, Julian; Deerenberg, Ingeborg; Van Laar, Margriet

    2008-01-01

    This paper's objective is to develop a method to estimate the total mortality among problem drug users. The total mortality is given by a base rate of mortality not related to drugs and the deaths that are directly and indirectly related to drugs. A fatal poisoning by drugs (overdose) is directly related to drugs, whereas a casualty due to a drug-related disease or a drug-related accident is indirectly related to drugs. As an example of a method to estimate the total mortality, the results from a cohort study among methadone patients in Amsterdam were projected on the whole population of problem drug users in The Netherlands. Due to differences between the problem drug users in Amsterdam and the rest of the country, adjustments were required. It was found that an initial estimation did not require adjustment for injection behavior and gender but did require adjustment for age and the percentage of HIV infection. In a first unadjusted estimation, the total number of deaths among problem drug users in The Netherlands in 2001 was estimated at 606 deaths. After adjustment for age, the estimated mortality decreased to 573 deaths, and after adjustment for HIV infection, this estimation again decreased to 479 deaths. From the ultimately estimated mortality, 11% was considered to be not related to drugs, 23% was attributed directly to drugs, and 66% was attributed indirectly to drugs. The number of direct deaths, as estimated by this method, falls in the same order of magnitude as the number extracted from the Causes of Death Statistics, when selecting cases according to the Drug-Related Deaths Standard as established by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA). Further cross-validation with other measures will be needed to assess the accuracy of the method, the limitations of which are discussed with respect to stipulating directions for future research. PMID:18393087

  14. Drugs to treat obesity: do they work?

    PubMed

    Kim, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a disease that has historically eluded effective medical therapy. Prior to 2012, phentermine and orlistat were the only medications available to treat obesity in the USA, with phentermine approved only for short-term use. However, as of 2015, the repertoire of pharmacological agents available to treat obesity has greatly expanded to include four new drugs: lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate extended release (ER), naltrexone ER/wellbutrin ER and liraglutide. Each has a unique mechanism of action and all are intended for long-term use. These newer medications share a common strategy to promote weight loss in that they are designed to manipulate the control of hunger and satiety in the central nervous system. Interestingly, the majority of these new agents are combinations of older medications that have been used for conditions other than obesity. The amount of weight loss seen with these agents beyond placebo varies but generally falls in the range of 3-10% of starting weight and requires continual use of the drug in order for weight loss to be sustained. In addition, each drug has a unique side effect profile that should be carefully considered when selecting the best agent for a given individual. This article provides a review of these recently approved medications focusing on efficacy, side effect profiles and appropriate application to the individual patient. PMID:27053517

  15. What America's Users Spend on Illegal Drugs. An Office of National Drug Control Policy Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    Two approaches were used to estimate the amount of illicit drugs consumed and available for consumption in the United States. Estimates of the number of drug users were multiplied by estimates of the average amount of drugs consumed. Then the supply of drugs available for consumption was examined by estimating the amount of drugs that enters the…

  16. Academically Successful Drug Users: An Oxymoron?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, William P.; Skager, Rodney

    1992-01-01

    Examined substance use among academically successful high school students. Findings from 3,331 first-year students and 3,515 juniors revealed that over 70 percent of academically successful students reported some type of drug use. Negative association between drug use and academic achievement may be counterbalanced by mediating factors, such as…

  17. Cognitive bias and drug craving in recreational cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Field, Matt; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P

    2004-04-01

    Recent theories propose that repeated drug use is associated with attentional and evaluative biases for drug-related stimuli, and that these cognitive biases are related to individual differences in subjective craving. This study investigated cognitive biases for cannabis-related cues in recreational cannabis users. Seventeen regular cannabis users and 16 non-users completed a visual probe task which assessed attentional biases for cannabis-related words, and an implicit association test (IAT) which assessed implicit positive or negative associations for cannabis-related words. Results from the IAT indicated more negative associations for cannabis-related words in non-users compared to users. Among cannabis users, those with high levels of cannabis craving had a significant attentional bias for cannabis-related words on the visual probe task, but those with low levels of craving did not. Results highlight the role of craving in attentional biases for cannabis-related stimuli. PMID:15072814

  18. Factors That Affect Adolescent Drug Users' Suicide Attempts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hokwang

    2016-01-01

    Drug abuse has been widely linked to suicide risk. We examined the factors that affect adolescent drug users' suicide attempts in South Korea. This study analyzed the data of 311 adolescents who had used drugs such as inhalants, psychotropic drugs, and marijuana (195 males and 116 females). Among 311 subjects, 109 (35.0%) had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. After adjusting for other variables, depressive mood (OR=19.79) and poly-drug use (OR=2.79), and low/middle levels of academic achievement compared with a high level (OR=3.72 and 4.38) were independently associated with increased odds of a suicide attempt, while better perceived health (OR=0.32) was independently associated with reduced odds of a suicide attempt. For adolescent drug users, preventive work should be directed toward the active treatment of drug use, depression, and physical health and reinforcing proper coping strategies for academic and other stress. PMID:27247604

  19. Factors That Affect Adolescent Drug Users' Suicide Attempts.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Song, Hokwang

    2016-05-01

    Drug abuse has been widely linked to suicide risk. We examined the factors that affect adolescent drug users' suicide attempts in South Korea. This study analyzed the data of 311 adolescents who had used drugs such as inhalants, psychotropic drugs, and marijuana (195 males and 116 females). Among 311 subjects, 109 (35.0%) had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. After adjusting for other variables, depressive mood (OR=19.79) and poly-drug use (OR=2.79), and low/middle levels of academic achievement compared with a high level (OR=3.72 and 4.38) were independently associated with increased odds of a suicide attempt, while better perceived health (OR=0.32) was independently associated with reduced odds of a suicide attempt. For adolescent drug users, preventive work should be directed toward the active treatment of drug use, depression, and physical health and reinforcing proper coping strategies for academic and other stress. PMID:27247604

  20. Drug user settings: a crack house typology.

    PubMed

    Geter, R S

    1994-06-01

    Both lay persons and members of the scientific community have come to view the inner-city crack house as a facility where drug dealers and crack addicts sell, buy, and use crack cocaine. It is suggested in this article that the term "crack house" be unbundled into four more meaningful terms based on the physical conditions of the house, its functionality, and the social relationships that it supports. Two typologies are proposed. The first separates drug houses into four general categories: (1) Crack House, (2) Cop House, (3) Drug House III, and (4) Drug House IV. The second typology categorizes the Crack House into four types: (A) the Party House, (B) the Hit House, (C) the Smoke House, and (D) the Bandominium. Each of these types is explored in detail. PMID:7960297

  1. FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158937.html FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer Tecentriq boosted survival ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug to treat bladder cancer was approved by ...

  2. Current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Li, Xinyue

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention for drug users in China and provide scientific evidence for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in drug users. Literature and articles related to drug abuse in China, as well as the results of prevention efforts and successful cases regarding HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users, are reviewed. Lessons learned are drawn out for the future improvement of work and the sustainable development of treatment programs. The number of drug users in China is increasing. Even though the number of opioid-type drug users is growing more slowly than in the past, the number of amphetamine-type stimulant users has increased sharply. It has been proven that methadone maintenance treatment and syringe exchange programs gradually and successfully control HIV/AIDS transmission in drug users. However, it is necessary to enhance these prevention methods and expand their coverage. In addition, the strengthening of antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment for HIV-infected drug users is crucial for HIV/AIDS prevention and control. The rapidly growing number of amphetamine-type stimulant users, along with their high-risk behavior, poses a hidden danger of greater HIV/AIDS transmission through sexual intercourse in the near future. PMID:25284965

  3. Fewer Drugs in Pipeline to Treat World's No. 1 Killer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160676.html Fewer Drugs in Pipeline to Treat World's No. 1 Killer While number of cancer drugs ... 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease remains the world's leading cause of death, but development of drugs ...

  4. Needle and Syringe Cleaning Practices among Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Harbke, Colin R.; Canty, John R.; Reynolds, Grace L.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates the effect of needle exchange on the bleach-mediated disinfection (BMD) practices of 176 needle and syringe sharing injection drug users (IDUs). Results reveal that IDUs who traded sex for money or drugs were less likely to practice BMD, and IDUs who reported a reduced number of sex partners were more likely to practice BMD. (Contains 36…

  5. 75 FR 45636 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act of 2008 (AGDUFA), authorizes FDA to collect user fees for...

  6. 77 FR 45629 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act of 2008 (AGDUFA), authorizes FDA to collect user fees for...

  7. Clinical Care of the HIV-Infected Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and chemical dependency, both of which are complicated by and intertwined with mental illness, are complex, overlapping spheres that adversely influence each other and the overall clinical outcomes of the affected individual [1]. Each disorder individually impacts tens of millions of people, with explosive epidemics described worldwide. Drug users have increased age matched morbidity and mortality for a number of medical and psychiatric conditions. HIV/AIDS, with its immunosuppressed states and direct virologic effects, exacerbate morbidity and mortality further among HIV-infected drug users. This article addresses the adverse consequences of HIV/AIDS, drug injection, the secondary comorbidities of both, and the impact of immunosuppression on presentation of disease as well as approaches to managing the HIV-infected drug user. PMID:17502234

  8. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  9. Patterns of Drug Use in a Sample of 200 Young Drug Users in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCambridge, Jim; Strang, John

    2004-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a secondary prevention intervention study was conducted to describe patterns of drug use in a non-treatment sample of young drug users recruited in ten further-education colleges across inner London. Participants were 200 young people who were either weekly cannabis users and/or who had…

  10. Perinatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women Users of Illegal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tenilson Amaral; Bersusa, Ana Aparecida Sanches; Santos, Tatiana Fiorelli Dos; Aquino, Márcia Maria Auxiliadora de; Mariani Neto, Corintio

    2016-04-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perinatal outcomes in pregnant women who use illicit drugs. Methods A retrospective observational study of patients who, at the time of delivery, were sent to or who spontaneously sought a public maternity hospital in the eastern area of São Paulo city. We compared the perinatal outcomes of two distinct groups of pregnant women - illicit drugs users and non-users - that gave birth in the same period and analyzed the obstetric and neonatal variables. We used Student's t-test to calculate the averages among the groups, and the Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test to compare categorical data from each group. Results We analyzed 166 women (83 users and 83 non-users) in both groups with a mean of age of 26 years. Ninety-five percent of the drug users would use crack or pure cocaine alone or associated with other psychoactive substances during pregnancy. Approximately half of the users group made no prenatal visit, compared with 2.4% in the non-users group (p < 0.001). Low birth weight (2,620 g versus 3,333 g on average, p < 0.001) and maternal syphilis (15.7% versus 0%, p < 0.001) were associated with the use of these illicit drugs. Conclusions The use of illicit drugs, mainly crack cocaine, represents an important perinatal risk. Any medical intervention in this population should combine adherence to prenatal care with strategies for reducing maternal exposure to illicit drugs. PMID:27088708

  11. Health education and knowledge assessment of HTLV-III diseases among intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, H M; French, J; Jackson, J; Hartsock, P I; MacDonald, M G; Weiss, S H

    1986-01-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type III (HTLV-III) is the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Since AIDS is not curable, public health efforts must be focused on decreasing AIDS transmission. 72% of all AIDS cases are male homosexuals; 17% are intravenous (IV) drug users; and 3% are hemophiliacs, blood recipients, and infants of these groups. The gay community is sufficiently organized to provide the necessary infrastructure for AIDS education and treatment; the drug users are not, and at least 1/3 of IV drug users share needles and syringes. In 1984 a cooperative study was undertaken in New Jersey by the New Jersey State Department of Health, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-III among IV drug users and to assess their knowledge about AIDS. Over 95% knew the severer symptoms of AIDS; 76% knew that most AIDS patients die within 2 years of diagnosis; but 9% thought AIDS could be treated. A year later in 1985 a similar knowledge assessment survey was done among 577 clients entering drug treatment programs in New Jersey. 90% of these respondents knew that homosexuals and IV drug users were the primary risk groups, but 11% thought alcoholics were also at risk, and 43% did not know that the infants of drug users were at risk. 84% knew that sex and shared needles were the major modes of transmission, but 1/3 thought that an infected person would immediately show visible signs of illness, and many did not know how rapidly AIDS killed. Also, many did not know how to adequately clean syringes. They thought boiling would damage the syringes, and only 1/3 knew that a dilute solution of household bleach kills the virus. New Jersey decided to use indigenous health workers, recruited from rehabilitated drug users, to educate the drug community. The core message was: get treatment; don't share needles; and if you must share needles, clean them. The same

  12. Factors associated with recent-onset injection drug use among drug users in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Irene; Ul-Hasan, Salman; Zafar, Tariq; Galai, Noya; Sherman, Susan G; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2007-01-01

    Seventy-two recent-onset injection drug users and 241 non-injection drug users were recruited in Quetta and Lahore, Pakistan, in 2003. Trained interviewers administered questionnaires regarding drug use behaviors and perceived changes in drug cost/supply. Logistic regression identified independent correlates of recent-onset injection. In Lahore, a perceived increase in drug cost was associated with higher odds of recent-onset injection, with no association in Quetta. Recent-onset injection was also associated with family history of drug use, group drug use, and sharing snorting/chasing tools. Changes in perception of the drug supply may be associated with recent-onset injection drug use. Familial/social influences were also associated with recent-onset injection, suggesting peer-led interventions could discourage transition to injection drug use. PMID:17613949

  13. Cohesive subgroups and drug user networks in Dhaka City, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Tarun Kanti; Gayen, Kaberi; Raeside, Robert; Elliott, Lawrie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to explore group drug taking behaviour in a slum area of Dhaka, Bangladesh. We set out to examine the relationships between those who met, at least weekly, to take illegal drugs together, and how these relationships might shape their drug behaviour. Sociometric and behavioural data were collected using questionnaires via semi-structured interviews. We found that the likelihood of injecting drugs and sharing needles increased with age, duration of group membership and length of drug use. Drug users were classified into two clusters: one was more cohesive and comprised longer-term users, who were more likely to inject drugs and had poorer physical and mental health. The other cluster comprised younger, better educated members who were more transient, less cohesive, less likely to inject drugs and had better health. Qualitative data suggested that members of the first cluster were less accepting of outsiders and confirmed more to group norms. We conclude that emotionally bonded cohesive subgroups acquire norms, which reinforce problematic drug-using behaviour. Thus, health initiatives need to consider group relationships and norms and those initiatives which work with networks may be more effective and more appropriate for low-income countries. PMID:21660788

  14. 76 FR 24035 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... legislation would be required for FDA to establish and collect user fees for generic drugs, and FDA is... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments... gather additional stakeholder input on the development of a generic drug user fee program. A user...

  15. 76 FR 44014 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... required for FDA to establish and collect user fees for generic drugs, and FDA has been engaged in... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments... gather additional stakeholder input on the development of a generic drug user fee program. A user...

  16. Injection Drug Users' Involvement In Drug Economy: Dynamics of Sociometric and Egocentric Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Latkin, Carl; Muth, Stephen Q; Rudolph, Abby

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the effect of social network cohesiveness on drug economy involvement, and to test whether this relationship is mediated by drug support network size in a sample of active injection drug users. Involvement in the drug economy was defined by self-report of participation in at least one of the following activities: selling drugs, holding drugs or money for drugs, providing street security for drug sellers, cutting/packaging/cooking drugs, selling or renting drug paraphernalia (e.g., pipes, tools, rigs), and injecting drugs in others' veins. The sample consists of 273 active injection drug users in Baltimore, Maryland who reported having injected drugs in the last 6 months and were recruited through either street outreach or by their network members. Egocentric drug support networks were assessed through a social network inventory at baseline. Sociometric networks were built upon the linkages by selected matching characteristics, and k-plex rank was used to characterize the level of cohesiveness of the individual to others in the social network. Although no direct effect was observed, structural equation modeling indicated k-plex rank was indirectly associated with drug economy involvement through drug support network size. These findings suggest the effects of large-scale sociometric networks on injectors' drug economy involvement may occur through their immediate egocentric networks. Future harm reduction programs for injection drug users (IDUs) should consider providing programs coupled with economic opportunities to those drug users within a cohesive network subgroup. Moreover, individuals with a high connectivity to others in their network may be optimal individuals to train for diffusing HIV prevention messages. PMID:25309015

  17. Do adolescent Ecstasy users have different attitudes towards drugs when compared to Marijuana users?

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Silvia S.; Storr, Carla L.; Alexandre, Pierre K.; Chilcoat, Howard D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Perceived risk and attitudes about the consequences of drug use, perceptions of others expectations and self-efficacy influence the intent to try drugs and continue drug use once use has started. We examine associations between adolescents’ attitudes and beliefs towards ecstasy use; because most ecstasy users have a history of marijuana use, we estimate the association for three groups of adolescents: non-marijuana/ecstasy users, marijuana users (used marijuana at least once but never used ecstasy) and ecstasy users (used ecstasy at least once). Methods Data from 5,049 adolescents aged 12–18 years old who had complete weighted data information in Round 2 of the Restricted Use Files (RUF) of the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY). Data were analyzed using jackknife weighted multinomial logistic regression models. Results Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy users were more likely to approve of marijuana and ecstasy use as compared to non-drug using youth. Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy users were more likely to have close friends who approved of ecstasy as compared to non-drug using youth. The magnitudes of these two associations were stronger for ecstasy use than for marijuana use in the final adjusted model. Our final adjusted model shows that approval of marijuana and ecstasy use was more strongly associated with marijuana and ecstasy use in adolescence than perceived risk in using both drugs. Conclusion Information about the risks and consequences of ecstasy use need to be presented to adolescents in order to attempt to reduce adolescents’ approval of ecstasy use as well as ecstasy experimentation. PMID:18068314

  18. Perceptions of parental bonding in freebase cocaine users versus non-illicit drug users

    PubMed Central

    Pettenon, Márcia; Kessler, Felix Henrique Paim; Guimarães, Luciano S. P.; Pedroso, Rosemeri Siqueira; Hauck, Simone; Pechansky, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Evidence has suggested that parenting styles have peculiar characteristics in families with drug-related issues. This study was undertaken to investigate the perception of crack (smoke cocaine) users and non-users about parental bonding quality regarding care and control in Brazil. Methods: A total of 198 hospitalized crack users and 104 users of any non-illicit drug were assessed using the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Results: Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that crack users were more likely (ORadj = 9.68; 95% CI: 2.82, 33.20) to perceive neglectful mothers, as well as more likely (ORadj = 4.71, 95% CI: 2.17, 10.22) to perceive controlling and affectionless fathers in comparison with non-illicit drug users who were more likely to perceive optimal parenting. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings indicate that the perception of neglectful mothers and affectionless controlling fathers may be associated with the tendency of the children to be less resilient when facing stressful events, leading them to a greater risk to use crack. PMID:25109717

  19. 78 FR 46958 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...,'' from the upper right-hand corner of your completed Animal Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet. Also write... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended...

  20. 77 FR 72356 - Animal Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the following meeting: Animal Drug User Fee Act. The topic to be discussed is proposed recommendations for the reauthorization of the Animal Drug User...

  1. Comorbidity and Risk Behaviors among Drug Users Not in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark E.; Brems, Christiane; Wells, Rebecca S.; Theno, Shelley A.; Fisher, Dennis G.

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of 700 drug users, 64% evidenced comorbidity (i.e., coexisting substance use and psychiatric disorders). Robust relationships between the presence of comorbidity and increased levels of risk behavior, such as needle sharing and trading sex for money, were revealed. (Contains 44 references and 2 tables.) (Author)

  2. Pregnancy and Sexual Health among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of…

  3. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Löckenhoff, Corinna E; Crum, Rosa M; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Costa, Paul T

    2008-01-01

    Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57) were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions. PMID:18405382

  4. Harms and benefits associated with psychoactive drugs: findings of an international survey of active drug users.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Celia J A; Noronha, Louise A; Muetzelfeldt, Mark; Feilding, Amanda; Fielding, Amanda; Curran, H Valerie

    2013-06-01

    There have been several recent efforts in the UK and the Netherlands to describe the harms of psychoactive substances based on ratings of either experts or drug users. This study aimed to assess the perceived benefits as well as harms of widely used recreational drugs, both licit and illicit, in an international sample of drug users. The survey was hosted at https://www.internationaldrugsurvey.org/ and was available in three languages. Residents reported their experience of 15 commonly used drugs or drug classes; regular users then rated their harms and benefits. In all, 5791 individuals from over 40 countries completed the survey, although the majority were from English speaking countries. Rankings of drugs differed across 10 categories of perceived benefits. Skunk and herbal cannabis were ranked consistently beneficial, whilst alcohol and tobacco fell below many classified drugs. There was no correlation at all between users' harm ranking of drugs and their classification in schedules of the USA or ABC system in the UK. Prescription analgesics, alcohol and tobacco were ranked within the top 10 most harmful drugs. These findings suggest that neither the UK nor US classification systems act to inform users of the harms of psychoactive substances. It is hoped the results might inform health professionals and educators of what are considered to be both the harms and benefits of psychoactive substances to young people. PMID:23438502

  5. 76 FR 45811 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates and payment procedures for fiscal year (FY) 2012 animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Animal Drug User Fee Act of 2003 (ADUFA) and the Animal Drug User Fee Amendments of 2008 (ADUFA II), authorizes FDA to collect user fees for certain animal drug applications and......

  6. International epidemiology of HIV and AIDS among injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Friedman, S R; Choopanya, K; Vanichseni, S; Ward, T P

    1992-10-01

    HIV/AIDS and iv drug use (IVDU) are of significant multinational scope and growing. Supporting increased IVDU in many countries are countries' geographical proximity to illicit drug trafficking distribution routes, law enforcement efforts which increase the demand for more efficient drug distribution and consumption, and countries' infrastructural and social modernization. Given the failures of intensified law enforcement efforts to thwart the use and proliferation of illegal drugs, countries with substantial IVDU should look away from preventing use to preventing HIV transmission within drug user populations. With HIV seroprevalence rates rapidly reaching 40-50% in some developing country IVDU groups, a variety of prevention programs is warranted. Such programs should be supported and implemented while prevention remains feasible. This paper examines the variation in HIV seroprevalence among IVD users, rapid HIV spread among users, HIV among IVDUs in Bangkok, emerging issues in HIV transmission among IVDUs, non-AIDS manifestations of HIV infection among IVDUs, prevention programs and effectiveness, and harm reduction. PMID:1466837

  7. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide. PMID:20724686

  8. Are payers treating orphan drugs differently?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joshua P.; Felix, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Background Some orphan drugs can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars annually per patient. As a result, payer sensitivity to the cost of orphan drugs is rising, particularly in light of increased numbers of new launches in recent years. In this article, we examine payer coverage in the United States, England and Wales, and the Netherlands of outpatient orphan drugs approved between 1983 and 2012, as well as the 11 most expensive orphan drugs. Methods We collected data from drug regulatory agencies as well as payers and drug evaluation authorities. Results We found that orphan drugs have more coverage restrictions than non-orphan drugs in all three jurisdictions. From an economic perspective, the fact that a drug is an orphan product or has a high per-unit price per se should not imply a special kind of evaluation by payers, or necessarily the imposition of more coverage restrictions. Conclusion Payers should consider the same set of decision criteria that they do with respect to non-orphan drugs: disease severity, availability of treatment alternatives, level of unmet medical need, and cost-effectiveness, criteria that justifiably may be taken into account and traded off against one another in prescribing and reimbursement decisions for orphan drugs.

  9. HIV post-exposure therapy for drug users in treatment.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P G

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of drug treatment program providers concerning human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) post-exposure therapy (PET) for drug users enrolled in drug treatment. This was a cross-sectional evaluation of drug treatment program providers in four methadone maintenance programs (MMPs) in New Haven, Connecticut. Thirty-five MMP providers including: 29 MMP treatment staff (physicians, nurses, counselors) and 6 primary care provider staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) participated in the study. The providers were presented with four case vignettes of individuals exposed to HIV through a needle stick ("stick"): a phlebotomist with occupational exposure (Case A) and three drug users with nonoccupational exposure to HIV (Cases B, C, and D). Case B had the same estimated future risk as Case A (three sticks/4 years) and the other cases had increased risk: Case C (four to six sticks/year) and Case D (monthly "sticks"). For each vignette, providers were asked whether they would offer HIV PET ("yes" or "no"). In addition, focus groups were held within each group of providers who were asked: "What role should drug treatment programs play in the implementation of PET?" All MMP staff (29/29) and primary care providers (6/6) felt that the phlebotomist with occupational exposure should be offered PET. The percent of MMP and Primary care provider staff recommending PET for the other cases were: Case B (MMP staff: 86% [25/29], PCPs: 100% [6/6]), Case C (MMP staff: 69% [20/29], PCPs: 33% [2/6]), and Case D (MMP staff: 59% [17/29], PCPs: 17% [1/6]). The "common themes" that were identified in the focus groups included: concern that MMPs lack resources to provide PET, the ethics of withholding PET, the "limit" on the number of times PET should be offered, and the role of PET in the overall HIV prevention message. Both MMP staff and PCPs felt that MMPs should have an "indirect" role in providing HIV PET by providing education

  10. Implicit prejudice toward injecting drug users predicts intentions to change jobs among drug and alcohol nurses.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, William; Brener, Loren; von Hippel, Courtney

    2008-01-01

    The meaning and importance of implicit prejudice is a source of considerable debate. One way to advance this debate is to assess whether implicit prejudice can predict independent variance, beyond that predicted by explicit prejudice, in meaningful and unambiguous behaviors or behavioral intentions. In the current research, drug and alcohol nurses reported their level of stress working with injecting drug users, their job satisfaction, their explicit prejudice toward injecting drug users, and their intentions to leave drug and alcohol nursing. The nurses also completed the Single Category Implicit Association Test, which measured their implicit prejudice toward injecting drug users. Analyses revealed that implicit prejudice was a significant mediator, beyond explicit prejudice and job satisfaction, of the relation between job stress and intention to change jobs. PMID:18181783

  11. Harms and benefits associated with psychoactive drugs: findings of an international survey of active drug users

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia JA; Noronha, Louise A; Muetzelfeldt, Mark; Fielding, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    There have been several recent efforts in the UK and the Netherlands to describe the harms of psychoactive substances based on ratings of either experts or drug users. This study aimed to assess the perceived benefits as well as harms of widely used recreational drugs, both licit and illicit, in an international sample of drug users. The survey was hosted at https://www.internationaldrugsurvey.org/ and was available in three languages. Residents reported their experience of 15 commonly used drugs or drug classes; regular users then rated their harms and benefits. In all, 5791 individuals from over 40 countries completed the survey, although the majority were from English speaking countries. Rankings of drugs differed across 10 categories of perceived benefits. Skunk and herbal cannabis were ranked consistently beneficial, whilst alcohol and tobacco fell below many classified drugs. There was no correlation at all between users’ harm ranking of drugs and their classification in schedules of the USA or ABC system in the UK. Prescription analgesics, alcohol and tobacco were ranked within the top 10 most harmful drugs. These findings suggest that neither the UK nor US classification systems act to inform users of the harms of psychoactive substances. It is hoped the results might inform health professionals and educators of what are considered to be both the harms and benefits of psychoactive substances to young people. PMID:23438502

  12. 76 FR 4119 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... related to a user fee for human generic drugs, and sought public input on such a program. The Agency... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening... comment period for the notice of public meeting entitled Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting;...

  13. 75 FR 67984 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... related to a user fee for human generic drugs, and sought public input on such a program. The Agency... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening... comment period for the notice of public meeting entitled Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting;...

  14. 75 FR 73103 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Animal Drug User...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Animal Drug User Fee Cover Sheet, Form 3546 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... solicits comments on burden hours necessary to complete FDA Form 3546, Animal Drug User Fee Act (ADUFA... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Animal Drug User Fee Cover Sheet; FDA Form 3546...

  15. 77 FR 43844 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet; Form FDA 3794 AGENCY: Food and Drug... 3794 entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet.'' DATES: Submit either electronic or written... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet; Form FDA...

  16. 75 FR 75175 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Animal Drug User...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Animal Drug User Fees and Fee Waivers and Reductions AGENCY: Food and Drug... notice solicits comments on the reporting requirements for the ] animal drug user fees and fee waivers... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Animal Drug User Fees and Fee Waivers and...

  17. Welfare Checks, Drug Consumption, and Health: Evidence from Vancouver Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Chris; Riddell, Rosemarie

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the link between welfare payments and drug use among injection drug users. The authors find an increase in the likelihood of an overdose in the days following check arrival, and in the probability of leaving the hospital against medical advice (AMA) on check day. Using the check arrival date as an instrument, we estimate…

  18. Mental Health Status, Drug Treatment Use, and Needle Sharing among Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Lena M.; Amodeo, Maryann; Chassler, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among mental health symptoms, drug treatment use, and needle sharing in a sample of 507 injection drug users (IDUs). Mental health symptoms were measured through the ASI psychiatric scale. A logistic regression model identified that some of the ASI items were associated with needle sharing in an opposing…

  19. Experienced drug users assess the relative harms and benefits of drugs: a web-based survey.

    PubMed

    Carhart-Harris, Robin Lester; Nutt, David John

    2013-01-01

    A web-based survey was used to consult the opinions of experienced drug users on matters related to drug harms. We identified a rare sample of 93 drug users with personal experience with 11 different illicit drugs that are widely used in the UK. Asked to assess the relative harms of these drugs, they ranked alcohol and tobacco as the most harmful, and three "Class A" drugs (MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin) and one class B (cannabis) were ranked as the four least harmful drugs. When asked to assess the relative potential for benefit of the 11 drugs, MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, and cannabis were ranked in the top four; and when asked why these drugs are beneficial, rather than simply report hedonic properties, they referred to potential therapeutic applications (e.g., as tools to assist psychotherapy). These results provide a useful insight into the opinions of experienced drug users on a subject about which they have a rare and intimate knowledge. PMID:24377171

  20. Border crossing to inject drugs in Mexico among injection drug users in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Tyson; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Garfein, Richard S; Patterson, Thomas L; Pollini, Robin A; Wagner, Karla D; Artamanova, Irina; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2012-04-01

    We examined correlates of ever injecting drugs in Mexico among residents of San Diego, California. From 2007 to 2010, injecting drug users (IDUs) in San Diego underwent an interviewer-administered survey. Logistic regression identified correlates of injection drug use in Mexico. Of 302 IDUs, 38% were Hispanic, 72% male and median age was 37; 27% ever injected in Mexico; 43% reported distributive syringe sharing there. Factors independently associated with ever injecting drugs in Mexico included being younger at first injection, injecting heroin, distributive syringe sharing at least half of the time, and transporting drugs over the last 6 months. One-quarter of IDUs reported ever injecting drugs in Mexico, among whom syringe sharing was common, suggesting possible mixing between IDUs in the Mexico-US border region. Prospective studies should monitor trends in cross-border drug use in light of recent Mexican drug policy reforms partially decriminalizing drug possession. PMID:21442300

  1. Gonorrhea among drug users: an Alaskan versus a national sample.

    PubMed

    Paschane, D M; Fisher, D G; Cagle, H H; Fenaughty, A M

    1998-05-01

    The study described here investigates the replicability of gender-specific risk profiles for gonorrhea based on an Alaskan sample compared to a U.S. national sample of drug users at risk for HIV infection. The Alaska sample (interviewed at a field station in Anchorage, Alaska; N=1,049) and the national sample (interviewed at 18 sites other than Alaska; N=17,619) consisted of cocaine smokers and injection drug users not in drug treatment. A history of gonorrhea infection was self-reported and coded as ever or never. The Anchorage and national risk profile for men included the following factors: (a) history of intranasal or parenteral cocaine use, (b) being black versus nonblack, (c) being older, (d) income from illegal activity, and (e) history of amphetamine use. The Anchorage and national risk profiles for women included the following factors: (a) trading sex for money, (b) being Native American versus non-Native American, and (c) trading sex for drugs. The Anchorage model for women included perceived homelessness as a factor, but it was not retained in the national model. The extent of the replicability of these models illustrates the generalizability of Alaskan findings to other U.S. drug-using populations. The authors also discuss the implications of these findings for disease prevention. PMID:9643466

  2. Drugs to Treat Nausea and Vomiting

    MedlinePlus

    ... state settlement of consumer fraud claims regarding the marketing of the prescription drug Neurontin (gabapentin). Women People Who May Have Higher Risk of Nausea and Vomiting Those under the age of 50 Women who had morning sickness during ...

  3. Best Drugs to Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... multistate settlement of consumer-fraud claims regarding the marketing of the prescription drug Neurontin (gabapentin). ... Build & Buy Car Buying Service Save thousands off MSRP with upfront dealer pricing information and a transparent car buying experience. See your ...

  4. HIV epidemic among drug users in China: 1995 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Guo, Wei; Li, Dongmin; Ding, Zhengwei; McGoogan, Jennifer M.; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zunyou; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe trends in the HIV epidemic among drug users (DUs) in China from 1995 to 2011. Design, setting and participants Datasets from China's national HIV/AIDS case reporting and sentinel surveillance systems as of December 2011 were used separately for descriptive analysis. Measures Changes in the geographic distribution of the number of HIV cases and HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs were examined. We also analyzed changes in HIV prevalence among the broader DU population, and drug use-related behaviors including types of drugs used, recent injecting, and recent needle sharing in the context of the rapid scale-up of DU sentinel sites and national harm reduction programs. Findings The HIV epidemic among China's DUs is still highly concentrated in five provinces. Here, HIV prevalence peaked at 30.3% (95% CI [28.6, 32.1]) among IDUs in 1999, and then gradually decreased to 10.9% (95% CI [10.6, 11.2]) by 2011. We observed a rapid increase in the use of “nightclub drugs” among DUs from 1.3% in 2004 to 24.4% in 2011. A decline in recent needle sharing among current IDU from 19.5% (95% CI [19.4, 19.6]) in 2006 to 11.3% (95% CI [11.2, 11.4]) in 2011 was found to be correlated with the rapid scale-up of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT; r(4) = - .94, p = 0.003) harm reduction efforts. Conclusions While needle sharing among current injecting drug users in China has declined dramatically and is correlated with the scale-up of national harm reduction efforts, the recent, rapid increased use of “nightclub drugs” presents a new challenge. PMID:25533861

  5. Buprenorphine substitution treatment in France: drug users' views of the doctor-user relationship

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Anne; Lert, France; Brodeur, Jean-Marc; Richard, Lucie

    2007-01-01

    The French system for drug substitution, or maintenance treatment, established in 1996, differs from the often strict conditions attached to methadone clinics in other countries. Because of the predominant role of general practitioners and the flexible prescription rules for Subutex® in France, the relationship between the physician and the drug user becomes a central element in the treatment. This article deals with the expectations that these users have of the physician, and their perception of his or her attitude towards them. In order to identify possible reasons for the absence of treatment compliance and of Subutex® misuse, it focuses on the users’ assessment of the physician’s response to the problems they report. This study, based on a diversified sample of 28 persons in treatment, showed 4 patterns of relationships between physicians and users, which differed in their focus: a) dosage, b) compliance, c) the person and d) obtaining a prescription. In all four case types, users had difficulty reporting other drug use or intravenous Subutex® injection within this relationship in which the stigma attached to drug dependence seems to reappear. Moreover, the lack of clarity about the treatment objectives and time frame limits the users’ ability to integrate the treatment into their lives and to commit themselves to it. The heterogeneity and fragility of the users’ situations are elements related to dependence that, during contact with the physician, require regular assessment of the individual’s situation and of the treatment objectives. This constant reappraisal of the situation with the physician should help to optimize the treatment and avoid the hiatus that can generate or continue “misuse.” PMID:17442473

  6. Perceptions of Genetic Testing and Genomic Medicine among Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, David C.; Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Friedman, Samuel R.; Jordan, Ashly E.; Hagan, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic testing will soon enter care for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and for addiction. There is a paucity of data on how to disseminate genetic testing into healthcare for marginalized populations. We explored drug users’ perceptions of genetic testing. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 34 drug users recruited from syringe exchange programs and an HIV clinic between May and June 2012. Individual interviews were conducted with participants reporting previous genetic testing. Results All participants expressed acceptance of genetic testing to improve care, but most had concerns regarding confidentiality and implications for law enforcement. Most expressed more comfort with genetic testing based on individual considerations rather than testing based on race/ethnicity. Participants expressed comfort with genetic testing in medical care rather than drug treatment settings and when specifically asked permission, with peer support, and given a clear rationale. Conclusions Although participants understood the potential value of genetic testing, concerns regarding breaches in confidentiality and discrimination may reduce testing willingness. Safeguards against these risks, peer support, and testing in medical settings based on individual factors and with clear rationales provided may be critical in efforts to promote acceptance of genetic testing among drug users. PMID:25037119

  7. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders Among Young Injection Drug Users*

    PubMed Central

    Mackesy-Amiti, Mary E.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Ouellet, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of individuals in treatment for substance use have found high rates of psychiatric disorders, however little is known about the mental health of drug users not in treatment. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of lifetime and recent substance use and psychiatric disorders among young injection drug users (IDU) outside of a treatment setting. Methods Participants were recruited through outreach and respondent-driven sampling. Trained interviewers administered the Psychiatric Research Instrument for Substance and Mental Disorders. Interviews were conducted at two field stations operated by Community Outreach Intervention Projects in Chicago. Participants were 570 young adults (18-25 years) who injected drugs in the previous 30 days. Heroin was the primary drug used in this sample. Past 12-month and lifetime substance use disorders and primary and substance-induced mental disorders were based on DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Results Nearly all participants met the criteria for heroin dependence. Multiple substance use disorders were common; cannabis was the most common substance involved after heroin, followed by alcohol and cocaine. Major depression, alcohol dependence, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder were highly prevalent. Other psychiatric disorders were observed at levels consistent with other young adult samples. Conclusions Young IDU experience major depression, alcohol dependence, anti-social personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder at high rates, and multiple substance use disorders are common. Anxiety disorders in this population appear to be similar in prevalence to young adults in general. PMID:22226707

  8. "Why Has It Only become an Issue Now?": Young Drug Users' Perceptions of Drug Driving in Melbourne, Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laura Ann; Wilson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary research into drug-user perceptions of drug driving was undertaken with a sample group of drug users aged 18 to 24 from Melbourne, Victoria. Eleven males and nine females participated in semi-structured interviews and completed self-report surveys. Participants discussed their drug driving and their perceptions of the likelihood of…

  9. Overdose experiences among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although previous studies have identified high levels of drug-related harm in Thailand, little is known about illicit drug overdose experiences among Thai drug users. We sought to investigate non-fatal overdose experiences and responses to overdose among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users (IDU) in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods Data for these analyses came from IDU participating in the Mit Sampan Community Research Project. The primary outcome of interest was a self-reported history of non-fatal overdose. We calculated the prevalence of past overdose and estimated its relationship with individual, drug-using, social, and structural factors using multivariate logistic regression. We also assessed the prevalence of ever witnessing an overdose and patterns of response to overdose. Results These analyses included 252 individuals; their median age was 36.5 years (IQR: 29.0 - 44.0) and 66 (26.2%) were female. A history of non-fatal overdose was reported by 75 (29.8%) participants. In a multivariate model, reporting a history of overdose was independently associated with a history of incarceration (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52 - 9.65, p = 0.004) and reporting use of drugs in combination (AOR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16 - 5.33, p = 0.019). A majority (67.9%) reported a history of witnessing an overdose; most reported responding to the most recent overdose using first aid (79.5%). Conclusions Experiencing and witnessing an overdose were common in this sample of Thai IDU. These findings support the need for increased provision of evidence-based responses to overdose including peer-based overdose interventions. PMID:20465842

  10. The Effects of Childhood Exposure to Drug Users and Religion on Drug Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Joon; Johnson, Byron R.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research finds drug-using peers and religiosity to be key predictors of drug use among youth, but the effects of childhood exposure to drug users and religion on later drug use have been understudied. The authors hypothesize a child's exposure to parental drug use and religious upbringing have a causal influence on drug use in youth…

  11. Initiation into Prescription Opioid Misuse among Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Teti, Michelle; Silva, Karol; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Harocopos, Alex; Treese, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    Background Prescription opioids are the most frequently misused class of prescription drugs among young adults. Initiation into prescription opioid misuse is an important public health concern since opioids are increasingly associated with drug dependence and fatal overdose. Descriptive data about initiation into prescription opioid misuse among young injection drug users (IDUs) are scarce. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken to describe patterns of initiation into prescription opioid misuse among IDUs aged 16 to 25 years. Those young IDUs who had misused a prescription drug at least three times in the past three months were recruited during 2008 and 2009 in Los Angeles (n=25) and New York (n=25). Informed by an ethno-epidemiological approach, descriptive data from a semi-structured interview guide were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Results Initiation into prescription opioid misuse was facilitated by easy access to opioids via participant’s own prescription, family, or friends, and occurred earlier than misuse of other illicit drugs, such as heroin. Nearly all transitioned into sniffing opioids, most injected opioids, and many initiated injection drug use with an opioid. Motives for transitions to sniffing and injecting opioids included obtaining a more potent high and/or substituting for heroin; access to multiple sources of opioids was common among those who progressed to sniffing and injecting opioids. Conclusion Prescription opioid misuse was a key feature of trajectories into injection drug use and/or heroin use among this sample of young IDUs. A new pattern of drug use may be emerging whereby IDUs initiate prescription opioid misuse before using heroin. PMID:21689917

  12. 76 FR 14028 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... questions related to a user fee for human generic drugs and sought public input on such a program. The... FR 47820), entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments.'' In that notice... a generic drug user fee program. In the last docket reopening on January 24, 2011 (76 FR 4119),...

  13. How do researchers categorize drugs, and how do drug users categorize them?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juliet P.; Antin, Tamar M.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers drug classifications and terms widely used in US survey research, and compares these to classifications and terms used by drug users. We begin with a critical review of drug classification systems, including those oriented to public policy and health services as well as survey research. We then consider the results of a pile sort exercise we conducted with 76 respondents within a mixed method study of Southeast Asian American adolescent and young adult drug users in urban Northern California, USA. We included the pile sort to clarify how respondents handled specific terms which we understood to be related to Ecstasy and methamphetamines. Results of the pile sort were analyzed using graphic layout algorithms as well as content analysis of pile labels. Similar to the national surveys, our respondents consistently differentiated Ecstasy terms from methamphetamine terms. We found high agreement between some specific local terms (thizz, crystal) and popular drug terms, while other terms thought to be mainstream (crank, speed) were reported as unknown by many respondents. In labeling piles, respondents created taxonomies based on consumption method (in particular, pill) as well as the social contexts of use. We conclude by proposing that divergences between drug terms utilized in survey research and those used by drug users may reflect two opposing tendencies: the tendency of survey researchers to utilize standardized language that constructs persons and experiences as relatively homogeneous, varying only within measurable degrees, and the tendency of drug users to utilize specialized language (argot) that reflects their understandings of their experiences as hybrid and diverse. The findings problematize the validity of drug terms and categories used in survey research. PMID:24431475

  14. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  15. New Drug May Treat Rare Obesity Disorder Causing Constant Hunger

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159982.html New Drug May Treat Rare Obesity Disorder Causing Constant ... been no good replacement for MSH. In the new study, researchers in France and Germany tested an ...

  16. 76 FR 45814 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates and payment procedures for fiscal year (FY) 2012 generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act of 2008 (AGDUFA), authorizes FDA to collect user fees for certain abbreviated applications for generic new animal drugs, on certain generic......

  17. Prevalence of skin problems and leg ulceration in a sample of young injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    condition that is costly to treat and has long-term implications for drug users and services caring for current or former injectors long after illicit drug use has ceased. PMID:25119472

  18. HIV-associated risk behaviour among drug users at drug rehabilitation centres.

    PubMed

    Fauziah, M N; Anita, S; Sha'ari, B N; Rosli, B I

    2003-06-01

    A cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and HIV-associated risk behavior was conducted in February 1998 among 6,324 drug users in 26 drug rehabilitation centres in Malaysia. The majority of respondents were males (97.3%) and Malays (77.8%), administered drugs intravenously (64.6%) and of these 65.4% shared needles. About 78.1% had sexual exposure, of which 55.1% had sex with girl friends, 31.3% with prostitutes and 4.6% with male partners. The HIV prevalence rate in the group was 12.1% and significantly high among injecting drug users (IDU); those sharing needles; those who started addiction at a young age (10-15 years); those who had sexual exposures and had sex with prostitutes. PMID:14569748

  19. Syringe Disposal Among Injection Drug Users in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Carpenter, Lisa; Geckeler, Dara; Colfax, Grant; Kral, Alex H.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of improperly discarded syringes and to examine syringe disposal practices of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco, we visually inspected 1000 random city blocks and conducted a survey of 602 IDUs. We found 20 syringes on the streets we inspected. IDUs reported disposing of 13% of syringes improperly. In multivariate analysis, obtaining syringes from syringe exchange programs was found to be protective against improper disposal, and injecting in public places was predictive of improper disposal. Few syringes posed a public health threat. PMID:20466956

  20. New Drugs for Treating Dyslipidemia: Beyond Statins

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Ho

    2015-01-01

    Statins have been shown to be very effective and safe in numerous randomized clinical trials, and became the implacable first-line treatment against atherogenic dyslipidemia. However, even with optimal statin treatment, 60% to 80% of residual cardiovascular risk still exists. The patients with familial hypercholesterolemia which results in extremely high level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level and the patients who are intolerant or unresponsive to statins are the other hurdles of statin treatment. Recently, new classes of lipid-lowering drugs have been developed and some of them are available for the clinical practice. The pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexintype 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor increases the expression of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in hepatocytes by enhancing LDL receptor recycling. The microsomal triglyceride transport protein (MTP) inhibitor and antisense oligonucleotide against apolipoprotein B (ApoB) reduce the ApoB containing lipoprotein by blocking the hepatic very low density lipoprotein synthesis pathway. The apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) mimetics pursuing the beneficial effect of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and can reverse the course of atherosclerosis. ApoA1 mimetics had many controversial clinical data and need more validation in humans. The PCSK9 inhibitor recently showed promising results of significant LDL-C lowering in familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients from the long-term phase III trials. The MTP inhibitor and antisesnse oligonucleotide against ApoB were approved for the treatment of homozygous FH but still needs more consolidated evidences about hepatic safety such as hepatosteatosis. We would discuss the benefits and concerns of these new lipid-lowering drugs anticipating additional benefits beyond statin treatment. PMID:25922802

  1. 75 FR 45632 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...), beginning with the letters AD, from the upper right-hand corner of your completed Animal Drug User Fee Cover... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal... Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates and payment procedures for fiscal year (FY) 2011 animal drug...

  2. The “hidden” epidemic: a snapshot of Moroccan intravenous drug users

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus is a persistent epidemiological problem, with an estimated 170 million individuals infected worldwide, and the leading cause of asymptomatic chronic infection, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Injection drug users (IDUs) have the highest seroprevalence as compared to chronic hemodialysis and transfusion patients, and this cohort remains the most under-studied high-risk group in North Africa to date. This study first sought to characterize the demographic, epidemiological, and genotypic profile of a total sample size of 211 chronically-infected IDUs living in the Tangier region of Northern Morocco, and secondly to contrast this to other chronically-infected patients, in order to uncover possible discrepancies. Results The general ‘profile’ of local IDUs marks a stark contrast to chronically-infected HCV Moroccan patients, other African countries, and neighboring European countries. The majority of Moroccan drug users were found to be middle-aged and celibate. A relatively high seroprevalence was found among drug users (60%), and this increased with age. The majority of drug users shared their needles and this hold implications for transmission, as seropositive status was significantly different between those users that shared vs. those that did not share their needles. In addition, IDUs exhibited genotypes 1a and 3a predominantly, as compared to the predominant 1b and 2a/2c genotypes found in chronically HCV-infected patients. The IDU genotypic profile closely matches the one in other European countries (Portugal, Spain, France, and Italy), which are invariably speculated as the potential source of currently-circulating genotypes in Moroccan IDUs. Conclusion These findings have implications for disease prevention, transmission and treatment, as this distinct IDU subgroup cannot be collectively pooled along with other HCV-positive high-risk groups. Local government, practitioners, and health institutions should take this

  3. A trial to reduce hepatitis C seroincidence in drug users.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Herman, Debra S; Anderson, Bradley J

    2009-10-01

    To test whether a four-session motivational intervention would reduce hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroincidence among injection and non-injection drug users compared to an assessment-only condition, we performed a randomized 24-month clinical trial. At baseline, 277 participants reported using heroin or cocaine at least three times weekly were HCV antibody negative, 65% were male and 46% were Caucasian and 39% reported having injected drugs. Of the 15 (5.4%) individuals who seroconverted, all reported injecting drugs either at baseline or during follow-up. Seroconversion rates did not differ significantly by treatment assignment (p =.79). The annual HCV incident rate was 8.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.76-14.13) for injectors and 0.74 (95% CI = 0.19-2.98) for non-injectors per 100 person-years. Significantly fewer participants in the intervention group initiated injection drug use behaviors (p =.009). This intervention was no more effective at reducing HCV seroconversion than assessment alone but did decrease injection initiation. PMID:20155608

  4. Sexual Risk Intervention In Multiethnic Drug And Alcohol Users

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah L.; Weiss, Stephen M.; Chitalu, Ndashi; Villar, Olga; Kumar, Mahendra; Bwalya, Violet; Mumbi, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    An estimated 38.6 million persons globally are living with HIV, of whom over 1.1 million reside in Zambia. Of the 2 million cases in the US, 64% of new cases among women are among African Americans. Alcohol and drug use represents a significant risk factor for HIV transmission among both Zambians and African Americans. In addition, gender dynamics in both the US and Zambia promote transmission. This study examines two interventions targeting HIV risk behavior among HIV positive substance users, women in Miami, USA (the New Opportunities for Women (NOW) Project) and men in Lusaka, Zambia (the Partner Project). The study compares the efficacy of these two culturally tailored sexual behavior interventions provided in group and individual session formats. US and Zambian participants increased sexual barrier use and reduced substance-related sexual risk. Comparatively greater gains were made by higher risk Zambian males than US females in both group and individual conditions. Among lower risk participants, women in the group condition achieved and sustained the greatest comparative risk reductions. Results suggest that cost effective group HIV transmission risk reduction interventions for multiethnic individuals can be successfully implemented among both female and male drug and alcohol users in multinational settings. PMID:18629378

  5. Barriers to Employment among Unemployed Drug Users: Age Predicts Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur Oli; Ring, Brandon M.; O’Reilly, Kristen; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug users in treatment or exiting treatment face many barriers to employment when entering the job market, such as low levels of education and technical skills, and low levels of interpersonal skills. As a result of these and other barriers, employment rates in these groups are generally low. Objective This article examines the existence and possible predictors of specific barriers to employment related to interpersonal and technical skills in a sample of participants enrolled in a therapeutic workplace intervention for substance abuse. Methods In Study I (N = 77), we characterized and examined predictors of participant scores on a staff-rated scale of interpersonal skills (Work Behavior Inventory). In Study II (N = 29), we examined whether participants had lower levels of computer knowledge than job seekers in the general population, and investigated possible predictors of computer knowledge in the sample. Results In general, participants in Study I displayed low levels of interpersonal skills, and participants in Study II scored lower on the computer knowledge test than job seekers in the general population. Older participants tended to have lower levels of interpersonal skills and lower levels of computer knowledge. Conclusions and Scientific Significance These results suggest that providers of workforce development services for drug users in treatment or exiting treatment should attend to these specific barriers to employment, which may also be more pronounced among older clients. PMID:22242680

  6. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice, request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is announcing...

  7. 78 FR 78366 - Draft Generic Drug User Fee Act Information Technology Plan; Availability for Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Generic Drug User Fee Act Information Technology Plan; Availability for Comment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51,...

  8. Cross-border drug injection relationships among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karla D.; Pollini, Robin A.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Vera, Alicia; Volkmann, Tyson A.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Background International borders are unique social and environmental contexts characterized by high levels of mobility. Among drug users, mobility increases risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in part through its effects on the social environment. However, the social dynamics of drug users living in border regions are understudied. Methods 1056 injection drug users (IDUs) residing in Tijuana, Mexico were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) from 2006 to 2007, and underwent surveys and testing for HIV, syphilis, and tuberculosis (TB). Using logistic regression on baseline data, we identified correlates of having ever injected drugs with someone from the US. Results Almost half (48%) reported ever injecting drugs with someone from the US. In RDS-adjusted logistic regression, factors independently associated with having ever injected with someone from the US included: having greater than middle school education (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 2.91; 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 1.52, 5.91), speaking English (AOR 3.24, 95% C.I. 1.96, 5.36), age (AOR 1.10 per year; 95% C.I. 1.07, 1.14), age at initiation of injection drug use (AOR 0.90 per year; 95% C.I. 0.86, 0.94), homelessness (AOR 2.61; 95% C.I. 1.27, 5.39), and having ever been incarcerated (AOR 11.82; 95% C.I., 5.22, 26.77). No associations with HIV, syphilis, TB, drug use, or injection risk behavior were detected. Conclusion Findings suggest that IDU networks in Mexico and the US may transcend international borders, with implications for cross-border transmission of infectious disease. Binational programs and policies need to consider the structure and geographic distribution of drug using networks. PMID:20889270

  9. Predictors of High Rates of Suicidal Ideation Among Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Cottler, Linda B.; Campbell, Wilbur; Krishna, V. A. S.; Cunningham-Williams, Renee M.; Ben Abdallah, Arbi

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have attempted to understand the link among substance abuse, depression, and suicidal ideation (SI). Assessment of this link is important to develop specific interventions for persons in substance abuse treatment. This association was tested among 990 drug users in and out of treatment with significant criminal justice histories from two National Institute on Drug Abuse studies. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule and Substance Abuse Module assessed DSM-III-R depression, number of depression criteria met, antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and substance use disorders. Compared with men, women were twice as likely to report depression (24% vs. 12%), whereas men were nearly twice as likely to report ASPD (42% vs. 24%). High rates of SI were found, with women more likely than men to report thoughts of death (50% vs. 31%), wanting to die (39% vs. 21%), thoughts of committing suicide (47% vs. 33%), or attempting suicide (33% vs. 11%); 63% of women and 47% of men reported at least one of these suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Male and female ideators were more likely than nonideators to report depressed mood and to meet criteria for depression, ASPD, and alcohol use disorders. Male ideators were more likely than male nonideators to meet criteria for cocaine use disorders. Using logistic regression, SI among men was predicted by alcohol use disorder (OR = 1.60), ASPD (OR = 1.59), and number of depression criteria (OR = 9.38 for five criteria). Among women, SI was predicted by older age, marital status, alcohol use disorder (OR = 2.77), and number of depression criteria (OR = 9.12 for five criteria). These original findings point out the need to discuss suicidal thoughts among depressed drug users for early treatment and prevention. PMID:15985836

  10. Policing Drug Users in Russia: Risk, Fear, and Structural Violence

    PubMed Central

    Sarang, Anya; Rhodes, Tim; Sheon, Nicolas; Page, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    We undertook qualitative interviews with 209 injecting drug users (primarily heroin) in three Russian cities: Moscow, Barnaul, and Volgograd. We explored drug injectors’ accounts of HIV and health risk. Policing practices and how these violate health and self emerged as a primary theme. Findings show that policing practices violate health and rights directly, but also indirectly, through the reproduction of social suffering. Extrajudicial policing practices produce fear and terror in the day-to-day lives of drug injectors, and ranged from the mundane (arrest without legal justification; the planting of evidence to expedite arrest or detainment; the extortion of money or drugs for police gain) to the extreme (physical violence as a means of facilitating ‘confession’ and as an act of ‘moral’ punishment without legal cause or rationale; the use of methods of ‘torture’; and rape). We identify the concept of police bespredel – living with the sense that there are ‘no limits’ to police power – as key to perpetuating fear and terror, internalized stigma, and a sense of fatalist risk acceptance. ‘Police besprediel’ is analyzed as a form of structural violence, contributing to ‘oppression illness’. Yet we also identify cases of resistance to such oppression, characterised by strategies to preserve dignity and hope. We identify hope for change as a resource of risk reduction as well as escape, if only temporarily, from the pervasiveness of social suffering. Future drug policies, and the state responses they sponsor, should set out to promote public health while protecting human rights, hope and human dignity. PMID:20397872

  11. DRUG DEALING CESSATION AMONG A COHORT OF DRUG USERS IN VANCOUVER, CANADA

    PubMed Central

    Werb, Dan; Bouchard, Martin; Kerr, Thomas; Shoveller, Jean; Qi, Jiezhi; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Drug dealing among drug users has been associated with elevated risk-taking and negative health outcomes. However, little is known about the cessation of drug dealing among this population. Methods We assessed time to cessation of drug dealing using Cox regression. We also used generalized estimation equation (GEE) analysis and chi-square analysis to examine factors associated with willingness to cease drug dealing. Results In total, 868 participants reported drug dealing between November 2005 and March 2009. Among 381 participants dealing drugs at baseline, 194 (51%) ceased dealing. Incidence of dealing cessation was positively associated with spending less than $50 per day on drugs (Adjusted Hazard Ratio [AHR] = 1.88, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.14 - 3.10) and negatively associated with buying drugs from the same source (AHR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.37 - 0.98). In a GEE analysis, willingness to cease dealing was positively associated with older age (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.03), crack use (AOR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.44 - 2.79), public injecting (AOR = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.55 - 2.43), and reporting that police presence affects drug purchases (AOR = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.22 - 1.91), and negatively associated with crystal methamphetamine injection (AOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.47 - 0.83). Discussion Intensity of drug use and acquisition method were predictive of dealing cessation. Willingness to cease dealing was associated with a range of risky drug-related activities. Interventions to reduce drug dealing should be conceived in tandem with addiction treatment strategies. PMID:21664770

  12. Policing drug users in Russia: risk, fear, and structural violence.

    PubMed

    Sarang, Anya; Rhodes, Tim; Sheon, Nicolas; Page, Kimberly

    2010-05-01

    We undertook qualitative interviews with 209 injecting drug users (IDUs) (primarily heroin) in three Russian cities: Moscow, Barnaul, and Volgograd. We explored IDU's accounts of HIV and health risk. Policing practices and how these violate health and self, emerged as a primary theme. Findings show that policing practices violate health and rights directly, but also indirectly, through the reproduction of social suffering. Extrajudicial policing practices produce fear and terror in the day-to-day lives of drug injectors, and ranged from the mundane (arrest without legal justification; the planting of evidence to expedite arrest or detainment; and the extortion of money or drugs for police gain) to the extreme (physical violence as a means of facilitating "confession" and as an act of "moral" punishment without legal cause or rationale; the use of methods of "torture"; and rape). We identify the concept of police bespredel-living with the sense that there are "no limits" to police power-as a key to perpetuating fear and terror, internalized stigma, and a sense of fatalist risk acceptance. Police besprediel is analyzed as a form of structural violence, contributing to "oppression illness." Yet, we also identify cases of resistance to such oppression, characterized by strategies to preserve dignity and hope. We identify hope for change as a resource of risk reduction as well as escape, if only temporarily, from the pervasiveness of social suffering. Future drug use(r)-related policies, and the state responses they sponsor, should set out to promote public health while protecting human rights, hope, and dignity. PMID:20397872

  13. Pregnancy and sexual health among homeless young injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E; Sanders, Bill; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer

    2009-04-01

    Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of prenatal care, and histories of sexual victimization are described. A total of 81 lifetime pregnancies and 26 children were reported. Infrequent and ineffective use of contraception was common. While pregnancy motivated some homeless youth to establish housing, miscarriages and terminations were more frequent among youth who reported being housed. Widespread access to prenatal and medical services was reported during pregnancy, but utilization varied. Many women continued to use substances throughout pregnancy. Several youth reported childhood sexual abuse and sexual victimization while homeless. Pregnancy presents a unique opportunity to encourage positive health behaviors in a high-risk population seldom seen in a clinical setting. PMID:18692891

  14. Therapeutic effects of acetylspiramycin and garlicin on cryptosporidiosis among drug users

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Zhu; Li, Jin; Guan, Lan; Li, Deng-Qing; Nie, Xin-Min; Gui, Rong; Chen, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis affects humans of all ages, particularly malnourished children and those with compromised immune systems such as HIV/AIDS. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of acetylspiramycin and garlicin on Cryptosporidium infection in institutionalized male drug users receiving rehabilitative treatment. Examination of stool specimens from 903 drug users via modified acid-fast bacilli staining resulted in 172 positive cases. Among them 151 subjects consented to participate in a randomized trial of acetylspiramycin and garlicin in four groups: acetylspiramycin plus garlicin, acetylspiramycin only, garlicin only, and placebo control. The cryptosporidiosis rate was higher in younger subjects with longer drug use history than subjects who are older with shorter history of drug use. After two segments of treatments, 76.2% of the cases achieved negative test results, with the four groups achieving the rates of 92.1%, 76.7%, 72.2%, and 61.8%, respectively (χ2 = 9.517, P = 0.023). These results indicate clinical potential of garlicin in conjunction with acetylspiramycin in treating cryptosporidiosis. PMID:27120065

  15. 77 FR 45624 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... published the notice of FY 2012 fees in the Federal Register on August 1, 2011 (76 FR 45811). The bottom... with the letters AD, from the upper right-hand corner of your completed Animal Drug User Fee Cover... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for...

