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Sample records for drug utilization

  1. Rural Drug Users: Factors Associated with Substance Abuse Treatment Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Carrie B.; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Tindall, Michele Staton; Garrity, Thomas F.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a modified version of Andersen’s (1968, 1995) Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to identify the correlates of the number of substance abuse treatment episodes received by rural drug users. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with 711 drug users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Descriptive analyses examine rural drug users’ substance use histories and retrospective substance abuse treatment service utilization patterns. A negative binomial regression model indicated that selected predisposing, historical health, and enabling factors were significantly associated with the utilization of substance abuse treatment among rural drug users. Despite high levels of recent and lifetime self-reported substance use among these rural drug users, treatment services were underutilized. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of the health care system and characteristics of the external environment associated with rural substance abuse treatment in order to increase utilization among drug users. PMID:20463206

  2. Determinants of US Prescription Drug Utilization using County Level Data.

    PubMed

    Nianogo, Thierry; Okunade, Albert; Fofana, Demba; Chen, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    Prescription drugs are the third largest component of US healthcare expenditures. The 2006 Medicare Part D and the 2010 Affordable Care Act are catalysts for further growths in utilization becuase of insurance expansion effects. This research investigating the determinants of prescription drug utilization is timely, methodologically novel, and policy relevant. Differences in population health status, access to care, socioeconomics, demographics, and variations in per capita number of scripts filled at retail pharmacies across the USA justify fitting separate econometric models to county data of the states partitioned into low, medium, and high prescription drug users. Given the skewed distribution of per capita number of filled prescriptions (response variable), we fit the variance stabilizing Box-Cox power transformation regression models to 2011 county level data for investigating the correlates of prescription drug utilization separately for low, medium, and high utilization states. Maximum likelihood regression parameter estimates, including the optimal Box-Cox λ power transformations, differ across high (λ = 0.214), medium (λ = 0.942), and low (λ = 0.302) prescription drug utilization models. The estimated income elasticities of -0.634, 0.031, and -0.532 in high, medium, and low utilization models suggest that the economic behavior of prescriptions is not invariant across different utilization levels. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25903420

  3. Perception of Generic Prescription Drugs and Utilization of Generic Drug Discount Programs

    PubMed Central

    Omojasola, Anthony; Hernandez, Mike; Sansgiry, Sujit; Jones, Lovell

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our study aimed to assess patient’s perceptions of generic drugs and utilization of generic drug discount programs. Design, Setting and Participants A survey was administered to adult participants at community health centers and community-based organizations in Houston, Texas, USA (n=525). Main Outcome Measures Multivariate logistic regression was used to quantify the strength of association between generic drug perception and utilization of generic drug discount programs. Results Respondents who agreed that “Generic prescription drugs are as effective as brand name prescription drugs,” were 3 times as likely to utilize generic drug discount programs (AOR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.8–4.8, P<.001). Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans (OR: 10.2; 95% CI: 1.4–76.4) and Hispanics (OR: 10.3; 95% CI: 1.3–79.4) were 10 times as likely to agree that generic drugs have more side effects than brand name drugs. Conclusion Race/ethnicity had no impact in utilization of generic drug discount programs, despite racial disparities in perception toward generic drugs’ side effects and generic drugs being inferior to brand name drugs. PMID:23140080

  4. Forecasting drug utilization and expenditure in a metropolitan health region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background New pharmacological therapies are challenging the healthcare systems, and there is an increasing need to assess their therapeutic value in relation to existing alternatives as well as their potential budget impact. Consequently, new models to introduce drugs in healthcare are urgently needed. In the metropolitan health region of Stockholm, Sweden, a model has been developed including early warning (horizon scanning), forecasting of drug utilization and expenditure, critical drug evaluation as well as structured programs for the introduction and follow-up of new drugs. The aim of this paper is to present the forecasting model and the predicted growth in all therapeutic areas in 2010 and 2011. Methods Linear regression analysis was applied to aggregate sales data on hospital sales and dispensed drugs in ambulatory care, including both reimbursed expenditure and patient co-payment. The linear regression was applied on each pharmacological group based on four observations 2006-2009, and the crude predictions estimated for the coming two years 2010-2011. The crude predictions were then adjusted for factors likely to increase or decrease future utilization and expenditure, such as patent expiries, new drugs to be launched or new guidelines from national bodies or the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee. The assessment included a close collaboration with clinical, clinical pharmacological and pharmaceutical experts from the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee. Results The annual increase in total expenditure for prescription and hospital drugs was predicted to be 2.0% in 2010 and 4.0% in 2011. Expenditures will increase in most therapeutic areas, but most predominantly for antineoplastic and immune modulating agents as well as drugs for the nervous system, infectious diseases, and blood and blood-forming organs. Conclusions The utilisation and expenditure of drugs is difficult to forecast due to uncertainties about the rate of adoption of new

  5. Medical cost offsets from prescription drug utilization among Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Roebuck, M Christopher

    2014-10-01

    This brief commentary extends earlier work on the value of adherence to derive medical cost offset estimates from prescription drug utilization. Among seniors with chronic vascular disease, 1% increases in condition-specific medication use were associated with significant (P  less than  0.001) reductions in gross nonpharmacy medical costs in the amounts of 0.63% for dyslipidemia, 0.77% for congestive heart failure, 0.83% for diabetes, and 1.17% for hypertension. PMID:25278321

  6. Questioning the method and utility of ranking drug harms in drug policy.

    PubMed

    Rolles, Stephen; Measham, Fiona

    2011-07-01

    In a 2010 Lancet paper Nutt et al. propose a model for evaluating and ranking drug harms, building on earlier work by incorporating multi criteria decision analysis. It is argued that problems arise in modelling drug harms using rankable single figure indices when determinants of harm reflect pharmacology translated through a complex prism of social and behavioural variables, in turn influenced by a range of policy environments. The delphic methodolgy used is highly vulnerable to subjective judgements and even the more robust measures, such as drug related death and dependence, can be understood as socially constructed. The failure of the model to dissaggregate drug use harms from those related to the policy environment is also highlighted. Beyond these methodological challenges the utility of single figure index harm rankings is questioned, specifically their role in increasingly redundant legal frameworks utilising a harm-based hierarchy of punitive sanctions. If analysis is to include the capacity to capture the complexity relating to drug using behaviours and environments; specific personal and social risks for particular using populations; and the broader socio-cultural context to contemporary intoxication, there will need to be acceptance that analysis of the various harm vectors must remain separate - the complexity of such analysis is not something that can or should be over generalised to suit political discourse or outdated legal frameworks. PMID:21652195

  7. An informatics approach to assess pediatric pharmacotherapy: design and implementation of a hospital drug utilization system.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, Athena; Vijayakumar, Sundararajan; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Patel, Dimple; Narayan, Mahesh; Vijayakumar, Kalpana; Mondick, John T; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2007-09-01

    Drug utilization in the inpatient setting can provide a mechanism to assess drug prescribing trends, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of hospital formularies and examine subpopulations for which prescribing habits may be different. Such data can be used to correlate trends with time-dependent or seasonal changes in clinical event rates or the introduction of new pharmaceuticals. It is now possible to provide a robust, dynamic analysis of drug utilization in a large pediatric inpatient setting through the creation of a Web-based hospital drug utilization system that retrieves source data from our accounting database. The production implementation provides a dynamic and historical account of drug utilization at the authors' institution. The existing application can easily be extended to accommodate a multi-institution environment. The creation of a national or even global drug utilization network would facilitate the examination of geographical and/or socioeconomic influences in drug utilization and prescribing practices in general. PMID:17656617

  8. Can Walmart make us healthier? Prescription drug prices and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Borrescio-Higa, Florencia

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes how prices in the retail pharmaceutical market affect health care utilization. Specifically, I study the impact of Walmart's $4 Prescription Drug Program on utilization of antihypertensive drugs and on hospitalizations for conditions amenable to drug therapy. Identification relies on the change in the availability of cheap drugs introduced by Walmart's program, exploiting variation in the distance to the nearest Walmart across ZIP codes in a difference-in-differences framework. I find that living close to a source of cheap drugs increases utilization of antihypertensive medications by 7 percent and decreases the probability of an avoidable hospitalization by 6.2 percent. PMID:26376457

  9. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  10. Impact of a drug bulletin on the knowledge, perception of drug utility, and prescribing behavior of physicians.

    PubMed

    Denig, P; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F M; Zijsling, D H

    1990-01-01

    The impact of a drug bulletin was tested in a randomized controlled trial that included 186 family physicians. The length of the trial was six months. It was hypothesized that printed information, such as in drug bulletins, influences physician prescribing behavior by changing their knowledge of drug efficacy and adverse effects and their perceptions of drug utility. Therefore, the impact of a drug bulletin was evaluated on these domains of influence. Interview data were used to assess changes in knowledge, perceived drug utility, and stated prescribing. Health insurance funds' records were used to collect actual prescribing data. Information in the bulletin on the treatment of renal colic changed physicians' knowledge as well as perceived utility of drugs used for renal colic (p less than 0.05). Significant changes in stated prescribing were also found. On the other hand, advice in the same bulletin on the treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) had no impact at all. It did not even improve the knowledge of the physicians about the drugs used for IBS. Apparently, the message about the treatment of IBS failed to gain the attention of the physicians. It is suggested that some messages are sufficiently transmitted through written information, and others that are seen as less relevant or too difficult to implement need more intensive strategies. PMID:2301192

  11. Drug Utilization Study in Medical Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Care Hospital in North India

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sharonjeet; Rajagopalan, Sujit; Bhalla, Ashish; Pandhi, Promila; Malhotra, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To generate data on the drug utilization pattern and cost of drug treatment and to determine the rationality of prescriptions. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional drug utilization study was conducted in the medical emergency unit of our hospital. Patient case records were reviewed to extract data on the pattern of drug use. Cost of drug treatment for the emergency visit was calculated by referring to the cost mentioned in Monthly Index of Medical Specialties and the rationality of prescriptions was evaluated using WHO core indicators of drug utilization. Results. 1100 case records were reviewed. Majority of patients received proton pump inhibitors followed by multivitamins. The median cost per prescription was 119.23$ (7.32$–7663.46$). Majority (49.9%) of drug cost was driven by antibiotics alone. An average of 4.9 drugs was prescribed per prescription. There were 14.89% encounters with antibiotics. 75.17% of the drugs were given as injectables and only 29.27% of the drugs were prescribed as generics. Conclusion. There is need to rationalize the drug therapy in terms of increasing prescribing of drugs by generic name and to avoid overuse of PPIs and multivitamins in emergency unit. Also the hospital pharmacy should be encouraged to procure more cost effective alternative antibiotics in future. PMID:24883208

  12. Utility and importance of animal data in drug product labels.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Information on the use and safety of medicines to assist prescription by healthcare professionals occurs in drug labels (Summary of Product Characteristics in Europe and Package Insert in the USA). Animal data (notably genotoxicity, reproduction toxicity and carcinogenicity and/or repeat dose toxicity testing) comprise an important component of the information (having a vital role in giving assurance that an extensive safety assessment for the medicinal product has occurred) and regulatory guidance is available to help inform on its input into drug labels. However, an evaluation of animal data for the 27 new drugs approved in the USA in 2013 (and the same drugs if available in Europe) shows great variability in detail and level of information presented within and across regions and/or the possibility of confusion on interpretation of some of the presented animal study findings. It is concluded that it may be time to revisit what animal data are presented in drug product labels (although bearing in mind current regional regulatory guidance requirements), not only to allow within and across region consistency on information given but to present it in a way that fully assists healthcare professions when prescribing a medicine. PMID:24928564

  13. Drug utilization in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Mengistu; Kebebe Borga, Dereje; Mulisa Bobasa, Eshetu

    2015-01-01

    Background Sustaining the availability and rational use of safe and effective drugs is a major problem in developing countries. Irrational drug use affects quality of health care more than accessibility of drugs. Objective To assess drug utilization in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone from January 21–28, 2012 by using structured questionnaires. Results Of 50 prescribers and 30 dispensers, 58% and 83.3% were males, respectively. The result showed that majority of prescribers agreed on availability of essential drugs (72%) and had access to up-to-date drug information (76%). However, 43.3% of dispensers didn’t get access to up-to-date drug information. 86% and 88% of prescribers note cost of drugs and stick to standard treatment guidelines of Ethiopia during prescription, respectively. All drug dispensers check the name of the drug (100%), age of the patient (90%), the dosage form of drug (96.7%), the route of administration (90%), the duration of therapy (86.7%), and frequency of administration (86.7%) for prescription papers. Conclusion In general, drug utilization at the study sites was found to be good, although there are major deviations from the concept of rational drug use. PMID:26229506

  14. Contingency management: utility in the treatment of drug abuse disorders.

    PubMed

    Stitzer, M L; Vandrey, R

    2008-04-01

    Contingency management (CM) is a strategy that uses positive reinforcement to improve the clinical outcomes of substance abusers in treatment, especially sustained abstinence from drugs of abuse. Further, CM has been adopted to improve methodology and interpretation of outcomes in clinical trials testing new pharmacotherapies and to improve adherence to efficacious medications in substance abuse patients. Thus, CM has proven to be widely useful as a direct therapeutic intervention and as a tool in treatment development. PMID:18305456

  15. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use that include...

  16. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use that include...

  17. Utilizing diversity-oriented synthesis in antimicrobial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Comer, Eamon; Duvall, Jeremy R; duPont Lee, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    The development of resistance to existing antimicrobials has created a threat to human health that is not being addressed through our current drug pipeline. Limitations with the use of commercial vendor libraries and natural products have created a need for new types of small molecules to be screened in antimicrobial assays. Diversity oriented synthesis (DOS) is a strategy for the efficient generation of compound collections with a high degree of structural diversity. Diversity-oriented synthesis molecules occupy the middle ground of both complexity and efficiency of synthesis between natural products and commercial libraries. In this review we focus upon the use of diversity-oriented synthesis compound collections for the discovery of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:25495985

  18. Can drug utilization help in promoting the more rational use of medicine? Experiences from Western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Mishra, P; Subish, P; Upadhyay, D K

    2007-07-01

    Drug utilization research describes the extent, nature and determinants of drug use in populations and aims to facilitate the more rational use of medicines. The departments of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy at the Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Nepal are committed to promoting the more rational use of medicines. The departments run a Drug Information Center and a Pharmacovigilance Center in the teaching hospital. Over the last eight years, the departments have conducted drug utilization studies in the teaching hospital and the community. A few of these were of the intervention type and drug use was studied before and after the intervention. Members of the departments are on the hospital Drug and Therapeutics Committee. Educational initiatives to improve prescribing have been carried out in a few instances. Restricting the number of brands in the hospital pharmacy and creation of a hospital drug list has been carried out. The impact of these initiatives has been studied only in a few cases. Generic prescribing was found to be low. The educational initiatives to improve prescribing had only limited success. The hospital is in the process of framing antimicrobial use guidelines for various departments. A hospital formulary is under preparation. The influence of drug utilization studies on the prescribing patterns has been low to moderate. The department of Clinical Pharmacy runs a Medication Counseling Center in the hospital and teaches appropriate use of medicines to patients. The studies and initiatives to promote the more rational use of medicines should be continued and strengthened. PMID:17545111

  19. Methods for comparing drug policies--the utility of composite drug harm indexes.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alison

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges for drug policy research is being able to compare policy options and outcomes. The development of indexes, such as the UK Drug Harm Index or the UNODC Illicit Drug Index is a way to systematically enable such comparisons. An Index is a single common metric that represents the diverse outcomes or consequences of drug use. An Index may be used for performance monitoring within one country/region over time; to establish societal benefit of drug policies as expressed in social costs saved; to compare countries or regions; or for comparative policy analysis. Clarity of purpose is important in how an Index is used. The consequences or outcomes that can be combined into a single Index include health consequences, crime consequences, public amenity, pain and suffering, labour market outcomes, and drug manufacture and trafficking activity. The choice of outcomes for inclusion is driven by the purpose but also often by practical considerations, such as data availability. The weighting of the consequences is an important consideration in translating the outcomes into a common metric. A monetary unit has a number of advantages: it is a unit that can be measured across diverse impacts; it gives implicit "weighting" of harms; and it is intuitive for policy makers and community. On the other hand, it represents an economic perspective. No one Index will be regarded as suitable and appropriate by every stakeholder and ongoing research effort on Indexes is an important foundational research activity to advance illicit drug policy. PMID:19356915

  20. Comparative study of paediatric prescription drug utilization between the spanish and immigrant population

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The immigrant population has increased greatly in Spain in recent years to the point where immigrants made up 12% of the infant population in 2008. There is little information available on the profile of this group with regard to prescription drug utilization in universal public health care systems such as that operating in Spain. This work studies the overall and specific differences in prescription drug utilization between the immigrant and Spanish population. Methods Use was made of the Aragonese Health Service databases for 2006. The studied population comprises 159,908 children aged 0-14 years, 13.6% of whom are foreign nationals. Different utilization variables were calculated for each group. Prescription-drug consumption is measured in Defined Daily Doses (DDD) and DDD/1000 persons/day/(DID). Results A total of 833,223 prescriptions were studied. Utilization is lower for immigrant children than in Spanish children for both DID (66.27 v. 113.67) and average annual expense (€21.55 v. €41.14). Immigrant children consume fewer prescription drugs than Spanish children in all of the therapy groups, with the most prescribed (in DID) being: respiratory system, anti-infectives for systemic use, nervous system, sensory organs. Significant differences were observed in relation to the type of drugs and the geographical background of immigrants. Conclusion Prescription drug utilization is much greater in Spanish children than in immigrant children, particularly with reference to bronchodilators (montelukast and terbutaline) and attention-disorder hyperactivity drugs such as methylphenidate. There are important differences regarding drug type and depending on immigrants' geographical backgrounds that suggest there are social, cultural and access factors underlying these disparities. PMID:19995453

  1. Utility of population pharmacokinetic modeling in the assessment of therapeutic protein-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Andrew T; Earp, Justin C; Gupta, Manish; Hanley, William; Hu, Chuanpu; Wang, Diane D; Zajic, Stefan; Zhu, Min

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of pharmacokinetic (PK) based drug-drug interactions (DDI) is essential for ensuring patient safety and drug efficacy. With the substantial increase in therapeutic proteins (TP) entering the market and drug development, evaluation of TP-drug interaction (TPDI) has become increasingly important. Unlike for small molecule (e.g., chemical-based) drugs, conducting TPDI studies often presents logistical challenges, while the population PK (PPK) modeling may be a viable approach dealing with the issues. A working group was formed with members from the pharmaceutical industry and the FDA to assess the utility of PPK-based TPDI assessment including study designs, data analysis methods, and implementation strategy. This paper summarizes key issues for consideration as well as a proposed strategy with focuses on (1) PPK approach for exploratory assessment; (2) PPK approach for confirmatory assessment; (3) importance of data quality; (4) implementation strategy; and (5) potential regulatory implications. Advantages and limitations of the approach are also discussed. PMID:24272952

  2. Systematic review of drug utilization studies & the use of the drug classification system in the WHO-SEARO Region

    PubMed Central

    Bachhav, Sagar S.; Kshirsagar, Nilima A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Information available on drug consumption is inadequate in most low and middle income countries. This systematic review was conducted to analyse published work on drug utilization research/studies (DUR) in the SEARO region of WHO for study objectives, methodology, results and recommendations and to identify the need for improving DUR and the use of the ATC/DDD system. Methods: A literature search for DUR was carried out in biomedical databases (PubMed, Scirus, Scopus and Google Scholar) up to May 2012. Publications were selected if those were in the English language, describing DUR or prescription practices, and study conducted in the WHO-SEARO countries. Results: A total of 318 publications were included in the review. Of these, 67 per cent were from India and 13 per cent were from Thailand. Majority of the publications were hospital based; only 16 per cent were community based. The ATC/DDD system was used in only 20 per cent of the publications, of which 73 per cent publications used DDD indicators. Several publications focused on antibiotics (31%). Publications that recommended the need for a policy or intervention to improve prescription practices/rational drug use amounted to 35 per cent. Interpretation & conclusions: Drug utilization studies using ATC/DDD system need to be promoted and carried out on an ongoing basis. DUR is important for rational use of drugs. Its relevance to policy making and resource allocation needs to be emphasized. PMID:26354209

  3. Drug and alcohol abuse: the bases for employee assistance programs in the nuclear-utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, L.R.; Rankin, W.L.; Barnes, V.; McGuire, M.V.; Hope, A.M.

    1983-07-01

    This report describes the nature, prevalence, and trends of drug and alcohol abuse among members of the US adult population and among personnel in non-nuclear industries. Analogous data specific to the nuclear utility industry are not available, so these data were gathered in order to provide a basis for regulatory planning. The nature, prevalence, and trend inforamtion was gathered using a computerized literature, telephone discussions with experts, and interviews with employee assistance program representatives from the Seattle area. This report also evaluates the possible impacts that drugs and alcohol might have on nuclear-related job performance, based on currently available nuclear utility job descriptions and on the scientific literature regarding the impairing effects of drugs and alcohol on human performance. Employee assistance programs, which can be used to minimize or eliminate job performance decrements resulting from drug or alcohol abuse, are also discussed.

  4. Drug utilization study in ophthalmology outpatients at a tertiary care teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Pradeep R; Moghe, Vijay V; Deshmukh, Yeshwant A

    2013-12-22

    In view of the advancement in drug development and availability of new ocular therapeutics in the discipline of ophthalmology, we attempted to study the drug utilization and describe the prescribing practices of ophthalmologists in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Method. A prospective, cross-sectional, observational study was conducted on patients attending Outpatient Department of Ophthalmology for curative complaints. Prescriptions of 600 patients treated were analyzed by the WHO prescribing indicators and additional indices. Results. Analysis showed that the average number of drugs per prescription was 1.49. Percentage of drugs prescribed by generic name was 2.35%. Percentage of encounters with antibiotics was 44.83%. Percentage of drugs prescribed from National Essential drug list (NEDL)/National Formulary of India (NFI) was 19.48%. Patient's knowledge of correct dosage was 93.83%. Antimicrobial agents were the most commonly prescribed drugs followed by antiallergy drugs and ocular lubricants. Fluoroquinolones accounted for 60% of the total antimicrobial drugs, of which gatifloxacin was the most frequently prescribed fluoroquinolone. Conclusion. The study indicated an awareness of polypharmacy, but showed ample scope for improvement in encouraging the ophthalmologists to prescribe by generic name and selection of essential drugs from NEDL/NFI. PMID:24455298

  5. Longitudinal Analysis of Changes in Illicit Drug Use and Health Services Utilization

    PubMed Central

    French, Michael T; Fang, Hai; Balsa, Ana I

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationships between illicit drug use and three types of health services utilization: emergency room utilization, hospitalization, and medical attention required due to injury(s). Data Waves 1 and 2 (11,253 males and 13,059 females) from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Study Design We derive benchmark estimates by employing standard cross-sectional data models to pooled waves of NESARC data. To control for potential bias due to time-invariant unobserved individual heterogeneity, we reestimate the relationships with fixed-effects models. Principal Findings The cross-sectional data models suggest that illicit drug use is positively and significantly related to health services utilization in almost all specifications. Conversely, the only significant (p<.05) relationships in the fixed-effects models are the odds of receiving medical attention for an injury and the number of injuries requiring medical attention for men, and the number of times hospitalized for men and women. Conclusions Failing to control for time-invariant individual heterogeneity could lead to biased coefficients when estimating the effects of illicit drug use on health services utilization. Moreover, it is important to distinguish between types of drug user (casual versus heavy) and estimate gender-specific models. PMID:21143479

  6. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) VOLUNTARY MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION...

