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Sample records for drugphospholipid complex technique

  1. Self-Assembled Nanoparticles Based on Amphiphilic Anticancer Drug-Phospholipid Complex for Targeted Drug Delivery and Intracellular Dual-Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Yang, Xiangrui; Li, Yanxiu; Wu, Shichao; Huang, Yu; Ye, Shefang; Xie, Liya; Dai, Lizong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-08-19

    Integrating advantages of mitomycin C (MMC)-phospholipid complex for increased drug encapsulation efficiency and reduced premature drug release, DSPE-PEG-folate (DSPE-PEG-FA) for specific tumor targeting, we reported a simple one-pot self-assembly route to prepare the MMC-phospholipid complex-loaded DSPE-PEG-based nanoparticles (MP-PEG-FA NPs). Both confocal imaging and flow cytometry demonstrated that MMC was distributed into nuclei after cellular uptake and intracellular drug delivery. More importantly, the systemically administered MP-PEG-FA NPs led to increased blood persistence and enhanced tumor accumulation in HeLa tumor-bearing nude mice. This study introduces a simple and effective strategy to design the anticancer drug-phospholipid complex-based targeted drug delivery system for sustained/controlled drug release. PMID:26234408

  2. Recent advances and future prospects of phyto-phospholipid complexation technique for improving pharmacokinetic profile of plant actives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid; Alexander, Amit; Ajazuddin; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, Shailendra

    2013-05-28

    The phyto-phospholipid complexation technique has emerged as one of the leading methods of improving bioavailability of phytopharmaceuticals having poor competency of solubilizing and crossing the biological membranes. Several plant actives in spite having potent in vitro pharmacological activities have failed to demonstrate similar in vivo response. Such plant actives have been made more effective systemically by incorporating them with dietary phospholipids forming new cellular structures which are amphipathic in nature. In the last few years phospholipids have been extensively explored for improved bioavailability and efficacy of plant drugs. Further, it is also much relevant to mention that phospholipids show unique compatibility with biological membranes and have inherent hepatoprotective activity. Different methods have been adopted to formulate phospholipid complexes of plant extractives utilizing varying solvent systems, molar ratios of drug/phospholipids and different drying techniques. Some methods of formulating such drug-phospholipid complexes have been patented as well. However, the stability of phyto-phospholipid complexes is still a matter of concern which needs attention. But still a number of products exploiting this technique are under clinical trials and some of them are now in market. The current review highlights key findings of recent years with our own viewpoints which can give the new directions to this strategy and also includes advancements in the technical aspects of phyto-phospholipid formulations which have been done in the recent past with future challenges. PMID:23474031

  3. Uptake mechanism and endosomal fate of drug-phospholipid lipid nanoparticles in subcutaneous and in situ hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Peifeng; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun; Duan, Yourong; Zhang, Zhirong

    2014-06-01

    Drug-phospholipid lipid nanoparticles (DPLNs) can effectively enhance the properties of traditional solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), as previously demonstrated by our research group and others. To date, however, very few studies have focused on the cellular uptake mechanism and fate of DPLNs in hepatoma. Therefore, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and endosomal fate of DPLNs through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry demonstrated that the Raw264.7 cell line (macrophage Raw264.7 cells), Chang cells (a human liver cell line) and HepG2 cells (a human hepatoma cell line) exhibited distinct uptake mechanisms. The Raw264.7 cells served as a model for examining liver-targeting ability. The results from mice with subcutaneous hepatomas and in situ hepatomas confirmed that the liver tumor-targeting property of the DPLNs was associated with the liver drug reservoir function. These findings further improve our understanding of DPLNs for clinical applications. PMID:24749394

  4. Relationships between human intestinal absorption and polar interactions drug/phospholipids estimated by IAM-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Grumetto, Lucia; Russo, Giacomo; Barbato, Francesco

    2015-07-15

    Phospholipid affinity indexes (logkW(IAM)) for 15 structurally non-related basic, acidic, ampholytic, and neutral drugs were measured by HPLC on two different phospholipid stationary phases (immobilized artificial membrane - IAM). According to a method we previously proposed, polar and electrostatic forces involved in drug/membrane interactions were quantified both as ΔlogkW(IAM) and as Δ(')logkW(IAM). These values are the differences between the experimental logkW(IAM) and the values expected for a neutral compound having the lipophilicity value equal to either that of the neutral form of the analyte (logP(N)) or that of the mixture of charged and neutral forms of the analyte at jejunum pH 6.5 (logD(6.5)), respectively. Jejunum absorption values, logPeff, measured by the Loc-I-Gut technique, did not relate with logkW(IAM) values. A moderate linear relationship was observed with logP(N) values for all the analytes and a weak parabolic relationship was observed with logD(6.5) values, but only after the exclusion of two analytes. In contrast, a highly significant linear inverse relationship was observed with ΔlogkW(IAM) values. Therefore, differently from the results of our recent studies on blood-brain barrier passage, the intestinal absorption data for not only bases and zwitterions but also for acids relate significantly with ΔlogkW(IAM) and not with Δ(')logkW(IAM) values. The results suggest that membrane passage at jejunum level can be described according to the "flip-flop" model; indeed, the lipophilicity of the neutral forms (logP(N)) appears related to the passage through the non-polar inner moieties of phospholipids whereas ΔlogkW(IAM) parameter appears related to the "trapping" forces at their polar surfaces. The method, easy to perform and at medium throughput, could be of use for preliminary screening of new drugs based on oral absorption potential. PMID:25917756

  5. Hybrid techniques for complex aerospace electromagnetics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberle, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Important aerospace electromagnetics problems include the evaluation of antenna performance on aircraft and the prediction and control of the aircraft's electromagnetic signature. Due to the ever increasing complexity and expense of aircraft design, aerospace engineers have become increasingly dependent on computer solutions. Traditionally, computational electromagnetics (CEM) has relied primarily on four disparate techniques: the method of moments (MoM), the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, the finite element method (FEM), and high frequency asymptotic techniques (HFAT) such as ray tracing. Each of these techniques has distinct advantages and disadvantages, and no single technique is capable of accurately solving all problems of interest on computers that are available now or will be available in the foreseeable future. As a result, new approaches that overcome the deficiencies of traditional techniques are beginning to attract a great deal of interest in the CEM community. Among these new approaches are hybrid methods which combine two or more of these techniques into a coherent model. During the ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program a hybrid FEM/MoM computer code was developed and applied to a geometry containing features found on many modern aircraft.

  6. Improved wax mold technique forms complex passages in solid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellbaum, R. F.; Page, A. D.; Phillips, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Low-cost fabricating technique produces minute, complex air passages in fluidic devices. Air jet interactions in these function as electronic and electromechanical control systems. Wax cores are fabricated without distortion by two-wax process using nonsoluble pattern-wax and water-soluble wax. Significant steps in fabrication process are discussed.

  7. Complex permittivity measurements of ferroelectrics employing composite dielectric resonator technique.

    PubMed

    Krupka, Jerzy; Zychowicz, Tomasz; Bovtun, Viktor; Veljko, Sergiy

    2006-10-01

    Composite cylindrical TE(0n1) mode dielectric resonator has been used for the complex permittivity measurements of ferroelectrics at frequency about 8.8 GHz. Rigorous equations have been derived that allowed us to find a relationship between measured resonance frequency and Q-factor and the complex permittivity. It has been shown that the choice of appropriate diameter of a sample together with rigorous complex angular frequency analysis allows precise measurements of various ferroelectric. Proposed technique can be used for materials having both real and imaginary part of permittivity as large as a few thousand. Variable temperature measurements were performed on a PbMg(1/3)Nb(2/3)O3 (PMN) ceramic sample, and the measured complex permittivity have shown good agreement with the results of measurements obtained on the same sample at lower frequencies (0.1-1.8 GHz). PMID:17036796

  8. Proteomics: Challenges, Techniques and Possibilities to Overcome Biological Sample Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of the structure and function of proteins in complex biological sample. Such an approach has the potential value to understand the complex nature of the organism. Current proteomic tools allow large-scale, high-throughput analyses for the detection, identification, and functional investigation of proteome. Advances in protein fractionation and labeling techniques have improved protein identification to include the least abundant proteins. In addition, proteomics has been complemented by the analysis of posttranslational modifications and techniques for the quantitative comparison of different proteomes. However, the major limitation of proteomic investigations remains the complexity of biological structures and physiological processes, rendering the path of exploration paved with various difficulties and pitfalls. The quantity of data that is acquired with new techniques places new challenges on data processing and analysis. This article provides a brief overview of currently available proteomic techniques and their applications, followed by detailed description of advantages and technical challenges. Some solutions to circumvent technical difficulties are proposed. PMID:20948568

  9. Encoding techniques for complex information structures in connectionist systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnden, John; Srinivas, Kankanahalli

    1990-01-01

    Two general information encoding techniques called relative position encoding and pattern similarity association are presented. They are claimed to be a convenient basis for the connectionist implementation of complex, short term information processing of the sort needed in common sense reasoning, semantic/pragmatic interpretation of natural language utterances, and other types of high level cognitive processing. The relationships of the techniques to other connectionist information-structuring methods, and also to methods used in computers, are discussed in detail. The rich inter-relationships of these other connectionist and computer methods are also clarified. The particular, simple forms are discussed that the relative position encoding and pattern similarity association techniques take in the author's own connectionist system, called Conposit, in order to clarify some issues and to provide evidence that the techniques are indeed useful in practice.

  10. Fault detection techniques for complex cable shield topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coonrod, Kurt H.; Davis, Stuart L.; McLemore, Donald P.

    1994-09-01

    This document presents the results of a basic principles study which investigated technical approaches for developing fault detection techniques for use on cables with complex shielding topologies. The study was limited to those approaches which could realistically be implemented on a fielded cable, i.e., approaches which would require partial disassembly of a cable were not pursued. The general approach used was to start with present transfer impedance measurement techniques and modify their use to achieve the best possible measurement range. An alternative test approach, similar to a sniffer type test, was also investigated.

  11. Microwave techniques for measuring complex permittivity and permeability of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, P.

    1995-08-01

    Different materials are of fundamental importance to the aerospace, microwave, electronics and communications industries, and include for example microwave absorbing materials, antennas lenses and radomes, substrates for MMIC and microwave components and antennaes. Basic measurements for the complex permittivity and permeability of those homogeneous solid materials in the microwave spectral region are described including hardware, instrumentation and analysis. Elevated temperature measurements as well as measurements intercomparisons, with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of each techniques are also presented.

  12. Probabilistic Analysis Techniques Applied to Complex Spacecraft Power System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Electric power system performance predictions are critical to spacecraft, such as the International Space Station (ISS), to ensure that sufficient power is available to support all the spacecraft s power needs. In the case of the ISS power system, analyses to date have been deterministic, meaning that each analysis produces a single-valued result for power capability because of the complexity and large size of the model. As a result, the deterministic ISS analyses did not account for the sensitivity of the power capability to uncertainties in model input variables. Over the last 10 years, the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed advanced, computationally fast, probabilistic analysis techniques and successfully applied them to large (thousands of nodes) complex structural analysis models. These same techniques were recently applied to large, complex ISS power system models. This new application enables probabilistic power analyses that account for input uncertainties and produce results that include variations caused by these uncertainties. Specifically, N&R Engineering, under contract to NASA, integrated these advanced probabilistic techniques with Glenn s internationally recognized ISS power system model, System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE).

  13. Active control technique of fractional-order chaotic complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Gamal M.; Ahmed, Mansour E.; Abed-Elhameed, Tarek M.

    2016-06-01

    Several kinds of synchronization of fractional-order chaotic complex systems are challenging research topics of current interest since they appear in many applications in applied sciences. Our main goal in this paper is to introduce the definition of modified projective combination-combination synchronization (MPCCS) of some fractional-order chaotic complex systems. We show that our systems are chaotic by calculating their Lyapunov exponents. The fractional Lyapunov dimension of the chaotic solutions of these systems is computed. A scheme is introduced to calculate MPCCS of four different (or identical) chaotic complex systems using the active control technique. Special cases of this type, which are projective and anti C-C synchronization, are discussed. Some figures are plotted to show that MPCCS is achieved and its errors approach zero.

  14. Nipple-areola complex reconstruction techniques: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Sisti, A; Grimaldi, L; Tassinari, J; Cuomo, R; Fortezza, L; Bocchiotti, M A; Roviello, F; D'Aniello, C; Nisi, G

    2016-04-01

    Many techniques for nipple-areola complex (NAC) reconstruction are described. Clarity is required on the currently available options. Since a complete list of all the techniques described until now is not available, a possibly comprehensive literature overview was carried out from 75 papers (years 1946-2015). The local flap was the most frequently described technique for the nipple reconstruction with no significant difference in complications' rate among the various types of techniques. Complications in nipple reconstruction were 46.9% after graft, 7.9% after local flap, and 5.3% in case of flaps with autologous graft/alloplastic/allograft augmentation, while complications in areola reconstruction were 10.1% after graft, and 1.6% after areola tattoo. Flaps appear to be more reliable than grafts in nipple reconstruction, while tattoo is thought to be safer than graft in areola reconstruction. The loss of projection, although considerable (45%-75%), had not significant impact on patients' satisfaction. Due to contraction, overcorrection of 25-50% of the desired result is advisory when adopting local flaps, in order to prevent loss of projection. The use of flaps with autologous graft/alloplastic/allograft augmentation (cartilage, fat, calcium hydroxylapatite, acellular dermal matrix, polymethylmethacrylate, biologic collagen) showed a minor loss of nipple projection but may expose to a relative increased number of postoperative flap necrosis. PMID:26868167

  15. Complex Archaeological Prospection Using Combination of Non-destructive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Pavelka, K.; Nový, P.; Šedina, J.

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the use of a combination of non-destructive techniques for the complex documentation of a fabulous historical site called Devil's Furrow, an unusual linear formation lying in the landscape of central Bohemia. In spite of many efforts towards interpretation of the formation, its original form and purpose have not yet been explained in a satisfactory manner. The study focuses on the northern part of the furrow which appears to be a dissimilar element within the scope of the whole Devil's Furrow. This article presents detailed description of relics of the formation based on historical map searches and modern investigation methods including airborne laser scanning, aerial photogrammetry (based on airplane and RPAS) and ground-penetrating radar. Airborne laser scanning data and aerial orthoimages acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre were used. Other measurements were conducted by our laboratory. Data acquired by various methods provide sufficient information to determine the probable original shape of the formation and proves explicitly the anthropological origin of the northern part of the formation (around village Lipany).

  16. Analyzing Complex and Structured Data via Unsupervised Learning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsterer, Kai Lars; Gieseke, Fabian; Gianniotis, Nikos; Kügler, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    In the last decades more and more dedicated all-sky-surveys created an enormous amount of data which is publicly available on the internet. The resulting datasets contain spatial, spectral, and temporal information which exhibit complex structures in the respective domain. The capability to deal with morphological features, spectral signatures, and complex time series data has become very important but is still a challenging task. A common approach when processing this kind of structured data is to extract representative features and use those for a further analysis. We present unsupervised learning approaches that help to visualize / cluster these complex data sets by e.g. deriving rotation / translation invariant prototypes or capturing the latent dynamics of time series without employing features and using echo-state-networks instead.

  17. Ablating Premature Ventricular Complexes: Justification, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Noheria, Amit; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the underlying principles that allow for safe and effective ablation for premature ventricular complexes. Clinical scenarios that necessitate consideration for ablation, the underlying anatomy, and the unique consideration to maximize energy delivery without compromising safety are sequentially examined. PMID:26306129

  18. Simulating and mapping spatial complexity using multi-scale techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Cola, L.

    1994-01-01

    A central problem in spatial analysis is the mapping of data for complex spatial fields using relatively simple data structures, such as those of a conventional GIS. This complexity can be measured using such indices as multi-scale variance, which reflects spatial autocorrelation, and multi-fractal dimension, which characterizes the values of fields. These indices are computed for three spatial processes: Gaussian noise, a simple mathematical function, and data for a random walk. Fractal analysis is then used to produce a vegetation map of the central region of California based on a satellite image. This analysis suggests that real world data lie on a continuum between the simple and the random, and that a major GIS challenge is the scientific representation and understanding of rapidly changing multi-scale fields. -Author

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING COMPLEX VISUAL DISCRIMINATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GEIS, GEORGE L.; ROTHENBERG, MARTIN

    THE SUBJECT OF THIS EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM WAS THE RECOGNITION OF, OR CONCEPTUAL RESPONSE TO, COMPLEX VISUAL STIMULI BY COLLEGE STUDENTS. PROGRAMED INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES WERE USED IN THE SUBJECT CONTEXT TO DEVELOP PRELIMINARY SELF-TEACHING MATERIALS FOR LEARNING COMPLEX CONCEPTS. THESE PROGRAMING TECHNIQUES WERE IMPLEMENTED TO PRODUCE VISUAL…

  20. NMR techniques in drug delivery: application to zein protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, F F O; Luzardo-Álvarez, Asteria; Blanco-Méndez, José; Martín-Pastor, Manuel

    2012-12-15

    Zein is a protein containing a large amount of nonpolar amino acids, which has shown the ability to form aggregates and entrap solutes, such as drugs and amino acids. NMR techniques were used to detect binding interactions and measure affinity between zein and three different drugs: tetracycline, amoxicillin and indomethacin. The release study of zein microparticle formulations containing any of these drugs was confronted with the affinity results, showing a remarkable correlation. The feasible methodology employed, focused in the functionality of the protein-drug interaction, can be very promising for the rational design of appropriate drug vehicles for drug delivery. PMID:23041651

  1. Applying Clustering Techniques to Reduce Complexity in Automated Planning Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, Luke; Levine, John

    Automated Planning is a very active area of research within Artificial Intelligence. Broadly this discipline deals with the methods by which an agent can independently determine the action sequence required to successfully achieve a set of objectives. In this paper, we will present initial work outlining a new approach to planning based on Clustering techniques, in order to group states of the world together and use the fundamental structure of the world to lift out more abstract representations. We will show that this approach can limit the combinatorial explosion of a typical planning problem in a way that is much more intuitive and reusable than has previously been possible, and outline ways that this approach can be developed further.

  2. Detecting Underground Mine Voids Using Complex Geophysical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, V. F.; Harbert, W. P.; Hammack, R. W.; Ackman, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    In July 2006, the National Energy Technology Laboratory in collaboration with Department of Geology and Planetary Science, University of Pittsburgh conducted complex ground geophysical surveys of an area known to be underlain by shallow coal mines. Geophysical methods including electromagnetic induction, DC resistivity and seismic reflection were conducted. The purpose of these surveys was to: 1) verify underground mine voids based on a century-old mine map that showed subsurface mine workings georeferenced to match with present location of geophysical test-site located on the territory of Bruceton research center in Pittsburgh, PA, 2) deliniate mine workings that may be potentially filled with electrically conductive water filtrate emerging from adjacent groundwater collectors and 3) establish an equipment calibration site for geophysical instruments. Data from electromagnetic and resistivity surveys were further processed and inverted using EM1DFM, EMIGMA or Earthimager 2D capablilities in order to generate conductivity/depth images. Anomaly maps were generated, that revealed the locations of potential mine openings.

  3. Percutaneous treatment of complex biliary stone disease using endourological technique and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Korkes, Fernando; Carneiro, Ariê; Nasser, Felipe; Affonso, Breno Boueri; Galastri, Francisco Leonardo; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Macedo, Antônio Luiz de Vasconcellos

    2015-01-01

    Most biliary stone diseases need to be treated surgically. However, in special cases that traditional biliary tract endoscopic access is not allowed, a multidisciplinary approach using hybrid technique with urologic instrumental constitute a treatment option. We report a case of a patient with complex intrahepatic stones who previously underwent unsuccessful conventional approaches, and who symptoms resolved after treatment with hybrid technique using an endourologic technology. We conducted an extensive literature review until October 2012 of manuscripts indexed in PubMed on the treatment of complex gallstones with hybrid technique. The multidisciplinary approach with hybrid technique using endourologic instrumental represents a safe and effective treatment option for patients with complex biliary stone who cannot conduct treatment with conventional methods. PMID:26061073

  4. How to perform distal anchoring technique by 6French radial approach in complex coronary procedures.

    PubMed

    Fiocca, Luigi; Bernelli, Chiara; Sirbu, Vasile; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Guagliumi, Giulio; Vassileva, Angelina; Borghesi, Marco; Valsecchi, Orazio

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the interventional landscape, device delivery during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can still present technical challenges especially when performed in complex anatomical settings and through radial approach. To overcome difficult coronary stent delivery, several strategies have been developed. A niche option in such complex cases is the anchoring balloon technique, which involves inflation of a balloon non-coaxially in a side branch or distally to the target lesion in a coaxial fashion, to facilitate stent delivery. However, the main limitation of this technique is the requirement of a large guide catheter (≥7French) which may preclude the use of radial approach. We describe, step-by-step, the distal anchoring ballooning technique performed by a 6Fr radial approach to overcome the stent delivery failure in complex anatomical scenarios and to safely and successfully carry out the PCI procedures. PMID:27053437

  5. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat'hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  6. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T.; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  7. Analytical techniques for characterization of cyclodextrin complexes in the solid state: A review.

    PubMed

    Mura, Paola

    2015-09-10

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides able to form inclusion complexes with a variety of hydrophobic guest molecules, positively modifying their physicochemical properties. A thorough analytical characterization of cyclodextrin complexes is of fundamental importance to provide an adequate support in selection of the most suitable cyclodextrin for each guest molecule, and also in view of possible future patenting and marketing of drug-cyclodextrin formulations. The demonstration of the actual formation of a drug-cyclodextrin inclusion complex in solution does not guarantee its existence also in the solid state. Moreover, the technique used to prepare the solid complex can strongly influence the properties of the final product. Therefore, an appropriate characterization of the drug-cyclodextrin solid systems obtained has also a key role in driving in the choice of the most effective preparation method, able to maximize host-guest interactions. The analytical characterization of drug-cyclodextrin solid systems and the assessment of the actual inclusion complex formation is not a simple task and involves the combined use of several analytical techniques, whose results have to be evaluated together. The objective of the present review is to present a general prospect of the principal analytical techniques which can be employed for a suitable characterization of drug-cyclodextrin systems in the solid state, evidencing their respective potential advantages and limits. The applications of each examined technique are described and discussed by pertinent examples from literature. PMID:25743620

  8. Exploration of inclusion complexes of neurotransmitters with β-cyclodextrin by physicochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Saha, Subhadeep; Kundu, Mitali; Saha, Binoy Chandra; Barman, Siti

    2016-07-01

    Molecular assemblies of β-cyclodextrin with few of the most important neurotransmitters, viz., dopamine hydrochloride, tyramine hydrochloride and (±)-epinephrine hydrochloride in aqueous medium have been explored by reliable spectroscopic and physicochemical techniques as potential drug delivery systems. Job plots confirm the 1:1 host-guest inclusion complexes, while surface tension and conductivity studies illustrate the inclusion process. The inclusion complexes were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and association constants have been calculated by using Benesi-Hildebrand method. Thermodynamic parameters for the formation of inclusion complexes have been derived by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrate that the overall inclusion processes are thermodynamically favorable.

  9. Multiple-technique identification of sibling species of the Anopheles quadrimaculatus complex.

    PubMed

    Narang, S K; Seawright, J A; Mitchell, S E; Kaiser, P E; Carlson, D A

    1993-12-01

    In the past, most researchers used a single technique for identification of cryptic taxa, population structures, biosystematics, and phylogenetic studies. Our experience with the Anopheles quadrimaculatus complex shows the importance of using several methods on individual mosquitoes. This approach consists of analysis of the polytene chromosomes in ovarian nurse cells, gas chromatographic profiles of cuticular hydrocarbons, isozyme electrophoresis, and restriction site analysis of mitochondrial or genomic DNA. We recommend use of this multiple-technique approach when analyzing feral populations for the first time, or for correlating information obtained by investigators using different techniques. PMID:8126484

  10. Laser ablation--reflections on a very complex technique for solid sampling.

    PubMed

    Niemax, K

    2001-06-01

    This paper is an attempt to point out the complex correlations between the experimental conditions in solid sampling by lasers. In particular, the influence of the laser properties, the surrounding gas, and the matrix on the analytical results of laser ablation techniques, such as laser induced breakdown spectrometry or laser ablation-ICP-MS, will be discussed. PMID:11495052

  11. Geophysical techniques applied to urban planning in complex near surface environments. Examples of Zaragoza, NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo-Anchuela, Ó.; Casas-Sainz, A. M.; Soriano, M. A.; Pocoví-Juan, A.

    Complex geological shallow subsurface environments represent an important handicap in urban and building projects. The geological features of the Central Ebro Basin, with sharp lateral changes in Quaternary deposits, alluvial karst phenomena and anthropic activity can preclude the characterization of future urban areas only from isolated geomechanical tests or from non-correctly dimensioned geophysical techniques. This complexity is here analyzed in two different test fields, (i) one of them linked to flat-bottomed valleys with irregular distribution of Quaternary deposits related to sharp lateral facies changes and irregular preconsolidated substratum position and (ii) a second one with similar complexities in the alluvial deposits and karst activity linked to solution of the underlying evaporite substratum. The results show that different geophysical techniques allow for similar geological models to be obtained in the first case (flat-bottomed valleys), whereas only the application of several geophysical techniques can permit to correctly evaluate the geological model complexities in the second case (alluvial karst). In this second case, the geological and superficial information permit to refine the sensitivity of the applied geophysical techniques to different indicators of karst activity. In both cases 3D models are needed to correctly distinguish alluvial lateral sedimentary changes from superimposed karstic activity.

  12. Enhancement of bioavailability and anthelmintic efficacy of albendazole by solid dispersion and cyclodextrin complexation techniques.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, R; Mohanta, G P; Madhusudan, S; Manna, P K; Manavalan, R

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the oral bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of albendazole (ABZ) employing solid dispersion and cyclodextrin complexation techniques. Solid dispersion (dispersion) was prepared using ABZ and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) polymer (1:1 weight ratio). Ternary inclusion complex (ternary complex) was prepared using ABZ, hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD) and L-tartaric acid (1:1:1 molar ratio). In rabbits with high gastric acidity (gastric pH approximately 1), ternary complex and solid dispersion showed a bioavailability enhancement of 3.2 and 2.4 fold respectively, compared to a commercial suspension (p < 0.05). The rise in gastric pH (pH > 5) caused a 62% reduction in AUC (area under the plasma level curve) for the commercial suspension, whereas the reduction in case of PVP dispersion and ternary complex was only 43% and 37% respectively. The rapid absorption of the drug from solid dispersion and ternary complex was reflected in improved anthelmintic efficacy against the systemic phases of Trichinella spiralis. The ternary complex was significantly more efficient than solid dispersion and exhibited the highest larvicidal activity (90%) at a dose of 50 mg x kg(-1) (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of the ternary complex might be high even if there is a great variation in the gastric pH. PMID:17867556

  13. The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex: comparative cytogenetic analysis in support of Sterile Insect Technique applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex currently harbors approximately 90 different members. The species complex has undergone many revisions in the past decades, and there is still an ongoing debate about the species limits. The availability of a variety of tools and approaches, such as molecular-genomic and cytogenetic analyses, are expected to shed light on the rather complicated issues of species complexes and incipient speciation. The clarification of genetic relationships among the different members of this complex is a prerequisite for the rational application of sterile insect technique (SIT) approaches for population control. Results Colonies established in the Insect Pest Control Laboratory (IPCL) (Seibersdorf, Vienna), representing five of the main economic important members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex were cytologically characterized. The taxa under study were B. dorsalis s.s., B. philippinensis, B. papayae, B. invadens and B. carambolae. Mitotic and polytene chromosome analyses did not reveal any chromosomal characteristics that could be used to distinguish between the investigated members of the B. dorsalis complex. Therefore, their polytene chromosomes can be regarded as homosequential with the reference maps of B. dorsalis s.s.. In situ hybridization of six genes further supported the proposed homosequentiallity of the chromosomes of these specific members of the complex. Conclusions The present analysis supports that the polytene chromosomes of the five taxa under study are homosequential. Therefore, the use of the available polytene chromosome maps for B. dorsalis s.s. as reference maps for all these five biological entities is proposed. Present data provide important insight in the genetic relationships among the different members of the B. dorsalis complex, and, along with other studies in the field, can facilitate SIT applications targeting this complex. Moreover, the availability of 'universal' reference polytene chromosome

  14. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  15. Advanced MRI Techniques in the Evaluation of Complex Cystic Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Popli, Manju Bala; Gupta, Pranav; Arse, Devraj; Kumar, Pawan; Kaur, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this research work was to evaluate complex cystic breast lesions by advanced MRI techniques and correlating imaging with histologic findings. METHODS AND MATERIALS In a cross-sectional design from September 2013 to August 2015, 50 patients having sonographically detected complex cystic lesions of the breast were included in the study. Morphological characteristics were assessed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI along with diffusion-weighted imaging and MR spectroscopy were used to further classify lesions into benign and malignant categories. All the findings were correlated with histopathology. RESULTS Of the 50 complex cystic lesions, 32 proved to be benign and 18 were malignant on histopathology. MRI features of heterogeneous enhancement on CE-MRI (13/18), Type III kinetic curve (13/18), reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (18/18), and tall choline peak (17/18) were strong predictors of malignancy. Thirteen of the 18 lesions showed a combination of Type III curve, reduced apparent diffusion coefficient value, and tall choline peak. CONCLUSIONS Advanced MRI techniques like dynamic imaging, diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR spectroscopy provide a high level of diagnostic confidence in the characterization of complex cystic breast lesion, thus allowing early diagnosis and significantly reducing patient morbidity and mortality. From our study, lesions showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement, Type III kinetic curve, diffusion restriction, and tall choline peak were significantly associated with malignant complex cystic lesions of the breast. PMID:27330299

  16. Efficient simulation of blood flow past complex endovascular devices using an adaptive embedding technique.

    PubMed

    Cebral, Juan R; Löhner, Rainald

    2005-04-01

    The simulation of blood flow past endovascular devices such as coils and stents is a challenging problem due to the complex geometry of the devices. Traditional unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics relies on the generation of finite element grids that conform to the boundary of the computational domain. However, the generation of such grids for patient-specific modeling of cerebral aneurysm treatment with coils or stents is extremely difficult and time consuming. This paper describes the application of an adaptive grid embedding technique previously developed for complex fluid structure interaction problems to the simulation of endovascular devices. A hybrid approach is used: the vessel walls are treated with body conforming grids and the endovascular devices with an adaptive mesh embedding technique. This methodology fits naturally in the framework of image-based computational fluid dynamics and opens the door for exploration of different therapeutic options and personalization of endovascular procedures. PMID:15822805

  17. The development of Laue techniques for single-pulse diffraction of chemical complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makal, A.; Trzop, E.; Sokolow, J.; Kalinowski, J.; Benedict, J.; Coppens, P.

    2011-07-01

    A modified Laue technique suitable for time-resolved diffraction is described in which profile-independent integration is used, the RATIO method is applied and multi-crystal data are normalized to a common scale. The method is applied in single-pulse pump-probe studies of a binuclear Rh complex, showing Rh-Rh bond shortening of 0.136 (8) AA on excitation.

  18. The use of complex network techniques to determine (future) climate transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qingyi; Viebahn, Jan; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2015-04-01

    In recent years much research activity has focused on the application of complex network techniques to problems in climate variability. This has been particularly successful in climate transition problems, where relatively simple topological properties of reconstructed interaction networks have provided useful early warning indicators of transitions in the ocean circulation and vegetation patterns. In this presentation, a critical evaluation will be given on recent results on such transition problems, with a focus on the collapse of the Atlantic Ocean circulation.

  19. A giant, complex fronto-ethmoidal ivory osteoma: Surgical technique in a resource-limited practice

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Unlike small and medium size fronto-ethmoidal osteomas which are amenable to surgical excision through limited craniofacial openings, giant lesions require extensive and complex craniofacial dissection, and post lesionectomy reconstruction using an array of modern-day surgical adjuncts. This is a report of our surgical technique for the successful and esthetically fair operative resection of a giant fronto-ethmoidal osteoma in a difficult practice setting. Case Description: A 32-year-old Nigerian lady harbored a giant complex fronto-ethmoidal ivory osteoma. Deploying our understanding of modern-day advanced microsurgical anatomy and technique of skull base surgery, but under severe resource limitations, a radical total surgical resection was performed and an esthetically fair post lesionectomy reconstruction was achieved. The patient remains tumor-free in 20 months, so far, of postoperative follow-up. Conclusions: Even under severe resource limitations, inventive adaptations of modern-day skull base surgery techniques can facilitate hitherto unusual functional and esthetically successful resection of giant osteomas of the fronto-ethmoidal sinus complex. PMID:21245944

  20. A modified complex modal testing technique for a rotating tire with a flexible ring model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongsuh; Wang, Semyung; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim; Kindt, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Natural frequencies, mode shapes and modal damping values are the most important parameters to describe the noise and vibration behavior of a mechanical system. For rotating machinery, however, the directivity of the propagation wave of each mode should also be taken into account. For rotating systems, this directivity can be determined by complex modal testing. In this paper, a rolling tire is represented as a flexible ring model. The limitation of application of the complex modal testing which requires two directional measurements at a certain point, which is difficult to measure in practice, has been overcome through a modified complex modal testing which requires only one directional measurements at any two points. The technique is described in detail and applied to both a numerical example and to an experimental data set of a real rotating tire.

  1. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard A; Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. PMID:27571414

  2. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems

    PubMed Central

    Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E.

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. PMID:27571414

  3. Application of Frequency Domain Substructure Synthesis Technique for Plates Loaded with Complex Attachments

    SciTech Connect

    RL Campbell; SA Hambric

    2004-02-05

    Frequency domain substructure synthesis is a modeling technique that enables the prediction of a combined response of individual structures using experimentally measured or numerically predicted frequency response functions (FRFs). The traditional synthesis algorithm [1,2] operates on component impedances and thus generally requires several matrix inversions. An improved algorithm, developed by Jetmundsen et al. [3], requires a single matrix inversion with a completely arbitrary interface definition that can easily incorporate connection impedances. The main limitations of the method are the large data requirements and sensitivity to data truncation. The utility of this technique is demonstrated through a comparison of synthesized and measured admittances of an edge-stiffened plate with attached equipment. The plate mobilities are obtained from a numerical analysis because of the ability to accurately model this structure using a finite element representation. The attachments are characterized experimentally because of their complexity. The sections describe the synthesis technique and show numerical and experimental results for the plate and equipment.