  16. 76 FR 33307 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ..., 75 FR 47820, FDA published a notice soliciting comment on development of a generic drug user fee... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Extension... public meeting, that appeared in the Federal Register of August 9, 2010 (75 FR 47820). In the notice,...

  17. Methamphetamine Users in a Community-Based Drug Court: Does Gender Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jennifer L.; Listwan, Shelley Johnson; Shaffer, Deborah Koetzle

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines men and women methamphetamine (meth) users who participated in a community-based drug court. The treatment of female drug users is a particularly salient issue because of the concerns with relapse and recidivism. For the current study, we studied the impact of the drug court by gender on a group of high-risk/high-need meth…

  18. 76 FR 79195 - Animal Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... September 20, 2011 (76 FR 58279). In that notice, FDA requested comments on the Animal Drug User Fee Act... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment...

  19. Nonnatural deaths among users of illicit drugs: pathological findings and illicit drug abuse stigmata.

    PubMed

    Delaveris, Gerd Jorunn Møller; Hoff-Olsen, Per; Rogde, Sidsel

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to provide information on illicit drug abuse stigmata and general pathological findings among an adult narcotic drug-using population aged 20 to 59 years whose death was nonnatural. A total of 1603 medicolegal autopsy reports from 2000 to 2009 concerning cases positive for morphine, heroin, amphetamines, ecstasy, cannabis, LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), PCP (phencyclidine), and high levels of GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) in addition to methadone and buprenorphine were investigated. Reported findings of hepatitis, portal lymphadenopathy, recent injection marks, drug user's equipment, and numbers of significant pathological conditions were registered and analyzed according to cases positive for opiates, opioids (OPs), and central nervous system (CNS)-stimulating illicit drugs, respectively. Of the selected cases, 1305 were positive for one or more opiate or OP. Cases positive for OPs had significantly more findings of noninfectious pathological conditions. Hepatitis, portal lymphadenopathy, recent injections marks findings of drug user's equipment were all findings found more frequently among the opiate OP-positive individuals. Portal lymphadenopathy was significantly more often found in cases with hepatitis than in cases with other or no infection. In the population positive for CNS stimulants, hepatitis recent injection marks were more frequent findings than in the CNS stimulant-negative group, irrespective of whether they were opiate OP positive or negative. PMID:25590496

  20. Limited uptake of hepatitis C treatment among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shruti H; Genberg, Becky L; Astemborski, Jacquie; Kavasery, Ravi; Kirk, Gregory D; Vlahov, David; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Thomas, David L

    2008-06-01

    We characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment knowledge, experience and barriers in a cohort of community-based injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, MD. In 2005, a questionnaire on HCV treatment knowledge, experience and barriers was administered to HCV-infected IDUs. Self-reported treatment was confirmed from medical records. Of 597 participants, 71% were male, 95% African-American, 31% HIV co-infected and 94% were infected with HCV genotype 1; 70% were aware that treatment was available, but only 22% understood that HCV could be cured. Of 418 who had heard of treatment, 86 (21%) reported an evaluation by a provider that included a discussion of treatment of whom 30 refused treatment, 20 deferred and 36 reported initiating treatment (6% overall). The most common reasons for refusal were related to treatment-related perceptions and a low perceived need of treatment. Compared to those who had discussed treatment with their provider, those who had not were more likely to be injecting drugs, less likely to have health insurance, and less knowledgeable about treatment. Low HCV treatment effectiveness was observed in this IDU population. Comprehensive integrated care strategies that incorporate education, case-management and peer support are needed to improve care and treatment of HCV-infected IDUs. PMID:18165889

  1. [Therapeutic techniques and subjectivation in treatment with drug users].

    PubMed

    Garbi, Silvana Laura; Touris, María Cecilia; Epele, María

    2012-07-01

    The internment process in therapeutic communities (TC) involves a multiplicity of therapeutic practices and strategies geared to abstinence from drug usage. According to the specialists' own regulations and explicit objectives, the residents must not only abandon the consumption of substances but also adopt new practices, attitudes, emotions and significances through the use of therapeutic techniques that allow them to adapt to the structure of the organization that these institutions impose. Based on the results of the ethnographic survey carried out between 2009 and 2010 in three TCs of the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires, Argentina, the scope of this article is to analyze from a sociological and anthropological standpoint the "therapeutic tools" that comprise the treatment, the subject models that underlie these tools, the consequences that they may produce and their participation in the subjectivity production processes. For this purpose, we focus on analysis of "confrontation" as a privileged and omnipresent strategy of subjectivation in these therapeutic contexts, in order to reveal the epistemological, economic, political and ethical dimensions in the de-subjectivation process of the institutionalized drug user. PMID:22872349

  2. Infective endocarditis in an HIV-infected intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Mėlinytė, Karolina; Savickaitė, Jurgita; Rekienė, Daiva Emilija; Naudžiūnas, Albinas; Burkauskienė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Laima

    2015-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common complication among injecting drug users. Disease risk among these patients is increased by the spread of HIV infection. In the following article, we discuss the exceptional clinical presentation of a 28-year-old patient who used intravenous drugs (heroin) for 10 years, had been infected with HIV for seven years and as a complication had developed Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis. The patient came to the hospital in serious condition, complaining of bodily pain, swelling of the legs and general weakness. During hospitalization, besides infective endocarditis, she was also diagnosed with anemia, toxic hepatitis, renal failure, ascites, sepsis, and pneumonia. A completely disrupted tricuspid valve, damaged aortic valve, and fibrosis of the mitral valve were detected. Echocardiographic and radiologic data showed that the patient's condition continued to deteriorate day by day, with significant progression of heart failure, ejection fraction decreasing from 45% to 10%, and development of myocarditis, hydrothorax and pericarditis. However, this progressive worsening of the patient's condition ceased when vancomycin was administered. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case described in the literature in which significant improvement was observed despite the patient's complex condition with associated complications. PMID:26417654

  3. Prevalence and correlates of HIV risk behaviors among drug users in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiushi; Latkin, Carl; Celentano, David; Luo, Huasong

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of HIV risk behaviors among 1,153 current drug users in China. Chi-squared tests of differences were used to test if drug users differed from non-users; logistic regression was used to identify behavior-specific risk factors. Results indicate that 60% of drug users injected drugs and more than one third shared needles. Compared to non-users, drug users had higher rates of risky sexual behavior and HIV/STDs. Among drug users, ethnic minorities and migrants were most vulnerable to unprotected casual sex and needle sharing. Drug users who experienced social isolation were associated with lower odds of risk behaviors; those who had experiences of anti-social behaviors and commercial sex, poor HIV knowledge, and perceived greater vulnerability were more prone to unprotected casual sex and needle sharing. Additional correlates of unprotected casual sex included being single, depression, and taking drugs/alcohol during sex. Additional risk factors of needle sharing included education and initiated drug use at younger ages. It is imperative that HIV interventions in China target drug users and address behavior-specific risk factors. PMID:16323036

  4. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B markers among incarcerated intravenous drug users

    PubMed Central

    Nokhodian, Zary; Yaran, Majid; Adibi, Peyman; Kassaian, Nazila; Meshkati, Marjan; Ataei, Behrooz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Drug injection is one of the most prominent risk factors for transmission of viral hepatitis. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is generally higher in prisoners compared with the general population. The object of this study was to assess the markers of HBV and related risk factors among intravenous drug users (IVDU) in prisoners. Materials and Methods: Through a cross-sectional study in 2012 HBV infection and its risk factors were assessed in prisoners with a history of intravenous drug use in Isfahan, Iran. A checklist was fulfilled for each participant and 5 ml blood was taken from each subject. Sera were analyzed for markers of the hepatitis B: Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAb) and hepatitis B virus core antibody (HBcAb) by ELISA. We used Chi-square test and logistic regression model to analyze data and P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All of the studied participants (n = 970) were men. The mean ± standard deviation of the age of the subjects was 32.61 ± 8.1 years and the majority of them had less than high school education. More than 40% of these men had a history of injection drug inside prison and 2.27% of them self-reported history of HBV infection. Of the 970 IVDU, 32 (3.3%) were positive for HBsAg. Among HBsAg + subjects, 23 (71.88%) were HBcAb+. 120 (12.37%) were found positive for isolated HBsAb, 45 (4.64%) for isolated HBcAb and 67 (6.9%) for both HBsAb and HBcAb. History of sharing needle (odds ratio: 2.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-4.65) had a significant association with HBsAg positivity. Conclusion: The results suggest that history of sharing needle had a significant association with HBsAg positivity. It seems that educational programs for injecting drug related behaviors, especially syringe sharing, are needed for IVDU. PMID:25002887

  5. Longitudinal Trajectories of Ketamine Use among Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Shin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic that became increasing popular in the club and rave scene in the 1980s and 1990s. Reports surfaced in the late 1990s indicating that ketamine was being injected in several U.S. cities by young injection drug users (IDUs). Since all studies on ketamine injection were cross-sectional, a longitudinal study was undertaken in 2005 to determine: characteristics of young IDUs who continue to inject ketamine; frequency of ketamine injection over an extended time period; risks associated with ongoing ketamine injection; and environmental factors that impact patterns of ketamine use. Methods Young IDUs aged 16 to 29 with a history of injecting ketamine (n=101) were recruited from public locations in Los Angeles and followed during a two-year longitudinal study. A semi-structured instrument captured quantitative and qualitative data on patterns of ketamine injection and other drug use. A statistical model sorted IDUs who completed three or more interviews (n=66) into three groups based upon patterns of ketamine injection at baseline and follow-up. Qualitative analysis focused on detailed case studies within each group. Results IDUs recruited at baseline were typically in their early 20s, male, heterosexual, white, and homeless. Longitudinal injection trajectories included: “Moderates,” who injected ketamine several times per year (n=5); “Occasionals,” who injected ketamine approximately once per year (n=21); and “Abstainers,” who did not inject any ketamine during follow-up (n=40). Findings suggest that ketamine is infrequently injected compared to other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine. Most IDUs who begin injecting ketamine will stop or curb use due to: negative or ambivalent experiences associated with ketamine; an inability to find the drug due to declining supply; or maturing out of injecting drugs more generally. Conclusion Reducing ketamine injection among young IDUs may best be accomplished

  6. Values and beliefs of psychedelic drug users: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Michael; Lyvers, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Psychedelic drugs such as LSD and psilocybin are often claimed to be capable of inducing life-changing experiences described as mystical or transcendental, especially if high doses are taken. The present study examined possible enduring effects of such experiences by comparing users of psychedelic drugs (n = 88), users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs (e.g., marijuana, amphetamines) (n = 29) and non illicit drug-using social drinkers (n = 66) on questionnaire measures of values, beliefs and emotional empathy. Samples were obtained from Israel (n = 110) and Australia (n = 73) in a cross-cultural comparison to see if values associated with psychedelic drug use transcended culture of origin. Psychedelic users scored significantly higher on mystical beliefs (e.g., oneness with God and the universe) and life values of spirituality and concern for others than the other groups, and lower on the value of financial prosperity, irrespective of culture of origin. Users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs scored significantly lower on a measure of coping ability than both psychedelic users and non illicit drug users. Both groups of illegal drug users scored significantly higher on empathy than non illicit drug users. Results are discussed in the context of earlier findings from Pahnke (1966) and Doblin (1991) of the transformative effect of psychedelic experiences, although the possibility remains that present findings reflect predrug characteristics of those who chose to take psychedelic drugs rather than effects of the drugs themselves. PMID:16903453

  7. A qualitative exploration of prescription opioid injection among street-based drug users in Toronto: behaviours, preferences and drug availability

    PubMed Central

    Firestone, Michelle; Fischer, Benedikt

    2008-01-01

    Background There is evidence of a high prevalence of prescription opioid (PO) and crack use among street drug users in Toronto. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe drug use behaviours and preferences as well as the social and environmental context surrounding the use of these drugs among young and old street-based drug injection drug users (IDUs). Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 25 PO injectors. Topics covered included drug use history, types of drugs used, how drugs were purchased and transitions to PO use. Interviews were taped and transcribed. Content analysis was conducted to identify themes. Results Five prominent themes emerged from the interviews: 1) Combination of crack and prescription opioids, 2) First injection experience and transition to prescription opioids, 3) Drug preferences and availability, 4) Housing and income and 5) Obtaining drugs. There was consensus that OxyContin and crack were the most commonly available drugs on the streets of Toronto. Drug use preferences and behaviours were influenced by the availability of drugs, the desired effect, ease of administration and expectations around the purity of the drugs. Distinct experiences were observed among younger users as compared to older users. In particular, the initiation of injection drug use and experimentation with POs among younger users was influenced by their experiences on the street, their peers and general curiosity. Conclusion Given the current profile of street-based drug market in Toronto and the emergence of crack and POs as two predominant illicit drug groups, understanding drug use patterns and socio-economic factors among younger and older users in this population has important implications for preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:18928556

  8. Injection drug users' and their risk networks experiences of and attitudes toward drug dealer violence in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl A.; Yang, Cui; Tobin, Karin E.; German, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Background A large portion of violence associated with drug use is due to drug dealing. These analyses sought to examine injection drug users' attitudes and experiences of drug dealer violence. Methods The current study used the 18-month follow up data of STEP into Action (STEP) study, an HIV prevention intervention among drug injectors and their risk network members conducted in Baltimore, Maryland. Four scales assessed acceptability of drug dealer violence, willingness to talk to drug users about avoiding drug dealer violence, social norms about reporting drug dealer violence, and intentions to report drug dealer violence to the police. Results Many (44%) of the 373 participants reported witnessing drug dealers' acts of violence within the prior 6 months. Although the majority of participants disagreed with statements on the acceptability of dealers using violence, only a minority indicated that they would call the police if they observed dealer violence. Most participants indicated that they would be interested in talking to drug users about how to avoid violent dealers. Males were more likely to report that violence was acceptable, whereas African Americans were less likely to condone violence. Those who were homeless and had higher incomes were more likely to report witnessing drug dealer violence. Conclusions These results suggest that it may be feasible to train current and former drug users and their risk network members in methods to promote violence reduction among drug dealers. PMID:22959117

  9. Male injection drug users try new drugs following U.S. deportation to Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Angela M.; Rangel, M. Gudelia; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Among male injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, U.S. deportation is associated with HIV transmission. Changing drug use behaviors following deportation, including the use of new drugs, may increase HIV risk but are understudied. We identify correlates of trying new drugs following male IDUs’ most recent U.S. deportation to Mexico. Methods In 2010, we recruited 328 deported male IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico. Questionnaires collected retrospective data on drug use and other HIV risk behaviors throughout migratory events. Logistic regression identified correlates of trying new drugs/combinations following their most recent deportations. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Results Nearly one in six men (n=52, 16%) tried new drugs following their most recent deportation, including heroin (n=31), methamphetamine (n=5), and heroin/methamphetamine combined (n=17). Trying new drugs following deportation was independently associated with U.S. incarceration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]= 3.96; 95% confidence interval [C.I.] 1.78, 8.84), increasing numbers of U.S. deportations (AOR=1.11 per deportation; C.I. 1.03, 1.20), feeling sad following deportation (AOR 2.69; C.I. 1.41, 5.14), and perceiving that one’s current lifestyle increases HIV/AIDS risk (AOR 3.91; C.I. 2.05, 7.44). Conclusions Trying new drugs following U.S. deportation may be related to the unique contexts and stressors experienced by drug-abusing migrants as they attempt to reestablish their lives in Mexico. Findings imply an unmet need for health and social programs to alleviate pre-and post-deportation stressors faced by undocumented and return migrants in the U.S.-Mexico context. PMID:21835559

  10. Injection drug users as social actors: a stigmatized community's participation in the syringe exchange programmes of New York City.

    PubMed

    Henman, A R; Paone, D; Des Jarlais, D C; Kochems, L M; Friedman, S R

    1998-08-01

    In 1992, New York State Department of Health regulations provided for fully legal syringe exchange programmes in the state. The policies and procedures mandated that: 'Each program must seek to recruit ... for inclusion on its advisory board ... program participants ... Programs are also urged to establish other advisory bodies, such as Users' Advisory Boards made up of program participants, to provide input and guidance on program policies and operations.' The inclusion of drug users as official advisors to the legal programmes was seen as a method for incorporating the views of the consumers of the service in operational decisions. The 1992 regulations implied a new public image for users of illicit psychoactive drugs: active drug users were seen to be capable not only of self-protective actions (such as avoiding HIV infection), but also of serving as competent collaborators in programmes to preserve the public health. This development has important implications with regard to the evolution of official drug policy, since it will be difficult in future to treat IDUs simply as the passive objects of state intervention. Whether as individuals or representatives of a wider population of illicit drug users, they have acquired a legitimacy and sense of personal worth which would have been unthinkable in previous periods. PMID:9828960

  11. Personality Differences between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Treated Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biasco, Frank; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined personality differences in 71 residents in a community drug abuse program, using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Results showed successfully treated patients tended to be more aware of their problems and realize a greater need for help. They were slightly more depressed, suspicious, and anxious than unsuccessful patients.…

  12. The challenges of treating epilepsy with 25 antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Santulli, Lia; Coppola, Antonietta; Balestrini, Simona; Striano, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays a substantial armamentarium of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is available, including drugs with different mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and tolerability; therefore the choice for the right treatment is often challenging. The specific characteristic of the drug, the epileptic syndrome, seizure types and the patient's features need to be taken into consideration driving the choice through available evidence-based studies, which are often lacking for older AEDs. Besides, study conditions in registered clinical trials (RCTs) are quite different from daily clinical practice, which is more complex and various. When dealing with first diagnosed epilepsy, monotherapy is widely accepted as the gold standard option. Likewise, alternative monotherapy should be considered when the first drug treatment fails. However, the association of different AEDs in polytherapy is a common practice. The choice of AEDs used in association is often based on clinical experience or anecdotal observations or small clinical studies. Polytherapy should be as "rational" as possible and consider the mechanism of action, the pharmacokinetic characteristics and the safety of each drug. When dealing with drug resistant patients, clinicians should never give up and consider the use of AEDs acting on new targets. An attempt to come back to a monotherapy or simpler therapeutic regimen should be pursued even in patients who were previously drug resistant. This review will focus on the strategies to treat epilepsy by choosing among 25 available drugs. PMID:26995307

  13. [Prevention and treatment of hepatitis C in illicit drug users].

    PubMed

    Sakoman, Slavko

    2009-12-01

    Drug use is a complex behavior with multidimensional determinants, including social, psychological, cultural, economic, and biological factors. Blood borne viral infections including hepatitis C virus are transmitted when an uninfected intravenous drug user (IVDU) uses injection equipment, especially syringes, that have previously been used by an infected person. The transmission can also result from sharing other injection equipment such as 'cookers' and 'cottons'. Recent studies have shown that the prevalence and incidence of drug abuse have declined substantially since the introduction of needle exchange. Infection with hepatitis C may spontaneously resolve during the acute stage and never progress to chronic infection, or the infection may become chronic without medical complications, or the infection may become chronic with progressive medical complications. Regular testing for infection is an important strategy for secondary prevention of chronic hepatitis C infection. Care for hepatitis C is a vital component of a comprehensive health program for persons using illicit drugs. Such care includes screening for transmission risk behavior, prevention counseling and education, testing for HCV antibody and RNA. IDUs found to have chronic HCV infection should be assessed for the presence and degree of liver disease and evaluated for treatment for HCV Hepatitis C care also requires providing access to treatment for substance use and abuse. Therapy with opioid agonists, including methadone maintenance treatment, has been shown to diminish and often eliminate opioid use and reduce transmission of infection. Approval of buprenorphine makes office-based pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction possible. When considering treatment for hepatitis C, particular attention must be paid to mental health conditions. As a group, IDUs exhibit higher rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders than the general population. IFN-based regimens for hepatitis C are often complicated by

  14. Multiple routes of drug administration and HIV risk among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Uusküla, Anneli; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses relationships between drug administration routes and HIV serostatus, drug-use and sexual behaviors among current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. We recruited 350 IDUs for a cross-sectional risk behavior survey. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were calculated to explore injection risk behavior, sexual behavior and HIV serostatus associated with multiple route use. Focus groups explored reasons why injectors might use non-injecting routes of administration. Those reporting multiple drug administration routes were less likely to be HIV seropositive (AOR 0.49; 95%CI 0.25-0.97), had almost twice the odds of having more than one sexual partner (AOR 1.90; 95%CI 1.01-3.60) and of reporting having sexually transmitted diseases (AOR 2.38; 95%CI 1.02-5.59). IDUs who engage in non-injecting drug use may be reducing their risk of acquiring HIV though sharing injection equipment, but if infected may be a critical group for sexual transmission of HIV to people who do not inject drugs. PMID:22116012

  15. Treating drug dependence with the aid of ibogaine: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; de Castro Comis, Maria Angélica; Chaves, Bruno Rasmussen; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2014-11-01

    Ibogaine is an alkaloid purported to be an effective drug dependence treatment. However, its efficacy has been hard to evaluate, partly because it is illegal in some countries. In such places, treatments are conducted in underground settings where fatalities have occurred. In Brazil ibogaine is unregulated and a combined approach of psychotherapy and ibogaine is being practiced to treat addiction. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ibogaine, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from 75 previous alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and crack users (72% poly-drug users). We observed no serious adverse reactions or fatalities, and found 61% of participants abstinent. Participants treated with ibogaine only once reported abstinence for a median of 5.5 months and those treated multiple times for a median of 8.4 months. This increase was statistically significant (p < 0.001), and both single or multiple treatments led to longer abstinence periods than before the first ibogaine session (p < 0.001). These results suggest that the use of ibogaine supervised by a physician and accompanied by psychotherapy can facilitate prolonged periods of abstinence, without the occurrence of fatalities or complications. These results suggest that ibogaine can be a safe and effective treatment for dependence on stimulant and other non-opiate drugs. PMID:25271214

  16. Electrophysiological evidence of early attentional bias to drug-related pictures in chronic cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Asmaro, Deyar; Carolan, Patrick L; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of attentional bias to cannabis-related cues were investigated in a marijuana dependent group and a non-user group employing a drug Stroop task in which cannabis-related, negative and neutral images were presented. Behaviorally, cannabis users were less accurate during drug-containing blocks than non-users. Electrophysiologically, in chronic marijuana-users, an early positive ERP enhancement over left frontal scalp (EAP, 200-350ms) was present in response to drug-containing blocks relative to negative blocks. This effect was absent in the non-user group. Furthermore, drug-containing blocks gave rise to enhanced voltage of a posterior P300 (300-400ms), and a posterior sustained slow wave (LPP, 400-700ms) relative to negative blocks. However, such effects were similar between cannabis users and non-users. Brain source imaging in cannabis users revealed a generator for the EAP effect to drug stimuli in left ventromedial prefrontal cortex/medial orbitofrontal cortex, a region active in fMRI studies of drug cue-reactivity and a target of the core dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway involved in the processing of substances of abuse. This study identifies the timing and brain localization of an ERP correlate of early attentional capture to drug-related pictures in chronic marijuana users. The EAP to drug cues may identify a new electrophysiological marker with clinical implications for predicting abstinence versus relapse or to evaluate treatment interventions. PMID:24126204

  17. 77 FR 72359 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the following meeting: Animal Generic...

  18. Perceived Drug Use Functions and Risk Reduction Practices Among High-Risk Nonmedical Users of Prescription Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Karol; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Nonmedical use of prescription drugs has become the fastest growing drug problem in the United States, particularly among young adults. This study examines the reasons young polydrug users misuse prescription drugs, and explores how young users employ risk reduction strategies to minimize adverse consequences. The sample was recruited during 2008 and 2009 in Los Angeles and New York, and comprised 45 nonmedical users of prescription drugs, aged 16 to 25. Data from a semistructured interview were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Participants reported nonmedical use of prescription drugs to change mood, to facilitate activity, and to monitor the intake of other substances. Commonly employed risk reduction strategies included calculating pill timing, dosage, and access, and monitoring frequency of use, particularly when combining different substances. Most study participants often planned drug use to occur within socially acceptable parameters, such that prescription drug misuse was a normalized feature of their everyday lives. PMID:25477621

  19. Non-adherence to telemedicine interventions for drug users: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Taís de Campos; Signor, Luciana; Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Fernandes, Simone; Bortolon, Cassandra Borges; Benchaya, Mariana Canellas; Ferigolo, Maristela; Barros, Helena MT

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate rates of non-adherence to telemedicine strategies aimed at treating drug addiction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted of randomized controlled trials investigating different telemedicine treatment methods for drug addiction. The following databases were consulted between May 18, 2012 and June 21, 2012: PubMed, PsycINFO, SciELO, Wiley (The Cochrane Library), Embase, Clinical trials and Google Scholar. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. The criteria evaluated were: appropriate sequence of data generation, allocation concealment, blinding, description of losses and exclusions and analysis by intention to treat. There were 274 studies selected, of which 20 were analyzed. RESULTS Non-adherence rates varied between 15.0% and 70.0%. The interventions evaluated were of at least three months duration and, although they all used telemedicine as support, treatment methods differed. Regarding the quality of the studies, the values also varied from very poor to high quality. High quality studies showed better adherence rates, as did those using more than one technique of intervention and a limited treatment time. Mono-user studies showed better adherence rates than poly-user studies. CONCLUSIONS Rates of non-adherence to treatment involving telemedicine on the part of users of psycho-active substances differed considerably, depending on the country, the intervention method, follow-up time and substances used. Using more than one technique of intervention, short duration of treatment and the type of substance used by patients appear to facilitate adherence. PMID:25119947

  20. Organization of Needs in Male and Female Drug and Alcohol Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huba, George J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The Personality Research Form (PRF) was administered to 1,095 college students. Students were divided into groups of nonusers of drugs and alcohol and users of a variety of drug combinations. Results suggest organization of motivational tendencies is the same for both sexes and for different types of substance users. (Author)

  1. Could Education Contribute to Reduce Prevalence of HIV among Injecting Drug Users? A Case Study of IDUs from the Rehabilitation Center for Drugs Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2008-01-01

    This study primarily focuses on Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) from the Narconon Nepal for drugs rehabilitation and prevention center. The study attempt to explore the changing behavior of IDUs from the education received from the rehabilitation center which contributes to reduce the prevalence of HIV among IDUs. The data were collected through semi…

  2. Nicotinic receptor modulation to treat alcohol and drug dependence

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shafiqur; Engleman, Eric A.; Bell, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and drug dependence are serious public health problems worldwide. The prevalence of alcohol and drug dependence in the United States and other parts of the world is significant. Given the limitations in the efficacy of current pharmacotherapies to treat these disorders, research in developing alternative pharmacotherapies continues. Preclinical and clinical evidence thus far has indicated that brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are important pharmacological targets for the development of medications to treat alcohol and drug dependence. The nAChRs are a super family of ligand gated ion channels, and are expressed throughout the brain with twelve neuronal nAChR subunits (α2–α10 and β2–β4) identified. Here, we review preclinical and clinical evidence involving a number of nAChR ligands that target different nAChR subtypes in alcohol and nicotine addiction. The important ligands include cytisine, lobeline, mecamylamine, varenicline, sazetidine A and others that target α4β2* nAChR subtypes as small molecule modulators of the brain nicotinic cholinergic system are also discussed. Taken together, both preclinical and clinical data exist that support nAChR–based ligands as promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of alcohol and drug dependence. PMID:25642160

  3. Delivering care to injection drug users coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lynn E

    2005-04-15

    Injection drug use has fueled the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection in the United States. Nevertheless, drug dependence is among the main reasons that coinfected persons are not being treated for HCV infection. This report describes the development and progress of an HIV clinic program (funded by the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act) to deliver care for HCV infection to HIV-seropositive injection drug users. To optimize safety and adherence, pegylated interferon is directly administered to patients in the context of integrated addiction, psychiatric, and HIV and HCV therapy. Ribavirin is packed weekly in pill boxes for patients to take at home. Thus far, adherence to weekly visits for treatment with interferon has been 99%. No one has had to stop treatment for HCV infection because of ongoing drug use, addiction relapse or exacerbation, or psychiatric complications. Presented here is a work in progress, rather than a finished research project or definitive model of care. PMID:15768348

  4. Demographic characteristics, drug use, and sexual behavior of i.v. drug user with AIDS in Bronx, New York.

    PubMed Central

    Schrager, L; Friedland, G; Feiner, C; Kahl, P

    1991-01-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) drug users are a key factor in the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, yet epidemiologic information about this population, especially those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is scarce. The demographic characteristics, drug use behavior, and sexual practices of i.v. drug users who developed AIDS were prospectively studied at the Montefiore Medical Center from October 1984 to February 1988. The early wave of i.v. drug users with AIDS was characterized by poverty, minority overrepresentation (more than 80 percent were black or Hispanic), and initiation of i.v. drug use at an early age (median age 19 years). Injection of drugs and sharing of needles was frequent. Most had used so-called shooting galleries, but only for a minority of injection episodes. Heroin or cocaine use was almost universal, nearly always accompanied by abuse of another substance, usually alcohol or marijuana. Fewer than a third had ever participated in a methadone maintenance program, but more than 40 percent had been in prison since 1978. All patients had been sexually active, often with partners who were not i.v. drug users. The research suggests a complex interaction existing between high-risk demographic characteristics, drug use practice, and certain types of sexual behavior, all of which contributed to the early spread of HIV infection in this population. Efforts that are directed toward interrupting i.v. drug user-related transmission of HIV need to include consideration of these characteristics. PMID:1899944

  5. Film Technique for Assessing Attitudes toward Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren, Andrew; Eburne, Norman

    1981-01-01

    A color, sound film depicting five young people discussing drug use was used to test participants in three workshops and two regular drug courses. Results suggest that initial exposure to drug training increases acceptance of drug use, perhaps by dispelling fearsome myths, but extended training reinstates rejection. (Author)

  6. Alcohol and HIV sexual risk behaviors among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Arasteh, Kamyar; Des Jarlais, Don C; Perlis, Theresa E

    2008-05-01

    We analyzed data from 6341 injection drug users (IDUs) entering detoxification or methadone maintenance treatment in New York City between 1990 and 2004 to test the hypothesis that alcohol use and intoxication is associated with increased HIV sexual risk behaviors. Two types of associations were assessed: (1) a global association (i.e., the relationship between HIV sexual risk behaviors during the 6 months prior to the interview and at-risk drinking in that period, defined as more than 14 drinks per week for males or 7 drinks per week for females), and (2) an event-specific association (i.e., the relationship between HIV sexual risk behaviors during the most recent sex episode and alcohol intoxication during that episode). Sexual risk behaviors included multiple sex partners and engaging in unprotected sex. After adjusting for the effects of other variables, at-risk-drinkers were more likely to report multiple sex partners and engaging in unprotected sex with casual sex partners (both global associations). IDUs who reported both they and their casual partners were intoxicated during the most recent sex episode were more likely to engage in unprotected sex (an event-specific association). We also observed two significant interactions. Among IDUs who did not inject cocaine, moderate-drinkers were more likely to report multiple partners. Among self-reported HIV seropositive IDUs, when both primary partners were intoxicated during the most recent sex episode they were more likely to engage in unprotected sex. These observations indicate both global and event-specific associations of alcohol and HIV sexual-risk behaviors. PMID:18242009

  7. Research fatigue among injecting drug users in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Karachi is the largest metropolis of Pakistan and its economic hub attracting domestic migrants for economic opportunities. It is also the epicenter of HIV epidemic in the country. Since 2004, one pilot study and four behavioral and biological surveillance rounds have been conducted in Karachi. In addition many student research projects have also focused on key risk groups including injection drug users (IDUs). As a result of this extra ordinary exposure of same kind of questions, IDUs know how to respond to high value questions related to sharing of needles or unsafe sexual practices. The purpose of the study was to explore the element of research fatigue among IDUs in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods The study was conducted on 32 spots in Karachi, selected on the basis of estimate of IDUs at each spot. A trained field worker (recovered IDU) visited each spot; observed sharing behavior of IDUs and asked questions related to practices in January 2009. Verbal consent was obtained from each respondent before asking questions. Results On average 14 IDUs were present at each spot and out of 32 selected spots, 81% were active while more than two groups were present at 69% spots. In each group three to four IDUs were present and everyone in the group was sharing. One dose of injecting narcotics was observed. Sharing of syringes, needles and distilled water was observed at 63% spots while professional injector/street doctor was present at 60% spots. Conclusion There is a need to check internal consistency in surveillance research. It is highly likely that IDUs and other risk groups know how to respond to key questions but their responses do not match with the practices. PMID:23758666

  8. Social determinants and the health of drug users: socioeconomic status, homelessness, and incarceration.

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This article reviews the evidence on the adverse health consequences of low socioeconomic status, homelessness, and incarceration among drug users. OBSERVATIONS: Social and economic factors shape risk behavior and the health of drug users. They affect health indirectly by shaping individual drug-use behavior; they affect health directly by affecting the availability of resources, access to social welfare systems, marginalization, and compliance with medication. Minority groups experience a disproportionately high level of the social factors that adversely affect health, factors that contribute to disparities in health among drug users. CONCLUSION: Public health interventions aimed at improving the health of drug users must address the social factors that accompany and exacerbate the health consequences of illicit drug use. PMID:12435837

  9. Investigation of Gastroduodenal Mucosal Injury in Japanese Asymptomatic Antiplatelet Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Sogabe, Masahiro; Okahisa, Toshiya; Nakasono, Masahiko; Fujino, Yasuteru; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Takaoka, Yoshihumi; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-07-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cerebral vascular disorders. Although there have been several studies on gastroduodenal mucosal injury with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as GI bleeding, in antiplatelet drug users (including low-dose aspirin (LDA)), there have been few reports on the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users. This study was a cross-sectional study elucidating the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users.Subjects were 186 asymptomatic Japanese antiplatelet drug users who underwent a regular health checkup. Subjects were divided into those with and without gastroduodenal mucosal injury endoscopically, and the association between gastroduodenal mucosal injury and other data in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users was investigated.The prevalence of males and drinkers were significantly higher in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in those without. In addition, the prevalence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) users was significantly lower in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in subjects without gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Logistic regression analysis showed PPI (odds ratios: 0.116; 95% confidence intervals: 0.021-0.638; P < 0.05) was a significant predictor of a decreased prevalence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury and closed-type (C-type) atrophy (3.172; 1.322-7.609; P < 0.01) was a significant predictor of an increased prevalence of severe gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users.Gender and lifestyle, such as drinking, may have an impact on risk of gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic subjects taking antiplatelet drugs. Although PPI is a significant predictor of a decreased prevalence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury, including in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users, status of

  10. Early Onset of Drug and Polysubstance Use as Predictors of Injection Drug Use Among Adult Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Trenz, Rebecca C.; Scherer, Michael; Harrell, Paul; Zur, Julia; Sinha, Ashish; Latimer, William

    2012-01-01

    Early onset of alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette use is an indicator of later substance use problems in adulthood such as alcohol or other drug dependence. This paper seeks to address the association between early onset alcohol, marijuana, cigarette, and polysubstance use with injection drug use among recent illicit drug users. The current study used baseline data from the Baltimore site of the NEURO-HIV Epidemiologic Study, an investigation of neuropsychological and social-behavioral risk factors of HIV, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C among both injection and non-injection drug users in Baltimore Maryland. The present study used a subset (N = 651) of the larger parent study that identified as White or Black, and reported any drug use in the past 6 months. In the full sample slightly more than half (52.5%) of study participants were IDUs. IDUs differed from non-IDUs on age of initiation for cigarettes, marijuana, and alcohol, with IDUs initiating the use of all three substances significantly earlier than non-IDUs. IDUs also had significantly greater proportions of early onset of alcohol (χ2 = 19.71, p < .01), cigarette (χ2 = 11.05, p < .01), marijuana (χ2 = 10.83, p < .01), and polysubstance use (χ2 = 23.48, p < .01) than non-IDUs. After adjusting for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, only participants identified as early onset alcohol users (AOR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.00-2.18) and early onset polysubstance users (AOR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10-2.38) were more likely to have IDU status than those who reported initiating substance use later. IDU status was then stratified by race/ethnicity. After controlling for age and gender, only early polysubstance use was a significant predictor of IDU status for Whites (AOR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.07-3.93). Consistent with literature on early substance initiation and later illicit substance use, early onset alcohol and polysubstance use is an important risk factor for IDU in adulthood. PMID:22172686

  11. USER S GUIDE FOR THE RANDOM DRUG SCREENING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    McNeany, Karen I

    2013-12-01

    The Random Drug Screening System (RDSS) is a desktop computing application designed to assign nongameable drug testing dates to each member in a population of employees, within a specific time line. The program includes reporting capabilities, test form generation, unique test ID number assignment, and the ability to flag high-risk employees for a higher frequency of drug testing than the general population.

  12. Drug Users and Driving Behaviors. Research Issues 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Gregory A., Ed.; And Others

    A major factor in the American public's concern over unconventional drug use is its effect on traffic safety. This volume contains summaries of the latest experimental and epidemiological research on the interactions between drugs and driving behaviors. The experimental studies deal with the effects of drugs and cognition, coordination, reaction…

  13. Drug choice, spatial distribution, HIV risk, and HIV prevalence among injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Gina Rae; Barbour, Russell; Heimer, Robert; Shaboltas, Alla V; Toussova, Olga V; Hoffman, Irving F; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2009-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Russia has been driven by the unsafe injection of drugs, predominantly heroin and the ephedrine derived psychostimulants. Understanding differences in HIV risk behaviors among injectors associated with different substances has important implications for prevention programs. Methods We examined behaviors associated with HIV risk among 900 IDUs who inject heroin, psychostimulants, or multiple substances in 2002. Study participants completed screening questionnaires that provided data on sociodemographics, drug use, place of residence and injection- and sex-related HIV risk behaviors. HIV testing was performed and prevalence was modeled using general estimating equation (GEE) analysis. Individuals were clustered by neighborhood and disaggregated into three drug use categories: Heroin Only Users, Stimulant Only Users, and Mixed Drug Users. Results Among Heroin Only Users, younger age, front/backloading of syringes, sharing cotton and cookers were all significant predictors of HIV infection. In contrast, sharing needles and rinse water were significant among the Stimulant Only Users. The Mixed Drug Use group was similar to the Heroin Only Users with age, front/back loading, and sharing cotton significantly associated with HIV infection. These differences became apparent only when neighborhood of residence was included in models run using GEE. Conclusion The type of drug injected was associated with distinct behavioral risks. Risks specific to Stimulant Only Users appeared related to direct syringe sharing. The risks specific to the other two groups are common to the process of sharing drugs in preparation to injecting. Across the board, IDUs could profit from prevention education that emphasizes both access to clean syringes and preparing and apportioning drug with these clean syringes. However, attention to neighborhood differences might improve the intervention impact for injectors who favor different drugs. PMID:19646255

  14. 78 FR 46955 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Number (PIN), beginning with the letters AD, from the upper right-hand corner of your completed Animal... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal... Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates and payment procedures for fiscal year (FY) 2014 animal drug...

  15. 76 FR 79195 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... of September 20, 2011 (76 FR 58277). In that notice, FDA requested comments on the Animal Generic... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; reopening of the comment...

  16. Perspectives on Health among Adult Users of Illicit Stimulant Drugs in Rural Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Draus, Paul J.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although the nonmedical use of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine is increasingly common in many rural areas of the United States, little is known about the health beliefs of people who use these drugs. Purpose: This research describes illicit stimulant drug users' views on health and health-related concepts that may…

  17. Quantitative Authorship Attribution of Users of Mexican Drug Dealing Related Online Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rico Sulayes, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    As the violence in the Mexican drug war escalates, a proliferation of social media sites about drug trafficking in Mexico was followed by the murder of some of their users, and the eventual disappearance of many of those sites. Despite these events, there still exist a number of drug-dealing related social media outlets in this country with a…

  18. Possible FDA-approved drugs to treat Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shu

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for the Ebola virus (EBOV) thus far. Most drugs and vaccines developed to date have not yet been approved for human trials. Two FDA-approved c-AbI1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors Gleevec and Tasigna block the release of viral particles; however, their clinical dosages are much lower than the dosages required for effective EBOV suppression. An α-1,2-glucosidase inhibitor Miglustat has been shown to inhibit EBOV particle assembly and secretion. Additionally, the estrogen receptor modulators Clomiphene and Toremifene prevent membrane fusion of EBOV and 50-90% of treated mice survived after Clomiphene/Toremifene treatments. However, the uptake efficiency of Clomiphene by oral administration is very low. Thus, I propose a hypothetical treatment protocol to treat Ebola virus infection with a cumulative use of both Miglustat and Toremifene to inhibit the virus effectively and synergistically. EBOV infection induces massive apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes. Also, cytolysis of endothelial cells triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and subsequent multiple organ failures. Therefore, blood transfusions and active treatments with FDA-approved drugs to treat DIC are also recommended. PMID:25984303

  19. Recommendations for treating children with drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Luisa; Lancella, Laura; Garazzino, Silvia; Tadolini, Marina; Matteelli, Alberto; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Principi, Nicola; Villani, Alberto; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still one of the most difficult infectious diseases to treat, and the second most frequent cause of death due to infectious disease throughout the world. The number of cases of multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB), which are characterised by high mortality rates, is increasing. The therapeutic management of children with MDR- and XDR-TB is complicated by a lack of knowledge, and the fact that many potentially useful drugs are not registered for pediatric use and there are no formulations suitable for children in the first years of life. Furthermore, most of the available drugs are burdened by major adverse events that need to be taken into account, particularly in the case of prolonged therapy. This document describes the recommendations of a group of scientific societies on the therapeutic approach to pediatric MDR- and XDR-TB. On the basis of a systematic literature review and their personal clinical experience, the experts recommend that children with active TB caused by a drug-resistant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis should always be referred to a specialised centre because of the complexity of patient management, the paucity of pediatric data, and the high incidence of adverse events due to second-line anti-TB treatment. PMID:26821118

  20. Drug Use, Personality and Partner Violence: A Model of Separate, Additive, Contributions in an Active Drug User Sample

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Adi; Pedersen, William C.; Fisher, Dennis G.; Reynolds, Grace L.; Hershberger, Scott L.; Reise, Steve; Bentler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Drug use is considered a main contributing factor to crime and violence. This research examined the evidence regarding the relationship between drug abuse and the occurrence of intimate partner violence. Current drug using men were assessed on aggression related personality variables, their drug use, and the occurrence of violence in their close relationships. A latent aggression factor and recent amphetamine use were the only variables found to be significantly associated with violence. No other drug use variables were found to be associated with violence by the participant and the overall drug use factor was not found to be associated with violence or aggressive personality. The widely accepted notion that increased substance use directly leads to increases in violent behavior was only partially supported, at least within this drug using population. The assessment of aggressive personality, rather than of drug use, is suggested for correctional as well as clinical settings in which drug users are prevalent when determining susceptibility to violence. PMID:21165162

  1. Poly-Drug Use among Ecstasy Users: Separate, Synergistic, and Indiscriminate Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, M.; Sterk, C.; Bahora, M.; Elifson, K.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to explore poly-drug use among young adult ecstasy users. This phenomenon of using multiple substances within a specific time period is multi-faceted. In this paper, we focus on the various patterns of poly-drug use and the reasons for combining multiple drugs among ecstasy users. Using a mixed-methods design, we conducted interviews with young adults who used ecstasy and other licit and illicit drugs in the past 90 days. Based on the qualitative analyses, we define three distinct types of poly-drug experiences: separate, synergistic, and indiscriminate use. While separate and synergistic poly-drug use tended to be intentional, indiscriminate poly-drug use often was unintentional. These findings show the importance of recognizing poly-drug use as a common phenomenon. The findings presented here suggest areas for further research aimed at identifying risk and protective behaviors and risk reduction strategies. PMID:23913981

  2. Enzymuria determination in children treated with aminoglycosides drugs.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Karakani, A; Asgharzadeh-Haghighi, S; Ghazi-Khansari, M; Seyed-Ebrahimi, A; Ghasemi, A; Jabari, E

    2008-12-01

    Although aminoglycosides antibiotics are used in children and adult commonly, they have serious side effects such as nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. In clinical practice, for renal function, the levels of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen routinely are measured. Since these parameters have limitations such as unreliability, insensitivity, and nonspecificity, the rapid assessment of renal function based on these patients is very important. Increase in N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), a hydrolytic lysosomal enzyme, suggests proximal tubular cell damage. In this study, 32 children aged 2 months through 2 years, treated with gentamicin and amikacin for suspected infections at the pediatric ward of Alborz hospital from September 2006 to February 2007, were enrolled. Serum and fresh urine before and after drug infusion were obtained on the 1st, 3rd, and 5th days of antibiotic treatment. Serum urea and creatinine with urinary creatinine, albumin, NAG, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were then determined. A statistically significant increase in urinary NAG, LDH, and AP on 5th day was found compared with before gentamicin administration (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). The urinary NAG activity may be a useful indicator of renal injury in children treated with aminoglycosides drugs compared with other routine clinical indicators. PMID:19273542

  3. From Abstinence to Relapse: A Preliminary Qualitative Study of Drug Users in a Compulsory Drug Rehabilitation Center in Changsha, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Mamy, Jules; Gao, Pengcheng; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Relapse among abstinent drug users is normal. Several factors are related to relapse, but it remains unclear what individuals’ actual life circumstances are during periods of abstinence, and how these circumstances facilitate or prevent relapse. Objective To illuminate drug users’ experiences during abstinence periods and explore the real-life catalysts and inhibitors contributing to drug use relapse. Method Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 drug users recruited from a compulsory isolated drug rehabilitation center in Changsha. The interviews were guided by open-ended questions on individuals’ experiences in drug use initiation, getting addicted, treatment history, social environment, abstinence, and relapse. Participants were also encouraged to share their own stories. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. The data of 18 participants who reported abstinence experiences before admission were included in the analyses. The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis with inductive hand coding to derive themes. Results Most drug users were able to successfully abstain from drugs. During abstinence, their lives were congested with challenges, such as adverse socioeconomic conditions, poor family/social support, interpersonal conflicts, and stigma and discrimination, all of which kept them excluded from mainstream society. Furthermore, the police’s system of ID card registration, which identifies individuals as drug users, worsened already grave situations. Relapse triggers reported by the participants focused mainly on negative feelings, interpersonal conflicts, and stressful events. Craving was experienced but not perceived as a relapse trigger by most participants. Conclusions This study of in-depth interview with drug users found evidence of situations and environments they live during abstinence appear rather disadvantaged, making it extremely difficult for them to remain abstinent. Comprehensive programs

  4. Religiosity and exposure to users in explaining illicit drug use among emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Palamar, Joseph J; Kiang, Mathew V; Halkitis, Perry N

    2014-06-01

    Religiosity is a protective factor against illicit drug use, but further investigation is needed to delineate which components of religiosity are protective against use. A racially diverse sample (N = 962) was surveyed about religiosity, exposure to users, and recent use of marijuana, powder cocaine, ecstasy, and nonmedical use of opioids and amphetamine. Results suggest that identifying as Agnostic increased odds of use for each of the five drugs; however, this effect disappeared when controlling for religious importance and attendance. High levels of religious attendance were protective against recent use of marijuana and cocaine, but protective effects diminished when controlling for exposure to users, which was a robust predictor of use of every drug. Religion is a protective mechanism against drug use, but this effect may diminish in light of exposure to users. Alternative preventative methods need to be directed toward individuals who are not religious or are highly exposed to users. PMID:23114835

  5. Cardiovascular effects of drugs used to treat Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Howes, Laurence Guy

    2014-06-01

    Drugs that are used to treat Alzheimer's disease include the acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors (ACHIs) donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine and the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. Adverse cardiovascular events with these drugs are very uncommon. However, there is evidence that ACHI therapy is associated with a small but significant increase in the risk of syncope and bradycardia. There are also a few reports that these drugs may occasionally be associated with QT prolongation and torsades de pointes ventricular tachycardia. Adverse cardiovascular effects of ACHIs including syncope and bradycardia are less common than their adverse gastrointestinal effects, but they remain important considerations in susceptible individuals. In contrast, animal studies and some observational studies suggest that ACHIs may reduce myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality and have favourable effects on hemodynamics and survival in heart failure. Further research is required to confirm these potential beneficial effects. Little is known about the cardiovascular effects of memantine but there have been reports of bradycardia and reduced cardiovascular survival associated with its use. PMID:24777654

  6. Integrating services for injection drug users infected with hepatitis C virus with methadone maintenance treatment: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Alain H; Soloway, Irene; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2005-04-15

    Despite the high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among drug users enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment programs, few drug users are being treated with combination therapy. The most significant barrier to treatment is lack of access to comprehensive HCV-related care. We describe a pilot program to integrate care for HCV infection with substance abuse treatment in a setting of maintenance treatment with methadone. This on-site, multidisciplinary model of care includes comprehensive screening and treatment for HCV infection, assessment of eligibility, counseling with regard to substance abuse, psychiatric services, HCV support groups, directly observed therapy, and enhanced linkages to a tertiary care system for diagnostic procedures. Our approach has led to high levels of adherence, with liver biopsy and substantial rates of initiation of antiviral therapy. Two cases illustrate the successful application of this model to patients with HCV infection complicated by active substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:15768345

  7. Propensity to Work Among Chronically Unemployed Adult Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur Oli; DeFulio, Anthony; Long, Lauren; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Analyses were conducted to compare rates of employment before, during, and after employment at the therapeutic workplace, which is a novel employment-based treatment for drug misuse. Participants in two clinical trials attended the therapeutic workplace at higher rates than they worked before intake and six months after discharge. These data suggest that unemployed chronic drug misusers will attend work at higher rates at the therapeutic workplace than in the community when paid modest wages, and that the failure of chronic drug misusers to obtain employment in the community may not result from lack of interest in work. PMID:20964531

  8. Long-Term Effectiveness of Accelerated Hepatitis B Vaccination Schedule in Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P.; Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Nguyen, Anh T.; Lai, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We demonstrated the effectiveness of an accelerated hepatitis B vaccination schedule in drug users. Methods. We compared the long-term effectiveness of accelerated (0–1–2 months) and standard (0–1–6 months) hepatitis B vaccination schedules in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and anti-hepatitis B (anti-HBs) antibody loss during 2-year follow-up in 707 drug users (HIV and HBV negative at enrollment and completed 3 vaccine doses) from February 2004 to October 2009. Results. Drug users in the accelerated schedule group had significantly lower HBV infection rates, but had a similar rate of anti-HBs antibody loss compared with the standard schedule group over 2 years of follow-up. No chronic HBV infections were observed. Hepatitis C positivity at enrollment and age younger than 40 years were independent risk factors for HBV infection and antibody loss, respectively. Conclusions. An accelerated vaccination schedule was more preferable than a standard vaccination schedule in preventing HBV infections in drug users. To overcome the disadvantages of a standard vaccination schedule, an accelerated vaccination schedule should be considered in drug users with low adherence. Our study should be repeated in different cohorts to validate our findings and establish the role of an accelerated schedule in hepatitis B vaccination guidelines for drug users. PMID:25880946

  9. Medical and Nonmedical Users of Prescription Drugs among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozenbroek, Katelyn; Rothstein, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants taken individually and in combination. Participants: Undergraduates at an urban mid-Atlantic university with 12,000 students. Methods: A questionnaire administered in classes provided 413 responses, with a usable response…

  10. Treat Jail Detainees' Drug Abuse to Lower HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... Amphetamines Bath Salts Brain and Addiction Club Drugs Cocaine Emerging Drugs GHB Hallucinogens Heroin Illegal Drugs Inhalants ...

  11. Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery for treating melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Vaibhav; Li, Wei; Mahato, Ram I

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma originated from melanocytes is the most aggressive type of skin cancer with limited treatment options. New targeted therapeutic options with the discovery of BRAF and MEK inhibitors have shown significant survival benefits. Despite the recent progress, development of chemoresistance and systemic toxicity remains a challenge for treating metastatic melanoma. While the response from the first line of treatment against melanoma using dacarbazine remains only 5–10%, the prolonged use of targeted therapy against mutated oncogene BRAF develops chemoresistance. In this review, we will discuss the nanoparticle-based strategies for encapsulation and conjugation of drugs to the polymer for maximizing their tumor distribution through enhanced permeability and retention effect. We will also highlight photodynamic therapy and design of melanoma-targeted nanoparticles. PMID:26244818

  12. Nursing Care in Alcohol and Drug User Treatment Facilities.

    PubMed

    Naegle, Madeline A

    2015-01-01

    Registered and advanced practice nurses are employed in substance user treatment facilities across the US and in most industrialized countries. Patterns of employment and job descriptions for nurses, however, are highly inconsistent and seriously flawed. Many regulatory system, legislative and government agency factors and to some degree, the nursing profession itself, sustain the flaws and limit the delivery of comprehensive care. Competencies linked to addictions nursing best practices are often underutilized because of narrow job descriptions. This results in limited health and nursing service delivery to vulnerable populations receiving treatment in these government funded programs. This article highlights the increasing demand for the delivery of integrated care to psychiatric and substance using populations. The author considers factors which stake holders can influence to change flawed employment patterns and limited access to comprehensive care for substance users. PMID:26361920

  13. 76 FR 58277 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request... meeting participants better understand the history and evolution of AGDUFA, and its current status....

  14. 78 FR 53152 - Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... appeared in the Federal Register of August 2, 2013 (78 FR 46980). The document announced the Fiscal Year..., 301-796-7103. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of Friday, August 2, 2013, in FR Doc... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year...

  15. 78 FR 78367 - Draft Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Information Technology Plan; Availability for Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability for public comment of the draft information technology (IT) plan entitled ``PDUFA V Information Technology Plan.'' This plan is intended to provide FDA's approach for enhancing business processes, data quality and consistency, supporting technologies, and IT operations as described in the Prescription Drug User Fee Act......

  16. Sexual Risk Taking among HIV-Positive Injection Drug Users: Contexts, Characteristics, and Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kelly R.; Purcell, David; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Halkitis, Perry N.; Gomez, Cynthia A.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) (N = 161) were recruited to complete a qualitative interview and a quantitative survey about sexual behavior and transmission risk. We identified two contexts in which exposure encounters occurred most commonly for HIV-positive IDUs: in intimate serodiscordant relationships and in the drug/sex economy.…

  17. 76 FR 58020 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act IV Information Technology Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act IV Information Technology... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of an updated information technology (IT) plan entitled ``PDUFA IV Information Technology Plan'' (updated plan) to achieve the objectives defined in...