  7. Synthesis of the antimalarial drug FR900098 utilizing the nitroso-ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Fokin, Andrey A; Yurchenko, Alexander G; Rodionov, Vladimir N; Gunchenko, Pavel A; Yurchenko, Raisa I; Reichenberg, Armin; Wiesner, Jochen; Hintz, Martin; Jomaa, Hassan; Schreiner, Peter R

    2007-10-11

    The antimalarial drug FR900098 was prepared from diethyl allylphosphonate involving the nitroso-ene reaction with nitrosocarbonyl methane as the key step followed by hydrogenation and dealkylation. The utilization of dibenzyl allylphosphonate as the starting compound allows one-step hydrogenation with dealkylation, which simplifies the preparative scheme further. PMID:17887769

  8. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: an example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Mikhail Y; Edelman, Elazer R; Wei, Abraham E; Pezone, Matthew J; Lovich, Mark A

    2013-10-28

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically systemic circulating drug levels but leads to significantly higher tissue drug concentration than might be needed with systemic infusion in a rat model of local epicardial inotropic therapy. Epinephrine was infused systemically or released locally to the anterior wall of the heart using a novel polymeric platform that provides steady, sustained release over a range of precise doses. Epinephrine tissue concentration, upregulation of cAMP, and global left ventricular response were measured at equivalent doses and at doses equally effective in raising indices of contractility. The contractile stimulation by epinephrine was linked to drug tissue levels and commensurate cAMP upregulation for IV systemic infusion, but not with local epicardial delivery. Though cAMP was a powerful predictor of contractility with local application, tissue epinephrine levels were high and variable--only a small fraction of the deposited epinephrine was utilized in second messenger signaling and biologic effect. The remainder of deposited drug was likely used in diffusive transport and distribution. Systemic side effects were far more profound with IV infusion which, though it increased contractility, also induced tachycardia and loss of systemic vascular resistance, which were not seen with local application. Local epicardial inotropic delivery illustrates then a paradigm of how target tissues differentially handle and utilize drug compared to systemic infusion. PMID:23872515

  9. ChEMBL web services: streamlining access to drug discovery data and utilities

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Mark; Nowotka, Michał; Papadatos, George; Dedman, Nathan; Gaulton, Anna; Atkinson, Francis; Bellis, Louisa; Overington, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ChEMBL is now a well-established resource in the fields of drug discovery and medicinal chemistry research. The ChEMBL database curates and stores standardized bioactivity, molecule, target and drug data extracted from multiple sources, including the primary medicinal chemistry literature. Programmatic access to ChEMBL data has been improved by a recent update to the ChEMBL web services (version 2.0.x, https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl/api/data/docs), which exposes significantly more data from the underlying database and introduces new functionality. To complement the data-focused services, a utility service (version 1.0.x, https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl/api/utils/docs), which provides RESTful access to commonly used cheminformatics methods, has also been concurrently developed. The ChEMBL web services can be used together or independently to build applications and data processing workflows relevant to drug discovery and chemical biology. PMID:25883136

  10. Utilizing the protein corona around silica nanoparticles for dual drug loading and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabi, Shakiba; Treccani, Laura; Dringen, Ralf; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-10-01

    A protein corona forms spontaneously around silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in serum-containing media. To test whether this protein corona can be utilized for the loading and release of anticancer drugs we incorporated the hydrophilic doxorubicin, the hydrophobic meloxicam as well as their combination in the corona around SNPs. The application of corona-covered SNPs to osteosarcoma cells revealed that drug-free particles did not affect the cell viability. In contrast, SNPs carrying a protein corona with doxorubicin or meloxicam lowered the cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, these particles had an even greater antiproliferative potential than the respective concentrations of free drugs. The best antiproliferative effects were observed for SNPs containing both doxorubicin and meloxicam in their corona. Co-localization studies revealed the presence of doxorubicin fluorescence in the nucleus and lysosomes of cells exposed to doxorubicin-containing coated SNPs, suggesting that endocytotic uptake of the SNPs facilitates the cellular accumulation of the drug. Our data demonstrate that the protein corona, which spontaneously forms around nanoparticles, can be efficiently exploited for loading the particles with multiple drugs for therapeutic purposes. As drugs are efficiently released from such particles they may have a great potential for nanomedical applications.A protein corona forms spontaneously around silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in serum-containing media. To test whether this protein corona can be utilized for the loading and release of anticancer drugs we incorporated the hydrophilic doxorubicin, the hydrophobic meloxicam as well as their combination in the corona around SNPs. The application of corona-covered SNPs to osteosarcoma cells revealed that drug-free particles did not affect the cell viability. In contrast, SNPs carrying a protein corona with doxorubicin or meloxicam lowered the cell proliferation in a concentration

  11. Evaluation of utility of pharmacokinetic studies in phase I trials of two oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kehua; House, Larry; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Seminerio, Michael J.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There are many phase I trials of oncology drug combinations, very few of which report clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions. We hypothesized that the utility of such pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies is low in the absence of a mechanistic hypothesis. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed 152 phase I (2 drug) combination studies published in 2007–2011. Results Only 28 (18%) studies had an implicit or explicit rationale, either inhibition/induction of a drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter, co-substrates for the same enzyme or transporter, potential for end-organ toxicity, or protein binding. Only 12 (8%) studies demonstrated a statistically significant DDI, based on change in clearance (or area under the curve) of parent drug and/or active metabolite. There was a strong association between a rationale and a demonstrable drug interaction, as only 2% of studies without a rationale demonstrated a DDI, compared to 32% of studies with a rationale (Fisher’s exact test, p<10−6). Conclusion DDI studies should not be routinely performed as part of phase I trials of oncology combinations. PMID:24056785

  12. Utility of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Drug-to-Antibody Ratio Measurements in Antibody-Drug Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Passmore, David; Rangan, Vangipuram; Deshpande, Shrikant; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Chen, Guodong

    2015-06-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are emerging modalities in the pharmaceutical industry. Characterization of ADC's drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) becomes a key assessment because of its importance in ADC efficacy and safety. DAR characterization by conventional intact protein MS analysis, however, is challenging because of high heterogeneity of ADC samples. The analysis often requires protein deglycosylation, disulfide-bond reduction, or partial fragmentation. In this study, we illustrate the practical utility of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in a routine LC/MS workflow for DAR measurements. This strategy allows analyte "cleanup" in the gas phase, providing significant improvement of signal-to-noise ratios of ADC intact mass spectra for accurate DAR measurements. In addition, protein drift time analysis offers a new dimension in monitoring the changes of DAR in lot-to-lot analysis.

  13. Applicability, Commercial Utility and Recent Patents on Starch and Starch Derivative as Pharmaceutical Drug Delivery Carrier.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shreya; Malviya, Rishabha; Sharma, Pramod K

    2015-01-01

    Natural polymers are widely utilized in pharmaceutical and food industries. Starch, a major carbohydrate is a staple food in human and animal diets which is simply extractable from various sources, like potato, maize, corn, wheat, etc. It is widely used as a raw material in various food and non food industries as well as in paper, textile and other industries. This article summarizes the starch and modification of starch and to produce a novel molecule with various applications in industries including number of advances in pharmaceutical industry. The unique characteristics of starch and their modified form can be successfully used as drug delivery carriers in various pharmaceutical preparations. It is widely used as controlled and sustained release polymer, tablet disintegrant, drug delivery carrier, plasma volume expander and also finds its applicability in bone tissue engineering and in artificial red cells. It also includes the patents related to starch and modified starch based products and their commercial utility. PMID:26205680

  14. Utilizing the protein corona around silica nanoparticles for dual drug loading and release.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Shakiba; Treccani, Laura; Dringen, Ralf; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-10-21

    A protein corona forms spontaneously around silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in serum-containing media. To test whether this protein corona can be utilized for the loading and release of anticancer drugs we incorporated the hydrophilic doxorubicin, the hydrophobic meloxicam as well as their combination in the corona around SNPs. The application of corona-covered SNPs to osteosarcoma cells revealed that drug-free particles did not affect the cell viability. In contrast, SNPs carrying a protein corona with doxorubicin or meloxicam lowered the cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, these particles had an even greater antiproliferative potential than the respective concentrations of free drugs. The best antiproliferative effects were observed for SNPs containing both doxorubicin and meloxicam in their corona. Co-localization studies revealed the presence of doxorubicin fluorescence in the nucleus and lysosomes of cells exposed to doxorubicin-containing coated SNPs, suggesting that endocytotic uptake of the SNPs facilitates the cellular accumulation of the drug. Our data demonstrate that the protein corona, which spontaneously forms around nanoparticles, can be efficiently exploited for loading the particles with multiple drugs for therapeutic purposes. As drugs are efficiently released from such particles they may have a great potential for nanomedical applications. PMID:26377025

  15. Association between unemployment rates and prescription drug utilization in the United States, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While extensive evidence suggests that the economic recession has had far reaching effects on many economic sectors, little is known regarding its impact on prescription drug utilization. The purpose of this study is to describe the association between state-level unemployment rates and retail sales of seven therapeutic classes (statins, antidepressants, antipsychotics, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors, opiates, phosphodiesterase [PDE] inhibitors and oral contraceptives) in the United States. Methods Using a retrospective mixed ecological design, we examined retail prescription sales using IMS Health Xponent™ from September 2007 through July 2010, and we used the Bureau of Labor Statistics to derive population-based rates and mixed-effects modeling with state-level controls to examine the association between unemployment and utilization. Our main outcome measure was state-level utilization per 100,000 people for each class. Results Monthly unemployment levels and rates of use of each class varied substantially across the states. There were no statistically significant associations between use of ACE inhibitors or SSRIs/SNRIs and average unemployment in analyses across states, while for opioids and PDE inhibitors there were small statistically significant direct associations, and for the remaining classes inverse associations. Analyses using each state as its own control collectively exhibited statistically significant positive associations between increases in unemployment and prescription drug utilization for five of seven areas examined. This relationship was greatest for statins (on average, a 4% increase in utilization per 1% increased unemployment) and PDE inhibitors (3% increase in utilization per 1% increased unemployment), and lower for oral contraceptives and atypical antipsychotics. Conclusion We found no evidence of an association between increasing unemployment and decreasing prescription utilization, suggesting that any

  16. Exploring the limits and utility of operant conditioning in the treatment of drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a research program to develop an operant treatment for cocaine addiction in low-income, treatment-resistant methadone patients. The treatment's central feature is an abstinence reinforcement contingency in which patients earn monetary reinforcement for providing cocaine-free urine samples. Success and failure of this contingency appear to be an orderly function of familiar parameters of operant conditioning. Increasing reinforcement magnitude and duration can increase effectiveness, and sustaining the contingency can prevent relapse. Initial development of a potentially practical application of this technology suggests that it may be possible to integrate abstinence reinforcement into employment settings using salary for work to reinforce drug abstinence. This research illustrates the potential utility and current limitations of an operant approach to the treatment of drug addiction. Similar research programs are needed to explore the limits of the operant approach and to develop practical applications that can be used widely in society for the treatment of drug addiction. PMID:22478430

  17. Adverse drug effects in hospitalized elderly: Data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project

    PubMed Central

    Shamliyan, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to analyze trends in hospital admissions due to adverse drug effects between the years 2000 to 2007 among the elderly using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. We identified the discharges with the principal and all listed diagnoses related to adverse drug effects and associated hospital charges using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9) codes. Between 2000 and 2007, 321,057 patients over 65 years were discharged with a principal diagnosis related to an adverse drug effect. Hospital charges were $5,329,276,300 or $666,159,537 annual cost. The number of discharges and total hospital charges did not change over the examined years, while mean charge per discharge increased on average by $1064 ± 384 per year. Total hospital charges for drug-induced gastritis with hemorrhage increased the most by $11,206,555 per year among those 66–84 years old and by $8,646,456 per year among those older than 85 years. During 2007, 791,931 elderly had adverse treatment effects among all listed diagnoses with hospital charges of $937,795,690. Effective drug management interventions are needed to improve safety of treatments in the elderly. PMID:22291486

  18. Effect of questionnaire structure on recall of drug utilization in a population of university students

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Self-reported data are a common source of information about drug exposure. Modes of data collection differ considerably and the questionnaire's structure may affect prevalence estimates. We compared the recall of medication use evaluated by means of two questionnaires differing in structure and length. Methods Drug utilization was assessed by two alternative versions of a questionnaire (A – 4 pages, including specific questions for 12 indications/pharmacological groups and one question for "other medicines"; B – 1 page, including 1 open-ended question to cover overall drug consumption). Each of 32 classes in a private University in Maputo, Mozambique, was randomly assigned questionnaire A (233 participants) or B (276 participants). Logistic regression (allowing for clustering by classroom) was used to compare the two groups in terms of socio-demographic characteristics and medication used during the previous month. Results Overall, 67.4% of the subjects had used at least one drug during the previous month. The following prevalences were greater among participants completing questionnaire A: use of drugs from two or more pharmacological groups (60.5% vs. 34.4%, p < 0.001), use of two or more drugs (66.2% vs. 43.0%, p < 0.001), and use of antibiotics (14.6% vs. 6.9%, p = 0.001), antifungals (9.4% vs. 4.0%, p = 0.013), antiparasitics (5.6% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.031) and antacids (8.6% vs. 3.6%, p = 0.024). Information about duration of treatment and medical advice was more complete with version A. Conclusion The indication/drug-specific questions (questionnaire A) revealed a significantly higher prevalence of use of medicines – antibiotics, antifungals, antiparasitics and antacids – without compromising the completeness of the information. PMID:19563651

  19. Utility of coloured hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Agius, Ronald

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the utility of coloured hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol in a large statistically significant population. The positivity rate, the 1st, 5th, 50th, 95th, and 99th percentiles of five amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, four opiates, methadone, buprenorphine, seven benzodiazepines, and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in 9488 non-treated and 1026 cosmetically treated (dyed or bleached) authentic hair samples was compared. Analytical methods used were accredited for forensic purposes at the cut-offs defined by the German driving licence re-granting medical and psychological assessment (MPA) guidelines. Considering only the drug classes for which at least 10 positive samples were detected, the positivity rate in non-treated hair was highest for alcohol (4.50%; measured using EtG at concentrations ≥ 7 pg/mg hair), followed by THC (2.00%), cocaine (1.75%), and amphetamine (0.59%). While the 1st to 99th percentile range was significantly lower for drugs in treated, compared to non-treated hair, no significant change was observed for EtG. Additionally, no significant difference in the positivity rate was observed between treated hair and non-treated hair for both drugs and EtG. This study is the first attempt to evaluate the influence of cosmetic treatment, mainly dying, on the positivity rate for both drugs and EtG in hair samples submitted routinely for abstinence testing and the first to indicate that dyed and eventually bleached hair is not necessarily useless in detecting drugs and/or alcohol consumption, thus making coloured hair analysis still useful, often being the only possibility to prove such misuse. PMID:24817056

  20. The utilization of Arabic online drug information among adults in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abanmy, Norah O; Al-Quait, Nouf A; Alami, Amani H; Al-Juhani, Meshaal H; Al-Aqeel, Sinaa

    2012-10-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the utilization of the world wide web has become increasingly popular. However, the exact figure of such use is unknown. This study aimed to determine the percentage of, and experience with, online Arabic drug information by Arabic-speaking adults in Saudi Arabia. A web based questionnaire was used. The questionnaire language was Arabic. Public were invited to participate in the survey through e-mails, Twitter, WhatsApp and Facebook in March 2012. The survey included 17 items examining the types of accessed Arabic drug information, the respondent's demographics, their ability to easily find and understand Arabic drug-related information, and their trustfulness and dependency on such information websites. Of the 422 Arabic speaking adults who answered the questionnaire, 88% stated that they used Arabic websites to answer drug-related questions. Of the respondents, 50% had a bachelor's degree, 44% were young adults, over half were female (60%), and 72% of them have a chronic disease. The ease of retrieving online information was the most common reason (69%) for consulting such websites. Google as a search engine was the most frequently (86%) accessible website. Although respondents reported different drug-related topics in their online searching, the search for adverse effects was the most common (68%). Respondents claimed that they could easily find (65%) and understand (49%) the drug-related information. Although a good number of respondents qualified this type of information as good, double-checking of information on other websites was highly recommended. Trustfulness was one of the important parameters to measure and 205 respondents (55%) claimed that they only trusted half of the information cited. Moreover, around 48% of respondents considered that finding the same information on more than one website increased its trustfulness. Surprisingly, 54% of respondents did not depend on Arabic information websites when making decisions on drug use

  1. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid base neutralization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huabing; Wan, Jiangling; Wang, Yirui; Mou, Dongsheng; Liu, Hongbin; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2008-09-01

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  2. Current status of the utilization of antiepileptic treatments in mood, anxiety and aggression: drugs and devices.

    PubMed

    Barry, John J; Lembke, Anna; Bullock, Kim D

    2004-01-01

    Interventions that have been utilized to control seizures in people with epilepsy have been employed by the psychiatric community to treat a variety of disorders. The purpose of this review will be to give an overview of the most prominent uses of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and devices like the Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of psychiatric disease states. By far, the most prevalent use of these interventions is in the treatment of mood disorders. AEDs have become a mainstay in the effective treatment of Bipolar Affective Disorder (BAD). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of valproic acid for acute mania, and lamotrigine for BAD maintenance therapy. AEDs are also effectively employed in the treatment of anxiety and aggressive disorders. Finally, VNS and TMS are emerging as possibly useful tools in the treatment of more refractory depressive illness. PMID:15112459

  3. Expanding Medicaid drug formulary coverage. Effects on utilization of related services.

    PubMed

    Kozma, C M; Reeder, C E; Lingle, E W

    1990-10-01

    Effects on utilization and expenditures occurring concurrently with an expansion of coverage in the South Carolina Medicaid drug formulary were investigated. Data were collected for prescriptions, physician office visits, and outpatient and inpatient hospital visits. Data were evaluated for a cohort of 12,139 individuals who had at least one prescription claim and were continuously eligible for benefits during the two-year study. A repeated measures design was employed to control the differences between subjects. A multivariate analysis of variance was used to detect overall differences in utilization and expenditures. A priori comparisons of means were performed to detect changes in levels and rates of expenditures and utilization for each service. Increases were observed in the number of prescriptions, physician visits, and outpatient visits per person while the number of inpatient hospital admissions declined. Similarly, expenditures increased for all service areas except the inpatient hospital service. The proportion of variance explained by the formulary change was small in all service areas, but would be of practical significance because of the large number of Medicaid recipients affected. From a theoretical perspective, an association of a reduction in inpatient hospital use and expenditures following the elimination of drug formulary restrictions is particularly noteworthy. These findings support the thesis that medical care services should not be viewed in isolation but rather as a system of interrelated activities. Interventions in one portion of the system are mirrored by changes in utilization of other components. Frequently, private and public medical care programs are managed with organizationally distinct benefit budgets, which are controlled independently. In view of the results of this study, this organizational approach may lead to a suboptimal allocation of resources. PMID:2232926

  4. Quantification of cell viability and rapid screening anti-cancer drug utilizing nanomechanical fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shangquan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiarong; Liang, Xin M; Gao, Dayong; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-15

    Cancer is a serious threat to human health. Although numerous anti-cancer drugs are available clinically, many have shown toxic side effects due to poor tumor-selectivity, and reduced effectiveness due to cancers rapid development of resistance to treatment. The development of new highly efficient and practical methods to quantify cell viability and its change under drug treatment is thus of significant importance in both understanding of anti-cancer mechanism and anti-cancer drug screening. Here, we present an approach of utilizing a nanomechanical fluctuation based highly sensitive microcantilever sensor, which is capable of characterizing the viability of cells and quantitatively screening (within tens of minutes) their responses to a drug with the obvious advantages of a rapid, label-free, quantitative, noninvasive, real-time and in-situ assay. The microcantilever sensor operated in fluctuation mode was used in evaluating the paclitaxel effectiveness on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This study demonstrated that the nanomechanical fluctuations of the microcantilever sensor are sensitive enough to detect the dynamic variation in cellular force which is provided by the cytoskeleton, using cell metabolism as its energy source, and the dynamic instability of microtubules plays an important role in the generation of the force. We propose that cell viability consists of two parts: biological viability and mechanical viability. Our experimental results suggest that paclitaxel has little effect on biological viability, but has a significant effect on mechanical viability. This new method provides a new concept and strategy for the evaluation of cell viability and the screening of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26406457

  5. Identification of novel, in vivo active Chk1 inhibitors utilizing structure guided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Andrew J.; Stokes, Stephen; Browne, Helen; Foloppe, Nicolas; Fiumana, Andreá; Scrace, Simon; Fallowfield, Mandy; Bedford, Simon; Webb, Paul; Baker, Lisa; Christie, Mark; Drysdale, Martin J.; Wood, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Chk1 kinase is a critical component of the DNA damage response checkpoint especially in cancer cells and targeting Chk1 is a potential therapeutic opportunity for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of DNA damaging chemotherapy drugs. Fragment elaboration by structure guided design was utilized to identify and develop a novel series of Chk1 inhibitors culminating in the identification of V158411, a potent ATP-competitive inhibitor of the Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. V158411 abrogated gemcitabine and camptothecin induced cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in the expected modulation of cell cycle proteins and increased cell death in cancer cells. V158411 potentiated the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine, cisplatin, SN38 and camptothecin in a variety of p53 deficient human tumor cell lines in vitro, p53 proficient cells were unaffected. In nude mice, V158411 showed minimal toxicity as a single agent and in combination with irinotecan. In tumor bearing animals, V158411 was detected at high levels in the tumor with a long elimination half-life; no pharmacologically significant in vivo drug-drug interactions with irinotecan were identified through analysis of the pharmacokinetic profiles. V158411 potentiated the anti-tumor activity of irinotecan in a variety of human colon tumor xenograft models without additional systemic toxicity. These results demonstrate the opportunity for combining V158411 with standard of care chemotherapeutic agents to potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of these agents without increasing their toxicity to normal cells. Thus, V158411 would warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:26437226

  6. Identification of novel, in vivo active Chk1 inhibitors utilizing structure guided drug design.

    PubMed

    Massey, Andrew J; Stokes, Stephen; Browne, Helen; Foloppe, Nicolas; Fiumana, Andreá; Scrace, Simon; Fallowfield, Mandy; Bedford, Simon; Webb, Paul; Baker, Lisa; Christie, Mark; Drysdale, Martin J; Wood, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Chk1 kinase is a critical component of the DNA damage response checkpoint especially in cancer cells and targeting Chk1 is a potential therapeutic opportunity for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of DNA damaging chemotherapy drugs. Fragment elaboration by structure guided design was utilized to identify and develop a novel series of Chk1 inhibitors culminating in the identification of V158411, a potent ATP-competitive inhibitor of the Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. V158411 abrogated gemcitabine and camptothecin induced cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in the expected modulation of cell cycle proteins and increased cell death in cancer cells. V158411 potentiated the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine, cisplatin, SN38 and camptothecin in a variety of p53 deficient human tumor cell lines in vitro, p53 proficient cells were unaffected. In nude mice, V158411 showed minimal toxicity as a single agent and in combination with irinotecan. In tumor bearing animals, V158411 was detected at high levels in the tumor with a long elimination half-life; no pharmacologically significant in vivo drug-drug interactions with irinotecan were identified through analysis of the pharmacokinetic profiles. V158411 potentiated the anti-tumor activity of irinotecan in a variety of human colon tumor xenograft models without additional systemic toxicity. These results demonstrate the opportunity for combining V158411 with standard of care chemotherapeutic agents to potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of these agents without increasing their toxicity to normal cells. Thus, V158411 would warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:26437226

  7. Use of proton-pump inhibitors among adults: a Danish nationwide drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Hallas, Jesper; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Lassen, Annmarie T.; Lødrup, Anders B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) has increased over the last decade. The objective of this study was to provide detailed utilization data on PPI use over time, with special emphasis on duration of PPI use and concomitant use of ulcerogenic drugs. Methods: Using the nationwide Danish Prescription Registry, we identified all Danish adults filling a PPI between 2002 and 2014. Using descriptive statistics, we reported (i) the distribution of use between single PPI entities, (ii) the development in incidence and prevalence of use over time, (iii) measures of duration and intensity of treatment, and (iv) the prevalence of use of ulcerogenic drugs among users of PPIs. Results: We identified 1,617,614 adults using PPIs during the study period. The prevalence of PPI use increased fourfold during the study period to 7.4% of all Danish adults in 2014. PPI use showed strong age dependency, reaching more than 20% among those aged at least 80 years. The proportion of users maintaining treatment over time increased with increasing age, with less than10% of those aged 18–39 years using PPIs 2 years after their first prescription, compared with about 40% among those aged at least 80 years. The overall use of ulcerogenic drugs among PPI users increased moderately, from 35% of users of PPI in 2002 to 45% in 2014. Conclusions: The use of PPIs is extensive and increasing rapidly, especially among the elderly. PMID:27582879

  8. Torsadogenic Risk of Antipsychotics: Combining Adverse Event Reports with Drug Utilization Data across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Raschi, Emanuel; Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Godman, Brian; Koci, Ariola; Moretti, Ugo; Kalaba, Marija; Bennie, Marion; Barbui, Corrado; Wettermark, Bjorn; Sturkenboom, Miriam; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics (APs) have been associated with risk of torsade de Pointes (TdP). This has important public health implications. Therefore, (a) we exploited the public FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to characterize their torsadogenic profile; (b) we collected drug utilization data from 12 European Countries to assess the population exposure over the 2005-2010 period. Methods FAERS data (2004-2010) were analyzed based on the following criteria: (1) ≥4 cases of TdP/QT abnormalities; (2) Significant Reporting Odds Ratio, ROR [Lower Limit of the 95% confidence interval>1], for TdP/QT abnormalities, adjusted and stratified (Arizona CERT drugs as effect modifiers); (3) ≥4 cases of ventricular arrhythmia/sudden cardiac death (VA/SCD); (4) Significant ROR for VA/SCD; (5) Significant ROR, combined by aggregating TdP/QT abnormalities with VA and SCD. Torsadogenic signals were characterized in terms of signal strength: from Group A (very strong torsadogenic signal: all criteria fulfilled) to group E (unclear/uncertain signal: only 2/5 criteria). Consumption data were retrieved from 12 European Countries and expressed as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID). Results Thirty-five antipsychotics met at least one criterium: 9 agents were classified in Group A (amisulpride, chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyamemazine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone). In 2010, the overall exposure to antipsychotics varied from 5.94 DID (Estonia) to 13.99 (France, 2009). Considerable increment of Group A agents was found in several Countries (+3.47 in France): the exposure to olanzapine increased across all Countries (+1.84 in France) and peaked 2.96 in Norway; cyamemazine was typically used only in France (2.81 in 2009). Among Group B drugs, levomepromazine peaked 3.78 (Serbia); fluphenazine 1.61 (Slovenia). Conclusions This parallel approach through spontaneous reporting and drug utilization analyses highlighted drug- and

  9. Cost effectiveness of drug eluting coronary artery stenting in a UK setting: cost–utility study

    PubMed Central

    Bagust, A; Grayson, A D; Palmer, N D; Perry, R A; Walley, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of drug eluting stents (DES) compared with conventional stents for treatment of symptomatic coronary artery disease in the UK. Design Cost–utility analysis of audit based patient subgroups by means of a simple economic model. Setting Tertiary care. Participants 12 month audit data for 2884 patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting at the Cardiothoracic Centre Liverpool between January 2000 and December 2002. Main outcome measures Risk of repeat revascularisation within 12 months of index procedure and reduction in risk from use of DES. Economic modelling was used to estimate the cost–utility ratio and threshold price premium. Results Four factors were identified for patients undergoing elective surgery (n  =  1951) and two for non‐elective surgery (n  =  933) to predict risk of repeat revascularisation within 12 months. Most patients fell within the subgroup with lowest risk (57% of the elective surgery group with 5.6% risk and 91% of the non‐elective surgery group with 9.9% risk). Modelled cost–utility ratios were acceptable for only one group of high risk patients undergoing non‐elective surgery (only one patient in audit data). Restricting the number of DES for each patient improved results marginally: 4% of stents could then be drug eluting on economic grounds. The threshold price premium justifying 90% substitution of conventional stents was estimated to be £112 (US$212, [euro ]162) (sirolimus stents) or £89 (US$167, [euro ]130) (paclitaxel stents). Conclusions At current UK prices, DES are not cost effective compared with conventional stents except for a small minority of patients. Although the technology is clearly effective, general substitution is not justified unless the price premium falls substantially. PMID:15831599

  10. Utilizing Chemical Genomics to Identify Cytochrome b as a Novel Drug Target for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Shilpi; Roach, Steven L.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Hoepfner, Dominic; Walker, John R.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Arkin, Michelle R.; McNamara, Case W.; Ballard, Jaime; Lai, Yin; Fu, Yue; Molteni, Valentina; Yeh, Vince; McKerrow, James H.; Glynne, Richard J.; Supek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased phenotypic screens enable identification of small molecules that inhibit pathogen growth by unanticipated mechanisms. These small molecules can be used as starting points for drug discovery programs that target such mechanisms. A major challenge of the approach is the identification of the cellular targets. Here we report GNF7686, a small molecule inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and identification of cytochrome b as its target. Following discovery of GNF7686 in a parasite growth inhibition high throughput screen, we were able to evolve a GNF7686-resistant culture of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Clones from this culture bore a mutation coding for a substitution of leucine by phenylalanine at amino acid position 197 in cytochrome b. Cytochrome b is a component of complex III (cytochrome bc1) in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c by a mechanism that utilizes two distinct catalytic sites, QN and QP. The L197F mutation is located in the QN site and confers resistance to GNF7686 in both parasite cell growth and biochemical cytochrome b assays. Additionally, the mutant cytochrome b confers resistance to antimycin A, another QN site inhibitor, but not to strobilurin or myxothiazol, which target the QP site. GNF7686 represents a promising starting point for Chagas disease drug discovery as it potently inhibits growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 0.15 µM, and is highly specific for T. cruzi cytochrome b. No effect on the mammalian respiratory chain or mammalian cell proliferation was observed with up to 25 µM of GNF7686. Our approach, which combines T. cruzi chemical genetics with biochemical target validation, can be broadly applied to the discovery of additional novel drug targets and drug leads for Chagas disease. PMID:26186534

  11. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    PubMed

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability. PMID:25217142

  12. A Case Report of Clonazepam Dependence: Utilization of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring During Withdrawal Period.