  4. Analytical techniques for characterization of cyclodextrin complexes in aqueous solution: a review.

    PubMed

    Mura, Paola

    2014-12-01

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides endowed with a hydrophilic outer surface and a hydrophobic inner cavity, able to form inclusion complexes with a wide variety of guest molecules, positively affecting their physicochemical properties. In particular, in the pharmaceutical field, cyclodextrin complexation is mainly used to increase the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs, and to enhance their bioavailability and stability. Analytical characterization of host-guest interactions is of fundamental importance for fully exploiting the potential benefits of complexation, helping in selection of the most appropriate cyclodextrin. The assessment of the actual formation of a drug-cyclodextrin inclusion complex and its full characterization is not a simple task and often requires the use of different analytical methods, whose results have to be combined and examined together. The purpose of the present review is to give, as much as possible, a general overview of the main analytical tools which can be employed for the characterization of drug-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes in solution, with emphasis on their respective potential merits, disadvantages and limits. Further, the applicability of each examined technique is illustrated and discussed by specific examples from literature. PMID:24680374

  5. The composition-explicit distillation curve technique: Relating chemical analysis and physical properties of complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J; Ott, Lisa S; Lovestead, Tara M; Huber, Marcia L

    2010-04-16

    The analysis of complex fluids such as crude oils, fuels, vegetable oils and mixed waste streams poses significant challenges arising primarily from the multiplicity of components, the different properties of the components (polarity, polarizability, etc.) and matrix properties. We have recently introduced an analytical strategy that simplifies many of these analyses, and provides the added potential of linking compositional information with physical property information. This aspect can be used to facilitate equation of state development for the complex fluids. In addition to chemical characterization, the approach provides the ability to calculate thermodynamic properties for such complex heterogeneous streams. The technique is based on the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. The analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. By far, the most widely used analytical technique we have used with the ADC is gas chromatography. This has enabled us to study finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this special issue of the Journal of Chromatography, specifically dedicated to extraction technologies, we describe the essential features of the advanced distillation curve metrology as an analytical strategy for complex fluids. PMID:20004402

  6. Improving image classification in a complex wetland ecosystem through image fusion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sinha, Priyakant; Taylor, Subhashni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of image fusion techniques on vegetation classification accuracies in a complex wetland system. Fusion of panchromatic (PAN) and multispectral (MS) Quickbird satellite imagery was undertaken using four image fusion techniques: Brovey, hue-saturation-value (HSV), principal components (PC), and Gram-Schmidt (GS) spectral sharpening. These four fusion techniques were compared in terms of their mapping accuracy to a normal MS image using maximum-likelihood classification (MLC) and support vector machine (SVM) methods. Gram-Schmidt fusion technique yielded the highest overall accuracy and kappa value with both MLC (67.5% and 0.63, respectively) and SVM methods (73.3% and 0.68, respectively). This compared favorably with the accuracies achieved using the MS image. Overall, improvements of 4.1%, 3.6%, 5.8%, 5.4%, and 7.2% in overall accuracies were obtained in case of SVM over MLC for Brovey, HSV, GS, PC, and MS images, respectively. Visual and statistical analyses of the fused images showed that the Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening technique preserved spectral quality much better than the principal component, Brovey, and HSV fused images. Other factors, such as the growth stage of species and the presence of extensive background water in many parts of the study area, had an impact on classification accuracies.

  7. Estimation of complex Young's modulus of non-stiff materials using a modified Oberst beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yabin; Wells, Valana

    2008-09-01

    The paper presents a modified Oberst beam technique to evaluate the complex Young's modulus of non-stiff materials. Unconstrained layer theories and non-parametric complex modulus identification methods used for stiff materials form the basis for the method. The proposed approach has several advantages over the standard Oberst beam technique. In particular, the layer properties can be evaluated at any frequency, and the base beam need not be completely covered with the layer material. In addition, the proposed method does not require that the complex modulus vs. frequency curve for the base beam should have a flat area near analyzed resonance frequencies in order to yield accurate results. The experiments conducted on a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) sample using a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) base beam produced good results. Uncertainty analysis shows that the measurement accuracy can be improved by increasing the modulus magnitude ratio between the layer material and the base beam material, or the thickness ratio between the layer and base beam.

  8. Contemporary Mapping Techniques of Complex Cardiac Arrhythmias - Identifying and Modifying the Arrhythmogenic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Koutalas, Emmanuel; Rolf, Sascha; Dinov, Borislav; Richter, Sergio; Arya, Arash; Bollmann, Andreas; Hindricks, Gerhard; Sommer, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology has moved a long way forward during recent decades in the comprehension and treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias. Contemporary electroanatomical mapping systems, along with state-of-the-art technology in the manufacture of electrophysiology catheters and cardiac imaging modalities, have significantly enriched our armamentarium, enabling the implementation of various mapping strategies and techniques in electrophysiology procedures. Beyond conventional mapping strategies, ablation of complex fractionated electrograms and rotor ablation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures, the identification and modification of the underlying arrhythmogenic substrate has emerged as a strategy that leads to improved outcomes. Arrhythmogenic substrate modification also has a major role in ventricular tachycardia ablation procedures. Optimisation of contact between tissue and catheter and image integration are a further step forward to augment our precision and effectiveness. Hybridisation of existing technologies with a reasonable cost should be our goal over the next few years. PMID:26835095

  9. Contemporary Mapping Techniques of Complex Cardiac Arrhythmias – Identifying and Modifying the Arrhythmogenic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Koutalas, Emmanuel; Rolf, Sascha; Dinov, Borislav; Richter, Sergio; Arya, Arash; Bollmann, Andreas; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology has moved a long way forward during recent decades in the comprehension and treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias. Contemporary electroanatomical mapping systems, along with state-of-the-art technology in the manufacture of electrophysiology catheters and cardiac imaging modalities, have significantly enriched our armamentarium, enabling the implementation of various mapping strategies and techniques in electrophysiology procedures. Beyond conventional mapping strategies, ablation of complex fractionated electrograms and rotor ablation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures, the identification and modification of the underlying arrhythmogenic substrate has emerged as a strategy that leads to improved outcomes. Arrhythmogenic substrate modification also has a major role in ventricular tachycardia ablation procedures. Optimisation of contact between tissue and catheter and image integration are a further step forward to augment our precision and effectiveness. Hybridisation of existing technologies with a reasonable cost should be our goal over the next few years. PMID:26835095

  10. Adapting simultaneous analysis phylogenomic techniques to study complex disease gene relationships.

    PubMed

    Romano, Joseph D; Tharp, William G; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2015-04-01

    The characterization of complex diseases remains a great challenge for biomedical researchers due to the myriad interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Network medicine approaches strive to accommodate these factors holistically. Phylogenomic techniques that can leverage available genomic data may provide an evolutionary perspective that may elucidate knowledge for gene networks of complex diseases and provide another source of information for network medicine approaches. Here, an automated method is presented that leverages publicly available genomic data and phylogenomic techniques, resulting in a gene network. The potential of approach is demonstrated based on a case study of nine genes associated with Alzheimer Disease, a complex neurodegenerative syndrome. The developed technique, which is incorporated into an update to a previously described Perl script called "ASAP," was implemented through a suite of Ruby scripts entitled "ASAP2," first compiles a list of sequence-similarity based orthologues using PSI-BLAST and a recursive NCBI BLAST+ search strategy, then constructs maximum parsimony phylogenetic trees for each set of nucleotide and protein sequences, and calculates phylogenetic metrics (Incongruence Length Difference between orthologue sets, partitioned Bremer support values, combined branch scores, and Robinson-Foulds distance) to provide an empirical assessment of evolutionary conservation within a given genetic network. In addition to the individual phylogenetic metrics, ASAP2 provides results in a way that can be used to generate a gene network that represents evolutionary similarity based on topological similarity (the Robinson-Foulds distance). The results of this study demonstrate the potential for using phylogenomic approaches that enable the study of multiple genes simultaneously to provide insights about potential gene relationships that can be studied within a network medicine framework that may not have been apparent using

  11. A novel proximal end stenting technique for assisting embolization of a complex true posterior communicating aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Jianmin; Ge, Jiajia; Li, Zi-Fu; Tian, Chun-Ou; Han, Jingfeng; Zhao, Rui; Hong, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Stent-assisted coiling has been widely used for endovascular treatment in recent years with satisfying clinical outcomes. The implantation of a stent using the regular approach, however, may not be safe or effective for certain aneurysms with complex structures. In this study, we report a novel stenting technique utilizing the proximal end of the stent for assisting embolization of a wide-neck irregular true posterior communicating aneurysm. This new method is a potential treatment strategy for wide-neck aneurysms located at the origin of a tortuous and thin vessel. PMID:26906925

  12. Implementation of numerical simulation techniques in analysis of the accidents in complex technological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klishin, G.S.; Seleznev, V.E.; Aleoshin, V.V.

    1997-12-31

    Gas industry enterprises such as main pipelines, compressor gas transfer stations, gas extracting complexes belong to the energy intensive industry. Accidents there can result into the catastrophes and great social, environmental and economic losses. Annually, according to the official data several dozens of large accidents take place at the pipes in the USA and Russia. That is why prevention of the accidents, analysis of the mechanisms of their development and prediction of their possible consequences are acute and important tasks nowadays. The accidents reasons are usually of a complicated character and can be presented as a complex combination of natural, technical and human factors. Mathematical and computer simulations are safe, rather effective and comparatively inexpensive methods of the accident analysis. It makes it possible to analyze different mechanisms of a failure occurrence and development, to assess its consequences and give recommendations to prevent it. Besides investigation of the failure cases, numerical simulation techniques play an important role in the treatment of the diagnostics results of the objects and in further construction of mathematical prognostic simulations of the object behavior in the period of time between two inspections. While solving diagnostics tasks and in the analysis of the failure cases, the techniques of theoretical mechanics, of qualitative theory of different equations, of mechanics of a continuous medium, of chemical macro-kinetics and optimizing techniques are implemented in the Conversion Design Bureau {number_sign}5 (DB{number_sign}5). Both universal and special numerical techniques and software (SW) are being developed in DB{number_sign}5 for solution of such tasks. Almost all of them are calibrated on the calculations of the simulated and full-scale experiments performed at the VNIIEF and MINATOM testing sites. It is worth noting that in the long years of work there has been established a fruitful and effective

  13. Components separation in complex ventral hernia repair: surgical technique and post-operative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Samuel W; Oommen, Bindhu; Heniford, B Todd; Augenstein, Vedra A

    2014-03-01

    There are over 350,000 ventral hernia repairs (VHR) performed in the United States annually and a variety of laparoscopic and open surgical techniques are described and utilized. Complex ventral hernias such as recurrent hernias, those with infected mesh, open wounds, coexisting enteric fistulas, parastomal hernias, and massive hernias-especially those with loss of abdominal domain-require sophisticated repair techniques. Many of these repairs are performed via an open approach. Ideally, the aim is to place mesh under the fascia with a large overlap of the defect and obtain primary fascial closure. However, it is often impossible to bring together fascial edges in very large hernias. Component separation is an excellent surgical technique in selected patients which involves release of the different layers of the abdominal wall and in turn helps accomplish primary fascial approximation. The posterior rectus sheath, external oblique or the transverse abdominis fascia can be cut and allows for closure of fascia in a tension free manner in a majority of patients. In this chapter we describe the various techniques for component separation, indications for use, how to select an appropriate type of release and post-operative outcomes. PMID:24700223

  14. Focused ion beam techniques for fabricating geometrically-complex components and devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Adams, David Price; Hodges, V. Carter; Vasile, Michael J.

    2004-03-01

    We have researched several new focused ion beam (FIB) micro-fabrication techniques that offer control of feature shape and the ability to accurately define features onto nonplanar substrates. These FIB-based processes are considered useful for prototyping, reverse engineering, and small-lot manufacturing. Ion beam-based techniques have been developed for defining features in miniature, nonplanar substrates. We demonstrate helices in cylindrical substrates having diameters from 100 {micro}m to 3 mm. Ion beam lathe processes sputter-define 10-{micro}m wide features in cylindrical substrates and tubes. For larger substrates, we combine focused ion beam milling with ultra-precision lathe turning techniques to accurately define 25-100 {micro}m features over many meters of path length. In several cases, we combine the feature defining capability of focused ion beam bombardment with additive techniques such as evaporation, sputter deposition and electroplating in order to build geometrically-complex, functionally-simple devices. Damascene methods that fabricate bound, metal microcoils have been developed for cylindrical substrates. Effects of focused ion milling on surface morphology are also highlighted in a study of ion-milled diamond.

  15. Techniques for studying the mechanical properties of materials in complex stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Lech; Turski, Karol; Waniewski, Maciej; Dziankowski, Zygmunt; Kiryk, Romuald

    In this article the authors describe an experimental technique suitable for determining the mechanical properties of materials in complex stress states. The studies were conducted so as to allow determination of elastic characteristics defined by two elasticity constants, plastic flow coefficients defined by a hardening curve, mechanical property anisotropy characteristics defined by the form and values of material anisotropy constants, and the evolution of these properties under deformation. The realization of such an extensive program for materials in complex stress states requires very accurate measurements, precise and automatic control of the loading of the specimen, and the collection and processing of a large volume of digital measurements results. The program also requires the right instrumentation and computer software to control the strength testing machine for materials in a complex stress state and software to process and graph the measurement results and reflect them in a desired graphic form. These are extremely important elements of the article, which, in addition to the traditional mechanical element, also discusses preparing the specimens, fastening and loading them, measuring the components of stress and strain, and determining the quality of the research and the value of the results. This article covers all these aspects of testing materials in complex stress states in a planar stress state, while specific parts of the article include a discussion of the literature in the field, the method used for complex stress state tests, the software used to control the strength testing machine, the software used to process the measurement results, and the results obtained for several series of tests performed on tubular specimens of PA6 aluminum alloy and 18G2 steel.

  16. Low-Complexity Lossless and Near-Lossless Data Compression Technique for Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Klimesh, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    This work extends the lossless data compression technique described in Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral- Image Data, (NPO-42517) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26. The original technique was extended to include a near-lossless compression option, allowing substantially smaller compressed file sizes when a small amount of distortion can be tolerated. Near-lossless compression is obtained by including a quantization step prior to encoding of prediction residuals. The original technique uses lossless predictive compression and is designed for use on multispectral imagery. A lossless predictive data compression algorithm compresses a digitized signal one sample at a time as follows: First, a sample value is predicted from previously encoded samples. The difference between the actual sample value and the prediction is called the prediction residual. The prediction residual is encoded into the compressed file. The decompressor can form the same predicted sample and can decode the prediction residual from the compressed file, and so can reconstruct the original sample. A lossless predictive compression algorithm can generally be converted to a near-lossless compression algorithm by quantizing the prediction residuals prior to encoding them. In this case, since the reconstructed sample values will not be identical to the original sample values, the encoder must determine the values that will be reconstructed and use these values for predicting later sample values. The technique described here uses this method, starting with the original technique, to allow near-lossless compression. The extension to allow near-lossless compression adds the ability to achieve much more compression when small amounts of distortion are tolerable, while retaining the low complexity and good overall compression effectiveness of the original algorithm.

  17. Multi-technique characterization of poly-L-lysine dendrigrafts-Cu(II) complexes for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Jean-Christophe; Maret, Barbara; Vidot, Kevin; Francoia, Jean-Patrick; Cangiotti, Michela; Lucchi, Susanna; Coppola, Concetta; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca

    2015-02-01

    Poly-L-lysine is a biocompatible polymer used for drug or gene delivery, for transport through cellular membranes, and as nanosized magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. Cu(II)-poly-L-lysine complexes are of particular interest for their role in biocatalysis. In this study, poly-L-lysine dendrigrafts (DGLs) at different generations (G2, G3, and G4) are synthesized and characterized in absence and presence of Cu(II) by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), UV-Vis, potentiometric titration and circular dichroism (CD). The analysis is performed as a function of the [Cu(II)]/[Lys] (=R) molar ratio, pH and generation by identifying differently flexible complexes in different dendrimer regions. The amine sites in the lateral chains become increasingly involved with the increase of pH. The good agreement and complementarity of the results from the different techniques provide an integrate view of the structural and dynamic properties of Cu(II)-DGL complexes implementing their use as biocatalysts. PMID:25330467

  18. Comparison of Euler and full potential marching techniques for flows over complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szema, K. Y.; Chakravarthy, S. R.; Shankar, V.; Byerly, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two recently developed aerodynamic prediction techniques based on the steady full potential equation and the unsteady Euler equations have been applied to a variety of three-dimensional supersonic flow problems exhibiting embedded subsonic regions. Both techniques utilize planar Gauss-Seidel relaxation in the marching direction and approximate factorization in the cross-flow plane. A conservative switching scheme and flux bias technique are employed in the full potential method to transition from the supersonic marching procedure to a subsonic relaxation algorithm and vice versa. A new unified approach with finite volume, high accuracy (up to third order) Total Variation Diminishing formulation (based on Roe's scheme) is used in the Euler solver. In the supersonic regions of the flow an 'infinitely large' time step is employed, and a finite time step is applied in the subsonic regions of the flow to reach the steady-state as a time-asymptote. Numerical solutions are obtained for a number of complex configurations, including: (1) an elliptic waverider, (2) a realistic fighter configuration, (3) the Space Shuttle, and (4) a Shuttle-like configuration. Both the Full Potential and Euler numerical results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Activated sampling in complex materials at finite temperature: The properly obeying probability activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, Henk; Chubynsky, M. V.; Barkema, G. T.; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-12-01

    While the dynamics of many complex systems is dominated by activated events, there are very few simulation methods that take advantage of this fact. Most of these procedures are restricted to relatively simple systems or, as with the activation-relaxation technique (ART), sample the conformation space efficiently at the cost of a correct thermodynamical description. We present here an extension of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART), that obeys detailed balance and samples correctly the thermodynamic ensemble. Testing POP-ART on two model systems, a vacancy and an interstitial in crystalline silicon, we show that this method recovers the proper thermodynamical weights associated with the various accessible states and is significantly faster than molecular dynamics in the simulations of a vacancy below 700 K.

  20. Activated sampling in complex materials at finite temperature: the properly obeying probability activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Vocks, Henk; Chubynsky, M V; Barkema, G T; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-12-22

    While the dynamics of many complex systems is dominated by activated events, there are very few simulation methods that take advantage of this fact. Most of these procedures are restricted to relatively simple systems or, as with the activation-relaxation technique (ART), sample the conformation space efficiently at the cost of a correct thermodynamical description. We present here an extension of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART), that obeys detailed balance and samples correctly the thermodynamic ensemble. Testing POP-ART on two model systems, a vacancy and an interstitial in crystalline silicon, we show that this method recovers the proper thermodynamical weights associated with the various accessible states and is significantly faster than molecular dynamics in the simulations of a vacancy below 700 K. PMID:16396563

  1. Application of advanced grid generation techniques for flow field computations about complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flowfields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct a boundary-fitted coordinate system. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach; its applications are investigated. The method conservative providing conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-stage Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed. The solutions include: low speed flow over a sphere, high speed flow over a slender body, supersonic flow through a duct, and supersonic internal/external flow interaction for an aircraft configuration at various angles of attack. The results demonstrate that the multiple grids approach along with the conservative interfacing is capable of computing the flows about the complex configurations where the use of a single grid system is not possible.

  2. High-resolution accurate mass spectrometry as a technique for characterization of complex lysimeter leachate samples.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Marshall, Samantha J; Saeed, Mansoor; Earll, Mark; Hadfield, Stephen T; Richardson, Kevan; Rawlinson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Lysimeter studies can be used to identify and quantify soil degradates of agrochemicals (metabolites) that have the potential to leach to groundwater. However, the apparent metabolic profile of such lysimeter leachate samples will often be significantly more complex than would be expected in true groundwater samples. This is particularly true for S-metolachlor, which has an extremely complex metabolic pathway. Consequently, it was not practically possible to apply a conventional analytical approach to identify all metabolites in an S-metolachlor lysimeter study, because there was insufficient mass to enable the use of techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Recent advances in high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry, however, allow innovative screening approaches to characterize leachate samples to a greater extent than previously possible. Leachate from the S-metolachlor study was screened for accurate masses (±5 ppm of the nominal mass) corresponding to more than 400 hypothetical metabolite structures. A refined list of plausible metabolites was constructed from these data to provide a comprehensive description of the most likely metabolites present. The properties of these metabolites were then evaluated using a principal component analysis model, based on molecular descriptors, to visualize the entire chemical space and to cluster the metabolites into a number of subclasses. This characterization and principal component analysis evaluation enabled the selection of suitable representative metabolites that were subsequently used as exemplars to assess the toxicological relevance of the leachate as a whole. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1401-1412. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627902

  3. Skin friction measurement in complex flows using thin oil film techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Grant NAG2-261 was initiated to support a program of research to study complex flows that occur in flight and laboratory experiments by building, testing and optimizing an on-board technique for direct measurement of surface shear stress using thin oil film techniques. The program of research has proceeded under the supervision of the NASA Ames Research Center and with further cooperation from the NASA Ames-Dryden and NASA Langley Research Centers. In accordance with the original statement of work, the following research milestones were accomplished: (1) design and testing of an internally mounted one-directional skin friction meter to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept; (2) design and construction of a compact instrument capable of measuring skin friction in two directions; (3) study of transitional and fully turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with and without longitudinal pressure gradients utilizing the compact two-directional skin friction meter; (4) study of the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer and a shock wave generated by a compression corner using the two-directional meter; and (5) flight qualification of the compact meter and accompanying electronic and pneumatic systems, preliminary installation into flight test fixture.

  4. New low-complexity and robust time synchronization technique for optical IMDD OFDM transmissions.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tuan-Anh; Arzel, Matthieu; Lin, Hao; Jahan, Bruno; Jezequel, Michel

    2014-06-16

    This paper provides an analysis of the performance of conventional preamble-based time synchronization techniques, which have been proposed for Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) radio transmissions, in the context of optical Intensity Modulated and Direct Detected (IMDD) OFDM transmissions over single-mode fiber. A novel preamble structure along with a two-stage synchronization algorithm is proposed. Thanks to the particular structure of the preamble, a first coarse synchronization metric does not present minor peaks. In addition, without the knowledge of the preamble waveform the receiver can perform both coarse and fine synchronization steps. As maximal delay in arrival time between different frequency components of a signal depends on chromatic dispersion and the signal bandwidth, it is also observed that a slowly time-varying preamble is more robust than a fast time-varying one. By means of numerical simulations, the proposed method is shown to provide better performance when compared to other conventional methods in terms of timing offset variance with reduced receiver complexity. In unamplified transmissions the proposed technique guarantees a quasi-optimal transmission capacity even with a short cyclic prefix. PMID:24977530

  5. Development of a complex experimental system for controlled ecological life support technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S.; Tang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Wang, X.; Feng, H.; Ai, W.; Qin, L.; Deng, Y.

    A complex experimental system for controlled ecological life support technique can be used as a test platform for plant-man integrated experiments and material close-loop experiments of the controlled ecological life support system CELSS Based on lots of plan investigation plan design and drawing design the system was built through the steps of processing installation and joined debugging The system contains a volume of about 40 0m 3 its interior atmospheric parameters such as temperature relative humidity oxygen concentration carbon dioxide concentration total pressure lighting intensity photoperiod water content in the growing-matrix and ethylene concentration are all monitored and controlled automatically and effectively Its growing system consists of two rows of racks along its left-and-right sides separately and each of which holds two up-and-down layers eight growing beds hold a total area of about 8 4m 2 and their vertical distance can be adjusted automatically and independently lighting sources consist of both red and blue light-emitting diodes Successful development of the test platform will necessarily create an essential condition for next large-scale integrated study of controlled ecological life support technique

  6. Bioclimatic and vegetation mapping of a topographically complex oceanic island applying different interpolation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón-Machado, Víctor; Otto, Rüdiger; del Arco Aguilar, Marcelino José

    2014-07-01

    Different spatial interpolation techniques have been applied to construct objective bioclimatic maps of La Palma, Canary Islands. Interpolation of climatic data on this topographically complex island with strong elevation and climatic gradients represents a challenge. Furthermore, meteorological stations are not evenly distributed over the island, with few stations at high elevations. We carried out spatial interpolations of the compensated thermicity index (Itc) and the annual ombrothermic Index (Io), in order to obtain appropriate bioclimatic maps by using automatic interpolation procedures, and to establish their relation to potential vegetation units for constructing a climatophilous potential natural vegetation map (CPNV). For this purpose, we used five interpolation techniques implemented in a GIS: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), ordinary cokriging (OCK), multiple linear regression (MLR) and MLR followed by ordinary kriging of the regression residuals. Two topographic variables (elevation and aspect), derived from a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), were included in OCK and MLR. The accuracy of the interpolation techniques was examined by the results of the error statistics of test data derived from comparison of the predicted and measured values. Best results for both bioclimatic indices were obtained with the MLR method with interpolation of the residuals showing the highest R 2 of the regression between observed and predicted values and lowest values of root mean square errors. MLR with correction of interpolated residuals is an attractive interpolation method for bioclimatic mapping on this oceanic island since it permits one to fully account for easily available geographic information but also takes into account local variation of climatic data.

  7. Bioclimatic and vegetation mapping of a topographically complex oceanic island applying different interpolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Machado, Víctor; Otto, Rüdiger; del Arco Aguilar, Marcelino José

    2014-07-01

    Different spatial interpolation techniques have been applied to construct objective bioclimatic maps of La Palma, Canary Islands. Interpolation of climatic data on this topographically complex island with strong elevation and climatic gradients represents a challenge. Furthermore, meteorological stations are not evenly distributed over the island, with few stations at high elevations. We carried out spatial interpolations of the compensated thermicity index (Itc) and the annual ombrothermic Index (Io), in order to obtain appropriate bioclimatic maps by using automatic interpolation procedures, and to establish their relation to potential vegetation units for constructing a climatophilous potential natural vegetation map (CPNV). For this purpose, we used five interpolation techniques implemented in a GIS: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), ordinary cokriging (OCK), multiple linear regression (MLR) and MLR followed by ordinary kriging of the regression residuals. Two topographic variables (elevation and aspect), derived from a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), were included in OCK and MLR. The accuracy of the interpolation techniques was examined by the results of the error statistics of test data derived from comparison of the predicted and measured values. Best results for both bioclimatic indices were obtained with the MLR method with interpolation of the residuals showing the highest R2 of the regression between observed and predicted values and lowest values of root mean square errors. MLR with correction of interpolated residuals is an attractive interpolation method for bioclimatic mapping on this oceanic island since it permits one to fully account for easily available geographic information but also takes into account local variation of climatic data. PMID:23686111

  8. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  9. Global skin friction diagnostics: The GLOF technique and measurements of complex separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodiga, Sudesh A.

    This work describes the application of the global luminescent oil film skin friction meter to quantitative global skin friction diagnostics of complex separated flows. The development of this technique is based on the relationship between the oil film thickness and luminescent intensity of a luminescent oil film. The projected thin oil film equation is given to relate the normalized luminescent intensity with skin friction. The variational formulation with a smoothness constraint on skin friction is proposed to obtain a snap shot solution from two consecutive images for a relative skin friction field. A complete skin friction field is reconstructed through superposition of a sequence of snap shot solutions. A refinement is implemented for this technique focused on data reduction simplification and robustness, luminescent oil formulation, UV excitation and oil film application. This is complemented by a systematic study with emphasis on parametric analysis of data reduction variables such as spatial resolution, time step, Lagrange multiplier, image file format and image filtering. A number of separated flows were also investigated---a low aspect ratio NACA0012 rectangular wing at different angles of attack, wing-body junction flow and delta wings at different angles of attack, yaw and roll. Detailed analysis of the complex skin friction topology of each test case was carried out along with topological constraint analysis using the Poincare-Bendixson index formula. The conservation law given by the Poincare-Bendixson index formula for the number of isolated singular points and boundary switch points in a region enclosed by a penetrable boundary is utilized as a general approach in analyzing the topological features of the skin friction fields. A systematic approach was developed to map skin friction vectors from the two dimensional image plane to a three dimensional model surface in the object space. Combined surface pressure and global skin friction measurements

  10. An improved six-port technique for measuring complex reflection coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafal, M. D.

    1980-03-01

    Current realizations of the Six-Port technique for measuring the complex reflection coefficient require accurate information about the system calibration constants. An examination of the sensitivity of the solution of the reflection coefficient to calibration constants is undertaken. An improved set of design specifications is derived based on the sensitivity of the solution and constraints on power measurement accuracy. It has been recognized that the system equations for the Six-Port are an overdetermined set of equations. Previously, this overdeterminedness has not been used to reduce the sensitivity of the solution of the reflection coefficient to variation of the calibration constants. An algorithm is described which makes use of the extra calibration constants. A Fortran program is presented which implements the algorithm. A hardware realization based on the improved set of design specifications is described. The circuit operates at a center frequency of 900 MHz and performs over a 16% band of frequencies without recalibration. Errors in phase measurement for this Six-Port implementation are less than two degrees except at the band edges. Errors in magnitude measurement are less than 10% except for measurements of small values of reflection coefficient magnitude (0.3) for which errors are 20%.

  11. Evolutionary programming technique for reducing complexity of artifical neural networks for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Joseph Y.; Land, Walker H., Jr.; Morrison, Clayton T.

    2000-06-01

    An evolutionary programming (EP) technique was investigated to reduce the complexity of artificial neural network (ANN) models that predict the outcome of mammography-induced breast biopsy. By combining input variables consisting of mammography lesion descriptors and patient history data, the ANN predicted whether the lesion was benign or malignant, which may aide in reducing the number of unnecessary benign biopsies and thus the cost of mammography screening of breast cancer. The EP has the ability to optimize the ANN both structurally and parametrically. An EP was partially optimized using a data set of 882 biopsy-proven cases from Duke University Medical Center. Although many different architectures were evolved, the best were often perceptrons with no hidden nodes. A rank ordering of the inputs was performed using twenty independent EP runs. This confirmed the predictive value of the mass margin and patient age variables, and revealed the unexpected usefulness of the history of previous breast cancer. Further work is required to improve the performance of the EP over all cases in general and calcification cases in particular.

  12. A probabilistic technique for the assessment of complex dynamic system resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchanos, Michael Gregory

    In the presence of operational uncertainty, one of the greatest challenges in systems engineering is to ensure system effectiveness, mission capability and survivability for large scale, complex system architectures. Historic events such as the 2003 Northeastern Blackout, and the 2005 Hurricane Katrina, have underlined the great importance of system safety, and survivability. With safety management currently applied on a reactive basis to emerging incidents and risk challenges, there is a paradigm shift from passive, reactive and diagnosis-based approaches to the development of architectures that will autonomously manage safety and survivability through active, proactive and prognosis-based engineering solutions. The shift aims to bring safety considerations early in the engineering design process, in order to reduce retrofitting and additional safety certification costs, increase flexibility in risk management, and essentially make safety be "built-in" the design. As a possible enabling research direction, resilience engineering is an emerging discipline, pertinent to safety management, which offers alternative insights on the design of more safe and survivable system architectures. Conceptually, resilience engineering brings new perspectives on the understanding of system safety, accidents, failures, performance degradations and risk. A resilient system can "absorb" the impact of change due to unexpected disturbances, while it "adapts" to change, in order to maintain the system's physical integrity and capability to carry on with its mission. The leading hypothesis advocates that if a complex dynamic system is more resilient, then it would be more survivable, thus more effective, despite the unexpected disturbances that could affect its normal operating conditions. For investigating the impact of more resilient systems on survivability and safety, a framework for theoretical resilience estimations has been formulated. It constitutes the basis for quantitative

  13. Employing socially driven techniques for framing, contextualization, and collaboration in complex analytical threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollocko, Arthur; Danczyk, Jennifer; Farry, Michael; Jenkins, Michael; Voshell, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The proliferation of sensor technologies continues to impact Intelligence Analysis (IA) work domains. Historical procurement focus on sensor platform development and acquisition has resulted in increasingly advanced collection systems; however, such systems often demonstrate classic data overload conditions by placing increased burdens on already overtaxed human operators and analysts. Support technologies and improved interfaces have begun to emerge to ease that burden, but these often focus on single modalities or sensor platforms rather than underlying operator and analyst support needs, resulting in systems that do not adequately leverage their natural human attentional competencies, unique skills, and training. One particular reason why emerging support tools often fail is due to the gap between military applications and their functions, and the functions and capabilities afforded by cutting edge technology employed daily by modern knowledge workers who are increasingly "digitally native." With the entry of Generation Y into these workplaces, "net generation" analysts, who are familiar with socially driven platforms that excel at giving users insight into large data sets while keeping cognitive burdens at a minimum, are creating opportunities for enhanced workflows. By using these ubiquitous platforms, net generation analysts have trained skills in discovering new information socially, tracking trends among affinity groups, and disseminating information. However, these functions are currently under-supported by existing tools. In this paper, we describe how socially driven techniques can be contextualized to frame complex analytical threads throughout the IA process. This paper focuses specifically on collaborative support technology development efforts for a team of operators and analysts. Our work focuses on under-supported functions in current working environments, and identifies opportunities to improve a team's ability to discover new information and

  14. Sample Preparation Techniques for the Untargeted LC-MS-Based Discovery of Peptides in Complex Biological Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Finoulst, Inez; Pinkse, Martijn; Van Dongen, William; Verhaert, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although big progress has been made in sample pretreatment over the last years, there are still considerable limitations when it comes to overcoming complexity and dynamic range problems associated with peptide analyses from biological matrices. Being the little brother of proteomics, peptidomics is a relatively new field of research aiming at the direct analysis of the small proteins, called peptides, many of which are not amenable for typical trypsin-based analytics. In this paper, we present an overview of different techniques and methods currently used for reducing a sample's complexity and for concentrating low abundant compounds to enable successful peptidome analysis. We focus on techniques which can be employed prior to liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for peptide detection and identification and indicate their advantages as well as their shortcomings when it comes to the untargeted analysis of native peptides from complex biological matrices. PMID:22203783

  15. Depolymerization of chitosan-metal complexes via a solution plasma technique.

    PubMed

    Pornsunthorntawee, Orathai; Katepetch, Chaiyapruk; Vanichvattanadecha, Chutima; Saito, Nagahiro; Rujiravanit, Ratana

    2014-02-15

    Chitosan-metal complexes were depolymerized under acidic conditions using a solution plasma system. Four different types of metal ions, including Ag(+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+) ions, were added to the chitosan solution at a metal-to-chitosan molar ratio of 1:8. The depolymerization rate was affected by the types of metal ions that form complexes with chitosan. The complexation of chitosan with Cu(2+) or Fe(3+) ions strongly promoted the depolymerization rate of chitosan using a solution plasma treatment. However, chitosan-Ag(+) and chitosan-Zn(2+) complexes exhibited no change in the depolymerization rate compared to chitosan. After plasma treatment of the chitosan-metal complexes, the depolymerized chitosan products were separated into water-insoluble and water-soluble fractions. The water-soluble fraction containing low-molecular-weight chitosan was obtained in a yield of less than 57% for the depolymerization of chitosan-Fe(3+) complex with the plasma treatment time of 180 min. PMID:24507312

  16. Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with double microcatheter technique for complex basilar bifurcation aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kawamoto, Yukihiko; Murakami, Taro; Okamura, Akitake; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2012-09-01

    Y-configured double stent technique is useful for coil embolization of a bifurcation wide neck aneurysm while preserving the patency of the two important vessels. However, if the important vessels emanating directly from the aneurysm comprised four vessels, two vessels not deployed, Y-stents might not be preserved with the Y-stent technique by itself. We report a case treated with Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with a double microcatheter technique for complex basilar bifurcation aneurysm. A 78-year-old woman presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of poor grade. CT-angiography showed a wide neck and shallow aneurysm of complex basilar bifurcation involving both posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) and superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs). In the chronic stage of SAH, Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with a double microcatheter technique was performed. After Y-stent (two Enterprise) deployment from both the PCAs to the basilar artery, coil embolization of a basilar bifurcation aneurysm was performed using a double microcatheter technique to preserve both SCAs. PMID:23077865

  17. AN INTRALABORATORY COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HYDRIDE GENERATION AND GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES FOR DETERMINING ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENIC IN COMPLEX WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed intralaboratory comparison of the determination of arsenic in complex wastewater samples by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption techniques has been conducted. Two hydride generation techniques were employed. One consisted of the use of sodium boro...

  18. A comparison of emissive probe techniques for electric potential measurements in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J. P.; Hershkowitz, N.; Raitses, Y.; Kaganovich, I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2011-07-15

    The major emissive probe techniques are compared to better understand the floating potential of an electron emitting surface in a plasma. An overview of the separation point technique, floating point technique, and inflection point in the limit of zero emission technique is given, addressing how each method works as well as the theoretical basis and limitations of each. It is shown that while the floating point method is the most popular, it is expected to yield a value {approx}1.5T{sub e}/e below the plasma potential due to a virtual cathode forming around the probe. The theoretical predictions were checked with experiments performed in a 2 kW annular Hall thruster plasma (n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}and T{sub e} {approx} 10-50 eV). The authors find that the floating point method gives a value around 2T{sub e}/e below the inflection point method, which is shown to be a more accurate emissive probe technique than other techniques used in this work for measurements of the plasma potential.