  18. Attitudes and knowledge about naloxone and overdose prevention among detained drug users in Ningbo, China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To date there has been limited research on both the prevalence of overdose and drug user knowledge about overdose prevention and response methods in China. In addition, there has been no effort to integrate naloxone information and distribution into pre-release services for drug users detained in isolated compulsory detoxification facilities in China. Methods The authors conducted a survey of 279 heroin users in isolated compulsory detoxification centers in Ningbo, China in an attempt to evaluate the possibility of conducting prelease peer naloxone programs in Ningbo isolated compulsory detoxification centers. Respondents' demographic background, history of heroin overdoses, and attitudes/knowledge about overdose prevention and response were collected. Results While drug users in Ningbo's compulsory detoxification centers have limited understandings of how to effectively respond to overdoses, they expressed concern about the possibility of overdose, interest in participating in overdose prevention and response programs, and a willingness to help their peers. In general, there was no significant difference in history and attitudes/knowledge of overdose between male and female participants. Conclusion Based on the findings of this research, our survey provides preliminary evidence that detained drug users have considerable interest in overdose prevention and response information and willingness to help peers. However, drug users in Ningbo isolated compulsory detoxification centers currently have limited understandings of effective ways of helping to prevent overdose deaths. PMID:22316338

  19. Overcoming Drug Resistance and Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Semenas, Julius; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Boorjian, Stephen A; Mongan, Nigel P; Persson, Jenny Liao

    2012-01-01

    Most of the prostate cancers (PCa) in advanced stage will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Within CRPC group, 50-70% of the patients will develop bone metastasis in axial and other regions of the skeleton. Once PCa cells spread to the bone, currently, no treatment regimens are available to eradicate the metastasis, and cancer-related death becomes inevitable. In 2012, it is estimated that there will be 28,170 PCa deaths in the United States. Thus, PCa bone metastasis-associated clinical complications and treatment resistance pose major clinical challenges. In this review, we will present recent findings on the molecular and cellular pathways that are responsible for bone metastasis of PCa. We will address several novel mechanisms with a focus on the role of bone and bone marrow microenvironment in promoting PCa metastasis, and will further discuss why prostate cancer cells preferentially metastasize to the bone. Additionally, we will discuss novel roles of several key pathways, including angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling in bone marrow and stem cell niches with their relationship to PCa bone metastasis and poor treatment response. We will evaluate how various chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation therapies may allow aggressive PCa cells to gain advantageous mutations leading to increased survival and rendering the cancer cells to become resistant to treatment. The novel concept relating several key survival and invasion signaling pathways to stem cell niches and treatment resistance will be reviewed. Lastly, we will provide an update of several recently developed novel drug candidates that target metastatic cancer microenvironments or niches, and discuss the advantages and significance provided by such therapeutic approaches in pursuit of overcoming drug resistance and treating advanced PCa. PMID:22746994

  20. Does harm reduction programming make a difference in the lives of highly marginalized, at-risk drug users?

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Susan J; Ruefli, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Harm reduction is a controversial model for treating drug users, with little formal research available on its operation and effectiveness. In order to advance the field, we first conducted participatory research of harm reduction with 120 clients using nominal-group technique to develop culturally relevant outcomes to measure progress. Second, we conducted focus group interviews with a different group of clients to help validate the outcomes. Third, we used the outcomes in an evaluation of the largest harm reduction program in New York City, which involved a representative sample of 261 and entailed baseline, post, and six follow-up assessments. The participatory research resulted in outcomes of 10 life areas important to drug users. Evaluation results showed that program participants made positive improvements across most outcomes, with the most substantial progress made in how clients dealt with drug-use problems. Along with their participation in the program, progress in some outcomes was also associated with clients' type of drug use (i.e., stable vs. chaotic), where more stable drug use was associated with better ways of making an income and types of housing. Surprisingly, progress was not associated with the kinds or numbers of services received or the length of time in the program. This was attributed to the service delivery model of harm reduction, in which clients are less inclined to associate their success with a single staff person or with a single service or intervention received than with the program as a whole. PMID:15171790

  1. Performance-Enhancing Drugs in Sports: How Chemists Catch Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, T. C.; Hatton, Caroline K.

    2011-01-01

    The "cat-and-mouse game" between those who enable athletes to use performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) and those who try to detect such use provides a wealth of interesting examples for the undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry classroom. In this article, we focus on several commonly used PEDs, including amphetamine, anabolic steroids,…

  2. Indicators of Adolescent Drug Users in a Clinical Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrier, Laurie K.; Lambert, Paul L.; Ramos, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    Analysis indicated a combination of physical abuse, sexual abuse, history of familial drug use, family violence, ethnicity, and a history of familial violence were significant in differentiating substance abusers from non-abusers. A separate analysis indicated that the significant variables grouped among three dimensions: violence, history of…

  3. Treatment motivation in drug users: a theory-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Longshore, Douglas; Teruya, Cheryl

    2006-02-01

    Motivation for drug use treatment is widely regarded as crucial to a client's engagement in treatment and success in quitting drug use. Motivation is typically measured with items reflecting high treatment readiness (e.g., perceived need for treatment and commitment to participate) and low treatment resistance (e.g., skepticism regarding benefits of treatment). Building upon reactance theory and the psychotherapeutic construct of resistance, we conceptualized these two aspects of treatment motivation - readiness and resistance - as distinct constructs and examined their predictive power in a sample of 1295 drug-using offenders referred to treatment while on probation. The sample was 60.7% African Americans, 33.5% non-Hispanic Whites, and 21.2% women; their ages ranged from 16 to 63 years old. Interviews occurred at treatment entry and 6 months later. Readiness (but not resistance) predicted treatment retention during the 6-month period. Resistance (but not readiness) predicted drug use, especially among offenders for whom the treatment referral was coercive. These findings suggest that readiness and resistance should both be assessed among clients entering treatment, especially when the referral is coercive. Intake and counseling protocols should address readiness and resistance separately. PMID:16051447

  4. HIV and drug users in Ukraine: building confidence to reduce HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Hyde, L

    1999-09-01

    This article discusses the programs of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) towards the drug practices and sexual behaviors of HIV infected individuals and drug users in Mykolaiv, Ukraine. Blagodiynist (Charity Foundation), one of the NGOs operating in Ukraine, has been helping drug users and sex workers. This group has collaborated with other group projects to produce better and effective interventions. As such, the needle-exchange project was organized, where drug users could not only exchange needles for clean ones, but also obtain information, advice, and even condoms. Role model stories approach was also another effective method that Blagodiynist utilized to make drug users and sex workers aware not only of the risk and reality of HIV, but to encourage behavior change as well, and to generate the self-confidence needed to alter their erroneous practices. The fact that sex workers and drug users have begun to take the risks of HIV infection seriously and have taken measures to protect themselves, reflect the success of these programs. PMID:12322332

  5. 75 FR 69093 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reopening until October 31, 2011, the comment period for the notice of public meeting that published in the Federal Register of March 16, 2010 (75 FR 12555). In the notice, FDA announced a public meeting to solicit input on the reauthorization of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) program. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act)......

  6. Health and Human Rights Concerns of Drug Users in Detention in Guangxi Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J. Elizabeth; Amon, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Background Although confinement in drug detoxification (“detox”) and re-education through labor (RTL) centers is the most common form of treatment for drug dependence in China, little has been published about the experience of drug users in such settings. We conducted an assessment of the impact of detention on drug users' access to HIV prevention and treatment services and consequent threats to fundamental human rights protections. Methods and Findings Chinese government HIV and anti-narcotics legislation and policy documents were reviewed, and in-depth and key informant interviews were conducted with 19 injection drug users (IDUs) and 20 government and nongovernmental organization officials in Nanning and Baise, Guangxi Province. Significant contradictions were found in HIV and antinarcotics policies, exemplified by the simultaneous expansion of community-based methadone maintenance therapy and the increasing number of drug users detained in detox and RTL center facilities. IDU study participants reported, on average, having used drugs for 14 y (range 8–23 y) and had been confined to detox four times (range one to eight times) and to RTL centers once (range zero to three times). IDUs expressed an intense fear of being recognized by the police and being detained, regardless of current drug use. Key informants and IDUs reported that routine HIV testing, without consent and without disclosure of the result, was the standard policy of detox and RTL center facilities, and that HIV-infected detainees were not routinely provided medical or drug dependency treatment, including antiretroviral therapy. IDUs received little or no information or means of HIV prevention, but reported numerous risk behaviors for HIV transmission while detained. Conclusions Legal and policy review, and interviews with recently detained IDUs and key informants in Guangxi Province, China, found evidence of anti-narcotics policies and practices that appear to violate human rights and imperil

  7. Knowledge of AIDS and HIV transmission among drug users in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proper knowledge of HIV transmission is not enough for people to adopt protective behaviors, but deficits in this information may increase HIV/AIDS vulnerability. Objective To assess drug users' knowledge of HIV/AIDS and the possible association between knowledge and HIV testing. Methods A Cross-sectional study conducted in 2006/7 with a convenience sample of 295 illicit drug users in Rio de Janeiro, assessing knowledge on AIDS/HIV transmission and its relationship with HIV testing. Information from 108 randomly selected drug users who received an educational intervention using cards illustrating situations potentially associated with HIV transmission were assessed using Multidimensional Scaling (MDS). Results Almost 40% of drug users reported having never used condoms and more than 60% reported not using condoms under the influence of substances. Most drug users (80.6%) correctly answered that condoms make sex safer, but incorrect beliefs are still common (e.g. nearly 44% believed HIV can be transmitted through saliva and 55% reported that HIV infection can be transmitted by sharing toothbrushes), with significant differences between drug users who had and who had not been tested for HIV. MDS showed queries on vaginal/anal sex and sharing syringes/needles were classified in the same set as effective modes of HIV transmission. The event that was further away from this core of properly perceived risks referred to blood donation, perceived as risky. Other items were found to be dispersed, suggesting inchoate beliefs on transmission modes. Conclusions Drug users have an increased HIV infection vulnerability compared to the general population, this specific population expressed relevant doubts about HIV transmission, as well as high levels of risky behavior. Moreover, the findings suggest that possessing inaccurate HIV/AIDS knowledge may be a barrier to timely HIV testing. Interventions should be tailored to such specific characteristics. PMID:21324119

  8. 'It's your life!': injecting drug users, individual responsibility and hepatitis C prevention.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Suzanne

    2004-04-01

    Health promotion materials on hepatitis C prevention and safe injecting enjoin injecting drug users to produce ethical selves through relatively rigid social and hygiene-related conduct. This article examines a sample of safe injecting and hepatitis C prevention health promotion materials, and interview data gathered from injecting drug users, to consider the ways in which the notion of individual responsibility functions within them. I argue that the primacy of the individual in western culture is indeed reflected in hepatitis C and safe injecting materials and, that for a range of reasons, injecting drug users also make use of notions of individual responsibility. The article concludes by considering the social and health implications of this individualist approach to injecting drug use and health promotion, and by suggesting ways in which effective materials which do not focus solely on the individual can be created. PMID:15068637

  9. [An attractive force: the meaning of drugs to users from an island in Cape Verde].

    PubMed

    Neves, Augusto César Lima; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to understand the meaning of drug consumption from the view of users who receive care in an outpatient clinic of a Mental Health Service on an island of the Cape Verde archipelago. The methodological framework was based on the Data-founded Theory, in the light of Symbolic Interactionism. Participants were nine drug users from the mentioned outpatient clinic. Recorded interviews and observation were the strategies for data collection. The comparative data analysis resulted in the central phenomenon An attractive force, which expresses the great difficult users have to stop the abusive consumption of psychoactive substances, knowing that all problems faced in the personal, familiar and social areas come from drug habituation. Thus, this study permitted the identification of vulnerable points for possible action by the health team, aiming for the prevention of drug abuse. PMID:20694429

  10. Assessing candidacy for acute hepatitis C treatment among active young injection drug users: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All five acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. An acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care. PMID:21497111

  11. Assessing Candidacy for Acute Hepatitis C Treatment Among Active Young Injection Drug Users: A Case-Series Report

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J.; Page, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All 5 acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. . Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. Acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care. PMID:21497111

  12. Impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on homeless injecting drug users: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Charlotte NE; Wright, Nat MJ; Jones, Lesley

    2005-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of injecting drug users are presenting to primary care and a growing number of general practices are specifically providing care for homeless people. Injecting drug users are at the greatest risk of hepatitis C infection and homeless drug misusers, because of their drug-taking behaviour and patterns, have been identified as being at greater risk of harm of blood-borne diseases than the general population. However, little work has been conducted with injecting drug users or homeless people who have hepatitis C and little is known about how the virus may affect them. Aim To explore the impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on homeless injecting drug users. Design of study This study employed qualitative research. In-depth interviews allowed the exploration of the impact of a potentially life-threatening diagnosis within the context of a person's expressed hierarchy of needs. Setting A primary care centre for homeless people in the north of England. Method In-depth interviews about the impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on their lives were conducted with 17 homeless injecting drug users who had received a positive hepatitis C diagnosis. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed using the framework approach. Results Receiving a positive diagnosis for hepatitis C resulted in feelings of shock, devastation, disbelief, anger, and questioning. A positive diagnosis had lasting social, emotional, psychological, behavioural, and physical effects on homeless injecting drug users, even years after the initial diagnosis. Most responders were diagnosed by a doctor in primary care or by hospital staff; however, not all had sought testing and a number were tested while inpatients and were unaware that blood had been taken for hepatitis C virus serology. Conclusions The implications for clinical policy and primary care practice are discussed, including the issues of patient choice, confidentiality, and pre- and post

  13. Fatal case of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype infection in an injecting drug user, Athens, Greece, 2012.

    PubMed

    Leuow, K; Papaventsis, D; Kourkoundi, S; Ioannidis, P; Karabela, S; Tsikrika, S; Marinou, I; Papavasileiou, A; Stone, M; Drobniewski, F; Paparisos, V; Vogiatzakis, E

    2013-01-01

    We present the first fatal case of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) in an injecting drug user (IDU) in Athens, Greece, co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus and discuss the implications for public health. Despite immediate initiation of treatment, the patient's condition gradually deteriorated and he died 16 days after hospital admission because of multiple organ failure. The contact tracing investigation revealed no further infections among the patient's contacts. PMID:23557942

  14. Alcohol and Illegal Drug Use Behaviors and Prescription Opioids Use: How do Nonmedical and Medical Users Compare, and Does Motive to Use Really Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Ghandour, Lilian A.; El Sayed, Donna S.; Martins, Silvia S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The study compared illegal drug and alcohol use behaviors between medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids (PO) and nonmedical users with distinct motives to use. Method An ethically-approved cross-sectional study (2010) was conducted on a representative sample of private university students (n=570), using a self-filled anonymous questionnaire. Results About 25% reported using PO only medically and 15% nonmedically. The prevalence of alcohol and illegal drug use was consistently higher among nonmedical than medical PO users. Adjusting for age and gender, lifetime medical users of PO were more likely to use marijuana only (OR=1.8, 95%CI= 1.1, 2.8), while nonmedical users were at higher odds of using marijuana, ecstasy, cocaine/crack, and alcohol problematically. Compared to non-users, students who took PO nonmedically for non-therapeutic reasons were more likely to use various illegal drugs, but nonmedical users who took PO to relieve pain/help in sleep were only more likely to use marijuana (OR=2.5, 95%CI=1.1, 5.4) and alcohol (e.g., alcohol abuse, OR=3.8, 95%CI= 1.4, 10.1). Conclusion Youth who use PO nonmedically to self-treat have a different alcohol and illegal drug-using profile than those who take it for non-therapeutic reasons. PMID:23391856

  15. Voice of the psychonauts: coping, life purpose, and spirituality in psychedelic drug users.

    PubMed

    Móró, Levente; Simon, Katalin; Bárd, Imre; Rácz, József

    2011-01-01

    Psychoactive drug use shows great diversity, but due to a disproportionate focus on problematic drug use, predominant nonproblematic drug use remains an understudied phenomenon. Historic and anecdotal evidence shows that natural sources of "psychedelic" drugs (e.g., mescaline and psilocybin) have been used in religious and spiritual settings for centuries, as well as for psychological self-enhancement purposes. Our study assessed a total of 667 psychedelic drug users, other drug users, and drug nonusers by online questionnaires. Coping, life purpose, and spirituality were measured with the Psychological Immune Competence Inventory, the Purpose in Life test, and the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale, respectively. Results indicate that the use of psychedelic drugs with a purpose to enhance self-knowledge is less associated with problems, and correlates positively with coping and spirituality. Albeit the meaning of "spirituality" may be ambiguous, it seems that a spiritually-inclined attitude in drug use may act as a protective factor against drug-related problems. The autognostic use of psychedelic drugs may be thus hypothesized as a "training situation" that promotes self-enhancement by rehearsing personal coping strategies and by gaining self-knowledge. However, to assess the actual efficiency and the speculated long-term benefits of these deliberately provoked exceptional experiences, further qualitative investigations are needed. PMID:22111402

  16. [Drug information for patients (Package Leaflets), and user testing in EU].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Michiko; Doi, Hirohisa; Furukawa, Aya

    2015-01-01

    Patients and consumers have desired high quality drug information in their pharmacotherapy, and are entitled to receive it. It is desirable that the information should be aimed at shared decision-making between patients and healthcare professionals about medications. The quality of drug information available to patients should also be assured. With an aim to improve the quality of "Drug Guide for Patients", we investigated Patient Information Leaflets (PILs) which are approved by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the United Kingdom (UK) with regard to the criteria of development and user testing for assuring the quality of the PILs. In the European Union (EU), these are called Package Leaflets (PLs). PILs have been a legal requirement in the UK since 1999 for all medications. The user testing of PILs has been implemented as evidence since 2005 so that people can rely on the information provided in the leaflet. Execution of PILs which follow the guidance of the user testing, according to the guidance of this user testing, would reflect the views of patients. Here, we introduce the development process and implementation of user testing of PILs. In terms of readability, accessibility and understandability of drug information for patients, we need to discuss involving the public in decisions on how its quality should be assured and how it can be made easily be comprehensible for patients, in order to make effective use of "Drug Guide for Patients" in the future in Japan. PMID:25747226

  17. Cocaine metabolite (benzoylecgonine) in hair and urine of drug users.

    PubMed

    Martinez, F; Poet, T S; Pillai, R; Erickson, J; Estrada, A L; Watson, R R

    1993-01-01

    Two methods of drug detection, urinalysis and hair analysis, were compared with respect to the efficiency of identification of drug use in a population of men living on the Arizona-Mexico border. The standard curve of cannabinoids in urine was linear to 20 ng/mL. The GC/MS levels for all cannabinoids combined in urine were very similar to that obtained by radioimmunoassay (RIA), 91% concordance. Similar results were obtained from samples analyzed dually for the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE) after spiking. As determined by RIA of urine, 74% of the subjects were positive for cannabinoids. The majority were in the range of 100-1000 ng/mg creatinine. The pattern of excretion of THC metabolites with respect to the verbally reported time of first use was fairly normal, with the peak rate of elimination 13-24 hours following the last reported use. Washed hair samples were extracted by overnight acid hydrolysis. Urine samples and neutralized hair extracts were analyzed for cocaine and BE by RIA. Of the hair samples, 55% contained cocaine/BE, as compared with only 4.3% of the urine samples. Most hair samples contained cocaine/BE in the range of 25-100 ng/sample (100 mg hair). All hair samples testing negative for cocaine/BE by RIA also tested negative by GC/MS, and four samples containing the highest amounts of cocaine and BE by RIA were similarly found to contain the highest amounts by GC/MS. Hair analysis, therefore, gives a wider window of detection of drug use than does urinalysis and shows merit in the confirmation of cocaine use in small clinical research studies. PMID:8336486

  18. The Relationship between Housing Status and HIV Risk among Active Drug Users: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Hilario, Helena; Convey, Mark; Corbett, A. Michelle; Weeks, Margaret; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between housing status and HIV risk using longitudinal, qualitative data collected in 2004-2005, from a purposeful sample of 65 active drug users in a variety of housed and homeless situations in Hartford, Connecticut. These data were supplemented with observations and in-depth interviews regarding drug use behavior collected in 2001-2005 to evaluate a peer-led HIV prevention intervention. Data reveal differences in social context within and among different housing statuses that affect HIV risky or protective behaviors including the ability to carry drug paraphernalia and HIV prevention materials, the amount of drugs in the immediate environment, access to subsidized and supportive housing, and relationships with others with whom drug users live. Policy implications of the findings, limitations to the data and future research are discussed. PMID:19142817

  19. Wound botulism in drug users: a still underestimated diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodolico, C; Barca, E; Fenicia, L; Anniballi, F; Sinardi, A U; Girlanda, P

    2010-12-01

    Wound botulism is a rare infectious disease that is becoming a frequent complication of parental drug use. Diagnosis is often difficult and based on clinical suspicion. We report the first Italian case of wound botulism due to intramuscular heroin injection in a 48-year-old man with an acute onset of slurred speech and dysphagia. The most considerable finding of electrophysiological study was the reduction in amplitude of compound muscle action potential which should be considered a useful initial electrodiagnostic sign in the clinical context of botulism. Alerting clinicians to botulism is crucial for a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment and thus decreasing mortality and complications. PMID:20552239

  20. [The Characteristics of Law-evading Drug Users and Effective Approaches].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

      The increasing number of law-evading drug users in Japan is becoming a serious social problem. Previous studies have shown that law-evading drug users are younger, more educated, and less antisocial than methamphetamine users. They also tend to have some type of psychiatric disorder before starting drug use; therefore one of the reasons that they start using drugs may be to alleviate certain psychiatric symptoms. Furthermore, if drug users are successful in avoiding arrest, they often lack the motivation to stop, which makes treatment difficult. Therapists are required to be non-confrontational, to keep pace with their patients, and to take their patients' other existing disorders into account. Recently, the Matrix Model has shown promise as a new treatment strategy for drug abusers in Japan. The Matrix Model, which was originally developed in response to the 1980s cocaine epidemic in the USA, is an intensive outpatient treatment approach for drug abuse and dependence. The Matrix Model integrates cognitive-behavioral therapy, contingency management, motivational interviewing, 12-step facilitation, family involvement, and so on, with a directive, non-confrontational approach, and this style of therapy seems to fit with law-evading drug users. A Matrix Model-based treatment program was first established in Japan in 2006. The aim of this report is to introduce and assess the benefits of the TAMA Mental Health and Welfare Center Relapse Prevention Program, a Matrix Model-based treatment program established at the Tama Mental Health and Welfare Center in 2007. PMID:26725673

  1. Fixed-dose combinations of drugs versus single-drug formulations for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Rigau Comas, David; Valderrama Rodríguez, Angélica; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Parker, Lucy Anne; Caylà, Joan; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are newly diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) typically receive a standard first-line treatment regimen that consists of two months of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol followed by four months of isoniazid and rifampicin. Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of these drugs are widely recommended. Objectives To compare the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of anti-tuberculosis regimens given as fixed-dose combinations compared to single-drug formulations for treating people with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 11 2015); MEDLINE (1966 to 20 November 2015); EMBASE (1980 to 20 November 2015); LILACS (1982 to 20 November 2015); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials; and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), without language restrictions, up to 20 November 2015. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared the use of FDCs with single-drug formulations in adults (aged 15 years or more) newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, and assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MDs) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We attempted to assess the effect of treatment for time-to-event measures with hazard ratios and their 95% CIs. We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool to determine the risk of bias in included trials. We used the fixed-effect model when there was little heterogeneity and the random-effects model with moderate heterogeneity. We used an I² statistic value of 75% or greater to denote significant heterogeneity, in which case we did not perform a

  2. 78 FR 3900 - Generic Drug User Fee-Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rate for the generic drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees for fiscal year (FY) 2013. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA), enacted the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, as......

  3. Effect of a Primary Care based Brief Intervention Trial among Risky Drug Users on Health-related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Gelberg, Lillian; Leake, Barbara D.; Yacenda-Murphy, Julia; Vahidi, Mani; Andersen, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improvement in quality of life (QOL) is a long term goal of drug treatment. Although some brief interventions have been found to reduce illicit drug use, no trial among adult risky (moderate non-dependent) drug users has tested effects on health-related quality of life. Methods A single-blind randomized controlled trial of patients enrolled from February 2011 to November 2012 was conducted in waiting rooms of five federally qualified health centers. 413 adult primary care patients were identified as risky drug users using the WHO-ASSIST and 334 (81% response; 171 intervention, 163 control) consented to participate in the trial. Three-month follow-ups were completed by 261 patients (78%). Intervention patients received the QUIT intervention of brief clinician advice and up to two drug-use health telephone sessions. The control group received usual care and information on cancer screening. Outcomes were three-month changes in the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental health component summary score (MCS) and physical health component summary score (PCS). Results The average treatment effect (ATE) was non-significant for MCS (0.2 points, p-value=0.87) and marginally significant for PCS (1.7 points, p-value=0.08). The average treatment effect on the treated (ATT) was 0.1 (p-value=0.93) for MCS and 1.9 (p-value=0.056) for PCS. The effect on PCS was stronger at higher (above median) baseline number of drug use days: ATE=2.7, p-value=0.04; ATT=3.21, p-value=0.02. Conclusions The trial found a marginally significant effect on improvement in PCS, and significant and stronger effect on the SF-12 physical component among patients with greater frequency of initial drug use. PMID:25042213

  4. 78 FR 70953 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee... Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers (Revision 1)'', published in the Federal Register of September 10, 2013 (78 FR 55261). In that notice, FDA requested public...

  5. The street/treatment barrier: treatment experiences of Puerto Rican injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Porter, J

    1999-12-01

    This study describes, through ethnographic interviews, the treatment experiences of Puerto Rican long-term heroin users who are at extremely high risk for HIV infection and the barriers they perceive to drug treatment. On the basis of this information we suggest policy recommendations for increasing drug treatment access for Puerto Rican long-term injectors of heroin. It is critical that Puerto Rican populations access drug treatment facilities given their risk factors for HIV infection and the high rate of poverty in Puerto Rican communities that exacerbates drug use. PMID:10573300

  6. Analysis of extensively washed hair from cocaine users and drug chemists to establish new reporting criteria.

    PubMed

    Morris-Kukoski, Cynthia L; Montgomery, Madeline A; Hammer, Rena L

    2014-01-01

    Samples from a self-proclaimed cocaine (COC) user, from 19 drug users (postmortem) and from 27 drug chemists were extensively washed and analyzed for COC, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine (NC), cocaethylene (CE) and aryl hydroxycocaines by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Published wash criteria and cutoffs were applied to the results. Additionally, the data were used to formulate new reporting criteria and interpretation guidelines for forensic casework. Applying the wash and reporting criteria, hair that was externally contaminated with COC was distinguished from hair collected from individuals known to have consumed COC. In addition, CE, NC and hydroxycocaine metabolites were only present in COC users' hair and not in drug chemists' hair. When properly applied, the use of an extended wash, along with the reporting criteria defined here, will exclude false-positive results from environmental contact with COC. PMID:25100648

  7. Compulsory drug detention center experiences among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's official reclassification of drug users as "patients" deserving care and not "criminals," the Thai government has continued to rely heavily on punitive responses to drug use such as "boot camp"-style compulsory "treatment" centers. There is very little research on experiences with compulsory treatment centers among people who use drugs. The work reported here is a first step toward filling that gap. Methods We examined experiences of compulsory drug treatment among 252 Thai people who inject drugs (IDU) participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with a history of compulsory treatment experience. Results In total, 80 (31.7%) participants reported a history of compulsory treatment. In multivariate analyses, compulsory drug detention experience was positively associated with current spending on drugs per day (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.07 - 3.22) and reporting drug planting by police (AOR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.04 - 3.15). Among those with compulsory treatment experience, 77 (96.3%) reported injecting in the past week, and no difference in intensity of drug use was observed between those with and without a history of compulsory detention. Conclusion These findings raise concerns about the current approach to compulsory drug detention in Thailand. Exposure to compulsory drug detention was associated with police abuse and high rates of relapse into drug use, although additional research is needed to determine the precise impact of exposure to this form of detention on future drug use. More broadly, compulsory "treatment" based on a penal approach is not consistent with scientific evidence on addressing drug addiction and should be phased out in favor of evidence-based interventions. PMID:22014093

  8. Recruiting and Retaining Mobile Young Injection Drug Users in a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Hathazi, Dodi; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal studies that research homeless persons or transient drug users face particular challenges in retaining subjects. Between 2005 and 2006, 101 mobile young injection drug users were recruited in Los Angeles into a 2-year longitudinal study. Several features of ethnographic methodology, including fieldwork and qualitative interviews, and modifications to the original design, such as toll-free calls routed directly to ethnographer cell phones and wiring incentive payments, resulted in retention of 78% of subjects for the first follow-up interview. Longitudinal studies that are flexible and based upon qualitative methodologies are more likely to retain mobile subjects while also uncovering emergent research findings. PMID:20222779

  9. Abuse liability of buprenorphine-naloxone tablets in untreated IV drug users.

    PubMed

    Alho, Hannu; Sinclair, David; Vuori, Erkki; Holopainen, Antti

    2007-04-17

    Buprenorphine (Subutex) is widely abused in Finland. A combination of buprenorphine plus naloxone (Suboxone) has been available since late 2004, permitting a comparison of the abuse of the two products among untreated intravenous (IV) users. A survey was distributed to attendees at a Helsinki needle exchange program over 2-weeks in April, 2005, At least 30% were returned anonymously. Survey variables included: years of prior IV opioid abuse, years of buprenorphine abuse, frequency, dosage, route of administration and reasons for use, concomitant IV abuse of other substances and amount paid on the street for both buprenorphine and buprenorphine+naloxone. Buprenorphine was the most frequently used IV drug for 73% of the respondents. More than 75% said they used IV buprenorphine to self-treat addiction or withdrawal. Most (68%) had tried the buprenorphine+naloxone combination IV, but 80% said they had a "bad" experience. Its street price was less than half that of buprenorphine alone. The buprenorphine+naloxone combination appears to be a feasible tool, along with easier access to addiction treatment, for decreasing IV abuse of buprenorphine. PMID:17055191

  10. Characterizing Drug Non-Users as Distinctive in Prevention Messages: Implications of Optimal Distinctiveness Theory

    PubMed Central

    Comello, Maria Leonora G.

    2011-01-01

    Optimal Distinctiveness Theory posits that highly valued groups are those that can simultaneously satisfy needs to belong and to be different. The success of drug-prevention messages with a social-identity theme should therefore depend on the extent to which the group is portrayed as capable of meeting these needs. Specifically, messages that portray non-users as a large and undifferentiated majority may not be as successful as messages that emphasize uniqueness of non-users. This prediction was examined using marijuana prevention messages that depicted non-users as a distinctive or a majority group. Distinctiveness characterization lowered behavioral willingness to use marijuana among non-users (Experiment 1) and served as a source of identity threat (contingent on gender) among users (Experiment 2). PMID:21409672

  11. Social and structural factors associated with HIV disease progression among illicit drug users: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Milloy, M-J; Marshall, Brandon; Kerr, Thomas; Buxton, Jane; Rhodes, Tim; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically review factors associated with HIV disease progression among illicit drug users, focusing on exposures exogenous to individuals that likely shape access and adherence to HIV treatment. Design A systematic review of peer-reviewed English-language studies among HIV-seropositive illicit drug users with at least one of these endpoint of interest: a diagnosis of AIDS; death; changes/differences in CD4 cell counts; or changes/differences in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods Articles were included if they reported factors associated with an outcome of interest among a group of illicit drug users. Studies were identified, screened and selected using systematic methods. Results Of 2,668 studies matching the search criteria, 58 (2%) met the inclusion criteria, all but one from North America or Western Europe. Overall, 41 (71%) studies contained significant individual-level clinical characteristics or behaviours (e.g., illicit drug use) associated with disease progression. Fifteen studies (26%) identified significant social, physical, economic or policy-level exposures, including incarceration, housing status or lack of legal income. Conclusion While past studies demonstrate important environmental exposures that appear to shape access to care and subsequent disease progression, the limited literature to examine these factors demonstrates the need for future research to consider risk environment characteristics and the role they may play in shaping health outcomes from HIV infection among drug users through determining access and adherence to evidence-based care. (198 words) PMID:22333747

  12. The Melding of Drug Markets in Houston After Katrina: Dealer and User Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kotarba, Joseph A.; Fackler, Jennifer; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dunlap, Eloise

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the majority of routine activities in New Orleans were disrupted, including the illegal drug market. The large-scale relocation of New Orleans evacuees (NOEs), including many illegal drug users and sellers, to host cities led to a need for new sources of illegal drugs. This need was quickly satisfied by two initially distinct drug markets (1) drug dealers from New Orleans who were themselves evacuees and (2) established drug dealers in the host cities. To be expected, the two markets did not operate indefinitely in parallel fashion. This paper describes the evolving, operational relationship between these two drug markets over time, with a focus on Houston. We analyze the reciprocal evolution of these two markets at two significant points in time: at the beginning of the relocation (2005) and two years later (2007). The overall trend is towards a melding of the two drug markets, as evidenced primarily by decreases in drug-related violence and the cross-fertilization of drug tastes. We describe the process by which the two drug markets are melded over time, in order to seek a better understanding of the social processes by which drug markets in general evolve. PMID:20509741

  13. The melding of drug markets in Houston after Katrina: dealer and user perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kotarba, Joseph A; Fackler, Jennifer; Johnson, Bruce D; Dunlap, Eloise

    2010-07-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the majority of routine activities in New Orleans were disrupted, including the illegal drug market. The large-scale relocation of New Orleans evacuees (NOEs), including many illegal drug users and sellers, to host cities led to a need for new sources of illegal drugs. This need was quickly satisfied by two initially distinct drug markets (1) drug dealers from New Orleans who were themselves evacuees and (2) established drug dealers in the host cities. To be expected, the two markets did not operate indefinitely in parallel fashion. This paper describes the evolving, operational relationship between these two drug markets over time, with a focus on Houston. We analyze the reciprocal evolution of these two markets at two significant points in time: at the beginning of the relocation (2005) and two years later (2007). The overall trend is towards a melding of the two drug markets, as evidenced primarily by decreases in drug-related violence and the cross-fertilization of drug tastes. We describe the process by which the two drug markets are melded over time, in order to seek a better understanding of the social processes by which drug markets in general evolve. PMID:20509741

  14. Effectiveness of an HIV risk reduction counseling intervention for out-of-treatment drug users.

    PubMed

    Kotranski, L; Semaan, S; Collier, K; Lauby, J; Halbert, J; Feighan, K

    1998-02-01

    This study examined and compared the effectiveness of two counseling interventions designed to reduce the HIV drug and sexual risk behaviors of 684 out-of-treatment drug users recruited from South Philadelphia, PA. All study participants received a standard intervention and one half were randomly assigned to also receive the enhanced intervention. The standard intervention provided HIV risk reduction education, HIV testing with pretest and posttest counseling, and training in condom use and needle cleaning. The enhanced intervention provided additional information on STD risk reduction. Both interventions were effective in influencing behavior change between baseline and 6-month follow-up. A higher proportion of persons reduced their drug risk behaviors compared to their sexual risk behaviors. As sexual risk behaviors are more resistant to change, there is a need for tailored interventions that target out-of-treatment drug users. PMID:9505096

  15. Control over Drug Acquisition, Preparation, and Injection: Implications for HIV and HCV Risk among Young Female Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karla D.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Hathazi, Susan Dodi; Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Young female injection drug users (IDUs) are at risk for HIV/HCV, and initiating the use of a new drug may confer additional and unexpected risks. While gender differences in the social context of injection drug use have been identified, it is unknown whether those differences persist during the initiation of a new drug. This mixed-methods study examined the accounts of 30 young female IDUs in Los Angeles, CA, USA from 2004 to 2006, who described the social context of initiating injection drug use and initiating ketamine injection. The analysis aimed to understand how the social context of young women's injection events contributes to HIV/HCV risk. Women's initiation into ketamine injection occurred approximately 2 years after their first injection of any drug. Over that time, women experienced changes in some aspects of the social context of drug injection, including the size and composition of the using group. A significant proportion of women described injection events characterized by a lack of control over the acquisition, preparation, and injection of drugs, as well as reliance on friends and sexual partners. Findings suggest that lack of control over drug acquisition, preparation, and injection may elevate women's risk; these phenomena should be considered as a behavioral risk factor when designing interventions. PMID:24364027

  16. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm in a Drug User

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatziioannou, Achilleas; Doriforou, Ortansia; Skiadas, Vasilios Koutoulidis, Vasilios; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros

    2006-08-15

    A 26-year-old drug abuser who presented with sepsis was found to have a pseudoaneurysm in the left vertebral artery. This aneurysm was presumed to be post-traumatic, since the patient reported multiple attempts to inject drugs in the left jugular vein 15 days prior to admission. The pseudoaneurysm was treated effectively with stent-graft placement.

  17. A decade of caring for drug users entirely within general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, E; Canavan, A; Butler, R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The government encourages general practitioners (GPs) to become involved in caring for drug users. However, in some areas of the country, including Bedford, secondary care support is inadequate. GPs in these areas have to decide how to cope with such patients entirely within general practice. AIM: To assess the characteristics and quality of care given without secondary care support to drug users by one practice in Bedford over a decade. METHOD: A search was made of the practice computer for all patients with a problem title of 'addiction drug' between 1986 and 1995. The age, sex, social characteristics, and drug history were recorded. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety-two patients were found, of which 155 took part in the practice programme; i.e. they consulted more than three times. Forty-three patients (37%) who took part and were prescribed Methadone were prescribed this drug as ampoules. Sixty-three patients (40.6%) who took part in the programme stopped using drugs. Thirty-two (33.6%) of the Methadone users became abstinent. A higher proportion of women (13-48%) than men (19-27.7%) stopped using Methadone (P = 0.019). Among patients who had a stable lifestyle, a higher proportion had been prescribed ampoules than mixture (22 out of 28: 78.6%; P = 0.001). Similarly, of those who had a job, eight out of 11 (72%; P = 0.037) had been prescribed methadone ampoules. Two-thirds of all patients prescribed amphetamines stopped using drugs. CONCLUSION: Long-term care of drug users entirely within general practice is feasible. Among those prescribed methadone ampoules, a higher than average proportion had stable lifestyles and had a stable job. PMID:10071402

  18. Policy advocacy for female injecting drug users in eastern and central Europe.

    PubMed

    Zakowicz, Anna

    2010-10-01

    A key reason for hosting AIDS 2010 in Vienna was to highlight the spread of HIV through injecting drug use, something that has reached crisis proportions in many parts of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In this article, based on a presentation at the conference, Anna Zakowicz discusses the options for promoting policy advocacy for female injecting drug users (IDUs) in Central and Eastern Europe. PMID:21413621

  19. The Reliability and Validity of Drug Users' Self Reports of Amphetamine Use Among Primarily Heroin and Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Napper, Lucy E.; Fisher, Dennis G.; Johnson, Mark E.; Wood, Michele M.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively few studies have addressed the psychometric properties of self-report measures of amphetamine use. This study examines the reliability and validity of the Risk Behavior Assessment's (RBA) lifetime and recent amphetamine-use questions. To evaluate validity, 4027 out-of-treatment primarily cocaine and heroin users provided urine samples that were compared to self-report data; to evaluate reliability, 218 completed the RBA at two time points, 48 hours apart. In the overall sample, self-reports demonstrated moderately high validity, with a 95% accuracy rate (kappa =.54). When analysis was restricted to recent amphetamine users validity was slightly lower (71.5% accuracy; kappa = .41). Test-retest data indicated good reliability for self-reports of ever having used amphetamine (kappa =.79), and amphetamine use in the past 30 days (.75 < r < .91). Out-of-treatment drug users provided accurate self-reports of amphetamine use. Reliable and valid measures are essential for describing and predicting trends in amphetamine use, evaluating the effectiveness of interventions, and developing policies and programs. PMID:20053503

  20. Influences of Cross-Border Mobility on Tuberculosis Diagnoses and Treatment Interruption Among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Deiss, Robert; Garfein, Richard S.; Lozada, Remedios; Burgos, Jose Luis; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Moser, Kathleen S.; Zuniga, Maria Luisa; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify correlates of reported lifetime diagnoses of TB among injection drug users in the border city of Tijuana, Mexico. Methods. Injection drug users in Tijuana were recruited into a prospective cohort study during 2006 and 2007. We used weighted multivariate logistic regression to identify correlates of TB diagnoses. Results. Of the 1056 participants, 103 (9.8%) reported a history of TB, among whom 93% received anti-TB medication and 80% were diagnosed in the United States. Treatment was prematurely halted among 8% of patients; deportation from the United States was the cause of half of these treatment interruptions. History of travel to (odds ratio [OR] = 6.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.53, 27.20) or deportation from (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.07, 3.12) the United States and incarceration (OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.06, 4.58) were independently associated with a reported lifetime diagnosis of TB. Conclusions. Mobility and migration are important factors in identifying and treating TB patients diagnosed in the US–Mexico border region. Strengthening capacity on both sides of the border to identify, monitor, and treat TB is a priority. PMID:19542040

  1. Surviving in two worlds: social and structural violence of Thai female injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Haritavorn, Niphattra

    2014-01-01

    Thai females injecting drugs are ensnared in a web of problems arising from forms of prejudice that magnify their vulnerability. They are vulnerable, at risk, and exposed to a high degree of social suffering. This paper aims to elucidate how social production and structural violence combine to shape the lives of these women. Using a qualitative methodology, two focus groups with 5 key informants and in-depth interviews involving a total of 35 women injecting drugs were conducted in Bangkok. The findings reveal that the structural environment that directly impacts upon these women's lives becomes the reason for their suffering. The structural environment puts these women at risk of violence in numerous social settings in which these women engage as well as generating tension at a subjective level (i.e. the habitus) of these women. Thai female injecting drug users are trapped in a difficult tension between the demands for being Thai women seeking to exist in the masculine world of drug use but at the same time meeting Thai society's expectations of womanhood. Unequal gender relations are manifest in the everyday violence that women face in the drug community, culminating in the essential nature of women being questioned, undermined and threatened. Living in the drug community, women are subjected to violence and harassment, and gendered brutality by intimate partners. In conclusion, the social suffering that Thai female injecting drug users find themselves confronting is confined to dilemmas cause by tensions between drug use and the overriding gender habitus. PMID:24183342

  2. Online drug user-led harm reduction in Hungary: a review of “Daath”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Harm reduction has been increasingly finding its way into public drug policies and healthcare practices worldwide, with successful intervention measures justifiably focussing on the highest-risk groups, such as injecting drug users. However, there are also other types of drug users in need for harm reduction, even though they pose less, low, or no public health risk. Occasionally, drug users may autonomously organise themselves into groups to provide advocacy, harm reduction, and peer-help services, sometimes online. The http://www.daath.hu website has been operated since 2001 by the “Hungarian Psychedelic Community”, an unorganised drug user group with a special interest in hallucinogenic and related substances. As of today, the website serves about 1200 visitors daily, and the online community comprises of more than 8000 registered members. The Daath community is driven by a strong commitment to the policy of harm reduction in the form of various peer-help activities that aim to expand harm reduction without promoting drug use. Our review comprehensively summarises Daath’s user-led harm reduction services and activities from the last ten years, firstly outlining the history and growth phases of Daath, along with its self-set guidelines and policies. Online services (such as a discussion board, and an Ecstasy pill database) and offline activities (such as Ecstasy pill field testing, and a documentary film about psychedelics) are described. In order to extend its harm reduction services and activities in the future, Daath has several social, commercial, and legislative challenges to face. Starting with a need to realign its focus, outlooks for the upcoming operation of Daath are pondered. Future trends in harm reduction, such as separating harm-decreasing from benefit-increasing, are also discussed. We aim to share these innovative harm reduction measures and good practices in order to be critically assessed, and – if found useful – adapted and applied

  3. Online drug user-led harm reduction in Hungary: a review of "Daath".

    PubMed

    Móró, Levente; Rácz, József

    2013-01-01

    Harm reduction has been increasingly finding its way into public drug policies and healthcare practices worldwide, with successful intervention measures justifiably focussing on the highest-risk groups, such as injecting drug users. However, there are also other types of drug users in need for harm reduction, even though they pose less, low, or no public health risk. Occasionally, drug users may autonomously organise themselves into groups to provide advocacy, harm reduction, and peer-help services, sometimes online. The http://www.daath.hu website has been operated since 2001 by the "Hungarian Psychedelic Community", an unorganised drug user group with a special interest in hallucinogenic and related substances. As of today, the website serves about 1200 visitors daily, and the online community comprises of more than 8000 registered members. The Daath community is driven by a strong commitment to the policy of harm reduction in the form of various peer-help activities that aim to expand harm reduction without promoting drug use. Our review comprehensively summarises Daath's user-led harm reduction services and activities from the last ten years, firstly outlining the history and growth phases of Daath, along with its self-set guidelines and policies. Online services (such as a discussion board, and an Ecstasy pill database) and offline activities (such as Ecstasy pill field testing, and a documentary film about psychedelics) are described. In order to extend its harm reduction services and activities in the future, Daath has several social, commercial, and legislative challenges to face. Starting with a need to realign its focus, outlooks for the upcoming operation of Daath are pondered. Future trends in harm reduction, such as separating harm-decreasing from benefit-increasing, are also discussed. We aim to share these innovative harm reduction measures and good practices in order to be critically assessed, and--if found useful--adapted and applied elsewhere

  4. Route of administration for illicit prescription opioids: a comparison of rural and urban drug users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonmedical prescription opioid use has emerged as a major public health concern in recent years, particularly in rural Appalachia. Little is known about the routes of administration (ROA) involved in nonmedical prescription opioid use among rural and urban drug users. The purpose of this study was to describe rural-urban differences in ROA for nonmedical prescription opioid use. Methods A purposive sample of 212 prescription drug users was recruited from a rural Appalachian county (n = 101) and a major metropolitan area (n = 111) in Kentucky. Consenting participants were given an interviewer-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders, and self-reported nonmedical use and ROA (swallowing, snorting, injecting) for the following prescription drugs: buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, OxyContin® and other oxycodone. Results Among urban participants, swallowing was the most common ROA, contrasting sharply with substance-specific variation in ROA among rural participants. Among rural participants, snorting was the most frequent ROA for hydrocodone, methadone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone, while injection was most common for hydromorphone and morphine. In age-, gender-, and race-adjusted analyses, rural participants had significantly higher odds of snorting hydrocodone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone than urban participants. Urban participants had significantly higher odds of swallowing hydrocodone and oxycodone than did rural participants. Notably, among rural participants, 67% of hydromorphone users and 63% of morphine users had injected the drugs. Conclusions Alternative ROA are common among rural drug users. This finding has implications for rural substance abuse treatment and harm reduction, in which interventions should incorporate methods to prevent and reduce route-specific health complications of drug use. PMID:20950455

  5. Suicide risk among Thai illicit drug users with and without mental/alcohol use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kittirattanapaiboon, Phunnapa; Suttajit, Sirijit; Junsirimongkol, Boonsiri; Likhitsathian, Surinporn; Srisurapanont, Manit

    2014-01-01

    Background It is not yet known if the increased risk of suicide in substance abusers is caused by the causal and/or coexisting relationship between substance use and psychiatric disorders. This study was designed to estimate the suicide risk among individuals with illicit drug use alone, illicit drug users with mental disorders, and illicit drug users with alcohol use disorders. Methods Subjects were participants of the 2008 Thai National Mental Health Survey. They were asked for their illicit drug use in the past year. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), current suicidality (1 month prior to assessment), mood episodes, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, and alcohol use disorders were used for assessing mental/alcohol use disorders. A score of 1 or more for the MINI–Suicidality module was defined as the presence of suicide risk. Results Of the total 17,140 respondents, 537 currently used illicit drugs, while 1,194 respondents had a suicide risk. Common illicit drugs were kratom (59%) and (meth)amphetamine (24%). Compared with 16,603 Thais without illicit drug use, the illicit drug users with or without mental/alcohol use disorders (n=537) had an increased risk of suicide (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.09, 1.55–2.81). While those who used illicit drugs alone (no mental/alcohol use disorder) (n=348) had no increased risk of suicide (adjusted OR, 95% CI =1.04, 0.66–1.65), the illicit drug users with mental or alcohol use disorders (n=27 and n=162, respectively) had significantly increased risk of suicide (adjusted ORs, 95% CIs =14.06, 6.50–30.3 and 3.14, 1.98–4.99, respectively). Conclusion A key limitation of this study was the combined suicidal behaviors as a suicidality risk. Mental or alcohol use disorders found in this population actually increased the suicide risk. These findings support the coexisting relationship that mental and alcohol use disorders play a vital role in increasing the suicide

  6. Condom use with primary partners among injecting drug users in Bangkok, Thailand and New York City, United States.

    PubMed

    Vanichseni, S; Des Jarlais, D C; Choopanya, K; Friedmann, P; Wenston, J; Sonchai, W; Sotheran, J L; Raktham, S; Carballo, M; Friedman, S R

    1993-06-01

    Trained interviewers spoke to 957 drug users attending a detoxification program, methadone maintenance program, or a research storefront in New York City in 1990-91 and to 601 drug users attending 17 drug use treatment clinics in Bangkok, Thailand, in the autumn of 1989 as part of a study to identify factors linked to the probability or failure of condom use with primary sexual partners among IV drug users. The participants also received HIV counseling and testing. IV drug users in New York City were more likely to be older (36.2 years vs. 30.1 years; p .001), female (25% vs. 5%; p .001), more ethnically diverse (p .001), and inject cocaine more often (33 injections/month vs. 0.5 injections/month) than those in Bangkok. 44% of drug users in New York City and 33% of those in Bangkok engaged in some unprotected penetrative intercourse with a primary heterosexual partner in the previous 6 months. Of drug users having penetrative sexual intercourse with a primary partner in the previous 6 months, 20% in New York City and 12% in Bangkok always used condoms (p .02). The strongest predictors of condom use among IV drug users from both countries were a previous positive HIV test and talking about AIDS with sexual partners (p = .001 for US; p = .0008 for Bangkok and p = .004 for US; p = .0596 for Bangkok, respectively). These findings indicated that unsafe sexual behavior with primary sexual partners among drug users is still a major source of HIV transmission in these 2 cities. Nevertheless, knowledge of HIV positive status and partner communication concerning AIDS are predictors of condom use shared by both groups. Thus, HIV/AIDS prevention programs should provide confidential HIV testing and counseling for drug users and should encourage frank discussions of AIDS between drug users and primary sexual partners. Peer support for risk reduction among drug users has the potential to facilitate such discussions. PMID:8363764

  7. Injection drug users and the provision of hepatitis C-related services in a nationwide sample of drug treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Zdravko P; Strauss, Shiela M; Astone, Janetta; Des Jarlais, Don C

    2004-01-01

    Drug treatment facilities are important sites for providing targeted prevention and health services to injection drug users (IDUs) who are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). A nationwide survey was conducted to examine whether differences exist in the HCV-related services provided by drug treatment programs that have varying proportions of IDUs among their patients. The results indicate that, overall, drug treatment programs with a greater proportion of IDUs offer significantly more HCV services as compared to programs with a smaller proportion of IDUs. However, important components of hepatitis C-related care, such as universal basic education and counseling about HCV and extensive HCV-antibody testing, are not yet being provided by all programs with a large proportion of IDUs among their patient populations. PMID:15255228

  8. Differential Risk Factors for HIV Drug and Sex Risk-Taking Among Non-treatment-seeking Hospitalized Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Denise; Tsui, Judith; Anderson, Bradley; Dossabhoy, Shernaz; Herman, Debra; Liebschutz, Jane M.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) are at increased risk of contracting HIV. From a clinical trial assessing an intervention to enhance the linkage of hospitalized patients to opioid treatment after discharge, we conducted multivariate analysis of baseline data from hospitalized IDUs with a history of opioid dependence (n = 104) to identify differences in factors predicting HIV drug and sex risk behaviors. Factors significantly associated with HIV drug risk were being non-Hispanic Caucasian and recent cocaine use. Being female, binge drinking, and poorer mental health were significantly associated with higher sex risk. Because factors predicting HIV sex risk behaviors differ from those predicting HIV drug risk, interventions aimed at specific HIV risks should have different behavioral and substance use targets. PMID:25063229

  9. Adaptation and Validation of the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a Sample of Male Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Medina, Pablo; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a sample of male drug users. A sample of 326 male drug users and 322 non-clinical males was selected by cluster sampling and convenience sampling, respectively. Results showed that the scale had good psychometric properties and adequate internal consistency reliability (Initiation = .66, Refusal = .74 and STD-P = .79). An evaluation of the invariance showed strong factor equivalence between both samples. A high and moderate effect of Differential Item Functioning was only found in items 1 and 14 (∆R 2 Nagelkerke = .076 and .037, respectively). We strongly recommend not using item 1 if the goal is to compare the scores of both groups, otherwise the comparison will be biased. Correlations obtained between the CSFQ-14 and the safe sex ratio and the SAS subscales were significant (CI = 95%) and indicated good concurrent validity. Scores of male drug users were similar to those of non-clinical males. Therefore, the adaptation of the SAS to drug users provides enough guarantees for reliable and valid use in both clinical practice and research, although care should be taken with item 1. PMID:25896498

  10. Someone to Count On: Homeless, Male Drug Users and Their Friendship Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterk-Elifson, Claire; Elifson, Kirk W.