    PubMed

    Kacirova, Ivana; Grundmann, Milan; Silhan, Petr; Brozmanova, Hana

    2016-03-01

    Clonazepam is long-acting benzodiazepine agonist used in short-acting benzodiazepine withdrawal; however, recent observations suggest the existence of its abuse. We demonstrate a 40-year-old man with a 20-year history of psychiatric care with recently benzodiazepine dependence (daily intake of ∼60 mg of clonazepam and 10 mg of alprazolam). High serum levels of both drugs were analyzed 3 weeks before admission to hospitalization (clonazepam 543.9 ng/mL, alprazolam 110 ng/mL) and at the time of admission (clonazepam 286.2 ng/mL, alprazolam 140 ng/mL) without any signs of benzodiazepine intoxication. Gradual withdrawal of clonazepam with monitoring of its serum levels and increase of gabapentin dose were used to minimize physical signs and symptoms of clonazepam withdrawal. Alprazolam was discontinued promptly. Clinical consequences of the treatment were controllable tension, intermittent headache, and rarely insomia. It is the first case report showing utilization of therapeutic drug monitoring during withdrawal period in the patient with extreme toleration to severe benzodiazepine dependence. PMID:26945373

  13. Utility of physiologically based absorption modeling in implementing Quality by Design in drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Lionberger, Robert A; Davit, Barbara M; Yu, Lawrence X

    2011-03-01

    To implement Quality by Design (QbD) in drug development, scientists need tools that link drug products properties to in vivo performance. Physiologically based absorption models are potentially useful tools; yet, their utility of QbD implementation has not been discussed or explored much in the literature. We simulated pharmacokinetics (PK) of carbamazepine (CBZ) after administration of four oral formulations, immediate-release (IR) suspension, IR tablet, extended-release (XR) tablet and capsule, under fasted and fed conditions and presented a general diagram of a modeling and simulation strategy integrated with pharmaceutical development. We obtained PK parameters and absorption scale factors (ASFs) by deconvolution of the PK data for IR suspension under fasted condition. The model was validated for other PK profiles of IR formulations and used to predict PK for XR formulations. We explored three key areas where a modeling and simulation approach impacts QbD. First, the model was used to help identify optimal in vitro dissolution conditions for XR formulations. Second, identification of critical formulations variables was illustrated by a parameter sensitivity analysis of mean particle radius for the IR tablet that showed a PK shift with decreased particle radius, C (max) was increased and T (max) was decreased. Finally, virtual trial simulations allowed incorporation of inter-subject variability in the model. Virtual bioequivalence studies performed for two test formulations suggested that an in vitro dissolution test may be a more sensitive discriminative method than in vivo PK studies. In summary, a well-validated predictive model is a potentially useful tool for QbD implementation in drug development. PMID:21207216

  14. Recent Advances in Ligand-Based Drug Design: Relevance and Utility of the Conformationally Sampled Pharmacophore Approach

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Chayan; Coop, Andrew; Polli, James E.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of three-dimensional (3D) structures of potential drug targets, ligand-based drug design is one of the popular approaches for drug discovery and lead optimization. 3D structure-activity relationships (3D QSAR) and pharmacophore modeling are the most important and widely used tools in ligand-based drug design that can provide crucial insights into the nature of the interactions between drug target and ligand molecule and provide predictive models suitable for lead compound optimization. This review article will briefly discuss the features and potential application of recent advances in ligand-based drug design, with emphasis on a detailed description of a novel 3D QSAR method based on the conformationally sample pharmacophore (CSP) approach (denoted CSP-SAR). In addition, data from a published study is used to compare the CSP-SAR approach to the Catalyst method, emphasizing the utility of the CSP approach for ligand-based model development. PMID:20807187

  15. Integration and utilization of different visualization methods and devices in a structure-based drug design process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohn, Matti T.; Nyronen, Tommi N.

    2003-05-01

    Molecular visualization techniques are used in various stages in the computer-aided drug design process. Here, we report on utilization of a four wall immersive virtual room in the visualization of protein - drug complexes. The advantage of a virtual room compared to desktop graphics is that it provides a high-resolution large field of view, helping the observers of the visualization to dissect the individual important structural features more easily than while using only conventional molecular graphics visualizations.

  16. Hospital Utilization for Injection Drug Use-Related Soft Tissue Infections in Urban versus Rural Counties in California

    PubMed Central

    Etzioni, David A.; Hurley, Brian; Holtom, Paul; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Asch, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Drug related-soft tissue infections (DR-STIs) are a significant source of hospital utilization in inner-city urban areas where injection drug use is common but the magnitude of hospital utilization for DR-STIs outside of inner-city urban areas is not known. We described the magnitude and characteristics of hospital utilization for DR-STIs in urban versus rural counties in California. All discharges from all nonfederal hospitals in California in 2000 with ICD-9 codes for a soft tissue infection and for drug dependence/abuse were abstracted from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database. There were 4,152 DR-STI discharges in 2000 from hospitals in 49 of California's 58 counties. Residents of 12 large metropolitan counties accounted for 3,598 discharges (87% of total). The majority of DR-STI discharges were from urban safety net hospitals with county indigent programs and Medicaid as the expected payment source and opiate related discharge diagnoses. Hospital utilization for DR-STIs in California is highest in large urban metropolitan counties, although DR-STI discharges are widespread. Increased access to harm reduction services and drug treatment may reduce government health care expenditures by preventing unnecessary hospital utilization for DR-STIs. PMID:16736367

  17. Prescription patterns of antihypertensives in a community health centre in Mexico City: a drug utilization study.

    PubMed

    Alba-Leonel, Adela; Carvajal, Alfonso; Fierro, Immaculada; Castillo-Nájera, Fernando; Campos-Ramos, Oscar; Villa-Romero, Antonio; Molina-Guarneros, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent; in Mexico, the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey reported a prevalence of hypertension of 31.5% in the adult population. Pharmacological treatment is the commonest intervention and has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, and total mortality. Accordingly, the type and number of antihypertensives used and the outcome - in terms of blood pressure (BP) control - are important. Therefore, our purpose is to learn the pattern of antihypertensive drug prescription and explore the determinants of BP control in an urban population in Mexico. A retrospective cross-sectional drug utilization study was conducted. Medical records from a community health centre were searched to identify those corresponding to patients diagnosed with hypertension; information upon antihypertensives used and control of the disease was carefully retrieved. A logistic regression model was built to know the main determinants of BP control. A sample of 345 clinical records of interest was identified. Most patients received antihypertensives (86.4%); the leading medications used were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, 63.8%; beta-blockers (26.5%), diuretics (19.8%), angiotensin-receptor blockers (15.8%) and calcium-channel blockers (6.4%). Only the age (≥55 years) and BMI (>30) of the patients, and the age of the doctors (≥55 years), had an important influence on BP control. Obesity is a particular and important determinant of uncontrolled hypertension; it is worth to act on body weight, on an individual basis. As lack of control has been also tied to elderly doctors, an education programme could be envisaged. PMID:26787266

  18. Mental Health Service and Drug Treatment Utilization: Adolescents with Substance Use/Mental Disorders and Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tyrone C.; Lo, Celia C.

    2010-01-01

    This research is a secondary data analysis of the impact of adolescents' mental/substance-use disorders and dual diagnosis on their utilization of drug treatment and mental health services. By analyzing the same teenagers who participated in the NIMH Methods for the Epidemiology of Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders (MECA) study, logistic…

  19. Drug utilization in pediatric neurology outpatient department: A prospective study at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krutika M.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Patel, Kamlesh P.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neurological disorders are a significant cause of morbidity, mortality and adversely affect quality of life among pediatric patients. In India, more than 30% population is under 20 years of age, many of whom present late during the course of illness. Several drugs prescribed to pediatric population suffering from neurological disorders may be off label or unlicensed. Aims and Objectives: To study drug use pattern, identify off-label/unlicensed drug use and to check potential for drug-drug interactions in patients attending outpatient department of pediatric neurology at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methodology: Prescriptions of patients attending pediatric neurology outpatient department were collected prospectively for 8 weeks. They were analyzed for prescribing pattern, WHO core prescribing indicators, off-label/unlicensed drug use and potential for drug-drug interactions. Result: A total of 140 prescriptions were collected, male female ratio being 2:1. Epilepsy was the most common diagnosis (73.57%) followed by breath holding spells, migraine and developmental disorders. Partial seizure was the most common type of epilepsy (52.42%). Average number of drugs prescribed per patient was 1.56. Most commonly prescribed drug was sodium valproate (25.11%) followed by phenytoin (11.41%). About 16% of the prescriptions contained newer antiepileptic drugs. More than 60% of the drugs were prescribed from WHO essential drug list. In 8.57% of cases drugs were prescribed in off-label/unlicensed manner. Twenty-six percent prescriptions showed potential for drug interactions. Conclusion: Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease among children and adolescents. Sodium valproate is the most commonly prescribed drug. A few prescriptions contained off-label/unlicensed drugs. PMID:25278669

  20. Evaluation of Drug Utilization Patterns during Initial Treatment in the Emergency Room: A Retroprospective Pharmacoepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheekavolu, Chakrapani; Pathapati, Rama Mohan; Babasaheb Laxmansingh, Kudagi; Saginela, Satish Kumar; Makineedi, Veera Prasad; Siddalingappa; Kumar, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Background. We assessed the prescribing trends, average number of drugs per prescription, and cost per prescription during the initial contact of the patient with the physician in emergency room. Methods. This retro-prospective study was conducted over a period of six months. Medical records of two hundred patients were reviewed for prescribing patterns. Results. 52 different types of drugs (996 drugs) were prescribed in total 200 prescriptions during the mean time spent in emergency room of 2.8 ± 1.4 hours. The average number of drugs per prescription was 4.2 ± 1.2. 95% of drugs were prescribed by trade name. Average drugs cost per prescription was 784 ± 134 rupees (17USD). Conclusion. Polypharmacy remains the main form of irrational prescribing. Prescribing patterns of drugs were knowledge based rather than WHO criteria for rational use of drugs. PMID:22242208

  1. Changes in Drug Utilization during a Gap in Insurance Coverage: An Examination of the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    PubMed Central

    Polinski, Jennifer M.; Shrank, William H.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Glynn, Robert J.; Liberman, Joshua N.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    but not switching drugs in 2006 and 2007. Blunt cost-containment features such as the coverage gap have an adverse impact on drug utilization that may conceivably affect health outcomes. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21857811

  2. Short-term Efficacy of a Brief Intervention to Reduce Drug Misuse and Increase Drug Treatment Utilization Among Adult Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Roland C.; Baird, Janette R.; Liu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although brief interventions (BIs) have shown some success for smoking cessation and alcohol misuse, it is not known if they can be applied in the emergency department (ED) to drug use and misuse. The objectives of this investigation were to assess the 3-month efficacy of a BI to reduce drug use and misuse, increase drug treatment services utilization among adult ED patients, and identify subgroups more likely to benefit from the BI. Methods This randomized, controlled trial enrolled 18- to 64-year-old English- or Spanish-speaking patients from two urban, academic EDs whose responses to the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test indicated a need for a brief or intensive intervention. Treatment participants received a tailored BI, while control participants only completed the study questionnaires. At the 3-month follow-up, each participant’s past 3-month drug use and misuse and treatment utilization were compared to his or her baseline enrollment data. Regression modeling was used to identify subgroups of patients (per demographic and clinical factors) more likely to stop or reduce their drug use or misuse or engage in drug treatment by the 3-month follow-up assessment. Results Of the 1,030 participants, the median age was 30 years (interquartile range = 24 to 42 years), and 46% were female; 57% were white/non-Hispanic, 24.9% were black/non-Hispanic, and 15% were Hispanic. The most commonly misused drugs were marijuana, prescription opioids, cocaine/crack, and benzodiazepines. Although at follow-up the proportions of participants reporting any past 3-month drug misuse had decreased in both study arms (control 84% vs. treatment 78%), the decreases were similar between the two study arms (Δ−6.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −13.0% to 0.0). In addition, at follow-up there were no differences between study arms in those who were currently receiving drug treatment (Δ1.8; 95% CI = −3.5 to 6.8), who had received treatment during

  3. New developments in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: clinical utility of bedaquiline and delamanid

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Grania; Hewison, Cathy; Varaine, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The current treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is long, complex, and associated with severe and life-threatening side effects and poor outcomes. For the first time in nearly 50 years, there have been two new drugs registered for use in multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Bedaquiline, a diarylquinoline, and delamanid, a nitromidoxazole, have received conditional stringent regulatory approval and have World Health Organization interim policy guidance for their use. As countries improve and scale up their diagnostic services, increasing number of patients with MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant TB are identified. These two new drugs offer a real opportunity to improve the outcomes of these patients. This article reviews the evidence for these two new drugs and discusses the clinical questions raised as they are used outside clinical trial settings. It also reviews the importance of the accompanying drugs used with these new drugs. It is important that barriers hindering the use of these two new drugs are addressed and that the existing clinical experience in using these drugs is shared, such that their routine-use programmatic conditions is scaled up, ensuring maximum benefit for patients and countries battling the MDR-TB crisis. PMID:26586956

  4. Drug-induced Parkinsonism versus Idiopathic Parkinson Disease: Utility of Nigrosome 1 with 3-T Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hee; Noh, Young; Lee, Jongho; Kim, Eung Yeop

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To explore the utility of nigrosome 1 with 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to differentiate idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) from drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP). Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this study, and participants gave informed consent. This study enrolled patients with DIP (n = 20) and IPD (n = 29) who underwent N-3-fluoropropyl-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ((18)F-FP-CIT) positron emission tomography (PET) and healthy participants (n = 20). All participants underwent 0.5 × 0.5 × 1.0 mm(3) oblique axial three-dimensional multiecho-data image combination imaging to view the nigrosome 1 with 3-T imaging. Two reviewers independently assessed the nigrosome 1 without clinical information. DIP was diagnosed when no abnormality was seen at (18)F-FP-CIT PET. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the nigrosome 1 imaging were evaluated between the IPD and DIP patients and between the IPD patients and healthy participants. Interrater agreement was assessed with Cohen κ. Results Both reviewers agreed in 63 of 69 participants (91.3%) for the presence of any abnormality on either side of the nigrosome 1 (κ = 0.825). Findings in all 29 IPD patients (100%) and three of 20 DIP patients (15%) were rated as abnormal and in 17 of 20 DIP patients (85%) they were interpreted as normal on the basis of imaging of the nitgrosome 1 (sensitivity, 100% (29 of 29); specificity, 85.0% (17 of 20); accuracy, 93.9% (46 of 49) between IPD and DIP patients). Findings in 3 of 20 healthy participants (15.0%) were interpreted as abnormal on the basis of imaging the nigrosome 1 while in the other 17 of 20 healthy participants (85.0%) they were rated as normal (sensitivity, 100% [29 of 29]; specificity, 85.0% [17 of 20]; accuracy, 93.9% [46 of 49] between IPD patients and healthy participants [κ = 0.831]). Conclusion The imaging of nigrosome 1 with 3-T imaging can differentiate DIP from IPD with high accuracy and

  5. Study of Drug Utilization Pattern for Skin Diseases in Dermatology OPD of an Indian Tertiary Care Hospital - A Prescription Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anuj Kumar; Kumar, Subodh; Kumar, Manish; Dikshit, Harihar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin diseases are the major contributors of disease burden in society. It affects individuals of all ages, neonates to elderly. Owing to its chronic nature, it causes serious impact on quality of life and financial status of the sufferer and his family. The problem gets compounded with the inappropriate and irrational use of medicines. Periodic prescription audit in form of drug utilization study is a way to improve the quality of prescription and curb the menace of irrational prescribing which has become a global phenomenon. Aim This study aims to determine the drug utilization pattern and assess the economic burden of the patient with skin disease. Materials and Methods It was a prospective, cross-sectional study conducted over a period of three months from January to March 2015 in newly diagnosed cases attending outpatient department of Skin and VD, IGIMS, Patna. The prescriptions were analysed with the help of descriptive statistics and results were expressed in percentage. Results Total 752 prescriptions were analysed during the study. Male patients were lesser as compared to female as male to female ratio was 0.88. Over 50% of patients were in adolescent age group i.e. 21-40 years. Acne (17.95%) was most common disease in the study population followed by eczema and Dermatophytosis. Among the drugs, antihistaminics (24.13%) were prescribed most frequently followed by antifungals and antibiotics. Topical agents constituted almost 60% of the total prescription and average number of drugs per prescription was 5.13, irrespective of the dosage forms prescribed. Conclusion This drug utilization study provides an insight to the prescriber regarding various issues related to polypharmacy, cost analysis and prevalent disease pattern in the region. This study also suggests periodic evaluation of prescription pattern to monitor and improve quality of prescription in other departments of the hospital. PMID:27042479

  6. Trends in utilization of FDA expedited drug development and approval programs, 1987-2014: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M; Darrow, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of special expedited development and review pathways at the US Food and Drug Administration over the past two decades. Design Cohort study. Setting FDA approved novel therapeutics between 1987 and 2014. Population Publicly available sources provided each drug’s year of approval, their innovativeness (first in class versus not first in class), World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Classification, and which (if any) of the FDA’s four primary expedited development and review programs or designations were associated with each drug: orphan drug, fast track, accelerated approval, and priority review. Main outcome measures Logistic regression models evaluated trends in the proportion of drugs associated with each of the four expedited development and review programs. To evaluate the number of programs associated with each approved drug over time, Poisson models were employed, with the number of programs as the dependent variable and a linear term for year of approval. The difference in trends was compared between drugs that were first in class and those that were not. Results The FDA approved 774 drugs during the study period, with one third representing first in class agents. Priority review (43%) was the most prevalent of the four programs, with accelerated approval (9%) the least common. There was a significant increase of 2.6% per year in the number of expedited review and approval programs granted to each newly approved agent (incidence rate ratio 1.026, 95% confidence interval 1.017 to 1.035, P<0.001), and a 2.4% increase in the proportion of drugs associated with at least one such program (odds ratio 1.024, 95% confidence interval 1.006 to 1.043, P=0.009). Driving this trend was an increase in the proportion of approved, non-first in class drugs associated with at least one program for drugs (P=0.03 for interaction). Conclusions In the past two decades, drugs newly approved by the FDA have been associated with an

  7. Ophthalmic drug delivery utilizing two-photon absorption: a novel approach to treat posterior capsule opacification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Träger, J.; Zorn, M.; Haberkorn, N.; Hampp, N.

    2007-07-01

    Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is the standard technique to treat cataract. Despite recent progress in surgical procedures, posterior capsule opacification is one of the sill remaining postoperative complications of cataract surgery. We present a novel strategy to reduce the incidence of posterior capsule opacification. A drug delivery polymer suitable for manufacturing intraocular lenses has been developed which enables repeated drug release in a non-invasive and controlled manner. The therapeutic molecules are attached through a UV light sensitive linkage to the polymer backbone which is mainly responsible for the optical properties of the intraocular lenses. However, UV light can not trigger the release of drug from the polymer due to the high absorption of the cornea. We developed linkers which enable drug release by two-photon absorption induced cleavage of the linker structure. Since the two-photon absorption requires high photon densities, this does not occur in ambient light conditions in daily life, but is easily triggered by focused laser beams from a pulsed laser. In this proof-of-principle study we have employed a cyclobutane type linker and investigated the properties of the therapeutic system with the approved drugs 5-fluorouracil and chlorambucil. The controlled drug delivery was successfully demonstrated in vitro and additional cell tests confirmed that the device itself shows no cytotoxicity until photochemical activation. This presented concept can provide a powerful method in ophthalmic drug delivery.

  8. Illicit Drugs: Contaminants in the Environment and Utility in Forensic Epidemiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The published literature surrounding the origin, occurrence, fate, and effects of illicit drug ingredients (IDIs) in the environment is examined. Similarities exist with medical pharmaceuticals, particularly with regard to the basic processes by which these ingredients enter the ...