  19. Managing Construction Operations Visually: 3-D Techniques for Complex Topography and Restricted Visibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Walter; Opdenbosh, Augusto; Santamaria, Juan Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Visual information is vital in planning and managing construction operations, particularly, where there is complex terrain topography and salvage operations with limited accessibility and visibility. From visually-assessing site operations and preventing equipment collisions to simulating material handling activities to supervising remotes sites…

  20. Surgical Technique for Repair of Peripheral Pulmonary Artery Stenosis and Other Complex Peripheral Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Richard D; Ibrahimiye, Ali N; Hanley, Frank L

    2016-08-01

    Surgical reconstruction of peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is a technically challenging procedure due to the need to access all lobar and segmental branches. This paper describes our surgical approach that entails division of the main pulmonary and separation of the branch pulmonary arteries. This surgical approach can also be utilized for other complex peripheral pulmonary artery reconstructions. PMID:27449462

  1. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    When tentatively identifying compounds in complex mixtures using mass spectral libraries, multiple matches or no plausible matches due to a high level of chemical noise or interferences can occur. Worse yet, most analytes are not in the libraries. In each case, Ion Composition El...

  2. A laser-sheet flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinath, M. S.; Ross, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    A flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) is described. The technique uses a laser sheet generated by the NFAC Long Range Laser Velocimeter (LRLV) to illuminate a smoke-like tracer in the flow. The LRLV optical system is modified slightly, and a scanned mirror is added to generate the sheet. These modifications are described, in addition to the results of an initial performance test conducted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. During this test, flow visualization was performed in the wake region behind a truck as part of a vehicle drag reduction study. The problems encountered during the test are discussed, in addition to the recommended improvements needed to enhance the performance of the technique for future applications.

  3. Recognizing and Managing Complexity: Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts and Techniques Using the Zebra Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, John; Zhang, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Teaching advanced programming can be a challenge, especially when the students are pursuing different majors with diverse analytical and problem-solving capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of using a particular problem as a vehicle for imparting a broad set of programming concepts and problem-solving techniques. We…

  4. Developing a complex independent component analysis technique to extract non-stationary patterns from geophysical time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Geodetic/geophysical observations, such as the time series of global terrestrial water storage change or sea level and temperature change, represent samples of physical processes and therefore contain information about complex physical interactionswith many inherent time scales. Extracting relevant information from these samples, for example quantifying the seasonality of a physical process or its variability due to large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions, is not possible by rendering simple time series approaches. In the last decades, decomposition techniques have found increasing interest for extracting patterns from geophysical observations. Traditionally, principal component analysis (PCA) and more recently independent component analysis (ICA) are common techniques to extract statistical orthogonal (uncorrelated) and independent modes that represent the maximum variance of observations, respectively. PCA and ICA can be classified as stationary signal decomposition techniques since they are based on decomposing the auto-covariance matrix or diagonalizing higher (than two)-order statistical tensors from centered time series. However, the stationary assumption is obviously not justifiable for many geophysical and climate variables even after removing cyclic components e.g., the seasonal cycles. In this paper, we present a new decomposition method, the complex independent component analysis (CICA, Forootan, PhD-2014), which can be applied to extract to non-stationary (changing in space and time) patterns from geophysical time series. Here, CICA is derived as an extension of real-valued ICA (Forootan and Kusche, JoG-2012), where we (i) define a new complex data set using a Hilbert transformation. The complex time series contain the observed values in their real part, and the temporal rate of variability in their imaginary part. (ii) An ICA algorithm based on diagonalization of fourth-order cumulants is then applied to decompose the new complex data set in (i

  5. Molecular tagging techniques and their applications to the study of complex thermal flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Li, Haixing; Hu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    This review article reports the recent progress in the development of a new group of molecule-based flow diagnostic techniques, which include molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) and molecular tagging thermometry (MTT), for both qualitative flow visualization of thermally induced flow structures and quantitative whole-field measurements of flow velocity and temperature distributions. The MTV and MTT techniques can also be easily combined to result in a so-called molecular tagging velocimetry and thermometry (MTV&T) technique, which is capble of achieving simultaneous measurements of flow velocity and temperature distribution in fluid flows. Instead of using tiny particles, the molecular tagging techniques (MTV, MTT, and MTV&T) use phosphorescent molecules, which can be turned into long-lasting glowing marks upon excitation by photons of appropriate wavelength, as the tracers for the flow velocity and temperature measurements. The unique attraction and implementation of the molecular tagging techniques are demonstrated by three application examples, which include: (1) to quantify the unsteady heat transfer process from a heated cylinder to the surrounding fluid flow in order to examine the thermal effects on the wake instabilities behind the heated cylinder operating in mixed and forced heat convection regimes, (2) to reveal the time evolution of unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside micro-sized, icing water droplets in order to elucidate the underlying physics pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena, and (3) to achieve simultaneous droplet size, velocity and temperature measurements of "in-flight" droplets to characterize the dynamic and thermodynamic behaviors of flying droplets in spray flows.

  6. A Mechanical Drag Coefficient Formulation and Urban Canopy Parameter Assimilation Technique for Complex Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, E.; Martilli, A.; Santiago, J. L.; González, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    A mechanical drag coefficient formulation was implemented into the Building Effect Parameterization + Building Energy Model system coupled with the mesoscale Weather Research Forecasting model to improve the representation of the wind speed in complex urban environments. Previously, this formulation had been assessed only against spatially-averaged results from computational fluid dynamical simulations in idealized urban configurations. The main objective is to evaluate its performance over a real city. The introduction of a drag coefficient that varies with the building plan-area fraction increases the accuracy of the mesoscale model in predicting surface wind speed in complex urban environments (i.e. New York City) particularly in areas with tall buildings. Additionally, a methodology to implement local building information and a new land-cover land-use distribution is proposed that improves the representation of the urban morphology.

  7. Separation technique for messenger RNAs by use of schizophyllan/poly(A) tail complexation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Taro; Beppu, Akiko; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2005-01-01

    Schizophyllan (SPG) is one of the water soluble beta-1,3-glucans and has a peculiar molecular recognition capability, namely, the single stranded SPG (s-SPG) can form a stoichiometric complex with certain polynucleotides such as poly(C) and poly(A), although it cannot bind poly(G) and poly(dC) at all. In this paper, we prepared an s-SPG-appended column and made an attempt to separate polynucleotides on the bases of this molecular recognition capability. The s-SPG-appended column trapped only such RNAs that could form the complex with s-SPG but eluted other RNAs which did not form the complex. Encouraged by the results in the model system, we extended the s-SPG-appended column into separation of native messenger RNAs (mRNAs) from a RNA mixture (total RNA) obtained from yeast. Since eukaryotic mRNAs have a poly(A) tail with 150-300 bases, we supposed that the tails would be trapped by the s-SPG-appended column. The results indicate that mRNAs were separated from total RNA in good yield and with high purity. It should be emphasized that this is the first device to separate natural mRNAs without using a dA/dT Watson-Crick-type interaction. PMID:15638518

  8. [Characterization of the Structure of the Prokaryotic Complex of Antarctic Permafrost by Molecular Genetic Techniques].

    PubMed

    Manucharova, N A; Trosheva, E V; Kol'tsova, E M; Demkina, E V; Karaevskaya, E V; Rivkina, E M; Mardanov, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2016-01-01

    A prokaryotic mesophilic organotrophic community responsible for 10% of the total microbial number determined by epifluorescence microscopy was reactivated in the samples ofAntarctic permafrost retrieved from the environment favoring long-term preservation of microbial communities (7500 years). No culturable forms were obtained without resuscitation procedures (CFU = 0). Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes were the dominant microbial groups in the complex. Initiation of the reactivated microbial complex by addition of chitin (0.1% wt/vol) resulted in an increased share of metabolically active biomass (up to 50%) due to the functional domination of chitinolytics caused by the target resource. Thus, sequential application of resuscitation procedures and initiation of a specific physiological group (in this case, chitinolytics) to a permafrost-preserved microbial community made it possible to reveal a prokaryotic complex capable of reversion of metabolic activity (FISH data), to determine its phylogenetic structure by metagenomic anal-ysis, and to isolate a pure culture of the dominant microorganism with high chitinolytic activity. PMID:27301132

  9. Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Quantifying Habitat and Hydraulic Complexity Measures: A Comparison with Traditional Surveying Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resop, J. P.; Kozarek, J. L.; Hession, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate stream topography measurement is important for many ecological applications such as hydraulic modeling and habitat characterization. Measures of habitat complexity are often difficult to quantify or are performed qualitatively. Traditional surveying with a total station can be time intensive and limited by poor spatial resolution. These problems lead to measurement and interpolation errors, which propagate to model uncertainty. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has the potential to measure topography at a high resolution and accuracy. Two methods, total station surveying and TLS, were used to measure a 100-m forested reach on the Staunton River in Shenandoah National Park, VA, USA. The TLS dataset was post-processed to remove vegetation and create a 2-cm digital elevation model (DEM). The position and size of ten rocks were compared for each method. An algorithm was developed for delineating rocks within the stream channel from the TLS DEM. Ecological metrics based on the structural complexity of the stream, such as percent in-stream rock cover and cross-sectional heterogeneity, were derived from the TLS dataset for six habitat areas and compared with the estimates from traditional methods. Compared to TLS, total station surveying underestimated rock volume and cross-sectional heterogeneity by 55% and 41%, respectively. TLS has the potential to quantify habitat complexity measures in an automated, unbiased manner.

  10. Arena Roof Technique for Complex Reconstruction After Extensive Chest Wall Resection.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; La Rocca, Antonello; La Manna, Carmine; Martucci, Nicola; De Luca, Giuseppe; Accardo, Rosanna

    2015-10-01

    Extensive primary resections or redos may produce significant chest wall defects requiring creative reconstructions in order to avoid reduction of the intrathoracic volume. We describe the successful use of an innovative technique for chest wall reconstruction based on the concept of roof coverage of sport arenas. In fact, titanium plates are anchored to the residual rib stumps along the parasternal and paravertebral lines. The acellular collagen matrix prosthesis was sutured to the free edges of the same titanium plates to create a roof, reproducing the chest wall dome geometric configuration. A 36-year-old female patient was diagnosed with an extensive desmoid tumor involving the lateral segments of second to fifth ribs on the right side. The arena roof technique allowed for adequate expansion of the uninvolved lung and optimal chest wall functional recovery. PMID:26434458

  11. Analysis of Power Laws, Shape Collapses, and Neural Complexity: New Techniques and MATLAB Support via the NCC Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Najja; Timme, Nicholas M; Bennett, Nicholas; Ripp, Monica; Lautzenhiser, Edward; Beggs, John M

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems include interactions that occur across many scales. Two divergent methods for characterizing such interactions have drawn on the physical analysis of critical phenomena and the mathematical study of information. Inferring criticality in neural systems has traditionally rested on fitting power laws to the property distributions of "neural avalanches" (contiguous bursts of activity), but the fractal nature of avalanche shapes has recently emerged as another signature of criticality. On the other hand, neural complexity, an information theoretic measure, has been used to capture the interplay between the functional localization of brain regions and their integration for higher cognitive functions. Unfortunately, treatments of all three methods-power-law fitting, avalanche shape collapse, and neural complexity-have suffered from shortcomings. Empirical data often contain biases that introduce deviations from true power law in the tail and head of the distribution, but deviations in the tail have often been unconsidered; avalanche shape collapse has required manual parameter tuning; and the estimation of neural complexity has relied on small data sets or statistical assumptions for the sake of computational efficiency. In this paper we present technical advancements in the analysis of criticality and complexity in neural systems. We use maximum-likelihood estimation to automatically fit power laws with left and right cutoffs, present the first automated shape collapse algorithm, and describe new techniques to account for large numbers of neural variables and small data sets in the calculation of neural complexity. In order to facilitate future research in criticality and complexity, we have made the software utilized in this analysis freely available online in the MATLAB NCC (Neural Complexity and Criticality) Toolbox. PMID:27445842

  12. Alternative Techniques for Treatment of Complex Below-the Knee Arterial Occlusions in Diabetic Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Uccioli, Luigi; Spinelli, Alessio; Del Giudice, Costantino Ros, Valerio Da; Volpi, Tommaso; Meloni, Marco; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe alternative endovascular (EV) techniques and assess their feasibility and efficacy in minimizing failure rates in limb salvage for the treatment of complex below-the knee (BTK) occlusions that could not be crossed with a conventional antegrade access. Between December 2007 and November 2010, 1,035 patients (557 male) underwent EV treatment for critical limb ischemia in our institution. In 124 (12% [83 male], mean age 68.2 {+-} 0.5 years) patients, transfemoral antegrade revascularization attempt failed, and an alternative approach was used. Follow-up was performed at 1 and 6 months. Results were compared with 56 patients treated between November 2002 and November 2007, in whom conventional technique was unsuccessful and unconventional techniques were not adopted. Technical success was achieved in 119 (96%) patients. The limb-salvage rates were 96.8% and 83% at 1- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Sixteen (12.9%) and 33 (26.6%) patients underwent reintervention at 1- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Transcutaneous oxygen tension increased at 1 month (44.7 {+-} 1.1 vs. 15.7 {+-} 0.8 mmHg; p < 0.001) and remained stable at follow-up. Twenty (16.1%) patients required major amputation. Thirteen (10.4%) patients died during follow-up. In our previous experience, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty failure, amputation, and death rates were 10.9, 39.2, and 23.2%, respectively. Alternative techniques allowed a significant decrease of major amputation and death rates (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.02, respectively). The use of alternative techniques seems feasible in case of a failed antegrade BTK revascularization attempt and could minimize failure rates in the treatment of complex occlusions while providing satisfying clinical success rates at 6 months.

  13. Exact Cavity Perturbation Technique to Determine Complex Permittivity of Dielectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Charles H.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    2011-01-01

    Cassini is an international spacecraft mission facilitated by NASA and ESA which seeks to understand the Saturn planetary system, including rings and moons. Launched in 1997, the Cassini spacecraft contains two major components: the Cassini orbiter that has been orbiting Saturn since October 2004, and the European-built Huygens probe that landed on Titan's surface in December 2004 to study its geology and atmosphere. Titan, Saturn's largest moon and the second largest moon in the solar system, possesses surface and atmospheric features similar to those of Earth, including lakes, seas, and mountains. A physical characterization of these features is critical to understanding the origin and evolution of Titan, whose surface composition reflects its geological history. Because Titan's atmosphere is largely composed of methane, it is believed that surfaces lakes are filled with mixtures of liquid hydrocarbons. The Cassini orbiter's RADAR instrument has been scanning Titan's surface at the atmosphere-penetrating microwave frequency of 13.8 Gigahertz since 2004. However, accurate interpretation of these data is limited by a lack of knowledge regarding dielectric properties of liquid hydrocarbons at cryogenic temperatures. Therefore, it is of specific interest to experimentally determine values for the complex permittivities of various liquid hydrocarbon mixtures at the surface conditions of Titan. In particular, more accurate values for complex permittivity would improve estimates of lake depth and surface composition obtained from the instrument's altimetry and backscatter modes.

  14. Managing complex processing of medical image sequences by program supervision techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crubezy, Monica; Aubry, Florent; Moisan, Sabine; Chameroy, Virginie; Thonnat, Monique; Di Paola, Robert

    1997-05-01

    Our objective is to offer clinicians wider access to evolving medical image processing (MIP) techniques, crucial to improve assessment and quantification of physiological processes, but difficult to handle for non-specialists in MIP. Based on artificial intelligence techniques, our approach consists in the development of a knowledge-based program supervision system, automating the management of MIP libraries. It comprises a library of programs, a knowledge base capturing the expertise about programs and data and a supervision engine. It selects, organizes and executes the appropriate MIP programs given a goal to achieve and a data set, with dynamic feedback based on the results obtained. It also advises users in the development of new procedures chaining MIP programs.. We have experimented the approach for an application of factor analysis of medical image sequences as a means of predicting the response of osteosarcoma to chemotherapy, with both MRI and NM dynamic image sequences. As a result our program supervision system frees clinical end-users from performing tasks outside their competence, permitting them to concentrate on clinical issues. Therefore our approach enables a better exploitation of possibilities offered by MIP and higher quality results, both in terms of robustness and reliability.

  15. Analysis of Power Laws, Shape Collapses, and Neural Complexity: New Techniques and MATLAB Support via the NCC Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Najja; Timme, Nicholas M.; Bennett, Nicholas; Ripp, Monica; Lautzenhiser, Edward; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems include interactions that occur across many scales. Two divergent methods for characterizing such interactions have drawn on the physical analysis of critical phenomena and the mathematical study of information. Inferring criticality in neural systems has traditionally rested on fitting power laws to the property distributions of “neural avalanches” (contiguous bursts of activity), but the fractal nature of avalanche shapes has recently emerged as another signature of criticality. On the other hand, neural complexity, an information theoretic measure, has been used to capture the interplay between the functional localization of brain regions and their integration for higher cognitive functions. Unfortunately, treatments of all three methods—power-law fitting, avalanche shape collapse, and neural complexity—have suffered from shortcomings. Empirical data often contain biases that introduce deviations from true power law in the tail and head of the distribution, but deviations in the tail have often been unconsidered; avalanche shape collapse has required manual parameter tuning; and the estimation of neural complexity has relied on small data sets or statistical assumptions for the sake of computational efficiency. In this paper we present technical advancements in the analysis of criticality and complexity in neural systems. We use maximum-likelihood estimation to automatically fit power laws with left and right cutoffs, present the first automated shape collapse algorithm, and describe new techniques to account for large numbers of neural variables and small data sets in the calculation of neural complexity. In order to facilitate future research in criticality and complexity, we have made the software utilized in this analysis freely available online in the MATLAB NCC (Neural Complexity and Criticality) Toolbox. PMID:27445842

  16. Application of linker technique to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key events controlling several biological processes. We have developed and employed a method to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies using glycine-rich linkers to fuse interacting partners, one of which is unstructured. Initial steps involve isothermal titration calorimetry to identify the minimum binding region of the unstructured protein in its interaction with its stable binding partner. This is followed by computational analysis to identify the approximate site of the interaction and to design an appropriate linker length. Subsequently, fused constructs are generated and characterized using size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments. The structure of the chimeric protein is then solved by crystallization, and validated both in vitro and in vivo by substituting key interacting residues of the full length, unlinked proteins with alanine. This protocol offers the opportunity to study crucial and currently unattainable transient protein interactions involved in various biological processes. PMID:26985443

  17. Packaging Concerns and Techniques for Large Devices: Challenges for Complex Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is going to have to accept the use of non-hermetic packages for complex devices. There are a large number of packaging options available. Space application subjects the packages to stresses that they were probably not designed for (vacuum for instance). NASA has to find a way of having assurance in the integrity of the packages. There are manufacturers interested in qualifying non-hermetic packages to MIL-PRF-38535 Class V. Government space users are agreed that Class V should be for hermetic packages only. NASA is working on a new Class for non-hermetic packages for M38535 Appendix B, "Class Y". Testing for package integrity will be required but can be package specific as described by a Package Integrity Test Plan. The plan is developed by the manufacturer and approved by DSCC and government space.

  18. Experimental techniques for three-axes load cells used at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    1985-01-01

    The necessary information for an aerodynamic investigation requiring load cell force measurements at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) is provided. Included are details of the Ames 40x80 three component load cells; typical model/load cell installation geometries; transducer signal conditioning; a description of the Ames Standard Computations Wind Tunnel Data Reduction Program for Load Cells Forces and Moments (SCELLS), and the inputs required for SCELLS. The Outdoor Aerodynamic Facilities Complex (OARF), a facility within the NFAC where three axes load cells serve as the primary balance system, is used as an example for many of the techniques, but the information applies equally well to other static and wind tunnel facilities that make use of load cell balances.

  19. The branchiostegal lung of Uca vocans (Decapoda: Ocypodidae): Unreported complexity revealed by corrosion casting and MicroCT techniques.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Francesco; Wirkner, Christian S; Cannicci, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The study of adaptation to terrestrial life in crabs poses several physiological questions. One of the major challenges the crabs have to face is respiration of air: most of the time, gills are unsuitable to perform oxygen exchange out of the water. Fiddler crabs, like other representatives of the Ocypodidae, have developed an additional mechanism of respiration by improving the circulation that lines the branchiostegal chamber, thus developing a branchiostegal lung. In the present study we describe the hitherto unreported complex morphology of the branchiostegal lung of the fiddler crab Uca vocans by means of corrosion casting techniques and 3D reconstruction. This complexity leads us to reconsider the degree of terrestriality of U. vocans and its evolutionary pathway towards land. PMID:26431635

  20. DOCK 6: Combining techniques to model RNA–small molecule complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P. Therese; Brozell, Scott R.; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Pettersen, Eric F.; Meng, Elaine C.; Thomas, Veena; Rizzo, Robert C.; Case, David A.; James, Thomas L.; Kuntz, Irwin D.

    2009-01-01

    With an increasing interest in RNA therapeutics and for targeting RNA to treat disease, there is a need for the tools used in protein-based drug design, particularly DOCKing algorithms, to be extended or adapted for nucleic acids. Here, we have compiled a test set of RNA–ligand complexes to validate the ability of the DOCK suite of programs to successfully recreate experimentally determined binding poses. With the optimized parameters and a minimal scoring function, 70% of the test set with less than seven rotatable ligand bonds and 26% of the test set with less than 13 rotatable bonds can be successfully recreated within 2 Å heavy-atom RMSD. When DOCKed conformations are rescored with the implicit solvent models AMBER generalized Born with solvent-accessible surface area (GB/SA) and Poisson–Boltzmann with solvent-accessible surface area (PB/SA) in combination with explicit water molecules and sodium counterions, the success rate increases to 80% with PB/SA for less than seven rotatable bonds and 58% with AMBER GB/SA and 47% with PB/SA for less than 13 rotatable bonds. These results indicate that DOCK can indeed be useful for structure-based drug design aimed at RNA. Our studies also suggest that RNA-directed ligands often differ from typical protein–ligand complexes in their electrostatic properties, but these differences can be accommodated through the choice of potential function. In addition, in the course of the study, we explore a variety of newly added DOCK functions, demonstrating the ease with which new functions can be added to address new scientific questions. PMID:19369428

  1. DOCK 6: combining techniques to model RNA-small molecule complexes.

    PubMed

    Lang, P Therese; Brozell, Scott R; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Pettersen, Eric F; Meng, Elaine C; Thomas, Veena; Rizzo, Robert C; Case, David A; James, Thomas L; Kuntz, Irwin D

    2009-06-01

    With an increasing interest in RNA therapeutics and for targeting RNA to treat disease, there is a need for the tools used in protein-based drug design, particularly DOCKing algorithms, to be extended or adapted for nucleic acids. Here, we have compiled a test set of RNA-ligand complexes to validate the ability of the DOCK suite of programs to successfully recreate experimentally determined binding poses. With the optimized parameters and a minimal scoring function, 70% of the test set with less than seven rotatable ligand bonds and 26% of the test set with less than 13 rotatable bonds can be successfully recreated within 2 A heavy-atom RMSD. When DOCKed conformations are rescored with the implicit solvent models AMBER generalized Born with solvent-accessible surface area (GB/SA) and Poisson-Boltzmann with solvent-accessible surface area (PB/SA) in combination with explicit water molecules and sodium counterions, the success rate increases to 80% with PB/SA for less than seven rotatable bonds and 58% with AMBER GB/SA and 47% with PB/SA for less than 13 rotatable bonds. These results indicate that DOCK can indeed be useful for structure-based drug design aimed at RNA. Our studies also suggest that RNA-directed ligands often differ from typical protein-ligand complexes in their electrostatic properties, but these differences can be accommodated through the choice of potential function. In addition, in the course of the study, we explore a variety of newly added DOCK functions, demonstrating the ease with which new functions can be added to address new scientific questions. PMID:19369428

  2. Techniques for Fault Detection and Visualization of Telemetry Dependence Relationships for Root Cause Fault Analysis in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Nathaniel

    This thesis explores new ways of looking at telemetry data, from a time-correlative perspective, in order to see patterns within the data that may suggest root causes of system faults. It was thought initially that visualizing an animated Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) matrix for telemetry channels would be sufficient to give new understanding; however, testing showed that the high dimensionality and inability to easily look at change over time in this approach impeded understanding. Different correlative techniques, combined with the time curve visualization proposed by Bach et al (2015), were adapted to visualize both raw telemetry and telemetry data correlations. Review revealed that these new techniques give insights into the data, and an intuitive grasp of data families, which show the effectiveness of this approach for enhancing system understanding and assisting with root cause analysis for complex aerospace systems.

  3. A Safe and Flexible Cardiopulmonary Bypass Technique for Complex Aortic Surgery without the Requirement for Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Machin, David; Tams, Gemma; Bingham, Helen; Abid, Qamar; Adem, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: This article describes an adaptable technique of full-body perfusion during complex aortic surgery, which was performed on six consecutive patients, at a nasopharyngeal temperature of 28–34°C for a mean duration of 5 hours. A modified perfusion system was used to provide upper and lower body perfusion through axillary and femoral artery cannulation. The option of selective antegrade cerebral perfusion was also available if required. A simple custom-made circuit and application of additional monitoring such as cerebral oximetry makes this technique a safe and flexible method of providing continuous whole-body perfusion at moderate hypothermia and above. We found that these patients all had no major coagulopathies after the procedure and demonstrated no observable neurological, renal, or gastrointestinal dysfunction on recovery. PMID:24649575

  4. General optimization technique for high-quality community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Campari, Riccardo; Belyi, Alexander; Ratti, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed the development of a large body of algorithms for community detection in complex networks. Most of them are based upon the optimization of objective functions, among which modularity is the most common, though a number of alternatives have been suggested in the scientific literature. We present here an effective general search strategy for the optimization of various objective functions for community detection purposes. When applied to modularity, on both real-world and synthetic networks, our search strategy substantially outperforms the best existing algorithms in terms of final scores of the objective function. In terms of execution time for modularity optimization this approach also outperforms most of the alternatives present in literature with the exception of fastest but usually less efficient greedy algorithms. The networks of up to 30000 nodes can be analyzed in time spans ranging from minutes to a few hours on average workstations, making our approach readily applicable to tasks not limited by strict time constraints but requiring the quality of partitioning to be as high as possible. Some examples are presented in order to demonstrate how this quality could be affected by even relatively small changes in the modularity score stressing the importance of optimization accuracy.

  5. Recovery of Missing Persons in Cyprus: Heavy Equipment Methods and Techniques for Complex Well Excavations.

    PubMed

    Ceker, Deren; Stevens, William D

    2015-11-01

    This technical note presents the methods and techniques developed by the Bi-communal Forensic Team (BCFT) of the Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus (CMP) used to excavate and exhume the remains of missing persons, many of whom were buried in deep wells at sites across the island of Cyprus during the conflict period of the 1960s and 1970s. A total of 493 Turkish Cypriots and 1508 Greek Cypriots were officially reported missing by the two communities as a result of the conflict. Since the team's formation, in 2005, the BCFT has excavated 114 wells, resulting in the recovery of 195 missing individuals from 35 of these well excavations. The standard excavation approach used by the BCFT, especially for deep well recovery, consists of "ramp," "pocket," and "pool" components. These excavation features enable CMP archaeologists to excavate deep wells safely and efficiently while simultaneously permitting time for thorough documentation and unimpeded recovery of human remains. The team uses three variants of this approach to cope with the variety of geological, physical, and hydrological contexts faced in Cyprus' wells, including hard and soft landforms, the presence or absence of water, and limitations imposed by surrounding infrastructure. The "terracing", "double-ramp", and "single-ramp" variations are detailed with respect to the environmental contexts which prescribe their use. The BCFT's general procedures for human remains recovery and standard well safety protocols conclude the article. PMID:26250595

  6. Tissue engineering techniques for the treatment of a complex knee injury.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Mario; Grassi, Federico Alberto; Manelli, Alessandro; Bulgheroni, Paolo

    2006-05-01

    We report and discuss the use of and rationale for tissue engineering techniques in a 40-year-old sportsman who suffered simultaneous anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, irreparable medial meniscal tear, and chondral lesion of the medial femoral condyle. A 2-step treatment was adopted to address all lesions. The first procedures consisted of ACL reconstruction and collagen meniscus implant (CMI), followed 6 months later by autologous chondrocyte implantation on a collagen membrane (MACI). A CMI biopsy was performed 6 months after implantation. Histologic and ultrastructural analysis documented scaffold invasion by cells and newly synthesized connective tissue. At 2-year follow up, the clinical and functional results were good and magnetic resonance imaging showed integration of the meniscal and cartilage implants. In this patient, each lesion needed to be addressed to achieve an optimal outcome. The primary goal was to restore normal joint biomechanics by performing CMI and ACL reconstruction. MACI was an adequate solution for the management of the large (5 cm(2)) chondral defect. PMID:16651180

  7. Ghost analysis visualization techniques for complex systems: examples from the NIF Final Optics Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, G K; Hendrix, J L; Rowe, J; Schweyen, J

    1998-06-26

    The stray light or "ghost" analysis of the National Ignition Facility's (NIP) Final Optics Assembly (FOA) has proved to be one of the most complex ghost analyses ever attempted. The NIF FOA consists of a bundle of four beam lines that: 1) provides the vacuum seal to the target chamber, 2) converts 1ω to 3ω light, 3) focuses the light on the target, 4) separates a fraction of the 3ω beam for energy diagnostics, 5) separates the three wavelengths to diffract unwanted 1ω & 2ω light away from the target, 6) provides spatial beam smoothing, and 7) provides a debris barrier between the target chamber and the switchyard mirrors. The three wavelengths of light and seven optical elements with three diffractive optic surfaces generate three million ghosts through 4th order. Approximately 24,000 of these ghosts have peak fluence exceeding 1 J/cm2. The shear number of ghost paths requires a visualization method that allows overlapping ghosts on optics and mechanical components to be summed and then mapped to the optical and mechanical component surfaces in 3D space. This paper addresses the following aspects of the NIF Final Optics Ghost analysis: 1) materials issues for stray light mitigation, 2) limitations of current software tools (especially in modeling diffractive optics), 3) computer resource limitations affecting automated coherent raytracing, 4) folding the stray light analysis into the opto-mechanical design process, 5) analysis and visualization tools from simple hand calculations to specialized stray light analysis computer codes, and 6) attempts at visualizing these ghosts using a CAD model and another using a high end data visualization software approach.

  8. Complex Retrieval of Embedded IVC Filters: Alternative Techniques and Histologic Tissue Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, William T.; Cupp, John S.; Louie, John D.; Kothary, Nishita; Hofmann, Lawrence V.; Sze, Daniel Y.; Hovsepian, David M.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of alternative endovascular methods to retrieve embedded optional and permanent filters in order to manage or reduce risk of long-term complications from implantation. Histologic tissue analysis was performed to elucidate the pathologic effects of chronic filter implantation. Methods: We studied the safety and effectiveness of alternative endovascular methods for removing embedded inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in 10 consecutive patients over 12 months. Indications for retrieval were symptomatic chronic IVC occlusion, caval and aortic perforation, and/or acute PE (pulmonary embolism) from filter-related thrombus. Retrieval was also performed to reduce risk of complications from long-term filter implantation and to eliminate the need for lifelong anticoagulation. All retrieved specimens were sent for histologic analysis. Results: Retrieval was successful in all 10 patients. Filter types and implantation times were as follows: one Venatech (1,495 days), one Simon-Nitinol (1,485 days), one Optease (300 days), one G2 (416 days), five Guenther-Tulip (GTF; mean 606 days, range 154-1,010 days), and one Celect (124 days). There were no procedural complications or adverse events at a mean follow-up of 304 days after removal (range 196-529 days). Histology revealed scant native intima surrounded by a predominance of neointimal hyperplasia and dense fibrosis in all specimens. Histologic evidence of photothermal tissue ablation was confirmed in three laser-treated specimens. Conclusion: Complex retrieval methods can now be used in select patients to safely remove embedded optional and permanent IVC filters previously considered irretrievable. Neointimal hyperplasia and dense fibrosis are the major components that must be separated to achieve successful retrieval of chronic filter implants.

  9. Evaluation of DNA extraction techniques for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in Asian elephant trunk wash samples.

    PubMed

    Kay, Meagan K; Linke, Lyndsey; Triantis, Joni; Salman, M D; Larsen, R Scott

    2011-02-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic assays for the detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in elephants are lacking. DNA extraction with PCR analysis is useful for tuberculosis screening in many species but has not been validated on elephant trunk wash samples. We estimated the analytical sensitivity and specificity of three DNA extraction methods to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in trunk wash specimens. A ZR soil microbe DNA kit (ZR) and a traditional salt and ethanol precipitation (TSEP) approach were evaluated under three different treatment conditions: heat treatment, phenol treatment, and contamination with Mycobacterium avium. A third approach, using a column filtration method, was evaluated for samples contaminated with soil. Trunk wash samples from uninfected elephants were spiked with various concentrations of M. bovis cells and subjected to the described treatment conditions prior to DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was amplified using IS6110-targeted PCR analysis. The ZR and TSEP methods detected as low as 1 to 5 M. bovis cells and 10 M. bovis cells, respectively, per 1.5 ml of trunk wash under all three conditions. Depending on the amount of soil present, the column filtration method detected as low as 5 to 50 M. bovis cells per 1.5 ml of trunk wash. Analytical specificity was assessed by DNA extraction from species of nontuberculous mycobacteria and amplification using the same PCR technique. Only M. bovis DNA was amplified, indicating 100% analytical specificity of this PCR technique. Our results indicate that these DNA extraction techniques offer promise as useful tests for detection of M. tuberculosis complex organisms in elephant trunk wash specimens. PMID:21159933

  10. Distributed intelligent real-time technique for coordinated multi-agents autonomous path planning among moving complex obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megherbi, Dalila B.

    2001-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the difficult and interesting problem of real-time planning and efficient motion control of rigid multi-robot systems to dynamically avoid moving obstacles and/or robots as these move. Most techniques described so far in the literature deal with the simpler problem of generating (generally off-line) a path among stationary obstacles. For practical purposes, however, obstacles are not always static and most interesting environments are in general not known precisely and/or time varying. Motivated by the fact that robots capable of maneuvering among moving obstalces will be capable of accomplishing a much larger and more versatile class of tasks, and as a result of our current and past research investigations over the years, we present an innovative approach and tackle the problem from a different angle. The proposed method follows upon our previous work which employs a notion of complex potential fields representation, and involves the use of state variables which preserve the Newman Boundary condition of such complex potential fields while allowing mobile robots to autonomously and dynamically avoid each other as well as other moving obstacles. In the heart of the technique is the exploitation of the powerful and fundamental tool of conformal mapping to derive the path solution for obstacles of arbitrary shapes. The advantage this novel approach offers over traditional formulations is its handling of both static and arbitrary moving obstacles/multi-robots. To the author's best knowledge, the proposed technique is the only proposed approach in the literature for real-time mobile robots motion control and obstacles avoidance which not only guarantees the reaching of the robot's goal under some conditions but also focuses on the means by which both the obstacles positions and orientations can elegantly and efficiently be dealt with when these latter continuously change with time.