    1992-01-01

    A study exploring friendship relations of homeless, male drug users (aged between 21 and 50 years) through 27 in-depth interviews in Atlanta (Georgia) found that subjects were engaged in friendship networks that offered social support and that there was a relationship between friendships and patterns of crack cocaine use. (JB)

  11. Criminality among Female Drug Users Following an HIV Risk-Reduction Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theall, Katherine P.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.; Stewart, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    The main objectives of this article are to determine the prevalence of criminality among a sample of female African American drug users and to examine change in criminality over time, including the correlates associated with this change. Data were collected from 336 adult women who participated in an HIV risk-reduction intervention focused on the…

  12. Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella oxytoca in an intravenous drug user with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Connor; Hatch, Michael; Ayan, Mohamed; Winn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella species is rare, with most isolates being K. pneumoniae. We report the case of a 24-year-old intravenous drug user with newly diagnosed seminoma who developed K. oxytoca endocarditis. In addition to having K. oxytoca isolated from blood culture, cultures of that species were obtained from a retroperitoneal metastasis found on original presentation. PMID:27034562

  13. Gender Differences in Sexual Practices and Beliefs among Rural Injection Drug Users in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagumny, Matthew J.; Holt, Tamala Ray

    1999-01-01

    Survey examines gender differences in sexual practices and beliefs about condom use among rural injecting drug users admitted to treatment programs. Results indicate that Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome knowledge was extremely limited for both males and females in this sample, suggesting that basic HIV/AIDS…

  14. Interpersonal Relationship Styles in Marathon Group Therapy: A Study with Illicit Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Bridges, Ned

    1983-01-01

    Assessed how illegal drug users (N=12) related to one another during a 16-hour unstructured group marathon. Interaction analysis supported the effectiveness of the marathon group. Members and facilitators were able to relate to each other by confronting significant behaviors and receiving feedback about ways to cope with personal problems. (JAC)

  15. Commissioning Pharmacological Treatments for Drug Users: A Brief Review of the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, Jenny; Oliver, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To provide a brief review of relevant existing evidence regarding pharmacological treatment for drug users, in order to enable commissioners and service providers to make informed decisions that are evidence based wherever possible. Methods: The review process involved an examination of key reference texts and literature derived from…

  16. Factors associated with hospitalization for blood-borne viral infections among treatment-seeking illicit drug users.

    PubMed

    Onyeka, Ifeoma N; Olubamwo, Olubunmi; Beynon, Caryl M; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Föhr, Jaana; Tiihonen, Jari; Tuomola, Pekka; Tasa, Niko; Kauhanen, Jussi

    2015-06-01

    Blood-borne viral infections (BBVIs) are important health consequences of illicit drug use. This study assessed predictors of inpatient hospital admissions for BBVIs in a cohort of 4817 clients seeking treatment for drug use in Finland. We examined clients' data on hospital admissions registered in the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register from 1997 to 2010 with diagnoses of BBVIs. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were separately conducted for each of the three BBVI groups to test for association between baseline variables and hospitalizations. Findings were reported as adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Based upon primary discharge diagnoses, 81 clients were hospitalized for HIV, 116 for hepatitis C, and 45 for other types of hepatitis. Compared to those admitted for hepatitis C and other hepatitis, drug users with HIV had higher total number of hospital admissions (294 versus 141 and 50 respectively), higher crude hospitalization rate (7.1 versus 3.4.and 1.2 per 1000 person-years respectively), and higher total length of hospital stay (2857 days versus 279 and 308 respectively). Trends in hospitalization for all BBVI groups declined at the end of follow-up. HIV positive status at baseline (aHR: 6.58) and longer duration of drug use (aHR: 1.11) were independently associated with increased risk for HIV hospitalization. Female gender (aHR: 3.05) and intravenous use of primary drug (aHR: 2.78) were significantly associated with HCV hospitalization. Having hepatitis B negative status at baseline (aHR: 0.25) reduced the risk of other hepatitis hospitalizations. Illicit drug use coexists with blood-borne viral infections. To address this problem, clinicians treating infectious diseases need to also identify drug use in their patients and provide drug treatment information and/or referral. PMID:25736625

  17. Conflict and user involvement in drug misuse treatment decision-making: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Jan; Neale, Joanne; Bloor, Michael; Jenkins, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Background This paper examines client/staff conflict and user involvement in drug misuse treatment decision-making. Methods Seventy-nine in-depth interviews were conducted with new treatment clients in two residential and two community drug treatment agencies. Fifty-nine of these clients were interviewed again after twelve weeks. Twenty-seven interviews were also conducted with staff, who were the keyworkers for the interviewed clients. Results Drug users did not expect, desire or prepare for conflict at treatment entry. They reported few actual conflicts within the treatment setting, but routinely discussed latent conflicts – that is, negative experiences and problematic aspects of current or previous treatment that could potentially escalate into overt disputes. Conflict resulted in a number of possible outcomes, including the premature termination of treatment; staff deciding on the appropriate outcome; the client appealing to the governance structure of the agency; brokered compromise; and staff skilfully eliciting client consent for staff decisions. Conclusion Although the implementation of user involvement in drug treatment decision-making has the potential to trigger high levels of staff-client conflict, latent conflict is more common than overt conflict and not all conflict is negative. Drug users generally want to be co-operative at treatment entry and often adopt non-confrontational forms of covert resistance to decisions about which they disagree. Staff sometimes deploy user involvement as a strategy for managing conflict and soliciting client compliance to treatment protocols. Suggestions for minimising and avoiding harmful conflict in treatment settings are given. PMID:18837989

  18. AIDS in New York City: the role of intravenous drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, A.; Rogers, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    The key to the future of the HIV epidemic is the intravenous drug user. In New York City the future has arrived--intravenous drug use is now the predominant risk factor among new cases of AIDS. Our limited knowledge of most facets of drug abuse prevention and treatment and the emotional polarity and politicalization of the issues surrounding AIDS have made control of its spread among intravenous drug users very difficult. Clearly new research efforts are needed better to decide how to reduce the further spread of HIV infection among this group. But efforts to stop the spread cannot await these results. Intense and immediate efforts should focus on five areas for potential control of the spread of HIV infection among drug users: education, treatment on demand, expanding support services, providing sterile equipment, and readjustment of some of society's moral judgments that currently block action. Let us hope that in 10 years we do not look back and realize that we did too little too late while it was still possible to make a difference. PMID:2695203

  19. Socio-demographic correlates of injection drug use among male drug users: a cross sectional study in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Sanjeev Raj; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Adhikari, Samaj; Poudyal, Amod Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Drug abuse is one of the major public health problems in Nepal. The objective of this study is to explore the factors responsible for the injecting drug use in Nepal. A cross sectional study was conducted among drug users in Pokhara sub metropolitan city in Nepal. Taking prevalence of 20% at 95% confidence interval and 20% non-response rate, 448 samples were calculated for face to face interviews. Most of the study participants were >24 year's age. Sixty-one percentage of the participants were unemployed. The largest percentage belonged to Gurung/Rai/Pun (37%) ethnic groups, and had completed secondary level of education (47.5%). In the logistic regression analysis occupation, motivating factors for drug use, ever been to custody, age at first drug use, age at first sex, money spent on drugs, ever been rehabilitated and age of the respondents showed a statistically significant association with injecting drug use status. The respondents having business [Adjusted Odds ratio (aOR) 4.506, 95% CI (1.677-12.104)], service [aOR 2.698, 95% CI (a1.146-6.355], having tragedy/turmoil [aOR 3.867, 95% CI (1.596-9.367)], family problem [aOR 2.010, 95% CI (2.010-53.496)], had sex at >19 years [aOR 1.683, 95% CI (1.017-2.785)], rehabilitated >2 times [aOR 4.699, 95% CI (1.401-15.763)], >24 years age group [aOR 1.741, 95% CI (1.025-2.957)] had higher odds of having injecting habits. Having money spent on drugs >3,000 NRs (300 USD) [aOR 0.489, 95%CI (0.274-0.870), not been to custody (aOR 0.330, 95%CI (0.203-0.537)] and having curiosity for drug use [aOR 0.147, 95% CI (0.029-0.737)] were found to be protective for injecting drug use. This study recommends the harm reduction program specifically focused on drug users of occupational groups like business, service and the youths through public health actions to stop transiting them to injecting drug use. PMID:24705679

  20. 75 FR 22601 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g); Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  1. [Drug use and treatment from the perspective of the users' family and friends in Bogota, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Eslava Albarracín, Daniel Gonzalo; Brands, Bruna; Adlaf, Edward; Giesbrecht, Norman; Simich, Laura; Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the partial results from a quantitative study that addresses the perspective of drug users' family and friends regarding the treatment of problems resulting from the use of illicit drugs. Participants were 104 health service users in Bogotá. Of the participants, 58% consider that drug use is a disease that needs treatment; 56% stated the general hospital as the main alternative for treatment; 95% reported that the state accounted for this situation. Participants were more acquainted with private institutions, with therapeutic communities and religious groups being reported as the ones with the strongest commitment to the problem. For 73% of participants, the existing services are inappropriate and of difficult use and access. Stigma is the main barrier for a person to seek health care, and only 50% believe there is any use in treatments. There is a need for broader dissemination of the existing resources so as to increase their implementation and use. PMID:20011903

  2. Cigarette smoking, illicit drug use, and routes of administration among heroin and cocaine users

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, PT; Trenz, RC; Scherer, M; Ropelewski, LR; Latimer, WW

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is ubiquitous among illicit drug users. Some have speculated that this may be partially due to similarities in the route of administration. However, research examining the relationship between cigarette smoking and routes of administration of illicit drugs is limited. To address this gap, we investigated sociodemographic and drug use factors associated with cigarette smoking among cocaine and heroin users in the Baltimore, Maryland community (N=576). Regular and heavy cigarette smokers were more likely to be White, have a history of a prior marriage, and have a lower education level. Regular smoking of marijuana and crack was associated with cigarette smoking, but not heavy cigarette smoking. Injection use was more common among heavy cigarette smokers. In particular, regular cigarette smokers were more likely to have a lifetime history of regularly injecting heroin. Optimal prevention and treatment outcomes can only occur through a comprehensive understanding of the interrelations between different substances of abuse. PMID:22305644

  3. Treating Drug Addiction in the Minority Communities: The Decade Ahead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Joseph S.

    While scholars are not in accord on the basic causes of contemporary drug abuse among minority Americans, most do agree that the social milieu of the drug abuser is fundamental. It has been urged that racism, poverty, police brutality and harrassment, the economics of addiction, the hopelessness of ghetto life, peer pressure, educational…

  4. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES

    PubMed Central

    CORREIA, RION BRATTIG; LI, LANG; ROCHA, LUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this “Bibliome”, the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products—including cannabis—which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015. We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that

  5. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    PubMed

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  6. The Role of Drinking Severity on Sex Risk Behavior and HIV Exposure among Illicit Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Michael; Trenz, Rebecca; Harrell, Paul; Mauro, Pia; Latimer, William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The current study examined how drinking severity among injection and non-injection drug users is associated with sex risk behaviors and risk of HIV exposure. Methods The study is a secondary analysis of an investigation of risk factors among drug users in Baltimore known as the NEURO-HIV Epidemiologic Study. Participants (N = 557) completed an interview, self-reported 30-day alcohol use, lifetime injection and non-injection drug use, and provided blood samples to screen for HIV. Participants were grouped into one of three drinking severity conditions: Abstinent (no reported alcohol use in prior 30-days), Moderate Alcohol Use (≤30 drinks for females, or ≤ 60 drinks for males), or Problematic Alcohol Use (>30 drinks for females, or >60 drinks for males). Drinking severity groups were significantly different on lifetime injection drug use, heroin injection, snorting/sniffing cocaine, and smoking crack. Results Logistic regression analyses found problematic alcohol users to be more likely than alcohol abstainers to inject drugs before or during sex (AOR = 5.78; 95% CI = 2.07-16.10), and more likely than moderate alcohol users to use alcohol before/during sex (AOR = 4.96; 95% CI = 2.09-11.81), inject drugs before/during sex (AOR = 2.96; 95% CI = 1.29-6.80) and to be HIV+ among Black participants (AOR = 2.72; 95% CI = 1.14-6.49). Conclusions These results outline the necessity for research and clinical intervention among this population to reduce sex risk behaviors and potential HIV exposure, while highlighting the need to examine drinking severity as a predictor of sex risk behaviors. PMID:23617865

  7. Theories of addiction: methamphetamine users' explanations for continuing drug use and relapse.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; De La Garza, Richard; Kalechstein, Ari D; Tziortzis, Desey; Jacobsen, Caitlin A

    2009-01-01

    A variety of preclinical models have been constructed to emphasize unique aspects of addiction-like behavior. These include Negative Reinforcement ("Pain Avoidance"), Positive Reinforcement ("Pleasure Seeking"), Incentive Salience ("Craving"), Stimulus Response Learning ("Habits"), and Inhibitory Control Dysfunction ("Impulsivity"). We used a survey to better understand why methamphetamine-dependent research volunteers (N = 73) continue to use methamphetamine, or relapse to methamphetamine use after a period of cessation of use. All participants met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine abuse or dependence, and did not meet criteria for other current Axis I psychiatric disorders or dependence on other drugs of abuse, other than nicotine. The questionnaire consisted of a series of face-valid questions regarding drug use, which in this case referred to methamphetamine use. Examples of questions include: "Do you use drugs mostly to make bad feelings like boredom, loneliness, or apathy go away?", "Do you use drugs mostly because you want to get high?", "Do you use drugs mostly because of cravings?", "Do you find yourself getting ready to take drugs without thinking about it?", and "Do you impulsively take drugs?". The scale was anchored at 1 (not at all) and 7 (very much). For each question, the numbers of participants rating each question negatively (1 or 2), neither negatively or affirmatively (3-5), and affirmatively (6 or 7) were tabulated. The greatest number of respondents (56%) affirmed that they used drugs due to "pleasure seeking." The next highest categories selected were "impulsivity" (27%) and "habits"(25%). Surprisingly, many participants reported that "pain avoidance" (30%) and "craving" (30%) were not important for their drug use. Results from this study support the contention that methamphetamine users (and probably other drug users as well) are more heterogeneous than is often appreciated, and imply that treatment development might be more successful if

  8. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  9. A screening study of drug-drug interactions in cerivastatin users: an adverse effect of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Floyd, J S; Kaspera, R; Marciante, K D; Weiss, N S; Heckbert, S R; Lumley, T; Wiggins, K L; Tamraz, B; Kwok, P-Y; Totah, R A; Psaty, B M

    2012-05-01

    An analysis of a case-control study of rhabdomyolysis was conducted to screen for previously unrecognized cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) 2C8 inhibitors that may cause other clinically important drug-drug interactions. Medication use in cases of rhabdomyolysis using cerivastatin (n = 72) was compared with that in controls using atorvastatin (n = 287) for the period 1998-2001. The use of clopidogrel was strongly associated with rhabdomyolysis (odds ratio (OR) 29.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.1-143). In a replication effort that used the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), it was found that clopidogrel was used more commonly in patients with rhabdomyolysis receiving cerivastatin (17%) than in those receiving atorvastatin (0%, OR infinity; 95% CI = 5.2-infinity). Several medications were tested in vitro for their potential to cause drug-drug interactions. Clopidogrel, rosiglitazone, and montelukast were the most potent inhibitors of cerivastatin metabolism. Clopidogrel and its metabolites also inhibited cerivastatin metabolism in human hepatocytes. These epidemiological and in vitro findings suggest that clopidogrel may cause clinically important, dose-dependent drug-drug interactions with other medications metabolized by CYP2C8. PMID:22419147

  10. A TYPOLOGY OF DRUG-RELATED OFFENDING AMONG YOUNG HOMELESS INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Hathaz, Dodi S.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates a link between drug use and offending, particularly amongst high-risk individuals, such as homeless youth. The extent to which such youth interpret their offending as being related to their drug use, though, is understudied. This manuscript investigates the interpretations of drug-related offenses offered by 151 primarily white, male, homeless IDUs aged 16–29 years. Youth were asked specific questions about their drug-related offenses during in-depth interviews as part of a larger study investigating health risks surrounding drug injection between 2004 and 2006. The first section of the manuscript outlines offenses youth revealed committing either in pursuit of or after using a variety of substances. The second part of the manuscript examines the overall context (motivation, environment), and provides a seven-tiered typology of drug-related offending based on youth's interpretations, linking certain drugs to specific offenses within particular contexts. From here, some theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:21423855

  11. Treating ADHD in Children and Teens: Choosing the Safest and Most Effective Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientific review by the Oregon Health and Science University-based Drug Effectiveness Review Project. This is a summary of a longer, more detailed report you can find at www.CRBestBuyDrugs.org . Generic Name Brand Name Pills per Day Average Cost per Month Stimulant Drugs Approved to Treat ADHD ...

  12. Prescribing patterns for older heavy drug users living in the community.

    PubMed

    Grymonpre, R E; Sitar, D S; Montgomery, P R; Mitenko, P A; Aoki, F Y

    1991-02-01

    We report an analysis of prescription drugs claimed under a government-sponsored, universal Pharmacare program for community-dwelling adults aged greater than or equal to 50 years in Manitoba during 1975, 1978, 1981, and 1984. We limited our analysis to claimants who reported over six drugs in a year in order to control for effects of inflation and a changing deductible. The median number of prescribed drugs and the percent of claimants over age 50 years receiving prescriptions from multiple physicians decreased during the course of our study. In this sample of heavy drug users, age and sex did not consistently correlate with overall drug use, although there was correlation for specific drug groups. The relative ranking of prescribed drugs changed over the years, although benzodiazepines, thiazide diuretics, topical steroids, and codeine-containing analgesics remained near the top. Barbiturates and topical antibiotics showed the greatest drop in prescription rates; acetaminophen and beta-blockers increased the most. Using these community data, we project the prevalence of drug-related adverse events to be highest with beta-blockers, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, thiazide diuretics, and benzodiazepines. PMID:2058191

  13. 77 FR 20825 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... classification information.'' In the Federal Register of April 29, 2010 (75 FR 22601), FDA announced the...; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for...

  14. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive…

  15. Sexual Risk Behaviors among Club Drug Users in Shanghai, China: Prevalence and Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yingying; He, Na; Zhu, Weiming; Detels, Roger

    2013-01-01

    We surveyed 276 club drug users in Shanghai, China. Overall, 43.8% reported ≥2 sex partners in the past 30 days, and 48.9% reported having sex with non-regular partners, 67.4% of whom had unprotected sex. Having ≥2 recent sex partners was associated with being 35 years or older, male, living with friends or others, introduced to club drug use by non-regular sex partners, using methamphetamine recently, self-identified as gay/lesbian or bisexual, had sexual debut before 20 years old, and recently had sex under the influence of drugs. Having unprotected sex with non-regular partners in the past 30 days was associated with lower education levels, having sex to obtain drugs, and lower levels of HIV/AIDS knowledge. Club drug users should be targeted for intervention programs. Future research needs to identify other protective and risk factors for sexual risk behaviors and design interventions to reduce club drug use and associated sexual risk behaviors. PMID:23247360

  16. Increased risk for hepatitis C associated with solvent use among Canadian Aboriginal injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Solvent abuse is a particularly serious issue affecting Aboriginal people. Here we examine the association between solvent use and socio-demographic variables, drug-related risk factors, and pathogen prevalence in Aboriginal injection drug users (IDU) in Manitoba, Canada. Methods Data originated from a cross-sectional survey of IDU from December 2003 to September 2004. Associations between solvent use and variables of interest were assessed by multiple logistic regression. Results A total of 266 Aboriginal IDU were included in the analysis of which 44 self-reported recent solvent use. Hepatitis C infection was 81% in solvent-users, compared to 55% in those reporting no solvent use. In multivariable models, solvent-users were younger and more likely to be infected with hepatitis C (AOR: 3.5; 95%CI: 1.3,14.7), to have shared needles in the last six months (AOR: 2.6; 95%CI:1.0,6.8), and to have injected talwin & Ritalin (AOR: 10.0; 95%CI: 3.8,26.3). Interpretation High hepatitis C prevalence, even after controlling for risky injection practices, suggests that solvent users may form closed networks of higher risk even amongst an already high-risk IDU population. Understanding the social-epidemiological context of initiation and maintenance of solvent use is necessary to address the inherent inequalities encountered by this subpopulation of substance users, and may inform prevention strategies for other marginalized populations. PMID:20642835

  17. Mediators of interpersonal violence and drug addiction severity among methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hobkirk, Andréa L; Watt, Melissa H; Green, Kimberly T; Beckham, Jean C; Skinner, Donald; Meade, Christina S

    2015-03-01

    South Africa has high rates of interpersonal violence and a rapidly growing methamphetamine epidemic. Previous research has linked experiences of interpersonal violence to higher rates of substance use, and identified mental health constructs as potential mediators of this association. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal violence and addiction severity among active methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa, and to explore symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use coping as mediators of this relationship. A community sample of 360 methamphetamine users was recruited through respondent driven sampling and surveyed on their experiences of violence, mental health, coping, and drug use and severity. A series of one-way ANOVAs were conducted to examine the relationship of self-reported interpersonal violence with drug addiction severity, and multiple mediation analyses were used to determine if PTSD symptoms and substance use coping mediated this relationship. The majority (87%) of the sample reported experiencing at least one instance of interpersonal violence in their lifetime, and the number of violent experiences was associated with increased drug addiction severity. PTSD and substance use coping were significant mediators of this association. Only the indirect effect of substance use coping remained significant for the female sample when the mediation model was conducted separately for men and women. The findings point to the need for integrated treatments that address drug use and PTSD for methamphetamine users in South Africa and highlight the importance of coping interventions for women. PMID:25479528

  18. Altered subjective reward valuation among drug-deprived heavy marijuana users: Aversion to uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Kathryn R.; Starr, Mark. J.; Curtin, John. J.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States and its use is rising. Nonetheless, scientific efforts to clarify the risk for addiction and other harm associated with marijuana use have been lacking. Maladaptive decision-making is a cardinal feature of addiction that is likely to emerge in heavy users. In particular, distorted subjective reward valuation related to homeostatic or allostatic processes has been implicated for many drugs of abuse. Selective changes in responses to uncertainty have been observed in response to intoxication and deprivation from various drugs of abuse. To assess for these potential neuroadaptive changes in reward valuation associated with marijuana deprivation, we examined the subjective value of uncertain and certain rewards among deprived and non-deprived heavy marijuana users in a behavioral economics decision-making task. Deprived users displayed reduced valuation of uncertain rewards, particularly when these rewards were more objectively valuable. This uncertainty aversion increased with increasing quantity of marijuana use. These results suggest comparable decision-making vulnerability from marijuana use as other drugs of abuse, and highlights targets for intervention. PMID:26595464

  19. Predictors of Hospitalization for Injection Drug Users Seeking Care for Soft Tissue Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baernstein, Amy; Binswanger, Ingrid; Bradley, Katharine; Merrill, Joseph O.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Soft tissue infections (STIs) from injection drug use are a common cause of Emergency Department visits, hospitalizations, and operating room procedures, yet little is known about factors that may predict the need for these costly medical services. OBJECTIVE To describe a cohort of injection drug users seeking Emergency Department care for STIs and to identify risk factors associated with hospitalization. We hypothesized that participants who delayed seeking care would be hospitalized more often than those who did not. DESIGN Cohort study using in-person structured interviews and medical record review. Logistic regression assessed the association between hospital admission and delay in seeking care as well as other demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors. PARTICIPANTS Injection drug users who sought Emergency Department care for STIs from May 2001 to March 2002. RESULTS Of the 136 participants, 55 (40%) were admitted to the hospital. Delay in seeking care was not associated with hospital admission. Participants admitted for their infection were significantly more likely to be living in a shelter (P = .01) and to report being hospitalized 2 or more times in the past year (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS We identified a subpopulation of injection drug users, mostly living in shelters, who were hospitalized frequently in the past year and who were more likely to be hospitalized for their current infections compared to others. As members of this subpopulation can be easily identified and located, they may benefit from interventions to reduce the health care utilization resulting from these infections. PMID:17356973

  20. Mediators of interpersonal violence and drug addiction severity among methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hobkirk, Andréa L.; Watt, Melissa H.; Green, Kimberly T.; Beckham, Jean C.; Skinner, Donald; Meade, Christina S.

    2014-01-01

    South Africa has high rates of interpersonal violence and a rapidly growing methamphetamine epidemic. Previous research has linked experiences of interpersonal violence to higher rates of substance use, and identified mental health constructs as potential mediators of this association. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal violence and addiction severity among active methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa, and to explore symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use coping as mediators of this relationship. A community sample of 360 methamphetamine users was recruited through respondent driven sampling and surveyed on their experiences of violence, mental health, coping, and drug use and severity. A series of one-way ANOVAs were conducted to examine the relationship of self-reported interpersonal violence with drug addiction severity, and multiple mediation analyses were used to determine if PTSD symptoms and substance use coping mediated this relationship. The majority (87%) of the sample reported experiencing at least one instance of interpersonal violence in their lifetime, and the number of violent experiences was associated with increased drug addiction severity. PTSD and substance use coping were significant mediators of this association. Only the indirect effect of substance use coping remained significant for the female sample when the mediation model was conducted separately for men and women. The findings point to the need for integrated treatments that address drug use and PTSD for methamphetamine users in South Africa and highlight the importance of coping interventions for women. PMID:25479528

  1. Accelerated Hepatitis B Vaccine Schedule among Drug Users – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Lu-Yu; Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Tran, Thanh Quoc; Clark, April; Xia, Rui; Lai, Dejian; Troisi, Catherine; Williams, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B vaccine provides a model for improving uptake and completion of multi-dose vaccinations in the drug-using community. Methods DASH project conducted randomized controlled trial among not-in-treatment current drug users in two urban neighborhoods. Neighborhoods were cluster-randomized to receive a standard (HIV information) or enhanced (HBV vaccine acceptance/adherence) behavioral intervention; participants within clusters were randomized to a standard (0, 1, 6 mo) or accelerated (0, 1, 2 mo) vaccination schedule. Outcomes were completion of three-dose vaccine and HBV seroprotection. Results Of those screening negative for HIV/HBV, 77% accepted HB vaccination and 75% of those received all 3 doses. Injecting drug users (IDUs) on the accelerated schedule were significantly more likely to receive 3 doses (76%) than those on the standard schedule (66%, p=.04), although for drug users as a whole the adherence was 77% and 73%. No difference in adherence was observed between behavioral intervention groups. Predictors of adherence were older age, African American race, stable housing, and alcohol use. Cumulative HBV seroprotection (≥10 mIU/mL) was gained by 12 months by 65% of those completing. Seroprotection at 6 months was greater for the accelerated schedule group. Conclusions The accelerated vaccine schedule improves hepatitis B vaccination adherence among IDU. PMID:20936979

  2. Innocent parties or devious drug users: the views of primary healthcare practitioners with respect to those who misuse prescription drugs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many health professionals engage in providing health services for drug users; however, there is evidence of stigmatisation by some health professionals. Prescription drug misusers as a specific group, may also be subject to such judgment. This study aimed to understand issues for primary care health practitioners in relation to prescription drug misuse (PDM), by exploring the attitudes and experiences of healthcare professionals with respect to PDM. Methods Tape-recorded interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of general practitioners (17), community pharmacists (16) and 'key experts' (18) in New Zealand. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis undertaken. Participants were offered vouchers to the value of NZ$30 for their participation. Results A major theme that was identified was that of two different types of patients involved in PDM, as described by participants - the 'abuser' and the 'overuser'. The 'abuser' was believed to acquire prescription medicines through deception for their own use or for selling on to the illicit market, to use the drugs recreationally, for a 'high' or to stave off withdrawal from illicit drugs. 'Overusers' were characterised as having become 'addicted' through inadvertent overuse and over prescribing, and were generally viewed more sympathetically by practitioners. It also emerged that practitioners' attitudes may have impacted on whether any harm reduction interventions might be offered. Furthermore, whilst practitioners might be more willing to offer help to the 'over-user', it seemed that there is a lack of appropriate services for this group, who may also lack a peer support network. Conclusions A binary view of PDM may not be helpful in understanding the issues surrounding PDM, nor in providing appropriate interventions. There is a need for further exploration of 'over users’ whose needs may not be being met by mainstream drug services, and issues of stigma in relation to

  3. What is the role of harm reduction when drug users say they want abstinence?

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Nettleton, Sarah; Pickering, Lucy

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative survey data indicate that most drug users starting treatment want abstinence rather than harm reduction (McKeganey et al., 2004). This finding has been seized upon by those seeking 'evidence' that abstinence is the bedrock of recovery and harm reduction is a negative and oppositional philosophy. However, all research involves questions of meaning, definition and value and an alternative research paradigm and different study design can provide important additional insights into treatment aspirations, including the desire for abstinence. Qualitative interviews conducted with 30 recovering heroin users (15 males and 15 females) in Southern England in 2009 confirm that those starting treatment often report a desire for abstinence. Nonetheless, drug users are frequently uncertain about their ability to achieve this and can have very different and inconsistent understandings of what being abstinent means. We suggest that the work of the critical theorist Habermas (1970, 1991) could improve our understanding of abstinence and is consistent with recent efforts to achieve a working definition of recovery. Importantly, our qualitative data also reveal that drug users have treatment aspirations that extend far beyond their drug consumption. They additionally want to improve relationships, engage in meaningful activities, acquire material possessions, and achieve better mental and physical health. Moreover, these broader life goals are often inextricably linked to their drug taking. From this, we conclude that both abstinence and harm reduction discourses should more routinely prioritise the many diverse 'wellness' goals that so clearly motivate treatment clients. The harm reduction field will then likely find that it has more in common with abstinence-oriented services and the broader recovery agenda than it might otherwise have imagined. PMID:21055914

  4. Dual epidemics of syphilis and methamphetamine use among drug users in Shandong Province of China.

    PubMed

    Liao, Meizhen; Kang, Dianmin; Tao, Xiaorun; Li, Jie; Qian, Yuesheng; Wang, Guoyong; Jiang, Baofa; Bi, Zhenqiang; Jia, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the types of drugs, the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and its correlates among Shandong's drug users in China. Two consecutive cross-sectional surveys in 2009 and 2010 provided demographics, types of drugs, sexual and drug-use behaviors, and HIV-related services. Of the 1320 unique, eligible participants, 81.1% were male, two-thirds <35 years of age, 13.0% non-Shandong residents; in the past year, majority (96.4%) reported ever using methamphetamine, 3.4% using heroin, 8.6% using ≥2 types of these drugs and 8.0% injecting drugs, 63.8% having commercial sex. HIV and syphilis prevalence were 0.2% and 8.3%, respectively. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, syphilis was independently associated with female, non-Shandong residents, higher levels of education, and 2010. Synthetic drugs, especially methamphetamine, have become the predominant sources of drug addiction. The emerging epidemic of syphilis potentially driven by methamphetamine use underscored the urgency to implement an effective sex and substance use-related intervention. PMID:23394142

  5. The effect of methadone maintenance on positive outcomes for opiate injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Karen F; Lehman, Wayne K; Booth, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This study examined outcome variables for 160 opiate injection drug users (IDUs) who entered methadone maintenance between baseline and 6 month follow-up. Outcome variables of interest included drug use, productivity and HIV risk behaviors. Participants were recruited through street outreach in Denver, Colorado from 2000 through 2004 using targeted sampling. The sample was primarily male, 48% White, averaged 39 years of age and had been injecting drugs for an average of nearly 20 years. Significant improvements were found in univariate tests. Logistic regression revealed that spending more time in treatment was a significant predictor of positive outcomes on drug use and HIV risk behaviors. The results underscore the importance of retaining IDUs in methadone maintenance in order to maximize their treatment success. Results from this study show that time in treatment can affect many aspects of the participant’s life in a positive way, including reduction of HIV risk. PMID:19150202

  6. Prevention of HIV Infection among Injection Drug Users in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Vlahov, David; Robertson, Angela M.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Injection drug use contributes to considerable global morbidity and mortality associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS and other infections due to blood-borne pathogens through the direct sharing of needles, syringes, and other injection equipment. Of ~16 million injection drug users (IDUs) worldwide, an estimated 3 million are HIV infected. The prevalence of HIV infection among IDUs is high in many countries in Asia and eastern Europe and could exacerbate the HIV epidemic in sub- Saharan Africa. This review summarizes important components of a comprehensive program for prevention of HIV infection in IDUs, including unrestricted legal access to sterile syringes through needle exchange programs and enhanced pharmacy services, treatment for opioid dependence (i.e., methadone and buprenorphine treatment), behavioral interventions, and identification and treatment of noninjection drug and alcohol use, which accounts for increased sexual transmission of HIV. Evidence supports the effectiveness of harm-reduction programs over punitive drug-control policies. PMID:20397939

  7. Beyond income: Material resources among drug users in economically-disadvantaged New York City neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Ompad, Danielle C.; Nandi, Vijay; Cerdá, Magdalena; Crawford, Natalie; Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about material resources among drug users beyond income. Income measures can be insensitive to variation among the poor, do not account for variation in cost-of-living, and are subject to non-response bias and underreporting. Further, most do not include illegal income sources that may be relevant to drug-using populations. Methods We explored the reliability and validity of an 18-item material resource scale and describe correlates of adequate resources among 1593 current, former and non-drug users recruited in New York City. Reliability was determined using coefficient α, ωh, and factor analysis. Criterion validity was explored by comparing item and mean scores by income and income source using ANOVA; content validity analyses compared scores by drug use. Multiple linear regression was used to describe correlates of adequate resources. Results The coefficient α and ωh for the overall scale were 0.91 and 0.68, respectively, suggesting reliability was at least adequate. Legal income >$5000 (vs. ≤ $5000) and formal (vs. informal) income sources were associated with more resources, supporting criterion validity. We observed decreasing resources with increasing drug use severity, supporting construct validity. Three factors were identified: basic needs, economic resources and services. Many did not have their basic needs met and few had adequate economic resources. Correlates of adequate material resources included race/ethnicity, income, income source, and homelessness. Conclusions The 18-item material resource scale demonstrated reliability and validity among drug users. These data provide a different view of poverty, one that details specific challenges faced by low-income communities. PMID:21835561

  8. The filter of choice: filtration method preference among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Injection drug use syringe filters (IDUSF) are designed to prevent several complications related to the injection of drugs. Due to their small pore size, their use can reduce the solution's insoluble particle content and thus diminish the prevalence of phlebitis, talcosis.... Their low drug retention discourages from filter reuse and sharing and can thus prevent viral and microbial infections. In France, drug users have access to sterile cotton filters for 15 years and to an IDUSF (the Sterifilt®) for 5 years. This study was set up to explore the factors influencing filter preference amongst injecting drug users. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were gathered through 241 questionnaires and the participation of 23 people in focus groups. Results Factors found to significantly influence filter preference were duration and frequency of injecting drug use, the type of drugs injected and subculture. Furthermore, IDU's rationale for the preference of one type of filter over others was explored. It was found that filter preference depends on perceived health benefits (reduced harms, prevention of vein damage, protection of injection sites), drug retention (low retention: better high, protective mechanism against the reuse of filters; high retention: filter reuse as a protective mechanism against withdrawal), technical and practical issues (filter clogging, ease of use, time needed to prepare an injection) and believes (the conviction that a clear solution contains less active compound). Conclusion It was concluded that the factors influencing filter preference are in favour of change; a shift towards the use of more efficient filters can be made through increased availability, information and demonstrations. PMID:21859488

  9. "Single-use" needles and syringes for the prevention of HIV infection among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C

    1998-01-01

    Providing single-use injection equipment to persons who inject illicit drugs would appear to be an effective method for reducing HIV transmission. However, interviews with manufacturers, syringe exchange program staff, and drug users revealed numerous difficulties with such a technologic solution. All designs for such equipment can be defeated and should probably be called difficult-to-reuse equipment. There are problems with consumer acceptance of difficult-to-reuse equipment and with safe disposal of large amounts of biohazardous waste. Despite these problems, it would be useful to conduct additional research, particularly on the potential for placing difficult-to-reuse equipment into shooting galleries. PMID:9663624

  10. Boredom, depressive symptoms, and HIV risk behaviors among urban injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    German, Danielle; Latkin, Carl A.

    2013-01-01

    Boredom is closely aligned with depression, but is understood to be conceptually distinct. Little is known about boredom among active drug users and the potential association with depression and HIV risk. Current IDUs (n=845) completed a baseline behavioral survey including socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported boredom, depressive symptoms (CESD score), and HIV risk behaviors. One-third of the sample reported high boredom in the past week. In multivariate analysis, those who reported boredom were less likely to be older, African-American, have a main partner, and to be employed at least part-time. Controlling for covariates, those with high boredom were almost five times as likely to report high depressive symptoms. Co-occurrence of boredom and depressive symptoms (28%) was strongly and independently associated with a range of injection risk behaviors and sex exchange. This study demonstrates the need for more thorough understanding of mental health and HIV risk among urban drug users. PMID:22760741

  11. Prediction of Candidate Drugs for Treating Pancreatic Cancer by Using a Combined Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xinran; Li, Ying; Yang, Bo; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of death from solid malignancies worldwide. Currently, gemcitabine is the only drug approved for treating pancreatic cancer. Developing new therapeutic drugs for this disease is, therefore, an urgent need. The C-Map project has provided a wealth of gene expression data that can be mined for repositioning drugs, a promising approach to new drug discovery. Typically, a drug is considered potentially useful for treating a disease if the drug-induced differential gene expression profile is negatively correlated with the differentially expressed genes in the target disease. However, many of the potentially useful drugs (PUDs) identified by gene expression profile correlation are likely false positives because, in C-Map, the cultured cell lines to which the drug is applied are not derived from diseased tissues. To solve this problem, we developed a combined approach for predicting candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer. We first identified PUDs for pancreatic cancer by using C-Map-based gene expression correlation analyses. We then applied an algorithm (Met-express) to predict key pancreatic cancer (KPC) enzymes involved in pancreatic cancer metabolism. Finally, we selected candidates from the PUDs by requiring that their targets be KPC enzymes or the substrates/products of KPC enzymes. Using this combined approach, we predicted seven candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer, three of which are supported by literature evidence, and three were experimentally validated to be inhibitory to pancreatic cancer celllines. PMID:26910401

  12. Drugs to Treat Overactive Bladder: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... state settlement of consumer fraud claims regarding the marketing of the prescription drug Neurontin. This brief should not be viewed as a substitute for a consultation with a medical or health professional. It is provided to enhance communication with your doctor, not replace it.

  13. Patterns, Trends, and Meanings of Drug Use by Dance-Drug Users in Edinburgh, Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sarah C. E.; Hayward, Emma

    2004-01-01

    A survey of drug use in the past year was completed by 124 clubbers (50% male, 50% female, age range 14-44, mean 24 years). Participants were self selecting and recruited in clubs and pre-club bars. Prevalence rates for alcohol, cannabis, and ecstasy were over 80%; 63% reported cocaine and 53% amphetamine use, 15%-43% used ketamine, psilocybin,…

  14. Drug Network Characteristics and HIV Risk Among Injection Drug Users in Russia: The roles of Trust, Size, and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Odinokova, Veronika A.; Heimer, Robert; Grau, Lauretta E.; Lyubimova, Alexandra; Safiullina, Liliya; Levina, Olga S.; Niccolai, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the influence of drug network characteristics including trust, size, and stability on HIV risk behaviors and HIV testing among injection drug users (IDUs) in St. Petersburg, Russia. Overall, male and female IDUs who reported having high levels of trust in their drug networks were significantly more likely to share syringes than those with lower levels of trust (OR [95% CI]) 2.87 [1.06, 7.81] and 4.89 [1.05, 21.94], respectively). Male and female IDUs in larger drug networks were more likely to share syringes than those in smaller networks (4.21 [1.54, 11.51] and 4.80 [1.20, 19.94], respectively). Characteristics that were significantly associated with not having been HIV tested included drug network instability among men and larger network size among women. High trust, large size, and instability were positively and significantly associated with syringe sharing and not having been HIV tested. Effectiveness of interventions in Russia to reduce the risk of HIV infection may be enhanced if network characteristics are addressed. PMID:20872063

  15. Alcohol, Drug and Sexual Risk Behavior Correlates of Recent Transactional Sex Among Female Black South African Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Alicia; Cavanaugh, Courtenay E.; Parry, Charles D.; Moleko, Anne Gloria; Latimer, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Transactional sex among black South African women has become a mode of economic survival putting them at higher risk for HIV and other infectious disease. In order to inform HIV interventions, drug and sexual risk behavior correlates of recent transactional sex among a descriptive epidemiological, cross-sectional sample of 189, black, South African women in Pretoria were examined using log binomial regression. Prevalence of HIV seropositivity was extremely high among non-transactional sex workers (47.1%) and transactional sex workers (54.6%), albeit not significantly different. Adjusted regression results indicated that the probability of transactional sex was greater for drug using women who tested positive for cocaine use (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio (APR)=1.3, 95% CI=1.1, 1.5) and knew of anyone who died of AIDS (APR =1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 2.1). The probability of transactional sex was lower for female drug users who reported greater education (APR =0.6, 95% CI= 0.4, 0.8), condom use in their first sexual encounter (APR =0.7, 95% CI=0.6, 1.0) or reported a recent steady sexual partnership (APR =0.8, 95% CI=0.7, 0.9). Drug use-related interventions for female transactional sex workers may need to focus on methods for the reduction of not only drug use, especially cocaine use, but also the reduction of sexual risk behaviors. PMID:21603063

  16. [Expensive new drugs for treating cancer: a dilemma].

    PubMed

    Tax, Sofie E M; van der Hoeven, J J M Koos

    2014-01-01

    The number of new cancer patients in the Netherlands is increasing annually: there were approximately 100,000 new cases in 2010 and there will be more than 120,000 in 2020. The number of systemic therapies available for these patients is growing rapidly, and spending on anticancer drug doubled within ten years, to EUR 733 m in 2013. During the past few years the amount spent on new targeted drugs was compensated by the expiration of patents for frequently used cytostatics such as paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabin, oxaliplatin and irinotecan. Immunotherapy is now available for patients with metastatic melanoma and the new 'checkpoint inhibitors' look promising for other cancers, including lung cancer, renal cell cancer, and bladder cancer. These drugs, as well as the numerous new targeted agents, are very expensive. The price for 4 cycles of ipilimumab for a patient with metastatic melanoma is approximately EUR 80,000. A special committee of the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF) released a report on the increasing costs of anticancer treatments and gave recommendations concerning how to address this issue. First of all, cost savings have to be achieved by lowering the price of the innovative drugs. The search for companion diagnostics should be encouraged, in order to avoid unnecessary drug administration. And, if these measures are not sufficient, the government should consider determining a price-ceiling for these treatments. A differentiation between treatments with curative intention or long-term survival benefits and those which only have marginal effects, would appear to be logical. PMID:25115212

  17. Real-time assessment of alcohol drinking and drug use in opioid-dependent polydrug users.

    PubMed

    Preston, Kenzie L; Jobes, Michelle L; Phillips, Karran A; Epstein, David H

    2016-10-01

    We investigated relationships between drinking, other drug use, and drug craving, using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), in a sample of polydrug users who were not heavy drinkers. In a prospective longitudinal cohort study, 114 heroin and cocaine users on methadone-maintenance treatment carried handheld electronic diaries during waking hours and were screened for drug and alcohol use for up to 25 weeks. Individuals who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence were excluded. Participants responded to 2-5 random prompts per day to report on their moods, cravings, and activities and initiated entries when they used or acutely craved heroin or cocaine. Drinking alcohol was assessed in both types of entries. Breath alcohol was measured three times weekly. Participants reported drinking alcohol in 1.6% of random-prompt entries, 3.7% of event-contingent entries when craving cocaine and/or heroin, and 11.6% of event-contingent entries when using cocaine and/or heroin. Alcohol drinking was also associated with higher craving ratings and prestudy alcohol use. More drinking was detected by ambulatory self-report than by in-clinic breath testing. Even though we had screened out heavy drinkers from our sample of polydrug users, drinking was associated with heroin and cocaine craving and actual use. PMID:27579810

  18. First injection of ketamine among young injection drug users (IDUs) in three U.S. cities

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Hathazi, Dodi; Alarcon, Erica; Tortu, Stephanie; Clatts, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, has emerged as an increasingly common drug among subgroups of young injection drug users (IDUs) in cities across the United States. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 213 young IDUs aged 16–28 years recruited in New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles between 2004 and 2006. While some initiated injection drug use with ketamine, the drug was more frequently injected by IDUs with extensive polydrug using histories. IDUs initiating with ketamine commonly self-injected via an intramuscular mode of administration. The injection group provided crucial knowledge and material resources that enabled the injection event to occur, including ketamine, syringes, and injection skills. Injection paraphernalia was commonly shared during the first injection of ketamine, particularly vials of pharmaceutically-packaged liquid ketamine. Injection events infrequently occurred in a rave or club and more typically in a private home, which challenges ketamine’s designation as a ‘club’ drug. The first injection of ketamine was a noteworthy event since it introduced a novel drug or new mode of administration to be further explored by some, or exposed others to a drug to be avoided in the future. Risk reduction messages directed towards young IDUs should be expanded to include ketamine. PMID:16979848

  19. The income-generating behaviour of injecting drug-users in Oslo.

    PubMed

    Bretteville-Jensen, A L; Sutton, M

    1996-01-01

    Drug users' income-generating behaviours, such as prostitution, acquisitive crime and small-scale dealing, have a major influence on the harm caused to the non-using population. Using data on the drug use and income sources of 900 drug-injectors in Oslo, this paper has two aims: to present data on Oslo income-generating behaviours and compare these with those in the Netherlands and Scotland; and to explore conceptual issues in the comparison of self-reported dealing income with other sources. Eighty-three per cent of respondents reported income from social benefit, and 43% had sold drugs in the last month. Half the females reported income from prostitution. The income-generation differences found in the comparisons section do not seem to reflect variations in drug and other social policies, but may relate to differences in the profitability of dealing. Using self-reported dealing income to compare the contributions of different income sources may be misleading, however, since it does not reflect financial profit or the value of dealers' drug consumption. Adjusted figures show that theft accounts for 23% of total drugs expenditure, while the corresponding figures for dealing and prostitution are 42% and 21%, respectively. PMID:8822015

  20. Investigational drugs to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Cuong; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon YC; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This is to a large extent due to antibiotic-resistant strains, in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). While the toll of invasive MRSA infections appears to decrease in U.S. hospitals, the rate of community-associated MRSA infections remains constant and there is a surge of MRSA in many other countries. This situation calls for continuing if not increased efforts to find novel strategies to combat MRSA infections. Areas covered This review will provide an overview of current investigational antibiotics in clinical development (up to phase II), and of therapeutic antibodies and alternative drugs against S. aureus in preclinical and clinical development, including a short description of the mechanism of action and a presentation of microbiological and clinical data. Expert opinion Increased recent antibiotic development efforts and results from pathogenesis research have led to several new antibiotics and alternative drugs, as well as a more informed selection of targets for vaccination efforts against MRSA. This developing portfolio of novel anti-staphylococcal drugs will hopefully provide us with additional and more efficient ways to combat MRSA infections in the near future and prevent us from running out of treatment options, even if new resistances arise. PMID:26536498

  1. Overcoming barriers to prevention, care, and treatment of hepatitis C in illicit drug users.

    PubMed

    Edlin, Brian R; Kresina, Thomas F; Raymond, Daniel B; Carden, Michael R; Gourevitch, Marc N; Rich, Josiah D; Cheever, Laura W; Cargill, Victoria A

    2005-04-15

    Injection drug use accounts for most of the incident infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the United States and other developed countries. HCV infection is a complex and challenging medical condition in injection drug users (IDUs). Elements of care for hepatitis C in illicit drug users include prevention counseling and education; screening for transmission risk behavior; testing for HCV and human immunodeficiency virus infection; vaccination against hepatitis A and B viruses; evaluation for comorbidities; coordination of substance-abuse treatment services, psychiatric care, and social support; evaluation of liver disease; and interferon-based treatment for HCV infection. Caring for patients who use illicit drugs presents challenges to the health-care team that require patience, experience, and an understanding of the dynamics of substance use and addiction. Nonetheless, programs are successfully integrating hepatitis C care for IDUs into health-care settings, including primary care, methadone treatment and other substance-abuse treatment programs, infectious disease clinics, and clinics in correctional facilities. PMID:15768335

  2. Factorial Structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)-18 among Chinese Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jichuan; Kelly, Brian C; Liu, Tieqiao; Zhang, Guanbai; Hao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) has been widely used for mental health screenings in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the validation of its application to Chinese populations has been very limited. The objective of this research is to assess the factorial structure of the BSI-18 within a Chinese drug using population. METHODS AND RESULTS A total sample of 303 drug users recruited via Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) from Changsha, China was used for the study. Our results show: 1) The BSI-18 item scores are highly skewed; 2) With dichotomous items measures (1-problem at least moderately caused respondent discomfort during the past week; 0-otherwise), our findings support the designed 3-factor solution of the BSI-18 (somatization, depression, and anxiety); 3) The BSI-18 has a hierarchical factorial structure with 3 first-order factors and an underlying second-order factor (general psychological distress); 4) Tentative support should also be given to a single dimension of general psychological distress in Chinese drug using populations. Our study recommends a useful alternative approach for evaluating the factorial structure of the BSI-18 – i.e. CFA with dichotomous item measures. Both the total BSI-18 score and the three subscales (SOM, DEP, and ANX) can be used in applications of the BSI-18. CONCLUSION Overall, our findings suggest the BSI-18 is useful with Chinese drug users, and shows potential for use with non-Western and substance using populations more generally. PMID:23906998

  3. Examining Factorial Structure and Measurement Invariance of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)-18 among Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jichuan; Kelly, Brian C.; Booth, Brenda M.; Falck, Russel S.; Leukefeld, Carl; Carlson, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the factorial structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI-18) and test its measurement invariance among different drug using populations. A total sample of 710 drug users was recruited using respondent-drive sampling (RDS) from three states: Ohio (n=248), Arkansas (n=237), and Kentucky (n=225). The results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) show: 1) the BSI-18 has a three-factor structure (somatization, depression, and anxiety) with an underlying second-order factor (global severity index of distress); and 2) its factorial structure and metric (factor loadings) are invariant across populations under study. However, the scalars (intercepts) of the BSI-18 items are not invariant, and the means of the latent factors also varied across populations. Our findings provide evidence of a valid factorial structure of the BSI-18 that can be readily applied to studying drug using populations. PMID:19733442

  4. Participant and Staff Experiences in a Peer-Delivered HIV Intervention with Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Kostick, Kristin M.; Weeks, Margaret; Mosher, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We explore ethical issues faced by investigators as they conduct research as part of a peer-delivered HIV/AIDS risk reduction program for injection drug users (IDUs). Staff and participant experiences in peer-delivered interventions among IDUs have come under scrutiny by ethics researchers because of their potential to inadvertently and negatively impact participant rehabilitation due to continued engagement with drug-using networks during the course of outreach. This study explores whether enhanced communication of participant concerns and experiences with clinic and research staff helps to reduce inadvertent malfeasance in peer-delivered drug treatment interventions. Results contribute to the development of patient support infrastructure in peer-delivered risk reduction programs involving IDUs. PMID:24572079

  5. Network Structure and the Risk for HIV Transmission Among Rural Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Young, A. M.; Jonas, A. B.; Mullins, U. L.; Halgin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that structural properties of drug users’ social networks can have substantial effects on HIV risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the structural properties of Appalachian drug users’ risk networks could lend insight into the potential for HIV transmission in this population. Data from 503 drug users recruited through respondent-driven sampling were used to construct a sociometric risk network. Network ties represented relationships in which partners had engaged in unprotected sex and/or shared injection equipment. Compared to 1,000 randomly generated networks, the observed network was found to have a larger main component and exhibit more cohesiveness and centralization than would be expected at random. Thus, the risk network structure in this sample has many structural characteristics shown to be facilitative of HIV transmission. This underscores the importance of primary prevention in this population and prompts further investigation into the epidemiology of HIV in the region. PMID:23184464

  6. The role of harm reduction in controlling HIV among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Alex; McLeod, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Injecting drug users (IDU) now account for one in 10 new HIV infections world wide. Yet it has been known since the early 1990s that HIV among IDU can be effectively, safely and cost-effectively controlled by the early and vigorous implementation of a comprehensive package of strategies known as ’harm reduction’. This concept means that decreasing drug-related harms is accorded an even higher priority than reduction of drug consumption. Strategies required involve: explicit and peer-based education about the risk of HIV from sharing injecting equipment; needle syringe programmes; drug treatment (including especially opiate substitution treatment) and community development. Many countries experiencing or threatened by an HIV epidemic among IDU have now adopted harm reduction but often implementation has been too little and too late. Although coverage is slowly improving in many countries, HIV is still spreading faster among IDU than harm reduction programmes while coverage in correctional centres lags far behind community settings. The scientific debate about harm reduction is now over. National and international support for harm reduction is growing while almost all the major UN organizations responsible for drug policy now support harm reduction. Only a small number of countries, led by the USA, are still vehemently opposed to harm reduction. Excessive reliance on drug law enforcement remains the major barrier to increased adoption of harm reduction. Sometimes zealous drug law enforcement undermines harm reduction. A more balanced approach to drug law enforcement is required with illicit drug use recognized primarily as a health and social problem. PMID:18641473

  7. Thirty Years of Orphan Drug Legislation and the Development of Drugs to Treat Rare Seizure Conditions: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a serious chronic health condition with a high morbidity impairing the life of patients and afflicted families. Many epileptic conditions, especially those affecting children, are rare disorders generating an urgent medical need for more efficacious therapy options. Therefore, we assessed the output of the US and European orphan drug legislations. Methods Quantitative analysis of the FDA and EMA databases for orphan drug designations according to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Results Within the US Orphan Drug Act 40 designations were granted delivering nine approvals, i.e. clobazam, diazepam viscous solution for rectal administration, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, repository corticotropin, rufinamide, topiramate, and vigabatrin. Since 2000 the EMA granted six orphan drug designations whereof two compounds were approved, i.e. rufinamide and stiripentol. In the US, two orphan drug designations were withdrawn. Orphan drugs were approved for conditions including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus. Comparing time to approval for rufinamide, which was approved in the US and the EU to treat rare seizure conditions, the process seems faster in the EU (2.2 years) than in the US (4.3 years). Conclusion Orphan drug development in the US and in the EU delivered only few molecular entities to treat rare seizure disorders. The development programs focused on already approved antiepileptic drugs or alternative pharmaceutical formulations. Most orphan drugs approved in the US are not approved in the EU to treat rare seizures although some were introduced after 2000 when the EU adopted the Orphan Drug Regulation. PMID:27557111

  8. Injecting Drug Users and Their Health Seeking Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tuhin; Bhuiyan, Faiz Ahmed; Islam, Md. Serajul; Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Nessa, Hurun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Injecting drug users (IDUs) are amongst the most vulnerable people to acquisition of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to collect information on IDUs and their health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 120 IDUs attending a drug rehabilitation center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographics, drug use, health seeking behavior, knowledge of injecting drugs, and sexual behavior. Results. The mean ± SD and median (IQR) age of the participants were 32.5 ± 21.3 and 33 (27–38) years, respectively, with only 9.2% females. Injection buprenorphine was the drug of choice for 40% of participants, and 58% of the participants first started drug use with smoking cannabis. 73.3% of participants shared needles sometimes and 57.5% were willing to use the needle exchange programs. 60% of the participants had no knowledge about the diseases spread by injection. Condom use during the last intercourse with regular partners was 11.7% and with any partners 15.8%. Conclusion. IDUs in Bangladesh are a high-risk group for HIV/AIDS due to lack of knowledge and risky behaviors. Education and interventions specifically aimed at IDUs are needed, because traditional education may not reach IDUs or influence their behavior. PMID:25692067

  9. Injection drug users trained by overdose prevention programs: Responses to witnessed overdoses

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Wagner, Karla D.; Silva, Karol; Kecojevic, Aleksander; Iverson, Ellen; McNeely, Miles; Kral, Alex H.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the growing public health problem of drug overdose, community-based organizations have initiated overdose prevention programs (OPP), which distribute naloxone, an opioid antagonist, and teach overdose response techniques. Injection drug users (IDUs) have been targeted for this intervention due to their high risk for drug overdose. Limited research attention has focused on factors that may inhibit or prevent IDUs who have been trained by OPPs to undertake recommended response techniques when responding to a drug overdose. IDUs (n=30) trained by two OPPs in Los Angeles were interviewed in 2010–11 about responses to their most recently witnessed drug overdose using an instrument containing both open and closed-ended questions. Among the 30 witnessed overdose events, the victim recovered in 29 cases while the outcome was unknown in one case. Participants responded to overdoses using a variety of techniques taught by OPP. Injecting the victim with naloxone was the most common recommended response while other recommended responses included stimulating the victim with knuckles, calling 911, and giving rescue breathing. Barriers preventing participants from employing recommended response techniques in certain circumstances included prior successes using folk remedies to revive a victim, concerns over attracting police to the scene, and issues surrounding access to or use of naloxone. Practical solutions, such as developing booster sessions to augment OPP, are encouraged to increase the likelihood that trained participants respond to a drug overdose with the full range of recommended techniques. PMID:22847602

  10. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  11. Exercise training as a drug to treat age associated frailty.

    PubMed

    Viña, Jose; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco Jose; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Exercise causes an increase in the production of free radicals [1]. As a result of a hormetic mechanism antioxidant enzymes are synthesised and the cells are protected against further oxidative stress. Thus, exercise can be considered as an antioxidant [2]. Age-associated frailty is a major medical and social concern as it can easily lead to dependency. In this review we describe that oxidative stress is associated with frailty and the mechanism by which exercise prevents age-associated frailty. We propose that individually tailored multicomponent exercise programmes are one of the best ways to prevent and to treat age-associated frailty. PMID:27021963

  12. Hepatitis-C virus infection among injecting drug users in Lahore, Pakistan: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Abdul Majeed; Majeed, Sadia; Jamil, Muhammad; Rehman, Abdul; Majeed, Sufia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis C virus among injecting drugs users, furthermore different genotypes of HCV infection and their effect on viral load were also found and subsequently most prevalent subtype was predicted. Methods: All samples were processed for Anti-HCV antibody detection through ELISA by using third generation ELISA Kit. The Anti-HCV positive serum samples were stored for RT-PCR to estimate the viral load and genotypes of HCV for study. Injecting drug users selected from in and around Lahore Metropolitan from July 2012 to August 2013 was included. The data analysis was completed by using SPSS version 16. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: A total of 241 Injecting drug users were enrolled and screened for Anti HCV in the study. Prevalence of HCV infection in IDUs from Lahore was found to be 36.09%. Education (p=0.000), low socioeconomic status (p=0.011), Blood transfusion (0.003), any tattoo on the body (p=0.002), use of injectable drugs with reused syringes (p=0.000) and sharing of syringes (p=0.001) in groups was significantly associated with HCV infection. Some utensils were also significantly associated with HCV status. The most common subtype of HCV genotype was 3a (n=65) followed by 2a (n=15) and 1a (n=6). Conclusion: The study reveals that IDUs with reused syringes status and sharing of syringes in group had more chances to get HCV infection. The viral load in IDUs infected with different subtypes of genotype was significantly associated. PMID:27182243

  13. Central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Farde, L.; Wiesel, F.A.; Halldin, C.; Sedvall, G.

    1988-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography and the carbon 11-labeled ligand raclopride, central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in the putamen was determined in psychiatric patients treated with clinical doses of psychoactive drugs. Receptor occupancy in drug-treated patients was defined as the percent reduction of specific carbon 11-raclopride binding in relation to the expected binding in the absence of drug treatment. Clinical treatment of schizophrenic patients with 11 chemically distinct antipsychotic drugs (including both classic and atypical neuroleptics such as clozapine) resulted in a 65% to 85% occupancy of D2-dopamine receptors. In a depressed patient treated with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline, no occupancy was found. The time course for receptor occupancy and drug levels was followed after withdrawal of sulpiride or haloperidol. D2-dopamine receptor occupancy remained above 65% for many hours despite a substantial reduction of serum drug concentrations. In a sulpiride-treated patient, the dosage was reduced in four steps over a nine-week period and a curvilinear relationship was demonstrated between central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy and serum drug concentrations. The results demonstrate that clinical doses of all the currently used classes of antipsychotic drugs cause a substantial blockade of central D2-dopamine receptors in humans. This effect appears to be selective for the antipsychotics, since it was not induced by the antidepressant nortriptyline.