  9. A two-year utilization of the pharmacist-operated drug information center in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Entezari-Maleki, Taher; Taraz, Mohammad; Javadi, Mohammad Reza; Hajimiri, Mir Hamed; Eslami, Kaveh; Karimzadeh, Iman; Esmaeili, Maysam; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess and describe the call services delivered by drug and poison information call center (DPIC) of 13-Aban pharmacy, which is closely operated by the Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All calls services including counseled and follow-up calls provided by 13-Aban DPIC to health care professionals and public were collected, documented, and evaluated in a 2 years period from July 2010 to June 2012 using the designed software. Data analysis was done by SPSS version 16.0. Findings: Totally 110,310 calls services delivered during a 2 years period. Among healthcare professionals, pharmacists, general physicians, and nurses requested more call services respectively (P = 0.001). DPIC could detect 585 potential cases of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and 420 cases of major drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Conclusion: This study by analyzing and reporting the two-years activities of one of the major DPICs in Iran, showed that DPICs can offer drug consultation for healthcare professional and public as well as detect and prevent ADRs and DDIs, and therefore can promote patients’ health regarding drug therapy. PMID:25535619

  10. Identifying Programmatic Gaps: Inequities in Harm Reduction Service Utilization among Male and Female Drug Users in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Lambdin, Barrot H.; Bruce, R. Douglas; Chang, Olivia; Nyandindi, Cassian; Sabuni, Norman; Zamudio-Haas, Sophia; McCurdy, Sheryl; Masao, Frank; Ivo, Yovin; Msami, Amani; Ubuguy, Omar; Mbwambo, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current estimates suggest an HIV prevalence of 42% among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in Dar es Salaam, while HIV prevalence is estimated to be 8.8% among the general population in the city. To address the HIV epidemic in this population, the government of Tanzania began establishing HIV prevention, treatment and care services including outreach and medication assisted treatment (MAT) for PWIDs in 2010. We assessed gender inequities in utilization of outreach and MAT services and evaluated differences in HIV risk behaviors between female and male PWIDs. Materials and Methods Routine outreach data between December 2010 to mid-August 2012 and baseline data on clients enrolling in methadone from February 2011 to August 2012 were utilized. Binomial regression was used to estimate adjusted relative risk estimates comparing females to males. Results From December 2010 to August 2012, 8,578 contacts were made to drug users; among them 1,898 were injectors. A total of 453 injectors were eligible and referred to MAT, of which, 443 enrolled in treatment. However, regarding total outreach contacts, outreach to PWID, referral to MAT and enrollment in MAT, 8% or less of drug users accessing services were women. In contrast, weighted estimations from surveys suggest that 34% of PWIDs are female, and this approximation is similar to recent population size estimations. Overall, 43% of traditional outreach workers conducting outreach with drug users were female. Though reporting higher levels of condom usage, female PWID were more likely to report multiple sex partners, anal sex, commercial sex work and struggle under a higher burden of addiction, mental disorders and abuse. Conclusions Services have not been mobilized adequately to address the clear needs of females who inject drugs. A clear and urgent need exists for women-centered strategies that effectively engage female PWID into HIV prevention services. PMID:23825620

  11. Production of limit size nanoliposomal systems with potential utility as ultra-small drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Zhigaltsev, Igor V; Tam, Ying K; Leung, Alex K K; Cullis, Pieter R

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies from this group have shown that limit size lipid-based systems - defined as the smallest achievable aggregates compatible with the packing properties of their molecular constituents - can be efficiently produced using rapid microfluidic mixing technique. In this work, it is shown that similar procedures can be employed for the production of homogeneously sized unilamellar vesicular systems of 30-40 nm size range. These vesicles can be remotely loaded with the protonable drug doxorubicin and exhibit adequate drug retention properties in vitro and in vivo. In particular, it is demonstrated that whereas sub-40 nm lipid nanoparticle (LNP) systems consisting entirely of long-chain saturated phosphatidylcholines cannot be produced, the presence of such lipids may have a beneficial effect on the retention properties of limit size systems consisting of mixed lipid components. Specifically, a 33-nm diameter doxorubicin-loaded LNP system composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and PEGylated lipid (DSPE-PEG2000) demonstrated adequate, stable drug retention in the circulation, with a half-life for drug release of ∼12 h. These results indicate that microfluidic mixing is the technique of choice for the production of bilayer LNP systems with sizes less than 50 nm that could lead to development of a novel class of ultra-small drug delivery vehicles. PMID:25856305

  12. The utility of cardiovascular drugs in the treatment of cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bösel, Julian; Amiri, Hemasse

    2010-09-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases share many pathophysiological traits, often impact one another and share several risk factors, though not always to the same magnitude. Therefore, it is not surprising that many classes of cardiovascular drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in the primary prevention, acute treatment and secondary prevention of stroke. Important advances have been made since 2007 in the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics and statins for the treatment of stroke. This review summarizes selected clinical trials of cardiovascular drugs completed from 2007 to 2010 that generated important evidence supporting the efficacy of these drugs in stroke treatment. Ongoing trials and preclinical research of promising agents and treatment strategies are also discussed. PMID:20730696

  13. Dynamic SIMS utilizing SF 5+ polyatomic primary ion beams for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Christine M.; Roberson, Sonya; Gillen, Greg

    2004-06-01

    The behavior of various biodegradable polymer films (e.g. polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid and polycaprolactone) as well as some model drugs (theophylline and 4-acetamidophenol) under dynamic SF 5+ primary ion bombardment is explored. A series of polylactic acid films containing varying concentrations of 4-acetamidophenol are also analyzed under similar conditions. The resultant molecular depth profiles obtained from these polymer films doped with drug show very little degradation in molecular signal as a function of SF 5+ primary ion dose, and it was found that the molecular ion signals of both polymer and drug remained constant for ion doses up to ˜5×10 15 ions/cm 2. In addition, the polymer film/Si interface was well defined which may imply that sputter-induced topography formation was not a significant limitation. These results suggest that the structure of the biodegradable polymers studied here which all have the common main chain structural unit, RCOOR, allows for a greater ability to depth profile due to ease of bond cleavage. Most importantly, however, these results indicate that in these particular polymer systems, the distribution of the drug as a function of depth can be monitored.

  14. Utilizing Business, University, and Community Resources to Target Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade-Mdivanian, R.; Anderson-Butcher, D.; Hale, K.; Kwiek, N.; Smock, J.; Radigan, D.; Lineberger, J.

    2012-01-01

    "Generation Rx" is a prescription drug abuse prevention strategy which includes a "toolkit" designed to be used with youth. Developed by Cardinal Health Foundation and the Ohio State University, it provides health care providers (especially pharmacists), parents, teachers, youth workers, and other community leaders with interactive tools and…

  15. Prevalence of multi-drug resistant Salmonella on comercial dairies utilizing a single heifer raising facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the current research were two-fold: 1) Determine the prevalence of multiple drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in the various classes of dairy cattle; and 2) Determine if co-mingling of calves from multiple farms at a heifer feedlot serves as a transmission vector for Salmonella back ...

  16. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... and systems to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use...

  17. The utility of diffusion chambers as models for the description of drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Ganzinger, U; Schiel, H; Georgopoulos, A; Gumhold, G

    1986-07-01

    Tissue cages were employed to explore the diffusion processes of several cephalosporins into extravascular fluids. Concentrations of cefotaxime in serum and in subcutaneous chambers increased proportionally to the amount of the drug injected. Administration of single equal doses of cephalothin, cephaloridine and cefotaxime resulted in different concentration-time courses in the serum and in diffusion chambers. These observations suggest that diffusion chambers are linked to the tissue at the implantation site. None of the classical compartmental approaches can be applied to evaluate the kinetics of drug diffusion into tissue cages. Correlations of total or non-protein bound drug concentrations in tissue cages to those in the peripheral compartment assumed concentration and time dependent diffusion processes. No specific diffusion constant based on the law of Fick could be derived for the diffusion chambers used in this study. Concentration-time courses in serum and interstitial fluid can be simultaneously evaluated according to pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models. Based on the equation describing the effect site this model can be used to simulate drug concentrations in tissue cages by varying the dose size or the dose interval. PMID:3759726

  18. Cost-Utility Analysis of IEV Drug Regimen Versus ESHAP Drug Regimen for the Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hatam, Nahid; Dehghani, Mehdi; Habibian, Mostafa; Jafari, Abdosaleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy for lymph nodes cancer is often composed of several drugs that are used in a treatment program. Objectives: The aim of this study was to perform a cost-utility analysis of IEV regimen (ifosfamide, epirubicin and etoposide) versus ESHAP regimen (etoposide, methylprednisolone, high-dose cytarabine, and cisplatin) in patients with lymphoma in the south of Iran. Patients and Methods: This was a cost-utility analysis done as a cross-sectional study in the south of Iran. Using decision tree, expected costs, quality -adjusted life years (QALYs) and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were estimated. In addition, the robustness of results was examined by sensitivity analysis. Results: The results of this study indicated that the total lymphoma patients were about 65 people that 27 patients received IEV regimen and 38 patients ESHAP (43 patients with Hodgkin’s and 22 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma). The results of decision tree showed that in the IEV arm, the expected cost was $20952.93 and the expected QALYs was 3.89 and in the ESHAP arm, the expected cost was $31691.74 and the expected QALYs was 3.86. Based on the results of the study, IEV regimen was cost-effective alternative to the ESHAP regimen. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, it is recommended that oncologists use IEV instead of ESHAP in the treatment of patients with lymphoma and because of high costs of IEV drug costs, it is suggested that IEV drugs should be covered by insurance. PMID:26634115

  19. Turning the gun on cancer: Utilizing lysosomal P-glycoprotein as a new strategy to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Nicole; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R; Jansson, Patric J

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer cells must constantly and rapidly adapt to changes in the tumor microenvironment, due to alterations in the availability of nutrients, such as glucose, oxygen and key transition metals (e.g., iron and copper). This nutrient flux is typically a consequence of rapid growth, poor vascularization and necrosis. It has been demonstrated that stress factors, such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation up-regulate master transcription factors, namely hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which transcriptionally regulate the multi-drug resistance (MDR), transmembrane drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Interestingly, in addition to the established role of plasma membrane Pgp in MDR, a new paradigm of intracellular resistance has emerged that is premised on the ability of lysosomal Pgp to transport cytotoxic agents into this organelle. This mechanism is enabled by the topological inversion of Pgp via endocytosis resulting in the transporter actively pumping agents into the lysosome. In this way, classical Pgp substrates, such as doxorubicin (DOX), can be actively transported into this organelle. Within the lysosome, DOX becomes protonated upon acidification of the lysosomal lumen, causing its accumulation. This mechanism efficiently traps DOX, preventing its cytotoxic interaction with nuclear DNA. This review discusses these effects and highlights a novel mechanism by which redox-active and protonatable Pgp substrates can utilize lysosomal Pgp to gain access to this compartment, resulting in catastrophic lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. Hence, a key MDR mechanism that utilizes Pgp (the "gun") to sequester protonatable drug substrates safely within lysosomes can be "turned on" MDR cancer cells to destroy them from within. PMID:27154979

  20. Overview of Transgenic Glioblastoma and Oligoastrocytoma CNS Models and Their Utility in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fuyi; Becker, Albert; LoTurco, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Many animal models have been developed to investigate the sources of central nervous system (CNS) tumor heterogeneity. Reviewed in this unit is a recently developed CNS tumor model using the piggyBac transposon system delivered by in utero electroporation, in which sources of tumor heterogeneity can be conveniently studied. Their applications for studying CNS tumors and drug discovery are also reviewed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26995546

  1. Utility of positron emission tomography for drug development for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Lampros; Smith-Jones, Peter M; Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Marti, Catherine N; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Skopicki, Hal A; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Parsey, Ramin; Butler, Javed

    2016-05-01

    Only about 1 in 5,000 investigational agents in a preclinical stage acquires Food and Drug Administration approval. Among many reasons for this includes an inefficient transition from preclinical to clinical phases, which exponentially increase the cost and the delays the process of drug development. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging technique that has been used for the diagnosis, risk stratification, and guidance of therapy. However, lately with the advance of radiochemistry and of molecular imaging technology, it became evident that PET could help novel drug development process. By using a PET radioligand to report on receptor occupancy during novel agent therapy, it may help assess the effectiveness, efficacy, and safety of such a new medication in an early preclinical stage and help design successful clinical trials even at a later phase. In this article, we explore the potential implications of PET in the development of new heart failure therapies and review PET's application in the respective pathophysiologic pathways such as myocardial perfusion, metabolism, innervation, inflammation, apoptosis, and cardiac remodeling. PMID:27179733

  2. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50), derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours) and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle). The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i.e. the infection became

  3. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  4. Synthesis of a drug delivery vehicle for cancer treatment utilizing DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brann, Tyler

    The treatment of cancer with chemotherapeutic agents has made great strides in the last few decades but still introduces major systemic side effects. The potent drugs needed to kill cancer cells often cause irreparable damage to otherwise healthy organs leading to further morbidity and mortality. A therapy with intrinsic selective properties and/or an inducible activation has the potential to change the way cancer can be treated. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are biocompatible and chemically versatile tools that can be readily functionalized to serve as molecular vehicles. The ability of these particles to strongly absorb light with wavelengths in the therapeutic window combined with the heating effect of surface plasmon resonance makes them uniquely suited for noninvasive heating in biologic applications. Specially designed DNA aptamers have shown their ability to serve as drug carriers through intercalation as well as directly acting as therapeutic agents. By combining these separate molecules a multifaceted drug delivery vehicle can be created with great potential as a selective and controllable treatment for cancer. Oligonucleotide-coated GNPs have been created using spherical GNPs but little work has been reported using gold nanoplates in this way. Using the Diasynth method gold nanoplates were produced to absorb strongly in the therapeutic near infrared (nIR) window. These particles were functionalized with two DNA oligonucleotides: one serving as an intercalation site for doxorubicin, and another, AS1411, serving directly as an anticancer targeting/therapeutic agent. These functional particles were fully synthesized and processed along with confirmation of DNA functionalization and doxorubicin intercalation. Doxorubicin is released via denaturation of the DNA structure into which doxorubicin is intercalated upon the heating of the gold nanoplate well above the DNA melting temperature. This temperature increase, due to light stimulation of surface plasmon

  5. Design and utilization of the drug-excipient chemical compatibility automated system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, V Hayden; Naath, Maryanne

    2008-07-01

    To accelerate clinical formulation development, an excipient compatibility screen should be conducted as early as possible and it must be rapid, robust and resource sparing. This however, does not describe the traditional excipient compatibility testing approach, requiring many tedious and labor intensive manual operations. This study focused on transforming traditional practices into a completely automated screening process to increase sample throughput and realign resources to more urgent areas, while maintaining quality. Using the developed system, a complete on-line performance study was conducted whereby drug-excipient mixtures were weighed, blended and subjected to accelerated stress stability for up to 1 month, followed by sample extraction and HPLC analysis. Compared to off-line traditional study protocols, the system provided similar relative rank order results with equivalent precision and accuracy, while increasing sample throughput. The designed system offers a resource sparing primary screen for drug-excipient chemical compatibility for solid dosage form development. This approach allows risk assessment analysis, based upon formulation complexity, to be conducted prior to the commitment of resources and candidate selection for clinical development. PMID:18486368

  6. Amorphous Solid Dispersions: Utilization and Challenges in Drug Discovery and Development.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Ho, Chris

    2015-10-01

    Amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) can accelerate a project by improving dissolution rate and solubility, offering dose escalation flexibility and excipient acceptance for toxicology studies, as well as providing adequate preclinical and clinical exposure. The prerequisite physicochemical properties for a compound to form a stable ASD are glass-forming ability and low-crystallization tendency, which can be assessed using computational tools and experimental methods. Polymer excipient screening by in silico miscibility prediction and experimental screening techniques is discussed. Improved technologies for polymer screening with minimal quantity of drug substance, and the scalability of ASD from bench to commercial are reviewed. Considerations of in vitro evaluations, preclinical animal selection, and the translation of the preclinical results to clinical studies are also discussed. Better understanding of how polymers improve the stability of the amorphous phase in the solid state and how ASD improves bioavailability have facilitated the applications of ASD ranging from discovery research to preclinical development and further to commercialization. With the understanding of how ASDs are currently used in the pharmaceutical industry and what challenges remain to be solved, ASD can be applied to solve drug formulation problems at given research and development stages. PMID:26175316

  7. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in monitoring and prognostication of osteoarthritis and its utility in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bibhu R.; Roy, Arnab; Khan, Faisal R.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major public concern as it is one of the leading causes of morbidity and lays a huge medical and economic burden on health resources. Early detection of OA has been a clinical challenge as early signs of joint inflammation are often not evidently identifiable on routine radiographic images. This presents a dire unmet medical need for a biomarker, which could detect early signs of joint inflammation much before irreversible joint damage and radiographic changes set in. Besides, the treatment of OA has remained mainly symptomatic. A disease modifying OA drug (DMOAD), which can act as targeted anti-OA therapy has not been able to receive regulatory approval yet. The clinical development of a DMAOD too warrants the need of a biomarker; which can act as a surrogate clinical endpoint used to monitor therapeutic efficacy and to validate a clinically meaningful change within the restricted time frame of a clinical study. In this regard, the current review focuses on cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a potential OA biomarker which has shown significant clinical promise as a tool for early detection, therapeutic monitoring, prognostication and drug development for OA. This brief review is pivoted around the findings of selected relevant publications from PubMed indexed journals. PMID:25657896

  8. A novel matrix for the short-term storage of cells: utility in drug metabolism and drug transporter studies with rat, dog and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Palmgren, Anna-Pia; Fihn, Britt-Marie; Bird, James; Courtney, Paul; Grime, Ken

    2013-06-01

    1. The SureTran matrix is a novel method facilitating short-term maintenance of fresh primary hepatocyte cellular function and offers the potential use of primary cells "as fresh" for several days post isolation. In the study presented, the maintenance of several key phase I and II drug metabolizing enzyme and drug transporter activities is demonstrated with rat and dog hepatocytes preserved for up to 7 days after cell isolation. 2. Intrinsic clearance values were determined for 60 new chemical entities using rat hepatocytes freshly isolated at AstraZeneca and rat hepatocytes prepared at the facilities of Abcellute Ltd (SureTran purveyors), stored and incubated 24 hours after isolation. A very good correspondence in the intrinsic clearance values underlines the utility of the cell maintenance matrix. 3. For human hepatocytes many of the enzyme activities assayed were well maintained for 7 days of storage but some declined to below 50% of initial values between day 4 and 7 of storage. Human OATP1B1 activity was only determined with one batch and declined to 51% of the initial test value by day 4 and further down to 35% by day 7. PMID:23137276

  9. Spiritual Change in Drug Treatment: Utility of the Christian Inventory of Spirituality

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Liliane Cambraia; Shorkey, Clay

    2010-01-01

    The current study used data from reliability testing of the Christian Inventory of Spirituality (CIS) to: 1) assess the utility of CIS in detecting differences in level of spirituality in residents of residential Christian faith-based substance abuse programs (RCFBSAPs); 2) test the hypothesis that residents that have been in the program for longer periods of time will have significantly higher levels of spirituality after controlling for relevant demographic characteristics; and 3) test the hypothesis that residents of programs that only use unlicensed staff and place higher importance on spirituality will have significantly higher levels of spirituality. A purposive sample of the cross-sectional data from the reliability testing of the CIS was used (n=253). Analysis supported the hypothesis. Demographic characteristics were not associated with level of spirituality. The CIS proved to be useful in discriminating levels of spirituality. Further research is needed to examine spiritual change using randomized pre-post test designs. PMID:20687002

  10. Utilizing ligand-receptor interactions for self-assembly of a novel lipid-based drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Michael Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Vesicles are closed spherical bilayer structures formed by self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules dispersed in an aqueous solution. The unique aspect of the vesicle structure is its ability to encapsulate a select volume of aqueous solution during its formation. For this reason, vesicles have been studied as models for cell membranes and have been investigated for their ability to formulate therapeutics for specialized drug delivery applications. Unfortunately, the current state of the art in vesicle-based drug delivery systems (sterically-stabilized unilamellar vesicles) has been unable to capture many of the envisioned properties for an effective delivery system with targeting capability. Natural biological systems rely upon a hierachical comparmentalization scheme, via self-assembled bilayer membranes, to create and control the myriad of physical and chemical environments necessary for life. Cells divide essential functions between a variety of membrane-enclosed structures or organelles, leading to a natural division of labor. The new vesicle-based drug delivery vehicle developed in this thesis strives to ultimately provide for a division of labor between bilayers with different lipid compositions. The structure should be capable of overcoming the limitations of unilamellar vesicle systems. The goal of this research was to study the fundamental aspects of higher-order self-assembly processes that are utilized for the creation of this novel new liposomal drug delivery system that we've named the vesosome. Site specific aggregation between lipid vesicles was mediated by ligand-receptor-ligand cross-linking of the vesicles. These tethered vesicle aggregates were then encapsulated with an outer membrane of different lipid composition to create the structure. A method for producing size-limited vesicle aggregates, without the need for mechanical extrusion, was developed by using the self-limiting nature of the ligand-receptor-ligand cross-linking reaction between

  11. Utility of Pilot Studies for Predicting Ratios and Intrasubject Variability in High-Variability Drugs.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Isabel; Ochoa, Dolores; Román, Manuel; Cabaleiro, Teresa; Abad-Santos, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Pilot studies can be used to identify adequate test formulations for pivotal bioequivalence trials. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of pilot studies in predicting ratios and the intrasubject coefficient of variation (CVw ) for pivotal studies of high-variability drugs. Seven cross-over and replicate bioequivalence trials were selected. A hundred simulations of pilot studies were performed for different sample sizes and designs. The pharmacokinetic data of the selected formulations were analysed using WinNonLin based on an analysis of variance (anova). The CVw was estimated using the formula recommended by the European Medicines Agency based on the mean square of the anova. We calculated the predictivity index ± 10% and ± 20% of the real value. The predictivity index of ± 20% in the 2 × 2 design with 12 volunteers was 100% for AUC0-t ratio, 87% for Cmax ratio, 50% for the CVw of AUC0-t and 52% for the CVw of Cmax . The results of the 4 × 4 design with 8 volunteers were similar to those of the 2 × 2 design with 12 volunteers. These results were worse for the predictivity index of ± 10% in both designs. Pilot studies do not seem useful for predicting sample size. However, they were very good for predicting the AUC0-t ratio and good for predicting the Cmax ratio. The most adequate design for pilot studies seems to be the 2 × 2 design with at least 12 volunteers. PMID:26806812

  12. Antimalarial drug utilization by women in Ethiopia: a knowledge-attitudes-practice study.

    PubMed Central

    Yeneneh, H.; Gyorkos, T. W.; Joseph, L.; Pickering, J.; Tedla, S.

    1993-01-01

    A survey was undertaken between December 1991 and February 1992 to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices with respect to malaria of 300 women from six randomly selected rural communities in central Ethiopia. A total of 85% were able to recognize one or more of the common symptoms of the disease; however, the modes of transmission were generally misunderstood and only 23% believed that transmission could be prevented. More women preferred to obtain antimalarials from government clinics rather than from private drug shops, mission clinics, unofficial suppliers of injections, open markets, or from leftover sources. Under-5-year-olds were identified as the most malaria-vulnerable group and given priority for treatment; severity of illness was the principal determinant in seeking treatment. Decisions about treatment were generally made jointly by both parents. Knowledge about the transmissibility of malaria decreased with increasing distance from a health unit (odds ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.86). A logistic regression analysis indicated that literacy and village were the most important variables associated with knowledge about preventing malaria. PMID:8313494

  13. Computer utilization in the Food and Drug Administration's bureau of foods mass spectrometry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Dreifuss, P A; Dusold, L R

    1982-09-01

    A network of computers is being used to support the Food and Drug Administration's Bureau of Foods mass spectrometry facility. Five mass spectrometers are each interfaced to at least 2 of the 6 dedicated minicomputers in the laboratory. This multiple interfacing provides data acquisition and processing backup, reducing the overall down-time. Selected data from all of the minicomputers can be sent to FDA's main computers via a digital cartridge tape recorder or paper tape. The digital cartridge tape recorder records data that are output from a minicomputer terminal and then plays it back on a terminal which is on-line with the main computer. This main computer stores and edits data; plots spectra for reports, data banks, and publications; and carries out some data processing. Multiple interfacing also serves to supplement the capabilities of the 8-year-old Finnigan MAT (formerly Varian MAT) SS-100 data system (Sperry-Univac/V-76) with the newer and more powerful Finnigan MAT INCOS (Data General/Nova 3) data system. The SS-100 data system is also enhanced by the substitution of the 110 baud paper tape with a 9600 baud cartridge tape recorder for I/O of system bootstraps, BASIC programs, and raw data. PMID:7130097

  14. Unique and potent effects of acute ibogaine on zebrafish: the developing utility of novel aquatic models for hallucinogenic drug research.