  11. Treatment of complex nonunion of the shaft of the tibia using Ilizarov technique and its functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ramji Lal; Ranjan, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    Background: A complex nonunion of the shaft of the tibia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with lower extremity injuries. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of the functional and radiological outcome of complex nonunion shaft of tibia, treated by radical debridement, Ilizarov ring fixator with compression and distraction osteogenesis. Methods: From 2005 to 2010, sixty cases of complex nonunion shaft of tibia were included in our study. All infected nonunions were managed by radical debridement, fixed with Ilizarov ring fixator, monofocal/bifocal compression, and distraction osteogenesis. The average duration of follow-up is 36 months (26–50 months). The functional evaluation was done by using Association for the Study and Application of Methods of Ilizarov (ASAMI) scoring system and bone union with serial radiographs. Results: All patients had a successful union. The mean time for union was 7 months (5–9 months). The mean time of fixator removal is 12 months (8–14 months). Every patient had pin tract infections which were successfully treated with oral antibiotics. Four patients had an equinus deformity, one patient had insignificant limb shortening (1.5 cm), and three patients had soft tissue dystrophy. Using the ASAMI scoring system, we obtained 45 excellent, 10 good, 3 fair, and 2 poor functional results. Conclusions: The Ilizarov technique for complex nonunions has a high rate of success in achieving union and eradicating infection, bone loss, and malalignment. Radical debridement is the key step to control bone infection. PMID:27226689

  12. Field enhancement and resonance phenomena in complex three-dimensional nanoparticles: efficient computation using the source-model technique.

    PubMed

    Ishay, Yakir; Leviatan, Yehuda; Bartal, Guy

    2014-05-15

    We present a semi-analytical method for computing the electromagnetic field in and around 3D nanoparticles (NP) of complex shape and demonstrate its power via concrete examples of plasmonic NPs that have nonsymmetrical shapes and surface areas with very small radii of curvature. In particular, we show the three axial resonances of a 3D cashew-nut and the broadband response of peanut-shell NPs. The method employs the source-model technique along with a newly developed intricate source distributing algorithm based on the surface curvature. The method is simple and can outperform finite-difference time domain and finite-element-based software tools in both its efficiency and accuracy. PMID:24978226

  13. Pretreatment procedures for characterization of arsenic and selenium species in complex samples utilizing coupled techniques with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Caruso, Joseph A

    2005-01-01

    Research interest in analyzing arsenic and selenium is dictated by their species-dependent behavior in the environment and in living organisms. Different analytical methodologies for known species in relatively simple chemical systems are well established, yet the analysis of complex samples is still a challenge. Owing to the complex matrix and low concentrations of target species that may be chemically labile, suitable pretreatment of the sample becomes a critical step in any speciation procedure. In this paper, the pretreatment procedures used for arsenic and selenium speciation are reviewed with the emphasis on the link between the analytical protocol applied and the biologically-significant information provided by the results obtained. In the first approach, the aim of pretreatment is to convert the original sample into a form that can be analyzed by a coupled (hyphenated) technique, preventing possible losses and/or species interconversion. Common techniques include different leaching and extraction modes, enzymatic hydrolysis, species volatilization, and so on, with or without species preconcentration. On the other hand, if the speciation analysis is performed for elucidation of elemental pathways and specific functions in a living system, more conscious pretreatment and/or fractionation is needed. The macroscopic separation of organs and tissues, isolation of certain types of cells, cell disruption and separation of sub-cellular fractions, as well as isolation of a specific biomolecules become important. Furthermore, to understand molecular mechanisms, the identification of intermediate-often highly instable--metabolites is necessary. Real life applications are reviewed in this work for aquatic samples, soils and sediments, plants, yeast, and urine. PMID:15662512

  14. Determination of size- and number-based concentration of silica nanoparticles in a complex biological matrix by online techniques.

    PubMed

    Bartczak, Dorota; Vincent, Phil; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-06-01

    We propose for the first time methodology for the determination of a number-based concentration of silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NP) in biological serum using nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) as the online detector for asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). The degree of selectivity offered by AF4 was found necessary to determine reliably number-based concentration of the measured NP in the complex matrix with a relative measurement error of 5.1% (as relative standard deviation, n = 3) and without chemical sample pretreatment. The simultaneous online coupling to other size and concentration detectors, such as multiangle light scattering (MALS) and ICPMS, for the measurement of the same NP suspension, was used to confirm the particle size determined with NTA and the equivalent particle number determined by AF4/NTA, respectively. The size- and number-based concentration data obtained by independent techniques were in a good agreement. The developed methodology can easily be extended to other types of particles or particle suspensions and other complex matrices provided that the particle size is above the limit of detection for NTA. PMID:25970520

  15. In Search for Instructional Techniques to Maximize the Use of Germane Cognitive Resources: A Case of Teaching Complex Tasks in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sliva, Yekaterina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce an instructional technique for teaching complex tasks in physics, test its effectiveness and efficiency, and understand cognitive processes taking place in learners' minds while they are exposed to this technique. The study was based primarily on cognitive load theory (CLT). CLT determines the amount of…

  16. Low complexity PAPR reduction techniques for clipping and quantization noise mitigation in direct-detection O-OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal, Laia; Svaluto Moreolo, Michela; Fàbrega, Josep M.; Junyent, Gabriel

    2014-06-01

    We present different distortionless peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) reduction techniques that can be easily applied, without any symmetry restriction, in direct-detection (DD) optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (O-OFDM) systems based on the fast Hartley transform (FHT). The performance of DD O-OFDM systems is limited by the constraints on system components such as digital-to-analog converter (DAC), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and electrical amplifiers. In this paper, in order to relax the constraints on these components, we propose to symmetrically clip the transmitted signal and apply low complexity (LC) distortionless PAPR reduction schemes able to mitigate, at the same time, PAPR, quantization and clipping noise. We demonstrate that, applying LC-selective mapping (SLM) without any additional transform block, the PAPR reduction is 1.5dB with only one additional FHT block using LC-partial transmit sequence (PTS) with random partitions; up to 3.1dB reduction is obtained. Moreover, the sensitivity performance and the power efficiency are enhanced. In fact, applying LC PAPR reduction techniques with one additional transform block and a 6 bit DAC resolution, the required receiver power for 8 dB clipping level and for a 10-3BER is reduced by 5.1dB.

  17. Rockfall source characterization at high rock walls in complex geological settings by photogrammetry, structural analysis and DFN techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Riva, Federico; Galletti, Laura; Zanchi, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall quantitative risk analysis in areas impended by high, subvertical cliffs remains a challenge, due to the difficult definition of potential rockfall sources, event magnitude scenarios and related probabilities. For this reasons, rockfall analyses traditionally focus on modelling the runout component of rockfall processes, whereas rock-fall source identification, mapping and characterization (block size distribution and susceptibility) are over-simplified in most practical applications, especially when structurally complex rock masses are involved. We integrated field and remote survey and rock mass modelling techniques to characterize rock masses and detect rockfall source in complex geo-structural settings. We focused on a test site located at Valmadrera, near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy), where cliffs up to 600 m high impend on a narrow strip of Lake Como shore. The massive carbonates forming the cliff (Dolomia Principale Fm), normally characterized by brittle structural associations due to their high strength and stiffness, are here involved in an ENE-trending, S-verging kilometre-scale syncline. Brittle mechanisms associated to folding strongly controlled the nature of discontinuities (bedding slip, strike-slip faults, tensile fractures) and their attributes (spacing and size), as well as the spatial variability of bedding attitude and fracture intensity, with individual block sizes up to 15 m3. We carried out a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 1500 m (11 camera stations from the opposite lake shore, 265 pictures) to 150 m (28 camera stations along N-S directed boat routes, 200 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion techniques resulted in detailed long-range (1500 m) and medium-range (150 to 800 m) point clouds covering the entire slope with maximum surface point densities exceeding 50 pts/m2. Point clouds allowed a detailed

  18. Chromosomal characterization in two species of an Astyanax bimaculatus complex (Characidae, Characiformes) using different techniques of chromosome banding.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Laura L L; Dos Santos, Angélica R; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Dias, Ana L

    2016-08-01

    Astyanax has been the subject of extensive cytogenetic studies due to its wide karyotypic diversity. This genus comprises species complexes, namely groups of fish of difficult morphological differentiation, such as the bimaculatus complex, which includes the characids with a rounded humeral spot. Thence, the present study proposed to accomplish a cytogenetic characterization of two species of this complex: A. asuncionensis and A. altiparanae, aiming to find chromosomal markers that differentiate these species, as well as achieve a better understanding of the karyotype evolution in the genus. For this we used different techniques of chromosome banding as C-banding, impregnation by silver nitrate, fluorochrome staining and FISH with 18S rDNA probe. This is the first cytogenetic study in A. asuncionensis, from Miranda river, which presented 2n = 50 and 18 m + 22sm + 6st + 4a (FN = 96) and single NORs. The populations of A. altiparanae also presented 2n = 50, but with different karyotypic formulae: the population of the Quexada river presented 16 m + 24sm + 4st + 6a (FN = 94) and the Esperança stream and Jacutinga river showed 16 m + 20sm + 4st + 10a (FN = 90). All analyzed populations showed an interindividual variation in the number and location of the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). Single and multiple NORs were detected either by impregnation with silver nitrate or by FISH with 18S rDNA probe. After C-banding, the two species differed in relation to the composition and heterochromatin distribution. The meiotic cells of A. altiparanae male individuals were also analyzed, showing that, despite the high karyotype variability, chromosome pairing occurs normally. The data show that A. altiparanae and A. asuncionensis share some characteristics with other species of the bimaculatus complex, suggesting a close phylogenetic relationship among those species. However, some features can be used as differentiation chromosomal markers in

  19. Thermodynamic study of β-cyclodextrin-dye inclusion complexes using gradient flow injection technique and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Izadmanesh, Y; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-08-01

    Gradient flow injection technique-diode array spectrophotometry was applied for β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-dye inclusion complex studies. A single injection of a small amount of mixed β-CD-dye solution (100μl) into the carrier solution of the dye and recording the spectra gave the titration data. The mole ratio data were calculated by calibrating the dispersion pattern using a calibrator dye (rose bengal). Model-based multivariate methods were used to analyze the spectral-mole ratio data and, as a result, estimate stability constants and concentration-spectral profiles. Reliability was tested by applying this method to study the β-CD host-guest complexes with several dyes as guest molecules. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to select the chemical model and reduce noise. Molecular modeling provided the ability to predict the guest conformation-orientation (posing) within the cavity of β-CD and the nature of the involved interactions. Among those dyes showing observable spectral variation, the stoichiometric ratio of β-CD: dye (and log Kf) of methyl orange, fluorescein, phenol red, 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR), and crystal violet were calculated to be 1:1 (4.26±0.01), 1:1 (1.53±0.08), 1:1 (3.11±0.04), 1:1 (1.06±0.12), and 2:1 (5.27±0.03), respectively. Compared with the classical method of titration, this method is simple and fast and has the advantage of needing reduced human interference. Molecular modeling facilitates a better understanding of the type of interactions and conformation of guest molecules in the β-CD cavity. The details of the proposed method are discussed in this paper. PMID:27111153

  20. Thermodynamic study of β-cyclodextrin-dye inclusion complexes using gradient flow injection technique and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadmanesh, Y.; Ghasemi, Jahan B.

    2016-08-01

    Gradient flow injection technique-diode array spectrophotometry was applied for β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-dye inclusion complex studies. A single injection of a small amount of mixed β-CD-dye solution (100 μl) into the carrier solution of the dye and recording the spectra gave the titration data. The mole ratio data were calculated by calibrating the dispersion pattern using a calibrator dye (rose bengal). Model-based multivariate methods were used to analyze the spectral-mole ratio data and, as a result, estimate stability constants and concentration-spectral profiles. Reliability was tested by applying this method to study the β-CD host-guest complexes with several dyes as guest molecules. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to select the chemical model and reduce noise. Molecular modeling provided the ability to predict the guest conformation-orientation (posing) within the cavity of β-CD and the nature of the involved interactions. Among those dyes showing observable spectral variation, the stoichiometric ratio of β-CD: dye (and log Kf) of methyl orange, fluorescein, phenol red, 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR), and crystal violet were calculated to be 1:1 (4.26 ± 0.01), 1:1 (1.53 ± 0.08), 1:1 (3.11 ± 0.04), 1:1 (1.06 ± 0.12), and 2:1 (5.27 ± 0.03), respectively. Compared with the classical method of titration, this method is simple and fast and has the advantage of needing reduced human interference. Molecular modeling facilitates a better understanding of the type of interactions and conformation of guest molecules in the β-CD cavity. The details of the proposed method are discussed in this paper.

  1. Using Complex Event Processing (CEP) and vocal synthesis techniques to improve comprehension of sonified human-centric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimland, Jeff; Ballora, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The field of sonification, which uses auditory presentation of data to replace or augment visualization techniques, is gaining popularity and acceptance for analysis of "big data" and for assisting analysts who are unable to utilize traditional visual approaches due to either: 1) visual overload caused by existing displays; 2) concurrent need to perform critical visually intensive tasks (e.g. operating a vehicle or performing a medical procedure); or 3) visual impairment due to either temporary environmental factors (e.g. dense smoke) or biological causes. Sonification tools typically map data values to sound attributes such as pitch, volume, and localization to enable them to be interpreted via human listening. In more complex problems, the challenge is in creating multi-dimensional sonifications that are both compelling and listenable, and that have enough discrete features that can be modulated in ways that allow meaningful discrimination by a listener. We propose a solution to this problem that incorporates Complex Event Processing (CEP) with speech synthesis. Some of the more promising sonifications to date use speech synthesis, which is an "instrument" that is amenable to extended listening, and can also provide a great deal of subtle nuance. These vocal nuances, which can represent a nearly limitless number of expressive meanings (via a combination of pitch, inflection, volume, and other acoustic factors), are the basis of our daily communications, and thus have the potential to engage the innate human understanding of these sounds. Additionally, recent advances in CEP have facilitated the extraction of multi-level hierarchies of information, which is necessary to bridge the gap between raw data and this type of vocal synthesis. We therefore propose that CEP-enabled sonifications based on the sound of human utterances could be considered the next logical step in human-centric "big data" compression and transmission.

  2. Development of Quality Assessment Techniques for Large Eddy Simulation of Propulsion and Power Systems in Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Large-eddy-simulation (LES) is quickly becoming a method of choice for studying complex thermo-physics in a wide range of propulsion and power systems. It provides a means to study coupled turbulent combustion and flow processes in parameter spaces that are unattainable using direct-numerical-simulation (DNS), with a degree of fidelity that can be far more accurate than conventional engineering methods such as the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approx- imation. However, development of predictive LES is complicated by the complex interdependence of different type of errors coming from numerical methods, algorithms, models and boundary con- ditions. On the other hand, control of accuracy has become a critical aspect in the development of predictive LES for design. The objective of this project is to create a framework of metrics aimed at quantifying the quality and accuracy of state-of-the-art LES in a manner that addresses the myriad of competing interdependencies. In a typical simulation cycle, only 20% of the computational time is actually usable. The rest is spent in case preparation, assessment, and validation, because of the lack of guidelines. This work increases confidence in the accuracy of a given solution while min- imizing the time obtaining the solution. The approach facilitates control of the tradeoffs between cost, accuracy, and uncertainties as a function of fidelity and methods employed. The analysis is coupled with advanced Uncertainty Quantification techniques employed to estimate confidence in model predictions and calibrate model's parameters. This work has provided positive conse- quences on the accuracy of the results delivered by LES and will soon have a broad impact on research supported both by the DOE and elsewhere.

  3. A comparison of full-spectrum and complex-symbol combining techniques for the Galileo S-band mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Million, S.; Shah, B.; Hinedi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Full-spectrum combining (FSC) and complex-symbol combining (CSC) are two antenna-arraying techniques being considered for the Galileo spacecraft's upcoming encounter with Jupiter. This article describes the performance of these techniques in terms of symbol signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) degradation and symbol SNR loss. It is shown that both degradation and loss are approximately equal at low values of symbol SNR but diverge at high SNR values. For the Galileo S-band (2.2 to 2.3 GHz) mission, degradation provides a good estimate of performance as the symbol SNR is typically below -5 dB. For the following arrays - two 70-m antennas, one 70-m and one 34-m antenna, one 70-m and two 34-m antennas, and one 70-m and three 34-m antennas - it is shown that FSC has less degradation than CSC when the subcarrier and symbol window-loop bandwidth products are above 3.0, 10.0, 8.5, and 8.2 mHz at the symbol rate of 200 sym/sec, and above 1.2, 4.5, 4.0, and 3.5 mHz at a symbol rate of 400 sym/sec, respectively. Moreover, for an array of four 34-m antennas, FSC has less degradation than CSC when the subcarrier and symbol window-loop bandwidth products are above 0.32 mHz at the symbol rate of 50 sym/sec and above 0.8 mHz at the symbol rate of 25 sym/sec.

  4. Effects of correlated noise on the full-spectrum combining and complex-symbol combining arraying techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazirani, P.

    1995-01-01

    The process of combining telemetry signals received at multiple antennas, commonly referred to as arraying, can be used to improve communication link performance in the Deep Space Network (DSN). By coherently adding telemetry from multiple receiving sites, arraying produces an enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over that achievable with any single antenna in the array. A number of different techniques for arraying have been proposed and their performances analyzed in past literature. These analyses have compared different arraying schemes under the assumption that the signals contain additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and that the noise observed at distinct antennas is independent. In situations where an unwanted background body is visible to multiple antennas in the array, however, the assumption of independent noises is no longer applicable. A planet with significant radiation emissions in the frequency band of interest can be one such source of correlated noise. For example, during much of Galileo's tour of Jupiter, the planet will contribute significantly to the total system noise at various ground stations. This article analyzes the effects of correlated noise on two arraying schemes currently being considered for DSN applications: full-spectrum combining (FSC) and complex-symbol combining (CSC). A framework is presented for characterizing the correlated noise based on physical parameters, and the impact of the noise correlation on the array performance is assessed for each scheme.

  5. Groundwater vulnerability and risk mapping in a geologically complex area by using stable isotopes, remote sensing and GIS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, Elias; Zacharias, Ierotheos

    2006-11-01

    Groundwater vulnerability and risk mapping is a relatively new scientific approach for facilitating planning and decision making processes in order to protect this valuable resource. Pan European methodology for aquifers vulnerability has recently been developed by assessing all the existing relevant techniques and emphasizing on karstic environments. In the particular study, state-of-the-art methods and tools have been implemented such as remote sensing, isotopic investigations and GIS to map the groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk in a geologically complex area of W. Greece. The updated land use map has been developed from a Landsat 7+TM image elaborated with image analysis software, while the detailed hydrogeologic properties of the area have been recorded with an intensive isotopic study. The local groundwater vulnerability map has been produced following the aforementioned Pan European method, in a GIS environment while the risk map, which was the final product of the study, has been developed after combining the vulnerability and the land use maps. The results indicated that the areas comprised of highly tectonized calcareous formations represented high vulnerability and risk zones while forested areas away from the karstic aquifer illustrated moderate to low vulnerability. Moreover, human activities increase the pollution risk in lowland areas consisting of sedimentary deposits that have been classified as moderate vulnerability. The particular methodology operated efficiently in this study and due to its accuracy and relatively easy implementation can be used as a decision support tool for local authorities.

  6. A comparison of techniques for fixation of the quadriceps muscle-tendon complex for in vitro biomechanical testing of the knee joint in sheep.

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Philip; Goudakos, Ioannis; Rosenstiel, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Taylor, William R; Duda, Georg N; Heller, Markus O

    2009-01-01

    Whilst in vitro testing can contribute to a better understanding of the biomechanical interactions at the knee joint, the application of physiological-like muscle forces in vitro remains challenging. One main difficulty seems to be the adequate fixation of the muscle-tendon complex to the mechanical apparatus that provides the forces in vitro. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of different muscle-tendon fixation mechanisms, including a new technique developed to optimise the interface grip of the soft tissues, to reliably transmit physiological in vivo loads through the muscle-tendon complex to the attached bone. The fixations of three quadriceps components in 16 right knees of skeletally mature female merino sheep were loaded to failure using four different fixation techniques (aluminium clamp, freeze clamp, suture technique and a new extension hull technique). Each technique was tested 12 times: 4 times on each individual quadriceps component. A factorial analysis for repeated measurements was undertaken to examine differences between the different fixation techniques. The extension hull technique and the aluminium clamp performed similarly, exceeding the computationally determined physiological forces in all but one trial and achieved higher failure loads than the suture technique. Although the freeze clamp reached the highest mean load to failure, it also failed more often than the extension hull technique. This comparison of the fixation techniques suggests that the new extension hull technique is a suitable fixation method for applying physiological-like muscle loading in an in vitro set-up. It cannot only be handled in a very simple manner, but also possesses a compact, lightweight construction, providing the possibility for the application of more complex loading conditions that include, e.g. the action of multiple muscles of the knee flexor and extensor group concurrently. PMID:18539516

  7. Novel CE-MS technique for detection of high explosives using perfluorooctanoic acid as a MEKC and mass spectrometric complexation reagent.

    PubMed

    Brensinger, Karen; Rollman, Christopher; Copper, Christine; Genzman, Ashton; Rine, Jacqueline; Lurie, Ira; Moini, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    To address the need for the forensic analysis of high explosives, a novel capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) technique has been developed for high resolution, sensitivity, and mass accuracy detection of these compounds. The technique uses perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as both a micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) reagent for separation of neutral explosives and as the complexation reagent for mass spectrometric detection of PFOA-explosive complexes in the negative ion mode. High explosives that formed complexes with PFOA included RDX, HMX, tetryl, and PETN. Some nitroaromatics were detected as molecular ions. Detection limits in the high parts per billion range and linear calibration responses over two orders of magnitude were obtained. For proof of concept, the technique was applied to the quantitative analysis of high explosives in sand samples. PMID:26666592

  8. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  9. Leishmania donovani complex (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae): comparison of deoxyribonucleic acid based techniques for typing of isolates from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gadisa, E; Kuru, T; Genet, A; Engers, H; Aseffa, A; Gedamu, L

    2010-10-01

    In Ethiopia, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an increasing public health concern. Recently, a new outbreak of VL claimed the lives of hundreds of Ethiopians. Mapping its distribution and the identification of the causative Leishmania species is important for proper use of resources and for control planning. The choice of appropriate typing technique is the key for determining the infecting species. Here we compared three deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) based markers. We used, for the first time, cpbE and cpbF (cpbE/F) PCR-RFLP and demonstrated that it clearly differentiates Leishmania donovani from Leishmania infantum. The cpbE/F PCR-RFLP gave identical banding pattern for all L. donovani strains irrespective of their geographic origin. With the K26 (primers) PCR-RFLP, the L. donovani strains gave a banding pattern different from L. infantum and showed variation with geographic origin. The Ethiopian isolates typed as L. donovani by the PCR-RFLP of the cpbE/F (gene) and K26 (primers) showed two types of patterns with the T2/B4 (primers) PCR-RFLP; one group with L. infantum-like and the other L. donovani-like pattern. Phylogenetic analysis using cpbE/F sequences showed variation with geographic origin of strains and the African strains of L. donovani are more distantly related to L. infantum. Moreover, the Ethiopian isolates were seen to be closely related to the Sudanese, Kenyan and Indian strains. Thus, we recommend the use of more than one marker to study the population genetics of L. donovani complex. PMID:20438727

  10. Functionalization of immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) with lipid vinyl sulfones and their application in immunological techniques and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Bustos, Teresa; González-González, Gloria; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Megía-Fernández, Alicia; Santoyo-González, Francisco; Osuna, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOM)-type nanocapsules have been functionalized with lipid vinyl sulfones that anchor to them via the hydrophobic zone of their structure and can be charged with pharmacologically active molecules or macromolecules. These functionalized nanocapsules can incorporate protein A and bind to G immunoglobulins (IgGs) to make vehicles directed at the surface antigens of infectious agents, tumor cells, or receptor cells and deliver the encapsulated molecules in a highly specific way. They may be of particular use in pharmacological treatments with highly toxic molecules that should not be used in solution whenever it can be avoided. When bound to antibodies they can be used in biological processes that require the delivery or presentation of macromolecules to certain specific cells, in immunization processes for instance, or in diagnostic immunological techniques, as they are able to transport both the secondary antibodies and the reaction labels. Methods and results We describe the preparation of ISCOMs, the binding to the ISCOMS of newly synthesized compounds composed of chain alkyl vinyl sulfone, and the subsequent binding of the vinyl-sulfone compounds to IgGs. Within this context, a compound deriving from cholesterol functionalized with vinyl sulfone and used together with cholesterol in varying proportions has been linked to the structure of the ISCOMs and bound to protein A–IgG. This functionalization in no way altered the form or structure of the ISCOMs and allowed the nanocapsules carrying the specific IgGs to bind to forms of Trypanosoma cruzi against which antibodies had been developed. The fact that functionalized ISCOMs containing antibodies could deliver actinomycin D directly to the parasite meant that the effective dose of the antibiotic could be reduced very significantly. Conclusion We have developed ISCOM-type nanocapsules functionalized with lipid vinyl sulfone capable of anchoring to the surface of functional

  11. Improvement of aripiprazole solubility by complexation with (2-hydroxy)propyl-β-cyclodextrin using spray drying technique.

    PubMed

    Mihajlovic, Tijana; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Graovac, Adrijana; Djuric, Zorica; Ibric, Svetlana

    2012-06-01

    Due to the fact that the number of new poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients is increasing, it is important to investigate the possibilities of improvement of their solubility in order to obtain a final pharmaceutical formulation with enhanced bioavailability. One of the strategies to increase drug solubility is the inclusion of the APIs in cyclodextrins. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of aripiprazole solubility improvement by inclusion in (2-hydroxy)propyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) and simultaneous manipulation of pH of the medium and addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone. Aripiprazole-HPBCD complexes were prepared by spray drying aqueous drug-HPBCD solutions, and their properties were compared with those prepared by solvent-drop co-grinding and physical mixing. The obtained powders were characterized by thermoanalytical methods (TGA and DSC), FTIR spectroscopy, their dissolution properties were assessed, while the binding of aripiprazole into the cavity of HPBCD was studied by molecular docking simulations. The solubilization capacity was found to be dependent on pH as well as the buffer solution's ionic composition. The presence of PVP in the formulation could affect the solubilization capacity significantly, but further experimentation is required before its effect is fully understood. On the basis of solubility studies, the drug/HPBCD stoichiometry was found to be 1:3. The spray-dried products were free of crystalline aripiprazole, they possessed higher solubility and dissolution rate, and were stable enough over a prolonged period of storage. Spray drying of cyclodextrin solutions proved to be an appropriate and efficient technique for the preparation of highly soluble inclusion compounds of aripiprazole and HPBCD. PMID:22535520

  12. Atmospheric and dispersion modeling in areas of highly complex terrain employing a four-dimensional data assimilation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J.D.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The results of this study indicate that the current data assimilation technique can have a positive impact on the mesoscale flow fields; however, care must be taken in its application to grids of relatively fine horizontal resolution. Continuous FDDA is a useful tool in producing high-resolution mesoscale analysis fields that can be used to (1) create a better initial conditions for mesoscale atmospheric models and (2) drive transport models for dispersion studies. While RAMS is capable of predicting the qualitative flow during this evening, additional experiments need to be performed to improve the prognostic forecasts made by RAMS and refine the FDDA procedure so that the overall errors are reduced even further. Despite the fact that a great deal of computational time is necessary in executing RAMS and LPDM in the configuration employed in this study, recent advances in workstations is making applications such as this more practical. As the speed of these machines increase in the next few years, it will become feasible to employ prognostic, three-dimensional mesoscale/transport models to routinely predict atmospheric dispersion of pollutants, even to highly complex terrain. For example, the version of RAMS in this study could be run in a ``nowcasting`` model that would continually assimilate local and regional observations as soon as they become available. The atmospheric physics in the model would be used to determine the wind field where no observations are available. The three-dimensional flow fields could be used as dynamic initial conditions for a model forecast. The output from this type of modeling system will have to be compared to existing diagnostic, mass-consistent models to determine whether the wind field and dispersion forecasts are significantly improved.

  13. Detection, characterization and quantification of inorganic engineered nanomaterials: A review of techniques and methodological approaches for the analysis of complex samples.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Francisco; Bolea, Eduardo; Cepriá, Gemma; Gómez, María T; Jiménez, María S; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Castillo, Juan R

    2016-01-21

    The increasing demand of analytical information related to inorganic engineered nanomaterials requires the adaptation of existing techniques and methods, or the development of new ones. The challenge for the analytical sciences has been to consider the nanoparticles as a new sort of analytes, involving both chemical (composition, mass and number concentration) and physical information (e.g. size, shape, aggregation). Moreover, information about the species derived from the nanoparticles themselves and their transformations must also be supplied. Whereas techniques commonly used for nanoparticle characterization, such as light scattering techniques, show serious limitations when applied to complex samples, other well-established techniques, like electron microscopy and atomic spectrometry, can provide useful information in most cases. Furthermore, separation techniques, including flow field flow fractionation, capillary electrophoresis and hydrodynamic chromatography, are moving to the nano domain, mostly hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as element specific detector. Emerging techniques based on the detection of single nanoparticles by using ICP-MS, but also coulometry, are in their way to gain a position. Chemical sensors selective to nanoparticles are in their early stages, but they are very promising considering their portability and simplicity. Although the field is in continuous evolution, at this moment it is moving from proofs-of-concept in simple matrices to methods dealing with matrices of higher complexity and relevant analyte concentrations. To achieve this goal, sample preparation methods are essential to manage such complex situations. Apart from size fractionation methods, matrix digestion, extraction and concentration methods capable of preserving the nature of the nanoparticles are being developed. This review presents and discusses the state-of-the-art analytical techniques and sample preparation methods suitable for

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING TRAINING NEEDS AND OCCUPATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE WITHIN THE BATON ROUGE AGRI-BUSINESS COMPLEX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORRISON, RICHARD G.

    DATA WERE SECURED BY PERSONAL INTERVIEW FROM 152 FARM-BASED BUSINESSES TO DEVELOP TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES FOR MAKING A SURVEY OF NONFARM AGRICULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES IN THE BATON ROUGE METROPOLITAN AREA. SEVEN MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL FAMILIES WERE IDENTIFIED IN THE AGRI-BUSINESS COMPLEX. A TOTAL OF 2,811 EMPLOYEES WAS CATEGORIZED INTO NINE LEVELS OF…

  15. COED Transactions, Vol. IX, No. 3, March 1977. Evaluation of a Complex Variable Using Analog/Hybrid Computation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcovitz, Alan B., Ed.

    Described is the use of an analog/hybrid computer installation to study those physical phenomena that can be described through the evaluation of an algebraic function of a complex variable. This is an alternative way to study such phenomena on an interactive graphics terminal. The typical problem used, involving complex variables, is that of…

  16. Structural analysis of complexes formed by ethyl 4-phenylthiocarbamoyl piperazine-1-carboxylate with Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) through spectroscopic and DFT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Om; Gautam, Priyanka; Dani, R. K.; Nandi, Abhisikta; Singh, N. K.; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2014-04-01

    A piperazine derivative, ethyl 4-phenylthiocarbamoyl piperazine-1-carboxylate and its Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurement, UV-Visible, FTIR, Raman spectroscopic and DFT methods. The Ni(II) and Zn(II) bind through the N and S sites of the two ligand Heptpc and N site of two pyridine molecules. However, the Cd(II) binds through the only N sites of the two ligand Heptpc and N site of two pyridine molecules. On the basis of various techniques used for the characterizations of the complexes, we found that the most possible geometry of the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes are distorted octahedral and of the Cd(II) complex is distorted tetrahedral.

  17. Deciphering the Conformational Choreography of Zinc Coordination Complexes with Standard and Novel Proton NMR Techniques Combined with DFT Methods.

    PubMed

    Pucheta, Jose Enrique Herbert; Prim, Damien; Gillet, Jean Michel; Farjon, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The presence of water has been shown to deeply impact the stability and geometry of Zn complexes in solution. Evidence for tetra- and penta-coordinated species in a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) model complex is presented. Novel (1) H NMR tools such as T1 -filtered selective exchange spectroscopy and pure shifted gradient-encoded selective refocusing as well as classical 2D ((1) H-(1) H) exchange spectroscopy, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy and T1 ((1) H) measurements, in combination with density functional theory methods allow the full conformational dynamics of a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) complex to be revealed. Four conformers and two families of complexes depending on the hydration states are elucidated. PMID:26845749

  18. Direct nerve suture and knee immobilization in 90° flexion as a technique for treatment of common peroneal, tibial and sural nerve injuries in complex knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Robert; Ciritsis, Bernhard; Giesen, Thomas; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    There are different ways to treat peripheral nerve injuries with concomitant defects in the lower extremity. One option is a direct nerve suture followed by immobilization of the knee in flexion as it is described for gunshot wounds that lead to lesions of the sciatic nerve and its terminal branches as well as isolated nerve lesions. We used this technique to treat a case of multiple nerve injuries of the lower extremity combined with a complex knee trauma including a lesion of both bones and the posterior capsule. To our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described for such a combined injury in literature. PMID:24968417

  19. Low-Complexity, High-Performance Bandwidth Efficient Coding and Coded Modulation Techniques for Satellite and Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The semi-annual progress report for NASA grant NAG5-557 is presented. The report contains three papers concerning bandwidth efficient coding and coded modulation techniques for satellite and space communications.

  20. The development of Laue techniques for single-pulse diffraction of chemical complexes: time-resolved Laue diffraction on a binuclear rhodium metal-organic complex

    PubMed Central

    Makal, Anna; Trzop, Elzbieta; Sokolow, Jesse; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Benedict, Jason; Coppens, Philip

    2011-01-01

    A modified Laue method is shown to produce excited-state structures at atomic resolution of a quality competitive with those from monochromatic experiments. The much faster data collection allows the use of only one or a few X-ray pulses per data frame, which minimizes crystal damage caused by laser exposure of the samples and optimizes the attainable time resolution. The method has been applied to crystals of the α-modification of Rh2(μ-PNP)2(PNP)2 (BPh4)2 [PNP = CH3N(P(OCH3)2)2, Ph = phenyl]. The experimental results show a shortening of the Rh—Rh distance in the organometallic complex of 0.136 (8) Å on excitation and are quantitatively supported by quantum-mechanical (QM)/molecular-mechanics (MM) theoretical calculations which take into account the confining effect of the crystal environment, but not by theoretical results on the isolated complex, demonstrating the defining effect of the crystal matrix. PMID:21694470

  1. Modern spectroscopic technique in the characterization of biosensitive macrocyclic Schiff base ligand and its complexes: Inhibitory activity against plantpathogenic fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Akhtar, Jameel; Chand, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of the type [M(L)Cl2], where M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) have been synthesized with a macrocyclic Schiff base ligand (1,4,5,7,10,11,12,15-octaaza,5,11,16,18-tetraphenyl, 3,4,12,13-tetramethyl cyclo-octadecane) derived from Schiff base (obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine and dibenzoyl methane) and ethylenediamine. The ligand was characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, EI Mass and molecular modeling studies while the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. All the complexes are non-electrolyte in nature. The covalency factor (β) and coefficient factor (α) suggest the covalent nature of the complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes have shown antifungal activity with their LD50 values determined by probit analysis against two economically important fungal plant pathogens i.e. Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium solani.