  14. Homeless drug users' awareness and risk perception of peer "Take Home Naloxone" use – a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat; Oldham, Nicola; Francis, Katharine; Jones, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    Background Peer use of take home naloxone has the potential to reduce drug related deaths. There appears to be a paucity of research amongst homeless drug users on the topic. This study explores the acceptability and potential risk of peer use of naloxone amongst homeless drug users. From the findings the most feasible model for future treatment provision is suggested. Methods In depth face-to-face interviews conducted in one primary care centre and two voluntary organisation centres providing services to homeless drug users in a large UK cosmopolitan city. Interviews recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically by framework techniques. Results Homeless people recognise signs of a heroin overdose and many are prepared to take responsibility to give naloxone, providing prior training and support is provided. Previous reports of the theoretical potential for abuse and malicious use may have been overplayed. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to recommend providing "over the counter" take home naloxone" to UK homeless injecting drug users. However a programme of peer use of take home naloxone amongst homeless drug users could be feasible providing prior training is provided. Peer education within a health promotion framework will optimise success as current professionally led health promotion initiatives are failing to have a positive impact amongst homeless drug users. PMID:17014725

  15. Profiles of risk: a qualitative study of injecting drug users in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Razzaghi, Emran M; Movaghar, Afarin Rahimia; Green, Traci Craig; Khoshnood, Kaveh

    2006-01-01

    Background In Iran, there are an estimated 200,000 injecting drug users (IDUs). Injecting drug use is a relatively new phenomenon for this country, where opium smoking was the predominant form of drug use for hundreds of years. As in many countries experiencing a rise in injecting drug use, HIV/AIDS in Iran is associated with the injection of drugs, accounting for transmission of more than two-thirds of HIV infections. This study aimed to: describe the range of characteristics of IDUs in Tehran, Iran's capital city; 2) examine the injecting-related HIV risk behaviors of IDUs, and 3) suggest necessary interventions to prevent HIV transmission among IDUs and their families and sex partners. Methods Using rapid assessment and response methods with a qualitative focus, six districts of Tehran were selected for study. A total of 81 key informants from different sectors and 154 IDUs were selected by purposeful, opportunistic and snowball sampling, then interviewed. Ethnographic observations were done for mapping and studying injecting-related HIV risk settings and behaviors. Modified content analysis methods were used to analyze the data and extract typologies of injecting drug users in Tehran. Results Evidence of injecting drug use and drug-related harm was found in 5 of 6 study districts. Several profiles of IDUs were identified: depending on their socioeconomic status and degree of stability, IDUs employed different injecting behaviors and syringe hygiene practices. The prevalence of sharing injection instruments ranged from 30–100%. Varied magnitudes of risk were evident among the identified IDU typologies in terms of syringe disinfection methods, level of HIV awareness, and personal hygiene exhibited. At the time of research, there were no active HIV prevention programs in existence in Tehran. Conclusion The recent rise of heroin injection in Iran is strongly associated with HIV risk. Sharing injection instruments is a common and complex behavior among Iranian

  16. The "translators": engaging former drug users as key research staff to design and implement a risk reduction program for rural cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Katharine E; Wright, Patricia B; Sims, Desi; Tyner, Kathy Russell; Montgomery, Brooke E E

    2012-04-01

    This manuscript describes lessons learned in the development and implementation of a clinical behavioral trial to reduce sexual risk among African-American cocaine users in rural Arkansas, from the perspectives of a multidisciplinary investigative team and community staff members with a history as local drug users who served as "translators." Recommendations for investigators doing community-based research with active substance users are provided in the following domains: (a) engaging the community during formative research, (b) establishing bidirectional trust, (c) ensuring community voices are heard, and (d) managing conflict. The "translator's" role is critical to the success of such projects. PMID:22428822

  17. The “Translators”: Engaging Former Drug Users as Key Research Staff to Design and Implement a Risk Reduction Program for Rural Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Katharine E.; Wright, Patricia B.; Sims, Desi; Tyner, Kathy Russell; Montgomery, Brooke E. E.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript describes lessons learned in the development and implementation of a clinical behavioral trial to reduce sexual risk among African-American cocaine users in rural Arkansas, from the perspectives of a multidisciplinary investigative team and community staff members with a history as local drug users who served as “translators.” Recommendations for investigators doing community-based research with active substance users are provided in the following domains: (a) engaging the community during formative research, (b) establishing bidirectional trust, (c) ensuring community voices are heard, and (d) managing conflict. The “translator’s” role is critical to the success of such projects. PMID:22428822

  18. The similarities and differences in impulsivity and cognitive ability among ketamine, methadone, and non-drug users.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong; Su, Dequan; Jiang, Xing; Zhu, Liang; Ye, Haosheng

    2016-09-30

    The study aimed to identify similarities and differences among ketamine, methadone users, and non-drug-using controls, on impulsivity, antisocial personality, and related cognitive abilities. A case-control observational design was used to compare the impulsivity and cognitive function of ketamine users (n = 51), methadone users (n=59), and controls (n=60). Antisocial personality traits and emotion states were also measured. One-way ANOVAs and planned post hoc pair-wise tests were used to analyze the data. Compared to non-drug-using controls, ketamine and methadone users had elevated scores on BIS and Pd scale of the MMPI, poorer performance on 2-back task, Stop-signal task, and Stroop test. Ketamine users performed the worst in the 2-back accuracy and Stop miss rate compared to methadone users and controls. There were no significant differences between the groups on the Iowa Gambling Task. Ketamine users did not show deficits in decision-making but exhibited strong impulsivity, antisocial personality, and poor response inhibition and working memory at levels similar to methadone users. These deficits may reflect vulnerability to addiction. This suggests that future treatment programs for ketamine users could address drug users' impulsive cognition and psychopathic deviance. PMID:27376671

  19. Physician response to financial incentives when choosing drugs to treat breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Andrew J; Johnson, Scott J

    2012-12-01

    This paper considers physician agency in choosing drugs to treat metastatic breast cancer, a clinical setting in which patients have few protections from physicians' rent seeking. Physicians have explicit financial incentives attached to each potential drug treatment, with profit margins ranging more than a hundred fold. SEER-Medicare claims and Medispan pricing data were formed into a panel of 4,503 patients who were diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer and treated with anti-cancer drugs from 1992 to 2002. We analyzed the effects of product attributes, including profit margin, randomized controlled trial citations, FDA label, generic status, and other covariates on therapy choice. Instruments and drug fixed effects were used to control for omitted variables and possible measurement error associated with margin. We find that increasing physician margin by 10% yields between an 11 and 177% increase in the likelihood of drug choice on average across drugs. Physicians were more likely to use drugs with which they had experience, had more citations, and were FDA-approved to treat breast cancer. Oncologists are susceptible to financial incentives when choosing drugs, though other factors play a large role in their choice of drug. PMID:23124970

  20. Brief Intervention for Drug Users Presenting in Emergency Departments (NIDA CTN Protocol 0047: SMART-ED)

    PubMed Central

    Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Donovan, Dennis M.; Mandler, Raul N.; Perl, Harold I.; Forcehimes, Alyssa A.; Crandall, Cameron; Lindblad, Robert; Oden, Neal L.; Sharma, Gaurav; Metsch, Lisa; Lyons, Michael S.; McCormack, Ryan; Konstantopoulos, Wendy Macias; Douaihy, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    %) or the BI-B group (244/275, 89%). Hair analysis differences between groups at other time points were not significant. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this sample of drug users seeking emergency medical treatment, a relatively robust brief intervention did not improve substance use outcomes. More work is needed to determine how drug use disorders may be addressed effectively in the ED. PMID:25179753

  1. Spinal osteomyelitis due to Mycobacterium fortuitum in a former intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Longardner, Katie; Allen, Ahkeel; Ramgopal, Moti

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with a history of intravenous drug use presented to the emergency department with a 6-month history of pain in her lumbar back and right buttock. She had stopped injecting drugs 1 year ago. Physical examination was unremarkable except for paraspinal and right sacroiliac joint tenderness. MRI confirmed discitis, osteomyelitis and abscess formation in the L5-S1 disc space. She underwent extensive vertebral surgery and debridement of the spinal abscess. Her surgical cultures grew Mycobacterium fortuitum, and she was treated with an appropriate combination of intravenous antimicrobial therapy. PMID:23845685

  2. 76 FR 59705 - Guidance for Industry on User Fee Waivers, Reductions, and Refunds for Drug and Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... clarification on related issues such as user fee exemptions for orphan drugs. In the Federal Register of March 14, 2011 (76 FR 13629), FDA announced the availability of a revised draft guidance entitled...

  3. Social networks and HCV viremia among anti-HCV positive rural drug users

    PubMed Central

    YOUNG, A. M.; JONAS, A. B.; HAVENS, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Though social networks are known to play an important role in drug-using behaviors associated with HCV infection, literature on social networks and HCV is inconsistent. This exploratory study examined HCV RNA distribution within a social network of anti-HCV positive rural Appalachia nonmedical prescription opioid users (NMPOUs). Participants were tested serologically for HCV RNA, and behavioral, demographic, and network data were collecting using interview-administered questionnaires. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression. Behavioral and demographic characteristics did not differ by RNA status. In the multivariate model, recent injection drug users were more likely to be RNA-positive (OR: 4.06, 95% CI: 1.04 – 15.83), and turnover into one’s drug network was significantly protective (OR: 0.15, 95% CI: 0.03-0.75). This is the first study to date to examine HCV distribution among rural NMPOUs from a network perspective and demonstrates that network characteristics significantly contribute to the epidemiology of HCV in this understudied, high-risk population. PMID:22717190

  4. Characteristics of hepatitis C infection in injecting drug users in Zadar County, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Medić, Alan; Dzelalija, Boris; Sonicki, Zdenko; Zekanović, Drazen

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine additional risk factors that could increase the prevalence of hepatitis C (HCV) infection among injecting drug users (IDU). The study included 327 heroin addicts registered in Zadar County, Croatia. The participants were divided into two groups according to their HCV status. HCV-positive and HCV-negative study participants were compared. HCV-positive group started injecting heroin at earlier age (median 18.5 years) than HCV-negative group (median 20.0 years) (p = 0.032) and had been injecting heroin for a significantly longer period (median 5 years vs. median 4 years, respectively; p < 0.001). IDUs in HCV-positive group shared their injecting equipment significantly more often than IDUs in HCV-negative group (p < 0.001; chi2 = 32.7). The main reasons for starting drugs were curiosity, psychological reasons (depression and/or neurosis), and peer or partner pressure in HCV-positive group, and fun, curiosity, and peer pressure in HCV-negative group (p = 0.051; chi2 = 23.6). Earlier onset of heroin use, longer heroin use, sharing injection equipment, curiosity, and psychological problems as reasons for starting drugs were associated with higher prevalence of HCV infection among injecting heroin users in Zadar County. PMID:18982740

  5. Let It "B"? The role of Hepatitis B universal vaccination among italian problematic drug users.

    PubMed

    Lugoboni, Fabio; Pavarin, Raimondo Maria; Resentera, Chiara; Gambini, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) hepatitis is extremely common among problematic drug users (DUs). As of 2012, 47 of the 53 European countries had implemented a universal hepatitis B vaccination programme, a scenario that could radically change its spread. Even so, drug users are still one of the main groups at risk of being infected by HBV, exposing the fact that universal vaccination still has not managed to reach an optimal level of contagion protection. In order to evaluate the role of universal HBV vaccination in protecting against risk behaviour related to the use of illicit drugs, a group of 748 DUs, 511 male and 237 female, was tested for HBV markers, at their first access to public addiction clinics in the metropolitan area of Bologna, Italy. 487 were born after 1981, so they were eligible to have received HBV vaccination in adolescence or at birth; in these subjects antibodies against HBV core antigen had the significant prevalence of 6.2%. Universal HBV vaccination has shown evidence of protecting against infection in the general population. These results, amongst the first to evaluate actual protection in DUs vaccinated at birth or during adolescence, show that compulsory universal vaccination does not solve the problem of HBV transmission in the most at risk groups and that additional strategies must be studied and implemented to address this issue. PMID:25872013

  6. Risk of intracranial hemorrhage in users of oral antithrombotic drugs: Study protocol for a nationwide study

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sasha; Solheim, Ole; Carlsen, Sven M.; Øie, Lise R.; Jensberg, Heidi; Gulati, Agnete M.; Giannadakis, Charalampis; Jakola, Asgeir S.; Salvesen, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Background A wide range of antithrombotic medications can be used in the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. Among hemorrhagic complications of antithrombotic drugs, intracranial hemorrhage may have particularly devastating consequences with high morbidity, disability and mortality rates. The incidence and risks of intracranial hemorrhage in patients on antithrombotic treatments from regular clinical practice outside clinical trials remain largely unknown. It is not known if results from clinical trials can be extrapolated to everyday clinical practice. We will conduct a nationwide study to investigate the risks and incidence rates of intracranial hemorrhage in users oral antithrombotic drugs in Norway from 2008 through 2014.   Methods and design The aim of this nationwide study is to investigate the incidence rates of intracranial hemorrhage requiring hospitalization in users of oral antithrombotic drugs. The study will be conducted within the approximately 4.7 million inhabitants of Norway from January 1 st, 2008, to December 31 st, 2014. Treatment and outcome data are obtained from the Norwegian patient registry and the Norwegian prescription database.   Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02481011) PMID:26918124

  7. Exploring the Attractiveness of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) among Experienced Drug Users.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan G C; Nabben, Ton; Keiman, Daan; Haanschoten, Gijs; Korf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) appear yearly on the European market (81 for the first time in 2013, adding to a total of over 350 NPS). Using semi-structured interviews with 25 Dutch experienced recreational drug users, the role of the Internet and friends in gathering and exchanging information about NPS was elaborated. Furthermore, we investigated how NPS were acquired and which aspects make NPS more or less attractive, including their legal status. It appeared that the Internet was an important source of information about NPS in general. Personal experiences with NPS were preferably shared face-to-face with friends, as for privacy reasons users were cautious to post their experiences on web sites and forums. NPS were usually obtained or bought from friends or-to a lesser extent-purchased via the Internet. The preference for a specific NPS depended on the desired effects (mostly stimulant or psychedelic), price (similar to MDMA or amphetamine), duration of effect (preferably around four hours), and setting (at home, at festivals, or in nightlife). Legal status was not relevant for the decision to use NPS. Most NPS are not superior to the already marketed drugs, and do not displace conventional illicit drugs. PMID:26098724

  8. Predictors of HIV infection among women drug users in New York and Miami.

    PubMed

    Tortu, S; McCoy, H V; Beardsley, M; Deren, S; McCoy, C B

    1998-01-01

    In the US, the number of women diagnosed with AIDS continues to increase. In this study, women in New York City (East Harlem) and Miami, two sites with high rates of drug use and HIV infection, were first compared on sociodemographic variables and risk behaviors. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify significant, independent predictors of HIV infection in each city. In comparing women from the two cities, several differences in sociodemographic characteristics and drug use were observed. In both cities, ever exchanging sex for drugs and/or money was predictive of HIV infection; and in East Harlem only, other lifetime risk variables independently predicted HIV infection: drug injection, having a sexually transmitted disease, and not having graduated from high school. Results suggest that intervention efforts with women who exchange sex should be intensified in both cities. Also, further comparisons of women drug users in AIDS epicenter cities are necessary to provide information on similarities and differences in sociodemographic characteristics and individual risk behaviors. More research attention should be focused on examining the social context of HIV risk in order to develop innovative intervention strategies which focus on the link between contextual factors and HIV infection. PMID:9640642

  9. Correlates of lending needles/syringes among HIV-seropositive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Metsch, Lisa R; Pereyra, Margaret; Purcell, David W; Latkin, Carl A; Malow, Robert; Gómez, Cynthia A; Latka, Mary H

    2007-11-01

    Among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs), we examined the correlates of lending needles/syringes with HIV-negative and unknown status injection partners. HIV-positive IDUs (N=738) from 4 cities in the United States who reported injection drug use with other IDUs in the past 3 months participated in an audio computer-assisted self-administered interview. Eighteen percent of study participants self-reported having lent their needles to HIV-negative or unknown status injection partners. Multivariate analyses showed that 6 variables were significantly associated with this high-risk injecting practice. Older IDUs, high school graduates, and those reporting more supportive peer norms for safer drug use were less likely to lend needles/syringes. Admission to a hospital for drug treatment in the past 6 months, having injected with >1 person in the past 3 months, and having more psychiatric symptoms were all associated with more risk. These findings underscore the need for a continued prevention focus on HIV-positive IDUs that recognizes the combination of drug use, mental health factors, and social factors that might affect this high-risk injecting practice, which could be associated with HIV and hepatitis C transmission. PMID:18089987

  10. Factors that help injecting drug users to access and benefit from services: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Joanne; sheard, Laura; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2007-01-01

    Background International research shows that injecting drug users (IDUs) can encounter many barriers when they try to access drug treatment and other services. However, the existing literature is mostly quantitative and does not consider the kinds of factors that injectors themselves identify as enabling them to access and benefit from services. Responding to this gap in knowledge, our paper explores IDUs' own suggestions for improving service engagement and their reports of other factors enabling them to seek help. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 current illicit drug injectors in three geographically diverse areas of West Yorkshire, England. Recruitment was through needle exchange programmes, with additional snowball sampling to ensure inclusivity of gender, ethnicity and primary drug injected. Transcribed data were analysed thematically using Framework. Results Although participants were often satisfied with current access to services, they made three broad suggestions for improving engagement. These were: providing more services (more providers and more forms of support); better operation of existing services (including better communication systems and more flexibility around individual needs); and staffing-related improvements (particularly, less judgemental and more understanding staff attitudes). Other factors identified as important enablers of help seeking were: having supporting relationships (particularly with family members); personal circumstances/life events (especially becoming a parent); and an injector's state of mind (such as feeling motivated and positive). Conclusion A range of practical suggestions for improving IDUs' access to drug treatment and other services are identified. PMID:17971204

  11. Perceived Need for Substance Abuse Treatment among Illicit Stimulant Drug Users in Rural Areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert G.; Krishnan, Laura L.; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.

    2007-01-01

    Non-medical drug use in rural communities in the United States is a significant and growing public health threat. Understanding what motivates drug users in rural areas to seek substance abuse treatment may help in addressing the problem. Perceived need for treatment, a construct indicative of problem recognition and belief in problem solution, has been identified as an important predictor of help-seeking behavior. This cross-sectional study used data collected through face-to-face interviews to examine factors associated with perceived need for drug abuse treatment among not-in-treatment, adult, illicit stimulant drug users (n=710) in rural areas of Ohio, Kentucky, and Arkansas. More than one-quarter of the sample perceived a need for treatment. Results from a stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that white users, users with better physical and mental health status, and occasional users of methamphetamine were significantly less likely to see a need for treatment. Users with higher Addiction Severity Index composite scores for family/social problems or legal problems, and users with prior drug abuse treatment experience were significantly more likely to perceive a need for treatment. These findings have practical implications for efforts addressing substance abuse in rural areas. PMID:17604917

  12. Hepatitis C and HIV in injecting drug users in Armenia, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Berbesi-Fernández, Dedsy; Segura-Cardona, Ángela; Montoya-Vélez, Liliana; Castaño-Perez, Guillermo A

    2015-01-01

    A constant and progressive increase in the availability of heroin in Colombia in recent decades and the intravenous use  of this drug have established the need to prevent a possible epidemic of HIV and hepatitis C. This research determined the sero-prevalence of hepatitis C and HIV according to sociodemographic characteristics and risk behaviors in people who inject drugs in Armenia, Colombia. This is a cross-sectional study on 265 users captured through respondent-driven sampling after informed consent. Sero-prevalence of hepatitis C was 22.3 % [95% CI 12.3 % -23.5 %]; for HIV infection, it was 2.6 % [95% CI 0.4 to 6.0]; 67.5% reported injecting for more than two years, 35 % shared needles and syringes, and 12.4 % had used a condom during their last sexual intercourse. Users who did not purchase syringes in drugstores in the last six months are 2.7 times [95% CI 1.32 to 5.48] more likely to contract hepatitis C; daily injection frequency was higher in HIV- positive cases [OR 2.87; 95% CI 0.55 to 15.9] but nonsignificant. One fourth of respondents are infected with HIV or hepatitis C, either as a single infection or co-infection. This study identified risk practices such as sharing needles and low condom use in the last six months, worldwide documented and discussed risk factors. This research is a first step in the search for strategies to prevent the spread of HIV infection and hepatitis C in networks of injecting drug users. PMID:26706807

  13. Injection Drug User Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL): Findings from a content validation study

    PubMed Central

    Hubley, Anita M; Palepu, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Background Quality of life studies among injection drug users have primarily focused on health-related measures. The chaotic life-style of many injection drug users (IDUs), however, extends far beyond their health, and impacts upon social relationships, employment opportunities, housing, and day to day survival. Most current quality of life instruments do not capture the realities of people living with addictions. The Injection Drug Users' Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL) was developed to reflect the life areas of relevance to IDUs. The present study examined the content validity of the IDUQOL using judgmental methods based on subject matter experts' (SMEs) ratings of various elements of this measure (e.g., appropriateness of life areas or items, names and descriptions of life areas, instructions for administration and scoring). Methods Six SMEs were provided with a copy of the IDUQOL and its administration and scoring manual and a detailed content validation questionnaire. Two commonly used judgmental measures of inter-rater agreement, the Content Validity Index (CVI) and the Average Deviation Mean Index (ADM), were used to evaluate SMEs' agreement on ratings of IDUQOL elements. Results A total of 75 elements of the IDUQOL were examined. The CVI results showed that all elements were endorsed by the required number of SMEs or more. The ADM results showed that acceptable agreement (i.e., practical significance) was obtained for all elements but statistically significant agreement was missed for nine elements. For these elements, SMEs' feedback was examined for ways to improve the elements. Open-ended feedback also provided suggestions for other revisions to the IDUQOL. Conclusion The results of the study provided strong evidence in support of the content validity of the IDUQOL and direction for the revision of some IDUQOL elements. PMID:17663783

  14. Characterization of Occult Hepatitis B Infection Among Injecting Drug Users in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Asli, Maryam; Kandelouei, Tahmineh; Rahimyan, Koroush; Davoodbeglou, Foad; Vaezjalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and its associated risk factors, together with the molecular characterization of the virus in injecting drug users of Tehran. Patients and Methods The study consisted of 229 injecting drug users. Serum samples were collected and tested for the presence of hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HBV B virus DNA was extracted from the serum samples, and a fragment of the S gene was amplified using the nested polymerase chain reaction. The genotype, subgenotypes, subtype, and S gene mutation of HBV were determined by direct sequencing. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the neighbor-joining method. Results Sixty-four (28%) participants were HBcAb positive, 59 cases were HBcAb positive and HBsAg negative, and 5 cases were HBsAg positive. Hepatitis B DNA was found in three HBsAg-positive cases. Thirteen of 59 (22%) individuals were hepatitis B DNA positive. The phylogenetic tree of hepatitis B DNA showed the existence of genotype D. The only significant correlation was between sharing a syringe and OBI. Conclusions In comparison with the rate of HBcAb positivity reported in other Iranian studies, the rate was higher in the present study. There were a few variations, genotypes, and subtypes among the infected injecting drug users. Further investigations are needed to unravel the molecular characterization of OBI. PMID:27226802

  15. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Surah, S; Adams, R; Townsend, L; Reynolds, I; Kinahan, J C; Keating, S; Mulcahy, F; Keenan, E; Barry, M; Lyons, F

    2013-11-01

    To investigate health-related quality of life in HIV-infected intravenous drug users registered but not engaged in HIV outpatient care (missing ≥2 outpatient appointments over 1 year or non-attendance for ≥6 months) we conducted a cross-sectional study to examine health-related quality of life of HIV-infected intravenous drug users registered for care at an inner city HIV unit. EQ-5D, SF-36, SF-6D, mood disorder, clinical and substance misuse data were collected. Mean scores and preference derived utility scores were calculated. Statistical relationships between health-related quality of life and other variables were explored using univariate and multivariate analysis. Fifty-five patients were recruited, 64% were males. The mean anxiety value was 11.44 (anxious) and mean depression score was 9.3 (borderline depressed). The mean EQ-5D utility was 0.45 (95% CI 0.35, 0.55) and mean SF-6D utility was 0.52 (95% CI 0.48, 0.55). There was no statistical relationship between HIV indices, substance misuse and EQ-5D and SF-6D utility. Anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with EQ-5D and SF-6D utility values on univariate and multivariate analysis. Health-related quality of life was reduced in this HIV-infected intravenous drug user population. Whilst hepatitis C co-infection and substance misuse did not affect health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression had a significant impact on it. PMID:23970601

  16. Hepatitis C genotype distribution and homology among geographically disparate injecting drug users in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Sanders-Buell, Eric; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Todd, Catherine S; Nasir, Abdul; Bradfield, Andrea; Lei, Esther; Poltavee, Kultida; Savadsuk, Hathairat; Kim, Jerome H; Scott, Paul T; de Souza, Mark; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence is high among injecting drug users in Afghanistan, but transmission dynamics are poorly understood. Samples from HCV-infected injecting drug users were sequenced to determine circulating genotypes and potential transmission linkages. Serum samples were obtained from injecting drug user participants in Hirat, Jalalabad, and Mazar-i-Sharif between 2006 and 2008 with reactive anti-HCV rapid tests. Specimens with detected HCV viremia were amplified and underwent sequence analysis. Of 113 samples evaluated, 25 samples (35.2%) were only typeable in NS5B, nine samples (12.7%) were only typeable in CE1, and 37 samples (52.1%) were genotyped in both regions. Of those with typeable HCV, all were Afghan males with a mean age of 31.1 (standard deviation [SD] ± 8.0) years and mean duration of injecting of 3.9 (SD ± 4.3) years. Most reported residence outside Afghanistan in the last decade (90.1%) and prior incarceration (76.8%). HCV genotypes detected were: 1a, (35.2%, n = 25), 3a (62.0%, n = 44), and 1b (2.8%, n = 2). Cluster formation was detected in NS5B and CE1 and were generally from within the same city. All participants within clusters reported being a refugee in Iran compared to 93.5% of those outside clusters. Only 22.2% (4/11) of those within clusters had been refugees in Pakistan and these four individuals had also been refugees in Iran. Predominance of genotype 3a and the association between HCV viremia and having been a refugee in Iran potentially reflects migration between Afghanistan and Iran among IDUs from Mazar-i-Sharif and Hirat and carry implications for harm reduction programs for this migratory population. PMID:23918535

  17. Injecting Drug Users Retention in Needle-Exchange Program and its Determinants in Iran Prisons

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad; Farnia, Marzieh; Moradi, Ghobad; Karamati, Mohammadreza; Paknazar, Fatemeh; Mirmohammad Khani, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Participation and to stay in a health program depends on many factors. One of these programs is Needle Exchange Program (NEP) in prisons. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the retention of injecting drug prisoners and find the related factors in Iran. Patients and Methods: This cohort study analyzed data about injecting drug male prisoners who were participated in NEP in three Iranian prisons. Data was collected from October 2009 to June 2010. A proper approach of survival analyses including Kaplan-Meier method, Log-Rank test, and Cox Proportional Hazard Model were used to evaluate Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) retention in NEP and its determinants. Results: Out of 320 prisoners, 167 were from Isfahan Central Prison, 82 from Tehran-Ghezel-Hesar Prison, and 71 from Hamadan Central Prison. Two-hundred and fifty prisoners (78.4%) had history of drug injection; and drug injection was the most common choice for 115 persons (35.9%). Participants were followed up for 29 weeks, the mean (SD) time of retention in the program was 24.1 (0.6) weeks. There was a significant relationship between age, number of used needles per week, duration of addiction, age of addiction onset, as well as imprisonment age, main method of drug use, type of main using drug, Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection, job status, reason of arrestment, history of involvement in harm reduction programs, and the length of retention (P < 0.05). There was also significant relationship between the history of using harm reduction services (P = 0.007), tattooing (P = 0.01), longer durations of addiction (P = 0.048), and retention. Conclusions: Tattooing and longer duration of addiction were two important factors that significantly increased retention in the program. In contrast, history of using harm reduction services was the factor that decreased persistence. The risk of quitting the program may decrease about 68% in those who did not involve in harm reduction programs. PMID:26405681

  18. Systems pharmacology to investigate the interaction of berberine and other drugs in treating polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Fu, Xin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common multifactorial endocrine disorder among women of childbearing age. PCOS has various and heterogeneous clinical features apart from its indefinite pathogenesis and mechanism. Clinical drugs for PCOS are multifarious because it only treats separate symptoms. Berberine is an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities, and it was testified to improve some diseases related to PCOS in animal models and in humans. Systems pharmacology was utilized to predict the potential targets of berberine related to PCOS and the potential drug-drug interaction base on the disease network. In conclusion, berberine is a promising polypharmacological drug for treating PCOS, and for enhancing the efficacy of clinical drugs. PMID:27306862

  19. Systems pharmacology to investigate the interaction of berberine and other drugs in treating polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Fu, Xin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common multifactorial endocrine disorder among women of childbearing age. PCOS has various and heterogeneous clinical features apart from its indefinite pathogenesis and mechanism. Clinical drugs for PCOS are multifarious because it only treats separate symptoms. Berberine is an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities, and it was testified to improve some diseases related to PCOS in animal models and in humans. Systems pharmacology was utilized to predict the potential targets of berberine related to PCOS and the potential drug-drug interaction base on the disease network. In conclusion, berberine is a promising polypharmacological drug for treating PCOS, and for enhancing the efficacy of clinical drugs. PMID:27306862

  20. The acceptability of a computer HIV/AIDS risk assessment to not-in-treatment drug users.

    PubMed

    Williams, M L; Freeman, R C; Bowen, A M; Saunders, L

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a study assessing the acceptability of a computer HIV risk assessment instrument administered to not-in-treatment drug users. The study asked three questions related to acceptability: (1) are drug users comfortable responding to HIV risk questions using the computer assessment; (2) do drug users feel that they possess the requisite skill to respond to questions using a computer; and (3) do drug users believe that the responses they provide using the computer assessment will remain private and confidential. This study differs from other assessments of the acceptability of computer assisted data collection in that the population of interest has only limited education and interaction with computers. Furthermore, the study was implemented under field conditions. To conduct the study, an existing HIV risk assessment instrument was adapted for use with the computer. Only slight modifications were made to the content of the instrument. To facilitate data collection with this population, audio enhancement and touch screen were used. Three scales measuring comfort, skill and perceived privacy were developed. Results of analysis showed that drug users are comfortable responding to an HIV risk assessment using computer assisted interviewing. Drug users also perceived that they possessed the requisite skill to successfully complete the interview. And, study participants reported that they believed that their responses using the computer interview would remain private and confidential. Only minor differences in scale scores based on sociodemographic characteristics were found among study participants. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:9924525

  1. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda MN; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  2. Desisting From Prescription Drug Abuse: An Application of Growth Models to Rx Opioid Users

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Whitney D.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Bakken, Nicholas W.; O’Connell, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Modern desistance research has examined many facets of desistance, in terms of theoretical predictors of desistance and recidivism, and in terms of differing types of offending. Though predicting desistance from illegal drug use is among these topics, no research to date has examined the predictors of desisting from prescription opioid abuse. This study uses longitudinal data from 318 prescription opioid users to analyze the effects of various predictors of desistance on declining nonmedical prescription opioid use, with an emphasis on gender differences among participants. Results indicate that theoretical and demographic characteristics correspond with differing rates of decline and further vary by gender. PMID:22736809

  3. Social and economic factors associated with recent and lifetime incarceration among Puerto Rican drug users.

    PubMed

    de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Lundgren, Lena M; Chassler, Deborah; Horowitz, Amanda C; Adorno, Elpidio; Purington, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 280 Puerto Rican drug users with a history of incarceration residing in Massachusetts, we explore whether a significant association exists between social and economic factors (maintaining social network contacts, receiving public assistance) and lifetime incarceration. Analysis of survey data using regression methods shows that respondents who live in their own home, receive public assistance, and have recent familial contact are significantly less likely to have been incarcerated in the past 6 months. Among study participants, men and those who initiated heroin use at younger ages are more likely to have greater lifetime incarceration totals. Practice implications are discussed. PMID:23768433

  4. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda Mn; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  5. Agents of change: peer mentorship as HIV prevention among HIV-positive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Sonja; Pearson, Charles; Frye, Victoria; Gómez, Cynthia A; Latka, Mary H; Purcell, David W; Knowlton, Amy R; Metsch, Lisa R; Tobin, Karin E; Valverde, Eduardo E; Knight, Kelly R

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of peer mentoring among HIV seropositive injection drug users in a randomized controlled trial, the INSPIRE study. Qualitative analyses of 68 in-depth open-ended interviews conducted in 2005 in Baltimore, New York, Miami, and San Francisco revealed that these individuals conceptualized themselves as change agents through the identity of peer mentor at the three related domains of individual, interpersonal, and community-level change. Implications for program development and future research of peer mentoring as a mechanism for HIV prevention are discussed. This study was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). PMID:22428820

  6. Septic Thrombophlebitis Caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum in an Intravenous Drug User.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulou, D; Lagadinou, M; Papayiannis, T; Siabi, V; Gogos, C A; Marangos, M

    2013-01-01

    Septic thrombophlebitis is characterized by venous thrombosis, inflammation and bacteremia, that can lead to fatal complications such as sepsis, septic emboli and even death. Though most commonly caused by indwelling catheters, it is also related to intravenous drug users (IVDU) especially those who attempt to inject drugs into more proximal and central veins. Lemierre's syndrome, also referred to as post-anginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, is a suppurative thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Primary infection is associated with oropharyngeal and dental infections and the most common causative organism is Fusobacterium necrophorum. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome in an IVDU, caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, which was inoculated at the site of injection, without a history of sore throat or pharyngitis. PMID:23691378

  7. Septic Thrombophlebitis Caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum in an Intravenous Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulou, D.; Lagadinou, M.; Papayiannis, T.; Siabi, V.; Gogos, C. A.; Marangos, M.

    2013-01-01

    Septic thrombophlebitis is characterized by venous thrombosis, inflammation and bacteremia, that can lead to fatal complications such as sepsis, septic emboli and even death. Though most commonly caused by indwelling catheters, it is also related to intravenous drug users (IVDU) especially those who attempt to inject drugs into more proximal and central veins. Lemierre's syndrome, also referred to as post-anginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, is a suppurative thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Primary infection is associated with oropharyngeal and dental infections and the most common causative organism is Fusobacterium necrophorum. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome in an IVDU, caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, which was inoculated at the site of injection, without a history of sore throat or pharyngitis. PMID:23691378

  8. Epidemic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among intravenous drug users (IVDU).

    PubMed Central

    D'Aquila, R. T.; Williams, A. B.

    1987-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is epidemic among intravenous drug users (IVDU), particularly in the northeastern United States. IVDU are playing a critical role in the spread of HIV by infecting their heterosexual partners and children, as well as their needle-sharing partners. The epidemiology of HIV infection among IVDU is reviewed here, including a compilation of seroprevalence data. Relevant determinants of the future spread of HIV among IVDU are discussed, including the major risk factors for HIV seropositivity, the modes of HIV transmission, and aspects of the natural history of HIV infection in IVDU. The public health policy implications of these issues include the need for education of adolescents and the general public about the risks of drug injection and heterosexual intercourse with IVDU, as well as motivation of IVDU to stop injecting, never share injection paraphernalia, or, at least, clean needles effectively. PMID:3324506

  9. Symbiotic Goals and the Prevention of Blood-Borne Viruses Among Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Samuel R.; Sandoval, Milagros; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Meylakhs, Peter; Des Jarlais, Don C.

    2011-01-01

    A positive-deviance control–case life history study of injection drug users (IDUs) in New York City who had injected drugs for 8–15 years compared 21 IDUs who were antibody negative for both HIV and hepatitis C with 3 infected with both viruses and 11 infected with hepatitis C virus but not HIV. Eligible subjects were referred from other research studies and from community organizations that conduct testing for HIV and hepatitis C virus. Data were collected during 2005–2008 and were analyzed using life history and grounded theory approaches. They support grounded hypotheses that IDUs who are able to attain symbiotic goals like avoiding withdrawal and maintaining social support are assisted thereby in remaining uninfected with HIV or hepatitis C. These hypotheses should be tested using cohort studies and prevention trials to see if helping IDUs attain symbiotic goals reduces infection risk. The study’s limitations are noted. PMID:21303250

  10. Bloodborne Viral Hepatitis Infections among Drug Users: The Role of Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lugoboni, Fabio; Quaglio, Gianluca; Civitelli, Paolo; Mezzelani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Drug use is a prevalent world-wide phenomenon and hepatitis virus infections are traditionally a major health problem among drug users (DUs). HBV and HCV, and to a lesser extent HAV, are easily transmitted through exposure to infected blood and body fluids. Viral hepatitis is not inevitable for DUs. Licensed vaccines are available for hepatitis A and hepatitis B. The purpose of this overview is to show some epidemiological data about HBV and the other blood-borne viral hepatitis among DUs and to summarize and discuss use of hepatitis vaccinations in this population. Successful vaccination campaigns among DUs are feasible and well described. We try to focus on the most significant results achieved in successful vaccination programs as reported in scientific literature. Vaccination campaigns among DUs represent a highly effective form of health education and they are cost-saving. PMID:19440291

  11. Factors associated with history of non-fatal overdose among young nonmedical users of prescription drugs

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Karol; Schrager, Sheree M.; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The current study examines the prevalence and correlates of lifetime non-fatal overdose (OD) involving the nonmedical use of prescription opioids and tranquilizers among a sample of high-risk young adults in New York, NY and Los Angeles, CA. Methods Data were derived from a cross-sectional study of 16–25 year old nonmedical users of prescription drugs (n = 596). Unadjusted associations between OD history and socio-demographic and drug use variables were investigated in bivariate logistic regression models. Multivariate logistic regression models identified correlates of non-fatal OD. Results Lifetime prevalence of non-fatal overdose involving prescription opioids and/or tranquilizers was 23.6%. Factors associated with increased risk of non-fatal overdose included lower social class while growing up (OR: 1.81, 95% CI: [1.15, 2.83], p < 0.01), having ever received care at a psychiatric hospital (OR: 1.79,95% CI: [1.12,2.85], p <0.05), ever witnessing a family member OD on drugs (OR: 1.59,95% CI: [1.02,2.50], p < 0.05), being prescribed tranquilizers (OR: 2.07,95% CI: [1.29,4.27], p < 0.01), ever snorting or sniffing opioids (OR: 2.51,95% CI: [1.48,4.27], p < 0.001), injecting tranquilizers (OR: 3.09,95% CI: [1.61, 5.93],p< 0.001), and past 90-day injection drug use (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: [1.03, 2.74], p < 0.05). Participants who reported past 90-day stimulant misuse had lower odds of reporting OD compared to those who were not recent stimulant users (OR: 0.60,95% CI: [0.38–0.96], p < 0.05). Conclusions This study documents the high prevalence of experiencing non-fatal overdose among young nonmedical users of prescription drugs. Results could inform overdose prevention efforts throughout the U.S. PMID:22974490

  12. Correlates of unprotected sex in a sample of young club drug users

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Lysa; Narvaez, Joana; Sordi, Anne; Guimarães, Luciano S. P.; Von Diemen, Lisia; Surratt, Hilary; Kurtz, Steven; Pechansky, Flavio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the demographic characteristics, psychiatric symptoms, substance use patterns, and sexual risk behaviors in a sample of club drug users to identify factors associated with unprotected sex during the 12 months prior to the interview. METHODS: This cross-sectional study employed the targeted sampling and ethnographic mapping approaches via face-to-face interviews conducted at bars and electronic music festivals using an adapted, semi-structured version of the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs questionnaire. The sample comprised 240 male and female young adults who had used ecstasy and/or LSD in the 90 days prior to the interview and who were not receiving treatment for alcohol or drug abuse. RESULTS: Of the 240 subjects selected (mean age: 22.9±4.5 years), 57.9% were men; of the male subjects, 52.5% reported having had unprotected sex in the previous 12 months. Of the total sample, 63.33% reported having had unprotected sex. Multivariate regression analysis showed that anal sex (PR = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.044–1.543; p = 0.017) and the use of alcohol/drugs to make sex last longer (PR = 1.430; 95% CI: 1.181–1.732; p<0.001) are associated with unprotected sex. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of intervention strategies aimed at reducing sexually risky behaviors should take into consideration the specific characteristics of drug users and should include the development of safer sex negotiation skills. PMID:24270948

  13. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH EMPLOYMENT AMONG A COHORT OF INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lindsey; Wood, Evan; Li, Kathy; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims One of the most substantial costs of drug use is lost productivity and social functioning, including holding of a regular job. However, little is known about employment patterns of injection drug users (IDU). We sought to identify factors that were associated with legal employment among IDU. Design and Methods We describe the employment patterns of participants of a longitudinal cohort study of IDU in Vancouver, Canada. We then use generalised estimating equations (GEE) to determine statistical associations between legal employment and various intrinsic, acquired, behavioural and circumstantial factors. Results From 1 June 1999 to 30 November 2003, 330 (27.7%) of 1190 participants reported having a job at some point during follow up. Employment rates remain somewhat stable throughout the study period (9–12.4%). Factors positively and significantly associated with legal employment in multivariate analysis were male gender (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.78) and living outside the Downtown Eastside (AOR = 1.85). Factors negatively and significantly associated with legal employment included older age (AOR = 0.97); Aboriginal ethnicity (AOR = 0.72); HIV-positive serostatus (AOR = 0.32); HCV-positive serostatus (AOR = 0.46); daily heroin injection (AOR = 0.73); daily crack use (AOR = 0.77); public injecting (AOR = 0.50); sex trade involvement (AOR = 0.49); recent incarceration (AOR = 0.56); and unstable housing (AOR = 0.57). Discussion and Conclusions Our results suggest a stabilising effect of employment for IDU and socio-demographic, drug use and risk-related barriers to employment. There is a strong case to address these barriers and to develop innovative employment programming for high-risk drug users. PMID:20565522

  14. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  15. Social Representations Used by the Parents of Mexican Adolescent Drug Users under Treatment to Explain Their Children's Drug Use: Gender Differences in Parental Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuno-Gutierrez, Bertha Lidia; Alvarez-Nemegyei, Jose; Rodriguez-Cerda, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the social representations used by the parents of adolescent drug users to explain the onset of drug use. Differences in explanations between the parents of male and female adolescents were also explored. Sixty parents who accompanied their children to four rehabilitation centers in 2004 completed two…

  16. The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model.

    PubMed

    Small, Dan; Glickman, Andrea; Rigter, Galen; Walter, Thia

    2010-01-01

    Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV. PMID:20047690

  17. The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV. PMID:20047690

  18. Predictors of Sharing Injection Equipment by HIV-Seropositive Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl A.; Buchanan, Amy S.; Metsch, Lisa R.; Knight, Kelly; Latka, Mary H.; Mizuno, Yuko; Knowlton, Amy R.

    2009-01-01

    Among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs), we examined baseline predictors of lending needles and syringes, and sharing cookers, cotton, and rinse water in the prior 3 months at follow-up. Participants were enrolled in INSPIRE, a secondary prevention intervention for sexually active HIV-positive IDUs in four US cities during 2001–2005. The analyses involved 357 participants who reported injecting drugs in the prior six months at either the 6- or 12-months follow-up visit. About half (49%) reported at least one sharing episode. In adjusted analyses, peer norms supporting safer injection practices, and having primary HIV medical care visits in the prior 6 months were associated with reporting no sharing of injection equipment. Higher levels of psychological distress was associated with a greater likelihood of reporting drug paraphernalia sharing. These findings suggest that intervention approaches for reducing HIV-seropositive IDUs’ transmission of blood-borne infections should include peer-focused interventions to alter norms of drug paraphernalia sharing and promoting primary HIV care and mental health services. PMID:19186356

  19. Perceived risk of HIV infection among deported male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Robertson, Angela M; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2014-01-01

    Deported injection drug users (IDUs) in Mexico may be vulnerable to HIV infection following expulsion from the USA. We examined factors associated with HIV risk perception among a sample of deportees in Tijuana. From January to April 2010, 313 male IDUs who reported ever being deported from the USA completed a questionnaire. Overall, 35% (N=110) of deportees perceived HIV risk. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, factors independently associated with HIV risk perception included ever having a steady female partner in Tijuana post-deportation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-5.07) and years spent in a US prison (AOR: 1.29 per year; 95% CI: 1.13-1.48). Conversely, years of drug injection use (AOR: 0.95 per year; 95% CI: 0.91-0.99), ever witnessing family members use drugs prior to first migration trip (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.65), years of residence in the USA (AOR: 0.91 per year; 95% CI: 0.84-0.98) and being a Tijuana native (AOR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.16-0.99) were negatively associated with HIV risk perception. US-Mexico border cities that receive deported migrants should target HIV prevention interventions to specific subgroups, including drug-using male deportees. Interventions should consider migrant's time in the USA, the role of their social networks, and reducing missed opportunities for HIV testing/education. PMID:24650124

  20. Predictors of sharing injection equipment by HIV-seropositive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Latkin, Carl A; Buchanan, Amy S; Metsch, Lisa R; Knight, Kelly; Latka, Mary H; Mizuno, Yuko; Knowlton, Amy R

    2008-12-01

    Among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs), we examined baseline predictors of lending needles and syringes and sharing cookers, cotton, and rinse water in the prior 3 months at follow-up. Participants were enrolled in Intervention for Seropositive Injectors-Research and Evaluation, a secondary prevention intervention for sexually active HIV-positive IDUs in 4 US cities during 2001-2005. The analyses involved 357 participants who reported injecting drugs in the prior 6 months at either the 6- or 12-month follow-up visit. About half (49%) reported at least 1 sharing episode. In adjusted analyses, peer norms supporting safer injection practices and having primary HIV medical care visits in the prior 6 months were associated with reporting no sharing of injection equipment. Higher levels of psychological distress were associated with a greater likelihood of reporting drug paraphernalia sharing. These findings suggest that intervention approaches for reducing HIV-seropositive IDUs' transmission of blood-borne infections should include peer-focused interventions to alter norms of drug paraphernalia sharing and promoting primary HIV care and mental health services. PMID:19186356

  1. Differences in sociodemographic, drug use and health characteristics between never, former and current injecting, problematic hard-drug users in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Injecting drug users are at increased risk for harmful effects compared to non-injecting drug users. Some studies have focused on differences in characteristics between these two groups (e.g., housing, overall health). However, no study has investigated the specific Dutch situation which in the last years has seen a decrease in homelessness among problematic hard-drug users and an increasing focus on physical health in low-threshold addiction care. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in sociodemographic, drug use and health characteristics between never-injecting (NIDUs), former-injecting (FIDUs) and current-injecting drug users (IDUs) and describe injecting practices. Methods A total of 202 problematic hard-drug users (NIDU = 64; FIDU = 76; IDU = 62) were recruited from 22 low-threshold care facilities, including drug consumption rooms, methadone maintenance treatment, heroin-assisted therapy, day shelter and/or night shelter, supported housing and day activity centres. Data were collected on-site through structured face-to-face interviews. Results Results indicate that IDUs represented a separate group of problematic hard-drug users, with distinct sociodemographic and drug use characteristics. Overall, IDUs appeared to be the group with least favourable characteristics (unstable housing/homelessness, illegal activities, polydrug use) and NIDUs appeared to have the most favourable characteristics (stable housing, help with debts, less polydrug use). The FIDU group lies somewhere in between. The three groups did not differ significantly in terms of health. Regarding injecting practices, results showed that majority of IDUs had injected drugs for over 10 years and IDUs injected heroin, cocaine, amphetamine and/or methadone in the past 6 months. Sharing syringes was not common. A quarter reported public injecting. Conclusions Unstable housing and homelessness are related to (former) injecting drug use, and stable housing is

  2. The Impact of Legalizing Syringe Exchange Programs on Arrests Among Injection Drug Users in California

    PubMed Central

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Anderson, Rachel; Flynn, Neil; Kral, Alex H.

    2007-01-01

    Legislation passed in 2000 allowed syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in California to operate legally if local jurisdictions declare a local HIV public health emergency. Nonetheless, even in locales where SEPs are legal, the possession of drug paraphernalia, including syringes, remained illegal. The objective of this paper is to examine the association between the legal status of SEPs and individual arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia among injection drug users (IDUs) in California from 2001 to 2003. Using data from three annual cross-sections (2001-03) of IDUs attending 24 SEPs in 16 California counties (N = 1,578), we found that overall, 14% of IDUs in our sample reported arrest or citation for paraphernalia in the 6 months before the interview. Further analysis found that 17% of IDUs attending a legal SEP (defined at the county level) reported arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia compared to 10% of IDUs attending an illegal SEP (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio of arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia was 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2, 2.3] for IDUs attending legal SEPs compared to IDUs attending illegal SEPs, after controlling for race/ethnicity, age, homelessness, illegal income, injection of amphetamines, years of injection drug use, frequency of SEP use, and number of needles received at last visit. IDUs attending SEPs with legal status may be more visible to police, and hence, more subject to arrest or citation for paraphernalia. These findings suggest that legislative efforts to decriminalize the operation of SEPs without concurrent decriminalization of syringe possession may result in higher odds of arrest among SEP clients, with potentially deleterious implications for the health and well-being of IDUs. More comprehensive approaches to removing barriers to accessing sterile syringes are needed if our public health goals for reducing new HIV/HCV infections are to be obtained. PMID:17265133

  3. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, R W F; Brundel, D H S; Neef, C; van Gelder, T; Mathijssen, R H J; Burger, D M; Jansman, F G A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug–drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A search was conducted in a computer-based medication prescription system for dispensing oral anticancer drugs to outpatients in three Dutch centres. Potential drug–drug interactions were identified using electronic (Drug Interaction Fact software) and manual screening methods (peer-reviewed reports). Results: In the 898 patients included in the study, 1359 PDDIs were identified in 426 patients (46%, 95% confidence interval (CI)=42–50%). In 143 patients (16%), a major PDDI was identified. The drug classes most frequently involved in a major PDDI were coumarins and opioids. The majority of cases concerned central nervous system interactions, PDDIs that can cause gastrointestinal toxicity and prolongation of QT intervals. In multivariate analysis, concomitant use of more drugs (odds ratio (OR)=1.66, 95% CI=1.54–1.78, P<0001) and genito-urinary cancer (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.12–0.52, P<0001) were risk factors. Conclusion: Potential drug–drug interactions are very common among cancer patients on oral cancer therapy. Physicians and pharmacists should be more aware of these potential interactions. PMID:23412102

  4. The Commissioning and Provision of Advocacy for Problem Drug Users in English DATS: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargill, Tamsin; Weaver, Tim D.; Patterson, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the commissioning and delivery of advocacy for problem drug users. We aimed to quantify provision, describe the commissioning of advocacy services in Drug Action Teams (DATs) and to identify factors influencing advocacy provision. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample of 50 English DATs. The…

  5. Motivations for Sexual Risk Behavior across Commercial and Casual Partners among Male Urban Drug Users: Contextual Features and Clinical Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Daughters, Stacey B.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to develop a measure for assessing the various motivations for sexual risk behavior (SRB) across commercial (involving the exchange of sex for money or drugs) and casual (nonregular) partners in a sample of inner-city, primarily African American drug users, and to examine the relationship of these motivations with a history…

  6. The influence of neighborhood characteristics on the relationship between discrimination and increased drug-using social ties among illicit drug users

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Galea, Sandro; Ford, Chandra; Latkin, Carl; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Social discrimination may isolate drug users into higher risk relationships, particularly in disadvantaged neighborhood environments where drug trade occurs. Design We used negative binomial regression accounting for clustering of individuals within their recruitment neighborhood to investigate the relationship between high-risk drug ties with various forms of social discrimination, neighborhood minority composition, poverty and education. Results Results show that experiencing discrimination due to drug use is significantly associated with more drug ties in neighborhoods with fewer blacks. Conclusion Future social network and discrimination research should assess the role of neighborhood social cohesion. PMID:23054418

  7. Recent trends in benzodiazepine use by injecting drug users in Victoria and Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Fry, Craig L; Bruno, Raimondo B

    2002-12-01

    To address the lack of data on patterns of benzodiazepine use among injecting drug users (IDU) in Victoria and Tasmania, convenience samples of 152 Melbourne and 100 Hobart IDU were recruited from needle and syringe programme outlets and administered a structured survey on patterns of benzodiazepine use, injection-related health problems and drug use history. Most respondents had used benzodiazepines during the preceding 6 months, and more than one-third (Melbourne 36%, 95% CI, 28-44; Hobart 37%, 95% CI, 27-47) had injected benzodiazepines during this period. Diazepam was the preferred benzodiazepine for those using orally, while intravenous benzodiazepine users preferred to inject temazepam. Benzodiazepine injection for Melbourne IDU was related to greater levels of injection-related health problems. Patterns of benzodiazepine use amongst Melbourne and Hobart IDU are different to that in other Australian jurisdictions, with available data suggesting that prevalence of injection may be increasing. Ongoing monitoring of benzodiazepine injection, together with in-depth studies of supply characteristics and health impacts in jurisdictions where significant trends are detected is needed. Consideration of regulatory, supply, education and training options for the prevention of benzodiazepine injection is also indicated. PMID:12537706

  8. Individual and Network Interventions With Injection Drug Users in 5 Ukraine Cities

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Wayne E. K.; Latkin, Carl A.; Dvoryak, Sergey; Brewster, John T.; Royer, Mark S.; Sinitsyna, Larisa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effects of an individual intervention versus a network intervention on HIV-related injection and sexual risk behaviors among street-recruited opiate injection drug users in 5 Ukraine cities. Methods. Between 2004 and 2006, 722 opiate injection drug users were recruited to participate in interventions that were either individually based or based on a social network model in which peer educators intervened with their network members. Audio computer-assisted self-interview techniques were used to interview participants at baseline and follow-up. Results. Multiple logistic analyses controlling for baseline injection and sexual risks revealed that both peer educators and network members in the network intervention reduced injection-related risk behaviors significantly more than did those in the individually based intervention and that peer educators increased condom use significantly more than did those in the individual intervention. Individual intervention participants, however, showed significantly greater improvements than did network members with respect to reductions in sexual risk behaviors. Conclusions. Social network interventions may be more effective than individually based interventions in changing injection risk behaviors among both peer educators and network members. The effectiveness of network interventions in changing sexual risk behaviors is less clear, probably owing to network composition and inhibitions regarding discussing sexual risk behaviors. PMID:20395584

  9. Syringe Sharing and HIV Incidence Among Injection Drug Users and Increased Access to Sterile Syringes

    PubMed Central

    Small, Will; Buchner, Chris; Zhang, Ruth; Li, Kathy; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effects of syringe exchange program (SEP) policy on rates of HIV risk behavior and HIV incidence among injection drug users. Methods. Using a multivariate generalized estimating equation and Cox regression methods, we examined syringe borrowing, syringe lending, and HIV incidence among a prospective cohort of 1228 injection drug users in Vancouver, British Columbia. Results. We observed substantial declines in rates of syringe borrowing (from 20.1% in 1998 to 9.2% in 2003) and syringe lending (from 19.1% in 1998 to 6.8% in 2003) following SEP policy change. These declines coincided with a statistically significant increase in the proportion of participants accessing sterile syringes from nontraditional SEP sources (P < .001). In multivariate analyses, the period following the change in SEP policy was independently associated with a greater than 40% reduction in syringe borrowing (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49, 0.65) and lending (AOR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.45, 0.60), as well as declining HIV incidence (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.13; 95% CI = 0.06, 0.31). Conclusions. Widespread syringe distribution appears to be a more effective SEP policy than do more restrictive SEP policies that limit syringe access. Efforts should be made to ensure that SEP policies and program design serve to maximize rather than hinder syringe access. PMID:20558797

  10. Detoxification Center-Based Sampling Missed a Subgroup of Higher Risk Drug Users, a Case from Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Jinkou

    2012-01-01

    Background Injection drug use remains among the most important HIV transmission risk in China. Representativeness of drug users sampled from detoxification centers is questionable. A respondent driven sampling survey was conducted to compare the results with those from the detoxification center in the same city. Methods In 2008, two independent surveys were conducted in Dongguan, China, one for community-based drug users using respondent driven sampling and the other for drug users in a compulsory detoxification center as routine sentinel surveillance. Demographic and behavioral information were collected using the same structured questionnaire. Intravenous blood samples were collected to measure antibodies to HIV-1, and syphilis. Results Compared to those 400 drug users recruited from the detoxification center, the 303 community-based drug users had higher HIV prevalence (14.7% versus 4.0%, P = 0.04), lower syphilis prevalence (4.7% versus 10.8%, P = 0.07), higher proportion of injection drug use (83.9% versus 60.2%, P = 0.01) and syringe sharing (47.8% versus 36.3%, P = 0.10), more likely to be separated (12.4% versus 3.8%, P = 0.01) and being migrants from Guangxi province (31.4% versus 18.0%, P = 0.09), more engaging in commercial sex (64.4% versus 52.5%, P = 0.04). HIV prevalence and rate of syringe sharing were consistently higher among drug users from Guangxi. Conclusions Detoxification center-based sampling missed a subgroup with higher HIV prevalence and higher rate of injection drug use. While detoxification center-based sampled can be used to monitor the trend of HIV prevalence and risk behaviors over time, periodic community-based sampling is still necessary to avoid possible systematic error in detoxification center-based samples. PMID:22529988

  11. A qualitative study of methamphetamine users' perspectives on barriers and facilitators of drug abstinence.

    PubMed

    Herbeck, Diane M; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Christou, Dayna; Lovinger, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    To better understand methamphetamine (MA) use patterns and the process of recovery, qualitative interviews were conducted with adult MA users (n = 20), comparing a sample that received substance abuse treatment with those who had not received treatment. Respondents provided detailed information on why and how they changed from use to abstinence and factors they considered to be barriers to abstinence. Audio recordings and transcripts were reviewed for common themes. Participants reported a range of mild/moderate to intensely destructive problems, including loss of important relationships and profound changes to who they felt they were at their core; e.g., "I didn't realize how dark and mean I was … I was like a different person." Initial abstinence was often facilitated by multiple external forces (e.g., drug testing, child custody issues, prison, relocation), but sustained abstinence was attributed to shifts in thinking and salient realizations about using. The treatment group reported using more and different resources to maintain their abstinence than the no-treatment group. Findings indicate individualized interventions and multiple, simultaneous approaches and resources were essential in reaching stable abstinence. Understanding long-term users' experiences with MA use, addiction, and abstinence can inform strategies for engaging and sustaining MA users in treatment and recovery. PMID:25052880

  12. Psychosocial and contextual correlates of opioid overdose risk among drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Lauretta E; Green, Traci C; Torban, Mikhail; Blinnikova, Ksenia; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Ilyuk, Ruslan; Kozlov, Andrei P; Heimer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Opioid overdose in Russia is a problem that has grown more severe as heroin abuse expanded over the past decade, yet few studies have explored it in detail. In order to gain a clearer understanding of the situation, 60 drug users, both in and out of drug treatment in St. Petersburg, were interviewed concerning their overdose experience and knowledge about overdose recognition and prevention. Methods Using a semi-structured interview, we sought to identify and describe local attitudes, knowledge and experience (both self-sustained and witnessed) of opioid overdose. Bi-variate and multiple logistic regressions were performed in order to identify the relationship between overdose experience and sociodemographic factors, risk behaviors, and clinical psychiatric measures. Results We found that having experienced or witnessed an opioid overdose within the previous year was common, overdose knowledge was generally high, but nearly half the participants reported low self-efficacy for effectively intervening in an overdose situation. In bivariate analyses, self-reported family problems (i.e., perceived problematic family interactions) were positively associated with both experiencing (t56 = 2.49; p < 0.05) and with witnessing a greater number of overdoses in the previous year (rhos = 0.31; p < 0.05). Having previously overdosed [Adjusted Risk Ratio (ARR) 1.7, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.1–2.6] and higher SCL-90-R somatization scores (ARR 1.2, 95% CI 0.96 – 1.5) were independently associated in multivariable analyses with self-sustained overdose experience in the past year. Greater perceived likelihood of experiencing a future overdose and concern about medical problems were independently associated with witnessing a higher number of overdoses within the previous year. Over two thirds of the participants expressed interest in receiving training in overdose prevention and response. Conclusion Opioid overdose experience is very common among drug users in St

  13. User Profiles of a Smartphone Application to Support Drug Adherence — Experiences from the iNephro Project

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Stefan; Kribben, Andreas; Meister, Sven; Diamantidis, Clarissa Jonas; Unger, Nicole; Mitchell, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose One of the key problems in the drug therapy of patients with chronic conditions is drug adherence. In 2010 the initiative iNephro was launched (www.inephro.de). A software to support regular and correct drug intake was developed for a smartphone platform (iOS). The study investigated whether and how smartphone users deployed such an application. Methods Together with cooperating partners the mobile application “Medikamentenplan” (“Medication Plan”) was developed. Users are able to keep and alter a list of their regular medication. A memory function supports regular intake. The application can be downloaded free of charge from the App Store™ by Apple™. After individual consent of users from December 2010 to April 2012 2042338 actions were recorded and analysed from the downloaded applications. Demographic data were collected from 2279 users with a questionnaire. Results Overall the application was used by 11688 smartphone users. 29% (3406/11688) used it at least once a week for at least four weeks. 27% (3209/11688) used the application for at least 84 days. 68% (1554/2279) of users surveyed were male, the stated age of all users was between 6–87 years (mean 44). 74% of individuals (1697) declared to be suffering from cardiovascular disease, 13% (292) had a previous history of transplantation, 9% (205) were suffering from cancer, 7% (168) reported an impaired renal function and 7% (161) suffered from diabetes mellitus. 69% (1568) of users were on <6 different medications, 9% (201) on 6 – 10 and 1% (26) on more than 10. Conclusion A new smartphone application, which supports drug adherence, was used regularly by chronically ill users with a wide range of diseases over a longer period of time. The majority of users so far were middle-aged and male. PMID:24194946

  14. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  15. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran.