    PubMed

    Cachat, Jonathan; Kyzar, Evan J; Collins, Christopher; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Green, Jeremy; Roth, Andrew; El-Ounsi, Mohamed; Davis, Ari; Pham, Mimi; Landsman, Samuel; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-01

    An indole alkaloid, ibogaine is the principal psychoactive component of the iboga plant, used by indigenous peoples in West Africa for centuries. Modulating multiple neurotransmitter systems, the drug is a potent hallucinogen in humans, although its psychotropic effects remain poorly understood. Expanding the range of model species is an important strategy for translational neuroscience research. Here we exposed adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 10 and 20mg/L of ibogaine, testing them in the novel tank, light-dark box, open field, mirror stimulation, social preference and shoaling tests. In the novel tank test, the zebrafish natural diving response (geotaxis) was reversed by ibogaine, inducing initial top swimming followed by bottom dwelling. Ibogaine also attenuated the innate preference for dark environments (scototaxis) in the light-dark box test. While it did not exert overt locomotor or thigmotaxic responses in the open field test, the drug altered spatiotemporal exploration of novel environment, inducing clear preference of some areas over others. Ibogaine also promoted 'mirror' exploration in the mirror stimulation test, disrupted group cohesion in the shoaling test, and evoked strong coloration responses due to melanophore aggregation, but did not alter brain c-fos expression or whole-body cortisol levels. Overall, our results support the complex pharmacological profile of ibogaine and its high sensitivity in zebrafish models, dose-dependently affecting multiple behavioral domains. While future investigations in zebrafish may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying these unique behavioral effects, our study strongly supports the developing utility of aquatic models in hallucinogenic drug research. High sensitivity of three-dimensional phenotyping approaches applied here to behavioral effects of ibogaine in zebrafish provides further evidence of how 3D reconstructions of zebrafish swimming paths may be useful for high-throughput pharmacological screening

  15. Pro-Arrhythmic Potential of Oral Antihistamines (H1): Combining Adverse Event Reports with Drug Utilization Data across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Raschi, Emanuel; Godman, Brian; Koci, Ariola; Moretti, Ugo; Kalaba, Marija; Wettermark, Bjorn; Sturkenboom, Miriam; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Background There is appreciable utilisation of antihistamines (H1) in European countries, either prescribed by physician and purchased by patients for self-medication. Terfenadine and astemizole underwent regulatory restrictions in ’90 because of their cardiac toxicity, but only scarce clinical data are available on other antihistamines. Aim To investigate the pro-arrhythmic potential of antihistamines by combining safety reports of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) with drug utilization data from 13 European Countries. Methods We identified signals of antihistamine arrhythmogenic potential by analyzing FAERS database for all cases of Torsades de Pointes (TdP), QT abnormalities (QTabn), ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden cardiac death/cardiac arrest (SCD/CA). Number of cases ≥3 and disproportionality were used to define alert signals: TdP and QTabn identified stronger signals, whereas SCD/CA identified weaker signals. Drug utilization data from 2005 to 2010 were collected from administrative databases through health authorities and insurance. Results Antihistamines were reported in 109 cases of TdP/QT prolongation, 278 VA and 610 SCD/CA. Five agents resulted in stronger signals (cetirizine, desloratadine, diphenhydramine, fexofenadine, loratadine) and 6 in weaker signals (alimemazine, carbinoxamine, cyclizine, cyproeptadine, dexchlorpheniramine and doxylamine). Exposure to antihistamines with stronger signal was markedly different across European countries and was at least 40% in each Country. Cetirizine was >29 Defined Daily Doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID) in Norway, desloratadine >11 DID in France and loratadine >9 DID in Sweden and Croatia. Drugs with weaker signals accounted for no more than 10% (in Sweden) and in most European countries their use was negligible. Conclusions Some second-generation antihistamines are associated with signal of torsadogenicity and largely used in most European countries. Although confirmation by

  16. Ten-Year Trends in the Morbidity of Diabetes Mellitus and Antidiabetic Drug Utilization in Croatia: A Study Based on Routinely Collected Data

    PubMed Central

    Topličan, Ivančica; Vrcić Keglević, Mladenka

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate trends of diabetes mellitus (DM) morbidity and antidiabetic drug utilization in Croatian primary health care (PHC) from 2005 to 2014. Method. Routinely collected morbidity data from all PHC units, presented in Croatian health-statistics yearbooks, were retrieved. Data on drug utilization were retrieved from the Annual Reports of the Croatian Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (ATC/DDD, antidiabetic, A10). Results. Total morbidity increased by 33.3% and DM increased by 65.6%, mostly in patients over age 65 (from 50% to 57%). Estimated DM prevalence in adults increased from 3.9% to 6.4%. Increased morbidity was followed by an even higher increase in drug utilization (120%). Metformin was first, with a constant increase (from 18% to 39%), followed by glimepiride, while glibenclamide use decreased. Total utilization of insulin increased even more, mostly for aspart (600%) and newly introduced glargine and detemir, while human insulin usage sharply decreased. Spending also increased, mostly for aspart (from 21% to 61% of total). Conclusions. Increased DM is followed by a higher increase in antidiabetic drug utilization; this trend will continue in the future. In Croatian PHC, metformin has primacy along with insulin analogues. PMID:27462470

  17. Ten-Year Trends in the Morbidity of Diabetes Mellitus and Antidiabetic Drug Utilization in Croatia: A Study Based on Routinely Collected Data.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Renata; Topličan, Ivančica; Vrcić Keglević, Mladenka

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate trends of diabetes mellitus (DM) morbidity and antidiabetic drug utilization in Croatian primary health care (PHC) from 2005 to 2014. Method. Routinely collected morbidity data from all PHC units, presented in Croatian health-statistics yearbooks, were retrieved. Data on drug utilization were retrieved from the Annual Reports of the Croatian Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (ATC/DDD, antidiabetic, A10). Results. Total morbidity increased by 33.3% and DM increased by 65.6%, mostly in patients over age 65 (from 50% to 57%). Estimated DM prevalence in adults increased from 3.9% to 6.4%. Increased morbidity was followed by an even higher increase in drug utilization (120%). Metformin was first, with a constant increase (from 18% to 39%), followed by glimepiride, while glibenclamide use decreased. Total utilization of insulin increased even more, mostly for aspart (600%) and newly introduced glargine and detemir, while human insulin usage sharply decreased. Spending also increased, mostly for aspart (from 21% to 61% of total). Conclusions. Increased DM is followed by a higher increase in antidiabetic drug utilization; this trend will continue in the future. In Croatian PHC, metformin has primacy along with insulin analogues. PMID:27462470

  18. The utility of the zebrafish model in conditioned place preference to assess the rewarding effects of drugs.

    PubMed

    Collier, Adam D; Echevarria, David J

    2013-09-01

    Substance abuse is a significant public health concern both domestically and worldwide. The persistent use of substances regardless of aversive consequences forces the user to give higher priority to the drug than to normal activities and obligations. The harmful and hazardous use of psychoactive substances can lead to a dependence syndrome. In this regard, the genetic and neurobiological underpinnings of reward-seeking behavior need to be fully understood in order to develop effective pharmacotherapies and other methods of treatment. Animal models are often implemented in preclinical screening for testing the efficacy of novel treatments. Several paradigms exist that model various facets of addiction including sensitization, tolerance, withdrawal, drug seeking, extinction, and relapse. Self-administration and, most notably, conditioned place preference (CPP) are relatively simple tests that serve as indicators of the aforementioned aspects of addiction by means of behavioral quantification. CPP is a commonly used technique to evaluate the motivational effects of compounds and experiences that have been associated with a positive or negative reward, which capitalizes on the basic principles of Pavlovian conditioning. During training, the unconditioned stimulus is consistently paired with a neutral set of environmental stimuli, which obtain, during conditioning, secondary motivational properties that elicit approach behavior in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus. For over 50 years, rodents have been the primary test subjects. However, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) is gaining favor as a valuable model organism in the fields of biology, genetics, and behavioral neuroscience. This paper presents a discussion on the merits, advantages, and limitations of the zebrafish model and its utility in relation to CPP. PMID:23811781

  19. Patterns of finasteride use in the male populations of four Nordic countries: A cross-national drug utilization study.

    PubMed

    Kjærulff, T M; Ersbøll, A K; Green, A; Emneus, M; Pukkala, E; Bolin, K; Stavem, K; Iversen, P; Brasso, K; Hallas, J; Thygesen, L C

    2016-06-01

    Objective Finasteride 5 mg is a drug used to treat prostate hyperplasia. Little is known about its pattern of usage. This cross-national analysis of individual-level data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden was undertaken to appraise its usage and describe cross-national differences. Materials and methods Individual-level data from nationwide prescription registers in Denmark (1995-2009), Finland (1997-2010), Norway (2004-2009) and Sweden (July 2005-2011) were used to examine cross-national finasteride utilization patterns in the adult male population (≥15 years). The study presents period prevalences, incidence rates, waiting time distributions and Lorenz curves. Results During the study period, 295,620 men had at least one prescription redemption of finasteride 5 mg, and there were approximately 3 million dispensing events of finasteride prescriptions in the four Nordic countries. Different patterns of finasteride use were observed among the four Nordic countries. The period prevalence was markedly higher in Finland and Sweden than in Denmark and Norway. In 2009, period prevalences were 18.2/1000 males in Finland and 12.0/1000 males in Sweden compared to 6.7/1000 males in Norway and 4.9/1000 males in Denmark. Incidence rates of finasteride use for Finland, Norway and Sweden were about three times that for Denmark in 2008-2009. Long-term use of finasteride was found in all four Nordic countries with a high ratio between prevalent and incident users. Conclusion Despite resemblances regarding political systems and healthcare services in the Nordic countries, differences in finasteride utilization were found across Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. PMID:26901820

  20. Impact of drug price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A previous study has suggested that drug price adjustments allow physicians in Taiwan to gain greater profit by prescribing generic drugs. To better understand the effect of price adjustments on physician choice, this study used renin-angiotensin drugs (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] and angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) to examine the impact of price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on patented and off-patent drugs with the same therapeutic indication. Methods Using the Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (2005), we identified 147,157 patients received ACEIs and/or ARBs between 1997 and 2008. The annual incident and prevalent users of ACEIs, ARBs and overall renin-angiotensin drugs were examined. Box-Tiao intervention analysis was applied to assess the impact of price adjustments on monthly utilization of and expenditures on these drugs. ACEIs were divided into patented and off-patent drugs, off-patent ACEIs were further divided into original brands and generics, and subgroup analyses were performed. Results The number of incident renin-angiotensin drug users decreased over the study period. The number of prevalent ARB users increased and exceeded the cumulative number of first-time renin-angiotensin drug users starting on ARBs, implying that some patients switched from ACEIs to ARBs. After price adjustments, long term trend increases in utilization were observed for patented ACEIs and ARBs; a long-term trend decrease was observed for off-patent ACEIs; long-term trend change was not significant for overall renin-angiotensin drugs. Significant long-term trend increases in expenditures were observed for patented ACEIs after price adjustment in 2007 (200.9%, p = 0.0088) and in ARBs after price adjustments in 2001 (173.4%, p < 0.0001) and 2007 (146.3%, p < 0.0001). A significant long-term trend decrease in expenditures was observed for off-patent ACEIs after 2004 price adjustment (

  1. Clinically Inconsequential Alerts: The Characteristics of Opioid Drug Alerts and Their Utility in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Genco, Emma K.; Forster, Jeri E.; Flaten, Hanna; Goss, Foster; Heard, Kennon J.; Hoppe, Jason; Monte, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Study objective We examine the characteristics of clinical decision support alerts triggered when opioids are prescribed, including alert type, override rates, adverse drug events associated with opioids, and preventable adverse drug events. Methods This was a retrospective chart review study assessing adverse drug event occurrences for emergency department (ED) visits in a large urban academic medical center using a commercial electronic health record system with clinical decision support. Participants include those aged 18 to 89 years who arrived to the ED every fifth day between September 2012 and January 2013. The main outcome was characteristics of opioid drug alerts, including alert type, override rates, opioid-related adverse drug events, and adverse drug event preventability by clinical decision support. Results Opioid drug alerts were more likely to be overridden than nonopioid alerts (relative risk 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21 to 1.50). Opioid drug-allergy alerts were twice as likely to be overridden (relative risk 2.24; 95% CI 1.74 to 2.89). Opioid duplicate therapy alerts were 1.57 times as likely to be overridden (95% CI 1.30 to 1.89). Fourteen of 4,581 patients experienced an adverse drug event (0.31%; 95% CI 0.15% to 0.47%), and 8 were due to opioids (57.1%). None of the adverse drug events were preventable by clinical decision support. However, 46 alerts were accepted for 38 patients that averted a potential adverse drug event. Overall, 98.9% of opioid alerts did not result in an actual or averted adverse drug event, and 96.3% of opioid alerts were overridden. Conclusion Overridden opioid alerts did not result in adverse drug events. Clinical decision support successfully prevented adverse drug events at the expense of generating a large volume of inconsequential alerts. To prevent 1 adverse drug event, providers dealt with more than 123 unnecessary alerts. It is essential to refine clinical decision support alerting systems to eliminate

  2. Inpatient drug utilization in Europe: nationwide data sources and a review of publications on a selected group of medicines (PROTECT project).

    PubMed

    Sabaté, Mònica; Ferrer, Pili; Ballarín, Elena; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Amelio, Justyne; Schmiedl, Sven; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2015-03-01

    Drug utilization (DU) studies in inpatient settings at a national level are rarely conducted. The main objective of this study was to review the general information on hospital medicine management in Europe and to report on the availability and characteristics of nationwide administrative drug consumption databases. A secondary objective was to perform a review of published studies on hospital DU of a group of selected drugs, focusing on methodological characteristics (ATC/DDD). General information on hospital drug management was retrieved from several websites, nationwide administrative drug consumption databases and reports published by governmental organizations. A PubMed search was conducted using keywords related to the selected group of drugs AND 'hospital drug utilization'. The data sources for hospital DU information varied widely and included 14 databases from 25 reviewed countries. Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Latvia, Norway and Sweden obtain information on inpatient DU at a national level from wholesalers/manufacturers. In Belgium, Italy and Portugal, drugs dispensed to patients in hospitals are registered at a national level. Data are freely available online only for Denmark and Iceland. From the PubMed search, of a total of 868 retrieved studies, only 13 studies used the ATC/DDD methodology. Although the number of DDD/100 bed-days was used in four studies, other units of measure were also used. The type of information provided for the inpatient sector allowed primarily for conducting DU research at an aggregated data level. The existence of national administrative structures to monitor hospital DU would contribute to promoting the rational use of medicines and improving the safety and quality of prescribing. PMID:25420967

  3. Utilization of H-bond interaction of nucleobase Uralic with antitumor methotrexate to design drug carrier with ultrahigh loading efficiency and pH-responsive drug release

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Teng-Teng; Lei, Qi; Yang, Bin; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Cheng, Hong; Liu, Li-Han; Zeng, Xuan; Feng, Jun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel Uralic (U)-rich linear-hyperbranched mono-methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-hyperbranched polyglycerol-graft-Uralic (mPEG-HPG-g-U) nanoparticle (NP) was prepared as drug carrier for antitumor methotrexate (MTX). Due to the H-bond interaction of U with MTX and hydrophobic interaction, this NP exhibited high drug loading efficiency of up to 40%, which was significantly higher than that of traditional NPs based on U-absent copolymers (<15%). In addition, MTX-loaded mPEG-HPG-g-U NPs also demonstrated an acidity-accelerated drug release behavior. PMID:26816622

  4. A challenge for diagnosing acute liver injury with concomitant/sequential exposure to multiple drugs: can causality assessment scales be utilized to identify the offending drug?

    PubMed

    Lim, Roxanne; Choudry, Hassan; Conner, Kim; Karnsakul, Wikrom

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity most commonly manifests as an acute hepatitis syndrome and remains the leading cause of drug-induced death/mortality and the primary reason for withdrawal of drugs from the pharmaceutical market. We report a case of acute liver injury in a 12-year-old Hispanic boy, who received a series of five antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, ampicillin/sulbactam, and clindamycin) for cervical lymphadenitis/retropharyngeal cellulitis. Histopathology of the liver biopsy specimen revealed acute cholestatic hepatitis. All known causes of acute liver injury were appropriately excluded and (only) drug-induced liver injury was left as a cause of his cholestasis. Liver-specific causality assessment scales such as Council for the International Organization of Medical Sciences/Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method scoring system (CIOMS/RUCAM), Maria and Victorino scale, and Digestive Disease Week-Japan were applied to seek the most likely offending drug. Although clindamycin is the most likely cause by clinical diagnosis, none of causality assessment scales aid in the diagnosis. PMID:25506455

  5. The Utility of Impulsive Bias and Altered Decision Making as Predictors of Drug Efficacy and Target Selection: Rethinking Behavioral Screening for Antidepressant Drugs.

    PubMed

    Marek, Gerard J; Day, Mark; Hudzik, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction may be a core feature of major depressive disorder, including affective processing bias, abnormal response to negative feedback, changes in decision making, and increased impulsivity. Accordingly, a translational medicine paradigm predicts clinical action of novel antidepressants by examining drug-induced changes in affective processing bias. With some exceptions, these concepts have not been systematically applied to preclinical models to test new chemical entities. The purpose of this review is to examine whether an empirically derived behavioral screen for antidepressant drugs may screen for compounds, at least in part, by modulating an impulsive biasing of responding and altered decision making. The differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) 72-second schedule is an operant schedule with a documented fidelity for discriminating antidepressant drugs from nonantidepressant drugs. However, a theoretical basis for this empirical relationship has been lacking. Therefore, this review will discuss whether response bias toward impulsive behavior may be a critical screening characteristic of DRL behavior requiring long inter-response times to obtain rewards. This review will compare and contrast DRL behavior with the five-choice serial reaction time task, a test specifically designed for assessing motoric impulsivity, with respect to psychopharmacological testing and the neural basis of distributed macrocircuits underlying these tasks. This comparison suggests that the existing empirical basis for the DRL 72-second schedule as a pharmacological screen for antidepressant drugs is complemented by a novel hypothesis that altering impulsive response bias for rodents trained on this operant schedule is a previously unrecognized theoretical cornerstone for this screening paradigm. PMID:26699144

  6. Utility of spatially-resolved atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques as alternatives to mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in drug metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blatherwick, Eleanor Q.; Van Berkel, Gary J; Pickup, Kathryn; Johansson, Maria K.; Beaudoin, Marie-Eve; Cole, Roderic; Day, Jennifer M.; Iverson, Suzanne; Wilson, Ian D.; Scrivens, James H.; Weston, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    1. Tissue distribution studies of drug molecules play an essential role in the pharmaceutical industry and are commonly undertaken using quantitative whole body autoradiography (QWBA) methods. 2. The growing need for complementary methods to address some scientific gaps around radiography methods has led to increased use of mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) technology over the last 5 to 10 years. More recently, the development of novel mass spectrometric techniques for ambient surface sampling has redefined what can be regarded as fit-for-purpose for MSI in a drug metabolism and disposition arena. 3. Together with a review of these novel alternatives, this paper details the use of two liquid microjunction (LMJ)- based mass spectrometric surface sampling technologies. These approaches are used to provide qualitative determination of parent drug in rat liver tissue slices using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) and to assess the performance of a LMJ surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP) interface for quantitative assessment of parent drug in brain, liver and muscle tissue slices. 4. An assessment of the utility of these spatially-resolved sampling methods is given, showing interdependence between mass spectrometric and QWBA methods, in particular there emerges a reason to question typical MSI workflows for drug metabolism; suggesting the expedient use of profile or region analysis may be more appropriate, rather than generating time-intensive molecular images of the entire tissue section.

  7. Dabigatran - a continuing exemplar case history demonstrating the need for comprehensive models to optimize the utilization of new drugs

    PubMed Central

    Godman, Brian; Malmström, Rickard E.; Diogene, Eduardo; Jayathissa, Sisira; McTaggart, Stuart; Cars, Thomas; Alvarez-Madrazo, Samantha; Baumgärtel, Christoph; Brzezinska, Anna; Bucsics, Anna; Campbell, Stephen; Eriksson, Irene; Finlayson, Alexander; Fürst, Jurij; Garuoliene, Kristina; Gutiérrez-Ibarluzea, Iñaki; Hviding, Krystyna; Herholz, Harald; Joppi, Roberta; Kalaba, Marija; Laius, Ott; Malinowska, Kamila; Pedersen, Hanne B.; Markovic-Pekovic, Vanda; Piessnegger, Jutta; Selke, Gisbert; Sermet, Catherine; Spillane, Susan; Tomek, Dominik; Vončina, Luka; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera; Wale, Janet; Wladysiuk, Magdalena; van Woerkom, Menno; Zara, Corinne; Gustafsson, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are potential conflicts between authorities and companies to fund new premium priced drugs especially where there are effectiveness, safety and/or budget concerns. Dabigatran, a new oral anticoagulant for the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), exemplifies this issue. Whilst new effective treatments are needed, there are issues in the elderly with dabigatran due to variable drug concentrations, no known antidote and dependence on renal elimination. Published studies showed dabigatran to be cost-effective but there are budget concerns given the prevalence of AF. These concerns resulted in extensive activities pre- to post-launch to manage its introduction. Objective: To (i) review authority activities across countries, (ii) use the findings to develop new models to better manage the entry of new drugs, and (iii) review the implications based on post-launch activities. Methodology: (i) Descriptive review and appraisal of activities regarding dabigatran, (ii) development of guidance for key stakeholder groups through an iterative process, (iii) refining guidance following post launch studies. Results: Plethora of activities to manage dabigatran including extensive pre-launch activities, risk sharing arrangements, prescribing restrictions and monitoring of prescribing post launch. Reimbursement has been denied in some countries due to concerns with its budget impact and/or excessive bleeding. Development of a new model and future guidance is proposed to better manage the entry of new drugs, centering on three pillars of pre-, peri-, and post-launch activities. Post-launch activities include increasing use of patient registries to monitor the safety and effectiveness of new drugs in clinical practice. Conclusion: Models for introducing new drugs are essential to optimize their prescribing especially where concerns. Without such models, new drugs may be withdrawn prematurely and/or struggle for funding. PMID

  8. Utility of NBD-Cl for the spectrophotometric determination of some skeletal muscle relaxant and antihistaminic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Hanaa M.; EL-Henawee, Magda M.; Ragab, Gamal H.; El-Hay, Soad S. Abd

    2007-08-01

    A simple, accurate, precise and sensitive colorimetric method for the determination of some skeletal muscle relaxant drugs, namely orphenadrine citrate ( I), baclofen ( II), antihistaminic drugs as acrivastine ( III) and fexofenadine hydrochloride ( IV) is described. This method is based on the formation of charge transfer complex with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) in non-aqueous medium. The orange color products were measured at 472, 465, 475 and 469 nm for drugs I, II, III and IV, respectively. The optimization of various experimental conditions was described. Beer's Law was obeyed in the range (2.5-17.5), (5-70), (2.5-25) and (10-50) μg/ml for drugs I, II, III and IV, respectively. The molar absorptivity ( ɛ), sandell sensitivity, detection (LOD) and quantitation limits (LOQ) are calculated. The procedure was favorably applied for determination of certain pharmaceutical dosage forms containing the studied drugs. The obtained results were compared with the official and reported methods. There were no significant differences between proposed, reported and the official methods.

  9. Key clinical considerations for demonstrating the utility of preclinical models to predict clinical drug-induced torsades de pointes

    PubMed Central

    Sager, P T

    2008-01-01

    While the QT/QTc interval is currently the best available clinical surrogate for the development of drug-induced torsades de pointes, it is overall an imperfect biomarker. In addition to low specificity for predicting arrhythmias, other issues relevant to using QT as a biomarker include (1) an apparent dissociation, for some drugs (for example, amiodarone, sodium pentobarbital, ranolazine) between QT/QTc interval prolongation and TdP risk, (2) Lack of clarity regarding what determines the relationship between QTc prolongation and TdP risk for an individual drug, (3) QT measurement issues, including effects of heart rate and autonomic perturbations, (4) the significant circadian changes to the QT/QTc interval and (5) concerns that the development, regulatory and commercial implications of finding even a mild QT prolongation effect during clinical development has significant impact the pharmaceutical discovery pipeline. These issues would be significantly reduced, clinical development simplified and marketing approval for some drugs might be accelerated if there were a battery of preclinical tests that could reliably predict a drug's propensity to cause TdP in humans, even in the presence of QTc interval prolongation. This approach is challenging and for it to be acceptable to pharmaceutical developers, the scientific community and regulators, it would need to be scientifically well validated. A very high-negative predictive value demonstrated in a wide range of drugs with different ionic effects would be critical. This manuscript explores the issues surrounding the use of QT as a clinical biomarker and potential approaches for validating preclinical assays for this purpose against clinical data sets. PMID:18536754

  10. Key clinical considerations for demonstrating the utility of preclinical models to predict clinical drug-induced torsades de pointes.

    PubMed

    Sager, P T

    2008-08-01

    While the QT/QTc interval is currently the best available clinical surrogate for the development of drug-induced torsades de pointes, it is overall an imperfect biomarker. In addition to low specificity for predicting arrhythmias, other issues relevant to using QT as a biomarker include (1) an apparent dissociation, for some drugs (for example, amiodarone, sodium pentobarbital, ranolazine) between QT/QTc interval prolongation and TdP risk, (2) Lack of clarity regarding what determines the relationship between QTc prolongation and TdP risk for an individual drug, (3) QT measurement issues, including effects of heart rate and autonomic perturbations, (4) the significant circadian changes to the QT/QTc interval and (5) concerns that the development, regulatory and commercial implications of finding even a mild QT prolongation effect during clinical development has significant impact the pharmaceutical discovery pipeline. These issues would be significantly reduced, clinical development simplified and marketing approval for some drugs might be accelerated if there were a battery of preclinical tests that could reliably predict a drug's propensity to cause TdP in humans, even in the presence of QTc interval prolongation. This approach is challenging and for it to be acceptable to pharmaceutical developers, the scientific community and regulators, it would need to be scientifically well validated. A very high-negative predictive value demonstrated in a wide range of drugs with different ionic effects would be critical. This manuscript explores the issues surrounding the use of QT as a clinical biomarker and potential approaches for validating preclinical assays for this purpose against clinical data sets. PMID:18536754

  11. Regenerated cellulose capsules for controlled drug delivery: Part III. Developing a fabrication method and evaluating extemporaneous utility for controlled-release.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Bhavik; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-25

    In this article, we describe a method to utilize cellulose dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and paraformaldehyde solvent system to fabricate two-piece regenerated cellulose hard shell capsules for their potential use as an oral controlled drug delivery a priori vehicle. A systematic evaluation of solution rheology as well as resulting capsule mechanical, visual and thermal analysis was performed to develop a suitable method to repeatedly fabricate RC hard shell capsule halves. Because of the viscoelastic nature of the cellulose solution, a combination of dip-coating and casting method, herein referred to as dip-casting method, was developed. The dip-casting method was formalized by utilizing two-stage 2(2) full factorial design approach in order to determine a suitable approach to fabricate capsules with minimal variability. Thermal annealing is responsible for imparting shape rigidity of the capsules. Proof-of-concept analysis for the utility of these capsules in controlled drug delivery was performed by evaluating the release of KCl from them as well as from commercially available USP equivalent formulations. Release of KCl from cellulose capsules was comparable to extended release capsule formulation. PMID:27262541

  12. A Review: The Current In Vivo Models for the Discovery and Utility of New Anti-leishmanial Drugs Targeting Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Mears, Emily Rose; Modabber, Farrokh; Don, Robert; Johnson, George E.