  2. Structure of open promoter complexes with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase as revealed by the DNase I footprinting technique: compilation analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ozoline, O N; Tsyganov, M A

    1995-01-01

    Footprinting data for 33 open promoter complexes with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, as well as 17 ternary complexes with different regulators, have been compiled using a computer program FUTPR. The typical and individual properties of their structural organization are analyzed. Promoters are subgrouped according to the extent of the polymerase contact area. A set of alternative sequence elements that could be responsible for RNA polymerase attachment in different promoter groups is suggested on the basis of their sequence homology near the hyperreactive sites. The model of alternative pathways used for promoter activation is discussed. PMID:8524639

  3. A Rhodium–Pentane Sigma‐Alkane Complex: Characterization in the Solid State by Experimental and Computational Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, F. Mark; Rees, Nicholas H.; Krämer, Tobias; Iannuzzi, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The pentane σ‐complex [Rh{Cy2P(CH2CH2)PCy2}(η2:η2‐C5H12)][BArF 4] is synthesized by a solid/gas single‐crystal to single‐crystal transformation by addition of H2 to a precursor 1,3‐pentadiene complex. Characterization by low temperature single‐crystal X‐ray diffraction (150 K) and SSNMR spectroscopy (158 K) reveals coordination through two Rh⋅⋅⋅H−C interactions in the 2,4‐positions of the linear alkane. Periodic DFT calculations and molecular dynamics on the structure in the solid state provide insight into the experimentally observed Rh⋅⋅⋅H−C interaction, the extended environment in the crystal lattice and a temperature‐dependent pentane rearrangement implicated by the SSNMR data. PMID:26880330

  4. Development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to detect alternate transportation fuel hydrocarbon intermediates in complex combustion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Barlow, Robert S.

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectra for important hydrocarbon fuels and combustion intermediates were recorded over a range of low-to-moderate flame temperatures using the multiscalar measurement facility located at Sandia/CA. Recorded spectra were extrapolated to higher flame temperatures and then converted into empirical spectral libraries that can readily be incorporated into existing post-processing analysis models that account for crosstalk from overlapping hydrocarbon channel signal. Performance testing of the developed libraries and reduction methods was conducted through an examination of results from well-characterized laminar reference flames, and was found to provide good agreement. The diagnostic development allows for temporally and spatially resolved flame measurements of speciated hydrocarbon concentrations whose parent is more chemically complex than methane. Such data are needed to validate increasingly complex flame simulations.

  5. A Rhodium-Pentane Sigma-Alkane Complex: Characterization in the Solid State by Experimental and Computational Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, F Mark; Rees, Nicholas H; Weller, Andrew S; Krämer, Tobias; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Macgregor, Stuart A

    2016-03-01

    The pentane σ-complex [Rh{Cy2 P(CH2 CH2 )PCy2 }(η(2) :η(2) -C5 H12 )][BAr(F) 4 ] is synthesized by a solid/gas single-crystal to single-crystal transformation by addition of H2 to a precursor 1,3-pentadiene complex. Characterization by low temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction (150 K) and SSNMR spectroscopy (158 K) reveals coordination through two Rh⋅⋅⋅H-C interactions in the 2,4-positions of the linear alkane. Periodic DFT calculations and molecular dynamics on the structure in the solid state provide insight into the experimentally observed Rh⋅⋅⋅H-C interaction, the extended environment in the crystal lattice and a temperature-dependent pentane rearrangement implicated by the SSNMR data. PMID:26880330

  6. Structural and conformational study of the aluminum-thymulin complex using 1-D and 2-D NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Laussac, J.P.; Lefrancier, P.; Dardenne, M.; Bach, J.F.; Marraud, M.; Cung, M.T.

    1988-11-16

    The interaction between aluminum and thymulin, a linear nonapeptide of thymic origin isolated from serum, was investigated by means of one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments. These experiments were performed in dimethyl-d/sub 6/ sulfoxide solution at different metal:peptide ratios. The results lead the following conclusions: (i) the Al(III) complexation corresponds to a fast exchange on the NMR time scale; (ii) the evolution of /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts indicates the existence of one type of complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry, associating two peptide molecules and one Al(III) ion; (iii) analysis of the spectra suggests that Al(III) has a specific binding site involving the Asn/sup 9/COO/sup /minus// terminal group and the hydroxyl group of the Ser/sup 4/ residue; (iv) from the NOESY data a conformation has been proposed and compared to the biologically active Zn(II)-thymulin complex. 23 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. New technique to isolate anthocyanins from Delaware grapes by forming an aluminium complex using a Discovery DPA-6S.

    PubMed

    Asada, Takayuki; Koi, Yoriko; Tamura, Hirotoshi

    2015-01-01

    An aluminium complex of crude Delaware grape anthocyanins, bearing an ortho-dihydroxyl group on the B ring and/or a p-coumaroyl group as an ester with flavocommelin, was formed and isolated by ethanol precipitation. Using a Discovery DPA-6S short column, selected anthocyanins were isolated to give cyanidin 3-glucoside (Cy3G, 48.2% yield with 95.2% purity) and cyanidin 3-(6-O-p-coumaroylglucoside) (Cy3-pC·G, 44.9% yield with 91.4% purity) from natural Delaware grape skin extracts without ODS-HPLC column chromatography. DPPH radical scavenging activity of the complex pigment was 3.4 ± 0.10 μmol TE/mg. Moreover, isolated pure anthocyanins from the complex pigment showed significantly higher DPPH radical scavenging activity [4.5 ± 0.08 μmol TE/mg (Cy3G) and 4.5 ± 0.04 μmol TE/mg (Cy3-pC·G), (p<0.05)]. PMID:25053021

  8. Conversion of Bouguer Gravity Data to Depth, Dip, And Density Contrast With Complex Attributes Analysis Technique in the Area of Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavaja, V.; Reci, H.; Tsokas, G.

    2005-05-01

    The complex attributes analysis is an operator used in the extracting parameters of the buried structures with susceptibility and density contrasts distributions, which lead to the gravity and magnetic anomalies in the region of interest. In this paper is presented the complex attributes analysis of gravity field filtered for wavelengths lower than 50 km in the territory of Greece. The area o Greece has a complex tectonic history and fault system dominated by the subduction of the African plate beneath the Euroasia. A Low-pass filter is used on the Bouguer Anomaly to cut off wavelengths lower than 50Km in order to delineate the major faults structures of interests at big depths. The complex attributes technique aids in interpretation of potential field anomalies, because it can delineate the edges of concealed targets. In obtaining the source parameters from the complex attributes like the local depth, strike and dip, the assumption of sloping contact for the subsurface model is used. The estimated local parameters are in agreement with results obtained by previous interpretations. They can be used in combination with other method to interpret the anomalous field.

  9. A comparative study of phosphopeptide-selective techniques for a sub-proteome of a complex biological sample.

    PubMed

    Källsten, Malin; Bergquist, Jonas; Zhao, Hongxing; Konzer, Anne; Lind, Sara Bergström

    2016-03-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is important for controlling cellular signaling and cell cycle regulatory events. The process is reversible and phosphoproteins normally constitute a minor part of the global proteome in a cell. Thus, sample preparation techniques tailored for phosphoproteome studies are continuously invented and evaluated. This paper aims at evaluating the performances of the most popular techniques for phospho-enrichments in sub-proteome analysis, such as viral proteomes expressed in human cells during infection. A two-species sample of Adenovirus type 2 infected human cells was used, and in-solution digestion, strong cation exchange (SCX), and electrostatic repulsion hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) fractionation, and subsequent enrichment by TiO2, were compared with SDS-PAGE fractionation and in-gel digestion. Evaluation was focused on phosphopeptide detection in the sub-proteome. The results showed that the SCX+TiO2 or ERLIC+TiO2 combinations had the highest enrichment efficiencies, but SDS-PAGE fractionation and in-gel digestion resulted in the highest number of identified proteins and phosphopeptides. Furthermore, the study demonstrates the usefulness of applying as many orthogonal techniques as possible in deep phosphoproteome analysis, since the overlap between approaches was low. PMID:26886742

  10. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry technique for the measurement of complex mechanical structures for aero-spatial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, René; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Garranzo, Daniel; Pintado, José M.; Frovel, Malte; Belenguer, Tomás

    2010-09-01

    Using the electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) technique in the in-plane arrangement, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a composite material that will be used in a passive focusing mechanism of an aerospace mission was measured. This measurement with ESPI was compared with another interferometric method (Differential Interferometer), whose principal characteristic is its high accuracy, but the measurement is only local. As a final step, the results have been used to provide feedback with the finite element analysis (FEA). Before the composite material measurements, a quality assessment of the technique was carried out measuring the CTE of Aluminum 6061-T6. Both techniques were compared with the datasheet delivered by the supplier. A review of the basic concepts was done, especially with regards to ESPI, and the considerations to predict the quality in the fringes formation were explained. Also, a review of the basic concepts for the mechanical calculation in composite materials was done. The CTE of the composite material found was 4.69X10-6 +/- 3X10-6K-1. The most important advantage between ESPI and differential interferometry is that ESPI provides more information due to its intrinsic extended area, surface deformation reconstruction, in comparison with the strictly local measurement of differential interferometry

  11. Enhanced dissolution, stability and physicochemical characterization of ATRA/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex pellets prepared by fluid-bed coating technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjian; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare stable all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) inclusion complex pellets with industrial feasible technology, the fluid-bed coating technique, using PVP K30 simultaneously as binder and reprecipitation retarder. The coating process was fluent with high coating efficiency. In vitro dissolution of the inclusion complex pellets in 5% w/v Cremopher EL solution was dramatically enhanced with no reprecipitation observed, and significantly improved stability against humidity (92.5% and 75% RH) and illumination (4500 lx ± 500 lx) was achieved by HPCD inclusion. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry confirmed the absence of crystallinity of ATRA. Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry revealed interaction between ATRA and HPCD adding evidence on inclusion of ATRA moieties into HPCD cavities. Solid-state (13)C NMR spectrometry indicated possible inclusion of ATRA through the polyene chain, which was the main reason for the enhanced photostability. It is concluded that the fluid-bed coating technique has the potential use in the industrial preparation of ATRA/HPCD inclusion complex pellets. PMID:22304703

  12. Computational complexity reduction techniques for real-time and high-resolution medical ultrasound imaging using the beam-space Capon method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Shigeaki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sato, Toru

    2016-07-01

    The beam-space (BS) Capon method is an adaptive beamforming technique that reduces computational complexity. However, the complexity is not low enough for real-time imaging. Reducing the number of time-delay and transformation processes from element-space to BS signal processing is required. We propose a technique that replaces the time-delay processes by the multiplication of steering vectors and covariance matrices. In addition, we propose a compensation technique for estimating the intensity accurately. In an experimental study using a 2.0 MHz transmission frequency on a 15 × 10.4 mm2 region of interest, the first side-lobe level, the ‑6 dB beam width, the intensity’s estimation error, and the calculation time of the conventional method were ‑15 dB, 0.70 mm, 3.2 dB, and 656 ms. Those of the proposed method were ‑17 dB, 0.36 mm, 1.6 dB, and 81 ms, respectively. Using our method on three CPUs achieves imaging of 37 frames/s.

  13. Mixed β-pyrrole substituted meso-tetraphenylporphyrins and their metal complexes: optical nonlinearity using degenerate four wave mixing technique.

    PubMed

    Kalnoor, Basanth S; Bisht, Prem B; Jena, Kailash C; Velkannan, V; Bhyrappa, P

    2013-08-29

    We have investigated the roles of structural modification and polar effects in the optical nonlinearities of a series of selectively mixed β-pyrrole functionalized tetraphenylporphyrin, MTPP(CHO)(R)2 (R = H, Br, 2-thienyl, phenyl (Ph), phenylethynyl (PE) compounds and their metal (Cu(II), Zn(II)) complexes in toluene. In the present study, we have used phase conjugation geometry of the four wave mixing process to measure the third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3)) and the second order hyperpolarizabilty ((γ)) with picosecond laser pulse excitation at 532 nm. An increase in the values of χ(3) and (γ) for electron-withdrawing groups was observed whereas an opposite trend was noticed for the electron-donating groups at the β-pyrrole positions. In the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of substituted free base porphyrins, the distortion of the macrocyclic ring may be responsible for the reduction of the values of χ(3) and (γ). From fluorescence measurements, it has been found that the electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituted groups at β-pyrrole positions and also the macrocyclic ring distortion of the porphyrin lead to increased radiationless transitions. PMID:23909768

  14. Infraorbital nerve transpositioning into orbital floor: a modified technique to minimize nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Sharadindu Mahadevappa; Kale, Tejraj Pundalik; Bhandage, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Transpositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve to prevent injury in lower jaw has been advocated for orthognathic, pre-prosthetic and for implant placement procedures. However, the concept of infra-orbital nerve repositioning in cases of mid-face fractures remains unexplored. The infraorbital nerve may be involved in trauma to the zygomatic complex which often results in sensory disturbance of the area innervated by it. Ten patients with infraorbital nerve entrapment were treated in similar way at our maxillofacial surgery centre. Materials and Methods In this article we are reporting three cases of zygomatico-maxillary complex fracture in which intra-operative repositioning of infra-orbital nerve into the orbital floor was done. This was done to release the nerve from fractured segments and to reduce the postoperative neural complications, to gain better access to fracture site and ease in plate fixation. This procedure also decompresses the nerve which releases it off the soft tissue entrapment caused due to trauma and the organized clot at the fractured site. Results There was no evidence of sensory disturbance during their three month follow-up in any of the patient. Conclusion Infraorbital nerve transposition is very effective in preventing paresthesia in patients which fracture line involving the infraorbital nerve. PMID:25922818

  15. Stabilization of starch-based microgel-lysozyme complexes using a layer-by-layer assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Pan, Yi; Chen, Hanqing; Liu, Tengfei; Tao, Han; Tian, Yaoqi

    2017-01-01

    The layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers of chitosan (CS) and carboxymethyl starch (CMS) on soft and porous pH- and ionic strength-response microgels was determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and zeta potential measurements. In vitro release of lysozyme from the stabilized microgels under simulated gastric and intestinal fluids was also investigated. The distribution of CS in the microgels was identified by CLSM, and the optimal molecular weight of CS was 100kDa, which could only be absorbed on the microgel surface. The CS was used as the first layer, while the CMS was used as the second layer, and the zeta potential revealed that the optimal weight ratios of CS and CMS to microgels in the complexes were 0.1 and 0.06, respectively. The in vitro release experiments suggested that the stabilized double-layer microgel complexes could potentially be applied as a carrier system to prevent early release in the stomach to target intestinal delivery. PMID:27507468

  16. Exhaustive expansion: A novel technique for analyzing complex data generated by higher-order polychromatic flow cytometry experiments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The complex data sets generated by higher-order polychromatic flow cytometry experiments are a challenge to analyze. Here we describe Exhaustive Expansion, a data analysis approach for deriving hundreds to thousands of cell phenotypes from raw data, and for interrogating these phenotypes to identify populations of biological interest given the experimental context. Methods We apply this approach to two studies, illustrating its broad applicability. The first examines the longitudinal changes in circulating human memory T cell populations within individual patients in response to a melanoma peptide (gp100209-2M) cancer vaccine, using 5 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to delineate subpopulations of viable, gp100-specific, CD8+ T cells. The second study measures the mobilization of stem cells in porcine bone marrow that may be associated with wound healing, and uses 5 different staining panels consisting of 8 mAbs each. Results In the first study, our analysis suggests that the cell surface markers CD45RA, CD27 and CD28, commonly used in historical lower order (2-4 color) flow cytometry analysis to distinguish memory from naïve and effector T cells, may not be obligate parameters in defining central memory T cells (TCM). In the second study, we identify novel phenotypes such as CD29+CD31+CD56+CXCR4+CD90+Sca1-CD44+, which may characterize progenitor cells that are significantly increased in wounded animals as compared to controls. Conclusions Taken together, these results demonstrate that Exhaustive Expansion supports thorough interrogation of complex higher-order flow cytometry data sets and aids in the identification of potentially clinically relevant findings. PMID:21034498

  17. Electrosonic spray ionization. A gentle technique for generating folded proteins and protein complexes in the gas phase and for studying ion-molecule reactions at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Takáts, Zoltán; Wiseman, Justin M; Gologan, Bogdan; Cooks, R Graham

    2004-07-15

    Electrosonic spray ionization (ESSI), a variant on electrospray ionization (ESI), employs a traditional micro ESI source with supersonic nebulizing gas. The high linear velocity of the nebulizing gas provides efficient pneumatic spraying of the charged liquid sample. The variable electrostatic potential can be tuned to allow efficient and gentle ionization. This ionization method is successfully applied to aqueous solutions of various proteins at neutral pH, and its performance is compared to that of the nanospray and micro ESI techniques. Evidence for efficient desolvation during ESSI is provided by the fact that the peak widths for various multiply charged protein ions are an order of magnitude narrower than those for nanospray. Narrow charge-state distributions compared to other ESI techniques are observed also; for most of the proteins studied, more than 90% of the protein ions can be accumulated in one charge state using ESSI when optimizing conditions. The fact that the abundant charge state is normally as low or lower than that recorded by ESI or nanospray indicates that folded protein ions are generated. The sensitivity of the ionization technique to high salt concentrations is comparable to that of nanospray, but ESSI is considerably less sensitive to high concentrations of organic additives such as glycerol or 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris base). Noncovalent complexes are observed in the case of myoglobin, protein kinase A/ATP complex, and other proteins. The extent of dissociation of protein ions in ESSI is comparable to or even smaller than that in the case of nanospray, emphasizing the gentle nature of the method. The unique features of ESSI are ascribed to very efficient spraying and the low internal energy supplied to the ions. Evidence is provided that the method is capable of generating fully desolvated protein ions at atmospheric pressure. This allows the technique to be used for the study of ion-molecule reactions at atmospheric

  18. Integral equation analysis and optimization of 2D layered nanolithography masks by complex images Green's function technique in TM polarization.

    PubMed

    Haghtalab, Mohammad; Faraji-Dana, Reza

    2012-05-01

    Analysis and optimization of diffraction effects in nanolithography through multilayered media with a fast and accurate field-theoretical approach is presented. The scattered field through an arbitrary two-dimensional (2D) mask pattern in multilayered media illuminated by a TM-polarized incident wave is determined by using an electric field integral equation formulation. In this formulation the electric field is represented in terms of complex images Green's functions. The method of moments is then employed to solve the resulting integral equation. In this way an accurate and computationally efficient approximate method is achieved. The accuracy of the proposed method is vindicated through comparison with direct numerical integration results. Moreover, the comparison is made between the results obtained by the proposed method and those obtained by the full-wave finite-element method. The ray tracing method is combined with the proposed method to describe the imaging process in the lithography. The simulated annealing algorithm is then employed to solve the inverse problem, i.e., to design an optimized mask pattern to improve the resolution. Two binary mask patterns under normal incident coherent illumination are designed by this method, where it is shown that the subresolution features improve the critical dimension significantly. PMID:22561933

  19. The Physicochemical Stability of Complex Intravenous Lipid Dispersions Supported by Light Obscuration and Dynamic Light Scattering Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, David Francis

    1994-01-01

    Procedures. The physicochemical stability of 45 clinically relevant intravenous nutritional emulsions were assessed employing a balanced fractional factorial design. Six factors were identified as influencing stability and included final concentrations of (1) Amino acids (%); (2) Glucose (%); (3) Lipids (%); (4) Monovalent Cations (mEq/L); (5) Divalent Cations (mEq/L); (6) Trivalent Cations (mg/L) Stability assessments included particle size analysis, pH changes and the visual development of cream layers and phase separation of free oil. Particle size analyses were accomplished employing laser techniques for particle counting and distribution. Particle sizing and counting was achieved using light obscuration and particle distributions were constructed with the aid of dynamic light scatter techniques. Results. Multiple stepwise regression analyses revealed that trivalent cation concentrations (as iron dextran) was the only variable to have any significant effect on the emulsions accounting for almost 60% of the adverse changes in the emulsions (increasing lipid particle sizes) during the course of the investigation. In addition, when the percent fat (PFAT) from time 0 comprised > 0.4% in the size range of >5 μm in diameter, it was associated with, highly unstable and potentially dangerous infusions. Importantly, these unstable emulsions were visually detectable only about 65% of the time. Assessment of the potential danger of these formulations with respect to pulmonary embolism was performed by infusing the admixture with the worst emulsion profile, yet was visually acceptable, in two groups of guinea pigs. Group 1 received the admixture which contained iron dextran and Group 2 received the identical admixture without iron dextran. The admixtures were prepared 24 hours prior to infusion and given to the animals over the last six hours of its expiration date. Prior to infusion, particle size analysis revealed a 100-fold increase in PFAT >5 μm in the iron dextran

  20. A novel technique for detecting instability of the distal radioulnar joint in complete triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions.

    PubMed

    Hess, Florian; Farshad, Mazda; Sutter, Reto; Nagy, Ladislav; Schweizer, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    We performed this study to investigate whether discrepancy of bilateral dorsovolar shift of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is decisive for the diagnosis of DRUJ instability. Although several cadaver studies have quantified the amount of physiological dorsovolar shift, so far, there is no reliable method of quantification of DRUJ mobility in daily practice. The aim was to describe a novel sonographic method of quantifying DRUJ instability and evaluate its reliability and validity. In this study, 40 healthy volunteers and 17 patients with complete rupture of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) underwent sonographic quantification of the grade of instability of their DRUJ bilaterally. Dorsovolar ulnar head translation relative to the distal radius was quantified by means of ultrasonography performed in a transversal plane through the ulnar head and Lister tubercle. Measurements were done while actively pressing the volar surface of the hand onto a brick 30 degrees pronated, and after lifting the hand. A quotient Q of the radioulnar distance (distance between the dorsal radius surface and the ulnar head) between the unloaded and loaded wrist was calculated for differentiation of a normal and unstable DRUJ. The Q ratio of the 17 patients with unilateral TFCC lesion was significantly different between the pathologic side and the contralateral wrist (1.19 vs. 0.54, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the Q ratio in the 40 healthy volunteers between the right and left side or dominant and nondominant wrist. A Q ratio > 0.8 was found to be a reasonable cut-off for pathologic laxity of the DRUJ with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 81%. A quotient Q > 0.8 determines instability of the DRUJ reliably. This was a level II diagnostic study. PMID:24179720

  1. Complex reconstruction of the dorsal hand using the induced membrane technique associated with bone substitute: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Guillier, David; Rizzi, Philippe; De Taddeo, Alice; Henault, Benoit; Tchurukdichian, Alain; Zwetyenga, Narcisse

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High-energy trauma of the hand often causes tissue loss involving bone, tendon and skin and is sometimes accompanied by devascularization of digits. Bone stabilization is the first step in the management of such injuries. Materials and methods A young patient presented composite tissue loss of the dorsum of his right (dominant) hand following an accident with a surface planer. Tissue loss involved the diaphyses of the first 4 metacarpals, tendons and skin with almost complete amputation of the 3rd finger. Bone stabilization comprised osteosynthesis using pins associated with cement to fill the bone defect. Hunter tendon rods were used for tendon repair and a pedicle groin flap (McGregor) was used to achieve skin coverage. The cement was replaced with autologous cortico-cancellous bone graft combined with bone paste (Nanostim) 3 months after the cement stabilization. Results Eleven months after the accident, the patient was able to return to work as a carpenter. Pinch and Grasp strength in the injured hand were half that in the contralateral hand, but there was no loss of sensitivity. Mobility was very satisfactory with a Kapandji score of 9 and a mean TAM of 280°. The patient can write, open a bottle and does not feel limited for everyday activities. Radiographically, the bone of the 3 reconstructed metacarpals appears consolidated. Conclusion The induced membrane technique allowed the reconstruction of small bone deficits in the long bones of the hand in a two-step procedure, the first step taking place in an emergency context of composite tissue trauma. PMID:27077131

  2. Sensitivity of the WRF model to PBL parametrisations and nesting techniques: evaluation of wind storms over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Navarro, J. J.; Raible, C. C.; Dierer, S.

    2015-10-01

    Simulating surface wind over complex terrain is a challenge in regional climate modelling. Therefore, this study aims at identifying a set-up of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) model that minimises systematic errors of surface winds in hindcast simulations. Major factors of the model configuration are tested to find a suitable set-up: the horizontal resolution, the planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterisation scheme and the way the WRF is nested to the driving data set. Hence, a number of sensitivity simulations at a spatial resolution of 2 km are carried out and compared to observations. Given the importance of wind storms, the analysis is based on case studies of 24 historical wind storms that caused great economic damage in Switzerland. Each of these events is downscaled using eight different model set-ups, but sharing the same driving data set. The results show that the lack of representation of the unresolved topography leads to a general overestimation of wind speed in WRF. However, this bias can be substantially reduced by using a PBL scheme that explicitly considers the effects of non-resolved topography, which also improves the spatial structure of wind speed over Switzerland. The wind direction, although generally well reproduced, is not very sensitive to the PBL scheme. Further sensitivity tests include four types of nesting methods: nesting only at the boundaries of the outermost domain, analysis nudging, spectral nudging, and the so-called re-forecast method, where the simulation is frequently restarted. These simulations show that restricting the freedom of the model to develop large-scale disturbances slightly increases the temporal agreement with the observations, at the same time that it further reduces the overestimation of wind speed, especially for maximum wind peaks. The model performance is also evaluated in the outermost domains, where the resolution is coarser. The results demonstrate the important role of horizontal

  3. Determining Omics spatiotemporal dimensions using exciting new nanoscopy techniques to assess complex cell responses to DNA damage: part B--structuromics.

    PubMed

    Falk, Martin; Hausmann, Michael; Lukášová, Emílie; Biswas, Abin; Hildenbrand, Georg; Davídková, Marie; Krasavin, Evgeny; Kleibl, Zdeněk; Falková, Iva; Ježková, Lucie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Ševčík, Jan; Hofer, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Matula, Pavel; Boreyko, Alla; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidisová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking developments in Omics and bioinformatics have generated new hope for overcoming the complexity and variability of (radio)biological systems while simultaneously shedding more light on fundamental radiobiological questions that have remained unanswered for decades. In the era of Omics, our knowledge of how genes and dozens of proteins interact in the frame of complex signaling and repair pathways (or, rather, networks) to preserve the integrity of the genome has been rapidly expanding. Nevertheless, these functional networks must be observed with strong correspondence to the cell nucleus, which is the main target of ionizing radiation. Information regarding these intricate processes cannot be achieved using high-throughput Omics approaches alone; it requires sophisticated structural probing and imaging. In the first part of this review, the article "Giving Omics Spatiotemporal Dimensions Using Exciting New Nanoscopy Techniques to Assess Complex Cell Responses to DNA Damage: Part A--Radiomics," we showed the development of different Omics solutions and how they are contributing to a better understanding of cellular radiation response. In this Part B we show how high-resolution confocal microscopy as well as novel approaches of molecular localization nanoscopy fill the gaps to successfully place Omics data in the context of space and time. The dynamics of double-strand breaks during repair processes and chromosomal rearrangements at the microscale correlated to aberration induction are explained. For the first time we visualize pan-nuclear nucleosomal rearrangements and clustering at the nanoscale during repair processes. Finally, we introduce a novel method of specific chromatin nanotargeting based on a computer database search of uniquely binding oligonucleotide combinations (COMBO-FISH). With these challenging techniques on hand, we speculate future perspectives that may combine specific COMBO-FISH nanoprobing and structural nanoscopy to

  4. 99Tc NMR as a promising technique for structural investigation of biomolecules: theoretical studies on the solvent and thermal effects of phenylbenzothiazole complex.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Daiana T; Souza, Eugenio F; Caetano, Melissa S; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2014-04-01

    The phenylbenzothiazole compounds show antitumor properties and are highly selective. In this paper, the (99)Tc chemical shifts based on the ((99m)Tc)(CO)3 (NNO) complex conjugated to the antitumor agent 2-(4'-aminophenyl)benzothiazole are reported. Thermal and solvent effects were studied computationally by quantum-chemical methods, using the density functional theory (DFT) (DFT level BPW91/aug-cc-pVTZ for the Tc and BPW91/IGLO-II for the other atoms) to compute the NMR parameters for the complex. We have calculated the (99)Tc NMR chemical shifts of the complex in gas phase and solution using different solvation models (polarizable continuum model and explicit solvation). To evaluate the thermal effect, molecular dynamics simulations were carried, using the atom-centered density matrix propagation method at the DFT level (BP86/LanL2dz). The results highlight that the (99)Tc NMR spectroscopy can be a promising technique for structural investigation of biomolecules, at the molecular level, in different environments. PMID:24446055

  5. Dermal Fenestration With Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: A Technique for Managing Soft Tissue Injuries Associated With High-Energy Complex Foot Fractures.

    PubMed

    Poon, Henrietta; Le Cocq, Heather; Mountain, Alistair J; Sargeant, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Military casualties can sustain complex foot fractures from blast incidents. This frequently involves the calcaneum and is commonly associated with mid-foot fracture dislocations. The foot is at risk of both compartment syndrome and the development of fracture blisters after such injuries. The amount of energy transfer and the environment in which the injury was sustained also predispose patients to potential skin necrosis and deep infection. Decompression of the compartments is a part of accepted practice in civilian trauma to reduce the risk of complications associated with significant soft tissue swelling. The traditional methods of foot fasciotomy, however, are not without significant complications. We report a simple technique of dermal fenestration combined with the use of negative pressure wound therapy, which aims to preserve the skin integrity of the foot without resorting to formal fasciotomy. PMID:26443232

  6. Exploring the heat-induced structural changes of β-lactoglobulin -linoleic acid complex by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Simion Ciuciu, Ana-Maria; Aprodu, Iuliana; Dumitrașcu, Loredana; Bahrim, Gabriela Elena; Alexe, Petru; Stănciuc, Nicoleta

    2015-12-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is the precursor of bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites and arachidonic acid, therefore is essential for human growth and plays an important role in good health in general. Because of the low water solubility and sensitivity to oxidation, new ways of LA delivery without compromising the sensory attributes of the enriched products are to be identified. The major whey protein, β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg), is a natural carrier for hydrophobic molecules. The thermal induced changes of the β-Lg-LA complex were investigated in the temperature range from 25 to 85 °C using fluorescence spectroscopy techniques in combination with molecular modeling study and the results were compared with those obtained for β-Lg. Experimental results indicated that, regardless of LA binding, the polypeptide chain rearrangements at temperatures higher than 75 °C lead to higher exposure of hydrophobic residues causing the increase of fluorescence intensity. Phase diagram indicated an all or none transition between two conformations. The LA surface involved in the interaction with β-Lg was about 497 Ǻ(2), indicating a good affinity between those two components even at high temperatures. Results obtained in this study provide important details about heat-induced changes in the conformation of β-Lg-LA complex. The thermal treatment at high temperature does not affect the LA binding and carrier functions of β-Lg. PMID:26604382

  7. The effect of multileaf collimator leaf width on the radiosurgery planning for spine lesion treatment in terms of the modulated techniques and target complexity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aim to evaluate the effects of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width (5 mm vs. 2.5 mm) on the radiosurgery planning for the treatment of spine lesions according to the modulated techniques (intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT] vs. volumetric-modulated arc therapy [VMAT]) and the complexity of the target shape. Methods For this study, artificial spinal lesions were contoured and used for treatment plans. Three spinal levels (C5, T5, and L2 spines) were selected, and four types of target shapes reflecting the complexity of lesions were contoured. The treatment plans were performed using 2.5-mm and 5-mm MLCs, and also using both static IMRT and VMAT. In total, 48 treatment plans were established. The efficacy of each treatment plan was compared using target volume coverage (TVC), conformity index (CI), dose gradient index (GI), and V30%. Results When the 5-mm MLC was replaced by the 2.5-mm MLC, TVC and GI improved significantly by 5.68% and 6.25%, respectively, while CI did not improve. With a smaller MLC leaf width, the improvement ratios of the TVC were larger in IMRT than VMAT (8.38% vs. 2.97%). In addition, the TVC was improved by 14.42-16.74% in target type 4 compared to the other target types. These improvements were larger in IMRT than in VMAT (27.99% vs. 6.34%). The V30% was not statistically different between IMRT and VMAT according to the MLC leaf widths and the types of target. Conclusion The smaller MLC leaf width provided improved target coverage in both IMRT and VMAT, and its improvement was larger in IMRT than in VMAT. In addition, the smaller MLC leaf width was more effective for complex-shaped targets. PMID:24606890

  8. Determining Omics spatiotemporal dimensions using exciting new nanoscopy techniques to assess complex cell responses to DNA damage: part A--radiomics.

    PubMed

    Falk, Martin; Hausmann, Michael; Lukášová, Emílie; Biswas, Abin; Hildenbrand, Georg; Davídková, Marie; Krasavin, Evgeny; Kleibl, Zdeněk; Falková, Iva; Ježková, Lucie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Ševčík, Jan; Hofer, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Matula, Pavel; Boreyko, Alla; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Recent ground-breaking developments in Omics have generated new hope for overcoming the complexity and variability of biological systems while simultaneously shedding more light on fundamental radiobiological questions that have remained unanswered for decades. In the era of Omics, our knowledge of how genes and proteins interact in the frame of complex networks to preserve genome integrity has been rapidly expanding. Nevertheless, these functional networks must be observed with strong correspondence to the cell nucleus, which is the main target of ionizing radiation. Nuclear architecture and nuclear processes, including DNA damage responses, are precisely organized in space and time. Information regarding these intricate processes cannot be achieved using high-throughput Omics approaches alone, but requires sophisticated structural probing and imaging. Based on the results obtained from studying the relationship between higher-order chromatin structure, DNA double-strand break induction and repair, and the formation of chromosomal translocations, we show the development of Omics solutions especially for radiation research (radiomics) (discussed in this article) and how confocal microscopy as well as novel approaches of molecular localization nanoscopy fill the gaps to successfully place the Omics data in the context of space and time (discussed in our other article in this issue, "Determining Omics Spatiotemporal Dimensions Using Exciting New Nanoscopy Techniques to Assess Complex Cell Responses to DNA Damage: Part B--Structuromics"). Finally, we introduce a novel method of specific chromatin nanotargeting and speculate future perspectives, which may combine nanoprobing and structural nanoscopy to observe structure-function correlations in living cells in real time. Thus, the Omics networks obtained from function analyses may be enriched by real-time visualization of Structuromics. PMID:25072147

  9. Blockmodeling techniques for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Brian Joseph

    The class of network models known as stochastic blockmodels has recently been gaining popularity. In this dissertation, we present new work that uses blockmodels to answer questions about networks. We create a blockmodel based on the idea of link communities, which naturally gives rise to overlapping vertex communities. We derive a fast and accurate algorithm to fit the model to networks. This model can be related to another blockmodel, which allows the method to efficiently find nonoverlapping communities as well. We then create a heuristic based on the link community model whose use is to find the correct number of communities in a network. The heuristic is based on intuitive corrections to likelihood ratio tests. It does a good job finding the correct number of communities in both real networks and synthetic networks generated from the link communities model. Two commonly studied types of networks are citation networks, where research papers cite other papers, and coauthorship networks, where authors are connected if they've written a paper together. We study a multi-modal network from a large dataset of Physics publications that is the combination of the two, allowing for directed links between papers as citations, and an undirected edge between a scientist and a paper if they helped to write it. This allows for new insights on the relation between social interaction and scientific production. We also have the publication dates of papers, which lets us track our measures over time. Finally, we create a stochastic model for ranking vertices in a semi-directed network. The probability of connection between two vertices depends on the difference of their ranks. When this model is fit to high school friendship networks, the ranks appear to correspond with a measure of social status. Students have reciprocated and some unreciprocated edges with other students of closely similar rank that correspond to true friendship, and claim an aspirational friendship with a much higher ranked individual a fraction of the time. In general, students with more friends have higher ranks than those with fewer friends, and older students have higher ranks than younger students.