    PubMed

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Mansouri, Seyed Ali; Sadeghi, Leila; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  16. Natural killer cells in highly exposed hepatitis C-seronegative injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Mina, M M; Cameron, B; Luciani, F; Vollmer-Conna, U; Lloyd, A R

    2016-06-01

    Injecting drug use remains the major risk factor for hepatitis C (HCV) transmission. A minority of long-term injecting drug users remain seronegative and aviraemic, despite prolonged exposure to HCV - termed highly exposed seronegative subjects. Natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in this apparent protection. A longitudinal nested, three group case-control series of subjects was selected from a prospective cohort of seronegative injecting drug users who became incident cases (n = 11), remained seronegative (n = 11) or reported transient high-risk behaviour and remained uninfected (n = 11). The groups were matched by age, sex and initial risk behaviour characteristics. Stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed in multicolour flow cytometry to enumerate natural killer cell subpopulations and to assess functional activity using Toll-like receptor ligands before measurement of activation, cytokine production and natural cytotoxicity receptor expression. Principal components were derived to describe the detailed phenotypic characteristics of the major NK subpopulations (based on CD56 and CD16 co-expression), before logistic regression analysis to identify associations with exposed, seronegative individuals. The CD56(dim) CD16(+) (P = 0.05, OR 6.92) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) (P = 0.05, OR 6.07) principal components differed between exposed, seronegative individuals and pre-infection samples of the other two groups. These included CD56(dim) CD16(+) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) subsets with CD56(dim) CD16(+) IFN-γ and TNF-α on unstimulated cells, and CD56(dim) CD16(-) CD69(+) , CD107a(+) , IFN-γ and TNF-α following TLR stimulation. The cytotoxic CD56(dim) NK subset thus distinguished highly exposed, seronegative subjects, suggesting NK cytotoxicity may contribute to protection from HCV acquisition. Further investigation of the determinants of this association and prospective assessment of protection against HCV infection are warranted. PMID:26833632

  17. Hepatitis C among Intravenous Drug Users in Isfahan, Iran: a Study of Seroprevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nokhodian, Zary; Meshkati, Marjan; Adibi, Peyman; Ataei, Behrooz; Kassaian, Nazila; Yaran, Majid; Shoaei, Parisa; Hassannejad, Razieh

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the major public health problems worldwide which is transmitted through contact with infected blood or blood products. One of the most prevalent modes of HCV transmission is injecting drug with unclean needles or syringes. Therefore intravenous drug users (IVDUs) are the most important group who should be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate seroprevalence and risk factors of hepatitis C virus in IVDUs population. Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried out on intravenous drug users who attended health and social care Drop-in centers during November 2008 to February 2009 in Isfahan province, Iran. Data was gathered using interviewer-administered questionnaire including demographic characteristics and main risk factors for HCV infection. 5ml venous blood sample was obtained from each subject. The HCV-Ab test was performed on all blood samples by ELISA. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistical methods and multiple logistic regressions by SPSS software, version 15. Results: The mean age of participants was 31.77 ± 8.51. 503 (94.7%) were men and 28 (5.3%) were women. HCV seroprevalence was 47.1% (95% CI: 42.9, 51.3). The multiple logistic regressions demonstrated that history of tattooing (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.02-2.90), history of imprisonment (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.40-4.42) and sharing needles/syringes (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.54-4.95) are significant predictors of risk of HCV in IVDU population. Conclusions: In conclusion, according to the high prevalence of HCV infection among IVDUs and high adds of HCV infection from tattooing, sharing of needles/syringes and imprisonment, effective harm reduction programs should be expanded among IVDUs to prevent new HCV infections. PMID:22826755

  18. Barriers to antiretroviral treatment access for injecting drug users living with HIV in Chennai, South India.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Velayudham, Jaikumar; Shunmugam, Murali; Newman, Peter A; Dubrow, Robert

    2014-01-01

    India's National AIDS Control Organization provides free antiretroviral treatment (ART) to people living with HIV (PLHIV), including members of marginalized groups such as injecting drug users (IDUs). To help inform development of interventions to enhance ART access, we explored barriers to free ART access at government ART centers for IDUs living with HIV in Chennai by conducting three focus groups (n = 19 IDUs) and four key informant interviews. Data were explored using framework analysis to identify categories and derive themes. We found interrelated barriers at the family and social, health-care system, and individual levels. Family and social level barriers included lack of family support and fear of societal discrimination, as well as unmet basic needs, including food and shelter. Health-care system barriers included actual or perceived unfriendly hospital environment and procedures such as requiring proof of address and identity from PLHIV, including homeless IDUs; provider perception that IDUs will not adhere to ART, resulting in ART not being initiated; actual or perceived inadequate counseling services and lack of confidentiality; and lack of effective linkages between ART centers, needle/syringe programs, and drug dependence treatment centers. Individual-level barriers included active drug use, lack of self-efficacy in ART adherence, low motivation to initiate ART stemming from a fatalistic attitude, and inadequate knowledge about ART. These findings indicate that to facilitate IDUs gaining access to ART, systemic changes are needed, including steps to make the environment and procedures at government ART centers more IDU-friendly and steps to decrease HIV- and drug use-related stigma and discrimination faced by IDUs from the general public and health-care providers. Housing support for homeless IDUs and linkage of IDUs with drug dependence treatment are also essential. PMID:24283220

  19. HIV prevention among injecting drug users: responses in developing and transitional countries.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, A L; Rana, S; Dehne, K L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated with injecting drug use has been reported in at least 98 countries and territories worldwide. There is evidence that new epidemics are emerging in different regions, including Eastern Europe, Latin American, and the eastern Mediterranean. The authors provide a global overview of the situation of HIV infection associated with injecting drug use and responses that have been implemented in various developing and transitional countries. METHODS: Although there has been extensive documentation of the extent and nature of of HIV infection associated with injecting drug use in many developed countries and the various interventions implemented in those countries, there is very limited information on the situation in developing and transitional countries. This chapter brings together information from a broad range of sources, including published literature; "gray" or "fugitive" literature; data collected by the World Health Organization (WHO), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the United Nations International Drug Control Programme (UNDCP); personal communications; and direct observation by the authors. The authors have traveled extensively to a wide range of developing and transitional countries and have accessed information not readily available to the international research community. RESULTS: A wide range of HIV prevention strategies targeting injecting drug users (IDUs) has been implemented in developing countries and countries in transition. Interventions include opioid substitution pharmacotherapy, needle syringe exchange and distribution, condom and bleach distribution, outreach to IDUs, peer education programs, and social network interventions. In some communities, completely new models of intervention and service delivery have developed in response to specific local needs and limitations. CONCLUSIONS: Although empirical data may currently be lacking to demonstrate the

  20. Attitudes toward Methadone among Out-of-Treatment Minority Injection Drug Users: Implications for Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Nickolas D.; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Velazquez, Lavinia; Rich, Josiah D.

    2009-01-01

    Injection drug use (IDU) continues to be a significant public health issue in the U.S. and internationally, and there is evidence to suggest that the burden of injection drug use and associated morbidity and mortality falls disproportionately on minority communities. IDU is responsible for a significant portion of new and existing HIV/AIDS cases in many parts of the world. In the U.S., the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus is higher among populations of African-American and Latino injection drug users (IDUs) than among white IDUs. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) has been demonstrated to effectively reduce opiate use, HIV risk behaviors and transmission, general mortality and criminal behavior, but opiate-dependent minorities are less likely to access MMT than whites. A better understanding of the obstacles minority IDUs face accessing treatment is needed to engage racial and ethnic disparities in IDU as well as drug-related morbidity and mortality. In this study, we explore knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about methadone among 53 out-of-treatment Latino and African-American IDUs in Providence, RI. Our findings suggest that negative perceptions of methadone persist among racial and ethnic minority IDUs in Providence, including beliefs that methadone is detrimental to health and that people should attempt to discontinue methadone treatment. Additional potential obstacles to entering methadone therapy include cost and the difficulty of regularly attending a methadone clinic as well as the belief that an individual on MMT is not abstinent from drugs. Substance use researchers and treatment professionals should engage minority communities, particularly Latino communities, in order to better understand the treatment needs of a diverse population, develop culturally appropriate MMT programs, and raise awareness of the benefits of MMT. PMID:19440415

  1. Tobacco Use and Nicotine Dependence among HIV-Infected and Uninfected Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Mariah M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Caporaso, Neil E.; McCormack, Meredith C.; Merlo, Christian A.; Hague, John C.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Engels, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Urban U.S. populations are burdened by intersecting epidemics of HIV-infection, injection drug use, and cigarette smoking. Given the substantial morbidity attributable to tobacco in these populations, we characterized smoking behaviors, nicotine addiction, and tobacco exposure among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, Maryland. Methods Smoking behaviors among participants in the ALIVE Study were assessed using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Smoking history and nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Index scores) were compared by HIV and drug injecting status. Serum cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) was measured for a sample of participants by enzyme immunoassay. Results Among 1,052 participants (29.7% HIV-infected, 39.8% active injectors), 85.2% were current smokers and 9.3% former smokers. Smoking prevalence, age at smoking initiation, and cumulative tobacco exposure were similar by HIV status. Median Fagerstrom scores of 4 for HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected smokers indicated moderate nicotine dependence. Daily cigarette consumption was identical by HIV status (median 10 cigarettes), although HIV-infected participants were less likely to smoke 1+ pack daily compared to HIV-uninfected participants (18.0% vs. 26.9%, p=0.001). Compared to former injectors, active injectors had higher smoking prevalence (90.5% vs. 81.7%, p=0.0001), greater daily cigarette consumption (30.7% vs. 19.6% smoked 1+ pack daily, p=0.0001), and slightly higher Fagerstrom scores (median 5 vs. 4). Cotinine levels paralleled self-reported cigarette consumption. Discussion Tobacco use is extremely common among inner city IDUs. Smoking behavior and nicotine dependence did not materially differ by HIV status but were associated with active drug injection. Cessation efforts should target the dual dependence of cigarettes and drugs experienced among this population. PMID:20875704

  2. Physical Violence Among a Prospective Cohort of Injection Drug Users: A Gender-Focused Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Brandon D.L.; Fairbairn, Nadia; Li, Kathy; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Although dramatically heightened rates of violence have been observed among injection drug users (IDU), little is known about the gender differences associated with violence among this population. Employing a risk environment framework, we performed an analysis of the factors associated with experiencing violence among participants enrolled in a prospective cohort study of IDU during the years 1996-2005 using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Among 1114 individuals, 291 (66%) of females and 470 (70%) of males reported experiencing violence during the study period. In multivariate analyses, mental illness, frequent alcohol use, frequent crack use, homelessness, Downtown Eastside residency, and requiring help injecting were positively associated with experiencing violence for both sexes (all p < 0.05). For females, binge drug use (AOR = 1.30) and drug dealing (AOR = 1.42) were positively associated with violence, while younger age (AOR = 1.02), frequent heroin injection (AOR = 1.24), and incarceration (AOR = 1.50) were significant for males. Women were more likely to be attacked by acquaintances, partners, and sex trade clients, while men were more likely to experience violence from strangers and the police. These findings indicate that susceptibility to violence among IDU is structured by environmental factors such as homelessness and drug-related factors such as frequent alcohol use and involvement in drug economies. Furthermore, important gender differences with respect to the predictors and characteristics of violent attacks do exist. These findings indicate an urgent need for the development of comprehensive programs and structural interventions that take a gender-focused approach to violence among IDU. PMID:18487025

  3. Surfactant-based drug delivery systems for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Among all cancers, lung cancer is the major cause of deaths. Lung cancer can be categorized into two classes for prognostic and treatment purposes: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both categories of cancer are resistant to certain drugs. Various mechanisms behind drug resistance are over-expression of superficial membrane proteins [glycoprotein (P-gp)], lung resistance-associated proteins, aberration of the intracellular enzyme system, enhancement of the cell repair system and deregulation of cell apoptosis. Structure-performance relationships and chemical compatibility are consequently major fundamentals in surfactant-based formulations, with the intention that a great deal investigation is committed to this region. With the purpose to understand the potential of P-gp in transportation of anti-tumor drugs to cancer cells with much effectiveness and specificity, several surfactant-based delivery systems have been developed which may include microspheres, nanosized drug carriers (nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, stealth liposomes, nanogels, polymer-drug conjugates), novel powders, hydrogels and mixed micellar systems intended for systemic and/or localized delivery. PMID:25013959

  4. High rates of serum Se deficiency among HIV and HCV infected and uninfected drug users in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Heidi B; Benetucci, Jorge; Muzzio, Estela; Redini, Liliana; Naveira, Jorge; Segura, Marcela; Weissenbacher, Mercedes; Tang, Alice M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence and correlates of low serum Se and determine whether HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or types of drugs used are associated with serum Se in a cohort of infected and uninfected drug users. Design Independent correlates of low serum Se levels based on data collected from food recalls, physical exams, and clinical status questionnaires were identified using multivariate analysis. Setting Buenos Aires, Argentina Subjects A total of 205 (25 females and 180 males) former and current drug users Results Drug users had an average serum Se level of 69.8±32.8 μg/dl, and 82% were considered deficient (< 85μg/l). Multivariate analyses found that HIV and/or HCV infection had lower mean Se compared to healthy, uninfected drug users (HIV/HCV co-infection: −25.3 μg/l (SE =7.6, p=0.001); HIV alone: −28.9 μg/l (SE=6.9, p<0.001); HCV alone −19.4 μg/l (SE = 7.1, p=0.006). Current and previous drug use was associated with higher serum Se. Cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol consumption were not found to be associated with Se status. Conclusions Low serum Se levels are highly prevalent among drug users in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Se supplementation and/or dietary interventions may be warranted in drug users who are at high risk of HIV and/or HCV infection. PMID:21740621

  5. Institutional ethical review and ethnographic research involving injection drug users: a case study.

    PubMed

    Small, Will; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Ethnographic research among people who inject drugs (PWID) involves complex ethical issues. While ethical review frameworks have been critiqued by social scientists, there is a lack of social science research examining institutional ethical review processes, particularly in relation to ethnographic work. This case study describes the institutional ethical review of an ethnographic research project using observational fieldwork and in-depth interviews to examine injection drug use. The review process and the salient concerns of the review committee are recounted, and the investigators' responses to the committee's concerns and requests are described to illustrate how key issues were resolved. The review committee expressed concerns regarding researcher safety when conducting fieldwork, and the investigators were asked to liaise with the police regarding the proposed research. An ongoing dialogue with the institutional review committee regarding researcher safety and autonomy from police involvement, as well as formal consultation with a local drug user group and solicitation of opinions from external experts, helped to resolve these issues. This case study suggests that ethical review processes can be particularly challenging for ethnographic projects focused on illegal behaviours, and that while some challenges could be mediated by modifying existing ethical review procedures, there is a need for legislation that provides legal protection of research data and participant confidentiality. PMID:24581074

  6. Remaking hospital space: The health care practices of injection drug users in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Szott, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical care has long been depicted by social scientists as a field of social control, as well as a branch of Foucauldian disciplinary power. This report focuses attention on the hospital, a highly regulated place in the United States, and examines how injection drug users (IDUs) negotiate the medical social control and institutionalized disciplinary power they encounter in this place. Methods Twenty-eight qualitative interviews were conducted in New York City with low-income people who inject drugs on a regular basis. Interview questions focused on their health and drug use and interactions with health care providers. Results A variety of practices were employed to avoid, defy and subvert medical power. Study participants reported leaving the hospital when they felt ready rather than waiting to be discharged, actively seeking the type of care they wanted and ignoring medical advice. Conclusion The hospital is not a site of total control in the narratives of IDUs, but rather a space to seek a self-determined amount and type of care. These results can re-orient providers of health care services towards understanding the productivity of the relationship between IDUs and the hospital. PMID:24418630

  7. Institutional Ethical Review and Ethnographic Research Involving Injection Drug Users: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Small, Will; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Ethnographic research among people who inject drugs (PWID) involves complex ethical issues. While ethical review frameworks have been critiqued by social scientists, there is a lack of social science research examining institutional ethical review processes, particularly in relation to ethnographic work. This case study describes the institutional ethical review of an ethnographic research project using observational fieldwork and in-depth interviews to examine injection drug use. The review process and the salient concerns of the review committee are recounted, and the investigators’ responses to the committee’s concerns and requests are described to illustrate how key issues were resolved. The review committee expressed concerns regarding researcher safety when conducting fieldwork and the investigators were asked to liaise with the police regarding the proposed research. An ongoing dialogue with the institutional review committee regarding researcher safety and autonomy from police involvement, as well as formal consultation with a local drug user group and solicitation of opinions from external experts, helped to resolve these issues. This case study suggests that ethical review processes can be particularly challenging for ethnographic projects focused on illegal behaviours, and that while some challenges could be mediated by modifying existing ethical review procedures, there is a need for legislation that provides legal protection of research data and participant confidentiality. PMID:24581074

  8. Effects of a One Hour Intervention on Condom Implementation Intentions among Drug Users in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Nydegger, Liesl A; Keeler, Amanda R.; Hood, Caroline; Siegel, Jason T.; Stacy, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 36% of HIV cases are related to substance abuse. Substance abusers, including non-injection drug users, are high-risk for contracting HIV due to risky behaviors, including unprotected sex. Due to these behavioral and infection risks, feasible interventions that focus on condom use within this population are imperative. The current study involved the development of brief intervention designed to increase implementation intentions (situation-linked action plans) to use condoms in convicted non-violent drug offenders participating in drug diversion programs in Southern California. Participants (n = 143) were randomized at the individual level to either waitlist-control or experimental conditions. The randomized wait-list control group received the HIV survey for the pre-test before the intervention, while the experimental group received a neutral, non-HIV related, survey at pre-test. The experimental group received the HIV survey as the post-test after the intervention (wait-list control group received the neutral, non-HIV related, survey). One-tailed Mann Whitney U tests were used to compare the wait-list control and experimental groups. The experimental group was more likely to report stronger implementation intentions to use condoms (p < .001). These results indicate in the short term that a brief, easily disseminated HIV intervention can be effective for increasing implementation intentions to use condoms in an extremely high HIV-risk population. PMID:23656365

  9. Association of methamphetamine use during sex with risky sexual behaviors and HIV infection among non-injection drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, F; Truax, S R; Ruiz, J D; Sun, R K

    1998-01-01

    Morbidity, mortality, and drug treatment data suggest that methamphetamine use is on the rise. Based on research findings of the sexual behaviors of methamphetamine-using injection drug users, we chose to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use during sex and risky sexual behaviors and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity among clients of publicly funded HIV testing sites in California who reported never injecting drugs. We found that among gay, bisexual, and heterosexual men and heterosexual women, users of methamphetamines reported more sexual partners than non-methamphetamine users. Among heterosexuals, a greater percentage of methamphetamine users than nonusers participated in anal intercourse. Methamphetamine use was independently related to decreased condom use during vaginal and anal intercourse, prostitution, and sex with known injection drug users. In addition, methamphetamine users were more likely to have had a sexually transmitted disease. When controlling for race or ethnicity; age; exposure to possibly infected blood or blood products; and the use of cocaine, alcohol, or marijuana during sex, methamphetamine-using bisexual men were more likely to test positive for HIV than those reporting no history of methamphetamine use. Our data suggest that noninjection methamphetamine use is related to increased, unprotected sexual activity and the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. PMID:9499742

  10. Spatial distribution and characteristics of injecting drug users (IDU) in five Northeastern states of India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Injecting drugs is the major driving force of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Northeastern India. We have assessed the spatial distribution of locations where injecting drug users (IDU) congregate, as well as the risk behaviour and key characteristics of IDUs to develop new strategies strengthening intervention measures for HIV prevention in this region. Methods Locations of IDUs congregation for buying and injecting drugs were identified through Key Informants (KI). Verification of the location and its characteristics were confirmed through field visits. We also conducted semi-structured and structured interviews with IDUs to learn more about their injecting behaviour and other characteristics. Results Altogether, 2462 IDU locations were identified in 5 states. The number of IDU locations was found to be greater in the states bordering Myanmar. Private houses, parks, abandoned buildings, pharmacies, graveyards, and isolated places were the most frequently chosen place for injecting drugs. Many injecting locations were visited by IDUs of varying ages, of which about 10-20% of locations were for females. In some locations, female IDUs were also involved in sex work. Sharing of needle and syringes was reported in all the states by large proportion of IDUs, mainly with close friends. However, even sharing with strangers was not uncommon. Needle and syringes were mainly procured from pharmacies, drug peddlers and friends. Lack of access to free sterile needles and syringes, and inconsistent supplies from intervention programs, were often given as the cause of sharing or re-use of needles and syringes by IDUs. Most of the IDUs described a negative attitude of the community towards them. Conclusion We highlight the injection of drugs as a problem in 5 Northeastern India states where this is the major driving force of an HIV epidemic. Also highlighted are the large numbers of females that are unrecognized as IDUs and the association between drug

  11. Declining risk for HIV among injecting drug users in Kathmandu, Nepal: the impact of a harm-reduction programme.

    PubMed

    Peak, A; Rana, S; Maharjan, S H; Jolley, D; Crofts, N

    1995-09-01

    To reduce the high rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among intravenous drug users in Nepal, the Lifesaving and Lifegiving Society of Kathmandu has been distributing sterile injecting equipment in exchange for contaminated materials since 1991. In addition, community health outreach workers affiliated with the program provide condoms and bleach, HIV counseling and education, and primary health care to about 750 of the estimated 1500-2000 intravenous drug users in the Kathmandu valley. Of the 48,386 client contacts in 1991-94, over half involved syringe exchange. During this period, 586 randomly selected clients were selected for interviews and serologic testing. The number of times drug users shared equipment declined from 14 times per week in the 1991 subsample to once a day or less in the 1993 and 1994 subsamples. Knowledge of HIV infection rose from 58% in 1991 to almost 100% in 1994, while the proportion of drug users considering themselves at risk of HIV increased from 25% to 47%. There were no significant changes in HIV seropositivity (1.6% in 1991) during the study period, and no new cases were recorded in 1993 or 1994. This finding confirms the effectiveness of needle/syringe exchange programs in controlling the spread of HIV infection among intravenous drug users. PMID:8527080

  12. Having Multiple Sexual Partners among Iranian Intra-Venous Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin; Yarmohamadivasel, Mosaieb; Moghani Lankarani, Maryam; Sehat, Mahmood; Narenjiha, Hooman; Rafiey, Hassan; Noori, Roya; Shirinbayan, Peymaneh; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transmission of HIV from intra-venous drug users (IDUs) to the community occurs predominantly through high-risk sexual behaviors. Limited information exists regarding the high-risk sexual behaviors of IDUs in Iran. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with having multiple sexual partners among Iranian IDUs. Methods: This is a national survey on drug-dependent adults. Participants were sampled from medical centers, prisons, and streets of capitals of 29 provinces in Iran between May 2007 and February 2008. We analyzed data of 1416 current IDUs. Socio-demographics and drug use characteristics were entered into a binary logistic regression model to determine predictors of having multiple sexual partners. Results: Having multiple sexual partners in the past or at the time of survey was reported by 56.4% of Iranian IDUs. Multivariate analysis showed that the likelihood of having multiple sexual partners in IDUs decreased by being married [odds ratio (OR), 0.38; P < 0.001] and increased by female gender (OR, 13.44; P = 0.02), having illegal income (OR, 1.72; P = 0.003), higher monthly family income (OR, 1.01; P = 0.003), pleasure, curiosity, and recreation as cause of first drug use (OR, 1.37; P = 0.04), ruins as usual place for injection (OR, 1.89; P = 0.001) and history of syringe sharing (OR, 1.50; P = 0.02). Conclusion: Having multiple sexual partners was reported by majority of Iranian IDUs, and this was linked to socio-demographics, initiation data, and other risk behaviors. This information should be considered in prevention efforts to reduce sexual transmission of HIV infection in Iran. PMID:25346698

  13. Spatial Epidemiology of HIV among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Rusch, Melanie L.; Weeks, John R.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2012-01-01

    The northwest border city of Tijuana is Mexico’s fifth largest and is experiencing burgeoning drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics. Since local geography influences disease risk, we explored the spatial distribution of HIV among injection drug users (IDUs). From 2006–2007, 1056 IDUs were recruited using respondent-driven sampling, and then followed for eighteen months. Participants underwent semi-annual surveys, mapping, and testing for HIV, tuberculosis, and syphilis. Using Average Nearest Neighbor and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics, locations where participants lived, worked, bought and injected drugs were compared with HIV status and environmental and behavioral factors. Median age was thirty-seven years; 85 percent were male. Females had higher HIV prevalence than males (10.2 percent vs. 3.4 percent; p=0.001). HIV cases at baseline (n=47) most strongly clustered by drug injection sites (Z-Score −6.173; p < 0.001), with a 16 km2 hotspot near the Mexico/U.S. border, encompassing the red-light district. Spatial correlates of HIV included syphilis infection, female gender, younger age, increased hours on the street per day, and higher number of injection partners. Almost all HIV seroconverters injected within a 2.5 block radius of each other immediately prior to seroconversion. Only history of syphilis infection and female gender were strongly associated with HIV in the area where incident cases injected. Directional trends suggested a largely static epidemic until July–December 2008, when HIV spread to the southeast, possibly related to intensified violence and policing that spiked in the latter half of 2008. While clustering allows for targeting interventions, the dynamic nature of epidemics suggests the importance of mobile treatment and harm reduction programs. PMID:23606753

  14. Human Rights Abuses and Suicidal Ideation among Male Injecting Drug Users in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Enisha; Samson, Luke; Sweat, Michael; Beyrer, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Background Human rights abuses, denial of care, police surveillance, and violence directed at IDUs have been found to impact HIV prevention efforts due to decreased attendance in harm reduction programs. The association of mental health status with rights abuses has not been examined extensively among drug users. In India, drug control laws are often in conflict with harm reduction policies, thus increasing the likelihood of rights abuses against IDUs. The purpose of this study was to describe human rights abuses occurring among IDUs in Delhi and examine their association with suicidal ideation. Methods 343 IDUs were recruited in two research sites in Delhi through respondent driven sampling and were interviewed with a cross sectional survey questionnaire that included items on human rights and socio demographics. Results IDUs in the study experienced many human rights abuses. Notably among these were denial of admission into hospital (38.5%), denial of needles and syringes (20%), police arrests for carrying needles and using drugs (85%), verbal abuse (95%) and physical abuse (88%). Several human rights abuses were associated with suicidal ideation. These include being denied needles and syringes (OR: 7.28, 95% CI: 3.03- 17.49); being arrested by police for carrying needles and using drugs (OR: 2.53, 95% CI: 1.06- 6.03), and being physically abused (OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.05- 2.23). The likelihood of suicidal ideation is also strongly related to the cumulative number of abuses. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that there is a high prevalence of human rights abuses among IDUs in Delhi. Given the alarming rate of suicidal ideation and its close relationship with human rights abuses it is essential that IDU interventions are executed within a rights-based framework. PMID:21439808

  15. Perceived risk of HIV infection among deported male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Robertson, Angela M.; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2014-01-01

    Deported injection drug users (IDUs) in Mexico may be vulnerable to HIV infection following expulsion from the U.S. We examined factors associated with HIV risk perception among a sample of deportees in Tijuana. From January to April 2010, 313 male IDUs who reported ever being deported from the U.S. completed a questionnaire. Overall, 35% (N=110) of deportees perceived HIV risk. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, factors independently associated with HIV risk perception included: ever having a steady female partner in Tijuana post-deportation (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 2.26; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.01-5.07) and years spent in a U.S. prison (AOR: 1.29 per year; 95% CI: 1.13-1.48). Conversely, years of drug injection use (AOR: 0.95 per year; 95% CI: 0.91-0.99), ever witnessing family members use drugs prior to first migration trip (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.65), years of residence in the United States (AOR: 0.91 per year; 95% CI: 0.84-0.98) and being a Tijuana-native (AOR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.16-0.99) were negatively associated HIV risk perception. U.S.-Mexico border cities that receive deported migrants should target HIV prevention interventions to specific subgroups, including drug-using male deportees. Interventions should consider migrant's time in the U.S., the role of their social networks, and reducing missed opportunities for HIV testing/education. PMID:24650124

  16. Spatial Epidemiology of HIV among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Kimberly C; Rusch, Melanie L; Weeks, John R; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2012-01-01

    The northwest border city of Tijuana is Mexico's fifth largest and is experiencing burgeoning drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics. Since local geography influences disease risk, we explored the spatial distribution of HIV among injection drug users (IDUs). From 2006-2007, 1056 IDUs were recruited using respondent-driven sampling, and then followed for eighteen months. Participants underwent semi-annual surveys, mapping, and testing for HIV, tuberculosis, and syphilis. Using Average Nearest Neighbor and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics, locations where participants lived, worked, bought and injected drugs were compared with HIV status and environmental and behavioral factors. Median age was thirty-seven years; 85 percent were male. Females had higher HIV prevalence than males (10.2 percent vs. 3.4 percent; p=0.001). HIV cases at baseline (n=47) most strongly clustered by drug injection sites (Z-Score -6.173; p < 0.001), with a 16 km(2) hotspot near the Mexico/U.S. border, encompassing the red-light district. Spatial correlates of HIV included syphilis infection, female gender, younger age, increased hours on the street per day, and higher number of injection partners. Almost all HIV seroconverters injected within a 2.5 block radius of each other immediately prior to seroconversion. Only history of syphilis infection and female gender were strongly associated with HIV in the area where incident cases injected. Directional trends suggested a largely static epidemic until July-December 2008, when HIV spread to the southeast, possibly related to intensified violence and policing that spiked in the latter half of 2008. While clustering allows for targeting interventions, the dynamic nature of epidemics suggests the importance of mobile treatment and harm reduction programs. PMID:23606753

  17. Assessing the HIV-1 Epidemic in Brazilian Drug Users: A Molecular Epidemiology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Monick Lindenmeyer; Marques, Bianca Cristina Leires; Bertoni, Neilane; Teixeira, Sylvia Lopes Maia; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves; Bastos, Francisco Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Person who inject illicit substances have an important role in HIV-1 blood and sexual transmission and together with person who uses heavy non-injecting drugs may have less than optimal adherence to anti-retroviral treatment and eventually could transmit resistant HIV variants. Unfortunately, molecular biology data on such key population remain fragmentary in most low and middle-income countries. The aim of the present study was to assess HIV infection rates, evaluate HIV-1 genetic diversity, drug resistance, and to identify HIV transmission clusters in heavy drug users (DUs). For this purpose, DUs were recruited in the context of a Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS) study in different Brazilian cities during 2009. Overall, 2,812 individuals were tested for HIV, and 168 (6%) of them were positive, of which 19 (11.3%) were classified as recent seroconverters, corresponding to an estimated incidence rate of 1.58%/year (95% CI 0.92–2.43%). Neighbor joining phylogenetic trees from env and pol regions and bootscan analyses were employed to subtype the virus from132 HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1 subtype B was prevalent in most of the cities under analysis, followed by BF recombinants (9%-35%). HIV-1 subtype C was the most prevalent in Curitiba (46%) and Itajaí (86%) and was also detected in Brasília (9%) and Campo Grande (20%). Pure HIV-1F infections were detected in Rio de Janeiro (9%), Recife (6%), Salvador (6%) and Brasília (9%). Clusters of HIV transmission were assessed by Maximum likelihood analyses and were cross-compared with the RDS network structure. Drug resistance mutations were verified in 12.2% of DUs. Our findings reinforce the importance of the permanent HIV-1 surveillance in distinct Brazilian cities due to viral resistance and increasing subtype heterogeneity all over Brazil, with relevant implications in terms of treatment monitoring, prophylaxis and vaccine development. PMID:26536040

  18. Social network members’ roles and use of mental health services among drug users in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Sapra, Katherine J.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Rudolph, Abby E.; Jones, Kandice C.; Benjamin, Ebele O.; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is more common among drug users (15–63%) than general population (5–16%). Lack of social support network members may be associated with low mental health service (MHS) use rates observed among drug users. We investigated the relationship between social network members’ roles and MHS use among frequent drug users using START data (NYC 2006–2009). Surveys assessed depression, MHS use, demographics, drug use and treatment, and social network members’ roles. Participants reporting lifetime depressive episode with start/end dates and information on social/risk network members were included (n=152). Adjusting for emotional support and HIV status, having ≥ 1 informational support network member remained associated with MHS use at last depressive episode (AOR: 3.37, 95% CI: 1.38, 8.19), as did history of drug treatment (AOR: 2.75, 95% CI: 1.02, 7.41) and no legal income (AOR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.64). These data suggest informational support is associated with MHS utilization among depressed drug users. PMID:23897001

  19. An exploratory analysis of communication sources: targeting high risk behavior among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Bodkin, C D; La Salvia, T A

    1996-01-01

    Currently, most AIDS education and prevention programs attempt to change the high risk behavior of injection drug users (IDU's) (e.g., sharing needles and engaging in unsafe sex) through the implementation of two distinct strategies. First, empirical-rational strategies suggest that people maximize their rational self-interest. Second, normative re-education strategies suggest that people change their individual behavior when they believe that there has been change in the sociocultural norms, values, and habits around them. Both of these strategies make assumptions about how communication changes IDU's beliefs and behavior. An empirical-rational strategy emphasizes non-personal mass communications (e.g., television, radio, newspaper); while normative re-education strategies make use of personal communications (e.g. friends, family, educational outreach workers, and group discussion). The purpose of this paper is to compare these strategies by examining the impact of AIDS communication sources on the beliefs and behaviors of IDU's. PMID:10172894

  20. Urging others to be healthy: "intravention" by injection drug users as a community prevention goal.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Samuel R; Maslow, Carey; Bolyard, Melissa; Sandoval, Milagros; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Neaigus, Alan

    2004-06-01

    "Intravention," prevention activities that are conducted by and sustained through ongoing actions of members of communities-at-risk, is an appropriate goal for HIV intervention activities. Data from 120 injection drug users in a Brooklyn, New York, neighborhood that has seen decreases in HIV prevalence among IDUs and little HIV diffusion to young adults indicate that most of them have recently (3 months) urged other people to engage in one or more self-protective actions. These data suggest that the common image of IDUs as simply being sources of social and medical problems is inaccurate. Research is needed into how to create and diffuse "communities of intravention; " and we suggest that behavioral interventions be evaluated for their success or failure at creating outward-focused health communication by participants as well as for their impact on individual risk behaviors. PMID:15237054

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of European injecting drug users concerning preventive measures for HIV.

    PubMed

    Richardson, S C; Papaevangelou, G; Ancelle-Park, R

    1994-04-01

    Strategies for controlling the HIV epidemic include education and information campaigns for intravenous drug users (IDUs), as for all high-risk groups, and the provision of various public health measures and treatment. These can only be effective if the IDU is aware of them and has a favourable image of them. A study of 2330 IDUs in 12 European countries recorded awareness and opinions of various categories of measures and institutions. Of all measures, those mentioned most often related to availability of new injecting equipment; specifically unrestricted sales in pharmacies and needle exchanges, which were also thought to be more useful than anything else. Prompted awareness of rehabilitative institutions was well over 90% in most countries, but up to a quarter of IDUs did not trust them and up to one fifth did not think that they were useful. There appears to be a general need for more effective communication with IDUs to improve the image of the services available. PMID:7813690

  2. HIV risk, health, and social characteristics of sexual minority female injection drug users in Baltimore

    PubMed Central

    German, Danielle; Latkin, Carl A.

    2015-01-01

    Female injection drug users {IDU} who report sex with women are at increased risk for HIV and social instability, but it is important to assess whether these disparities also exist according to sexual minority identity rather than behaviorally defined categories. Within a sample of current IDU in Baltimore, about 17% of female study participants (n=307) identified as gay/lesbian/bisexual. In controlled models, sexual minorities were three times as likely to report sex exchange behavior and four times as likely to report a recent STI. Injection risk did not differ significantly, but sexual minority women reported higher prevalence of socio-economic instability, negative health indicators, and fewer network financial, material, and health support resources. There is a need to identify and address socio-economic marginalization, social support, and health issues among female IDUs who identify as lesbian or bisexual. PMID:25504312

  3. Explaining the Geographical Variation of HIV Among Injection Drug Users in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, D.; Bourgois, P.

    2005-01-01

    Distinct physical and chemical types of street heroin exist worldwide, but their impact on behavior and disease acquisition is not well understood or documented. This article presents a hypothesis to explain the unequal diffusion of HIV among injection drug users in the United States by examining the distribution and use of one type of heroin—“Mexican black tar.” Drawing on ethnographic, clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory data, we suggest that the chemical properties of black tar heroin promote the following safer injection practices: (1) the rinsing of syringes with water to prevent clogging; (2) the heating of cookers to promote dissolution; and (3) a rapid transition from venous injection to subcutaneous or intramuscular injections. PMID:14677781

  4. Recurrent deep venous thrombosis in an HIV-positive and injecting drug user woman.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Vitorino Modesto; Teles, Ludmila Thommen; Leão, Carlos Eduardo Silva; Lopes, Jânio Wagner Pinheiro; Fastudo, Custodio Abel; Lima, Regina Lucas Machada

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent deep venous thrombosis in a 44-year-old woman, intravenous drug user and HIV-infected, who injected cocaine in the groins and veins of the dorsum of the feet. She suffered several episodes of deep venous thrombosis and soft-tissue infections in the lower limbs. Images of Doppler ultrasound scan revealed thrombosis in the right popliteal vein with partial recanalization and calcified thrombi in the territory of the right femoral vein. After use of heparin and oral anticoagulation, her clinical evolution was uneventful, and she was asymptomatic at the occasion of the hospital discharge. This report calls for better awareness about injections in the groins and superficial femoral veins, which are part of the deep venous system. Thrombosis related to HIV infection is highlighted. PMID:22529454

  5. Topological and Historical Considerations for Infectious Disease Transmission among Injecting Drug Users in Bushwick, Brooklyn (USA).

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Kirk; Curtis, Richard; Friedman, Samuel; Khan, Bilal

    2013-03-01

    Recent interest by physicists in social networks and disease transmission factors has prompted debate over the topology of degree distributions in sexual networks. Social network researchers have been critical of "scale-free" Barabasi-Albert approaches, and largely rejected the preferential attachment, "rich-get-richer" assumptions that underlie that model. Instead, research on sexual networks has pointed to the importance of homophily and local sexual norms in dictating degree distributions, and thus disease transmission thresholds. Injecting Drug User (IDU) network topologies may differ from the emerging models of sexual networks, however. Degree distribution analysis of a Brooklyn, NY, IDU network indicates a different topology than the spanning tree configurations discussed for sexual networks, instead featuring comparatively short cycles and high concurrency. Our findings suggest that IDU networks do in some ways conform to a "scale-free" topology, and thus may represent "reservoirs" of potential infection despite seemingly low transmission thresholds. PMID:24672745

  6. Puerto Rican drug users experiences of physical and sexual abuse: comparisons based on sexual identities.

    PubMed

    Finlinson, H Ann; Robles, Rafaela R; Cólón, Héctor M; Soto López, Mayra; del Carmen Negrón, María; Oliver-Vélez, Denise; Deren, Sherry; Andía, Jonny F; Cant, John G H

    2003-08-01

    This study integrates the results of quantitative and qualitative methods to elucidate the association between sexual identity and physical and sexual abuse among Puerto Rican drug users. A structured questionnaire was administered to 800 subjects in New York and 399 in Puerto Rico. A total of 93 subjects (7.9%) self-identified as homosexual or bisexual. Gay males were significantly more likely than heterosexual males to report first occurrence of physical abuse by a family member in childhood. Both gay and bisexual males were more likely than their heterosexual counterparts to report first experiencing unwanted sex in childhood and intimate partner physical abuse later in life. Lesbians were more likely than female heterosexuals to report unwanted sex in childhood. Qualitative data were collected through in-depth life histories with 21 subjects and suggest that gay and lesbian subjects perceive antihomosexual prejudice on the part of family members as one cause of childhood physical and sexual abuse. PMID:14533022

  7. Changes in sexual and drug-related risk behavior following antiretroviral therapy initiation among HIV-infected injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tsung-chieh; Westergaard, Ryan P.; Lau, Bryan; Celentano, David D.; Vlahov, David; Mehta, Shruti H.; Kirk, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether HAART is associated with subsequent sexual and drug-related risk behavior compensation among injection drug users (IDUs). Design A community-based cohort study of 362 HIV-infected IDUs initiating HAART in Baltimore, Maryland. Methods HAART use and risk behavior was assessed at 8316 biannual study visits (median 23). Using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), we examined the effect of HAART initiation on changes in risk behavior while adjusting for sociodemographics, alcohol use, CD4+ cell count, year of initiation and consistency of HAART use. Results At HAART initiation, participants were a median of 44.4 years old, 71.3% men and 95.3% African–American. In multivariable analysis, HAART initiation was associated with a 75% reduction in the likelihood of unprotected sex [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.19–0.32] despite no change in overall sexual activity (aOR 0.95; 0.80–1.12). Odds of any injecting decreased by 38% (aOR 0.62; 0.51–0.75) after HAART initiation. Among the subset of persistent injectors, needle-sharing increased nearly two-fold (aOR 1.99; 1.57–2.52). Behavioral changes were sustained for more than 5 years after HAART initiation and did not differ by consistency of HAART use. Reporting specific high-risk behaviors in the year prior to initiation was a robust predictor of engaging in those behaviors subsequent to HAART. Conclusion Overall, substantial declines in sexual risk-taking and active injecting argue against significant behavioral compensation among IDUs following HAART initiation. These data also provide evidence to support identifying persons with risky pre-HAART behavior for targeted behavioral intervention. PMID:23079804

  8. [Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing among injecting drug users].

    PubMed

    Gyarmathy, V Anna; Rácz, József

    2011-01-23

    In Hungary, there is a need for widely accessible HIV and HCV testing and counseling for injecting drug users. Theoretically, free and confidential rapid HIV and HCV testing would be the most suitable for this purpose. Low threshold agencies, such as needle and syringe programs, would provide ideal premises for such a testing system, Here, participants would be able to undergo regular testing every six months. Making rapid testing widely available raises the following three main issues: 1. validity of the testing results (or: the verification of positive rapid test results), 2. circumstances of taking blood (or: legislation regarding drawing blood), and 3. cost effectiveness (or: how important is it to prevent an HIV epidemic). The authors propose the establishment of a system that offers screening using rapid tests and which would be an expansion of a currently existing system of HIV and HCV testing based on finger prick blood. The current system would thus serve as a means to verify the results of the rapid tests. At the same time, there is a need to obtain permission from a public health body to enable in needle and syringe programs the provision of rapid testing and testing of blood using finger pricks. In many countries, test results are given to injecting drug users not by doctors but by trained social workers - such a system could also be established in Hungary. If preventing an HIV epidemic in Hungary is a priority, then wide access to rapid HIV testing is justified. Widely accessible free and confidential rapid HIV and HCV testing and counseling - combined with screening and verification using finger prick blood - may function not only as a testing and counseling service but also as a good quality public health monitoring system. Such a system, however, requires regular financial support from the government. PMID:21224188

  9. Molecular characterization of hepatitis C virus core region in moroccan intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Trimbitas, Roxana-Delia; Fayssel, Naouar; Serghini, Fatima-Zahra; Wakrim, Lahcen; Khyatti, Meriem; Essalhi, Mohammed; Bellefquih, Abdelkrim Meziane; Benani, Abdelouaheb

    2016-08-01

    Intravenous drug users (IDUs) represent a highly-infected reservoir for Hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, harboring some of the most elevated prevalences and majority of the epidemic in developed nations. Studies aimed at sequencing regions of the viral genome uncovered amino acid mutations, some of which have been implicated in resistance to standard of care pegylated interferon/Ribavirin double therapy. Using the nested PCR method on the Core region of HCV strains in Moroccan IDUs living in the Tangier region this study sought to identify genotype-specific amino acid mutations, followed by Phylogenetic methods in order to compare them with international strains so as to identify sequences of highest homology. Genotyping was confirmed and recombination events excluded by line-probe assay. Italy was found most homologous for genotypes 1a and 3a, Iran for genotype 1a and Egypt for genotype 4a. Amino Acid Mutation analysis revealed the following novel genotype 3a-specific mutations: N16I, L36V, T49A, P71S, T75S, and T110N. The outcome of this work describes the HCV genetic heterogeneity in high-risk intravenous drug users, and it gives clues to the global migratory flow of genotypes as they cross geographical boundaries between various IDU populations and identifies "signature" amino acid mutations traceable to HCV genotype 3a. Identification of key amino acid positions in the HCV Core region with higher rates of mutations paves the way for eventual clinical trials seeking to establish a link between these recurrent mutations and response to standard of care Interferon and Ribavirin antiviral therapy. J. Med. Virol. 88:1376-1383, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754854

  10. Behavior Change and Health-Related Interventions for Heterosexual Risk Reduction Among Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    SEMAAN, SALAAM; JARLAIS, DON C. DES; MALOW, ROB

    2007-01-01

    Prevention of heterosexual transmission of HIV between and from drug users is important for controlling the local and global HIV heterosexual epidemic. Sex risk reduction interventions and health-related interventions are important for reducing the sex risk behaviors of drug users. Sex risk reduction interventions address individual-level, peer-level, and structural-level determinants of risk reduction. Health-related interventions include HIV counseling and testing, prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, and delivery of highly active antiretroviral therapy. It is important to adapt effective interventions implemented in resource-rich countries to the realities of the resource-constrained settings and to address relevant contextual factors. RESUMEN Il est important de prévenir la transmission hétérosexuelle du VIH à partir des usagers de drogue pour contrôler l’épidémie hétérosexuelle locale et mondiale de VIH. Des interventions ciblant à la fois la réduction de risque sexuel et la santé des usagers de drogue sont nécessaires. Les interventions de réduction de risque sexuel prennent en compte le niveau individuel, le niveau des pairs et celui des déterminants structurels de la réduction des risques. Les interventions visant l’amélioration de la santé comprennent le conseil et le dépistage du VIH, la prévention et le traitement des infections sexuellement transmissibles et la prescription d’antirétroviraux. Il est important d’adapter les interventions efficaces mises en place dans les pays riches aux réalités des contextes de pays à ressources limitées et de tenir compte des facteurs contextuels pertinents. PMID:17002987

  11. Use of synthetic cathinones and cannabimimetics among injection drug users in San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karla D.; Armenta, Richard F.; Roth, Alexis M.; Maxwell, Jane C.; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of synthetic cathinones (SC) and cannabimimetics (i.e., “THC homologues” [TH]) is associated with adverse health effects. We investigated the epidemiology of synthetic drug use among a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Diego, California. Methods We used logistic regression analysis to identify correlates of SC and TH use among 485 IDUs enrolled from June 2012 to September 2013. Results Seven percent of participants reported ever using SC and 30% reported ever using TH. In multivariate logistic regression, age and recent hospitalization were significantly associated with odds of SC use (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 0.93, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 0.90, 0.97; and AOR 2.34 95% C.I. 1.00, 5.49, respectively) and TH use (AOR 0.96, 95% C.I. 0.94, 0.98; and AOR 2.62, 95% C.I. 1.47, 4.68, respectively). Use of methamphetamine (AOR 9.35, 95% C.I. 1.20, 72.79) and club drugs in the past six months (AOR 3.38, 95% C.I. 1.17, 9.76) were significantly associated with SC use. Being on probation/parole (AOR 2.42, 95% C.I. 1.44,4.07), initiating injection drug use with stimulants (AOR 1.89 95% C.I. 1.13, 3.16), and past six-month marijuana (AOR 9.22, 95% C.I. 4.49, 18.96) and prescription drug use (AOR 1.98, 95% C.I. 1.20, 3.27) were significantly associated with TH use. Conclusions A considerable proportion of IDU use synthetic drugs and may experience harms associated with their use. Findings have implications for criminal justice system management. Prevention efforts should emphasize the risks associated with rapidly changing synthetic formulations, and the potential harms associated with polydrug use. PMID:24916748

  12. A Pressing Need for Pharmacotherapy Development to Treat Drug Addiction: An Editorial from a Legal Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andraka-Christou, B

    2016-01-01

    Only three FDA-approved pharmacological treatments exist for treating opiate dependence, all of which are underprescribed and underused. No FDA-approved pharmacological treatments exist for cocaine or methamphetamine dependence. More evidence-based, FDA-approved treatments are needed for treating drug dependence, but pharmaceutical companies are unlikely to pursue such research without government incentives. Today pharmaceutical companies primarily conduct research and development (R&D) related to "blockbuster" and rare diseases; drug dependence does not fall into either category. Further compounding the problem, pharmaceutical companies have been recently slashing risky areas of research, rather than adopting new areas. Fortunately, the government has a number of options to incentivize pharmaceutical R&D relating to drug dependence treatment, including the following: market exclusivity for new medications, tax breaks, priority review vouchers, liability reduction, and an advanced market commitment. PMID:27055610

  13. Sterile syringe access and disposal among injection drug users newly enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Jennifer; Arnsten, Julia H; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2006-01-01

    Background We sought to assess injection practices, means of acquiring and disposing of syringes, and utilization and knowledge of harm reduction resources among injection drug users (IDUs) entering methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Methods Interviews with 100 consecutive patients, including 35 IDUs, entering a MMT program in the Bronx, NY. Results Utilization of unsafe syringe sources was reported by 69% of IDUs in our sample. Most (80%) IDUs reused syringes, and syringe sharing was also common. Fewer than half knew that non-prescription pharmacy purchase of syringes was possible. The most common means of disposing of injecting equipment were the trash (63%) and syringe exchange programs (49%). Conclusions These findings indicate that drug users entering treatment under-utilize sanctioned venues to obtain sterile syringes or safely dispose of used injection equipment. Programs providing services to drug users should adopt a proactive stance to address the safety and health issues faced by injectors. PMID:16503997

  14. Correlations between compulsory drug abstinence treatments and HIV risk behaviors among injection drug users in a border city of South China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huey T; Tuner, Nannette; Chen, Charlene J; Lin, Hui-yi; Liang, Shaoling; Wang, Siven

    2013-08-01

    Compulsory drug abstinence treatments (CAT) provided by the public security system have been one of the predominant methods of addressing drug abuse and HIV risks in China. This study assessed the association between CAT and HIV risk behaviors by surveying a community sample of 613 injection drug users (IDUs) at a city located in South China. The data indicated that the great majority of the participants (89.6%) had received the institutionalized treatments an average of 4.5 times. The study found that the number of compulsory drug abstinence treatments increased IDUs' HIV/AIDS knowledge. However, other HIV-related outcomes were not encouraging. The study found that the number of compulsory drug abstinence treatments was not related to an increase in condom use. Furthermore, the frequency of compulsory drug abstinence treatments was not related to needle/syringe sharing, but was positively associated with cooker/cotton/rinse water sharing and drug solution sharing. The number of compulsory drug abstinence treatments was positively associated with HIV status. In general, this study found little support that CAT has accomplished its goal in reducing HIV risks among injection drug users in the sample. Policy implications for reforming CAT are suggested. PMID:23837811

  15. Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) in an Adolescent Treated With Lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Ginory, Almari; Chaney-Catchpole, Michelle; Demetree, Julie M; Mayol Sabatier, Laura M; Nguyen, Mathew

    2013-07-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a hypersensitivity syndrome most commonly associated with antiepileptic agents, allopurinol, and sulfonamides. It is a severe adverse reaction associated with fever, rash, eosinophilia, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. We present the case of a 17-year-old Caucasian female with bipolar disorder type II and posttraumatic stress disorder treated with lamotrigine for a non-Food and Drug Administration-approved indication that developed DRESS syndrome at an initial dose higher than that recommended. Her symptoms were atypical in that she developed a rash with influenza-like symptoms that resolved after discontinuation of lamotrigine and returned 8 days later. She was hospitalized because of elevated liver enzymes and treated with corticosteroids. In patients presenting with rash and systemic symptoms, DRESS syndrome should be considered and treated appropriately to reduce mortality, which can be as high as 10%. Treatment includes withdrawal of the offending agent and corticosteroids. PMID:24052787

  16. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Yallapu, Murali M.; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described. PMID:26635971

  17. Examining the relationship between ethnicity and the use of drug-related services: an ethnographic study of Nepali drug users in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wai-Man

    2014-01-01

    A recent survey has shown that Nepali drug users in Hong Kong tend to have a low rate of usage of day-care and residential rehabilitation services, but a high rate of usage of methadone services. Little is known about the reasons behind such a pattern. Therefore, in this study, a 12-month ethnographic examination has been implemented in three sites, including a day-care center, residential rehabilitation center, and methadone clinic, to explore the experiences of 20 Nepali drug users in their use of drug-related services in Hong Kong and to examine the relationship between ethnicity and the use of drug-related services. The result shows that the reason for this pattern of service use is related to the approach of the services and the cultural perception of the service providers about the service users. The day-care and residential rehabilitation services emphasize an integrated approach, but the staff tend to overlook the heterogeneity of their clients, for example, the differences in caste and sex, and fail to provide suitable services to them, whereas the methadone service follows a biomedical model, which seldom addresses the social characteristics of the service users, which in turn minimizes the opportunity for misunderstandings between the staff and the clients. This research shows that ethnicity is a significant factor in drug treatment and that culture-specific treatment that takes into consideration the treatment approach and the heterogeneity of the clients is strongly needed. PMID:25114609

  18. Bisexual Behavior Among Male Injection Drug Users in New York City.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Kathleen H; Neaigus, Alan; Wendel, Travis; Marshall, David M; Hagan, Holly

    2016-02-01

    Drug using men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) may be at high risk for HIV infection and transmitting HIV to sex partners. In 2012, injection drug users (IDUs) were sampled in New York City for the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance cross-sectional study using respondent-driven sampling. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %CI) to determine correlates of bisexual behavior in the past 12 months. Of 333 participants, 47(14.1 %) reported MSMW. Variables independently associated (p < 0.05) with MSMW included bisexual sexual identity (vs. "straight") (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 92.6; 95 % CI 18.9, 454.5), Bronx residence [vs. Manhattan (aOR 8.4; 95 %CI 1.6,43.7)], past 12 month behaviors of having sex with ≥3 sex partners (aOR 18.1; 95 % CI 3.3,98.4), "sold" sex (aOR 8.5; 95 % CI 2.3, 31.5), "bought" sex (aOR 0.2; 95 % CI 0.1, 0.9), and injection methamphetamine use (aOR 20.5; 95 % CI 3.0, 139.7). MSM IDUs are an important subgroup to consider for HIV interventions, as they may not be reached through HIV prevention programming aimed at MSM. PMID:26607927

  19. Reasoning deficits among illicit drug users are associated with aspects of cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Fisk, John E; Morley, Andy M; Hadjiefthyvoulou, Florentia; Montgomery, Catharine