    2015-01-01

    The current in vivo models for the utility and discovery of new potential anti-leishmanial drugs targeting Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) differ vastly in their immunological responses to the disease and clinical presentation of symptoms. Animal models that show similarities to the human form of CL after infection with Leishmania should be more representative as to the effect of the parasite within a human. Thus, these models are used to evaluate the efficacy of new anti-leishmanial compounds before human clinical trials. Current animal models aim to investigate (i) host–parasite interactions, (ii) pathogenesis, (iii) biochemical changes/pathways, (iv) in vivo maintenance of parasites, and (v) clinical evaluation of drug candidates. This review focuses on the trends of infection observed between Leishmania parasites, the predictability of different strains, and the determination of parasite load. These factors were used to investigate the overall effectiveness of the current animal models. The main aim was to assess the efficacy and limitations of the various CL models and their potential for drug discovery and evaluation. In conclusion, we found that the following models are the most suitable for the assessment of anti-leishmanial drugs: L. major–C57BL/6 mice (or–vervet monkey, or–rhesus monkeys), L. tropica–CsS-16 mice, L. amazonensis–CBA mice, L. braziliensis–golden hamster (or–rhesus monkey). We also provide in-depth guidance for which models are not suitable for these investigations. PMID:26334763

  13. A Review: The Current In Vivo Models for the Discovery and Utility of New Anti-leishmanial Drugs Targeting Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Mears, Emily Rose; Modabber, Farrokh; Don, Robert; Johnson, George E

    2015-01-01

    The current in vivo models for the utility and discovery of new potential anti-leishmanial drugs targeting Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) differ vastly in their immunological responses to the disease and clinical presentation of symptoms. Animal models that show similarities to the human form of CL after infection with Leishmania should be more representative as to the effect of the parasite within a human. Thus, these models are used to evaluate the efficacy of new anti-leishmanial compounds before human clinical trials. Current animal models aim to investigate (i) host-parasite interactions, (ii) pathogenesis, (iii) biochemical changes/pathways, (iv) in vivo maintenance of parasites, and (v) clinical evaluation of drug candidates. This review focuses on the trends of infection observed between Leishmania parasites, the predictability of different strains, and the determination of parasite load. These factors were used to investigate the overall effectiveness of the current animal models. The main aim was to assess the efficacy and limitations of the various CL models and their potential for drug discovery and evaluation. In conclusion, we found that the following models are the most suitable for the assessment of anti-leishmanial drugs: L. major-C57BL/6 mice (or-vervet monkey, or-rhesus monkeys), L. tropica-CsS-16 mice, L. amazonensis-CBA mice, L. braziliensis-golden hamster (or-rhesus monkey). We also provide in-depth guidance for which models are not suitable for these investigations. PMID:26334763

  14. Rapid and facile detection of four date rape drugs in different beverages utilizing proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).

    PubMed

    Jürschik, Simone; Agarwal, Bishu; Kassebacher, Thomas; Sulzer, Philipp; Mayhew, Christopher A; Märk, Tilmann D

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we illustrate the application of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in the field of food and drink safety. We present proof-of-principle measurements of four different drinks (water, tea, red wine and white wine) each spiked separately with four different date rape drugs (chloral hydrate, tricholorethanol, γ-butyrolactone and butanediol). At first, the ideal PTR-MS operating conditions (reduced electric field strength and monitoring the most abundant [fragment] ion) for detection of the drugs were determined utilizing a time-of-flight-based PTR-MS instrument. We then dissolved small quantities of the drugs (below the activation threshold for effects on humans) into the various types of drinks and detected them using a quadrupole-based PTR-MS instrument via two different sampling methods: (1) dynamic headspace sampling and (2) direct liquid injection. Both methods have their advantages and drawbacks. Only with dynamic headspace sampling can rape drug contaminations be detected within a timeframe of seconds, and therefore, this method is the most promising use of PTR-MS as a fast, sensitive and selective monitor for the detection of food and drink contamination. PMID:22972776

  15. New Alert Override Codes for the Drug Utilization Review System Derived from Outpatient Prescription Data from a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ki-Bong; Kim, Woojae; Park, Man Young; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Park, Rae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper proposes new alert override reason codes that are improvements on existing Drug Utilization Review (DUR) codes based on an analysis of DUR alert override cases in a tertiary medical institution. Methods Data were obtained from a tertiary teaching hospital covering the period from April 1, 2012 to January 15, 2013. We analyzed cases in which doctors had used the 11 overlapping prescription codes provided by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) or had provided free-text reasons. Results We identified 27,955 alert override cases. Among these, 7,772 (27.8%) utilized the HIRA codes, and 20,183 (72.2%) utilized free-text reasons. According to the free-text content analysis, 8,646 cases (42.8%) could be classified using the 11 HIRA codes, and 11,537 (57.2%) could not. In the unclassifiable cases, we identified the need for codes for "prescription relating to operation" and "emergency situations." Two overlapping prescription codes required removal because they were not used. Codes A, C, F, H, I, and J (for drug non-administration cases) explained surrounding situations in too much detail, making differentiation between them difficult. These 6 codes were merged into code J4: "patient was not taking/will not take the medications involved in the DDI." Of the 11 HIRA codes, 6 were merged into a single code, 2 were removed, and 2 were added, yielding 6 alert override codes. We could codify 23,550 (84.2%) alert override cases using these codes. Conclusions These new codes will facilitate the use of the drug–drug interactions alert override in the current DUR system. For further study, an appropriate evaluation should be conducted with prescribing clinicians. PMID:26893949

  16. A New Screen for Tuberculosis Drug Candidates Utilizing a Luciferase-Expressing Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guéren

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Masayuki; Doe, Matsumi; Tamaru, Aki; Kinoshita, Naoko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Sawa, Ryuichi; Umekita, Maya; Enany, Shymaa; Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Niki, Mamiko; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Hatano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious infectious disease caused by a bacterial pathogen. Mortality from tuberculosis was estimated at 1.5 million deaths worldwide in 2013. Development of new TB drugs is needed to not only to shorten the medication period but also to treat multi-drug resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) grows slowly and only multiplies once or twice per day. Therefore, conventional drug screening takes more than 3 weeks. Additionally, a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) facility is required. Thus, we developed a new screening method to identify TB drug candidates by utilizing luciferase-expressing recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guéren (rBCG). Using this method, we identified several candidates in 4 days in a non-BSL-3 facility. We screened 10,080 individual crude extracts derived from Actinomyces and Streptomyces and identified 137 extracts which possessed suppressive activity to the luciferase of rBCG. Among them, 41 compounds inhibited the growth of both Mtb H37Rv and the extensively drug-resistant Mtb (XDR-Mtb) strains. We purified the active substance of the 1904–1 extract, which possessed strong activity toward rBCG, Mtb H37Rv, and XDR-Mtb but was harmless to the host eukaryotic cells. The MIC of this substance was 0.13 μg/ml, 0.5 μg/ml, and 2.0–7.5 μg/ml against rBCG, H37Rv, and 2 XDR-strains, respectively. Its efficacy was specific to acid-fast bacterium except for the Mycobacterium avium intracellular complex. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed that the active substance of 1904–1 was cyclomarin A. To confirm the mode of action of the 1904-1-derived compound, resistant BCG clones were used. Whole genome DNA sequence analysis showed that these clones contained a mutation in the clpc gene which encodes caseinolytic protein, an essential component of an ATP-dependent proteinase, and the likely target of the active substance of 1904–1. Our method provides a

  17. Can utilizing a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system prevent hospital medical errors and adverse drug events?

    PubMed

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians' resistance to change. PMID:25593568

  18. Assessment of function and clinical utility of alcohol and other drug web sites: An observational, qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing popularity and use of the internet makes it an attractive option for providing health information and treatment, including alcohol/other drug use. There is limited research examining how people identify and access information about alcohol or other drug (AOD) use online, or how they assess the usefulness of the information presented. This study examined the strategies that individuals used to identify and navigate a range of AOD websites, along with the attitudes concerning presentation and content. Methods Members of the general community in Brisbane and Roma (Queensland, Australia) were invited to participate in a 30-minute search of the internet for sites related to AOD use, followed by a focus group discussion. Fifty one subjects participated in the study across nine focus groups. Results Participants spent a maximum of 6.5 minutes on any one website, and less if the user was under 25 years of age. Time spent was as little as 2 minutes if the website was not the first accessed. Participants recommended that AOD-related websites should have an engaging home or index page, which quickly and accurately portrayed the site's objectives, and provided clear site navigation options. Website content should clearly match the title and description of the site that is used by internet search engines. Participants supported the development of a portal for AOD websites, suggesting that it would greatly facilitate access and navigation. Treatment programs delivered online were initially viewed with caution. This appeared to be due to limited understanding of what constituted online treatment, including its potential efficacy. Conclusions A range of recommendations arise from this study regarding the design and development of websites, particularly those related to AOD use. These include prudent use of text and information on any one webpage, the use of graphics and colours, and clear, uncluttered navigation options. Implications for future website

  19. Drug utilization evaluation of meropenem and correlation of side effects with renal status of patients in a teaching based hospital.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris

    2014-09-01

    Meropenem is a restricted, broad spectrum and expensive antibiotic. The major consequences of irrational use of restricted antibiotics are increase drug resistance and drug expenditure. The use of antibiotics, specifically restricted antibiotics, must be monitored continuously to increase its adherence to the standard guidelines to avoid such problems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of meropenem use with respect to renal status of patients in a teaching based hospital. A retrospective study was carried out from 1st January 2013 to 30th June 2013 to determine the evaluation of meropenem use in accordance to the criteria developed through national (Infectious disease society of Pakistan) and international guidelines (Health care infection control practices advisory committee). The data was recorded on data collection form by thorough reviewing of patients' medical records. Main outcomes measured were indication, dose, interval, duration, creatinine clearance, complete blood count and culture sensitivity test. Correlation of different variable (side effects and generalized health) was also observed with reference to renal status of patients. Statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics. A total of 201 cases of meropenem prescription were identified during the study period. The variable, which was most consistent with the criteria was 'indication', in which 97.52% of meropenem prescription was indicated in diseases encouraged by guidelines. However, the use of meropenem as an empirical therapy was the major problem reported in this study as it adhered to in only 43% of the cases. It was also noted that prevalence of side effects increased when meropenem was prescribed in renal compromised patients, and also observed that generalized health of patients decreased with meronem use in renal unstable patients. Thrombocytopenia was the major problem associated with the meropenem use (37.81%). The study detected various

  20. Novel oral formulation safely improving intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs: utilization of polyamines and bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru; Minami, Takanori; Hirota, Masao; Toguchi, Hajime; Odomi, Masaaki; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2006-03-10

    In order to develop a novel oral formulation that can safely improve the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs, polyamines such as spermine (SPM) and spermidine (SPD) was examined as an absorption enhancing adjuvant in rats. The absorption of rebamipide, classified into BCS Class IV, from colon was significantly improved by SPM or SPD, and the enhancing ability of SPM was larger than that of SPD. As a possible mixing and/or interaction of polyamines with bile acids were expected, the combinatorial use of sodium taurocholate (STC) with polyamines was also examined. The absorption of rebamipide was drastically improved by the combinatorial use of SPM or SPD with STC. As STC itself did not enhance the absorption of rebamipide so much, it was considered that polyamines and STC had a synergistic enhancing effect. In-vivo oral absorption study was also performed to investigate the effectiveness and safety of polyamines and their combinatorial use with STC in rats. Although the enhancing effect slightly attenuated comparing with the in-situ loop study, the absorption of rebamipide was significantly improved and the combinatorial use of 10 mM SPM with 25 mM STC showed the largest enhancing effect. Histopathological studies clearly showed that any significant change in stomach and duodenum was not caused by SPM (10 mM), SPD (10 mM) or their combinatorial use with STC (25 mM) at 1.5 or 8.0 h after oral administration. Taken all together, polyamines, especially SPM, and its combinatorial use with STC could improve the absorption of poorly absorbable drugs without any significant changes in gastrointestinal tract after oral administration in rats. PMID:16410031

  1. Utility of a human FcRn transgenic mouse model in drug discovery for early assessment and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay B; Wang, Mengmeng; Kavosi, Mania S; Joyce, Alison; Kurz, Jeffrey C; Fan, Yao-Yun; Dowty, Martin E; Zhang, Minlei; Zhang, Yiqun; Cheng, Aili; Hua, Fei; Jones, Hannah M; Neubert, Hendrik; Polzer, Robert J; O'Hara, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies continue to develop as an emerging drug class, with a need for preclinical tools to better predict in vivo characteristics. Transgenic mice expressing human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) have potential as a preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) model to project human PK of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using a panel of 27 mAbs with a broad PK range, we sought to characterize and establish utility of this preclinical animal model and provide guidance for its application in drug development of mAbs. This set of mAbs was administered to both hemizygous and homozygous hFcRn transgenic mice (Tg32) at a single intravenous dose, and PK parameters were derived. Higher hFcRn protein tissue expression was confirmed by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in Tg32 homozygous versus hemizygous mice. Clearance (CL) was calculated using non-compartmental analysis and correlations were assessed to historical data in wild-type mouse, non-human primate (NHP), and human. Results show that mAb CL in hFcRn Tg32 homozygous mouse correlate with human (r(2) = 0.83, r = 0.91, p < 0.01) better than NHP (r(2) = 0.67, r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for this dataset. Applying simple allometric scaling using an empirically derived best-fit exponent of 0.93 enabled the prediction of human CL from the Tg32 homozygous mouse within 2-fold error for 100% of mAbs tested. Implementing the Tg32 homozygous mouse model in discovery and preclinical drug development to predict human CL may result in an overall decreased usage of monkeys for PK studies, enhancement of the early selection of lead molecules, and ultimately a decrease in the time for a drug candidate to reach the clinic. PMID:27232760

  2. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  3. Pattern of drug utilization for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in urban Ghana following national treatment policy change to artemisinin-combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dodoo, Alexander NO; Fogg, Carole; Asiimwe, Alex; Nartey, Edmund T; Kodua, Augustina; Tenkorang, Ofori; Ofori-Adjei, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Change of first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria to artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) is widespread in Africa. To expand knowledge of safety profiles of ACT, pharmacovigilance activities are included in the implementation process of therapy changes. Ghana implemented first-line therapy of artesunate-amodiaquine in 2005. Drug utilization data is an important component of determining drug safety, and this paper describes how anti-malarials were prescribed within a prospective pharmacovigilance study in Ghana following anti-malarial treatment policy change. Methods Patients with diagnosis of uncomplicated malaria were recruited from pharmacies of health facilities throughout Accra in a cohort-event monitoring study. The main drug utilization outcomes were the relation of patient age, gender, type of facility attended, mode of diagnosis and concomitant treatments to the anti-malarial regimen prescribed. Logistic regression was used to predict prescription of nationally recommended first-line therapy and concomitant prescription of antibiotics. Results The cohort comprised 2,831 patients. Curative regimens containing an artemisinin derivative were given to 90.8% (n = 2,574) of patients, although 33% (n = 936) of patients received an artemisinin-based monotherapy. Predictors of first-line therapy were laboratory-confirmed diagnosis, age >5 years, and attending a government facility. Analgesics and antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed concomitant medications, with a median of two co-prescriptions per patient (range 1–9). Patients above 12 years were significantly less likely to have antibiotics co-prescribed than patients under five years; those prescribed non-artemisinin monotherapies were more likely to receive antibiotics. A dihydroartemisinin-amodiaquine combination was the most used therapy for children under five years of age (29.0%, n = 177). Conclusion This study shows that though first-line therapy recommendations may change

  4. Evaluation of a simple carrier molecule to enhance drug penetration of dermal layers by utilizing multivariate methods, structure property correlations, and continuous system modeling.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Nicotinic acid is shown to be comparable to dihydropyridine in its capacity to facilitate penetration of an attached antibacterial drug through dermal layers. Antibacterial drugs examined with nicotinic acid or dihydropyridine carriers were beta-lactam antibiotics: methicillin, oxacillin, benzylpenicillin, penicillin F, penicillin dihydro F, propicillin, carbenicillin, penicillin K, penicillin X, and ampicillin. An oxymethyl (-O-CH2-) group is inserted as the linker between the antibiotic and the carrier group. Structure Property Correlations and multivariate methods such as regression analysis, cluster analysis, principal component analysis, discriminate analysis, self-organizing tree algorithm, and factor analysis clearly showed that nicotinic acid performs as an effective carrier drug and is comparable to dihydropyridine. The skin penetration constant Kp was calculated for all 10 antibiotics having either dihydropyridine or nicotinic acid as carrier, and was found to have a mean of 5.13E-05 cm/hour and 1.83E-05 cm/hour, respectively. The standard deviation for each group showed the numerical values overlap as did the 90% confidence interval for each group. A hierarchical tree organization of skin shows the overlapped dermal layers as they exist in normal skin and for the model utilized in this work. A Deming-Regression analysis also shows the nicotinic acid and dihydropyridine structures to have similar and correlated water solubility. Plotting Kp of the dihydropyridine structures as independent variable versus Kp of the nicotinic acid structures show good correlation (Pearson correlation r = 0.6606) and no significant departure from linearity. Connected box plots showed the majority of Kp values for each group of modified antibiotics to exist in a tight cluster. Polar graph of the Log Kow values showed the two groups of modified antibiotics to be correlated and numerically adjacent in trend. ChemSketch property calculations and modeling demonstrates the affects

  5. [Drug utilization and pharmaceutical cost-containment in germany-perspectives 1 year after enactment of the GMG].

    PubMed

    Schlander, Michael

    2005-06-15

    After 3 decades of health care cost containment in Germany, enactment of the most recent reform (Health Insurance Modernization Act, GMG) marks a watershed insofar as, apparently, the potential has been largely exhausted for further savings in pharmaceutical spending. Yet the new drugs segment maintains its role as a growth driver, owing to the continuing shift from older to new, and frequently more expensive, products. This observation holds true even after introducing phase 2 reference pricing, covering so-called me too products. Health economic analyses would be required to better differentiate pharmaceutical products based on their incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. However, the opportunity was missed with the GMG to introduce formal health-economic evaluations and thus overcome the counterproductive silo mentality associated with traditional German component management. International experience from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom suggests that economic evaluations, while informing rational reimbursement decisions, may in fact contribute to increasing pharmaceutical expenditures. Further tightening of pharmaceutical component management in Germany may result in increasing inefficiencies due to underuse of effective products; furthermore, it appears conceivable that ("second order") dynamic inefficiencies and, hence, social costs might be the consequence of reduced pharmaceutical research and development expenditures. PMID:15968483

  6. Utilization of bio-degradable fermented tapioca to synthesized low toxicity of carbon nanotubes for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurulhuda, I.; Poh, R.; Mazatulikhma, M. Z.; Salman, A. H. A.; Haseeb, A. K.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have potential biomedical applications, and investigations are shifting towards the production of such nanotubes using renewable natural sources. CNTs were synthesized at various temperatures of 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C, respectively, using a local fermented food known as "tapai ubi" or fermented tapioca as a precursor. The liquid part of this fermented food was heated separately at 80°C and channeled directly into the furnace system that employs the thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Ferrocene, which was the catalyst was placed in furnace 1 in the thermal CVD process. The resulting CNTs produced from the process were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and raman spectroscopy. The FESEM images showed the growth morphology of the CNTs at the different temperatures employed. It was observed that the higher the synthesis temperature up to a point, the diameter of CNTs produced, after which the diameter increased. CNTs with helical structures were observed at 700 °C with a diameter range of 111 - 143 nm. A more straightened structure was observed at 750 °C with a diameter range of 59 - 121 nm. From 800 °C onwards, the diameters of the CNTs were less than 60 nm. Raman analysis revealed the present of D, G and G' peak were observed at 1227-1358, 1565-1582, and 2678-2695 cm-1, respectively. The highest degree of crystallity of the carbon nanotubes synthesized were obtained at 800 °C. The radial breathing mode (RBM) were in range between 212-220 and 279-292 cm-1. Carbon nanotubes also being functionalized with Polyethylene bis(amine) Mw2000 (PEG 2000-NH2) and showed highly cells viability compared to non-functionalized CNT. The nanotubes synthesized will be applied as drug delivery in future study.

  7. Prediction of oral absorption of griseofulvin, a BCS class II drug, based on GITA model: utilization of a more suitable medium for in-vitro dissolution study.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Yoshitsugu; Kadono, Keitaro; Fujie, Yasuko; Metsugi, Yukiko; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2007-06-01

    The in-vivo absorbability of drugs categorized into the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class II is very difficult to be predicted because of the large variability in the absorption and/or dissolution kinetics and the lack of an adequate in-vitro system for evaluating the dissolution behavior. We tried to predict the in-vivo absorption kinetics of griseofulvin, categorized into BCS class II, orally administrated as powders into rats, based on Gastrointestinal-Transit-Absorption model (GITA model), consisting of the absorption, dissolution and GI-transit processes. Using the dissolution rate constants (k(dis)) of griseofulvin obtained with JP 1st solution, JP 2nd solution, FaSSIF, FeSSIF and modified SIBLM as a medium, simulation lines were not able to describe the observed mean plasma profile at all. On the other hand, a calculated line provided by employing k(dis) obtained with MREVID 2 (medium reflecting in-vivo dissolution 2), a new medium, was in better agreement with the observed mean plasma profile than existing media, indicating that the utilization of adequate k(dis) value made it possible to predict the in-vivo absorption kinetics of drugs classified into BCS class II based on GITA model and that MREVID 2 could be a useful medium for describing the in-vivo dissolution kinetics. PMID:17442444

  8. Utilizing Social Action Theory as a Framework to Determine Correlates of Illicit Drug Use Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Traube, Dorian E.; Holloway, Ian W.; Schrager, Sheree M.; Kipke, Michele D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) continue to be at elevated risk for substance use; however, models explaining this phenomenon have often focused on a limited array of explanatory constructs. Purpose This study utilizes Social Action Theory (SAT) as a framework to address gaps in research by documenting the social, behavioral, and demographic risk factors associated with illicit drug use among YMSM. Methods Structural equation modeling was used to apply SAT to a cross-sectional sample of 526 men from the Healthy Young Men Study, a longitudinal study of substance use and sexual risk behavior among YMSM in Los Angeles. Results The final model possessed very good fit statistics (CFI = 0.936, TLI = 0.925, RMSEA = 0.040) indicating that SAT is appropriate for use with YMSM. Conclusions Substance use interventions for YMSM could be enhanced by employing SAT as conceptualized in this study and using a multi-targeted strategy for impacting illicit drug use. PMID:21644802

  9. Evaluation of the Feasibility and Utility of a Pharmacist-Centered Collaborative Drug Therapy Management Program for Oncology-Based Symptom Management.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Elizabeth A; Pietkiewicz, John M; Blum, Bonnie L

    2016-06-01

    Collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) is a practice agreement between a pharmacist and a physician, which allows the pharmacist to assume responsibility of drug therapy management. There has been limited documentation of CDTM practices in the oncology setting. Therefore, a CDTM program in the gynecology oncology clinic at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) was initiated to establish the feasibility and utility of CDTM and its effects on patient care and physician satisfaction. Primarily, 3 symptoms were managed by the CDTM pharmacists, namely chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), and women's health. The CDTM program showed favorable results after a short 4-month period. The CDTM pharmacists were referred a total of 12 consultations for CDTM purposes; 8 patients enrolled in the CIPN CDTM protocol, 3 in the CINV protocol, and 1 in the women's health protocol. The CDTM pharmacists were able to perform a total of 54 consultations, with a mean time of 16.9 minutes spent with each patient per consultation. Additionally, the CDTM pharmacists made 70 interventions and identified 6 medication-related adverse effects. The patient and physician satisfaction survey demonstrated the value of the CDTM pharmacists, and respondents were supportive of the program. PMID:25510586

  10. Impact of potential pregabalin or duloxetine drug–drug interactions on health care costs and utilization among Medicare members with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jeffrey J; Sadosky, Alesia B; Ten Eyck, Laura L; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Brown, Courtney R; Suehs, Brandon T; Parsons, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact of newly initiated pregabalin or duloxetine treatment on fibromyalgia (FM) patients’ encounters with potential drug–drug interactions (DDIs), the health care cost and utilization consequences of those interactions, and the impact of treatment on opioid utilization. Patients and methods Subjects included those with an FM diagnosis, a pregabalin or duloxetine prescription claim (index event), ≥1 inpatient or ≥2 outpatient medical claims, and ≥12 months preindex and ≥6 postindex enrollment. Propensity score matching was used to help balance the pregabalin and duloxetine cohorts on baseline demographics and comorbidities. Potential DDIs were defined based on Micromedex 2.0 software and were identified by prescription claims. Results No significant differences in baseline characteristics were found between matched pregabalin (n=794) and duloxetine cohorts (n=794). Potential DDI prevalence was significantly greater (P<0.0001) among duloxetine subjects (71.9%) than among pregabalin subjects (4.0%). There were no significant differences in all-cause health care utilization or costs between pregabalin subjects with and without a potential DDI. By contrast, duloxetine subjects with a potential DDI had higher mean all-cause costs ($9,373 versus $7,228; P<0.0001) and higher mean number of outpatient visits/member (16.0 versus 13.0; P=0.0009) in comparison to duloxetine subjects without a potential DDI. There was a trend toward a statistically significant difference between pregabalin and duloxetine subjects in their respective pre- versus post-differences in use of ≥1 long-acting opioids (1.6% and 3.4%, respectively; P=0.077). Conclusion The significantly higher prevalence of potential DDIs and potential cost impact found in FM duloxetine subjects, relative to pregabalin subjects, underscore the importance of considering DDIs when selecting a treatment. PMID:25339847

  11. Medication Use and Medical Comorbidity in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C from a U.S. Commercial Claims Database: High Utilization of Drugs with Interaction Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lauffenburger, Julie C.; Mayer, Christina L.; Hawke, Roy L.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.; Fried, Michael W.; Farley, Joel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background With the advent of the direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), significant drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential now exists for patients treated for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, little is known about how often patients with HCV use medications that may interact with newer HCV treatments, especially those with CYP3A DDI potential. Methods Using a large United States commercial insurance database, medication use and comorbidity burden was examined among adult patients with a chronic HCV diagnosis from 2006-2010. Medications were examined by total number of prescription claims, proportion of patients exposed, and DDI potential with prototypical CYP3A DAAs, boceprevir and telaprevir, for which data were available. Results Patient comorbidity burden was high and increased over the study period. Medication use was investigated in 53,461 patients with chronic HCV. Twenty-one (53%) of the top 40 most utilized medications were classified as having interaction potential, with 62% of patients received at least one of the top 22 interacting medications by exposure. Of these, 59% and 41% were listed in a common DDI resource but not in medication prescribing information, 77% and 77% had not been investigated in DDI studies, 32% and 27% did not have clear recommendations for DDI management, and only 14% and 23% carried a recommendation to avoid coadministration for boceprevir and telaprevir, respectively. Conclusion Practitioners may expect a medication with CYP3A DDI potential in two-thirds of patients with HCV and almost one-half of the most frequently used medications. However, DDI potential may not be reflected in prescribing information. PMID:25014625

  12. Assessing change in cognitive function in dementia: the relative utilities of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale and the Cognitive Drug Research system.