  10. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  11. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiong; Hu, Hao; Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  12. Non-invasive investigative techniques for the diachronic study of territorial compartments: a case study for the documentation and analysis of architectural complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lieto, Marco; Marchetta, Isabella; Ciriello, Rosanna; De Martino, Gregory; Della Mora, Dario

    2014-05-01

    The trend in the study of areas of land in their integrity and as dynamic, anthropic units in diachronic history has initiated long survey campaigns over several decades that have covered large areas mapping the evidence and attempting a reconstruction of the evolution of ancient settlements. The need for further study to disentangle the knots of modes and types of settlement boosted further investigations of targeted excavations, based on the quality and density of the findings from the field. Currently archaeological research can rely on non-invasive integrated methods to better define the areas to be investigated systematically obtaining new typologies of information and better management of time and research costs. In this paper we present a specific case study in which a variety of integrated survey methods have contributed to the documentation and analysis of monumental complexes linked to specific local contexts. The area under investigation lies in Italy, in the province of Potenza and, specifically in the town of Forenza. The survey activities, involving the entire municipality, have been running on and off for about 2 years and have already resulted in the collection of a lot of interesting data that will be useful to essential fieldwork. In particular, we carried out different types of investigation in three different sample sites: 1. monumental complex of Santa Maria de 'Armenis: to complement previous excavations which involved only a portion of the estimated area of interest, we carried out magnetometric and geo-electrical surveys aimed at a more precise definition of the true extent and interpretation of the monument in antiquity; 2. site of Monte Caruso: we carried out remote sensing using a remote-controlled UAV hexakopter drone with stereoscopic photogrammetric survey techniques aimed at the detailed documentation of the monumental evidence of a structure visible in elevation but in a context difficult to approach with traditional surveying

  13. In search for instructional techniques to maximize the use of germane cognitive resources: A case of teaching complex tasks in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliva, Yekaterina

    The purpose of this study was to introduce an instructional technique for teaching complex tasks in physics, test its effectiveness and efficiency, and understand cognitive processes taking place in learners' minds while they are exposed to this technique. The study was based primarily on cognitive load theory (CLT). CLT determines the amount of total cognitive load imposed on a learner by a learning task as combined intrinsic (invested in comprehending task complexity) and extraneous (wasteful) cognitive load. Working memory resources associated with intrinsic cognitive load are defined as germane resources caused by element interactivity that lead to learning, in contrast to extraneous working memory resources that are devoted to dealing with extraneous cognitive load. However, the amount of learner's working memory resources actually devoted to a task depends on how well the learner is engaged in the learning environment. Since total cognitive load has to stay within limits of working memory capacity, both extraneous and intrinsic cognitive load need to be reduced. In order for effective learning to occur, the use of germane cognitive resources should be maximized. In this study, the use of germane resources was maximized for two experimental groups by providing a learning environment that combined problem-solving procedure with prompts to self-explain with and without completion problems. The study tested three hypotheses and answered two research questions. The first hypothesis predicting that experimental treatments would reduce total cognitive load was not supported. The second hypothesis predicting that experimental treatments would increase performance was supported for the self-explanation group only. The third hypothesis that tested efficiency measure as adopted from Paas and van Merrienboer (1993) was not supported. As for the research question of whether the quality of self-explanations would change with time for the two experimental conditions, it was

  14. A 4:1 stoichiometric binding and stabilization of mitoxantrone-parallel stranded G-quadruplex complex established by spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Tarikere Palakashan; Barthwal, Ritu

    2016-09-01

    Small molecule ligands which specifically bind and stabilize G-quadruplex structures in telomeric ends inhibit the activity of telomerase enzyme, an important marker for cancer. Understanding of the binding mode of ligand-G quadruplex complex is important for evaluating relative efficacy of anti-tumor drugs. The present study is focused on interaction of anti-tumor drug mitoxantrone (MTX) with tetra-molecular parallel stranded G-quadruplex sequence d-TTGGGGT using absorbance, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy techniques. Absorbance of mitoxantrone shows hypochromism up to MTX (D)/DNA quadruplex (N) ratio ~5, followed by hyperchromism up to D/N=0.21 accompanied by a red shift of 15nm. The fluorescence emission of MTX shows decrease up to D/N ~5 and then increases with red shift of 8nm. The two observed fluorescent lifetimes, 0.17ns (91%) and 0.44ns (9%), indicate dual binding mode. Absence of isobestic and isoemissive point indicates presence of multiple complexes. Circular Dichroism spectra showing positive induced band at 645nm and two exciton bands centered at 619 and 664nm suggest binding of mitoxantrone as a dimer. Proton NMR studies show intermolecular MTX-MTX short contacts confirming existence of stacked dimer of MTX. Thermal melting transitions of DNA saturate at D/N=4 with ΔTm=25°C. The results establish highly specific external groove binding of 4 molecules of mitoxantrone as two dimers at two distinct sites of DNA. PMID:27362369

  15. Innovative 3D and 4D geological interpretation, modelling and visualisation techniques for subsurface characterisation of complex industrial sites - examples in the UK nuclear industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicholas; Shevelan, John; Hodgetts, David; Head, William

    2013-04-01

    Industrial sites are typically complex, with numerous plants within their (often) relatively small footprint. The 'cramped' nature of these sites means that the geological characterisation that is essential to the development of environmental safety cases may be hampered by a lack of access to exposures, if they exist at all. Due to access limitations and potential for ground vibration affecting key plants, geophysical data are typically limited to those gathered from lower resolution surveys (e.g. electrical resistivity tomography) rather than those gathered from more informative vibroseis seismic reflection surveys. Thus, whilst many industrial sites may possess numerous intrusive boreholes (Sellafield, perhaps the UK's most complex industrial site, has over 3000), there is a lack of ties to either high resolution geophysical data, or important regional lithostratigraphic data provided by exposure of key sequences. This poses a conundrum: the hydrogeological 3D and 4D numerical models required to show the predicted migration paths of potential contamination within the subsurface require the best geological understanding possible, yet without high resolution geophysical data or geological exposure within the sites themselves geological interpretation is often restricted to attempting to correlate between boreholes that may be tens to hundreds of metres apart and only a few metres deep, which one could assume may not provide a good geological understanding. In this paper, using examples from the nuclear industry, we describe how the use of outcrop analogues and innovative GIS-based, 3D/4D geological interpretation, characterisation, modelling and visualisation techniques goes some way to addressing these issues. Regional outcrops of Triassic sandstone and unconsolidated Quaternary sequences are ideal analogues for unexposed sequences underlying key nuclear sites in West Cumbria (UK), providing important sedimentological (and depositional), lithostratigraphic and

  16. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modeling in order, ultimately, to identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Furthermore, a holistic view of results across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidized gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i.e. toluene) oxidation and "more realistic" plant mesocosm systems, demonstrates that such an ensemble of chemometric mapping has the potential to be

  17. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modelling in order to ultimately identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Results show that "model" biogenic oxidative systems can be successfully separated and classified according to their oxidation products. Furthermore, a holistic view of results obtained across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidised gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i

  18. Analysis of the Anopheles (Anopheles) quadrimaculatus complex of sibling species (Diptera: Culicidae) using morphological, cytological, molecular, genetic, biochemical, and ecological techniques in an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Reinert, J F; Kaiser, P E; Seawright, J A

    1997-12-01

    The Anopheles quadrimaculatus complex of 5 cryptic species (i.e., An. diluvialis Reinert, new species; An. inundatus Reinert, new species; An. maverlius Reinert, new species; An. quadrimaculatus Say; An. smaragdinus Reinert, new species) is analyzed using multiple techniques, including morphological, cytological, molecular, genetic, biochemical, and ecological procedures. All life stages (egg, 4th-instar larva, pupa, and female and male adults) are described using morphological features, and pertinent stages or structures are illustrated. A neotype for An. quadrimaculatus is designated, and the synonymy of An. annulimanus Van der Wulp is confirmed. Several new morphological features are described. New and summarized data from published literature on hybridization, cytological, electrophoretic, molecular, and cuticular hydrocarbon studies are included. Immature and adult bionomics are given. The geographic distribution for each species is listed and shown on maps. Procedures for collecting, processing, and rearing specimens are described. Keys using morphological characters are included for the eggs, 4th-instar larvae, pupae, adult females, and male genitalia. Also, a biochemical key for the 5 species is included. Color and pattern variations of larvae and pupae are discussed. PMID:9474550

  19. Cytogenetic analysis of Epicauta atomaria (Meloidae) and Palembus dermestoides (Tenebrionidae) with Xyp sex determination system using standard staining, C-bands, NOR and synaptonemal complex microspreading techniques.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, M C; Zacaro, A A; Cella, D M

    2000-01-01

    The mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of the beetles Epicauta atomaria (Meloidae) and Palembus dermestoides (Tenebrionidae) were analysed using standard staining, C-banding and silver impregnation techniques. We determine the diploid and haploid chromosome numbers, the sex determination system and describe the chromosomal morphology, the C-banding pattern and the chromosome(s) bearing NORs (nucleolar organizer regions). Both species shown 2n = 20 chromosomes, the chromosomal meioformula 9 + Xyp, and regular chromosome segregation during anaphases I and II. The chromosomes of E. atomaria are basically metacentric or submetacentric and P. dermestoides chromosomes are submetacentric or subtelocentric. In both beetles the constitutive heterochromatin is located in the pericentromeric region in all autosomes and in the Xp chromosome; additional C-bands were observed in telomeric region of the short arm in some autosomes in P. dermestoides. The yp chromosome did not show typical C-bands in these species. As for the synaptonemal complex, the nucleolar material is associated to the 7th bivalent in E. atomaria and 3rd and 7th bivalents in P. dermestoides. Strong silver impregnated material was observed in association with Xyp in light and electron microscopy preparations in these species and this material was interpreted to be related to nucleolar material. PMID:11338427

  20. Communication complexity and information complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Denis

    Information complexity enables the use of information-theoretic tools in communication complexity theory. Prior to the results presented in this thesis, information complexity was mainly used for proving lower bounds and direct-sum theorems in the setting of communication complexity. We present three results that demonstrate new connections between information complexity and communication complexity. In the first contribution we thoroughly study the information complexity of the smallest nontrivial two-party function: the AND function. While computing the communication complexity of AND is trivial, computing its exact information complexity presents a major technical challenge. In overcoming this challenge, we reveal that information complexity gives rise to rich geometrical structures. Our analysis of information complexity relies on new analytic techniques and new characterizations of communication protocols. We also uncover a connection of information complexity to the theory of elliptic partial differential equations. Once we compute the exact information complexity of AND, we can compute exact communication complexity of several related functions on n-bit inputs with some additional technical work. Previous combinatorial and algebraic techniques could only prove bounds of the form theta( n). Interestingly, this level of precision is typical in the area of information theory, so our result demonstrates that this meta-property of precise bounds carries over to information complexity and in certain cases even to communication complexity. Our result does not only strengthen the lower bound on communication complexity of disjointness by making it more exact, but it also shows that information complexity provides the exact upper bound on communication complexity. In fact, this result is more general and applies to a whole class of communication problems. In the second contribution, we use self-reduction methods to prove strong lower bounds on the information

  1. Local Modelling Techniques for Assessing Micro-Level Impacts of Risk Factors in Complex Data: Understanding Health and Socioeconomic Inequalities in Childhood Educational Attainments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shang-Ming; Lyons, Ronan A.; Bodger, Owen G.; John, Ann; Brunt, Huw; Jones, Kerina; Gravenor, Mike B.; Brophy, Sinead

    2014-01-01

    Although inequalities in health and socioeconomic status have an important influence on childhood educational performance, the interactions between these multiple factors relating to variation in educational outcomes at micro-level is unknown, and how to evaluate the many possible interactions of these factors is not well established. This paper aims to examine multi-dimensional deprivation factors and their impact on childhood educational outcomes at micro-level, focusing on geographic areas having widely different disparity patterns, in which each area is characterised by six deprivation domains (Income, Health, Geographical Access to Services, Housing, Physical Environment, and Community Safety). Traditional health statistical studies tend to use one global model to describe the whole population for macro-analysis. In this paper, we combine linked educational and deprivation data across small areas (median population of 1500), then use a local modelling technique, the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy system, to predict area educational outcomes at ages 7 and 11. We define two new metrics, “Micro-impact of Domain” and “Contribution of Domain”, to quantify the variations of local impacts of multidimensional factors on educational outcomes across small areas. The two metrics highlight differing priorities. Our study reveals complex multi-way interactions between the deprivation domains, which could not be provided by traditional health statistical methods based on single global model. We demonstrate that although Income has an expected central role, all domains contribute, and in some areas Health, Environment, Access to Services, Housing and Community Safety each could be the dominant factor. Thus the relative importance of health and socioeconomic factors varies considerably for different areas, depending on the levels of each of the other factors, and therefore each component of deprivation must be considered as part of a wider system. Childhood educational

  2. EB curing and cure grafting of novel CT monomer complexes: comparison with UV process and extension of the technique to thiol-ene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Gary R.; Garnett, John L.; Zilic, Elvis

    2004-09-01

    EB curing and cure grafting of charge transfer (CT) monomer complexes is discussed. The complexes studied involve representative donors (D) such as vinyl ethers and typical acceptors (A) including maleates, maleimides and acrylates also oligomers. The EB results are compared with UV curing and cure grafting of the same complexes. The work has been extended to include EB/UV curing and cure grafting of thiol-ene systems. The significance of these results in the potential commercial application of these complexes is discussed.

  3. Decomposition techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  4. Utility of positron annihilation lifetime technique for the assessment of spectroscopic data of some charge-transfer complexes derived from N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Adam, Abdel Majid A; Sharshar, T; Saad, Hosam A; Eldaroti, Hala H

    2014-03-25

    In this work, structural, thermal, morphological, pharmacological screening and positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed on the interactions between a N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (NEDA·2HCl) donor and three types of acceptors to characterize these CT complexes. The three types of acceptors include π-acceptors (quinol and picric acid), σ-acceptors (iodine) and vacant orbital acceptors (tin(IV) tetrachloride and zinc chloride). The positron annihilation lifetime parameters were found to be dependent on the structure, electronic configuration, the power of acceptors and molecular weight of the CT complexes. The positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be used as a probe for the formation of charge-transfer (CT) complexes. PMID:24291622

  5. Handbook of Techniques and Guides for the Study of the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex, Part 2. Key to the Phytoplankton Phyla and Genera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helrich, Jane

    Project MER (Marine Ecology Research) is aimed at improving environmental education in the San Francisco Bay Area schools. This document is the second of a series of guides designed to help students and teachers gather data concerning the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex and to organize these data to make a contribution to the literature of…

  6. Combination of β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex and self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for photostability and enhanced oral bioavailability of methotrexate: novel technique.

    PubMed

    Bourkaib, Nadia; Zhou, Jianping; Yao, Jing; Fang, Zhengjie; Mezghrani, Omar

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, we prepared an inclusion complex of methotrexate (MTX) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in order to decrease its photosensitivity and enhance its aqueous solubility. Then we incorporated this inclusion complex in a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) overall to increase its oral bioavailability. The inclusion complex has been prepared by freeze drying method and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), ultraviolet (UV), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy assays. The proper molecular ratio of MTX/β-CD was found to be of 1:7, and the water-solubility of MTX was increased in an average of 10-fold. The photostability studies showed that the MTX became stable on exposure to light. Construction of pseudoternary diagrams were investigated to prepare a MTX/β-CD inclusion complex loaded SMEDDS which was characterized by measuring the particle size and the zeta-potential. The optimum formulation of SMEDDS was a system consisting of ethyl oleate, tween 80, and propylene glycol with a mean droplet size of 39.42 nm. In vitro drug release in different pH media showed that the release profile of MTX from the MTX/β-CD loaded SMEDDS was influenced by the pH of the release medium and presented the characteristics of a sustained release profile. Finally, in-vivo studies showed an enhancement of the bioavailability of MTX from the MTX/β-CD loaded SMEDDS form of 1.57-fold. We concluded that the β-CD inclusion complex loaded SMEDDS improved the chemical and physiological properties of MTX and could be a promising means for the delivery of MTX and other unstable and lipophilic drugs by oral route. PMID:22998295

  7. Single Event Analysis and Fault Injection Techniques Targeting Complex Designs Implemented in Xilinx-Virtex Family Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; Label, Kenneth; Kim, Kim

    2014-01-01

    An informative session regarding SRAM FPGA basics. Presenting a framework for fault injection techniques applied to Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Introduce an overlooked time component that illustrates fault injection is impractical for most real designs as a stand-alone characterization tool. Demonstrate procedures that benefit from fault injection error analysis.

  8. Recurrent inguinal hernia in a preschool girl treated laparoscopically with a preperitoneal transabdominal technique and polypropylene mesh: an alternative in complex cases.

    PubMed

    Weber-Sanchez, A; Weber-Alvarez, P; Garteiz-Martinez, D

    2012-02-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl treated by a laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) technique with polypropylene mesh in whom a primary contralateral hernia was found and repaired, closing the orifice with a suture. This 4-year-old female had a medical history of clubfoot treated by surgery during her first year of age, ureteral reimplantation because of stenosis, and laparoscopic cholecystectomy because of hydrocholecystis. She had recurrence 1 year after a conventional inguinal herniorraphy and was treated by the TAPP technique with polypropylene mesh. A primary contralateral hernia was found and repaired, and the orifice was closed with a suture. The child's acceptance of the procedure was good, and the postoperative evolution was uneventful, requiring minimal analgesia in the first 24 h. She was discharged the following day. Two years later, there have been no recurrences, and the girl is developing and carrying out activities in a normal way. The open technique remains the gold standard for hernioplasty in children, but laparoscopy may be an option, and it is possible that in some special cases, the use of mesh to reinforce the inguinal wall using the TAPP technique, although it is controversial, may be justified. PMID:20803043

  9. First reported revascularization of complex occlusion of the right coronary artery using the IVUS-guided reverse CART technique via a gastroepiploic artery graft.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Katoh, Osamu; Zhou, Hua; Kyo, Eisho

    2016-02-01

    When patients who have previously undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery develop ischemia symptoms that cannot be controlled by optimal medical therapy, repeat revascularization is indicated. The revascularization strategy should be based on individual clinical and anatomical characteristics. We report here a challenging patient who presented with recurrent stable angina due to worsening of a proximal right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis to chronic total occlusion (CTO) after anastomosis of the right gastroepiploic artery (GEA) to the posterior descending artery. A soft guidewire was advanced through the right GEA collateral channel to the distal end of the CTO, but the dedicated CTO guidewires could not be advanced across the severely calcified CTO using the retrograde wire crossing or kissing wire techniques. The RCA was eventually revascularized by implantation of drug-eluting stents using the intravascular ultrasound-guided reverse controlled antegrade and retrograde subintimal tracking technique. PMID:25148795

  10. A comparison of four relative radiometric normalization (RRN) techniques for mosaicing H-res multi-temporal thermal infrared (TIR) flight-lines of a complex urban scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Hay, G. J.; Couloigner, I.; Hemachandran, B.; Bailin, J.

    2015-08-01

    High-spatial and -radiometric resolution (H-res) thermal infrared (TIR) airborne imagery, such as the TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) provide unique surface temperature information that can be used for urban heat loss mapping, heat island analysis, and landcover classifications. For mapping large urban areas at a high-spatial resolution (i.e., sub-meter), airborne thermal imagery needs to be acquired over a number of flight-lines and mosaiced together. However, due to radiometric variations between flight-lines the similar objects tend to have different temperature characteristics on the mosaicked image, resulting in reduced visual and radiometric agreement between the flight-lines composing the final mosaiced output. To reduce radiometric variability between airborne TIR flight-lines, with a view to produce a visually seamless TIR image mosaic, we evaluate four relative radiometric normalization techniques including: (i) Histogram Matching, (ii) Pseudo Invariant Feature (PIF) Based Linear Regression, (iii) PIF-Based Theil-Sen Regression, and (iv) No-Change Stratified Random Samples (NCSRS) Based Linear Regression. The techniques are evaluated on two adjacent TABI-1800 airborne flight-lines (each ∼30 km × 0.9 km) collected ∼25 min apart over a portion of The City of Calgary (with ∼30% overlap between them). The performances of these techniques are compared based on four criteria: (i) speed of computation, (ii) ability to automate, (iii) visual assessment, and (iv) statistical analysis. Results show that NCSRS-Based Linear Regression produces the best overall results closely followed by Histogram Matching. Specifically, these two radiometric normalization techniques: (i) increase the visual and statistical agreement between the tested TIR airborne flight-lines (NCSRS Based Linear Regression increases radiometric agreement between flight-lines by 53.3% and Histogram Matching by 52.4%), (ii) produce a visually seamless image mosaic, and (iii) can

  11. A high-throughput 2D-analytical technique to obtain single protein parameters from complex cell lysates for in silico process development of ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Frieder; Elsäßer, Dennis; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-11-29

    The accelerating growth of the market for biopharmaceutical proteins, the market entry of biosimilars and the growing interest in new, more complex molecules constantly pose new challenges for bioseparation process development. In the presented work we demonstrate the application of a multidimensional, analytical separation approach to obtain the relevant physicochemical parameters of single proteins in a complex mixture for in silico chromatographic process development. A complete cell lysate containing a low titre target protein was first fractionated by multiple linear salt gradient anion exchange chromatography (AEC) with varying gradient length. The collected fractions were subsequently analysed by high-throughput capillary gel electrophoresis (HT-CGE) after being desalted and concentrated. From the obtained data of the 2D-separation the retention-volumes and the concentration of the single proteins were determined. The retention-volumes of the single proteins were used to calculate the related steric-mass action model parameters. In a final evaluation experiment the received parameters were successfully applied to predict the retention behaviour of the single proteins in salt gradient AEC. PMID:24139506

  12. A novel hybrid dimension reduction technique for undersized high dimensional gene expression data sets using information complexity criterion for cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Pamukçu, Esra; Bozdogan, Hamparsum; Çalık, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression data typically are large, complex, and highly noisy. Their dimension is high with several thousand genes (i.e., features) but with only a limited number of observations (i.e., samples). Although the classical principal component analysis (PCA) method is widely used as a first standard step in dimension reduction and in supervised and unsupervised classification, it suffers from several shortcomings in the case of data sets involving undersized samples, since the sample covariance matrix degenerates and becomes singular. In this paper we address these limitations within the context of probabilistic PCA (PPCA) by introducing and developing a new and novel approach using maximum entropy covariance matrix and its hybridized smoothed covariance estimators. To reduce the dimensionality of the data and to choose the number of probabilistic PCs (PPCs) to be retained, we further introduce and develop celebrated Akaike's information criterion (AIC), consistent Akaike's information criterion (CAIC), and the information theoretic measure of complexity (ICOMP) criterion of Bozdogan. Six publicly available undersized benchmark data sets were analyzed to show the utility, flexibility, and versatility of our approach with hybridized smoothed covariance matrix estimators, which do not degenerate to perform the PPCA to reduce the dimension and to carry out supervised classification of cancer groups in high dimensions. PMID:25838836

  13. Application of electromagnetic techniques in survey of contaminated groundwater at an abandoned mine complex in southwestern Indiana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, G.A.; Olyphant, G.A.; Harper, D.

    1991-01-01

    In part of a large abandoned mining complex, electromagnetic geophysical surveys were used along with data derived from cores and monitoring wells to infer sources of contamination and subsurface hydrologic connections between acidic refuse deposits and adjacent undisturbed geologic materials. Electrical resistivity increases sharply along the boundary of an elevated deposit of pyritic coarse refuse, which is highly contaminated and electrically conductive, indicating poor subsurface hydrologic connections with surrounding deposits of fine refuse and undisturbed glacial material. Groundwater chemistry, as reflected in values of specific conductance, also differs markedly across the deposit's boundary, indicating that a widespread contaminant plume has not developed around the coarse refuse in more than 40 yr since the deposit was created. Most acidic drainage from the coarse refuse is by surface runoff and is concentrated around stream channels. Although most of the contaminated groundwater within the study area is concentrated within the surficial refuse deposits, transects of apparent resistivity and phase angle indicate the existence of an anomalous conductive layer at depth (>4 m) in thick alluvial sediments along the northern boundary of the mining complex. Based on knowledge of local geology, the anomaly is interpreted to represent a subsurface connection between the alluvium and a flooded abandoned underground mine. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  14. Application of complex geometrical optics to determination of thermal, transport, and optical parameters of thin films by the photothermal beam deflection technique.

    PubMed

    Korte, Dorota; Franko, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    In this work, complex geometrical optics is, for what we believe is the first time, applied instead of geometrical or wave optics to describe the probe beam interaction with the field of the thermal wave in photothermal beam deflection (photothermal deflection spectroscopy) experiments on thin films. On the basis of this approach the thermal (thermal diffusivity and conductivity), optical (energy band gap), and transport (carrier lifetime) parameters of the semiconductor thin films (pure TiO2, N- and C-doped TiO2, or TiO2/SiO2 composites deposited on a glass or aluminum support) were determined with better accuracy and simultaneously during one measurement. The results are in good agreement with results obtained by the use of other methods and reported in the literature. PMID:26366490

  15. Continued investigation of solid propulsion economics. Task 1B: Large solid rocket motor case fabrication methods - Supplement process complexity factor cost technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, J.

    1967-01-01

    This supplement to Task lB-Large Solid Rocket Motor Case Fabrication Methods supplies additional supporting cost data and discusses in detail the methodology that was applied to the task. For the case elements studied, the cost was found to be directly proportional to the Process Complexity Factor (PCF). The PCF was obtained for each element by identifying unit processes that are common to the elements and their alternative manufacturing routes, by assigning a weight to each unit process, and by summing the weighted counts. In three instances of actual manufacture, the actual cost per pound equaled the cost estimate based on PCF per pound, but this supplement, recognizes that the methodology is of limited, rather than general, application.

  16. Integration of numerical models and geoinformatic techniques in the delimitation of a protection zone for the MGB 319 complex multi-aquifer system in southwest Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwin, Jacek

    2015-09-01

    The study area, situated near the city of Wrocław in southwest Poland, is part of the hydrogeological system of the Quaternary/Neogene MGB 319, inclusive of a buried valley of high water potential, named the Bogdaszowice structure. This structure is an alternative source of water supply for the Wrocław city area. Numerical modelling is the most effective tool in establishing a groundwater protection strategy for Major Groundwater Basins (MGBs) in complex aquifer systems. In the present study, the first step was to assess the hydrodynamic conditions of the Radakowice groundwater intake by analyses of head contours, pathlines, average flow times and capture zones of particular wells. Subsequently, these results were used in combination with other data and compiled as GIS layers. The spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity was based on the lithology of surface sediments. Other data sets such as the thickness of the unsaturated zone, average soil moisture and infiltration rate were taken either directly from the model or were calculated. Based on the input data obtained, vertical flow time calculations for every model cell were made. The final outcome is a map of the protection zone for the aquifer system of the MGB 319.

  17. Use of 1H NMR STD, waterLOGSY, and Langmuir monolayer techniques for characterization of drug-zein protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, F F O; Luzardo-Álvarez, A; Blanco-Méndez, J; Otero-Espinar, F J; Martín-Pastor, M; Sández Macho, I

    2013-11-01

    Zein is a protein based natural biopolymer containing a large amount of nonpolar amino acids, which has shown the ability to form aggregates and entrap solutes, such as drugs and amino acids to form stable protein-drug complexes. In this work, π-A isotherm, NMR, and Dynamic light scattering were used to detect the formation of protein aggregates and the affinity between zein and two different drugs: tetracycline and indomethacin. An effective interaction of zein and the two drugs was evidenced by means of liquid NMR reinforced by means of changes in the surface pressure by π-A isotherm. The effective interactions zein/drugs under air/water interface were evidenced as a change in the surface pressure of the π-A isotherm of zein in the presence of drug solutions. The presence of tetracycline in the subphase decreased the area occupied by the monolayer at the expanded region until pressures of 12 mN/m were the areas became similar, but indomethacin produces an increment of the area in both expanded and collapsed region. The feasible methodology employed, focused in the functionality of the protein-drug interaction, can be very promising in the drug delivery field. PMID:23891773

  18. Three-dimensional techniques for capturing and building virtual models of complex objects for use in scientific and industrial applications, data archiving, and the entertainment industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Arthur; Chapman, Ralph E.; Wilcox, Brian

    2003-05-01

    The past 10 years have seen remarkable improvements in the capture of 3-dimesional data. Both scanning speeds and accuracy have increased by a magnitude. Software and increasingly more powerful computers allow larger data bases and faster post processing. CT, laser and optical scanners are finding increased use in the medical, manufacturing, scientific and entertainment industries. CT (Computerized Tomography) is generally used to capture internal as well as external surfaces. Medical (hospital) scanners are the most common and can be of service in industrial applications. But true industrial scanners service a much wider range of sizes and materials. Laser and optical scanners are line-of-sight, and are available in portable and permanent CMM mounting arrangements. Scanners are available to capture a wide range of objects; from entire buildings to fingernail sized parts. Solid objects requiring multiple scans, must register each scan to another for part completion. The collected data is exported as a "point cloud." The data can be used to digitally inspect complex parts, surface them for tooling and reverse engineering, or export surfaces to animation software.

  19. Structure reactivity and thermodynamic analysis on the oxidation of ampicillin drug by copper(III) complex in aqueous alkaline medium (stopped-flow technique)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetti, Nagaraj P.; Hegde, Rajesh N.; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T.

    2009-07-01

    Oxidation of penicillin derivative, ampicillin (AMP) by diperiodatocuprate(III) (DPC) in alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength of 0.01-mol dm -3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction between DPC and ampicillin in alkaline medium exhibits 1:4 stoichiometry (ampicillin:DPC). Intervention of free radicals was observed in the reaction. Based on the observed orders and experimental evidences, a mechanism involving the protonated form of DPC as the reactive oxidant species has been proposed. The oxidation reaction in alkaline medium has been shown to proceed via a DPC-AMP complex, which decomposes slowly in a rate determining step to yield phenyl glycine (PG) and free radical species of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), followed by other fast steps to give the products. The two major products were characterized by IR, NMR, LC-MS and Spot test. The reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanism were calculated. The activation parameters with respect to slow step of the mechanism were computed and discussed and thermodynamic quantities were also determined.

  20. Automatic recognition of complex magnetic regions on the Sun in GONG magnetogram images and prediction of flares: Techniques for the flare warning program Flarecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, Graham A.; Lobzin, Vasili V.; Wilkinson, Phil J.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.

    2011-11-01

    In the present paper, Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) solar magnetograms are used to automatically identify active regions by thresholding the line-of-sight component of the solar magnetic field. The flare potential of the regions is predicted by locating strong-gradient polarity inversion lines (SPILs) and estimating their parameters. The parameters of interest are the length of the SPIL, a proxy for its curvature; the maximum west-east and south-north gradients of the magnetic field in its vicinity; and a sum of the magnetic field gradients, the summation being performed along the SPIL. Analysis for thresholding of one, two, and three parameters and the corresponding probabilities for correct prediction of flares are presented and compared. The probability for correct prediction of X-ray flares of class C or greater in a 24 h window exceeds 88%, while the probability of false alarms is less than 10% if the decision rule involves thresholding of three specific parameters. These parameters are the steepest south-north gradient of the magnetic field, the maximum curvature of the SPILs, and the length of the longest SPIL, all being calculated for the entire region rather than for a particular SPIL. The steepest south-north gradient of the magnetic field is also used to estimate the probabilities for a flare to belong to classes C, M, or X. These techniques are now implemented in the flare warning program Flarecast. The first automatically predicted M- and X-class flares are presented, and Flarecast is found to predict well the observed X-ray flares.

  1. Dismantling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, E.

    1998-03-13

    Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule.

  2. Stapedectomy technique.

    PubMed

    House, J W

    1993-06-01

    This article reviews the evolution of the author's stapedectomy technique from total footplate removal with single loop wire prosthesis and Gelfoam seal to small fenestra stapedectomy with platinum ribbon piston prosthesis and blood seal. The author concludes that the microdrill is effective, safe, and cost effective for performing this procedure. Since using this technique, the author has had no cases of sensorineural hearing loss and few complaints of dizziness or vertigo. PMID:8341570

  3. Spatial Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabeur, Nafaa; Sahli, Nabil

    The environment, including the Earth and the immense space, is recognized to be the main source of useful information for human beings. During several decades, the acquisition of data from this environment was constrained by tools and techniques with limited capabilities. However, thanks to continuous technological advances,spatial data are available in huge quantities for different applications. The technological advances have been achieved in terms of hardware and software as well. They are allowing for better accuracy and availability, which in turn improves the quality and quantity of useful knowledge that can be extracted from the environment. They have been applied to geography, resulting in geospatial techniques. Applied to both science and technology, geospatial techniques resulted in areas of expertise, such as land surveying, cartography, navigation, remote sensing, Geographic Infor-mation Systems (GISs), and Global Positioning Systems (GPSs). They had evolved quickly with advances in computing, satellite technology and a growing demand to understand our global environment. In this chapter, we will discuss three important techniques that are widely used in spatial data acquisition and analysis: GPS and remote sensing techniques that are used to collect spatial data and a GIS that is used to store, manipulate, analyze, and visualize spatial data. Later in this book, we will discuss the techniques that are currently available for spatial knowledge discovery.

  4. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlatescu, Ioana; Virag, Vasile; Avram, Calin N.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  5. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlatescu, Ioana Avram, Calin N.; Virag, Vasile

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  6. Tracer Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, H.; Motomura, S.; Kamino, S.; Enomoto, S.

    In radioactive tracer technique, radioactive nuclides are used to follow the behavior of elements or chemical species in chemical and other processes. This is realized by means of radioactivity measurement. In 1913, Hevesy and Paneth succeeded in determining the extremely low solubility of lead salts by using naturally occurring 210Pb as a radioactive tracer. As various radioactive nuclides became artificially available, this technique has been widely employed in studies of chemical equilibrium and reactions as well as in chemical analysis. It is also an essential technique in biochemical, biological, medical, geological, and environmental studies. Medical diagnosis and industrial process control are the fields of its most important practical application. In this chapter, fundamental ideas concerning radioactive tracers will be described followed by their application with typical examples. Detailed description on their application to life sciences and medicine is given in Vol. 4.

  7. Miscellaneous Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Shyam N.

    Nondestructive way of determining the food quality is the need of the hour. Till now major methods such as colour measurements and their modeling; machine vision systems; X-ray, CT and MRI; NIR spectroscopy; electronic nose and tongue; and ultrasonic technology have been discussed in detail. These techniques, in general, are considered to be sophisticated and costly, and therefore probably are not being adopted as fast as it should be. I am however of the reverse opinion. While going through these techniques, it has been seen that majority of quality parameters have been measured and correlated with the signals obtained using different equipment.

  8. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David V.; Baranwal, Rita

    2009-12-08

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  9. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  10. Spare Roof Technique: A Middle Third New Technique.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Miguel Gonçalves; Monteiro, Daniel; Reis, Claudia; Almeida e Sousa, Cecilia

    2016-02-01

    To our knowledge, the spare roof technique (SRT) is the first technique that is based on a complete skeletonization/preservation of the upper lateral cartilages. This technique is used to keep the natural roof of the nose's middle third, while dehumping and/or correcting the crooked septum. From January 2014 till March 2015, a total of 40 rhinoplasties were performed through the SRT: 28 reduction rhinoplasties, 6 complex crooked noses (with extracorporeal septoplasty), and 6 mixed cases. The SRT is an excellent middle third technique. The natural roof was kept and fitted the accurate new position in almost all cases with no surgical complexity. It is an easy technique with many applications and it is also very useful in the classical humpectomy of the Caucasian nose and correction of the crooked nose. PMID:26862972

  11. Titration Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Jerrold J.; Houston Jetzer, Kelly; Patani, Néha; Zimmerman, John; Zweerink, Gerald

    1995-07-01

    Significant attention is paid to the proper technique for reading a meniscus. Video shows meniscus-viewing techniques for colorless and dark liquids and the consequences of not reading a meniscus at eye level. Lessons are provided on approaching the end point, focusing on end point colors produced via different commonly used indicators. The concept of a titration curve is illustrated by means of a pH meter. Carefully recorded images of the entire range of meniscus values in a buret, pipet, and graduated cylinder are included so that you can show your students, in lecture or pre-lab discussion, any meniscus and discuss how to read the buret properly. These buret meniscus values are very carefully recorded at the rate of one video frame per hundredth of a milliliter, so that an image showing any given meniscus value can be obtained. These images can be easily incorporated into a computer-based multimedia environment for testing or meniscus-reading exercises. Two of the authors have used this technique and found the exercise to be very well received by their students. Video on side two shows nearly 100 "bloopers", demonstrating both the right way and wrong ways to do tasks associated with titration. This material can be used in a variety of situations: to show students the correct way to do something; to test students by asking them "What is this person doing wrong?"; or to develop multimedia, computer-based lessons. The contents of Titration Techniques are listed below: Side 1 Titration: what it is. A simple titration; Acid-base titration animation; A brief redox titration; Redox titration animation; A complete acid-base titration. Titration techniques. Hand technique variations; Stopcock; Using a buret to measure liquid volumes; Wait before reading meniscus; Dirty and clean burets; Read meniscus at eye level (see Fig. 1); Meniscus viewing techniques--light colored liquids; Meniscus viewing techniques--dark liquids; Using a magnetic stirrer; Rough titration

  12. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  13. [Tracheostomy techniques].