    2014-11-01

    Deficits in deductive reasoning have been observed among ecstasy/polydrug users. The present study seeks to investigate dose-related effects of specific drugs and whether these vary with the cognitive demands of the task. One hundred and five participants (mean age 21.33, SD 3.14; 77 females, 28 males) attempted to generate solutions for eight one-model syllogisms and one syllogism for which there was no valid conclusion. All of the one-model syllogisms generated at least one valid conclusion and six generated two valid conclusions. In these six cases, one of the conclusions was classified as common and the other as non-common. The number of valid common inferences was negatively associated with the aspects of short-term cannabis use and with measures of IQ. The outcomes observed were more than simple post-intoxication effects since cannabis use in the 10 days immediately before testing was unrelated to reasoning performance. Following adjustment for multiple comparisons, the number of non-common valid inferences was not significantly associated with any of the drug-use measures. Recent cannabis use appears to impair the processes associated with generating valid common inferences while not affecting the production of non-common inferences. It is possible, therefore, that the two types of inference may recruit different executive resources, which may differ in their susceptibility to cannabis-related effects. PMID:24723099

  20. Responsibility attribution of HIV infection and coping among injection drug users in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chih-Chin; Chronister, Julie; Chou, Chih-Hung; Tan, Sooyin; Macewicz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study explored responsibility attribution (RA) of HIV/AIDS infection (i.e., how an individual perceives the cause of their HIV/AIDS infection) and its relationship to coping styles among injection drug users (IDUs) with HIV/AIDS. In addition, this study investigated whether self-esteem, social support, and religiosity mediate the relationship between RA and coping styles of IDUs with HIV/AIDS. Participants were 201 adult IDUs with HIV/AIDS participating in the National Drug Rehabilitation Center in Malaysia. Five measures were used to assess the above constructs. Cluster analysis, analysis of variance, and mediation analyses were conducted. Results of this study indicated that IDUs with HIV/AIDS in Malaysia can be classified into four homogenous attribution groups: external, fatalistic, internal, and indeterminate. Mediator analyses revealed that combination of self-esteem, social support, and religiosity mediate the relationship between RA and coping behaviors. Clinicians working with IDUs with HIV/AIDS need to address the role of RA, self-esteem, religiosity, and social support as these psychosocial constructs are linked to coping with HIV/AIDS. Future researchers should investigate whether enhancing self-esteem, social support, and religiosity can promote active problem-solving coping and reduce the use of avoidance coping behaviors. PMID:23713718

  1. Law Enforcement Practices Associated with HIV Infection Among Injection Drug Users in Odessa, Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Dvoryak, Sergey; Sung-Joon, Min; Brewster, John T.; Wendt, William W.; Corsi, Karen F.; Semerik, Oleg Y.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite HIV prevention efforts over the past 10 years in Odessa, Ukraine, HIV rates among injection drug users (IDUs) remain high. We explored whether IDUs’ experiences with the police and court system in Odessa were associated with HIV serostatus, after controlling for other factors. Qualitative methods, including semi-structured interviews with the police and members of court (N = 19), and focus groups with IDUs (N = 42), were employed to aid in developing a survey instrument for a larger quantitative phase and to assist in interpreting the findings from the quantitative phase, which included 200 participants who were interviewed and tested for HIV. Overall, 55 % tested positive for HIV. Negative experiences with the police were noted by 86 % and included having preloaded syringes taken (66 %), rushed injections due to fear of the police (57 %), police planting drugs (18 %), paying police to avoid arrest (61 %) and threatened by the police to inform on other IDUs (23 %). HIV positive participants were more likely than those who were negative to report these experiences. In a multiple logistic regression, the most significant correlate of HIV infection was rushed injections due to fear of the police. Police actions in Odessa may be contributing to the continued escalation of HIV among IDUs, underscoring the need for structural interventions. PMID:23754613

  2. Harmful microinjecting practices among a cohort of injection drug users in Vancouver Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, Beth; Lloyd-Smith, Elisa; Small, Will; Tobin, Diane; Stone, Dave; Li, Kathy; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We sought to identify factors associated with harmful microinjecting practices in a longitudinal cohort of IDU. Methods Using data from the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS) between January 2004 and December 2005, generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression was performed to examine sociodemographic and behavioral factors associated with four harmful microinjecting practices (frequent rushed injecting, frequent syringe borrowing, frequently injecting with a used water capsule, frequently injecting alone). Results In total, 620 participants were included in the present analysis. Our study included 251 (40.5%) women and 203 (32.7%) self-identified Aboriginal participants. The median age was 31.9 (interquartile range: 23.4–39.3). GEE analyses found that each harmful microinjecting practice was associated with a unique profile of sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Discussion We observed high rates of harmful microinjecting practices among IDU. The present study describes the epidemiology of harmful microinjecting practices and points to the need for strategies that target higher risk individuals including the use of peer-driven programs and drug-specific approaches in an effort to promote safer injecting practices. PMID:20509739

  3. Severe illness and death among injecting drug users in Scotland: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Hutchinson, S; Lingappa, J; Wadd, S; Ahmed, S; Gruer, L; Taylor, T H; Roy, K; Gilchrist, G; McGuigan, C; Penrice, G; Goldberg, D

    2005-04-01

    Between April and September 2000, 60 injecting drug users in Scotland died or were hospitalized with severe illness. Laboratory investigations suggested that Clostridium novyi and other bacteria were important aetiological agents. To determine associated environmental/behavioural factors a case-control study was undertaken with 19 'definite' and 32 'probable' cases in Glasgow, Scotland. For every deceased case (n=19), up to three proxy individuals were interviewed. Three controls were identified for each case. Multivariate logistic regression analyses compared (i) all cases and controls; (ii) definite cases and matched controls; (iii) probable cases and matched controls. In all three analyses injecting into muscle or skin and injecting most of the time with a filter used by someone else were the variables most strongly associated with illness. Comparing only muscle-injecting cases and controls, cases were significantly more likely to have injected larger amounts of heroin per average injection than were controls. The findings make an important epidemiological contribution to the understanding of the public health and clinical implications of the contamination of illicit drugs by histotoxic clostridia. PMID:15816144

  4. Two subtypes of HIV-1 among injection-drug users in southern China.

    PubMed

    Yu, X F; Chen, J; Shao, Y; Beyrer, C; Lai, S

    1998-04-25

    The rate of HIV-1 infection has increased steadily in China by about 80% annually and by the end of September 1997, 8277 HIV-1 cases had been reported, of whom more than 75% were IV drug users (IVDUs). UNAIDS, however, has estimated that up to 200,000 people could actually be infected with HIV-1 in China. Guangxi Province borders Yunnan province in the west and Vietnam to the south, and is a major transit area for heroin trafficking from the opium-growing region of Laos and Myanmar. Phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 env sequences (C2-V3) obtained from 14 IVDUs found that 9 subjects from Pingxiang City were infected with subtype E and 5 from Baise City with subtype C. The 9 subtype E and 5 subtype C HIV-1 sequences were clustered together within each group, with significant bootstrap values of 100% and 95%, respectively. The subtype E sequences were more closely related to HIV-1 subtype E from Thailand than to those from Africa, and the subtype C sequences were clustered more closely to those from India than to those from Africa. Study results suggest 2 epidemiologically unrelated epidemics and 2 different sources; subtype C probably transmitted from Yunnan to Baise City through drug trafficking and IVDU interaction, and subtype E coming into China from Vietnam. PMID:9643749

  5. Weight loss associated with HIV seroconversion among injection-drug users.

    PubMed

    Marmor, M; Titus, S; Harrison, C; Cord-Cruz, E A; Shore, R E; Vogler, M; Krasinski, K; Mildvan, D; Des Jarlais, D C

    1996-08-15

    To describe symptoms associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroconversion, we studied a cohort of 366 injection-drug users (IDUs) with a study design that included recall every 3 months to collect symptom histories using a structured questionnaire. Eleven HIV seroconversions were observed in 621.5 person years at risk (PYAR), equivalent to 1.8 seroconversions/100 PYAR. Cox regression analysis showed age < or = 35 years to be a significant risk factor for HIV seroconversion after controlling for gender, race, and the frequency of drug injection. An embedded case-control analysis then compared symptom histories of HIV seroconverters with those of age-(+/- 5 years) and visit number-matched controls who remained HIV seronegative for > or = 3 months longer than the HIV-seroconverters. Multivariate case-control analysis adjusted for injection frequency yielded significant associations of HIV seroconversion with histories of weight loss > or = 4.5 kg (seven of 11 cases; odds ratio [OR] = 11.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1, 43.1) and oral ulcers (three of 11 cases; OR = 7.6, 95% CI = 1.2, 48.2) in the 3 months before the subjects' first HIV-seropositive study visit. We conclude that histories of recent symptoms reported by HIV-seroconverting IDUs differ from those reported by non-HIV-seroconverting IDUs, and weight loss may be particularly common among IDUs experiencing primary HIV infection. PMID:8757430

  6. OxyContin® as currency: OxyContin® use and increased social capital among rural Appalachian drug users.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Adam B; Young, April M; Oser, Carrie B; Leukefeld, Carl G; Havens, Jennifer R

    2012-05-01

    Studies have shown that position within networks of social relations can have direct implications on the health behaviors of individuals. The present study examines connections between drug use and individual social capital within social networks of drug users (n = 503) from rural Appalachian Kentucky, U.S.A. Respondent driven sampling was used to recruit individuals age 18 and older who had used one of the following drugs to get high: cocaine, crack, heroin, methamphetamine, or prescription opioids. Substance use was measured via self-report and social network analysis of participants' drug use network was used to compute effective size, a measure of social capital. Drug network ties were based on sociometric data on recent (past 6 month) drug co-usage. Multivariate multi-level ordinal regression was used to model the independent effect of socio-demographic and drug use characteristics on social capital. Adjusting for gender, income, and education, daily OxyContin(®) use was found to be significantly associated with greater social capital, and daily marijuana use was associated with less social capital. These results suggest that in regions with marked economic disparities such as rural Appalachia, OxyContin(®) may serve as a form of currency that is associated with increased social capital among drug users. Interventions focusing on increasing alternate pathways to acquiring social capital may be one way in which to alleviate the burden of drug use in this high-risk population. PMID:22465379

  7. OxyContin® as Currency: OxyContin® Use and Increased Social Capital among Rural Appalachian Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Adam B.; Young, April M.; Oser, Carrie B.; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Havens, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that position within networks of social relations can have direct implications on the health behaviors of individuals. The present study examines connections between drug use and individual social capital within social networks of drug users (n=503) from rural Appalachian Kentucky, U.S.A. Respondent driven sampling was used to recruit individuals age 18 and older who had used one of the following drugs to get high: cocaine, crack, heroin, methamphetamine, or prescription opioids. Substance use was measured via self-report and social network analysis of participants’ drug use network was used to compute effective size, a measure of social capital. Drug network ties were based on sociometric data on recent (past 6 month) drug co-usage. Multivariate multi-level ordinal regression was used to model the independent effect of sociodemographic and drug use characteristics on social capital. Adjusting for gender, income, and education, daily OxyContin® use was found to be significantly associated with greater social capital, and daily marijuana use was associated with less social capital. These results suggest that in regions with marked economic disparities such as rural Appalachia, OxyContin® may serve as a form of currency that is associated with increased social capital among drug users. Interventions focusing on increasing alternate pathways to acquiring social capital may be one way in which to alleviate the burden of drug use in this high-risk population. PMID:22465379

  8. Drug interactions with the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)--Part 2: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between AEDs and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2013-12-01

    Since antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed to treat various non-epilepsy-related disorders in addition to the fact that patients with epilepsy may develop concurrent disorders that will need treatment, the propensity for AEDs to interact with non-AEDs is considerable and indeed can present a difficult clinical problem. The present review details the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that have been reported to occur with the new AEDs (eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, retigabine (ezogabine), rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide) and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders. Interaction study details are described, as necessary, so as to allow the reader to take a view as to the possible clinical significance of particular interactions. Pharmacokinetic interactions relate to hepatic enzyme induction or inhibition and involved a variety of drugs including psychoactive drugs, cardioactive drugs, oral contraceptives, antituberculous agents, analgesics and antineoplastic drugs. A total of 68 pharmacokinetic interactions have been described, with lamotrigine (n = 22), topiramate (n = 18) and oxcarbazepine (n = 7) being associated with most, whilst lacosamide, pregabalin, stiripentol and vigabatrin are associated with none. Overall, only three pharmacodynamic interactions have been described and occur with oxcarbazepine, perampanel and pregabalin. PMID:23794036

  9. HIV vaccine acceptability among high-risk drug users in Appalachia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A vaccine could substantially impact the HIV epidemic, but inadequate uptake is a serious concern. Unfortunately, people who use drugs, particularly those residing in rural communities, have been underrepresented in previous research on HIV vaccine acceptability. This study examined HIV vaccine acceptability among high-risk drug users in a rural community in the United States. Methods Interviewer-administered questionnaires included questions about risk behavior and attitudes toward HIV vaccination from 433 HIV-negative drug users (76% with history of injection) enrolled in a cohort study in Central Appalachia. HIV vaccine acceptability was measured on a 4-point Likert scale. Generalized linear mixed models were used to determine correlates to self-report of being “very likely” to receive a 90% effective HIV vaccine (i.e. “maximum vaccine acceptability”, or MVA). Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are reported. Results Most (91%) reported that they would accept a preventive HIV vaccine, but concerns about cost, dosing, transportation constraints, vaccine-induced seropositivity, and confidentiality were expressed. Cash incentives, oral-administration, and peer/partner encouragement were anticipated facilitators of uptake. In multivariate analysis, men were significantly less likely to report MVA (AOR: 0.33, CI: 0.21 – 0.52). MVA was more common among participants who believed that they were susceptible to HIV (AOR: 2.31, CI: 1.28 – 4.07), that an HIV vaccine would benefit them (AOR: 2.80, CI: 1.70 – 4.64), and who had positive experiential attitudes toward HIV vaccination (AOR: 1.85, CI: 1.08 – 3.17). MVA was also more common among participants who believed that others would encourage them to get vaccinated and anticipated that their behavior would be influenced by others' encouragement (AOR: 1.81, 95% 1.09 – 3.01). Conclusions To our knowledge, this study was among the first to explore and

  10. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as therapeutics to treat Rift Valley fever virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Ashwini; Bansal, Neha; Senina, Svetlana; Hooper, Idris; Lundberg, Lindsay; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gutting, Bradford; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no FDA-approved therapeutics available to treat Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. In an effort to repurpose drugs for RVFV treatment, a library of FDA-approved drugs was screened to determine their ability to inhibit RVFV. Several drugs from varying compound classes, including inhibitors of growth factor receptors, microtubule assembly/disassembly, and DNA synthesis, were found to reduce RVFV replication. The hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma drug, sorafenib, was the most effective inhibitor, being non-toxic and demonstrating inhibition of RVFV in a cell-type and virus strain independent manner. Mechanism of action studies indicated that sorafenib targets at least two stages in the virus infectious cycle, RNA synthesis and viral egress. Computational modeling studies also support this conclusion. siRNA knockdown of Raf proteins indicated that non-classical targets of sorafenib are likely important for the replication of RVFV. PMID:26217313

  11. Vietnamese-speaking injecting drug users in Melbourne: the need for harm reduction programs.

    PubMed

    Louie, R; Krouskos, D; Gonzalez, M; Crofts, N

    1998-06-01

    While research on aspects of injecting drug use (IDU), including injecting and sexual risks for HIV transmission, has been progressing in 'mainstream' Australian populations, there has been little among non-English speaking background (NESB) communities in Australia, particularly the South-East Asian communities, of which the Vietnamese is the largest. This exploratory study employed and trained peer workers to recruit and interview IDUs of Vietnamese origin in Melbourne on a wide range of subjects related to risks associated with their drug using, as an initial assessment of risk-taking behaviours for blood-borne viruses among Vietnamese-speaking IDUs. A finger-prick blood sample was taken where possible to measure antibody status to HIV, HBV and HCV. The profile which emerged was not dissimilar to that of their English-speaking counterparts prior to the benefit of currently available harm-reduction programs. A relatively isolated group whose social world often related only to other Vietnamese-speaking drug users, they were engaging in unsafe sex and unsafe injecting and were unfamiliar with procedures for cleaning injecting equipment and where they could seek out information and services, including needle exchanges. This study has identified an urgent need not only to promote currently available information and services to this group, but also to provide culturally relevant education and other harm-reduction measures needed to prevent transmission of HIV, other BBVs and STDs. The study has highlighted the lack of responsiveness of mainstream health services to the needs of Vietnamese-speaking IDUs. PMID:9659777

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Diversity among Intravenous Drug Users in Yunnan Province, Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenlong; Feng, Ruilin; Wu, Zhongxiang; Cun, Wei; Dong, Shaozhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, high proportions (15.6%–98.7%) of intravenous drug users (IDUs) in China were found to be positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Yunnan Province is located in southwestern China and borders one of the world's most important opium-producing regions, thus it is an important drug trafficking route to other regions of China. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we assessed 100 HCV-positive plasma samples from IDUs who were enrolled through the Kunming Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2012. HCV C/E1 fragments were PCR-amplified and sequenced. We identified eight HCV subtypes (1a, 1b, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6n, 6u and 6v), of which genotype 6 was most predominant (frequency, 47%) followed by genotypes 3 (41%) and 1 (12%). HCV subtypes 6n (30%) and 3b (29%) were most common and were identified in 59% of the IDUs. We compared HCV genotypes among IDUs in Yunnan Province with those from other regions and found that the distribution patterns of HCV genotypes in Yunnan Province were similar to those in southern China, but different from those in eastern China. However, the distribution patterns of HCV subtypes varied among Yunnan Province and southern China, despite the shared similar genotypes. A comparison of the current data with those previously reported showed that the frequency of HCV genotype 6 increased from 25% to 47% within 5 years, especially subtypes 6a (5% to 15%) and 6n (11.2% to 30%). In contrast, the frequencies of subtypes 3b and 1b decreased by almost 50% within 5 years. Conclusion/Significance Our results provided further information to support the assertion that drug trafficking routes influence HCV transmission patterns among IDUs in Yunnan Province. The frequency of HCV genotypes and subtypes changed rapidly among IDUs in Yunnan Province and subtypes 6a and 6n may have originated in Vietnam and Myanmar, respectively. PMID:24358211

  13. Cigarette Smoking and Quit Attempts Among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Injection drug use and cigarette smoking are major global health concerns. Limited data exist regarding cigarette smoking behavior and quit attempts among injection drug users (IDUs) in low- and middle-income countries to inform the development of cigarette smoking interventions. We conducted a cross-sectional study to describe cigarette smoking behavior and quit attempts among IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico. Methods: IDUs were recruited through community outreach and administered in-person interviews. Multivariable Poisson regression models were constructed to determine prevalence ratios (PRs) for quit attempts. Results: Of the 670 participants interviewed, 601 (89.7%) were current smokers. Of these, median number of cigarettes smoked daily was 10; 190 (31.6%) contemplated quitting smoking in the next 6 months; 132 (22.0%) had previously quit for ≥1 year; and 124 (20.6%) had made a recent quit attempt (lasting ≥1 day during the previous 6 months). In multivariable analysis, recent quit attempts were positively associated with average monthly income (≥3,500 pesos [US$280] vs. <1,500 pesos [US$120]; PR = 2.30; 95% CI = 1.57–3.36), smoking marijuana (PR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.01–2.90), and smoking heroin (PR = 1.85; 95% CI = 1.23–2.78), and they were negatively associated with number of cigarettes smoked daily (PR = 0.96; 95% CI = 0.94–0.98). Conclusions: One out of 5 IDUs attempted to quit cigarette smoking during the previous 6 months. Additional research is needed to improve the understanding of the association between drug use patterns and cigarette smoking quit attempts, including the higher rate of quit attempts observed among IDUs who smoke marijuana or heroin compared with IDUs who do not smoke these substances. PMID:23873979

  14. Injecting drug users in Scotland, 2006: Listing, number, demography, and opiate-related death-rates.

    PubMed

    King, Ruth; Bird, Sheila M; Overstall, Antony; Hay, Gordon; Hutchinson, Sharon J

    2013-06-01

    Using Bayesian capture-recapture analysis, we estimated the number of current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Scotland in 2006 from the cross-counts of 5670 IDUs listed on four data-sources: social enquiry reports (901 IDUs listed), hospital records (953), drug treatment agencies (3504), and recent Hepatitis C virus (HCV) diagnoses (827 listed as IDU-risk). Further, we accessed exact numbers of opiate-related drugs-related deaths (DRDs) in 2006 and 2007 to improve estimation of Scotland's DRD rates per 100 current IDUs. Using all four data-sources, and model-averaging of standard hierarchical log-linear models to allow for pairwise interactions between data-sources and/or demographic classifications, Scotland had an estimated 31700 IDUs in 2006 (95% credible interval: 24900-38700); but 25000 IDUs (95% CI: 20700-35000) by excluding recent HCV diagnoses whose IDU-risk can refer to past injecting. Only in the younger age-group (15-34 years) were Scotland's opiate-related DRD rates significantly lower for females than males. Older males' opiate-related DRD rate was 1.9 (1.24-2.40) per 100 current IDUs without or 1.3 (0.94-1.64) with inclusion of recent HCV diagnoses. If, indeed, Scotland had only 25000 current IDUs in 2006, with only 8200 of them aged 35+ years, the opiate-related DRD rate is higher among this older age group than has been appreciated hitherto. There is counter-balancing good news for the public health: the hitherto sharp increase in older current IDUs had stalled by 2006. PMID:23730265

  15. Rapid characterization of the biomechanical properties of drug-treated cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Chu, Henry K.; Zhang, Yang; Bai, Guohua; Wang, Kaiqun; Tan, Qiulin; Sun, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Cell mechanics is closely related to many cell functions. Recent studies have suggested that the deformability of cells can be an effective biomarker to indicate the onset and progression of diseases. In this paper, a microfluidic chip is designed for rapid characterization of the mechanics of drug-treated cells through stretching with dielectrophoresis (DEP) force. This chip was fabricated using PDMS and micro-electrodes were integrated and patterned on the ITO layer of the chip. Leukemia NB4 cells were considered and the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) drug on NB4 cells were examined via the microfluidic chip. To induce a DEP force onto the cell, a relatively weak ac voltage was utilized to immobilize a cell at one side of the electrodes. The applied voltage was then increased to 3.5 V pp and the cell started to be stretched along the applied electric field lines. The elongation of the cell was observed using an optical microscope and the results showed that both types of cells were deformed by the induced DEP force. The strain of the NB4 cell without the drug treatment was recorded to be about 0.08 (time t = 180 s) and the drug-treated NB4 cell was about 0.21 (time t = 180 s), indicating a decrease in the stiffness after drug treatment. The elastic modulus of the cell was also evaluated and the modulus changed from 140 Pa to 41 Pa after drug treatment. This microfluidic chip can provide a simple and rapid platform for measuring the change in the biomechanical properties of cells and can potentially be used as the tool to determine the biomechanical effects of different drug treatments for drug discovery and development applications.

  16. Ophthalmic drug delivery utilizing two-photon absorption: a novel approach to treat posterior capsule opacification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Träger, J.; Zorn, M.; Haberkorn, N.; Hampp, N.

    2007-07-01

    Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is the standard technique to treat cataract. Despite recent progress in surgical procedures, posterior capsule opacification is one of the sill remaining postoperative complications of cataract surgery. We present a novel strategy to reduce the incidence of posterior capsule opacification. A drug delivery polymer suitable for manufacturing intraocular lenses has been developed which enables repeated drug release in a non-invasive and controlled manner. The therapeutic molecules are attached through a UV light sensitive linkage to the polymer backbone which is mainly responsible for the optical properties of the intraocular lenses. However, UV light can not trigger the release of drug from the polymer due to the high absorption of the cornea. We developed linkers which enable drug release by two-photon absorption induced cleavage of the linker structure. Since the two-photon absorption requires high photon densities, this does not occur in ambient light conditions in daily life, but is easily triggered by focused laser beams from a pulsed laser. In this proof-of-principle study we have employed a cyclobutane type linker and investigated the properties of the therapeutic system with the approved drugs 5-fluorouracil and chlorambucil. The controlled drug delivery was successfully demonstrated in vitro and additional cell tests confirmed that the device itself shows no cytotoxicity until photochemical activation. This presented concept can provide a powerful method in ophthalmic drug delivery.

  17. Behavioral risk reduction in a declining HIV epidemic: injection drug users in New York City, 1990-1997.

    PubMed Central

    Des Jarlais, C; Perlis, T; Friedman, S R; Chapman, T; Kwok, J; Rockwell, R; Paone, D; Milliken, J; Monterroso, E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed trends in HIV risk behaviors among injection drug users in New York City from 1990 to 1997. METHODS: Injection drug users were recruited continuously from a large drug detoxification treatment program (N = 2588) and a research storefront located in a high-drug-use area (N = 2701). Informed consent was obtained, and a trained interviewer administered a structured interview covering sociodemographics, drug use history, HIV risk behavior, and participation in syringe exchange. RESULTS: Trends were assessed for 5 risk behaviors in the 6-month period before the interview. The 3 injection risk behaviors declined significantly over time at each site (all P < .01). When data were pooled across sites, all 5 risk behaviors declined significantly over time (all P < .01). Participation in syringe exchange programs and in HIV counseling and testing increased greatly from 1990 to 1997. CONCLUSIONS: The continuing risk reduction among injection drug users indicates a "declining phase" in the large HIV epidemic in New York City. HIV prevention programs appear to be making an important contribution to the declining phase. PMID:10897190

  18. Polymer nanoparticles for drug and small silencing RNA delivery to treat cancers of different phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided powerful and efficient tools in development of cancer diagnosis and therapy. There are numerous nanocarriers that are currently approved for clinical use in cancer therapy. In recent years, biodegradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted a considerable attention for their ability to function as a possible carrier for target-specific delivery of various drugs, genes, proteins, peptides, vaccines, and other biomolecules in humans without much toxicity. This review will specifically focus on the recent advances in polymer-based nanocarriers for various drugs and small silencing RNA’s loading and delivery to treat different types of cancer. PMID:23996830

  19. Multiple Drug-Use Patterns Among a Group of High School Students: Regular Users vs. Nonusers of Specific Drug Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.; Seehafer, Roger W.

    1976-01-01

    Although no cause-effect relationship can be shown, regular drug use seems to predispose one to further drug experimentation and use, while non-use of a particular drug seems to predispose one to non-use of other drugs. (Author/MB)

  20. Prescription Opioid Misuse and Mental Health Among Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Mackesy-Amiti, Mary E.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Ouellet, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prescription opioid (PO) misuse is a significant concern in the United States. Objectives This study describes the prevalence and timing of PO misuse, diagnoses of opiate abuse and dependence, and their associations with psychiatric disorders in a sample of young people who inject drugs (PWID). Methods Participants were 570 young (18–25 years) PWID, primarily heroin users, recruited through outreach and respondent-driven sampling. Trained interviewers administered a semi-structured psychiatric interview. Diagnoses of substance use and mental disorders were based on DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Results Estimated rates of lifetime PO abuse and dependence were 19% and 17% respectively. Past year PO misuse was significantly associated with anti-social personality disorder (ASPD, OR = 2.15, 95% CI 1.43–3.24), past year substance-induced major depression (SIMD, OR = 1.81, 95% CI 1.16–2.83), and prior post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, OR = 2.45, 95% CI 1.31–4.60). Among male PO users, PTSD was a significant predictor of PO abuse (prior, OR = 7.62, 95% CI 2.16–26.88; past year, OR = 21.67 95% CI 2.46–190.75), and dependence (prior, OR = 4.82, 95% CI 1.48–15.67; past year, OR = 9.65, 95% CI 1.75–53.32). Conclusion Among young PWID, PTSD is a significant risk factor for PO misuse for both men and women, and men with PTSD are in addition at increased risk for PO abuse and dependence. These findings have implications for harm reduction and substance abuse prevention efforts. PMID:25105884

  1. Natural Products as Tools for Neuroscience: Discovery and Development of Novel Agents to Treat Drug Abuse⊥

    PubMed Central

    Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Much of what we know about the neurosciences is the direct result of studying psychoactive natural products. Unfortunately, there are many gaps in our understanding of the basic biological processes that contribute to the etiology of many CNS disorders. The investigation of psychoactive natural products offers an excellent approach to identify novel agents to treat CNS disorders and to find new chemical tools to better elucidate their biological mechanisms. This review will detail recent progress in a program directed towards investigating psychoactive natural products with the goal of treating drug abuse by targeting κ opioid receptors. PMID:19099466

  2. Is urine an alternative to cosmetically treated hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol?

    PubMed

    Agius, Ronald; Dufaux, Bertin; Kahl, Hans-Gerhard; Nadulski, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    This study attempts to assess the utility of the urine matrix as an alternative to cosmetically treated hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol for driving licence re-granting in 1026 cosmetically treated hair samples and 33 262 urine routine samples. No significant difference was observed between the percentage positive samples in cosmetically treated hair to those in urine at both the 95% and 99% significance level for amphetamines, cocaine, opiates, benzodiazepines, and methadone. Significant difference was found between the positivity rates of cannabinoids in cosmetically treated hair and that in urine indicating urine to be a better alternative to the use of the hair matrix even when cosmetically treated. The opposite was observed for the alcohol consumption marker ethyl glucuronide (EtG) for which the positivity rate in cosmetically treated hair was twice that in urine samples. Particularly for alcohol abstinence monitoring, as for the rehabilitative driving licence re-granting medical and psychological assessment (MPA) programme in Germany, it seems that ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in hair presents a much better alternative than urine testing, even when cosmetically treated hair is analyzed. Moreover, segmentation is an additional advantage of hair testing which can provide additional useful information. PMID:24817057

  3. [Epidemiology of hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus infections among injecting drug users in Hungary--what's next?].

    PubMed

    Gyarmathy, V Anna; Rácz, József

    2010-03-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) is currently about 35% among injecting drug users in Budapest, Hungary, and it is under 20% outside of the capital, and no verified case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been detected so far. Mathematical models describe that the co-occurrence of HIV and HCV among injecting drug users is such under an HCV prevalence of about 35% the probability of an HIV epidemic is low, but above this threshold an, HIV epidemic is to be expected. According to these models, there is a looming probability of an HIV epidemic among injecting drug users in Hungary, especially in Budapest. There are four ways to prevent or delay such an epidemic: 1. substitution treatment programs; 2. legal access to injecting equipment; 3. free and confidential HIV and HCV counseling and rapid testing; and 4. hygienic injecting environment. In order to avoid a predicted HIV epidemic, epidemiological pattern of HCV among injecting drug users in Hungary requires both a comprehensive prevention response and the systematic monitoring of the epidemiological situation. The success of the prevention programs depends on two factors: 1. wide access; and 2. regular financial support from the government. PMID:20178967

  4. Peer Norms and Sharing of Injection Paraphernalia among Puerto Rican Injection Drug Users in New York and Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andia, Jonny F.; Deren, Sherry; Robles, Rafaela R.; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Colon, Hector M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the influence of peer norms on sharing of injection paraphernalia (e.g., indirect sharing behaviors, including sharing of cookers, cotton, rinse water and back/front loading) among Puerto Rican injection drug users (IDUs) in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, and East Harlem, New York City. Data were collected from 873 Puerto Rican IDUs…

  5. HIV incidence among injection drug users in New York City, 1992-1997: evidence for a declining epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    Des Jarlais, D C; Marmor, M; Friedmann, P; Titus, S; Aviles, E; Deren, S; Torian, L; Glebatis, D; Murrill, C; Monterroso, E; Friedman, S R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed recent (1992-1997) HIV incidence in the large HIV epidemic among injection drug users in New York City. METHODS: Data were compiled from 10 separate studies (N = 4979), including 6 cohort studies, 2 "repeat service user" studies, and 2 analyses of voluntary HIV testing and counseling services within drug treatment programs. RESULTS: In the 10 studies, 52 seroconversions were found in 6344 person-years at risk. The observed incidence rates among the 10 studies were all within a narrow range, from 0 per 100 person-years at risk to 2.96 per 100 person-years at risk. In 9 of the 10 studies, the observed incidence rate was less than 2 per 100 person-years at risk. The weighted average incidence rate was 0.7 per 100 person-years at risk. CONCLUSIONS: The recent incidence rate in New York City is quite low for a high-seroprevalence population of injection drug users. The very large HIV epidemic among injection drug users in New York City appears to have entered a "declining phase," characterized by low incidence and declining prevalence. The data suggest that very large high-seroprevalence HIV epidemics may be "reversed." PMID:10705851

  6. Community Impact of Pharmacy-Randomized Intervention to Improve Access to Syringes and Services for Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In an effort to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), New York State deregulated pharmacy syringe sales in 2001 through the Expanded Syringe Access Program by removing the requirement of a prescription. With evidence suggesting pharmacists' ability to expand their public health role, a structural,…

  7. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV…

  8. Cutaneous abscess due to Eubacterium lentum in injection drug user: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Emanuela; Zorzi, Antonella; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Antolini, Dario; Fontana, Roberta; Vento, Sandro; Concia, Ercole

    2005-08-01

    We described the first case, to the best of our knowledge, of cutaneous abscess due to Eubacterium lentum in a parenteral drug user, after complete fracture of the right femor. The case underlines the importance of carefully performed microbiological tests, due to the peculiar cultural needs of the micro-organism. PMID:16038756

  9. The Effects of 16 Hour Long Marathon Groups on the Ways that Female Drug Users Perceive Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of three 16-hour-long unstructured marathon groups composed of female illicit drug users in a woman's prison (N=78), using evaluative adjective pairs of the semantic differential concept Women. Marathon groups rated women as more successful and more pleasurable than did controls. (JAC)

  10. What Affects Reintegration of Female Drug Users after Prison Release? Results of a European Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurhold, Heike; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Sanclemente, Cristina; Schmied, Gabriele; Shewan, David; Verthein, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this follow-up study is to explore factors influencing the success or failure of women in reintegrating after their release from prison. Female drug users in five European cities were tracked after being released from prison. Out of 234 female prisoners contacted in prisons, 59 were included in the follow-up study. Structured…

  11. HIV Risk in Intravenous Drug Users and Crack Cocaine Smokers: Predicting Stage of Change for Condom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Anne M.; Trotter, Robert, II

    1995-01-01

    Expanded the applicability of stage models to the reduction of HIV-risk behaviors. Distributed not-in-treatment crack cocaine smokers and intravenous drug users across three levels of intention to change, which revealed that benefits of change and condom assertiveness varied across the stages of change. Discusses other findings. (RJM)

  12. Neighborhood History as a Factor Shaping Syringe Distribution Networks Among Drug Users at a U.S. Syringe Exchange1

    PubMed Central

    Braine, Naomi; Acker, Caroline; Goldblatt, Cullen; Yi, Huso; Friedman, Samuel; DesJarlais, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the US, high-visibility drug markets are concentrated in neighborhoods with few economic opportunities, while drug buyers/users are widely dispersed. A study of Pittsburgh Syringe Exchange participants provides data on travel between and network linkages across neighborhoods with different levels of drug activity. There are distinct racial patterns to syringe distribution activity within networks and across neighborhoods. Pittsburgh’s history suggests these patterns emerge from historical patterns of social and economic development. Study data demonstrate the ability of IDUs to form long term social ties across racial and geographic boundaries and use them to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. PMID:19578475

  13. Frequency and structure of stimulant designer drug consumption among suspected drug users in Budapest and South-East Hungary in 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Institóris, László; Árok, Zsófia; Seprenyi, Katalin; Varga, Tibor; Sára-Klausz, Gabriella; Keller, Éva; Tóth, Réka A; Sala, Leonardo; Kereszty, Éva; Róna, Kálmán

    2015-03-01

    Identification of abuse and frequency patterns of stimulant designer drugs (SDDs) provides important information for their risk assessment and legislative control. In the present study urine and/or blood samples of suspected drug users in criminal cases were analysed by GC-MS for 38 SDDs, and for the most frequent illicit and psychoactive licit drugs in Hungary. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 2744 suspected drug users were sampled in Budapest and during 2012 and 2013, 774 persons were sampled in South-East Hungary (Csongrád County - neighbour the Romanian and Serbian borders). In Budapest 71.4% of cases, and in South-East Hungary 61% of cases were positive for at least one substance. Pentedrone was the most frequent SDD in both regions; however, the frequency distribution of the remaining drugs was highly diverse. SDDs were frequently present in combination with other drugs - generally with amphetamine or other stimulants, cannabis and/or benzodiazepines. The quarterly distribution of positive samples indicated remarkable seasonal changes in the frequency and pattern of consumption. Substances placed on the list of illicit drugs (mephedrone, 4-fluoro-amphetamine, MDPV, methylone, 4-MEC) showed a subsequent drop in frequency and were replaced by other SDDs (pentedrone, 3-MMC, methiopropamine, etc.). Newly identified compounds from seized materials were added to the list of new psychoactive substances ("Schedule C"). While the risk assessment of substances listed in Schedule C has to be performed within 2 years after scheduling, continuous monitoring of their presence and frequency among drug users is essential. In summary, our results suggest which substances should be dropped from the list of SDDs measured in biological samples; while the appearance of new substances from seized materials indicate the need for developing adequate standard analytical methods. PMID:25671307

  14. Developing a Brief Scale to Measure HIV Transmission Risk Among Injecting Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Shahesmaeili, Armita; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Soori, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main concerns of policymakers is to measure the impact of harm reduction programs and different interventions on the risk of HIV transmission among Injecting Drug Users (IDUs). Looking simultaneously at multiple factors and conditions that affect the risk of HIV transmission may provide policymakers a better insight into the mixed nature of HIV transmission. Objectives: The present study aimed to design a simple, brief, and multi-dimensional scale for measuring HIV transmission risk among IDUs. Patients and Methods: From October 2013 to March 2014, we conducted face-to-face interviews with 147 IDUs. Eligible participants were individuals 18 years or older who had injected drugs at least once during the last year and had not participated in similar studies within the 2 months before the interview. To design a scale for measuring HIV transmission risk, we specified 11 items, which address different dimensions of HIV risk taking behaviors/situations based on experts’ opinion. We applied exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with principal component extraction to develop scales. Eigen values greater than 1 were used as a criterion for factor extraction. Results: We extracted 7 items based on first factor, which were accounted for 21% of the variations. The final scale contained 7 items: 4 items were related to injecting practice and 3 items related to sexual behaviors. The Cronbach’s α coefficient was 0.66, acceptable for such a brief scale. Conclusions: Applying a simple and brief scale that incorporates the different dimensions of HIV transmission risk may provide policymakers and harm reductionists with a better understanding of HIV transmission in this key group and may be advantageous for evaluating intervention programs. PMID:26870713

  15. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus infection among injecting drug users in Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, N; Jolley, D; Kaldor, J; van Beek, I; Wodak, A

    1997-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To review the epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Australia, and consider needs for further research and prevention policies and programmes. DESIGN: (1) Review of the results of surveillance for HCV; (2) review of published literature on prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for HCV among IDUs; and (3) reconstruction of incidence rates from prevalence studies of HCV in IDUs. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Field and clinic based studies of IDUs in Australia. MAIN RESULTS: HCV has been present at high prevalences (of the order of 60-70%) in populations of Australian IDUs since at least 1971. Duration of injecting and main drug injected were the main predictors of seropositivity, the latter possibly a surrogate for frequency of injecting and both together as surrogate for cumulative numbers of times injected. Risk of infection begins with first injection and continues as long as injecting does. Current incidence is approximately 15 per 100 person years, and up to 40 per 100 person years in some subpopulations. Incidence may have decreased through the 1980s as a result of behaviour change in relation to HIV, as it has for hepatitis B, but not significantly so. CONCLUSIONS: Control of HCV infection in Australia will depend on effectiveness of measures to control HCV spread among IDUs. This will be a greater challenge than the control of HIV in this population has been. Needs identified include improved surveillance, especially for recently acquired infection, better understanding of exact transmission modes, and urgent improvement in prevention strategies. PMID:9519134

  16. Expanded syringe exchange programs and reduced HIV infection among new injection drug users in Tallinn, Estonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Estonia has experienced an HIV epidemic among intravenous drug users (IDUs) with the highest per capita HIV prevalence in Eastern Europe. We assessed the effects of expanded syringe exchange programs (SEP) in the capital city, Tallinn, which has an estimated 10,000 IDUs. Methods SEP implementation was monitored with data from the Estonian National Institute for Health Development. Respondent driven sampling (RDS) interview surveys with HIV testing were conducted in Tallinn in 2005, 2007 and 2009 (involving 350, 350 and 327 IDUs respectively). HIV incidence among new injectors (those injecting for < = 3 years) was estimated by assuming (1) new injectors were HIV seronegative when they began injecting, and (2) HIV infection occurred at the midpoint between first injection and time of interview. Results SEP increased from 230,000 syringes exchanged in 2005 to 440,000 in 2007 and 770,000 in 2009. In all three surveys, IDUs were predominantly male (80%), ethnic Russians (>80%), and young adults (mean ages 24 to 27 years). The proportion of new injectors decreased significantly over the years (from 21% in 2005 to 12% in 2009, p = 0.005). HIV prevalence among all respondents stabilized at slightly over 50% (54% in 2005, 55% in 2007, 51% in 2009), and decreased among new injectors (34% in 2005, 16% in 2009, p = 0.046). Estimated HIV incidence among new injectors decreased significantly from 18/100 person-years in 2005 and 21/100 person-years in 2007 to 9/100 person-years in 2009 (p = 0.026). Conclusions In Estonia, a transitional country, a decrease in the HIV prevalence among new injectors and in the numbers of people initiating injection drug use coincided with implementation of large-scale SEPs. Further reductions in HIV transmission among IDUs are still required. Provision of 70 or more syringes per IDU per year may be needed before significant reductions in HIV incidence occur. PMID:21718469

  17. Respondent-driven sampling in a study of drug users in New York City: notes from the field.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Courtney; Des Jarlais, Don; Bramson, Heidi; Tower, Lisa; Abdul-Quader, Abu S; Nemeth, Chris; Heckathorn, Douglas

    2006-11-01

    Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations, police and community relations, and the overall lessons we learned. Project staff recruited eight seeds from a syringe exchange in Lower Manhattan to serve as the initial study participants. Upon completion of the interview that lasted approximately 1 h and a blood draw, each seed was given three coupons to recruit three drug users into the study. Each of the subsequent eligible participants was also given three coupons to recruit three of their drug-using acquaintances. Eligible participants had to have: injected, smoked or snorted an illicit drug in the last 6 months (other than marijuana), aged 18 or older, adequate English language knowledge to permit informed consent and complete questionnaire. From April to July 2004, 618 drug users were interviewed, including 263 (43%) current injectors, 119 (19%) former injectors, and 236 (38%) never injectors. Four hundred sixty nine (76%) participants were men, 147 (24%) were women, and two (<1%) were transgender. By race/ethnicity, 285 (46%) were black, 218 (35%) Hispanic, 88 (14%) white, 23 (4%) mixed/not specified, and four (<1%) native American. Interviews were initially done on a drop-in basis but this system changed to appointments 1 month into the study due to the large volume of subjects coming in for interviews. Data collection was originally proposed to last for 1 year with a target recruitment of 500 drug users. Utilizing RDS, we were able to recruit and interview 118 more drug users than originally proposed in one quarter of the time. RDS was efficient with respect to time and economics (we did not have to hire an outreach worker) and

  18. DRESS Syndrome in the ICU: When a Patient Is Treated with Multiple Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Prothet, Johanne; Blaise, Benjamin J.; Ben Said, Benoit; Page, Mathieu; Ber, Charles-Eric; Crozon, Jullien; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is life-threatening. It associates a skin condition with hematological and visceral disorders. The DRESS syndrome diagnosis in the intensive care unit (ICU) is difficult as clinical features are nonspecific. Furthermore, the need to treat patients with multiple drugs usually prevents the identification of the causative drug. We report the case of a patient who developed two bouts of DRESS caused by piperacillin-tazobactam, the first being complicated with a distributive shock. Cases of DRESS occurring inside ICU are seldom reported. However, any intensivist may encounter this situation during his career and should be aware of its diagnostic and management specific aspects. PMID:26904309

  19. 'Workers', 'clients' and the struggle over needs: understanding encounters between service providers and injecting drug users in an Australian city.

    PubMed

    Moore, David

    2009-03-01

    A feature of contemporary Western, neo-liberal democracies is the frequent interaction between representatives of health and social services and the members of stigmatised and 'unruly' populations, such as injecting drug users. Previous research on drugs has tended to ignore the power relations and cultural dynamics at work in these encounters, and the ways in which they are framed by the wider neo-liberal context. Drawing on an ethnography of street-based heroin use in Melbourne, Australia's second largest city, I show how the discourses of both service providers and injecting drug users draw on wider neo-liberal values of independence, autonomy, rationality and responsibility. Service providers negotiate a framework of needs interpretation that creates and reproduces professional identities, and maintains boundaries between 'workers' and 'clients'. It also includes tensions around the definition of injecting drug users as 'chaotic' (i.e., failed neo-liberal) subjects, and slippage between service philosophies that emphasise a social model of health and forms of service delivery that emphasise the production of responsibilised subjects. For their part, street-based injectors construct an alternative framework of needs interpretation that emphasises their self-reliance, autonomy and independence, attributes and capacities largely denied them in service-provider discourse. In encounters with service providers, street-based injectors respond in various ways that include elements of resistance, strategic accommodation and the incorporation of therapeutic discourse. I conclude by considering the implications of my analysis for the future development of drug policy and practice. PMID:19167141

  20. A perfect storm: crack cocaine, HSV-2, and HIV among non-injecting drug users in New York City.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; McKnight, Courtney; Arasteh, Kamyar; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Perlman, David C; Hagan, Holly; Dauria, Emily F; Cooper, Hannah L F

    2014-06-01

    Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has reached 16% among non-injecting drug users (NIDU) in New York City, an unusually high prevalence for a predominantly heterosexual population that does not inject drugs. Using a long-term study (1983-2011, >7,000 subjects) among persons entering the Beth Israel drug-treatment programs in New York City, we identified factors that contributed to this high prevalence: a preexisting HIV epidemic among injectors, a crack cocaine epidemic, mixing between injectors and crack users, policy responses not centered on public health, and herpes-simplex virus 2 facilitating HIV transmission. Implications for avoiding high prevalence among NIDU in other areas are discussed. PMID:24502371

  1. Spatial Analysis of HIV Positive Injection Drug Users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Mobley, Lee R.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Novak, Scott P.; Lopez, Andrea M.; Kral, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914). HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment) across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (1987–1995) and late period (1996–2005). We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time. PMID:24722543

  2. Correlates to seroprevalent herpes simplex virus type 2 among rural Appalachian drug users.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Dustin B; Young, April M; Mullins, Ursula L; Havens, Jennifer R

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the most common cause of genital ulcer disease and, along with substance abuse, an important HIV risk factor. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine HSV-2 seroprevalence in a sample of drug users in rural Appalachia. Rural Appalachian individuals age 18 or older reporting non-medical use of prescription opioids, heroin, crack/cocaine, or methamphetamine in the past 6 months (n = 499) were included. Behavioral, demographic, and sexual network data were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Participants' serum was tested for HSV-2 antibodies using the Biokit rapid test (Lexington, MA). The estimated population seroprevalence of HSV-2 was 14.4% (95%CI: 9.6-19.4%). Only 8.8% were aware of being HSV-2+, and unprotected sex was reported in 80% of serodiscordant sexual relationships. In a multivariate model, female gender, age, older age at first oral sex, and frequency of unprotected sex in the sexual network were independently associated with HSV-2 seropositivity. Despite lower seroprevalence than that reported in similar studies of substance abusers, targeted interventions to reduce sexual risk behavior are warranted in this underserved population. Network-informed approaches with particular focus on women, older individuals, and those engaging in frequent unprotected sex are recommended. PMID:26288383

  3. Modeling the HIV/AIDS epidemic among injecting drug users and sex workers in Kunming, China.

    PubMed

    Bacaër, Nicolas; Abdurahman, Xamxinur; Ye, Jianli

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Kunming, the provincial capital of Yunnan, China. The population is divided into several groups, with individuals possibly changing group. Two transmission routes of HIV are considered: needle sharing between injecting drug users (IDUs) and commercial sex between female sex worker (FSWs) and clients. The model includes male IDUs who are also clients and female IDUs who are also FSWs. Groups are split in two--risky and safe--according to condom use and needle sharing. A system of partial differential equations is derived to describe the spread of the disease. For the simulation, parameters are chosen to fit as much as possible data publicly available for Kunming. Some mathematical properties of the model--in particular the epidemic threshold R0 which determines the goal of public health interventions--are also presented. Though the model couples two transmission routes of HIV, the approximation R0 approximately = max[R0(IDU), R0(sex)], with closed formulas for R0(IDU) and R0(sex), appears to be quite good. The critical levels of condom use and clean needle use necessary to stop both the sexual transmission and the transmission among IDUs can therefore be determined independently. PMID:16794944

  4. An overview of anthrax infection including the recently identified form of disease in injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus anthracis infection (anthrax) can be highly lethal. Two recent outbreaks related to contaminated mail in the USA and heroin in the UK and Europe and its potential as a bioterrorist weapon have greatly increased concerns over anthrax in the developed world. Methods This review summarizes the microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of anthrax. Results and conclusions Anthrax, a gram-positive bacterium, has typically been associated with three forms of infection: cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and inhalational. However, the anthrax outbreak among injection drug users has emphasized the importance of what is now considered a fourth disease form (i.e., injectional anthrax) that is characterized by severe soft tissue infection. While cutaneous anthrax is most common, its early stages are distinct and prompt appropriate treatment commonly produces a good outcome. However, early symptoms with the other three disease forms can be nonspecific and mistaken for less lethal conditions. As a result, patients with gastrointestinal, inhalational, or injectional anthrax may have advanced infection at presentation that can be highly lethal. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with gram stain and culture from blood or tissue followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR). While antibiotics are the mainstay of anthrax treatment, use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists are a consideration. Prompt surgical therapy appears to be important for successful management of injectional anthrax. PMID:22527064

  5. HIV among injection drug users and their intimate partners in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Wu, Elwin; Beyrer, Chris; Shaw, Stacey; Hunt, Tim; Ma, Xin; Chang, Mingway; Ismayilova, Leyla; Tukeyev, Marat; Zhussupov, Baurzhan; Rozental, Yelena

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines prevalence rates of HIV, HCV, and syphilis among a sample of injecting drug users (IDUs) and their heterosexual intimate partners (N = 728) from Almaty, Kazakhstan. The study uses baseline data from Project Renaissance, a couple-based HIV prevention intervention delivered to a couple where one or both partners are IDUs. HIV prevalence rates among female and male IDUs were 28 %. Among the full sample, 75 % had HCV, and 13 % tested positive for the syphilis antibody test. Only 10 % of the sample ever visited a needle exchange program. One-fourth (25.3 %) had never been tested for HIV. One-quarter of those who tested positive were unaware of their status. Being HIV positive was associated with a history of incarceration, being an IDU, and having access to needle exchange programs. The findings call for increasing efforts to improve access to HIV testing, prevention, treatment, and care for IDUs in Almaty, Kazakhstan. PMID:23612942

  6. Injection drug users' perspectives on placing HIV prevention and other clinical services in pharmacy settings.

    PubMed

    Lutnick, Alexandra; Case, Patricia; Kral, Alex H

    2012-04-01

    In their role as a source of sterile syringes, pharmacies are ideally situated to provide additional services to injection drug users (IDUs). Expanding pharmacy services to IDUs may address the low utilization rates of healthcare services among this population. This qualitative study of active IDUs in San Francisco explored perspectives on proposed health services and interventions offered in pharmacy settings, as well as facilitators and barriers to service delivery. Eleven active IDUs participated in one-on-one semistructured interviews at a community field site and at a local syringe exchange site between February and May 2010. Results revealed that most had reservations about expanding services to pharmacy settings, with reasons ranging from concerns about anonymity to feeling that San Francisco already offers the proposed services in other venues. Of the proposed health services, this group of IDUs prioritized syringe access and disposal, clinical testing and vaccinations, and provision of methadone. Pharmacists' and pharmacy staff's attitudes were identified as a major barrier to IDUs' comfort with accessing services. The findings suggest that although IDUs would like to see some additional services offered within pharmacy settings, this is contingent upon pharmacists and their staff receiving professional development trainings that cultivate sensitivity towards the needs and experiences of IDUs. PMID:22231488

  7. Correlates of unsafe syringe acquisition and disposal among injection drug users in Baltimore, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Golub, Elizabeth T; Bareta, Joseph C; Mehta, Shruti H; McCall, Lisa D; Vlahov, David; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2005-01-01

    Because multi-person syringe use is the most common vehicle for HIV and hepatitis C virus transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), safe sources of sterile syringes and safe methods of disposal are necessary to curb these epidemics. We examined syringe acquisition and disposal in a cohort of IDUs in Baltimore. Between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2001, 1034 participants reported on syringe acquisition at 3492 visits, and 953 reported on disposal at 2569 visits. Participants were 69.9% male, 93.9% African-American, and median age was 44. Syringes were acquired exclusively from unsafe sources at 32.3% of visits, while exclusively unsafe disposal was reported at 59.3% of visits. Significant correlates of unsafe acquisition were: attending shooting galleries, anonymous sex, sharing needles, smoking crack, and emergency room visits. Significant correlates of unsafe disposal were: injecting speedball, no methadone treatment, acquiring safely, and frequent injection. Having a primary source of medical care was associated with safe acquisition, but unsafe disposal. IDUs continue to acquire safely but dispose unsafely, especially among those with a primary source of care; this suggests that messages about safe disposal are not being disseminated as widely as those about acquisition. These data suggest the need for a more active program involving pharmacists, an expanded syringe access program, and better efforts to enhance safe disposal. PMID:16419554

  8. Potential impact of vaccination on the hepatitis C virus epidemic in injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Judith A.; Wylie, Dennis; Dill, Jesse; Sanchez, Maria S.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Page-Shafer, Kimberly; Getz, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes significant morbidity and mortality in injecting drug users (IDU) worldwide. HCV vaccine candidates have shown promise for reducing the infectivity of acute infection and averting chronic infection, yet the impact of varying levels of vaccine efficacy and vaccine delivery strategies on the HCV epidemic in IDU have not been explored. Methods We utilized extensive data on injecting behavior collected in the UFO Study of young IDU in San Francisco to construct a stochastic individual-based model that reflects heterogeneous injecting risk behavior, historical HCV trends, and existing information on viral dynamics and vaccine characteristics. Results Our modeled HCV rate closely paralleled observed HCV incidence in San Francisco, with estimated incidence of 59% per person year (ppy) early in the epidemic, and 27% ppy after risk reduction was introduced. Chronic HCV infection, the clinically relevant state of HCV infection that leads to liver disease and hepatocellular cancer, was estimated at 22% ppy (±3%) early in the epidemic and 14% ppy (±2%) after risk reduction was introduced. We considered several scenarios, and highlight that a vaccine with 50% to 80% efficacy targeted to high-risk or sero-negative IDU at a high vaccination rate could further reduce chronic HCV incidence in IDU to 2–7% ppy 30 years after its introduction. Conclusions Our results underscore the importance of further efforts to develop both HCV vaccines and optimal systems of delivery to IDU populations. PMID:20445816

  9. Hepatitis A Virus among Drug Users and the Role of Vaccination: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lugoboni, Fabio; Pajusco, Benedetta; Albiero, Anna; Quaglio, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    In countries with advanced economies better health and hygiene conditions, along with the introduction, in some cases, of global vaccination, have relegated most viral hepatitis to marginal social groups and, in particular, drug users (DUs). The availability of safe and effective vaccines for hepatitis A virus (HAV) and B (HBV) may play a major role in combating this phenomenon. Despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine for over a decade and the recommendations of international health organizations, vaccinations against HAV among DUs are not as widely known and available as are HBV vaccinations. The purpose of this review article is to present the most significant data in the literature on the prevalence of HAV among DUs and the role of targeted vaccination. To our knowledge, the present article is the first to solely deal with vaccination against HAV in DUs. Immunization after the administration of anti-HAV vaccine has been demonstrated in DUs even if they have responded significantly less than either the general population or carriers of chronic liver disease. All the vaccines were well tolerated and adherence to the vaccine schedule was good. Further studies are needed to optimize the timing and doses of vaccine to be administered to DUs, especially to assess adherence and antibody persistence. Vaccination campaigns are feasible among DUs and have proven to be highly cost–effective. PMID:22347865

  10. Gender differences in clinical manifestations before AIDS diagnosis among injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Spijkerman, I J; Langendam, M W; van Ameijden, E J; Coutinho, R A; van den Hoek, A

    1998-04-01

    We compared incidence rates of self-reported HIV-related symptoms and illnesses, verified clinical manifestations and findings on physical examination between female and male injecting drug users (IDU) stratified by HIV serostatus in the Amsterdam cohort study on the natural history of HIV infection. HIV-positive female IDU (n = 100) reported a higher frequency of several symptoms and illnesses than male IDU (n = 139). Symptoms were reported more chronically by women compared to men, while clinical manifestations were reported by a greater proportion of women affected by these illnesses compared to men. In HIV-negative IDU (163 women and 232 men) the incidence rates were lower compared to HIV-positives, and a similar gender effect on reported symptoms and illnesses was found. Adjusting for biological, behavioral, demographic and study related variables did not change the gender effect on clinical manifestations substantially. We conclude that the gender effect among HIV-positive IDU was not caused by a differential impact of HIV infection on the incidence of the studied clinical manifestations among female and male IDU, but reflects a higher morbidity of female IDU compared to male IDU. PMID:9663511