    PubMed

    Wesnes, Keith A

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the suitability of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog) as the gold standard in registration trials of treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Working groups have recommended replacing the ADAS-cog if suitable automated alternatives can be found. This paper makes the case for the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) computerised cognitive assessment system, as an example of a suitable instrument to replace the ADAS-cog. The CDR system has been widely used in dementia work for 20 years and shows good correlations to the ADAS-cog, while additionally assessing the domains of attention, working memory, information processing and retrieval speed of information held in memory. The utility of the system in evaluating and differentiating the major dementias will be described, as well as its ability to track deterioration over time. Its validation as a core measure of cognitive dysfunction in the dementias will be described, as will work showing that various CDR measures relate closely to activities of daily living. The sensitivity of the CDR system to anticholinesterases will be described in Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's dementia. Finally, the CDR system has a large normative database which allows treatment effects in dementia to be put into an unambiguous clinical perspective. PMID:18322407

  13. Potential of prescription registries to capture individual-level use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Denmark: trends in utilization 1999–2012

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Morten; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to over-the-counter availability, no consensus exists on whether adequate information on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use can be obtained from prescription registries. Objectives To examine utilization of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs in Denmark between 1999 and 2012 and to quantify the proportion of total sales that was sold on prescription. Method Based on nationwide data from the Danish Serum Institute and the Danish National Prescription Registry, we retrieved sales statistics for the Danish primary health care sector to calculate 1-year prevalences of prescription users of aspirin or nonaspirin NSAIDs, and to estimate the corresponding proportions of total sales dispensed on prescription. Results Both low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs were commonly used in the Danish population between 1999 and 2012, particularly among elderly individuals. The 1-year prevalence of prescribed low-dose aspirin increased throughout the study period, notably among men. Nonaspirin NSAID use was frequent in all age groups above 15 years and showed a female preponderance. Overall, the prevalence of prescribed nonaspirin NSAIDs decreased moderately after 2004, but substantial variation according to NSAID subtype was observed; ibuprofen use increased, use of all newer selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors nearly ceased after 2004, diclofenac use decreased by nearly 50% after 2008, and naproxen use remained stable. As of 2012, the prescribed proportion of individual-level NSAID sales was 92% for low-dose aspirin, 66% for ibuprofen, and 100% for all other NSAIDs. Conclusion The potential for identifying NSAID use from prescription registries in Denmark is high. Low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use varied substantially between 1999 and 2012. Notably, use of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors nearly ceased, use of diclofenac decreased markedly, and naproxen use remained unaltered. PMID:24872722

  14. Three years of antibacterial consumption in Indonesian Community Health Centers: The application of anatomical therapeutic chemical/defined daily doses and drug utilization 90% method to monitor antibacterial use

    PubMed Central

    Pradipta, Ivan S.; Ronasih, Elis; Kartikawati, Arrum D.; Hartanto, Hartanto; Amelia, Rizki; Febrina, Ellin; Abdulah, Rizky

    2015-01-01

    Context: Irrational use of antibacterial drugs in Community Health-Care Centers (CHCs) may lead to increased resistance, morbidity, and mortality. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine patterns of antibacterial use at CHCs in a district of Indonesia and use this as data for an antibiotic policy. Settings and Design: The observational-descriptive study was conducted in a district of Indonesia to obtain antibacterial use from 2008 to 2010. Subjects and Methods: The data obtained from the report on the use of medicines were classified and processed using the anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) and defined daily doses (DDD) method, with DDD/1000 patients as a unit measurement. The number of patients was obtained from attending patients in that research period. The most abundant antibacterial drugs use segment was identified by the drug utilization 90% (DU90%) method. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis were performed in this study. Results: Fourteen kinds of antibacterial drugs were used in 61 CHCs. The total of antibacterial drug use during the period 2008–2010 was 871.36 DDD/1000 patients/day. Declining antibacterial use was observed between 2008 and 2010. Six kinds of antibacterial drugs were the most commonly used. The data show that the average use per visit was as high as 24.41 DDD. Conclusions: Amoxicillin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim are antibacterials that have to be reconsidered by physicians for use in the Bandung CHC. The high use of antibacterial drugs, as described in the study, can be used as reference to develop an antimicrobial stewardship program and increase awareness of resistance, adverse drug reaction and drug interaction of antibacterial drugs. PMID:25983606

  15. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  16. Utilization of human nuclear receptors as an early counter screen for off-target activity: a case study with a compendium of 615 known drugs.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Hu, Rong; Munzli, Anke; Chen, Yuan; Dunn, Robert T; Weikl, Kerstin; Strauch, Simone; Schwandner, Ralf; Afshari, Cynthia A; Hamadeh, Hisham; Nioi, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Off-target effects of drugs on nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) may result in adverse effects in multiple organs/physiological processes. Reliable assessments of the NHR activities for drug candidates are therefore crucial for drug development. However, the highly permissive structures of NHRs for vastly different ligands make it challenging to predict interactions by examining the chemical structures of the ligands. Here, we report a detailed investigation on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of 615 known drugs or drug candidates against a panel of 6 NHRs: androgen, progesterone, estrogen α/β, and thyroid hormone α/β receptors. Our study revealed that 4.7 and 12.4% compounds have agonistic and antagonistic activities, respectively, against this panel of NHRs. Nonetheless, potent, unintended NHR hits are relatively rare among the known drugs, indicating that such interactions are perhaps not tolerated during drug development. However, we uncovered examples of compounds that unintentionally agonize or antagonize NHRs. In addition, a number of compounds showed multi-NHR activities, suggesting that the cross-talk between multiple NHRs co-operate to elicit in vivo effects. These data highlight the merits of counter screening drug candidate against NHRs during drug discovery/development. PMID:25752796

  17. Retrospective analysis of drug utilization, health care resource use, and costs associated with IFN therapy for adjuvant treatment of malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Le, Trong Kim; Shaw, James W; Kotapati, Srividya

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examines real-world drug utilization patterns, health care resource use, and costs among patients receiving adjuvant treatment with IFN versus patients receiving no treatment (“observation”) for malignant melanoma following surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using administrative claims from Truven Health Analytics (MarketScan®) to identify all adjuvant melanoma patients (aged ≥18 years) diagnosed between June 2007 and June 2011 who had a lymph node dissection (ie, index surgery) and were treated with IFN or subsequently observed. Health care resource use and costs of services were converted to 2012 US dollars and were evaluated and compared using multivariable regression. Results Of 1,999 eligible subjects with melanoma surgery claims, 179 (9.0%) were treated with IFN and 1,820 (91.0%) were observed. The median duration (days) and number of doses of IFN therapy were 73 and 36, respectively. Among IFN-treated patients, only 10.6% completed ≥80% of maintenance therapy. The total average cost for patients treated with IFN was US$60,755±$3,972 (n=179); significantly higher than for patients undergoing observation ($31,641±$2,471; P<0.0001). Similar trends were observed when evaluating total cost components, including melanoma-related and non-melanoma–related medical costs. Among the melanoma-related medical costs, outpatient services, including office visits and laboratory testing, represented between 33% and 53% of total costs and demonstrated the largest difference between IFN-treated and observation patients. Outpatient service costs for IFN-treated patients were $32,414±$2,498, over three times greater than those for observation patients ($10,556±$1,128; P<0.0001). Conclusion The majority of adjuvant melanoma patients in this study was treated with observation versus IFN treatment. Among those who attempted IFN treatment, most could not complete the recommended course of therapy. Health care costs were

  18. Acceptability of Rapid Point-of-Care Hepatitis C Tests Among People Who Inject Drugs and Utilize Syringe-Exchange Programs

    PubMed Central

    Barocas, Joshua A.; Linas, Benjamin P.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Fangman, John; Westergaard, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    People who inject drugs may benefit from point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing offered at syringe exchanges. We sought to understand whether this population would be willing to undergo rapid HCV testing. We found that there was broad support for rapid HCV testing, especially among younger people who inject drugs with high perceived risk. PMID:27191007

  19. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  20. Design of experiments utilization to map the processing capabilities of a micro-spray dryer: particle design and throughput optimization in support of drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ormes, James D; Zhang, Dan; Chen, Alex M; Hou, Shirley; Krueger, Davida; Nelson, Todd; Templeton, Allen

    2013-02-01

    There has been a growing interest in amorphous solid dispersions for bioavailability enhancement in drug discovery. Spray drying, as shown in this study, is well suited to produce prototype amorphous dispersions in the Candidate Selection stage where drug supply is limited. This investigation mapped the processing window of a micro-spray dryer to achieve desired particle characteristics and optimize throughput/yield. Effects of processing variables on the properties of hypromellose acetate succinate were evaluated by a fractional factorial design of experiments. Parameters studied include solid loading, atomization, nozzle size, and spray rate. Response variables include particle size, morphology and yield. Unlike most other commercial small-scale spray dryers, the ProCepT was capable of producing particles with a relatively wide mean particle size, ca. 2-35 µm, allowing material properties to be tailored to support various applications. In addition, an optimized throughput of 35 g/hour with a yield of 75-95% was achieved, which affords to support studies from Lead-identification/Lead-optimization to early safety studies. A regression model was constructed to quantify the relationship between processing parameters and the response variables. The response surface curves provide a useful tool to design processing conditions, leading to a reduction in development time and drug usage to support drug discovery. PMID:22414114

  1. A new high-throughput method utilizing porous silica-based nano-composites for the determination of partition coefficients of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih H; Tam, Kin; Tsang, Shik C

    2011-09-01

    We show that highly porous silica-based nanoparticles prepared via micro-emulsion and sol-gel techniques are stable colloids in aqueous solution. By incorporating a magnetic core into the porous silica nano-composite, it is found that the material can be rapidly separated (precipitated) upon exposure to an external magnetic field. Alternatively, the porous silica nanoparticles without magnetic cores can be equally separated from solution by applying a high-speed centrifugation. Using these silica-based nanostructures a new high-throughput method for the determination of partition coefficient for water/n-octanol is hereby described. First, a tiny quantity of n-octanol phase is pre-absorbed in the porous silica nano-composite colloids, which allows an establishment of interface at nano-scale between the adsorbed n-octanol with the bulk aqueous phase. Organic compounds added to the mixture can therefore undergo a rapid partition between the two phases. The concentration of drug compound in the supernatant in a small vial can be determined by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. With the adaptation of a robotic liquid handler, a high-throughput technology for the determination of partition coefficients of drug candidates can be employed for drug screening in the industry based on these nano-separation skills. The experimental results clearly suggest that this new method can provide partition coefficient values of potential drug candidates comparable to the conventional shake-flask method but requires much shorter analytical time and lesser quantity of chemicals. PMID:21780284

  2. Utilizing structures of CYP2D6 and BACE1 complexes to reduce risk of drug-drug interactions with a novel series of centrally efficacious BACE1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brodney, Michael A; Beck, Elizabeth M; Butler, Christopher R; Barreiro, Gabriela; Johnson, Eric F; Riddell, David; Parris, Kevin; Nolan, Charles E; Fan, Ying; Atchison, Kevin; Gonzales, Cathleen; Robshaw, Ashley E; Doran, Shawn D; Bundesmann, Mark W; Buzon, Leanne; Dutra, Jason; Henegar, Kevin; LaChapelle, Erik; Hou, Xinjun; Rogers, Bruce N; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Lira, Ricardo; Martinez-Alsina, Luis; Mikochik, Peter; Murray, John C; Ogilvie, Kevin; Price, Loren; Sakya, Subas M; Yu, Aijia; Zhang, Yong; O'Neill, Brian T

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the first generation of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors advanced into clinical development for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the alignment of drug-like properties and selectivity remains a major challenge. Herein, we describe the discovery of a novel class of potent, low clearance, CNS penetrant BACE1 inhibitors represented by thioamidine 5. Further profiling suggested that a high fraction of the metabolism (>95%) was due to CYP2D6, increasing the potential risk for victim-based drug-drug interactions (DDI) and variable exposure in the clinic due to the polymorphic nature of this enzyme. To guide future design, we solved crystal structures of CYP2D6 complexes with substrate 5 and its corresponding metabolic product pyrazole 6, which provided insight into the binding mode and movements between substrate/inhibitor complexes. Guided by the BACE1 and CYP2D6 crystal structures, we designed and synthesized analogues with reduced risk for DDI, central efficacy, and improved hERG therapeutic margins. PMID:25781223

  3. The Methylene Alkoxy Carbamate Self-Immolative Unit: Utilization for the Targeted Delivery of Alcohol-Containing Payloads with Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kolakowski, Robert V; Haelsig, Karl T; Emmerton, Kim K; Leiske, Chris I; Miyamoto, Jamie B; Cochran, Julia H; Lyon, Robert P; Senter, Peter D; Jeffrey, Scott C

    2016-07-01

    A strategy for the conjugation of alcohol-containing payloads to antibodies has been developed and involves the methylene alkoxy carbamate (MAC) self-immolative unit. A series of MAC β-glucuronide model constructs were prepared to evaluate stability and enzymatic release, and the results demonstrated high stability at physiological pH in a substitution-dependent manner. All the MAC model compounds efficiently released alcohol drug surrogates under the action of β-glucuronidase. To assess the MAC technology for ADCs, the potent microtubule-disrupting agent auristatin E (AE) was incorporated through the norephedrine alcohol. Conjugation of the MAC β-glucuronide AE drug linker to the anti-CD30 antibody cAC10, and an IgG control antibody, gave potent and immunologically specific activities in vitro and in vivo. These studies validate the MAC self-immolative unit for alcohol-containing payloads within ADCs, a class that has not been widely exploited. PMID:27198854

  4. Utility of small-animal positron emission tomographic imaging of rats for preclinical development of drugs acting on the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Takeaki; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Maeda, Jun-Ichi; Morio, Yasunori; Kuwahara, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Goto, Nobuharu; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2009-09-01

    Visualization of neurotransmission components in living small animals using positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential of contributing to the preclinical development of neuroactive drugs, although it is yet to be examined whether quantitative animal PET data on candidate compounds can be extrapolated to humans. Here, we investigated the comparability of the occupancies of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) by therapeutic agents in rat PET studies with our predetermined data from ex- vivo animal experiments and clinical PET scans. Rats were treated with varying doses of fluvoxamine and a newly developed compound, (2S)-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) piperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)benzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride (Wf-516), and underwent PET scans with [11C]3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile ([11C]DASB), a selective radioligand for in-vivo quantification of 5-HTT. PET images indicated a reduction of [11C]DASB binding to 5-HTT as a function of the doses and/or plasma concentrations of fluvoxamine and Wf-516. The doses of these drugs at half-maximal effect (15.2 mg/kg and 3.1 mg/kg, respectively), determined that using binding potentials for [11C]DASB, were comparable to those estimated by our previous ex-vivo measurements in rats (4.5 mg/kg and 1.1 mg/kg, respectively), as there was only a 3-fold difference between these results. Moreover, the plasma concentration of fluvoxamine needed for 50% occupancy of central 5-HTT (6.1 ng/ml) was almost equivalent to the value determined in human PET studies (4.6 ng/ml). These findings support the view that the conjunctive use of small-animal PET and [11C]DASB facilitates a quantitative comparison of in-development drugs targeting 5-HTT with established inhibitors and a predictive estimation of their plasma concentrations exerting therapeutic effects in humans. PMID:19236731

  5. Functional Characterization of Sodium-dependent Multivitamin Transporter (SMVT) in MDCK-MDR1 cells and its Utilization as a Target for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuanghui; Kansara, Viral S.; Zhu, Xiaodong; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim. K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research is to characterize a sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in MDCK-MDR1 cells (Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with the human MDR1 gene) and to investigate the feasibility of utilizing MDCK-MDR1 cell line as an in vitro model to study the permeability of biotin-conjugated prodrugs of anti-HIV protease inhibitors. Mechanism of [3H] biotin uptake and transport was delineated. Transepithelial permeability of the biotin conjugated prodrug i.e. biotin-saquinavir was also studied. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out to confirm the existence of SMVT in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Biotin uptake was Na+, pH, and temperature dependent, but energyindependent. Transepithelial transport studies of biotin-saquinavir in MDCK-MDR1, wild type MDCK, and Caco-2 cells revealed that permeability of biotin-saquinavir was similar in all three cell lines. A band of SMVT mRNA at 862 bp was identified by RT-PCR. A sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter, SMVT, responsible for biotin uptake and transport, was identified and functionally characterized in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Therefore, MDCK-MDR1 cell line may be utilized as an in vitro model to study the permeability of biotin conjugated prodrugs such as HIV protease inhibitors. PMID:16749865

  6. A concise review of the bioanalytical methods for the quantitation of sitagliptin, an important dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor, utilized for the characterization of the drug.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P S; Srinivas, Nuggehally R; Mullangi, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is an emerging therapeutic approach for treating type 2 diabetes and has revolutionized the concept of diabetes management. Sitagliptin is the first approved orally active, potent, selective and nonpeptidomimetic DPP4 inhibitor. Incidence of hypoglycemia and weight gain is negligible with sitagliptin treatment. It is used as monotherapy or in combination with other anti-diabetic drugs to treat type 2 diabetes. There are numerous bioanalytical methods published for the analysis of sitagliptin in preclinical and clinical samples. This review focuses on the various HPLC and LC-MS/MS methods that have been used to analyze sitagliptin in various biological matrices. A small section is devoted to the bioanalysis of other DPP4 inhibitors such as vildagliptin, saxagliptin and linagliptin. This review provides key information in a concise manner regarding sample processing options, chromatographic/detection conditions and validation parameters of the chosen methods for sitagliptin and other DPP4 inhibitors. PMID:26873580

  7. A pilot randomised controlled trial to assess the utility of an e‐learning package that trains users in adverse drug reaction causality

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Jamie J.; Bellis, Jennifer R.; Peak, Matthew; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Williamson, Paula R.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Causality assessment of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by healthcare professionals is often informal which can lead to inconsistencies in practice. The Liverpool Causality Assessment Tool (LCAT) offers a systematic approach. An interactive, web‐based, e‐learning package, the Liverpool ADR Causality Assessment e‐learning Package (LACAeP), was designed to improve causality assessment using the LCAT. This study aimed to (1) get feedback on usability and usefulness on the LACAeP, identify areas for improvement and development, and generate data on effect size to inform a larger scale study; and (2) test the usability and usefulness of the LCAT. Methods A pilot, single‐blind, parallel‐group, randomised controlled trial hosted by the University of Liverpool was undertaken. Participants were paediatric medical trainees at specialty training level 1+ within the Mersey and North‐West England Deaneries. Participants were randomised (1 : 1) access to the LACAeP or no training. The primary efficacy outcome was score by correct classification, predefined by a multidisciplinary panel of experts. Following participation, feedback on both the LCAT and the LACAeP was obtained, via a built in survey, from participants. Key findings Of 57 randomised, 35 completed the study. Feedback was mainly positive although areas for improvement were identified. Seventy‐four per cent of participants found the LCAT easy to use and 78% found the LACAeP training useful. Sixty‐one per cent would be unlikely to recommend the training. Scores ranged from 4 to 13 out of 20. The LACAeP increased scores by 1.3, but this was not significant. Conclusions Improving the LACAeP before testing it in an appropriately powered trial, informed by the differences observed, is required. Rigorous evaluation will enable a quality resource that will be of value in healthcare professional training. PMID:26032626

  8. Labview utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  9. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  10. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  11. Club Drugs. The DAWN Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Applied Studies.

    This report was prepared in response to requests from the media, law enforcement, and community leaders for information about club drugs. By being able to utilize statistics from hospital emergency departments and by compiling statistics on drug-related deaths, the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is able to alert parents, educators, and others…

  12. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  13. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses. Other uses of these drugs are abuse. Club drugs are also sometimes used as "date rape" drugs, to make someone unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault. Abusing these drugs can ...

  14. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... Adverse reactions to drugs are common. (adverse means unwanted or unexpected.) Almost any drug can cause an adverse reaction. Reactions range from irritating ...

  15. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  16. Lighting Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with lighting utilization. Its objective is for the student to be able to outline the development of lighting use and conservation and identify major types and operating characteristics of lamps used in electric lighting. Some topics…

  17. BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biomass utilization task consists of the evaluation of a biomass conversion technology including research and development initiatives. The project is expected to provide information on co-control of pollutants, as well as, to prove the feasibility of biomass conversion techn...

  18. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  19. Drugs, drugs--who has the drugs?

    PubMed

    Blair, James

    2012-01-01

    Drug diversion, although on the increase, is not the only problem involving drugs that hospital security officials should be concerned with. Growing drug shortages, offshore production, counterfeiting, and weaknesses in the drug supply chain in case of a world-wide pandemic, are even greater causes for concern, the author claims. PMID:22423518

  20. Drug Facts

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Weed, Pot) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  1. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners ...

  2. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  3. Pharmacogenetic testing: current evidence of clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Susanne B.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, the number of clinical pharmacogenetic tests has steadily increased as understanding of the role of genes in drug response has grown. However, uptake of these tests has been slow, due in large part to the lack of robust evidence demonstrating clinical utility. We review the evidence behind four pharmacogenetic tests and discuss the barriers and facilitators to uptake: (1) warfarin (drug safety and efficacy); (2) clopidogrel (drug efficacy); (3) codeine (drug safety and efficacy); and (4) abacavir (drug safety). Future efforts should be directed toward addressing these issues and considering additional approaches to generating evidence basis to support clinical use of pharmacogenetic tests. PMID:24020014

  4. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  5. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  6. Drug diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  7. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Anti-Epilepsy Medications

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past twenty years, 14 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. In general, the clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring has not been established in clinical trials for these new anticonvulsants, and clear guidelines for drug monitoring have yet to be defined. The antiepileptic drugs with the strongest justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly protein bound and are candidates for free drug monitoring. Therapeutic drug monitoring has lower utility for gabapentin, pregabalin, and vigabatrin. Measurement of salivary drug concentrations has potential utility for therapeutic drug monitoring of lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and topiramate. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs will be discussed in managing patients with epilepsy. PMID:20640233

  8. Naltrexone: its clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, H M

    Naltrexone is a long-acting orally-administered opioid antagonist that has demonstrated clinical utility as an adjunct in the outpatient treatment of opioid abuse. Naltrexone can be administered on a daily, twice a week or three times a week regimen, based on the clinical needs of the patient, and the therapeutic goals of the patient and therapist. Because naltrexone is unscheduled under the Controlled Substances Act, any licensed physician can prescribe this drug. This decentralized therapeutic approach for the highly motivated patient permits a ready separation between the patient's drug using friends and his or her current activities. The patients most likely to benefit from naltrexone therapy are employed, married, stabilized on low-dose methadone prior to detoxification, or detoxified from their opioid dependency 7 or more days previously, and are highly motivated to be maintained on a nonopioid chemotherapeutic agent. Naltrexone does not cure dependency. It does assist clinicians in dealing with the medical, psychological and economic problems associated with primary opioid abuse. Naltrexone will work well only when it is part of a larger therapeutic regimen which is tailored to the individual needs of the patient. PMID:3832903

  9. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  10. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing. PMID:27441421

  11. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  12. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs. There are a few other differences— like color, shape, size, or taste—but they do not ... different . Brand-name drugs are often advertised by color and shape. Remember the ads for the “purple ...

  13. Automated Drug Identification for Urban Hospitals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, Donna L.

    1971-01-01

    Many urban hospitals are becoming overloaded with drug abuse cases requiring chemical analysis for identification of drugs. In this paper, the requirements for chemical analysis of body fluids for drugs are determined and a system model for automated drug analysis is selected. The system as modeled, would perform chemical preparation of samples, gas-liquid chromatographic separation of drugs in the chemically prepared samples, infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the drugs, and would utilize automatic data processing and control for drug identification. Requirements of cost, maintainability, reliability, flexibility, and operability are considered.