    PubMed

    Mieth, M; Schellhaaß, A; Hüttner, F J; Larmann, J; Weigand, M A; Büchler, M W

    2016-01-01

    Due to the comprehensive establishment of modern techniques, tracheostomy has become a routine procedure in intensive care units (ICU). The negative effects of prolonged translaryngeal intubation on the laryngeal and tracheal mucosa up to tracheal stenosis can be reduced by tracheostomy. Furthermore, long-term ventilation is facilitated; however, there is no clear evidence on the optimal timing of tracheostomy in critically ill patients. The specific indications and contraindications of surgical as well as percutaneous tracheostomy must be strictly observed for a safe and successful intervention. Exchanging the tracheostomy tube may lead to potentially dangerous situations especially after percutaneous tracheostomy. A standardized and structured approach is therefore recommended. PMID:26643155

  14. Separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Duke, T

    1998-10-01

    The past two years have seen continued development of capillary electrophoresis methods. The separation performance of flowable sieving media now equals, and in some respects exceeds, that provided by gels. The application of microfabrication techniques to separation science is gaining pace. There is a continuing trend towards miniaturization and integration of separation with preparative or analytical steps. Innovative separation methods based on microfabrication technology include electrophoresis in purpose-designed molecular sieves, dielectric, trapping using microelectrodes, and force-free motion in Brownian ratchets. PMID:9818184

  15. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  16. Recent developments in complex scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1980-12-15

    Some recent developments in the use of complex basis function techniques to study resonance as well as certain types of non-resonant, scattering phenomena are discussed. Complex scaling techniques and other closely related methods have continued to attract the attention of computational physicists and chemists and have now reached a point of development where meaningful calculations on many-electron atoms and molecules are beginning to appear feasible.

  17. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  18. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  19. Orthogonally functionalized nanoscale micelles for active targeted codelivery of methotrexate and mitomycin C with synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Wu, Hongjie; Chang, Ying; Yuan, Conghui; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shuang; Hou, Zhenqing; Dai, Lizong

    2015-03-01

    The design of nanoscale drug delivery systems for the targeted codelivery of multiple therapeutic drugs still remains a formidable challenge (ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9558-9570; ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9518-9525). In this article, both mitomycin C (MMC) and methotrexate (MTX) loaded DSPE-PEG micelles (MTX-M-MMC) were prepared by self-assembly using the dialysis technique, in which MMC-soybean phosphatidylcholine complex (drug-phospholipid complex) was encapsulated within MTX-functionalized DSPE-PEG micelles. MTX-M-MMC could coordinate an early phase active targeting effect with a late-phase synergistic anticancer effect and enable a multiple-responsive controlled release of both drugs (MMC was released in a pH-dependent pattern, while MTX was released in a protease-dependent pattern). Furthermore, MTX-M-MMC could codeliver both drugs to significantly enhance the cellular uptake, intracellular delivery, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis in vitro and improve the tumor accumulation and penetration and anticancer effect in vivo compared with either both free drugs treatment or individual free drug treatment. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the systemically administrated, orthogonally functionalized, and self-assisted nanoscale micelles for targeted combination cancer chemotherapy. The highly convergent therapeutic strategy opened the door to more simplified, efficient, and flexible nanoscale drug delivery systems. PMID:25625539

  20. Planning Complex Projects Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henke, Andrea L.; Stottler, Richard H.; Maher, Timothy P.

    1995-01-01

    Automated Manifest Planner (AMP) computer program applies combination of artificial-intelligence techniques to assist both expert and novice planners, reducing planning time by orders of magnitude. Gives planners flexibility to modify plans and constraints easily, without need for programming expertise. Developed specifically for planning space shuttle missions 5 to 10 years ahead, with modifications, applicable in general to planning other complex projects requiring scheduling of activities depending on other activities and/or timely allocation of resources. Adaptable to variety of complex scheduling problems in manufacturing, transportation, business, architecture, and construction.

  1. New techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisacane, V. L.

    1983-04-01

    Equipment, operations, calibration, and accuracy of existing positioning, geodetic, and gravimetric equipment are explored. Radio navigation and positioning systems now include OMEGA, LORAN, VOR, DME, TACAN, and LONAR. Dedicated positioning satellites comprise the Transit and Navstar systems, with positioning accuracies of 8 m available with the GPS. Missile tracking, particularly for submarine launched rockets, is accomplished with the Satrack satellite, which furnishes position and velocity accuracy to within 40 ft and 0.08 ft/sec, respectively. VLBI techniques permit sighting of astronomical objects to obtain 20 cm accuracy for pole positioning and 1 m/sec for earth rotation speeds. Methods have been devised to use portable equipment which compensates for refraction when using lasers and masers in ranging trials. NASA has established a fixed and mobile global laser tracking network to provide a ranging accuracy of 100 cm when employed with satellite and lunar reflectors. Lasers are also used for terrain contouring, aircraft ranging, and satellite altimetry. A free-fall gravimeter has been developed which involves dropping one reflector of a two-beam Michelson interferometer, yielding an accuracy of 10 microgal. It is noted that new standards are needed for the NASA Deep Space Network.

  2. Carney Complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening guidelines may change over time as new technologies are developed and more is learned about Carney complex. It is important to talk with your doctor about appropriate screening tests. Learn more about what to expect when having ...

  3. Complex networks: Patterns of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The Turing mechanism provides a paradigm for the spontaneous generation of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems. A framework that describes Turing-pattern formation in the context of complex networks should provide a new basis for studying the phenomenon.

  4. Recent development in chromatographic techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromatographic techniques play a significant role in the determination of analytes in complex matrices, separating individual sample components prior to their detection. In the analysis of contaminants and chemical residues in foods, gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) are two m...

  5. EEG data compression techniques.

    PubMed

    Antoniol, G; Tonella, P

    1997-02-01

    In this paper, electroencephalograph (EEG) and Holter EEG data compression techniques which allow perfect reconstruction of the recorded waveform from the compressed one are presented and discussed. Data compression permits one to achieve significant reduction in the space required to store signals and in transmission time. The Huffman coding technique in conjunction with derivative computation reaches high compression ratios (on average 49% on Holter and 58% on EEG signals) with low computational complexity. By exploiting this result a simple and fast encoder/decoder scheme capable of real-time performance on a PC was implemented. This simple technique is compared with other predictive transformations, vector quantization, discrete cosine transform (DCT), and repetition count compression methods. Finally, it is shown that the adoption of a collapsed Huffman tree for the encoding/decoding operations allows one to choose the maximum codeword length without significantly affecting the compression ratio. Therefore, low cost commercial microcontrollers and storage devices can be effectively used to store long Holter EEG's in a compressed format. PMID:9214790

  6. Variable Complexity Optimization of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    2002-01-01

    The use of several levels of modeling in design has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. The work under the grant focused on developing variable complexity modeling strategies with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization, and design against uncertainty using response surface techniques.

  7. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  8. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and every 9 days views the entire globe ...

  9. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  10. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science – which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour – is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  11. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils. PMID:24997950

  12. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  13. Synthesis and x-ray structural characterization of binuclear iridium(I) and rhodium(I) hydroxypyridinate complexes. 1. Complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectra by two-dimensional and NOE techniques. The nature of inside and outside /sup 1/H chemical shift differences

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, G.S.; Mann, K.R.

    1988-09-21

    Six new d/sup 8/-d/sup 8/ complexes, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-chp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-2hq))/sub 2/, (Rh(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, and (Rh(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (hp = 2-hydroxyphridinate, mhp = 6-methyl-2-hydroxypyridinate, chp = 6-chloro-2-hydroxypyridinate, 2hq = 2-hydroxyquinolate, COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), were synthesized and characterized by /sup 1/H NMR, /sup 13/C NMR, and IR spectroscopy and FAB mass spectrometry. X-ray crystallographic analyses of the isostructural (M(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (M = Ir and Rh) complexes confirmed the binuclear nature of the complexes. The complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/ (and by analogy, the spectra of the other five complexes) was carried out with selective decoupling, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), and two-dimensional NMR techniques. The NOE observed between hp proton H5 and COD proton H15 allowed the precise assignment of all 12 COD resonances. Olefinic proton H12 (trans to N and outside) resonates downfield of olefinic proton H11 (trans to N and inside). Olefininc proton H15 (trans to O and outside) resonates upfield of olefinic proton H16 (trans to O and inside). The endo methylene protons resonate upfield of the exo methylene protons. The inside/outside chemical shift differences observed for these compounds are ascribed to steric and magnetic anisotropy effects. The crystallographic data are presented. The molecular structure of the complexes is discussed in detail. 39 references, 5 figures, 9 tables.

  14. A comparison of culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques used to characterize bacterial communities on healthy and white plague-diseased corals of the Montastraea annularis species complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, G. M.; Rothenberger, J. P.; Sikaroodi, M.; Gillevet, P. M.; Peters, E. C.; Jonas, R. B.

    2013-06-01

    Diseases of hermatypic corals pose a global threat to coral reefs, and investigations of bacterial communities associated with healthy corals and those exhibiting signs of disease are necessary for proper diagnosis. One disease, commonly called white plague (WP), is characterized by acute tissue loss. This investigation compared the bacterial communities associated with healthy coral tissue ( N = 15), apparently healthy tissue on WP-diseased colonies ( N = 15), and WP-diseased tissues ( N = 15) from Montastraea annularis (species complex) colonies inhabiting a Bahamian reef. Aliquots of sediment ( N = 15) and water ( N = 15) were also obtained from the proximity of each coral colony sampled. Samples for culture-dependent analyses were inoculated onto one-half strength Marine Agar (½ MA) and Thiosulfate Citrate Bile Salts Sucrose Agar to quantify the culturable communities. Length heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR) of the 16S rRNA gene characterized the bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTU) associated with lesions on corals exhibiting signs of a white plague-like disease as well as apparently healthy tissue from diseased and non-diseased conspecifics. Analysis of Similarity was conducted on the LH-PCR fingerprints, which indicated no significant difference in the composition of bacterial communities associated with apparently healthy and diseased corals. Comparisons of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons from cultured bacterial colonies (½ MA; N = 21) with all amplicons obtained from the whole coral-associated bacterial community indicated ≥39 % of coral-associated bacterial taxa could be cultured. Amplicons from these bacterial cultures matched amplicons from the whole coral-associated bacterial community that, when combined, accounted for >70 % total bacterial abundance. An OTU with the same amplicon length as Aurantimonas coralicida (313.1 bp), the reported etiological agent of WPII, was detected in relatively low abundance (<0.1 %) on all tissue types. These findings

  15. Drug Screening for Autophagy Inhibitors Based on the Dissociation of Beclin1-Bcl2 Complex Using BiFC Technique and Mechanism of Eugenol on Anti-Influenza A Virus Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Xiang-Feng; Zeng, Jun; Wan, Qian-Ying; Yang, Jia-Cai; Li, Wei-Zhong; Chen, Xiao-Xuan; Wang, Ge-Fei; Li, Kang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in many human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and virus infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), influenza A virus (IAV) and coxsackievirus B3/B4 (CVB3/B4), so a drug screening model targeting autophagy may be very useful for the therapy of these diseases. In our study, we established a drug screening model based on the inhibition of the dissociation of Beclin1-Bcl2 heterodimer, an important negative regulator of autophagy, using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technique for developing novel autophagy inhibitors and anti-IAV agents. From 86 examples of traditional Chinese medicines, we found Syzygium aromaticum L. had the best activity. We then determined the anti-autophagy and anti-IAV activity of eugenol, the major active compound of Syzygium aromaticum L., and explored its mechanism of action. Eugenol could inhibit autophagy and IAV replication, inhibited the activation of ERK, p38MAPK and IKK/NF-κB signal pathways and antagonized the effects of the activators of these pathways. Eugenol also ameliorated the oxidative stress and inhibited the expressions of autophagic genes. We speculated that the mechanism underlying might be that eugenol inhibited the oxidative stress and the activation of ERK1/2, p38MAPK and IKK/NF-κB pathways, subsequently inhibited the dissociation of Beclin1-Bcl2 heterodimer and autophagy, and finally impaired IAV replication. These results might conversely display the reasonableness of the design of our screening model. In conclusion, we have established a drug screening model for developing novel autophagy inhibitor, and find eugenol as a promising inhibitor for autophagy and IAV infection. PMID:23613775

  16. On-column labeling technique and chiral ligand-exchange CE with zinc(II)-L-arginine complex as a chiral selector for assay of dansylated D,L-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Yang, Gengliang

    2009-08-01

    A novel on-column labeling method of amino acid (AA) enantiomers by using dansyl chloride (Dns-Cl) has been explored combined with chiral ligand-exchange CE (CLE-CE) technique and UV detection. Efficient labeling was achieved by sequential injection of buffer, Dns-Cl, AA enantiomers, Dns-Cl and buffer at 0.2 psi for 10.0, 3.0, 24.0, 3.0, and 10.0 s, respectively. After injection, the sandwich sections were allowed to react at room temperature for 35.0 min. With this procedure, successful on-column labeling and CLE-CE separation of 17 pairs AA enantiomers have been achieved with a buffer of 100.0 mM boric acid, 5.0 mM ammonium acetate, 3.0 mM ZnSO4 and 6.0 mM L-Arg at pH 8.4, giving nine pairs fully enantioresolved with resolution in between 2.0 and 5.1. CLE-CE of some individual and mixed pairs was also demonstrated, much the same as using pre-column labeling. As validated by both artificially prepared solutions and serum samples, this new method was shown to be applicable to the quantitative analysis, with a linear range between 14.0 muM and 3.7 mM, correlation coefficient above 0.99 and recovery in between 90.4% and 111.7%. It was also demonstrated that the migration time-temperature based curve allows for temperature determination in CE by using this new method. PMID:19655328

  17. Coupling of Molecular Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles by High Performance Liquid Chromatography as an Efficient Technique for Sensitive and Selective Trace Determination of 4-Chloro-2-Methylphenoxy Acetic Acid in Complex Matrices

    PubMed Central

    OMIDI, Fariborz; BEHBAHANI, Mohammad; SAMADI, Saadi; SEDIGHI, Alireza; SHAHTAHERI, Seyed Jamaleddin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy acetic acid (MCPA) is one of the most important pesticides which is extensively used to control weeds in arable farmland. Exposure to this compound occurs in general population and persons who occupationally handle it. The aim of this present work was the preparation of MCPA imprinting polymer and its application as a selective sample preparation technique for trace determination of MCPA in biological and environmental samples. Methods In this study, MCPA imprinting polymer was obtained by precipitation polymerization using methacrylic acid (the functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (the cross-linker), 2, 2’-azobisisobutyronitrile (the initiator) and MCPA (the template molecule) in acetonitrile solution. The MIP-NPs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The optimization process was carried out applying batch method. After optimization of the parameters, affecting the adsorption and desorption of analyte, urine and different water samples were used to determine MCPA. Results Imprinted MCPA molecules were removed from the polymeric structure using acetic acid in methanol (20:80 v/v %) as the eluting solvent. Both sorption and desorption process occur within 10 min. The maximum sorbent capacity of the molecular imprinted polymer is 87.4 mg g-1. The relative standard deviation and limit of detection for water samples by introduced selective solid phase extraction were 4.8% and 0.9 μg L-1, and these data for urine samples were 4.5% and 1.60 μg L-1, respectively. Conclusion The developed method was successfully applied to determine MCPA in urine and different water samples. PMID:26060766

  18. Applications of Electromigration Techniques: Electromigration Techniques in Detection of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziubakiewicz, Ewelina; Buszewski, Bogusław

    The detection and identification of microbes is a challenge and an important aspect in many fields of our lives from medicine to bioterrorism defense. However, the analysis of such complex molecules brings a lot of questions mainly about their behavior. Bacteria are biocolloid, whose surface charge originates from the ionization of carboxyl, phosphate, or amino groups and the adsorption of ions from solution. Consequently, the charged cell wall groups determine the spontaneous formation of the electrical double layer. In this chapter application of electromigration techniques for microorganism's identification and separation are described. This approach represents the possibility to apply electromigration techniques in medical diagnosis, detection of food contamination, and sterility testing.

  19. Analytical techniques: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation, containing articles on a number of analytical techniques for quality control engineers and laboratory workers, is presented. Data cover techniques for testing electronic, mechanical, and optical systems, nondestructive testing techniques, and gas analysis techniques.

  20. Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    2006-01-01

    Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

  1. [Carney complex].

    PubMed

    Kacerovská, D; Michal, M; Síma, R; Grossmann, P; Kazakov, D V

    2011-10-01

    Carney complex is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease, with at least two genetic loci including the PRKAR1A gene located on chromosome 17 and the CNC2 locus mapped to chromosome 2. Clinically this syndrome is characterized by multiple myxomas occurring in different anatomic sites, mucocutaneous pigmentary lesions, and a variety of non-endocrine and endocrine tumors, often causing endocrine abnormalities, involving various organs. Knowledge of morphological findings in CNC patients with their typical locations is necessary to raise suspicion of this syndrome by pathologists. Confirmation of the diagnosis allows regular clinical check-ups and early treatment of these patients. PMID:22145222

  2. Techniques for Automated Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Ryan C.

    2014-09-02

    The performance of a particular HPC code depends on a multitude of variables, including compiler selection, optimization flags, OpenMP pool size, file system load, memory usage, MPI configuration, etc. As a result of this complexity, current predictive models have limited applicability, especially at scale. We present a formulation of scientific codes, nodes, and clusters that reduces complex performance analysis to well-known mathematical techniques. Building accurate predictive models and enhancing our understanding of scientific codes at scale is an important step towards exascale computing.

  3. Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Espiard, Stéphanie; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Carney complex is a rare, dominantly inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome, affecting endocrine glands as the adrenal cortex (causing Cushing's syndrome), the pituitary and the thyroid. It is associated with many other nonendocrine tumors, including cardiac myxomas, testicular tumors, melanotic schwannoma, breast myxomatosis, and abnormal pigmentation (lentiginosis) or myxomas of the skin. The gene located on the CNC1 locus was identified 12 years ago as the regulatory subunit 1A (R1A) of the protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) located at 17q22-24. Inactivating heterozygous germline mutations of PRKAR1A are observed in about two thirds of Carney complex patients with some genotype-phenotype correlation useful for follow-up and prognosis. More rarely, mutations of phosphodiesterase genes have been reported in patients presenting mainly with Cushing's syndrome. In vitro and in vivo studies help to understand how R1A inactivation leads to tumorigenesis. PRKAR1A appears to be a relatively weak tumorigenic signal which can cooperate with other signaling pathways and tumor suppressors. PMID:23652670

  4. Compressively sensed complex networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop low dimension parametric (deterministic) models of complex networks, to use compressive sensing (CS) and multiscale analysis to do so and to exploit the structure of complex networks (some are self-similar under coarsening). CS provides a new way of sampling and reconstructing networks. The approach is based on multiresolution decomposition of the adjacency matrix and its efficient sampling. It requires preprocessing of the adjacency matrix to make it 'blocky' which is the biggest (combinatorial) algorithm challenge. Current CS reconstruction algorithm makes no use of the structure of a graph, its very general (and so not very efficient/customized). Other model-based CS techniques exist, but not yet adapted to networks. Obvious starting point for future work is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction.

  5. NDT for Complex Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Non-destructive testing of structures composed of various types of materials is performed using a variety of methods. Most commonly, electromagnetic and acoustic methods are used to perform this task. Advances in computer software and electro-mechanical hardware have resulted in semi-automated systems for performing simple low-cost in-situ concrete testing. These systems are designed to be operated by anyone who can read a manual and push the right buttons. Although useful in many circumstances, we ask: "What happens when concrete structures are not simple and are too complex to be analyzed by these semi-automated systems and, most importantly, by minimally trained operators?" Many infrastructure projects are boldly pushing the limit of traditional engineering design. As structures become more complex, the methods and techniques used to evaluate these structures must also evolve. A first step towards adapting geophysical methods to evaluate complex structures is to develop pre-investigation conceptual models of possible responses that structures will have to available geophysical methods. This approach is important for designing the geometry and data acquisition parameters necessary for achieving the desired results. Examples of case by case assessments of the application of GPR to concrete investigations are examined. These include complex concrete wall structures, soil tunnel structures, and airport runways. HGI's adaption of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic methods for assessing the substrate of a heavily reinforced concrete structure up to seven feet thick is reviewed. A range of GPR antenna frequencies were used to image the concrete and the underlying material. Time and frequency domain GPR analyses where used in the assessment. A multi-channel seismic survey using a roll-along data collection technique was used to assess the resonant frequency of the concrete structure, the nature of the underlying medium, and behavior of the structural system.

  6. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  7. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  8. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-01-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  9. A Survey of Shape Parameterization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of shape parameterization techniques for multidisciplinary optimization and highlights some emerging ideas. The survey focuses on the suitability of available techniques for complex configurations, with suitability criteria based on the efficiency, effectiveness, ease of implementation, and availability of analytical sensitivities for geometry and grids. The paper also contains a section on field grid regeneration, grid deformation, and sensitivity analysis techniques.

  10. Data mining and visualization techniques

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Pak Chung; Whitney, Paul; Thomas, Jim

    2004-03-23

    Disclosed are association rule identification and visualization methods, systems, and apparatus. An association rule in data mining is an implication of the form X.fwdarw.Y where X is a set of antecedent items and Y is the consequent item. A unique visualization technique that provides multiple antecedent, consequent, confidence, and support information is disclosed to facilitate better presentation of large quantities of complex association rules.

  11. Mass spectrometry of large complexes.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is becoming a more and more powerful tool for investigating protein complexes. Recent developments, based on different ionization techniques, electrospray, desorption/ionization and others are contributing to the usefulness of MS to describe the organization and structure of large non-covalent assemblies. PMID:19782560

  12. Tri-soft shell technique.

    PubMed

    Arshinoff, Steve A; Norman, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Soft-shell techniques exist for lower viscosity dispersive with higher viscosity cohesive ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVDs) (soft-shell technique [SST]), viscoadaptive OVDs with balanced salt solution (ultimate soft-shell technique), intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome (soft-shell bridge), and many specific modifications for disinserted zonular fibers, frayed iris strands, Fuchs endothelial dystrophy, small holes in the posterior capsule with protruding vitreous, capsular dye use, and others. Soft-shell techniques exist because it is rheologically impossible to control the surgical environment with a single OVD as well as with an ordered combination of rheologically different OVDs. Surgeons frequently confuse these techniques because of their multitude. This paper unifies all SSTs into a single improved tri-soft shell technique (TSST), from which basic specific applications to unusual circumstances are simple and intuitive. As shown with previous SSTs, the TSST allows surgeons to perform complex tasks with greater surgical facility and to protect endothelial cells better than with single OVDs. PMID:23889867

  13. [Carney complex].

    PubMed

    Losada Grande, Eladio José; Al Kassam Martínez, Daniel; González Boillos, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and cutaneous myxoma, and endocrine overactivity. Skin pigmentation includes lentigines and blue nevi. Myxomas may occur in breast, skin and heart. Cardiac myxomas may be multiple and occur in any cardiac chamber, and are more prone to recurrence. The most common endocrine gland manifestation is an ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PPNAD may occur isolated, with no other signs of CNC. Pituitary and thyroid glands and gonads are also involved. The PRKAR1A gene, located in 17 q22-24, encodes type 1A regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. Inactivating germline mutations of this gene are found in 70% of patients with CNC. PRKAR1A is a key component of the c-AMP signaling pathway that has been implicated in endocrine tumorigenesis. Many different mutations have been reported in the PRKAR1A gene. In almost all cases the sequence change was predicted to lead to a premature stop codon and the resultant mutant mRNA was subject to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. There is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with CNC. Genetic analysis should be performed in all CNC index cases. All affected patients should be monitored for clinical signs of CNC at least once a year. Genetic diagnosis allows for more effective preparation of more appropriate and effective therapeutic strategies and genetic counseling for patients and gene carriers, and to avoid unnecessary tests to relatives not carrying the gene. PMID:21536508

  14. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  15. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  16. New analytical techniques for mycotoxins in complex organic matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Bicking, M.K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Air samples are collected for analysis from the Ames Solid Waste Recovery System. The high level of airborne fungi within the processing area is of concern due to the possible presence of toxic mycotoxins, and carcinogenic fungal metabolites. An analytical method has been developed to determine the concentration of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in the air of the plant which produces Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF). After extraction with methanol, some components in the matrix are precipitated by dissolving the samples in 30% acetonitrile/chloroform. An aliquot of this solution is injected onto a Styragel column where the sample components undergo simultaneous size exclusion and reverse phase partitioning. The Styragel column appears to have a useable lifetime of more than six months. After elution from Styragel, the sample is diverted to a second column containing Florisil which has been modified with oxalic acid and deactivated with water. Aflatoxins are eluted with 5% water/acetone. After removal of this solvent, the sample is dissolved in 150 ..mu..L of a spotting solvent and the entire sample applied to a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate using a unique sample applicator developed here. The aflatoxins on the TLC plate are analyzed by laser fluorescence. A detection limit of 10 pg is possible for aflatoxin standards using a nitrogen laser as the excitation source. Sample concentrations are determined by comparing with an internal standard, a specially synthesized aflatoxin derivative. In two separate RDF samples, aflatoxin B1 was found at levels of 6.5 and 17.0 ppB. In a separate study, the spore pigment in Aspergillus flavus was isolated. The mass spectrum indicates a molecular weight in excess of 700. Only aliphatic hydrocarbons have been identified in the mass spectrum of products from a permanganate oxidation.

  17. EMC Techniques for a Complex Project: Karoo Array Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, H. C.; van der Merwe, P. S.; Otto, A. J.; Wiid, P. G.; Andriambeloson, J. A.; Langat, P. K.; Kruizinga, B.

    2012-05-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is to be the most sensitive radio astronomy receiver ever constructed. The Karoo Array Telescope (KAT) region, part of an SKA bidding site in South Africa, has been proclaimed a radio quiet zone. This paper describes several contributions our group has made to the strategies used in the management of environmental RFI and self- generated emissions. Additionally, we are interested in the hardening of telescopes against lightning.

  18. TECHNIQUES FOR ANALYZING COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DBPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although chlorine has been used to disinfect drinking water for approximately 100 years, there have been concerns raised over its use, due to the formation of potentially hazardous by-products. Trihalomethanes (THMs) were the first disinfection by-products (DBPs) identified and ...

  19. COMPLEX ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY FOR MONITORING DNAPL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to develop new practical complex resistivity field measurement techniques for pollution characterization and monitoring. For this purpose we will document the detectability of clay-organic interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further un...

  20. Complex posterior urethral injury

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjay B.; Joshi, Pankaj M.; Hunter, Craig; Surana, Sandesh; Shahrour, Walid; Alhajeri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment strategies for seven different scenarios for treating complex pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI), categorised as repeat surgery for PFUI, ischaemic bulbar urethral necrosis (BUN), repair in boys and girls aged ⩽12 years, in patients with a recto-urethral fistula, or bladder neck incontinence, or with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and bladder neck/prostate region. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed the success rates and surgical procedures of these seven complex scenarios in the repair of PFUI at our institution from 2000 to 2013. Results In all, >550 PFUI procedures were performed at our centre, and 308 of these patients were classified as having a complex PFUI, with 225 patients available for follow-up. The overall success rates were 81% and 77% for primary and repeat procedures respectively. The overall success rate of those with BUN was 76%, using various methods of novel surgical techniques. Boys aged ⩽12 years with PFUI required a transpubic/abdominal approach 31% of the time, compared to 9% in adults. Young girls with PFUI also required a transpubic/abdominal urethroplasty, with a success rate of 66%. In patients with a recto-urethral fistula the success rate was 90% with attention to proper surgical principles, including a three-stage procedure and appropriate interposition. The treatment of bladder neck incontinence associated with the tear-drop deformity gave a continence rate of 66%. Children with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and at the bladder neck-prostate junction were all continent after a one-stage transpubic/abdominal procedure. Conclusion An understanding of complex pelvic fractures and their appropriate management can provide successful outcomes. PMID:26019978

  1. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  2. Innovative measurement techniques in surface science.

    PubMed

    Freund, Hans-Joachim; Nilius, Niklas; Risse, Thomas; Schauermann, Swetlana; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-01-17

    We describe four new experimental techniques advanced during the last decade in the authors' laboratory. The techniques include photon scanning tunneling microscopy; aberration-corrected low-energy electron microscopy in combination with photoelectron emission microscopy, microcalorimetry, and electron-spin resonance spectroscopy. It is demonstrated how those techniques may be applied to solve fundamental problems in surface science with growing demands to tackle complex nanoscopic systems, and, in particular in catalysis science, which, without the availability of those techniques, would be difficult if not impossible to address. PMID:21226183

  3. EDITORIAL: Imaging Systems and Techniques Imaging Systems and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George; Yang, Wuqiang; Petrou, M.; Nikita, K. S.; Pastorino, M.; Amanatiadis, A.; Zentai, G.

    2011-10-01

    This special feature on Imaging Systems and Techniques comprises 27 technical papers, covering essential facets in imaging systems and techniques both in theory and applications, from research groups spanning three different continents. It mainly contains peer-reviewed articles from the IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST 2011), held in Thessaloniki, Greece, as well a number of articles relevant to the scope of this issue. The multifaceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment, and the technological revolution; there is an urgent need to address and propose dynamic and innovative solutions to problems that tend to be either complex and static or rapidly evolving with a lot of unknowns. For instance, exploration of the engineering and physical principles of new imaging systems and techniques for medical applications, remote sensing, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, exploration and management of natural resources, and environmental monitoring, are some of the areas that need to be addressed with urgency. Similarly, the development of efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level is another important area of research. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, using high resolution and high selectivity nanoimaging techniques, can play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as well as provide efficient drug-delivery imaging solutions for disease treatment with increased sensitivity and specificity. On the other hand, technical advances in the development of efficient digital imaging systems and techniques and tomographic devices operating on electric impedance tomography, computed tomography, single-photon emission and positron emission tomography detection principles are anticipated to have a significant impact on a

  4. PATTERN RECOGNITION STUDIES OF COMPLEX CHROMATOGRAPHIC DATA SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromatographic fingerprinting of complex biological samples is an active research area with a large and growing literature. Multivariate statistical and pattern recognition techniques can be effective methods for the analysis of such complex data. However, the classification of ...

  5. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  6. Fock spaces for modeling macromolecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Justin

    Large macromolecular complexes play a fundamental role in how cells function. Here I describe a Fock space formalism for mathematically modeling these complexes. Specifically, this formalism allows ensembles of complexes to be defined in terms of elementary molecular ``building blocks'' and ``assembly rules.'' Such definitions avoid the massive redundancy inherent in standard representations, in which all possible complexes are manually enumerated. Methods for systematically computing ensembles of complexes from a list of components and interaction rules are described. I also show how this formalism readily accommodates coarse-graining. Finally, I introduce diagrammatic techniques that greatly facilitate the application of this formalism to both equilibrium and non-equilibrium biochemical systems.

  7. Organization of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, Maksim

    Many large complex systems can be successfully analyzed using the language of graphs and networks. Interactions between the objects in a network are treated as links connecting nodes. This approach to understanding the structure of networks is an important step toward understanding the way corresponding complex systems function. Using the tools of statistical physics, we analyze the structure of networks as they are found in complex systems such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, and numerous industrial and social networks. In the first chapter we apply the concept of self-similarity to the study of transport properties in complex networks. Self-similar or fractal networks, unlike non-fractal networks, exhibit similarity on a range of scales. We find that these fractal networks have transport properties that differ from those of non-fractal networks. In non-fractal networks, transport flows primarily through the hubs. In fractal networks, the self-similar structure requires any transport to also flow through nodes that have only a few connections. We also study, in models and in real networks, the crossover from fractal to non-fractal networks that occurs when a small number of random interactions are added by means of scaling techniques. In the second chapter we use k-core techniques to study dynamic processes in networks. The k-core of a network is the network's largest component that, within itself, exhibits all nodes with at least k connections. We use this k-core analysis to estimate the relative leadership positions of firms in the Life Science (LS) and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sectors of industry. We study the differences in the k-core structure between the LS and the ICT sectors. We find that the lead segment (highest k-core) of the LS sector, unlike that of the ICT sector, is remarkably stable over time: once a particular firm enters the lead segment, it is likely to remain there for many years. In the third chapter we study how

  8. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  9. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  10. Physics of complex and supermolecular fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, S.A.; Clark, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present a collection of papers from the International Symposium on Complex and Supermolecular Fluids presents tutorials and minireviews focusing on the physical properties of complex fluids using the concepts and techniques of condensed matter physics. The book stresses the unifying principles, rather than chemical details, behind the physics of diverse materials. Principal topics include colloids, microemulsions, ferrofluids, and micellar systems. It characterizes supermolecular and complex fluids by exploiting their analogies to atomic systems.

  11. Multi-dimensional tunnelling and complex momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowcock, Peter; Gregory, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    The problem of modeling tunneling phenomena in more than one dimension is examined. It is found that existing techniques are inadequate in a wide class of situations, due to their inability to deal with concurrent classical motion. The generalization of these methods to allow for complex momenta is shown, and improved techniques are demonstrated with a selection of illustrative examples. Possible applications are presented.

  12. A Comparative Study of Landmine Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasban, H.; Zahran, O.; Elaraby, Sayed M.; El-Kordy, M.; Abd El-Samie, F. E.

    2010-09-01

    Several countries suffer from the existence of millions of buried landmines in their territories. These landmines have indefinite life, and may still cause horrific personal injuries and economic dislocation for decades after a war has finished. Therefore, there is a growing demand by these countries for reliable landmine inspection systems. There are several landmine detection techniques that can be used for this purpose. Each technique is suitable for detection under some conditions depending on the type of the landmine case, the explosive material, and the soil. This paper presents an overview of some of the existing landmine detection techniques. These techniques are briefly described and their merits and drawbacks are highlighted and compared. The purpose of this comparison is to shows the ideal conditions and the challenges for each technique. Furthermore, a comparison between landmine detection techniques from the points of view of cost, complexity, speed, safety, false alarm rate and effect of environmental conditions is presented.

  13. EPR techniques for space biodosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.; Hayes, R.; Kenner, G.; Sholom, S.; Chumak, V.

    1996-12-31

    Retrospective dosimetry of tooth enamel has become an increasingly complex and difficult discipline to undertake while still attaining accuracy. The paper provides a review of the major obstacles, advances and pertinent phenomenon associated with low level retrospective dosimetry of human tooth enamel. Also covered is the many sources of error in EPR dosimetry, their potential solutions, as well as the different analysis and scanning techniques in use with their prospective pros and cons. Prospective directions for new approaches, methods, and instruments are also reviewed.