  11. Choosing Money over Drugs: The Neural Underpinnings of Difficult Choice in Chronic Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Wesley, Michael J.; Lohrenz, Terry; Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; McClure, Samuel M.; De La Garza, Richard; Salas, Ramiro; Thompson-Lake, Daisy G. Y.; Newton, Thomas F.; Bickel, Warren K.; Montague, P. Read

    2014-01-01

    Addiction is considered a disorder that drives individuals to choose drugs at the expense of healthier alternatives. However, chronic cocaine users (CCUs) who meet addiction criteria retain the ability to choose money in the presence of the opportunity to choose cocaine. The neural mechanisms that differentiate CCUs from non-cocaine using controls (Controls) while executing these preferred choices remain unknown. Thus, therapeutic strategies aimed at shifting preferences towards healthier alternatives remain somewhat uninformed. This study used BOLD neuroimaging to examine brain activity as fifty CCUs and Controls performed single- and cross-commodity intertemporal choice tasks for money and/or cocaine. Behavioral analyses revealed preferences for each commodity type. Imaging analyses revealed the brain activity that differentiated CCUs from Controls while choosing money over cocaine. We observed that CCUs devalued future commodities more than Controls. Choices for money as opposed to cocaine correlated with greater activity in dorsal striatum of CCUs, compared to Controls. In addition, choices for future money as opposed to immediate cocaine engaged the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of CCUs more than Controls. These data suggest that the ability of CCUs to execute choices away from cocaine relies on activity in the dorsal striatum and left DLPFC. PMID:25197609

  12. Mathematically modelling the spread of hepatitis C in injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Corson, S; Greenhalgh, D; Hutchinson, S

    2012-09-01

    Mathematical modelling can provide valuable insights into the biological and epidemiological properties of infectious diseases as well as the potential impact of intervention strategies employed by health organizations worldwide. In this paper, we develop a deterministic, compartmental mathematical model to approximate the spread of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in an injecting drug user (IDU) population. Using analytical techniques, we find that the model behaviour is determined by the basic reproductive number R(0), where R(0) = 1 is a critical threshold separating two different outcomes. If R(0) ≤ 1 and HCV is initially present in the population, we find that the system will reach a disease-free equilibrium where HCV has been eliminated in all IDUs and needles. If R(0) > 1, then there is a unique positive endemic equilibrium which we show is locally stable. We then use simulations to verify our analytical results and examine the effect of different parameter values and intervention measures on HCV prevalence estimates. PMID:21900152

  13. Risk practices associated with bacterial infections among injection drug users in Denver, CO

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kristina T.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been limited research on bacterial infections (e.g., skin and soft tissue abscesses, endocarditis) among injection drug users (IDUs), despite these infections often resulting in serious morbidity and costly medical care. Although high-risk practices that contribute to bacterial infections are not entirely clear, certain injection practices have been found to increase risk in past studies. Objectives To examine rates of bacterial infections among IDUs in Denver, CO and high-risk practices that predict skin infections. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with 51 active heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine IDUs (over 18 years). Results Among all participants, 55% reported a lifetime history of at least one skin infection and 29% reported having an infection in the last year. Those with a skin infection in the last year were significantly more likely to inject intramuscularly (OR = 1.57) and to report greater heroin injection frequency (OR = 1.08) compared to IDUs with no history of skin infections. Heroin and speedball injectors reported a higher number of past abscesses compared to methamphetamine and cocaine injectors. Conclusion Intervention strategies to reduce bacterial infections should focus on high-risk injection practices. Scientific Significance Learning about rates of bacterial infections and high-risk practices associated with these infections can benefit researchers developing risk reduction interventions for IDUs. PMID:20337504

  14. Gender and HIV risk behavior among intravenous drug users in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Choi, Susanne Y P; Cheung, Yuet Wah; Chen, Kanglin

    2006-04-01

    Using data from a community-based study of injection drug users (IDUs) in Sichuan Province in China, this study compared the level of HIV risk behavior (needle sharing and unsafe sex) amongst female and male IDUs, and examined the risk factors separately for these two groups. Five risk factors were examined in the analysis, including a lack of family support, having an IDU primary sex partner, economic pressure, lack of access to a methadone program, and younger age. Regression results showed that male and female IDUs had different risk factors. For male IDUs, younger age and a lack of family support increased their level of HIV risk behavior. For female IDUs, having an IDU primary sex partner and economic pressure were predictive of their HIV risk behavior. Sex differences in risk factors are explained with respect to gender norms surrounding HIV risk behavior in the context of social relations. Female IDUs who were sex workers suffered additional HIV risk due to their powerlessness in negotiating safe sex with male customers. Practical implications of the findings for HIV/AIDS prevention and intervention work in China are discussed. PMID:16185801

  15. Governing street-based injecting drug users: a critique of heroin overdose prevention in Australia.

    PubMed

    Moore, David

    2004-10-01

    This article provides a critical analysis of existing approaches to the prevention of heroin overdose in Australia. It draws on almost 2 years of ethnographic research with street-based injecting drug users (IDUs), street-based sex workers and service providers in Melbourne, Australia's second largest city, and on recent anthropological and sociological work on governmentality. The substantive sections of the article argue: (1) that heroin overdose prevention in Australia contains implicit or explicit assumptions of rationality and personal autonomy, continues to emphasise individual behaviour change and inscribes a self-disciplined, self-aware, self-regulating subject; and (2) that the social, cultural and economic realities--the 'lived experience'--of street-based IDUs and sex workers may undermine or hinder the successful adoption of overdose prevention strategies. The paper concludes by arguing that the 'chaotic' practices of street-based IDUs and sex workers arise in response to particular 'risk environments', and that individually focused overdose prevention strategies, while an important first step, need to be complemented by measures addressing the macro- and micro-aspects of risk environments. PMID:15246182

  16. The evolving molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tee, Kok Keng; Saw, Teik Leong; Pon, Chee Keong; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Ng, Kee Peng

    2005-12-01

    Earlier studies in the 1990s indicate that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype B has been the predominant subtype among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Malaysia. More recent studies performed between 2003 and 2004, however, show a high prevalence of unique CRF01_AE/B intersubtype recombinants among IDUs. To determine the subtype distribution among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur prior to the emergence of CRF01_AE/B intersubtype recombinants, the gag-pol or the reverse transcriptase gene was sequenced from IDUs who were diagnosed as HIV positive between 1993 and 2002. Subtype B was present at 50.0% followed by CRF01_AE/B recombinant at 41.7%, with more CRF01_AE/B recombinants detected between 2000 and 2002. All CRF01_AE/B recombinants shared similar recombination patterns. Interestingly, we found that this potential new candidate of circulating recombinant form (CRF) could have emerged as early as the mid-1990s. The results showed evidence of changing HIV-1 molecular epidemiology toward the predominance of CRF01_AE/B intersubtype recombinants among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur. PMID:16379608

  17. Transmembrane pH-gradient liposomes to treat cardiovascular drug intoxication.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Bouvet, Céline; Moreau, Pierre; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2010-12-28

    Injectable scavenging nanocarriers have been proposed as detoxifying agents when there are no specific antidotes to treat pharmacological overdoses. They act by capturing the drug in situ, thereby restricting distribution in tissues. In the clinic, the only systems used for that purpose are parenteral lipid emulsions, which are relatively inefficient in terms of uptake capacity. In this study, we investigated long-circulating liposomes with a transmembrane pH gradient as treatment for diltiazem intoxication. The unique ion-trapping properties of the vesicles toward ionizable compounds were exploited to sequester the drug in the bloodstream and limit its pharmacological effect. After in vitro optimization of the formulation, the in vivo scavenging properties of the liposomes were demonstrated by examining the drug's pharmacokinetics. The reduced volume of distribution and increased area under the plasma concentration versus time curve in animals treated with liposomes indicated limited tissue distribution. The vesicles exerted a similar but more pronounced effect on deacetyl-diltiazem, the principal active metabolite of the drug. This in vivo uptake of both drug and metabolite altered the overall pharmacological outcome. In rats receiving an intravenous bolus of diltiazem, the liposomes tempered the hypotensive decline and maintained higher average blood pressure for 1 h. The detoxifying action of liposomes was even stronger when the rats received higher doses of the drug via perfusion. In conclusion, the present work provided clear evidence that liposomes with a transmembrane pH gradient are able to change the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of diltiazem and its metabolite and confirmed their potential as efficient detoxifying nanocarriers. PMID:21067150

  18. Group sex events amongst non-gay drug users: an understudied risk environment.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Samuel R; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Sandoval, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses relevant literature on group sex events--defined as events at which some people have sex with more than one partner--as risk environments, with a particular focus on group sex events where people who take drugs by non-injection routes of administration participate and where the event is not primarily LGBT-identified, at a "classic" crack house, nor in a brothel. It also briefly presents some findings from a small ethnography of such events. Group sex participation by people who take drugs by non-injection routes of administration seems to be widespread. It involves both behavioural and network risk for HIV and STI infection, including documented high-risk behaviour and sexual mixing of STI- and HIV-infected people with those who are uninfected. Indeed several HIV and STI outbreaks have been documented as based on such group sex events. Further, group sex events often serve as potential bridge environments that may allow infections to pass from members of one high-risk-behavioural category to another, and to branch out through these people's sexual and/or injection networks to other members of the local community. The ethnographic data presented here suggest a serious possibility of "third party transmission" of infectious agents between people who do not have sex with each other. This can occur even when condoms are consistently used since condoms and sex toys are sometimes used with different people without being removed or cleaned, and since fingers and mouths come into contact with mucosal surfaces of other members of the same or opposite sex. In addition to being risk environments, many of these group sex events are venues where risk-reducing norms, activities and roles are present--which lays the basis for harm reduction interventions. Research in more geographical locations is needed so we can better understand risks associated with group sex events in which drug users participate--and, in particular, how both participants and others

  19. Group-sex events among non-gay drug users: An understudied risk environment

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Samuel R.; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Sandoval, Milagros

    2010-01-01

    Background and Methods This article discusses relevant literature on group sex events—defined as events at which some people have sex with more than one partner—as risk environments, with a particular focus on group sex events where people who take drugs by non-injection routes of administration participate and where the event is not primarily LGBT-identified, at a “classic” crack house, nor in a brothel. It also briefly presents some findings from a small ethnography of such events. Results Group sex participation by people who take drugs by non-injection routes of administration seems to be widespread. It involves both behavioural and network risk for HIV and STI infection, including documented high-risk behaviour and sexual mixing of STI- and HIV-infected people with those who are uninfected. Indeed several HIV and STI outbreaks have been documented as based on such group sex events. Further, group sex events often serve as potential bridge environments that may allow infections to pass from members of one high-risk-behavioural category to another, and to branch out through these people’s sexual and/or injection networks to other members of the local community. The ethnographic data presented here suggest a serious possibility of “third party transmission” of infectious agents between people who do not have sex with each other. This can occur even when condoms are consistently used since condoms and sex toys are sometimes used with different people without being removed or cleaned, and since fingers and mouths come into contact with mucosal surfaces of other members of the same or opposite sex. In addition to being risk environments, many of these group sex events are venues where risk-reducing norms, activities and roles are present—which lays the basis for harm reduction interventions. Conclusion Research in more geographical locations is needed so we can better understand risks associated with group sex events in which drug users participate

  20. 77 FR 58848 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Patient-Focused Drug Development; Consultation Meetings; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing this notice to request that patient stakeholders notify FDA of their intention to participate in periodic consultation meetings on process issues related to FDA's patient-focused drug development initiative. This initiative is being conducted to fulfill FDA performance commitments made as part of the fifth authorization of the Prescription Drug......

  1. Latent Class Analysis of Polysubstance Use, Sexual Risk Behaviors, and Infectious Disease Among South African Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Trenz, Rebecca C.; Scherer, Michael; Duncan, Alexandra; Harrell, Paul; Moleko, Anne Gloria; Latimer, William

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV transmission risk among non-injection drug users is high due to the co-occurrence of drug use and sexual risk behaviors. The purpose of the current study was to identify patterns of drug use among polysubstance users within a high HIV prevalence population. Methods The study sample included 409 substance users from the Pretoria region of South Africa. Substances used by 20% or more the sample included: cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana and heroin in combination, marijuana and cigarettes in combination, and crack cocaine. Latent class analysis was used to identify patterns of polysubstance use based on types of drugs used. Multivariate logistic regression analyses compared classes on demographics, sexual risk behavior, and disease status. Results Four classes of substance use were found: MJ+Cig (40.8%), MJ+Her (30.8%), Crack (24.7%), and Low Use (3.7%). The MJ+Cig class was 6.7 times more likely to use alcohol and 3 times more likely to use drugs before/during sex with steady partners than the Crack class. The MJ+Cig class was16 times more likely to use alcohol before/during sex with steady partners than the MJ+Her class. The Crack class was 6.1 times more likely to engage in transactional sex and less likely to use drugs before/during steady sex than the MJ+Her class. Conclusions Findings illustrate patterns of drug use among a polysubstance using population that differ in sexual risk behavior. Intervention strategies should address substance use, particularly smoking as a route of administration (ROA), and sexual risk behaviors that best fit this high-risk population. PMID:23562370

  2. HIV Prevalence Rates among Injection Drug Users in 96 Large US Metropolitan Areas, 1992–2002

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Spencer; Cleland, Charles M.; Cooper, Hannah; Brady, Joanne E.; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2008-01-01

    This research presents estimates of HIV prevalence rates among injection drug users (IDUs) in large US metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) during 1992–2002. Trend data on HIV prevalence rates in geographic areas over time are important for research on determinants of changes in HIV among IDUs. Such data also provide a foundation for the design and implementation of structural interventions for preventing the spread of HIV among IDUs. Our estimates of HIV prevalence rates among IDUs in 96 US MSAs during 1992–2002 are derived from four independent sets of data: (1) research-based HIV prevalence rate estimates; (2) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing data (CDC CTS); (3) data on the number of people living with AIDS compiled by the CDC (PLWAs); and (4) estimates of HIV prevalence in the US. From these, we calculated two independent sets of estimates: (1) calculating CTS-based Method (CBM) using regression adjustments to CDC CTS; and (2) calculating the PLWA-based Method (PBM) by taking the ratio of the number of injectors living with HIV to the numbers of injectors living in the MSA. We take the mean of CBM and PBM to calculate over all HIV prevalence rates for 1992–2002. We evaluated trends in IDU HIV prevalence rates by calculating estimated annual percentage changes (EAPCs) for each MSA. During 1992–2002, HIV prevalence rates declined in 85 (88.5%) of the 96 MSAs, with EAPCs ranging from −12.9% to −2.1% (mean EAPC = −6.5%; p < 0.01). Across the 96 MSAs, collectively, the annual mean HIV prevalence rate declined from 11.2% in 1992 to 6.2 in 2002 (EAPC, −6.4%; p < 0.01). Similarly, the median HIV prevalence rate declined from 8.1% to 4.4% (EAPC, −6.5%; p < 0.01). The maximum HIV prevalence rate across the 11 years declined from 43.5% to 22.8% (EAPC, −6.7%; p < 0.01). Declining HIV prevalence rates may reflect high continuing mortality among infected IDUs, as well as primary HIV

  3. Continuing HIV Risk in New York City Injection Drug Users: The Association of Syringe Source and Syringe Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Jenness, Samuel M.; Hagan, Holly; Liu, Kai-Lih; Wendel, Travis; Murrill, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Sterile syringe access is an important means to reduce HIV risk, but many injection drug users (IDU) who obtain syringes from sterile sources continue to share syringes. We examined the factors associated with continuing syringe sharing in New York City. We recruited 500 active IDU in 2005 through respondent-driven sampling. In multiple logistic regression, not obtaining all syringes in the past year exclusively from sterile sources was associated with increased syringe sharing. Ensuring adequate syringe availability as well as engaging and retaining nonusers and inconsistent users in sterile syringe services may increase sterile syringe access and decrease syringe sharing. PMID:21303239

  4. Cost-effectiveness of Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Prevention of HIV Among Drug Users in Shiraz, South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkaran, Ali; Mirahmadizadeh, Alireza; Heidari, Alireza; Javanbakht, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase in high-risk injections and unsafe sexual behaviors has led to increased HIV infection prevalence among Intravenous Drug Users (IDUs). The high costs of HIV/AIDS care and low financial resources necessitate an economic evaluation to make the best decision for the control of HIV/AIDS. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the cost-effectiveness of Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) centers in HIV infection prevention among drug users. Materials and Methods: In this interventional study, we included all the seven MMT centers and the drug users registered there (n = 694). We calculated all the costs imposed on the government, i.e. Provider of case. Mathematical models were used to estimate the number of HIV cases averted from high-risk behaviors. Sensitivity analyses were performed to show the effects of uncertainty in parameters on the number of HIV cases averted and also Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER). Results: Based on the averted models, the selected MMT centers could prevent 128 HIV cases during 1 year. The total cost was $ 547423 and that of HIV/AIDS care in the no intervention scenario was estimated $ 14171816. ICER was $ 106382 per HIV case averted. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicated that MMT intervention was cost-effective even in the worst scenario and ICER varied from $ 39149 to $ 290004 per HIV case averted. Conclusions: With regard to the high prevalence of drug injection among drug users and considering the high effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MMT centers in preventing HIV infection, establishment of MMT centers in regional and national levels seems reasonable. PMID:24719714

  5. Adherence and resource use among patients treated with biologic drugs: findings from BEETLE study

    PubMed Central

    Degli Esposti, Luca; Sangiorgi, Diego; Perrone, Valentina; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio; Perone, Francesco; Buda, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Systemic administration of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF alpha) leads to an anti-inflammatory and joint protective effect in pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn’s disease. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to therapy, persistence in treatment (no switches or interruptions), and consumption of care resources (drugs, outpatient services, hospitalizations). Methods We conducted an observational retrospective cohort analysis using the administrative databases of five local health units. Patients filling at least one prescription for anti-TNF alpha between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included and followed up for 1 year. Patients were defined as adherent if >80% of the follow-up period was covered by drugs dispensation. Results A total of 1,219 patients were analyzed (mean age 49.6±14.6, male 47%). Among enrolled patients, 36% were affected by rheumatoid arthritis, and 31% and 10% were affected by psoriasis and Crohn’s disease, respectively; other indications remained below these percentages. Thirty-four percent of patients (420) were treated with adalimumab, 51% (615) with etanercept, and 15% (184) with infliximab. Among the 94% of patients who did not switch, those treated with infliximab had a higher rate of adherence across all indications (51% overall) when compared to that observed in patients treated with etanercept (27%) or adalimumab (23%). The mean annual nonpharmacological expenditure for each patient in analysis was €988 for adherent and €1,255 for nonadherent patients. Infliximab was associated with the lowest cost for all indications as determined by the multivariate generalized linear model. Conclusions Patients treated with infliximab were associated with higher adherence and persistence in treatment and lower costs, as compared to those treated with adalimumab or etanercept. PMID:25258545

  6. Promethazine Misuse among Methadone Maintenance Patients and Community-Based Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Brad J.; Lynch, Kara L.; Toochinda, Tab; Lutnick, Alexandra; Cheng, Helen Y.; Kral, Alex H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Promethazine has been reported to be misused in conjunction with opioids in several settings. Promethazine misuse by itself or in conjunction with opioids may have serious adverse health effects. To date, no prevalence data for the nonmedical use of promethazine has been reported. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of promethazine use in two different populations in San Francisco, California, USA: methadone maintenance clinic patients and community-based injection drug users (IDUs). Methods We analyzed urine samples for the presence of promethazine and reviewed the clinical records for 334 methadone maintenance patients at the county methadone clinic. Separately, we used targeted sampling methods to recruit and survey 139 community-based opioid IDUs about their use of promethazine. We assessed prevalence and factors associated with promethazine use with bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results The prevalence of promethazine positive urine samples among the methadone maintenance patients was 26 percent. Only 15 percent of promethazine positive patients had an active prescription for promethazine. Among IDUs reporting injection of opiates in the community-based survey, 17 percent reported having used promethazine in the past month; 24 percent of the IDUs who reported being enrolled in methadone treatment reported using promethazine in the past month. Conclusions The finding that one quarter of methadone maintenance patients in a clinic or recruited in community settings have recently used promethazine provides compelling evidence of significant nonmedical use of promethazine in this patient population. Further research is needed to establish the extent and nature of nonmedical use of promethazine. PMID:23385449

  7. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p < .01); however, no effect of experimental group was observed on percent opiate-negative (71% vs. 60%, p = .19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, p = .82) samples in the contingency and prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (p < .001) and when not protected by naltrexone (p < .02), independent of experimental group. Overall, these results show that contingent access to a therapeutic workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence. PMID:23205722

  8. The harm inside: injection during incarceration among male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pollini, Robin A; Alvelais, Jorge; Gallardo, Manuel; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Magis-Rodriquez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2009-07-01

    Limited access to sterile syringes and condoms in correctional facilities make these settings high risk environments for HIV transmission. Although incarceration among injection drug users (IDUs) is common, there is limited information regarding specific IDU risk behaviors inside. We examined correlates of incarceration, injection inside and syringe sharing inside among male IDUs recruited in Tijuana, Mexico, using respondent driven sampling (RDS) (n=898). An interviewer administered survey collected data on sociodemographic, behavioral and contextual characteristics. Associations with (a) history of incarceration, (b) injection inside, and (c) syringe sharing inside were identified using univariate and multiple logistic regression models with RDS adjustment. Seventy-six percent of IDUs had been incarcerated, of whom 61% injected inside. Three quarters (75%) of those who injected shared syringes. U.S. deportation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 2.43] and migration (AOR=1.81; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.95) were independently associated with incarceration. Injection inside was independently associated with recent receptive syringe sharing (AOR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.75, 3.45) and having sex with a man while incarcerated (AOR=3.59; 95% CI: 1.65, 7.83). Sharing syringes inside was independently associated with having sex with a man while incarcerated (AOR=6.18; 95% CI: 1.78, 21.49). A majority of incarcerated IDUs reported injecting and syringe sharing during incarceration, and these IDUs were more likely to engage in sex with other men. Corrections-based interventions to reduce injection and syringe sharing are urgently needed, as are risk reduction interventions for male IDUs who have sex with men while incarcerated. PMID:19386448

  9. Vitamin-D pathway genes and HIV-1 disease progression in injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Laplana, Marina; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Puig, Teresa; Caruz, Antonio; Fibla, Joan

    2014-07-15

    Vitamin-D has pleiotropic effects on calcium and bone metabolism, cellular growth control, cell differentiation and modulation of both innate and acquired immune response. Previous studies revealed the association of vitamin-D receptor gene (VDR) polymorphism with infection diseases including HIV-1 infection. To assess for association between polymorphisms of vitamin-D pathway genes CYP27B1, vitamin-D binding protein (VDBP) and VDR with HIV-1 infection, disease progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was analysed according to CDC93 criteria in a cohort of 185 HIV-1 seroprevalent patients belonging to the injection drug users. Genotype data was obtained from rs10877012, rs3782130 and rs4646536 markers at CYP27B1 locus; rs7041 and rs4588 at VDBP locus; and rs11568820, rs4516035, rs2228570, rs1544410 and rs17878969 at VDR locus. Distribution of genotypes between patients grouped by outcome was compared by contingency table analysis. Marker-marker interaction was assessed by a MDR analysis. Assuming an additive model for VDR markers, a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was employed to evaluate association with disease progression. Among vitamin-D pathway genes, VDR locus reveals specific 5'UTR and 3'UTR diplotype combinations associated with both, slower and faster progression to AIDS. Marker-marker interaction analysis indicates a strong interaction between VDR markers and a redundant effect for CYP27B1 markers. According to our results, VDR locus association follows an additive model in which increased genetic risk score for the VDR is directly correlated with AIDS progression rates. Our data supports a role of vitamin-D pathway gene variability on HIV-1 disease progression. PMID:24768180

  10. The Harm Inside: Injection during incarceration among male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pollini, Robin A.; Alvelais, Jorge; Gallardo, Manuel; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Magis-Rodriquez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Limited access to sterile syringes and condoms in correctional facilities make these settings high risk environments for HIV transmission. Although incarceration among injection drug users (IDUs) is common, there is limited information regarding specific IDU risk behaviors inside. We examined correlates of incarceration, injection inside and syringe sharing inside among male IDUs recruited in Tijuana, Mexico, using respondent driven sampling (RDS) (n=898). An interviewer administered survey collected data on sociodemographic, behavioral and contextual characteristics. Associations with a) history of incarceration, b) injection inside, and c) syringe sharing inside were identified using univariate and multiple logistic regression models with RDS adjustment. Seventy-six percent of IDUs had been incarcerated, of whom 61% injected inside. Three quarters (75%) of those who injected shared syringes. U.S. deportation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 2.43] and migration (AOR=1.81; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.95) were independently associated with incarceration. Injection inside was independently associated with recent receptive syringe sharing (AOR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.75, 3.45) and having sex with a man while incarcerated (AOR=43.59; 95% CI: 1.65, 7.83). Sharing syringes inside was independently associated with having sex with a man while incarcerated (AOR=6.18; 95% CI: 1.78, 21.49). A majority of incarcerated IDUs reported injecting and syringe sharing during incarceration, and these IDUs were more likely to engage in sex with other men. Corrections-based interventions to reduce injection and syringe sharing are urgently needed, as are risk reduction interventions for male IDUs who have sex with men while incarcerated. PMID:19386448

  11. HIV infection among injecting drug users in north-east Malaysia, 1992.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Crofts, N

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has spread widely among injecting drug users (IDUs) in countries to the north and west of the 'Golden Triangle' region of South-East Asia; it is likely to have spread southwards to Malaysia as well. In order to assess HIV seroprevalence among IDUs in north-east Malaysia and describe risk factors for HIV infection in this population, we performed a cross-sectional seroepidemiological study among 210 IDUs recruited at the detoxification ward of the General Hospital in the capital city of the north-eastern Malaysian state, Kelantan. Subjects were sequential entrants to the detoxification ward, interviewed about HIV risk behaviour, and tested for antibody to HIV and to syphilis. Nearly a third (62/210, 30%) of these IDUs were HIV seropositive. Three-quarters (159/210) had travelled to Thailand in the preceding 5 years, of whom 32% (51/159) were HIV seropositive; this was associated with injecting in Thailand, but not with sexual contact there. Of those who had not left Malaysia in the preceding 5 years, 26% (11/43) were HIV seropositive, a rate not significantly different from those who had travelled. Travel within Malaysia was common (144/210, 69%) among IDUs interviewed, as was unsafe injecting and unsafe sexual behaviour (20% had shared injecting equipment and 21% had had unprotected intercourse) in other states. In every locale, rates of unsafe injecting behaviour were high (55% sharing in last month), even among those who knew they were HIV infected, and rates of condom usage were low (93% of 160 sexually active IDUs had never used a condom). Syphilis was not associated with HIV infection, but with contact with Thai prostitutes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8218462

  12. Hepatitis C virus risk behaviors within the partnerships of young injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Judith A.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Davidson, Peter J.; Lum, Paula J.; Page, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Aims Young injection drug users (IDU) are at high risk for hepatitis C virus (HCV). We sought to determine whether perceiving one's injecting partner to be HCV positive was associated with decreased odds of engaging in receptive needle/syringe sharing (RNS) or ancillary equipment sharing (AES) with that partner. Design We conducted a cross-sectional study from 2003 to 2007 in San Francisco (n=212 participants) to examine whether perceived partner HCV status was associated with RNS and AES within injecting partnerships (n=492 partnerships) of young (under age 30) IDU who are HCV antibody negative. Findings RNS and AES (in the absence of RNS) occurred in 23% and 66% of injecting partnerships in the prior month. The odds of engaging in RNS were significantly lower for relationships in which the participant reported that his/her partner was HCV positive (odds ratio [OR] 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25-0.95). This association was attenuated when adjusted for reusing one's own needle/syringe (adjusted OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.28-1.15). The odds of engaging in AES were lower for participants who did not know the HCV status of their partner, only among non-sexual partnerships (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.29-0.76). Conclusions Because perceiving one's partner to be HCV positive was associated with decreased RNS, increased HCV testing and partner disclosure may be warranted. AES was common and was decreased only among non-sexual partnerships in which the HCV status of the partner was not known. This suggests that interventions to reduce AES in young IDU must be widespread. PMID:20491725

  13. Satellite needle distribution among injection drug users: policy and practice in two canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, Mark W; Bruneau, Julie; Brogly, Susan; Spittal, Patricia; O'Shaughnessy, Michael V; Schechter, Martin T

    2002-09-01

    Access to clean needles and syringes through needle exchange programs (NEPs) has reduced both high-risk behaviors and the transmission of blood-borne infections among injection drug users (IDUs). However, policies regarding "needle-for-needle" exchange versus unrestricted needle distribution remain controversial. The objective of this study was to compare sources of needles, trends in needle distribution, and the practice of satellite needle distribution (SND) among IDUs in Vancouver and Montreal. SND was defined as receiving a new syringe from another individual through trading, purchasing, borrowing, or being given the syringe outright, or supplying a syringe to another individual through trading, selling, lending, or giving a syringe outright. This was practiced by 46% of IDUs in Vancouver and 50% of IDUs in Montreal. SND was associated with borrowing used injection equipment (adjusted OR [AOR], 2.62; 95% CI: 1.85-3.71), conducting bulk needle exchanges (AOR, 1.85; 95% CI: 1.34-2.54), being married or in a common-law relationship (AOR, 1.85; 95% CI: 1.34-2.54), and regular visits to the NEP (> weekly) (AOR, 1.54; 95% CI: 1.17-2.13). In Vancouver, SND was also associated with borrowing used needles (AOR, 2.07; 95% CI: 1.22-3.52). In these two cities, despite different distribution policies, almost half of the participants reported SND, and this was associated with high risk sharing. The practice of SND appears to be an important mechanism for needle acquisition, especially for those at highest risk for HIV and hepatitis C transmission. PMID:12352156

  14. Potential use of safer injecting facilities among injection drug users in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Small, Dan; Palepu, Anita; Tyndall, Mark W.

    2003-01-01

    Background The Vancouver Coastal Health Authority will initiate North America's first sanctioned safer injecting facility, as a pilot project, on Sept. 15, 2003. The analyses presented here were conducted to estimate the potential use of safer injecting facilities by local illicit injection drug users (IDUs) and to evaluate the potential impact of newly established Health Canada restrictions and current police activities on the use of the proposed facility. Methods During April and May 2003, we recruited active IDUs in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside to participate in a feasibility study. We used descriptive and univariate statistics to determine potential use of a safer injecting facility and to explore factors associated with willingness to use such a facility with and without federal restrictions and police presence. Results Overall, 458 street-recruited IDUs completed an interviewer-administered survey, of whom 422 (92%) reported a willingness to use a safer injecting facility. Those expressing willingness were more likely to inject in public (odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9–8.0). When the restrictions in the Health Canada guidelines were considered, only 144 (31%) participants were willing to use a safer injecting facility. IDUs who inject alone were more likely (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.1) and women were less likely (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4–0.9) to be willing to use a safer injecting facility operating under these restrictions. Only 103 (22%) of the participants said they would be willing to use a safer injecting facility if police were stationed near the entrance. Interpretation Most IDUs participating in this study expressed a willingness to use a safer injecting facility. However, willingness declined substantially when the IDUs were asked about using a facility operating under selected Health Canada restrictions and in the event that police were stationed near the entrance. PMID:14557313

  15. METHADONE MAINTENANCE THERAPY PROMOTES INITIATION OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AMONG INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Uhlmann, Sasha; Milloy, M-J; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Guillemi, Silvia; Marsh, David; Hogg, Robert S.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Wood, Evan

    2010-01-01

    Aims Despite proven benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), many HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU) do not access treatment even in settings with free health care. We examined whether methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) increased initiation and adherence to ART among an IDU population with free health care. Design We prospectively examined a cohort of opioid-using antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected IDU and investigated factors associated with initiation of antiretroviral therapy as well as subsequent adherence. Factors independently associated with time to first initiation of antiretroviral therapy were modelled using Cox proportional hazards regression. Findings Between May 1996 and April 2008, 231 antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected opioid using IDU were enrolled, among whom 152 (65.8%) initiated ART, for an incidence density of 30.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 25.9–35.6) per 100 person-years. After adjustment for time-updated clinical characteristics and other potential confounders, use of MMT was independently associated with more rapid uptake of antiretroviral therapy (relative hazard = 1.62 [95% CI: 1.15–2.28]; p = 0.006). Those prescribed methadone also had higher rates of ART adherence after first antiretroviral initiation (odds ratio = 1.49 [95% CI: 1.07–2.08]; p = 0.019). Conclusion These results demonstrate that MMT contributes to more rapid initiation and subsequent adherence to ART among opioid-using HIV-infected IDU. Addressing international barriers to the use and availability of methadone may dramatically increase uptake of HIV treatment among this population. PMID:20331553

  16. Association between Pregnancy and Active Injection Drug Use and Sex Work among Women Injection Drug Users in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Girchenko, P; Ompad, D C; Bikmukhametov, D; Gensburg, L

    2015-06-01

    Widespread use of unsafe sexual practices among women injecting drugs both practicing and not practicing sex work leads to high levels of unplanned pregnancies in this population. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between pregnancy and active drug use and sex work. Data were collected using a convenience sample of 500 women in Saint Petersburg, Russia, in 2013. All women had recent experience of drug use, of which 200 were pregnant at the time of the study. The study consisted of a structured interview followed by a rapid HIV test. Pregnancy was protective against both active drug use and sex work. For HIV-positive women, these associations were stronger than for HIV-negative women: drug use prevalence ratio (PR) was 0.59 vs 0.85; for sex work, the PRs were 0.36 vs 0.64. Higher levels of education were associated with a lower prevalence ratio for active drug use and sex work in all models. Having children was not associated with active drug use or sex work. Pregnancy might be an optimal time for conducting interventions aimed at cessation of drug use and sex work among women injecting drugs. PMID:25835324

  17. Conducting Rapid Street Assessment of Drug Users in New York City Using Oral Fluid and Brief Interviews: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Aikins, Ross; Hoefinger, Heidi; Guarino, Honoria; Rosenblum, Andrew; Magura, Stephen; Joseph, Herman

    2016-01-01

    This study piloted the feasibility of rapidly collecting both self-reports of drug use and saliva specimens for drug toxicology in field settings. The use of oral fluid collection devices to supplement self-reports is unproven in street settings and may pose challenges for field research. Sixty adults who identified as recent illicit drug users were recruited in public settings in New York City and were asked to complete a brief drug screening inventory and provided saliva specimens. Descriptive findings are detailed along with critical best research practices and limitations that provide important directions for researchers looking to employ both toxicology and self-report in rapid field recruitment designs. PMID:26098766

  18. Taking Care of Themselves: How Long-Term Injection Drug Users Remain HIV and Hepatitis C Free

    PubMed Central

    Meylakhs, Peter; Friedman, Samuel R.; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Sandoval, Milagros; Meylakhs, Nastia

    2014-01-01

    Though prevalence of HIV and especially Hepatitis C is high among injection drug users (IDUs) in New York, about a third of those who have injected for 8 – 15 years have avoided infection by either virus despite their long-term drug use. Based on life history interviews with 35 long-term IDUs in New York, this paper seeks to show how successful integration and performance of various drug using and non-drug using roles may have contributed to some of these IDUs’ staying uninfected with either virus. We argue that analysis of non-risk related aspects of the lives of the risk-takers (IDUs) is very important in understanding their risk-taking behavior and its outcomes (infection statuses). Drawing on work-related, social, and institutional resources, our double-negative informants underwent both periods of stability and turmoil without getting infected. PMID:25688570

  19. Nanocarriers as pulmonary drug delivery systems to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Malgorzata; Vandamme, Thierry; Sokolowski, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of nanocarriers administered by pulmonary route to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases. Indeed, during the past 10 years, the removal of chlorofluorocarbon propellants from industrial and household products intended for the pulmonary route has lead to the developments of new alternative products. Amongst these ones, on one hand, a lot of attention has been focused to improve the bioavailability of marketed drugs intended for respiratory diseases and to develop new concepts for pulmonary administration of drugs and, on the other hand, to use the pulmonary route to administer drugs for systemic diseases. This has led to some marketed products through the last decade. Although the introduction of nanotechnology permitted to step over numerous problems and to improve the bioavailability of drugs, there are, however, unresolved delivery problems to be still addressed. These scientific and industrial innovations and challenges are discussed along this review together with an analysis of the current situation concerning the industrial developments. PMID:18488412

  20. EMPLOYMENT-BASED ABSTINENCE REINFORCEMENT PROMOTES OPIATE AND COCAINE ABSTINENCE IN OUT-OF-TREATMENT INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Holtyn, August F.; Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; DeFulio, Anthony; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Strain, Eric C.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We examined the use of employment-based abstinence reinforcement in out-of-treatment injection drug users, in this secondary analysis of a previously reported trial. Participants (N = 33) could work in the therapeutic workplace, a model employment-based program for drug addiction, for 30 weeks and could earn approximately $10 per hr. During a 4-week induction, participants only had to work to earn pay. After induction, access to the workplace was contingent on enrollment in methadone treatment. After participants met the methadone contingency for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. After participants met those contingencies for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. The percentage of drug-negative urine samples remained stable until the abstinence reinforcement contingency for each drug was applied. The percentage of opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples increased abruptly and significantly after the opiate- and cocaine-abstinence contingencies, respectively, were applied. These results demonstrate that the sequential administration of employment-based abstinence reinforcement can increase opiate and cocaine abstinence among out-of-treatment injection drug users. PMID:25292399

  1. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Sheketha R; Hedlund, Peter B; Roberts, Amanda J; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L; Engleman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed-including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction. PMID:25628528

  2. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Sheketha R.; Hedlund, Peter B.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed—including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction. PMID:25628528

  3. Absence of detectable striatal dopamine D4 receptors in drug-treated schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, G P; Mason, S L

    1995-08-01

    The difference between saturable binding of [3H]emonapride (to D2, D3 and D4 receptors) and [125I]epidepride (to D2 and D3 receptors) was used to determine dopamine D4 receptors in putamen taken post-mortem from antipsychotic-treated schizophrenic subjects and matched controls. Despite an overall increase in D2/D3 receptor density in schizophrenia, reflecting prior antipsychotic drug treatment, striatal D4 receptors were not significantly detectable in either controls or schizophrenic subjects. PMID:7589196

  4. Early Human Screening of Medications to Treat Drug Addiction: Novel Paradigms and the Relevance of Pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, KA; Lerman, C

    2011-01-01

    Initial screening of medications for efficacy in treating drug dependence may be accomplished more efficiently by using novel approaches that combine the practical advantages of within-subject laboratory studies with the clinical validity provided by clinical trials. A priori selection of functional gene variants associated with the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic effects of a medication may aid this effort by controlling for individual variability as to clinical response or adverse effects; however, there are limitations to this approach, and these should be carefully considered. PMID:21270792

  5. Trends in HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among injecting drug users in Europe, 2005 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Wiessing, L; Likatavicius, G; Hedrich, D; Guarita, B; van de Laar, M J; Vicente, J

    2011-01-01

    Data on newly diagnosed HIV infections and HIV prevalence in 2005 to 2010 suggest falling infection rates in injecting drug users (IDUs) in the European Union (EU). However, recent increases in HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection rates in IDUs suggest increasing injecting risks in some countries. The coverage of effective prevention measures has increased, but is still low in several countries. Overall the data suggest a continued risk of new outbreaks of HIV infection among IDUs. PMID:22172300

  6. ‘South Asian cocktail’ - the concurrent use of opioids, benzodiazepines and antihistamines among injecting drug users in Nepal and associations with HIV risk behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Data of the Central Bureau of Statistic of Nepal from 2008 show a total of more than 46,000 illegal drug users, out of which 61% are injecting drug users (IDU). An injecting mix of medicines like opioids, benzodiazepines and antihistamines (the so-called South Asian cocktail) was prevalent. Furthermore, it is estimated that about 70,000 people are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The government of Nepal has started realizing and recognizing drug use and HIV as significant health and social issues. Harm reduction programs such as needle syringe exchange and opioid substitution treatment are being implemented. Methods The aim of this study is to obtain specific knowledge on the drug use behaviour and the health status of drug users with a focus on HIV in drug users with concurrent injection of opioids, benzodiazepines and antihistamines. After an initial mapping of Kathmandu Valley, 300 drug users in contact with different treatment and counselling centres were randomly chosen for the interviews. The research questionnaire was designed according to the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI) and Maudsley Addiction Profile standards. Results Ninety-one percent of the respondents are male and 9% female. Mean age is 28.7 years. Ninety-five percent are injecting drug users with a mean of 8.7 years of drug use history. Eighty-six percent are injecting different ‘cocktails’, usually made of buprenorphine, diazepam, promethazine and/or other substances (30-day prevalence). Similarly, 48% use heroin, whereas only 2% take cocaine/crack. Among those tested for HIV (N = 223), 33% are positive (25% of the sample population). Compared to the other drug users (mainly heroin), the cocktail users show a higher HIV infection rate and more co-infections. Furthermore, risk behaviour, as e.g. needle sharing, is much more common among the cocktail users. Conclusion Currently, the mixture of medicines, opioids, benzodiazepines and antihistamines

  7. Mortality among young injection drug users in San Francisco: a 10-year follow-up of the UFO study.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer L; Tsui, Judith I; Hahn, Judith A; Davidson, Peter J; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-02-15

    This study examined associations between mortality and demographic and risk characteristics among young injection drug users in San Francisco, California, and compared the mortality rate with that of the population. A total of 644 young (<30 years) injection drug users completed a baseline interview and were enrolled in a prospective cohort study, known as the UFO ("U Find Out") Study, from November 1997 to December 2007. Using the National Death Index, the authors identified 38 deaths over 4,167 person-years of follow-up, yielding a mortality rate of 9.1 (95% confidence interval: 6.6, 12.5) per 1,000 person-years. This mortality rate was 10 times that of the general population. The leading causes of death were overdose (57.9%), self-inflicted injury (13.2%), trauma/accidents (10.5%), and injection drug user-related medical conditions (13.1%). Mortality incidence was significantly higher among those who reported injecting heroin most days in the past month (adjusted hazard ratio = 5.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 24.3). The leading cause of death in this group was overdose, and primary use of heroin was the only significant risk factor for death observed in the study. These findings highlight the continued need for public health interventions that address the risk of overdose in this population in order to reduce premature deaths. PMID:22227793

  8. Injecting risk behavior among drug users in Amsterdam, 1986 to 1992, and its relationship to AIDS prevention programs.

    PubMed Central

    van Ameijden, E J; van den Hoek, A R; Coutinho, R A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Serial, cross-sectional trends in injecting risk behavior were studied among drug users from 1986 to 1992. METHODS. From a cohort study in Amsterdam, 616 intake visits of drug users who had injected in the 6 months preceding intake were selected. RESULTS. The proportion of drug users who reported borrowing and lending used injection equipment and reusing needles/syringes (in the previous 6 months), continuously declined from 51% to 20%, from 46% to 10% and from 63% to 39%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, it appeared unlikely that a selective recruitment of participants over time was responsible for these trends. Participants, recruited later in time, had been previously tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) more often, had received daily methadone less often, and had obtained a higher proportion of new needles via exchange programs. Indications were found that (1) voluntary HIV testing and counseling leads to less borrowing, lending, and reusing equipment; and (2) obtaining needles via exchange programs leads to less reusing needles/syringes. It appeared that nonattenders of methadone and exchange programs have reduced borrowing and lending to the same extent as attenders. CONCLUSIONS. Methodologically, evaluating specific measures is difficult. However, the combination of various preventive measures in Amsterdam is likely to be responsible for the observed decrease in injecting risk behavior. PMID:8296953

  9. 78 FR 27113 - Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012; Regulatory Science Initiatives Public Hearing; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... drug research, with a focus on the following: 1. Identification of current regulatory science...; Regulatory Science Initiatives Public Hearing; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... of the regulatory science initiatives for generic drugs and an opportunity for public input...

  10. Predicting aberrant drug behavior in patients treated for chronic pain: importance of abuse history.

    PubMed

    Michna, Edward; Ross, Edgar L; Hynes, Wilfred L; Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Soumekh, Sharonah; Janfaza, David; Palombi, Diane; Jamison, Robert N

    2004-09-01

    Physicians can encounter problems in prescribing opioids for some patients with chronic pain such as multiple unsanctioned dose escalations, episodes of lost or stolen prescriptions, and positive urine drug screenings for illicit substances. This study explored the usefulness of questions on abuse history in predicting problems with prescribing opioids for patients at a hospital-based pain management program. One hundred forty-five (145) patients who were taking long- and short-acting opioids for their pain were classified as high or low risk on the basis of their responses to interview questions about 1) substance abuse history in their family, 2) past problems with drug or alcohol abuse, and 3) history of legal problems. The treating physicians completed a questionnaire about problems that they had encountered with their patients. Problem behaviors were verified through chart review. No differences in demographic characteristics were found between those classified as high and low risk. Patients who admitted to a family history of substance abuse, a history of legal problems, and drug or alcohol abuse were prone to more aberrant drug-related behaviors, including a higher incidence of lost or stolen prescriptions and the presence of illicit substances in their urine (P < 0.05). Patients classified as high risk also had a significantly higher frequency of reported mental health problems and motor vehicle accidents. More of these patients smoked cigarettes, tended to need a cigarette within the first hour of the day, took higher doses of opioids, and reported fewer adverse effects from the medications than did those without such a history (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that questions about abuse history and legal problems can be useful in predicting aberrant drug-related behavior with opioid use in persons with chronic noncancer pain. PMID:15336337

  11. 'We are always in some form of contact': friendships among homeless drug and alcohol users living in hostels.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Brown, Caral

    2016-09-01

    Homeless drug and alcohol users are one of the most marginalised groups in society. They frequently have complex needs and limited social support. In this paper, we explore the role of friendship in the lives of homeless drug and alcohol users living in hostels, using the concepts of 'social capital' and 'recovery capital' to frame the analyses. The study was undertaken in three hostels, each in a different English city, during 2013-2014. Audio recorded semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 residents (9 females; 21 males) who self-reported drink and/or drug problems; follow-up interviews were completed 4-6 weeks later with 22 participants (6 females; 16 males). Data were transcribed verbatim, coded using the software package MAXQDA, and analysed using Framework. Only 21 participants reported current friends at interview 1, and friendship networks were small and changeable. Despite this, participants desired friendships that were culturally normative. Eight categories of friend emerged from the data: family-like friends; using friends; homeless friends; childhood friends; online-only friends; drug treatment friends; work friends; and mutual interest friends. Routine and regular contact was highly valued, with family-like friends appearing to offer the most constant practical and emotional support. The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) was central to many participants' friendships, keeping them connected to social support and recovery capital outside homelessness and substance-using worlds. We conclude that those working with homeless drug and alcohol users - and potentially other marginalised populations - could beneficially encourage their clients to identify and build upon their most positive and reliable relationships. Additionally, they might explore ways of promoting the use of ICTs to combat loneliness and isolation. Texting, emailing, online mutual aid meetings, chatrooms, Internet penpals, skyping and other social media

  12. Identifying Programmatic Gaps: Inequities in Harm Reduction Service Utilization among Male and Female Drug Users in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Lambdin, Barrot H.; Bruce, R. Douglas; Chang, Olivia; Nyandindi, Cassian; Sabuni, Norman; Zamudio-Haas, Sophia; McCurdy, Sheryl; Masao, Frank; Ivo, Yovin; Msami, Amani; Ubuguy, Omar; Mbwambo, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current estimates suggest an HIV prevalence of 42% among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in Dar es Salaam, while HIV prevalence is estimated to be 8.8% among the general population in the city. To address the HIV epidemic in this population, the government of Tanzania began establishing HIV prevention, treatment and care services including outreach and medication assisted treatment (MAT) for PWIDs in 2010. We assessed gender inequities in utilization of outreach and MAT services and evaluated differences in HIV risk behaviors between female and male PWIDs. Materials and Methods Routine outreach data between December 2010 to mid-August 2012 and baseline data on clients enrolling in methadone from February 2011 to August 2012 were utilized. Binomial regression was used to estimate adjusted relative risk estimates comparing females to males. Results From December 2010 to August 2012, 8,578 contacts were made to drug users; among them 1,898 were injectors. A total of 453 injectors were eligible and referred to MAT, of which, 443 enrolled in treatment. However, regarding total outreach contacts, outreach to PWID, referral to MAT and enrollment in MAT, 8% or less of drug users accessing services were women. In contrast, weighted estimations from surveys suggest that 34% of PWIDs are female, and this approximation is similar to recent population size estimations. Overall, 43% of traditional outreach workers conducting outreach with drug users were female. Though reporting higher levels of condom usage, female PWID were more likely to report multiple sex partners, anal sex, commercial sex work and struggle under a higher burden of addiction, mental disorders and abuse. Conclusions Services have not been mobilized adequately to address the clear needs of females who inject drugs. A clear and urgent need exists for women-centered strategies that effectively engage female PWID into HIV prevention services. PMID:23825620

  13. Overdose prevention for injection drug users: Lessons learned from naloxone training and distribution programs in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Tinka Markham; Rudenstine, Sasha; Stancliff, Sharon; Sherman, Susan; Nandi, Vijay; Clear, Allan; Galea, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    Background Fatal heroin overdose is a significant cause of mortality for injection drug users (IDUs). Many of these deaths are preventable because opiate overdoses can be quickly and safely reversed through the injection of Naloxone [brand name Narcan], a prescription drug used to revive persons who have overdosed on heroin or other opioids. Currently, in several cities in the United States, drug users are being trained in naloxone administration and given naloxone for immediate and successful reversals of opiate overdoses. There has been very little formal description of the challenges faced in the development and implementation of large-scale IDU naloxone administration training and distribution programs and the lessons learned during this process. Methods During a one year period, over 1,000 participants were trained in SKOOP (Skills and Knowledge on Opiate Prevention) and received a prescription for naloxone by a medical doctor on site at a syringe exchange program (SEP) in New York City. Participants in SKOOP were over the age of 18, current participants of SEPs, and current or former drug users. We present details about program design and lessons learned during the development and implementation of SKOOP. Lessons learned described in the manuscript are collectively articulated by the evaluators and implementers of the project. Results There were six primary challenges and lessons learned in developing, implementing, and evaluating SKOOP. These include a) political climate surrounding naloxone distribution; b) extant prescription drug laws; c) initial low levels of recruitment into the program; d) development of participant appropriate training methodology; e) challenges in the design of a suitable formal evaluation; and f) evolution of program response to naloxone. Conclusion Other naloxone distribution programs may anticipate similar challenges to SKOOP and we identify mechanisms to address them. Strategies include being flexible in program planning and

  14. U.S. Drug Use and Migration experiences of Mexican Female Sex Workers who are injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Victoria D.; Burgos, José Luis; Rangel, María Gudelia; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe U.S.-based drug/sex behaviors and correlates of lifetime U.S. drug use by Mexican female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs). Methods Between 2008–2010, 315 migrant FSW-IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico responded to questionnaires. Results Twenty-seven percent (n=85) of FSW-IDUs were U.S. migrants; of these, 46% (n=39) were deportees. One-half of U.S.-migrant FSW-IDUs consumed illicit drugs in the U.S., and two-thirds of these injected drugs in the U.S. Among U.S. injectors, over 75% ever received or shared used injection equipment. The majority (92%) of U.S.-migrant FSW-IDUs never obtained U.S. drug treatment services. HIV prevalence was 4% among U.S.-migrant and 5% among non-U.S. migrant FSW-IDUs; 100% of U.S.-migrant and 75% of non-U.S. migrant FSW-IDUs were unaware of their HIV status. Conclusions Binational coordination to improve access to substance use treatment and HIV testing services in Mexico and the U.S. among marginalized binational migrants may be critical to containing HIV transmission. PMID:23698687

  15. Knowledge about human immunodeficiency virus infection and sexual behavior among drug users: a cross sectional study in Pokhara submetropolitan city, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Sanjeev Raj; Mishra, Shiva Raj

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse is one of the public health problems in Nepal. Only limited research has been done to explore knowledge and sexual behaviors of injection drug users in Nepal. The objective of this research was to explore knowledge about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and sexual behavior among drug users in Nepal. More than 90% of participants had heard of HIV. Almost all participants who had heard of HIV knew that HIV is transmitted through unsafe sexual intercourse and through syringe use. In comparison to that, a small percentage of participants knew of infected blood and mother to child as modes of transmission of HIV. Injection drug users were less likely to use condoms during sexual intercourse with their wives. Awareness programs and behavior-change communication to alert drug users to the risks of sharing syringes need to be conducted, in addition to promoting the use of condoms during sexual intercourse with other women as well as with their wives. PMID:24550681

  16. A Comparative Study of the Attitudes of College Students and Drug Treatment Center Residents Toward Drugs, Other Drug Users and Themselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Mitchell, Sam

    1986-01-01

    Assessed the attitudes of college students and drug treatment center residents with histories of using marijuana and amphetamines. The drug treatment center residents tended to devalue themselves, drugs, and peers in the drug culture to a greater extent than the students. (Author/BL)

  17. Evaluation of an AIDS education model for women drug users in jail.

    PubMed

    Magura, S; Kang, S Y; Shapiro, J L; O'Day, J

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports outcome evaluation results of an AIDS education program for drug-using women in jail, of whom the majority were current drug injectors, had high-risk sexual partners, and never used condoms for insertive sex. The women participated in four small-group health/HIV education sessions. Education participants and controls were followed-up 7 months after their release from jail; the two groups did not differ significantly on drug- or sex-related HIV risk behaviors at follow-up. However, being in drug dependency treatment (primarily methadone maintenance) at follow-up was associated with reduced heroin use, crack use, drug dealing, and criminal activity. Although improved HIV education in jail is important, better networks of community resources, including more accessible community drug dependency treatment, also must be developed to support drug-dependent women after their release from jail. PMID:7790127

  18. Longitudinal Changes in Drug Use Severity and Physical Health-Related Quality of Life among Untreated Stimulant Users

    PubMed Central

    Borders, Tyrone F.; Booth, Brenda M.; Falck, Russel S.; Leukefeld, Carl; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether drug use severity is associated with physical health-related quality of life (HRQL) over time. Data are from a longitudinal, multi-state, natural history community study of users of cocaine and/or methamphetamine who were interviewed at 6-month intervals over 2 years with a 79% follow-up participation rate. Physical HRQL was assessed with the physical component summary (PCS) of the SF-8™ Health Survey and drug, alcohol, and psychiatric severity were all assessed with the Addiction Severity Index (ASI). Random coefficient regression analyses were conducted to test for longitudinal associations between the independent variables and SF-8 PCS scores. Reductions in drug use severity over time were accompanied by only minor improvements in SF-8 PCS scores, underscoring the potential long-term harm of illicit drug use on physical health. Greater psychiatric severity was strongly associated with lower SF-8 PCS scores, suggesting that clinical attention to mental health issues could potentially lead to improvements in perceived physical health as well among stimulant users. PMID:19560873

  19. Neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 - A promising drug for treating influenza virus: Steered molecular dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Binh Khanh; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We study binding affinity of R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958 to neuraminidase of pathogenic influenza viruses by molecular dynamics simulations. {yields} It is shown that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. {yields} We predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus. {yields} The high correlation between theoretical and experimental data implies that SMD is a very promising tool for drug design. -- Abstract: Two neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir, are important drug treatments for influenza. Oseltamivir-resistant mutants of the influenza virus A/H1N1 and A/H5N1 have emerged, necessitating the development of new long-acting antiviral agents. One such agent is a new neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958. An atomic level understanding of the nature of this antiviral agents binding is still missing. We address this gap in our knowledge by applying steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to different subtypes of seasonal and highly pathogenic influenza viruses. We show that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. Based on results obtained by SMD and the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method, we predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus as its binding affinity does not vary much across these systems. The high correlation level between theoretically determined rupture forces and experimental data on binding energies for the large number of systems studied here implies that SMD is a promising tool for drug design.

  20. No evidence of drug-induced pancreatitis in rats treated with exenatide for 13 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, K; Belanger, P; Gu, G; Parkes, D; Roy, D

    2013-01-01

    Aims The potential association of glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) with the development of pancreatitis or pancreatic malignancies in patients with diabetes has been suggested. This study evaluated the long-term effects of the GLP-1RA exenatide on pancreatic exocrine structure and function in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type 2 diabetes. Methods Rats received subcutaneous twice-daily injections of 0 (control), 6, 40 and 250 µg/kg/day exenatide for 3 months. Clinical signs, body and pancreas weight, food consumption, HbA1c, fasting serum amylase, lipase, glucose and insulin concentrations were evaluated during treatment and after a 28-day off-drug period to assess the reversibility of any observed effects. Morphometric analysis of pancreatic ductal cell proliferation and apoptosis were performed. Results Plasma exenatide concentrations were several-fold higher than therapeutic levels observed in humans. No exenatide-related effects were observed on clinical signs, lipase concentration, pancreatic weight, pancreatic histology, ductal cell proliferation or apoptosis. Exenatide improved animal survival, physical condition, glucose concentrations and HbA1c, decreased food intake, and increased serum insulin concentration. Total amylase concentrations, although within normal ranges, were slightly higher in exenatide-treated rats; following the off-drug period, total amylase concentrations were comparable in treated and untreated rats. Exenatide-related minimal-to-moderate islet hypertrophy was observed at doses ≥6 µg/kg/day, with dose-related increases in incidence and degree. These changes were still present after the off-drug period. Conclusions Chronic administration of exenatide in ZDF rats resulted in the expected metabolic benefits and improved animal survival, with no adverse effects noted on pancreatic exocrine structure and function. PMID:23163898