  14. Pharmacy utilization and the Medicare Modernization Act.

    PubMed

    Maio, Vittorio; Pizzi, Laura; Roumm, Adam R; Clarke, Janice; Goldfarb, Neil I; Nash, David B; Chess, David

    2005-01-01

    To control expenditures and use medications appropriately, the Medicare drug coverage program has established pharmacy utilization management (PUM) measures. This article assesses the effects of these strategies on the care of seniors. The literature suggests that although caps on drug benefits lower pharmaceutical costs, they may also increase the use of other health care services and hurt health outcomes. Our review raises concerns regarding the potential unintended effects of the Medicare drug program's PUM policies for beneficiaries. Therefore, the economic and clinical impact of PUM measures on seniors should be studied further to help policymakers design better drug benefit plans. PMID:15787955

  15. Drug Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.; And Others

    Results of a survey of student perceptions of drugs and drug use that was conducted at Bowie State College are presented. Studies that have been conducted on college students' use of alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine in the last five years are reviewed, along with additional studies relating to the general population and the following drugs:…

  16. Discovery of a Selective and Potent Inhibitor of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Interacting Kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1/2) Utilizing Structure-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Han, Wooseok; Ding, Yu; Xu, Yongjin; Pfister, Keith; Zhu, Shejin; Warne, Bob; Doyle, Mike; Aikawa, Mina; Amiri, Payman; Appleton, Brent; Stuart, Darrin D; Fanidi, Abdallah; Shafer, Cynthia M

    2016-04-14

    The discovery of a highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitor 9 for in vitro target validation of MNK1/2 kinases is described. The aminopyrazine benzimidazole series was derived from an HTS hit and optimized by utilization of a docking model, conformation analysis, and binding pocket comparison against antitargets. PMID:27002243

  17. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  18. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  19. Utilizing Structures of CYP2D6 and BACE1 Complexes To Reduce Risk of Drug–Drug Interactions with a Novel Series of Centrally Efficacious BACE1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the first generation of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors advanced into clinical development for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the alignment of drug-like properties and selectivity remains a major challenge. Herein, we describe the discovery of a novel class of potent, low clearance, CNS penetrant BACE1 inhibitors represented by thioamidine 5. Further profiling suggested that a high fraction of the metabolism (>95%) was due to CYP2D6, increasing the potential risk for victim-based drug–drug interactions (DDI) and variable exposure in the clinic due to the polymorphic nature of this enzyme. To guide future design, we solved crystal structures of CYP2D6 complexes with substrate 5 and its corresponding metabolic product pyrazole 6, which provided insight into the binding mode and movements between substrate/inhibitor complexes. Guided by the BACE1 and CYP2D6 crystal structures, we designed and synthesized analogues with reduced risk for DDI, central efficacy, and improved hERG therapeutic margins. PMID:25781223

  20. Drug dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... men References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Kowalchuk A, Reed BC. Drug abuse. In: ...

  1. Drug abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Weiss RD. Drugs of abuse. In: Goldman ...

  2. Prescription Drug Expenditures and Population Demographics

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G

    2006-01-01

    Objective To provide detailed demographic profiles of prescription drug utilization and expenditures in order to isolate the impact of demographic change from other factors that affect drug expenditure trends. Data Sources/Study Setting Demographic information and drug utilization data were extracted for virtually the entire British Columbia (BC) population of 1996 and 2002. All residents had public medical and hospital insurance; however their drug coverage resembled the mix of private and public insurance in the United States. Study Design A series of research variables were constructed to illustrate profiles of drug expenditures and drug utilization across 96 age/sex strata. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Drug use and expenditure information was extracted from the BC PharmaNet, a computer network connecting all pharmacies in the province. Principal Findings Per capita drug expenditures increased at an average annual rate of 10.8 percent between 1996 and 2002. Population aging explained 1.0 points of this annual rate of expenditure growth; the balance was attributable to rising age/sex-specific drug expenditures. Conclusions Relatively little of the observed increase in drug expenditures in BC could be attributed to demographic change. Most of the expenditure increase stemmed from the age/sex-specific quantity and type of drugs purchased. The sustainability of drug spending therefore depends not on outside forces but on decisions made by policy makers, prescribers, and patients. PMID:16584456

  3. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  4. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... using any of these products. Some types of food may also cause adverse drug reactions. For example, grapefruit and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your doctor ... interactions with any foods or beverages. What about medicines I've used ...

  5. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  6. Projecting future drug expenditures--1995.

    PubMed

    Santell, J P

    1995-01-15

    Use of information on inflation, pharmacoeconomics, market introduction of new drug entities, practice-site-specific drug-use patterns, federal legislation, and the changing structure of health care delivery to project drug expenditures is discussed. Drug price inflation has been declining over the past several years, from 6.9% in 1991 to 2.2% for part of 1994. This can be attributed to both the growth of managed care and the industry's fear of government price controls. Pharmaceutical industry analysts project the overall price increase for pharmaceuticals in the next 12-24 months to be 2-5%. Pharmacoeconomic research is likely to become increasingly important; pharmacists will need to understand and critically evaluate this research. Drug budget projections should include a complete review of new drugs and biotechnology agents pending FDA approval, drugs pending approval for new indications, and common unlabeled uses of expensive existing agents. Various methods are available for tracking practice-site-specific drug-use patterns; those that categorize expenditures by diagnosis-related group may underestimate total expenditures associated with treating a given condition. State and federal legislation may affect drug rebates, prices, and ultimately drug expenditures. Although health care reform legislation did not pass in 1994, changes are occurring in both the pharmaceutical industry and in health care delivery, shifting the control of drug selection, utilization, and expenditures from individual prescribers to large purchasers. The accuracy of projections of drug expenditures can be improved by examining inflation, pharmacoeconomic research, the introduction of new drug entities, practice-site-specific drug-use patterns, federal legislation, and the changing structure of health care delivery. PMID:12879542

  7. 42 CFR 456.703 - Drug use review program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drug use review program. 456.703 Section 456.703... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.703 Drug use review program. (a)...

  8. 42 CFR 456.705 - Prospective drug review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prospective drug review. 456.705 Section 456.705... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.705 Prospective drug review. (a)...

  9. 42 CFR 456.709 - Retrospective drug use review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retrospective drug use review. 456.709 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.709 Retrospective drug use review. (a)...

  10. 42 CFR 456.709 - Retrospective drug use review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retrospective drug use review. 456.709 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.709 Retrospective drug use review. (a)...

  11. 42 CFR 456.703 - Drug use review program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug use review program. 456.703 Section 456.703... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.703 Drug use review program. (a)...

  12. 42 CFR 456.705 - Prospective drug review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prospective drug review. 456.705 Section 456.705... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.705 Prospective drug review. (a)...

  13. 42 CFR 456.705 - Prospective drug review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prospective drug review. 456.705 Section 456.705... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.705 Prospective drug review. (a)...

  14. 42 CFR 456.709 - Retrospective drug use review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Retrospective drug use review. 456.709 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.709 Retrospective drug use review. (a)...

  15. 42 CFR 456.709 - Retrospective drug use review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Retrospective drug use review. 456.709 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.709 Retrospective drug use review. (a)...

  16. 42 CFR 456.705 - Prospective drug review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prospective drug review. 456.705 Section 456.705... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.705 Prospective drug review. (a)...

  17. 42 CFR 456.703 - Drug use review program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drug use review program. 456.703 Section 456.703... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.703 Drug use review program. (a)...

  18. 42 CFR 456.709 - Retrospective drug use review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retrospective drug use review. 456.709 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.709 Retrospective drug use review. (a)...

  19. 42 CFR 456.703 - Drug use review program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug use review program. 456.703 Section 456.703... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.703 Drug use review program. (a)...

  20. 42 CFR 456.703 - Drug use review program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drug use review program. 456.703 Section 456.703... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.703 Drug use review program. (a)...

  1. 42 CFR 456.705 - Prospective drug review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prospective drug review. 456.705 Section 456.705... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Drug Use Review (DUR) Program and Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.705 Prospective drug review. (a)...

  2. [Club drugs].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Diogo Frasquilho; Carmo, Ana Lisa; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Navarro, Rita; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Club drugs are the following substances: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA); Methamphetamine; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD); Ketamine; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Flunitrazepam. These substances are mainly used by adolescents and young adults, mostly in recreational settings like dance clubs and rave parties. These drugs have diverse psychotropic effects, are associated with several degrees of toxicity, dependence and long term adverse effects. Some have been used for several decades, while others are relatively recent substances of abuse. They have distinct pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, are not easy to detect and, many times, the use of club drugs is under diagnosed. Although the use of these drugs is increasingly common, few health professionals feel comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment. The authors performed a systematic literature review, with the goal of synthesising the existing knowledge about club drugs, namely epidemiology, mechanism of action, detection, adverse reactions and treatment. The purpose of this article is creating in Portuguese language a knowledge data base on club drugs, that health professionals of various specialties can use as a reference when dealing with individual with this kind of drug abuse. PMID:22525626

  3. Old drugs, novel ways out: Drug resistance toward cytotoxic chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Pang, Baoxu; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy of chemotherapy in the treatment of distinct malignancies is often hampered by drug resistance arising in the tumor. Understanding the molecular basis of drug resistance and translating this knowledge into personalized treatment decisions can enhance therapeutic efficacy and even curative outcome. Over the years, multiple drug resistance mechanisms have been identified that enable tumors to cope with the damage instigated by a specific drug or group of anti-tumor agents. Here we provide an overview of the molecular pathways leading to resistance against conventional anti-cancer drugs, with emphasis on the utility of these pathways for rational selection of treatments for individual cancer patients. We further complement the review by discussing the pitfalls and difficulties in translating these findings into novel treatment strategies for cancer patients. PMID:27620955

  4. Controlling Your Utility Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucht, Ray; Dembowski, Frederick L.

    1985-01-01

    A cost-effective alternative to high utility bills for middle-sized and smaller utility users is the service of utility rate consultants. The consultants analyze utility invoices for the previous 12 months to locate available refunds or credits. (MLF)

  5. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  6. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one. PMID:20471318

  7. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  8. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  9. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, especially in brain areas involved in the perception of pain and pleasure. Prescription stimulants , such as ... of drug that causes changes in your mood, perceptions, and behavior can affect judgment and willingness to ...

  10. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  11. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  12. Categorizing Drugs and Drug-Taking: A More Meaningful Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Robert S.; Duncan, David F.

    This document reviews various definitions of the nature and classification of drugs. Difficulties with existing categorizations which use such bases as clinical utility, molecular structure, effects on the central nervous system, legality, and hazard potential are disucssed. A more meaningful categorization based on the availability and sources of…

  13. Drug misuse.

    PubMed

    Waller, T

    1992-12-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  14. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products FDA Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA - FAQ | Instructions | ... 6332) Contact FDA For Government For Press Combination Products Advisory Committees Science & Research Regulatory Information Safety Emergency ...

  15. Prime Drug Interplay in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Govila, Vivek; Saini, Ashish; Verma, Sunil Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Drug interaction is a negative representation of pharmacotherapy. In order to provide the best patient care possible, a thorough knowledge of how the drug interactions occur is needed for proper application in practice. Possible interactions among current medication and drugs being prescribed should be considered always. A thorough understanding of the mechanism of interactions among drugs is a must for the health care practitioner. Considering the astounding number of drugs patients may be taking, this task seems discouraging. The count of possible interactions in dental practice are less due to few number of drugs utilized and brief period of therapy, but still notable number are to be considered. The aim of present preview is to consider the manifold and multiplex nature of pharmacological drug-drug interaction in the general dental practice setting. PMID:27135021

  16. Utilities Expense Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Deborah P.

    2001-01-01

    Examines how deregulation has affected school district utility costs. Offers ideas that can help school districts save money and energy. Provides several examples of state-wide initiatives intended to help school districts control utility costs. (GR)

  17. Narcotic Drug Control in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Legislature, Albany.

    This report concentrates on the analysis and evaluation of programs utilized by New York State's Narcotics Addiction Control Commission (NACC) and concerned with control of narcotic drugs and with those individuals who abuse them. The three key premises, basic to the narcotic drug control programs approved by the state legislature, are: (1) there…

  18. Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Hill, Tiffany; Dhawan, Nidhi

    2016-09-01

    An adverse drug reaction relates to an undesired response to administration of a drug. Type A reactions are common and are predictable to administration, dose response, or interaction with other medications. Type B reactions are uncommon with occurrences that are not predictable. Appropriate diagnosis, classification, and entry into the chart are important to avoid future problems. The diagnosis is made with careful history, physical examination, and possibly allergy testing. It is recommended that help from allergy immunology specialists should be sought where necessary and that routine prescription of Epi pen should be given to patients with multiple allergy syndromes. PMID:27545730

  19. [Ureter drugs].

    PubMed

    Raynal, G; Bellan, J; Saint, F; Tillou, X; Petit, J

    2008-03-01

    Many improvements have been made recently in the field of the ureteral smooth muscle pharmacology. After a brief summary on physiological basis, we review what is known about effects on ureter of different drugs class. In a second part, we review clinical applications for renal colic analgesia, calculi expulsive medical therapy, ESWL adjuvant treatment and preoperative treatment before retrograde access. There are now sufficient data on NSAID and alpha-blockers. beta-agonists, especially for beta3 selective ones, and topical drugs before retrograde access are interesting and should be further evaluated. PMID:18472067

  20. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided. PMID:11366758

  1. Sourcebook on Research Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen, Ed.; Rosenblatt, Aaron, Ed.

    Major papers presented at the Conference on Research Utilization in Social Work Education are compiled in this sourcebook. The conference focused on six topics that reviewed the state of the art of research utilization and suggested directions for the future. The papers included are: Understanding Research Utilization in Social Work (Stuart A.…

  2. Research Utilization in Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Everett M.

    In terms of its attention to research utilization, vocational rehabilitation today may be where agriculture was in 1913. One reason for this is an inadequate understanding of the process of research utilization. Scattered studies of research utilization have occurred, but suffer from a lack of integration. Among propositions that may be postulated…

  3. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system. PMID:25991099

  4. Drug Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  5. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  6. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known as Roofies Methamphetamine, also known as Speed, Ice, Chalk, Meth, Crystal, Crank, and Glass Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD), also ...

  7. Trojan Microparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Nicolas; Jakhmola, Anshuman; Vandamme, Thierry F.

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have regulated a wide range of products, (foods, cosmetics, drugs, devices, veterinary, and tobacco) which may utilize micro and nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials. Nanotechnology allows scientists to create, explore, and manipulate materials in nano-regime. Such materials have chemical, physical, and biological properties that are quite different from their bulk counterparts. For pharmaceutical applications and in order to improve their administration (oral, pulmonary and dermal), the nanocarriers can be spread into microparticles. These supramolecular associations can also modulate the kinetic releases of drugs entrapped in the nanoparticles. Different strategies to produce these hybrid particles and to optimize the release kinetics of encapsulated drugs are discussed in this review. PMID:24300177

  8. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents. PMID:11564050

  9. Cogeneration and utility diversification

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Niagara Mohawk saw cogeneration and utility diversification as an opportunity to break away from the traditional model of a public utility and avoid the fate of the railroads. The author reviews how HYDRA-CO Enterprises evaluated the risks and opportunities of diversification and the steps it took to diversify, which included a joint venture cogeneration project. The company sees a future with ever expanding opportunities for utility subsidiaries for those with courage and imagination.

  10. Utilities weather the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Lihach, N.

    1984-11-01

    Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

  11. An Evaluation of the "Drugs Are Like That" Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Allan G.

    The purpose of this study is to assess in selected Vancouver elementary schools the drug education program utilizing the film "Drugs Are Like That." Questionnaire responses are summarized for: (1) parents who attended the advanced showings of the film with the subsequent discussions on drug abuse, and (2) principals, teacher, counsellors, nurses…

  12. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  13. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  14. QSAR Modeling and Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexey V; Varlamova, Ekaterina V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Muratov, Eugene N; Fourches, Denis; Kuz'min, Victor E; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Tropsha, Alexander; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the fourth leading cause of fatality in the U.S. with more than 100,000 deaths per year. As up to 30% of all ADRs are believed to be caused by drug-drug interactions (DDIs), typically mediated by cytochrome P450s, possibilities to predict DDIs from existing knowledge are important. We collected data from public sources on 1485, 2628, 4371, and 27,966 possible DDIs mediated by four cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 for 55, 73, 94, and 237 drugs, respectively. For each of these data sets, we developed and validated QSAR models for the prediction of DDIs. As a unique feature of our approach, the interacting drug pairs were represented as binary chemical mixtures in a 1:1 ratio. We used two types of chemical descriptors: quantitative neighborhoods of atoms (QNA) and simplex descriptors. Radial basis functions with self-consistent regression (RBF-SCR) and random forest (RF) were utilized to build QSAR models predicting the likelihood of DDIs for any pair of drug molecules. Our models showed balanced accuracy of 72-79% for the external test sets with a coverage of 81.36-100% when a conservative threshold for the model's applicability domain was applied. We generated virtually all possible binary combinations of marketed drugs and employed our models to identify drug pairs predicted to be instances of DDI. More than 4500 of these predicted DDIs that were not found in our training sets were confirmed by data from the DrugBank database. PMID:26669717

  15. Part I---Evaluating Effects of Oligomer Formation on Cytochrome P450 2C9 Electron Transfer and Drug Metabolism, Part II---Utilizing Molecular Modeling Techniques to Study the Src-Interacting Proteins Actin Filament Associated Protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and Cortactin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jett, John Edward, Jr.

    The dissertation has been divided into two parts to accurately reflect the two distinct areas of interest pursued during my matriculation in the School of Pharmacy at West Virginia University. In Part I, I discuss research probing the nature of electron transfer in the Cytochrome P450 family of proteins, a group of proteins well-known for their role in drug metabolism. In Part II, I focus on in silico and in vitro work developed in concert to probe protein structure and protein-protein interactions involved in actin filament reorganization and cellular motility. Part I. Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are an important class of enzymes known to metabolize a variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. P450s are most commonly found in liver and intestinal endothelial cells and are responsible for the metabolism of approximately 75% of pharmaceutical drugs on the market. CYP2C9---one of the six major P450 isoforms---is responsible for ˜20% of drug metabolism. Elucidation of the factors that affect in vitro drug metabolism is crucial to the accurate prediction of in vivo drug metabolism kinetics. Currently, the two major techniques for studying in vitro drug metabolism are solution-based. However, it is known that the results of solution-based studies can vary from in vivo drug metabolism. One reason suggested to account for this variation is the state of P450 oligomer formation in solution compared to the in vivo environment, where P450s are membrane-bound. To understand the details of how oligomer formation affects in vitro drug metabolism, it is imperative that techniques be developed which will allow for the unequivocal control of oligomer formation without altering other experimental parameters. Our long term goal of this research is to develop methods to more accurately predict in vivo drug metabolism from in vitro data. This section of the dissertation will discuss the development of a platform consisting of a doped silicon surface containing a large array of gold

  16. Electric utilities and telecommunications

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    Part I of this article will provide some background on the involvement of electric utilities in telecommunications. It will discuss the Power Radio Services, under which the FCC regulates radio communications of electric utilities, the pole attachment statute of the Communications Act, which authorized the FCC to regulate attachments of cable television cables to electric utility poles, and a recent Department of Energy (DOE) report on the need for a demonstration on the use of telecommunications for DSM. Part I will also discuss several recent developments relative to the Power Radio Services and the pole attachment statute. Part II will discuss electric utilities and telecommunications under PUHCA. It will outline the extensive and complex requirements of PUHCA that are applicable to public utility holding companies, as well as the specific requirements of PUHCA for the formation by public utility holding companies of subsidiaries to engage in telecommunications activities. It will also discuss the seven instances in the past decade in which the SEC has approved the formation by public utility holding companies of such subsidiaries. Part III of this article will discuss a principal obstacle to expanded electric utility involvement in telecommunications activities-a series of administrative and judicial decisions that illustrate the potential for dual regulation by the SEC and the FERC to result in confusion and inefficiencies. It will also discuss proposals in Congress to minimize this potential. Part IV will discuss House Bill 3636 and Senate Bill 1822 and their proposals to amend PUHCA to facilitate the formation or acquisition by public utility holding companies of non-utility subsidiaries to engage in telecommunications activities. It will also discuss their proposals to address the potential consequences of dual regulation by the SEC and the FERC of electric utilities involved in telecommunications.

  17. Drug utilisation study in a tertiary care center: recommendations for improving hospital drug dispensing policies.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Niti; Mittal, R; Singh, I; Shafiq, Nusrat; Malhotra, S

    2014-07-01

    Drug therapy accounts for a major portion of health expenditure. A useful strategy for achieving cost efficient healthcare is drug utilisation research as it forms the basis for making amendments in drug policies and helps in rational drug use. The present observational study was conducted to generate data on drug utilization in inpatients of our tertiary care hospital to identify potential targets for improving drug prescribing patterns. Data was collected retrospectively from randomly selected 231 medical records of patients admitted in various wards of the hospital. WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical/Defined Daily Dose methodology was used to assess drug utilisation data and drug prescriptions were analysed by WHO core drug indicators. Antibiotics were prescribed most frequently and also accounted for majority of drug costs. The prescribed daily dose for most of the antibiotics corresponded to defined daily dose reflecting adherence to international recommendations. Brand name prescribing and polypharmacy was very common.78% of the total drugs prescribed were from the National List of Essential Medicines 2003. Restricting the use of newer and costlier antibiotics, branded drugs and number of drugs per prescription could be considered as targets to cut down the cost of drug therapysignificantly. PMID:25284928

  18. [Emergent drugs (I): smart drugs].

    PubMed

    Burillo-Putze, G; Díaz, B Climent; Pazos, J L Echarte; Mas, P Munné; Miró, O; Puiguriguer, J; Dargan, P

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a series of new drugs, known as smart drugs or legal highs, have gaining in popularity. They are easily obtainable through online shops. This is happening amongst younger segments of the population and is associated with recreational consumption, at weekends. In general, they are synthetic derivatives of natural products. There has been hardly any clinical research into them and they are not detectable in hospital laboratories. Three of these products, BZP (1- benzylpiperazine), mefedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) and Spice are probably the most widely used in Europe. The first two are consumed as an alternative to ecstasy and cocaine and are characterized by their producing a clinical profile of a sympathetic mimetic type; on occasion, they have serious consequences, with convulsions and even death. Spice (a mixture of herbs with synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-018, JWH-073 and CP 47497-C8) is giving rise to profiles of dependence and schizophrenia. Although the emergent drugs have an aura of safety, there is an increasing amount of experience on their secondary effects. PMID:21904408

  19. "A'ole" Drugs! Cultural Practices and Drug Resistance of Rural Hawai'ian Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Po'A-Kekuawela, Ka'Ohinani; Okamoto, Scott K.; Nebre, La Risa H.; Helm, Susana; Chin, Coralee I. H.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how Native Hawai'ian youths from rural communities utilized cultural practices to promote drug resistance and/or abstinence. Forty-seven students from five different middle schools participated in gender-specific focus groups that focused on the cultural and environmental contexts of drug use for Native Hawai'ian…

  20. Instructional Facility Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalamazoo Valley Community Coll., MI.

    Data describing campus facility use for instructional and related purposes for one week of activity in Fall 1978 were collected and evaluated at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Four measures of space utilization were used: (1) percent of available time used; (2) percent of available space used; (3) percent of scheduled space utilized; and (4)…

  1. Teuchos Utility Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    Teuchos is designed to provide portable, object-oriented tools for Trillnos developers and users. This includes templated wrappers to BLAS/LAPACK, a serial dense matrix class, a parameter list, XML parsing utilities, reference counted pointer (smart pointer) utilities, and more. These tools are designed to run on both serial and parallel computers.

  2. Individualized drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacogenetics of either individual patients or tumors has been used to aid the progress of personalized medicine to generate antitumor drugs (eg, trastuzamab and erlotinib) that are active against tumors expressing particular growth factor receptors. Outside the field of cancer therapeutics, pharmacogenetic tests have been introduced to detect patient genotypes with the aim of individualizing existing treatments. For example, the analysis of thiopurine S-methyltransferase genotypes enables the prediction of toxicity in patients to be treated with either 6-mercaptopurine or azathioprine, while the uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronosyl-transferase 1A1 genotype may predict irinotecan toxicity. There is a large body of information concerning cytochrome P450 (CYP) polymorphisms and their relationship with drug toxicity and response; however, currently, there is limited use of CYP genotypes to individualize treatments. It is now well recognized that the CYP2C9 genotype, when combined with the genotype for vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, is predictive of dose requirement for oral anticoagulants, a fact that is likely to have clinical utility. There is also potential to individualize treatments with certain drugs on the basis of CYP2D6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A5 genotypes. Studies on genes encoding drug receptors in relation to individualized prescription have been limited but there is increasing information on the relationship between response to beta2-adrenoceptor agonists and the genotype for the beta2-adrenoceptor gene. The introduction of pharmacogenetic tests into routine healthcare requires both a demonstration of cost-effectiveness and the availability of appropriate accessible testing systems. PMID:17265738

  3. The expanding utility of microdosing.

    PubMed

    Lappin, Graham

    2015-11-01

    The concept of microdosing has been around for more than a decade. It consists of the subpharmacologic administration of an investigational drug (1% of the pharmacologic dose or 100 µg, whichever is lower) to human subjects to attain pre-phase 1 pharmacokinetics (PK) in humans. The major concern with microdosing has been the potential for nonlinear PK between doses, but methods are emerging to evaluate the potential for nonlinear PK prior to conducting a study. Currently, approximately 80% of drugs tested by the oral route and 100% by the intravenous route have exhibited scalable PK between a microdose and a therapeutic dose (within a factor of 2). Over the past few years microdosing has found utility in pediatrics, protein-based therapeutics, and a new application known as intra-arterial microdosing that focuses more on localized pharmacodynamics than PK. Compared with other PK predictive methods, such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, allometry, and in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, microdosing appears to provide a significantly better understanding of PK prior to phase 1, albeit within what is currently a limited database. PMID:27137711

  4. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page ... Monitored Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement ...

  5. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... works with other insurance Find health & drug plans Drug plan coverage rules Note Call your Medicare drug ... shingles vaccine) when medically necessary to prevent illness. Drugs you get in hospital outpatient settings In most ...

  6. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  7. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  8. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Drug abuse first aid

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse is the misuse or overuse of any medication or drug, including alcohol. This article discusses first ... use of these drugs is a form of drug abuse. Legitimate medications can be abused by people who ...