  14. Experimental techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Robert L.

    2008-04-01

    This review discusses experimental techniques that provide an accurate spatial and temporal measurement of the fields used to describe multiphase systems for a wide range of concentrations, velocities, and chemical constituents. Five methods are discussed: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonic pulsed Doppler velocimetry (UPDV), electrical impedance tomography (EIT), x-ray radiography, and neutron radiography. All of the techniques are capable of measuring the distribution of solids in suspensions. The most versatile technique is MRI, which can be used for spatially resolved measurements of concentration, velocity, chemical constituents, and diffusivity. The ability to measure concentration allows for the study of sedimentation and shear-induced migration. One-dimensional and two-dimensional velocity profiles have been measured with suspensions, emulsions, and a range of other complex liquids. Chemical shift MRI can discriminate between different constituents in an emulsion where diffusivity measurements allow the particle size to be determined. UPDV is an alternative technique for velocity measurement. There are some limitations regarding the ability to map complex flow fields as a result of the attenuation of the ultrasonic wave in concentrated systems that have high viscosities or where multiple scattering effects may be present. When combined with measurements of the pressure drop, both MRI and UPDV can provide local values of viscosity in pipe flow. EIT is a low cost means of measuring concentration profiles and has been used to study shear-induced migration in pipe flow. Both x-ray and neutron radiographes are used to image structures in flowing suspensions, but both require highly specialized facilities.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation technique guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1973-01-01

    A total of 70 individual nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are described. Information is presented that permits ease of comparison of the merits and limitations of each technique with respect to various NDE problems. An NDE technique classification system is presented. It is based on the system that was adopted by the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB). The classification system presented follows the NMAB system closely with the exception of additional categories that have been added to cover more advanced techniques presently in use. The rationale of the technique is explained. The format provides for a concise description of each technique, the physical principles involved, objectives of interrogation, example applications, limitations of each technique, a schematic illustration, and key reference material. Cross-index tabulations are also provided so that particular NDE problems can be referred to appropriate techniques.

  16. The radiocarbon hydroxyl technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Malcolm J.; Sheppard, John C.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiocarbon Technique depends upon measuring the rate of oxidation of CO in an essentially unperturbed sample of air. The airborne technique is slightly different. Hydroxyl concentrations can be calculated directly; peroxyl concentrations can be obtained by NO doping.

  17. Seals and Sealing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Developments by the aerospace industry in seals and sealing techniques are announced for possible use in other areas. The announcements presented are grouped as: sealing techniques for cryogenic fluids, high pressure applications, and modification for improved performance.

  18. Coping with Stress: The Effectiveness of Exercise and Other Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Bonnie G.

    1994-01-01

    Examines conceptual issues related to using exercise as a stress-management technique. The paper considers stress a complex process that involves the body and the mind. Coping strategies other than exercise include cognitive, somatic, and behavioral techniques. Research indicates exercise is as effective as other stress-management techniques. (SM)

  19. Optimizing ECM techniques against monopulse acquisition and tracking radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ki Hoon

    1989-09-01

    Electronic countermeasure (ECM) techniques against monopulse radars, which are generally employed in the Surface-to-Air Missile targeting system, are presented and analyzed. Particularly, these ECM techniques are classified into five different categories, which are; denial jamming, deception jamming, passive countermeasures, decoys, and destructive countermeasures. The techniques are fully discussed. It was found difficult to quantize the jamming effectiveness of individual techniques, because ECM techniques are involved with several complex parameters and they are usually entangled together. Therefore, the methodological approach for optimizing ECM techniques is based on purely conceptual analysis of the techniques.

  20. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  1. Computerized measures of visual complexity.

    PubMed

    Machado, Penousal; Romero, Juan; Nadal, Marcos; Santos, Antonino; Correia, João; Carballal, Adrián

    2015-09-01

    Visual complexity influences people's perception of, preference for, and behaviour toward many classes of objects, from artworks to web pages. The ability to predict people's impression of the complexity of different kinds of visual stimuli holds, therefore, great potential for many domains, basic and applied. Here we use edge detection operations and several image metrics based on image compression error and Zipf's law to estimate the visual complexity of images. The experiments involved 800 images, each previously rated by thirty participants on perceived complexity. In a first set of experiments we analysed the correlation of individual features with the average human response, obtaining correlations up to rs = .771. In a second set of experiments we employed Machine Learning techniques to predict the average visual complexity score attributed by humans to each stimuli. The best configurations obtained a correlation of rs = .832. The average prediction error of the Machine Learning system over the set of all stimuli was .096 in a normalized 0 to 1 interval, showing that it is possible to predict, with high accuracy human responses. Overall, edge density and compression error were the strongest predictors of human complexity ratings. PMID:26164647

  2. Conforming Morse-Smale Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, Attila; Gunther, David; Levine, Joshua A.; Tierny, Julien; Pascucci, Valerio

    2014-08-11

    Morse-Smale (MS) complexes have been gaining popularity as a tool for feature-driven data analysis and visualization. However, the quality of their geometric embedding and the sole dependence on the input scalar field data can limit their applicability when expressing application-dependent features. In this paper we introduce a new combinatorial technique to compute an MS complex that conforms to both an input scalar field and an additional, prior segmentation of the domain. The segmentation constrains the MS complex computation guaranteeing that boundaries in the segmentation are captured as separatrices of the MS complex. We demonstrate the utility and versatility of our approach with two applications. First, we use streamline integration to determine numerically computed basins/mountains and use the resulting segmentation as an input to our algorithm. This strategy enables the incorporation of prior flow path knowledge, effectively resulting in an MS complex that is as geometrically accurate as the employed numerical integration. Our second use case is motivated by the observation that often the data itself does not explicitly contain features known to be present by a domain expert. We introduce edit operations for MS complexes so that a user can directly modify their features while maintaining all the advantages of a robust topology-based representation.

  3. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-01

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process. PMID:27070765

  4. Immunoisolation of Protein Complexes from Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Frank L.; Miteva, Yana; Kaltenbrun, Erin; Waldron, Lauren; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    The immunoaffinity isolation of protein complexes is an essential technique for the purification and concentration of protein complexes from cells and tissues. In this chapter we present the methodologies for the purification of proteins and protein complexes from Xenopus laev is and Xenopus tropical is. Specific to this protocol are the techniques for the cryolysis of Xenopus cells and tissues, a procedure that limits contamination from yolk proteins while preserving endogenous protein complexes, the methodologies for immunoaffinity purification of proteins using magnetic beads, and the protocols for western blot analysis. In addition, the procedures in this chapter can be extended to use with proteomic analysis of protein complexes as presented in the following chapter. PMID:22956099

  5. Simulation Techniques in Training College Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    Traditional methods of recruitment and selection in academic administration have not placed an emphasis on formal training or preparation but have relied heavily on informal notions of experiential learning. Simulation as a device for representing complex processes in a manageable form, gaming as an organizing technique for training and…

  6. Radar cross sections of standard and complex shape targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohel, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The theoretical, analytical, and experimental results are described for radar cross sections (RCS) of different-shaped targets. Various techniques for predicting RCS are given, and RCS of finite standard targets are presented. Techniques used to predict the RCS of complex targets are made, and the RCS complex shapes are provided.

  7. Low-Complexity Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery Via Adaptive Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    A low-complexity, adaptive predictive technique for lossless compression of hyperspectral data is presented. The technique relies on the sign algorithm from the repertoire of adaptive filtering. The compression effectiveness obtained with the technique is competitive with that of the best of previously described techniques with similar complexity.

  8. Low-Complexity Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery via Adaptive Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, M.

    2005-01-01

    A low-complexity, adaptive predictive technique for lossless compression of hyperspectral data is presented. The technique relies on the sign algorithm from the repertoire of adaptive filtering. The compression effectiveness obtained with the technique is competitive with that of the best of previously described techniques with similar complexity.

  9. Techniques for Specifying Bug Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D J; Vuduc, R W; Misherghi, G

    2007-04-30

    We present our on-going work to develop techniques for specifying source code signatures of bug patterns. Specifically, we discuss two approaches. The first approach directly analyzes a program in the intermediate representation (IR) of the ROSE compiler infrastructure using ROSE's API. The second analyzes the program using the bddbddb system of Lam, Whaley, et al.. In this approach, we store the IR produced by ROSE as a relational database, express patterns as declarative inference rules on relations in the language Datalog, and bddbddb implements the Datalog programs using binary decision diagram (BDD) techniques. Both approaches readily apply to large-scale applications, since ROSE provides full type analysis, control flow, and other available analysis information. In this paper, we primarily consider bug patterns expressed with respect to the structure of the source code or the control flow, or both. More complex techniques to specify patterns that are functions of data flow properties may be addressed by either of the above approaches, but are not directly treated here. Our Datalog-based work includes explicit support for expressing patterns on the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) in parallel distributed memory programs. We show examples of this on-going work as well.

  10. Computational intelligence techniques in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Hassanien, Aboul Ella; Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah; Ghali, Neveen I

    2013-12-01

    Computational intelligence (CI) is a well-established paradigm with current systems having many of the characteristics of biological computers and capable of performing a variety of tasks that are difficult to do using conventional techniques. It is a methodology involving adaptive mechanisms and/or an ability to learn that facilitate intelligent behavior in complex and changing environments, such that the system is perceived to possess one or more attributes of reason, such as generalization, discovery, association and abstraction. The objective of this article is to present to the CI and bioinformatics research communities some of the state-of-the-art in CI applications to bioinformatics and motivate research in new trend-setting directions. In this article, we present an overview of the CI techniques in bioinformatics. We will show how CI techniques including neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine, deep belief network, fuzzy logic, rough sets, evolutionary algorithms (EA), genetic algorithms (GA), swarm intelligence, artificial immune systems and support vector machines, could be successfully employed to tackle various problems such as gene expression clustering and classification, protein sequence classification, gene selection, DNA fragment assembly, multiple sequence alignment, and protein function prediction and its structure. We discuss some representative methods to provide inspiring examples to illustrate how CI can be utilized to address these problems and how bioinformatics data can be characterized by CI. Challenges to be addressed and future directions of research are also presented and an extensive bibliography is included. PMID:23891719

  11. Surgical forceps techniques.

    PubMed

    Malden, N

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers two new elevator and dental forceps techniques for the atraumatic removal of teeth to avoid a surgical procedure where possible. The techniques described should be applicable in relatively well defined but commonly occurring situations. The two techniques involve the unconventional use of conventional dental extraction forceps, with the aim of facilitating removal of the retained roots of certain teeth: the first for incisors, canines and premolars and the second for lower first molars. The term 'surgical forceps technique's is tentatively put forward as a description of these hybrid procedures. PMID:11819949

  12. EDITORIAL: Imaging systems and techniques Imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George; Nikita, Konstantina; Pastorino, Matteo; Karras, Dimitrios

    2009-10-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on providing the state-of-the-art approaches and solutions to some of the most challenging imaging areas, such as the design, development, evaluation and applications of imaging systems, measuring techniques, image processing algorithms and instrumentation, with an ultimate aim of enhancing the measurement accuracy and image quality. This special issue explores the principles, engineering developments and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, and encourages broad discussion of imaging methodologies, shaping the future and identifying emerging trends. The multi-faceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment and technological evolution. There is an urgent need to address new problems, which tend to be either static but complex, or dynamic, e.g. rapidly evolving with time, with many unknowns, and to propose innovative solutions. For instance, the battles against cancer and terror, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, management of natural resources and environmental monitoring are some of the areas that need to be addressed. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios and demanding design parameters, e.g. speed, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), specificity, contrast, spatial resolution, scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environments, necessitate the development of a multi-functional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, and operation on diverse detection and imaging principles. Efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level present another important research area. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, and using high-resolution, high-selectivity nano-imaging methods, quantum dots, nanoparticles, biomarkers, nanostructures, nanosensors, micro-array imaging chips

  13. Metal complex interactions with DNA.

    PubMed

    Pages, Benjamin J; Ang, Dale L; Wright, Elisé P; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2015-02-28

    Increasing numbers of DNA structures are being revealed using biophysical, spectroscopic and genomic methods. The diversity of transition metal complexes is also growing, as the unique contributions that transition metals bring to the overall structure of metal complexes depend on the various coordination numbers, geometries, physiologically relevant redox potentials, as well as kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics. The vast range of ligands that can be utilised must also be considered. Given this diversity, a variety of biological interactions is not unexpected. Specifically, interactions with negatively-charged DNA can arise due to covalent/coordinate or subtle non-coordinate interactions such as electrostatic attraction, groove binding and intercalation as well as combinations of all of these modes. The potential of metal complexes as therapeutic agents is but one aspect of their utility. Complexes, both new and old, are currently being utilised in conjunction with spectroscopic and biological techniques to probe the interactions of DNA and its many structural forms. Here we present a review of metal complex-DNA interactions in which several binding modes and DNA structural forms are explored. PMID:25427534

  14. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination. PMID:26676036

  15. Techniques for Teachers Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, A., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    Includes a simple technique to demonstrate Millikan's oil drop experiment, an environmental studies experiment to measure dissolved oxygen in water samples, and a technique to demonstrate action-reaction. Science materials described are the Pol-A-Star Tomiscope, Nuffield chemistry film loops, air pucks and pH meters. (JR)

  16. TECHNIQUES FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HASTINGS, GERALDINE; AND OTHERS

    A COMPENDIUM OF WORKABLE AND REASONABLE TECHNIQUES TO PROVIDE TEACHERS WITH ALTERNATIVES IN SELECTING LEARNING EXPERIENCES IS PRESENTED. MATERIALS ARE DESIGNED TO AID TEACHERS AND LEARNERS IN ALL SUBJECT MATTER AREAS. TEACHING TECHNIQUES DESCRIBED ARE (1) THE CASE STUDY, (2) DISCUSSIONS SUCH AS SYMPOSIUM, COLLOQUIUM, BUZZ SESSIONS, AND…

  17. Emerging optical nanoscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Paul C; Leong-Hoi, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    To face the challenges of modern health care, new imaging techniques with subcellular resolution or detection over wide fields are required. Far field optical nanoscopy presents many new solutions, providing high resolution or detection at high speed. We present a new classification scheme to help appreciate the growing number of optical nanoscopy techniques. We underline an important distinction between superresolution techniques that provide improved resolving power and nanodetection techniques for characterizing unresolved nanostructures. Some of the emerging techniques within these two categories are highlighted with applications in biophysics and medicine. Recent techniques employing wider angle imaging by digital holography and scattering lens microscopy allow superresolution to be achieved for subcellular and even in vivo, imaging without labeling. Nanodetection techniques are divided into four subcategories using contrast, phase, deconvolution, and nanomarkers. Contrast enhancement is illustrated by means of a polarized light-based technique and with strobed phase-contrast microscopy to reveal nanostructures. Very high sensitivity phase measurement using interference microscopy is shown to provide nanometric surface roughness measurement or to reveal internal nanometric structures. Finally, the use of nanomarkers is illustrated with stochastic fluorescence microscopy for mapping intracellular structures. We also present some of the future perspectives of optical nanoscopy. PMID:26491270

  18. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  19. Emerging Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in selected imaging technologies focused on the cardiovascular system. The techniques covered are: ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), microSPECT, microPET, near infrared imaging, and quantum dots. For each technique, the basic physical principles are explained and recent example applications demonstrated. PMID:16614313

  20. Simulation verification techniques study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonmaker, P. B.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized of the simulation verification techniques study which consisted of two tasks: to develop techniques for simulator hardware checkout and to develop techniques for simulation performance verification (validation). The hardware verification task involved definition of simulation hardware (hardware units and integrated simulator configurations), survey of current hardware self-test techniques, and definition of hardware and software techniques for checkout of simulator subsystems. The performance verification task included definition of simulation performance parameters (and critical performance parameters), definition of methods for establishing standards of performance (sources of reference data or validation), and definition of methods for validating performance. Both major tasks included definition of verification software and assessment of verification data base impact. An annotated bibliography of all documents generated during this study is provided.

  1. Intelligent freeform manufacturing of complex organs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong

    2012-11-01

    Different from the existing tissue engineering strategies, rapid prototyping (RP) techniques aim to automatically produce complex organs directly from computer-aided design freeform models with high resolution and sophistication. Analogous to building a nuclear power plant, cell biology (especially, renewable stem cells), implantable biomaterials, tissue engineering, and single/double/four nozzle RP techniques currently enable researchers in the field to realize a part of the task of complex organ manufacturing. To achieve this multifaceted undertaking, a multi-nozzle rapid prototyping system which can simultaneously integrate an anti-suture vascular system, multiple cell types, and a cocktail of growth factors in a construct should be developed. This article reviews the pros and cons of the existing cell-laden RP techniques for complex organ manufacturing. It is hoped that with the comprehensive multidisciplinary efforts, the implants can virtually replace the functions of a solid internal organ, such as the liver, heart, and kidney. PMID:22888830

  2. Nonisostructural complex oxide heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Franklin J. Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-07-01

    The authors present an overview of the fundamentals and representative examples of the growth of epitaxial complex oxide thin films on structurally dissimilar substrates. The authors will delineate how the details of particular crystal structures and symmetry of different oxide surfaces can be employed for a rational approach to the synthesis of nonisostructural epitaxial heterostructures. The concept of oxygen eutaxy can be widely applied. Materials combinations will be split into three categories, and in all cases the films and substrates occur in different crystal structures: (1) common translational and rotational symmetry between the film and substrate planes; (2) translational symmetry mismatch between the substrates and films that is distinct from a simple mismatch in lattice parameters; and (3) rotational symmetry mismatch. In case (1), in principle single-crystalline thin films can be attained despite the films and substrates possessing different crystal structures. In case (2), antiphase boundaries will be prevalent in the thin films. In case (3), thin-film rotational variants that are joined by tilt boundaries will be present. Diffraction techniques to determine crystallographic alignment and epitaxial variants are discussed, and transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate extended defects in the thin films will also be reviewed. The authors end with open problems in this field regarding the structure of oxide interfaces that can be topics for future research.

  3. Computer memory access technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zottarelli, L. J.

    1967-01-01

    Computer memory access commutator and steering gate configuration produces bipolar current pulses while still employing only the diodes and magnetic cores of the classic commutator, thereby appreciably reducing the complexity of the memory assembly.

  4. EXAFS study of copper thiosemicarbazide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Mishra, S.; Ninama, S.; Pritam, A.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper deals with the synthesis of transition metal Schiff base complexes of copper by chemical root method. The synthesized metal complexes have been studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. The metal ligand bond length have been determined using LSS, Levy's and Lytle's methods. Bond-lengths have also been determined from the Fourier transform of the EXAFS data. Bond lengths determined from these methods are comparable to each other.

  5. Variable Complexity Optimization of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    1999-01-01

    The use of several levels of modeling in design has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. The work under the grant focused on developing variable complexity modeling strategies with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of plates with discontinuities subject to uncertainty in material properties and geometry, design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, and the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization.

  6. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon). PMID:22181304

  7. Detailed fuel spray analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Bosque, M. A.; Humenik, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed fuel spray analyses are a necessary input to the analytical modeling of the complex mixing and combustion processes which occur in advanced combustor systems. It is anticipated that by controlling fuel-air reaction conditions, combustor temperatures can be better controlled, leading to improved combustion system durability. Thus, a research program is underway to demonstrate the capability to measure liquid droplet size, velocity, and number density throughout a fuel spray and to utilize this measurement technique in laboratory benchmark experiments. The research activities from two contracts and one grant are described with results to data. The experiment to characterize fuel sprays is also described. These experiments and data should be useful for application to and validation of turbulent flow modeling to improve the design systems of future advanced technology engines.

  8. Soft Landing of Complex Molecules on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2011-07-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile technique for identification and structural characterization of large molecules. The advent of soft ionization techniques such as electrospray (ESI) (1-2) has enabled ionization of a wide variety of complex molecules without significant \\fragmentation while non-thermal ion sources such as laser vaporization (3-4) and magnetron sputtering (5-6) have provided access to materials that cannot, currently, be produced through conventional techniques. Most mass spectrometry studies rely on ionization of a molecule of interest or a complex mixture followed by mass analysis. Alternatively, mass spectrometry may be used as a preparatory technique, in which mass-selected ions are deposited onto solid supports or into liquid materials (7-18). Preparatory mass spectrometry offers several unique advantages for deposition of complex molecules on substrates including the ability to generate high-purity uniform films (19-20), unprecedented selectivity and specificity of preparation of deposited species (11, 21-22), the ability to focus and pattern an ion beam (23-24), and flexibility in both ion formation (1, 3, 25-26) and mass selection (27-32) processes. This review will highlight applications of mass-selected deposition of complex molecules for selective immobilization of biological molecules and catalytically active complexes on substrates.

  9. Electrical termination techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakey, W. E.; Schleicher, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A technical review of high reliability electrical terminations for electronic equipment was made. Seven techniques were selected from this review for further investigation, experimental work, and preliminary testing. From the preliminary test results, four techniques were selected for final testing and evaluation. These four were: (1) induction soldering, (2) wire wrap, (3) percussive arc welding, and (4) resistance welding. Of these four, induction soldering was selected as the best technique in terms of minimizing operator errors, controlling temperature and time, minimizing joint contamination, and ultimately producing a reliable, uniform, and reusable electrical termination.

  10. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  11. Interpretation Techniques Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    The processes, algorithms and procedures for extraction and interpretation of ERTS-1 data are discussed. Analysis of data acquired temporally is possible through geometric correction, correlation, and registration techniques. The powerful techniques in image enhancement developed for the lunar and planetary programs are valuable for Earth Resources Survey programs. There is evidence that both optical and digital methods of spatial information extraction can provide valuable sources of data information the ERTS system. The techniques available, even for a limited number of bands and limited resolution can be effectively used to extract much of the information required by resource managers.

  12. Classroom Assessment Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2003-12-01

    and the learner should be carefully observed and monitored. Forrest says that Student Portfolios, which document learning in more detail, seldom reveal how teaching contributes to students' progress. Cerbin further indicates that a course portfolio is essentially, a like a manuscript of scholarly work in progress. In this example, it is a work that explains what, how, and why students learn or do not learn in a course. In this paper, the author reports on a dozen techniques that could perhaps be used to document assessment of student learning. References : Cerbin, W. (1993). Fostering a culture of teaching as scholarship. The Teaching Professor, 7(3), 1-2. Edgerton, R., Hutchings, P., & Quinlan, P. (1991). The teaching portfolio: Capturing the scholarship in teaching. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education. Forrest, A. (1990). Time will tell: Portfolio-assisted assessment of general education. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education. Linn, R., Baker, E., & Dunbar, S. (1991). Complex, Performance-based Assessment: Expectations and Validation Criteria. Educational Researcher, 20 (8), 15-21. Narayanan, M. (2003). Assessment in Higher Education: Partnerships in Learning. Paper presented at the 23rd Annual Lilly Conference on College Teaching, Miami University, Oxford, OH. Seldin, P. (1991). The teaching portfolio. Bolton, MA: Anker. Young, C. O., Sr., & Young, L. H. (1999). Assessing Learning in Interactive Courses. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 10 (1), 63-76.

  13. Subdiffractive microscopy: techniques, applications, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Long, Brian R; Robinson, Danielle C; Zhong, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Cellular processes rely on the precise orchestration of signaling and effector molecules in space and time, yet it remains challenging to gain a comprehensive picture of the molecular organization underlying most basic biological functions. This organization often takes place at length scales below the resolving power of conventional microscopy. In recent years, several “superresolution” fluorescence microscopic techniques have emerged that can surpass the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy by a factor of two to twenty. These methods have been used to reveal previously unknown organization of macromolecular complexes and cytoskeletal structures. The resulting high-resolution view of molecular organization and dynamics is already changing our understanding of cellular processes at the systems level. However, current subdiffractive microscopic techniques are not without limitations; challenges remain to be overcome before these techniques achieve their full potential. Here, we introduce three primary types of subdiffractive microscopic techniques, consider their current limitations and challenges, and discuss recent biological applications. PMID:24443323

  14. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  15. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  16. "Techniques for Teachers" Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, A.

    1972-01-01

    A series of short articles describe a method of combined developing/fixing for monochrome film, techniques for thin layer chromatography, experiments with lasers, and safety precautions to be used with lasers in school laboratories. (AL)

  17. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  18. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... fall. There are also many other types of breathing techniques you can learn. In many cases, you do ... These sensors measure your skin temperature, brain waves, ... time, you can learn to change them without using the monitor.

  19. Exemplary Management Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Featured in the third article of the series are management techniques for school insurance record management and for reducing the amount of time school maintenance personnel spend driving from school to school. (Author/MLF)

  20. Renal Tumor Biopsy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xue-Song; Zhou, Li-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review hot issues and future direction of renal tumor biopsy (RTB) technique. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including RTB technique in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on RTB technique in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Computed tomography and ultrasound were usually used for guiding RTB with respective advantages. Core biopsy is more preferred over fine needle aspiration because of superior accuracy. A minimum of two good-quality cores for a single renal tumor is generally accepted. The use of coaxial guide is recommended. For biopsy location, sampling different regions including central and peripheral biopsies are recommended. Conclusion: In spite of some limitations, RTB technique is relatively mature to help optimize the treatment of renal tumors. PMID:27174334

  1. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  2. Imaging an Adapted Dentoalveolar Complex

    PubMed Central

    Herber, Ralf-Peter; Fong, Justine; Lucas, Seth A.; Ho, Sunita P.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of a rat dentoalveolar complex was illustrated using various imaging modalities. Micro-X-ray computed tomography for 3D modeling, combined with complementary techniques, including image processing, scanning electron microscopy, fluorochrome labeling, conventional histology (H&E, TRAP), and immunohistochemistry (RANKL, OPN) elucidated the dynamic nature of bone, the periodontal ligament-space, and cementum in the rat periodontium. Tomography and electron microscopy illustrated structural adaptation of calcified tissues at a higher resolution. Ongoing biomineralization was analyzed using fluorochrome labeling, and by evaluating attenuation profiles using virtual sections from 3D tomographies. Osteoclastic distribution as a function of anatomical location was illustrated by combining histology, immunohistochemistry, and tomography. While tomography and SEM provided past resorption-related events, future adaptive changes were deduced by identifying matrix biomolecules using immunohistochemistry. Thus, a dynamic picture of the dentoalveolar complex in rats was illustrated. PMID:22567314

  3. Apollo Onboard Navigation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews basic navigation concepts, describes coordinate systems and identifies attitude determination techniques including Primary Guidance, Navigation and Control System (PGNCS) IMU management and Command and Service Module Stabilization and Control System/Lunar Module (LM) Abort Guidance System (AGS) attitude management. The presentation also identifies state vector determination techniques, including PGNCS coasting flight navigation, PGNCS powered flight navigation and LM AGS navigation.

  4. Nondestructive testing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Don E.; McBride, Don

    A comprehensive reference covering a broad range of techniques in nondestructive testing is presented. Based on years of extensive research and application at NASA and other government research facilities, the book provides practical guidelines for selecting the appropriate testing methods and equipment. Topics discussed include visual inspection, penetrant and chemical testing, nuclear radiation, sonic and ultrasonic, thermal and microwave, magnetic and electromagnetic techniques, and training and human factors. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  5. Techniques for colorectal anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yik-Hong; Ashour, Mohamed Ahmed Tawfik

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leak remains one of the most feared post-operative complications, particularly after anterior resection of the rectum with, the shift from abdomino-peritoneal resections to total mesorectal excision and primary anastomosis. The literature fails to demonstrate superiority of stapled over hand-sewn techniques in colorectal anastomosis, regardless of the level of anastomosis, although a high stricture rate was noted in the former technique. Thus, improvements in safety aspects of anastomosis and alternatives to hand-sewn and stapled techniques are being sought. Here, we review alternative anastomotic techniques used to fashion bowel anastomosis. Compression anastomosis using compression anastomotic clips, endoluminal compression anastomotic rings, AKA-2, biofragmental anastomotic rings, or Magnamosis all involve the concept of creating a sutureless end-to-end anastomosis by compressing two bowel ends together, leading to a simultaneous necrosis and healing process that joins the two lumens. Staple line reinforcement is a new approach that reduce the drawbacks of staplers used in colorectal practice, i.e. leakage, bleeding, misfiring, and inadequate tissue approximation. Various non-absorbable, semi or fully absorbable materials are now available. Two other techniques can provide alternative anastomotic support to the suture line: a colorectal drain and a polyester stent, which can be utilized in ultra-low rectal excision and can negate the formation of a defunctioning stoma. Doxycycline coated sutures have been used to overcome the post-operative weakness in anastomosis secondary to rapid matrix degradation mediated by matrix metalloproteinase. Another novel technique, the electric welding system, showed promising results in construction of a safe, neat, smooth sutureless bowel anastomosis. Various anastomotic techniques have been shown to be comparable to the standard techniques of suturing and stapling. However, most of these alternatives need

  6. Shear Banding of Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Fardin, Marc A.; Manneville, Sebastien; Lerouge, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Even in simple geometries, many complex fluids display nontrivial flow fields, with regions where shear is concentrated. The possibility for such shear banding has been known for several decades, but in recent years, we have seen an upsurge in studies offering an ever-more precise understanding of the phenomenon. The development of new techniques to probe the flow on multiple scales with increasing spatial and temporal resolution has opened the possibility for a synthesis of the many phenomena that could only have been thought of separately before. In this review, we bring together recent research on shear banding in polymeric and soft glassy materials and highlight their similarities and disparities.

  7. A review of sensitivity analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    Mathematical models are utilized to approximate various highly complex engineering, physical, environmental, social, and economic phenomena. Model parameters exerting the most influence on model results are identified through a {open_quotes}sensitivity analysis.{close_quotes} A comprehensive review is presented of more than a dozen sensitivity analysis methods. The most fundamental of sensitivity techniques utilizes partial differentiation whereas the simplest approach requires varying parameter values one-at-a-time. Correlation analysis is used to determine relationships between independent and dependent variables. Regression analysis provides the most comprehensive sensitivity measure and is commonly utilized to build response surfaces that approximate complex models.

  8. Model building techniques for analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Henry, Ronald C.; Brooks, Sean; Martin, Wilbur D.

    2009-09-01

    The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual model-based environment whereby analysis is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) models using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the product definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid model acts as the design solid model that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. Analysis is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid model (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the analysis solid model (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER modeling techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part model. This document contains recommended modeling techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.

  9. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  10. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  11. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  12. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to grow on ... related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called anthracyclines. ...

  13. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cytarabine lipid complex is used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of the spinal cord and brain). Cytarabine lipid complex is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. ...

  14. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other parts of ... after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications called ...

  15. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  16. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  17. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer of the ... two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called vinca ...

  18. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread ... has worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic ...

  19. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  20. Complex-I-ty in aging

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Devon A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of mitochondrial complex I in aging has been studied in both C. elegans and Drosophila, where RNAi knock down of specific complex I subunits has been shown to extend lifespan. More recently, studies in Drosophila have shown that an increase in mitochondrial activity, including complex I-like activity, can also slow aging. In this review, we discuss this apparent paradox. Improved maintenance of mitochondrial activity, mitochondrial homeostasis, may be responsible for lifespan extension in both cases. Decreased electron transport chain activity caused by reducing complex I subunit expression prompts an increase in stress response signaling that leads to enhanced mitochondrial homeostasis during aging. Increased complex I activity, as well as mitochondrial biogenesis, is expected to both directly counteract the decline in mitochondrial health that occurs during aging and may also increase cellular NAD+ levels, which have been linked to mitochondrial homeostatic mechanisms through activation of sirtuins. We suggest that manipulations that increase or decrease complex I activity both converge on improved mitochondrial homeostasis during aging, resulting in prolonged lifespan. PMID:24961226

  1. Review of Current Crime Prediction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Vikas; Adderley, Richard; Bramer, Max

    Police analysts are requiredto unravel the complexities in data to assist operational personnel in arresting offenders and directing crime prevention strategies. However, the volume of crime that is being committed and the awareness of modern criminals make this a daunting task. The ability to analyse this amount of data with its inherent complexities without. using computational support puts a strain on human resources. This paper examines the current techniques that are used to predict crime and criminality. Over time, these techniques have been refined and have achieved limited success. They are concentrated into three categories: statistical methods, these mainly relate to the journey to crime, age of offending and offending behaviour; techniques using geographical information systems that identify crime hot spots, repeat victimisation, crime attractors and crime generators; a miscellaneous group which includes machine learning techniques to identify patterns in criminal behaviour and studies involving reoffending. The majority of current techniques involve the prediction of either a single offender's criminality or a single crimetype's next offence. These results are of only limited use in practical policing. It is our contention that Knowledge Discovery in Databases should be used on all crime types together with offender data, as a whole, to predict crime and criminality within a small geographical area of a police force.

  2. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  3. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  4. A 3-D chimera grid embedding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, J. A.; Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) chimera grid-embedding technique is described. The technique simplifies the construction of computational grids about complex geometries. The method subdivides the physical domain into regions which can accommodate easily generated grids. Communication among the grids is accomplished by interpolation of the dependent variables at grid boundaries. The procedures for constructing the composite mesh and the associated data structures are described. The method is demonstrated by solution of the Euler equations for the transonic flow about a wing/body, wing/body/tail, and a configuration of three ellipsoidal bodies.

  5. Nonlinear dynamic macromodeling techniques for audio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrodzki, Jan; Bieńkowski, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    This paper develops a modelling method and a models identification technique for the nonlinear dynamic audio systems. Identification is performed by means of a behavioral approach based on a polynomial approximation. This approach makes use of Discrete Fourier Transform and Harmonic Balance Method. A model of an audio system is first created and identified and then it is simulated in real time using an algorithm of low computational complexity. The algorithm consists in real time emulation of the system response rather than in simulation of the system itself. The proposed software is written in Python language using object oriented programming techniques. The code is optimized for a multithreads environment.

  6. A Technique for the Analysis of Auto Exhaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sothern, Ray D.; And Others

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline explains a technique for separating the complex mixture of hydrocarbons contained in automotive exhausts. A Golay column and subambient temperature programming technique are…

  7. IMPROVED TECHNIQUE FOR ESTIMATING MEAN DEPTHS OF LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors describe a technique for determining mean lake depth utilizing a systematically aligned dot grid. This technique is, on the average, 55% faster than the traditional planimeter methods, depending on the type of planimeter and the size and complexity of the lake. No det...

  8. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  9. MEMS metrology techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Erik

    2004-12-01

    The MEMS industry currently produces over $13 billion in annual revenue, with devices in such diverse applications as blood pressure sensors, projection displays, optical switches, printers, hard drives, and gyroscopes. As production techniques improve, ever more functions may be served by MEMS, and the industry is growing at an annual rate of more than 15%. The large diversity of MEMS leads to many challenges in metrology, as each design has different critical factors which will affect its performance. Unlike traditional semiconductor devices, MEMS require characterization both in their static state and under actuation. Parameters of interest include shape, dimensions, surface roughness, sidewall angles, film thickness, residual stress, feature volumes, response times, thermal properties, resonance frequencies, stiction, environmental immunity and more. This talk will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of techniques for MEMS surface metrology. Bright- and dark-field microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, contact and non-contact surface profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laser Doppler vibrometry and digital holography are some of the primary techniques used to evaluate MEMS surfaces and motion. While no single technique can fully characterize all MEMS devices, or even one device under all conditions, the utility of each of the different types of instruments is increasing as they are pushed by MEMS and other industries to provide more characterization capability. With a broad understanding of the various metrology techniques available, the one or few critical instruments to measure a given class of devices will hopefully be more easily understood.

  10. MEMS metrology techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The MEMS industry currently produces over $13 billion in annual revenue, with devices in such diverse applications as blood pressure sensors, projection displays, optical switches, printers, hard drives, and gyroscopes. As production techniques improve, ever more functions may be served by MEMS, and the industry is growing at an annual rate of more than 15%. The large diversity of MEMS leads to many challenges in metrology, as each design has different critical factors which will affect its performance. Unlike traditional semiconductor devices, MEMS require characterization both in their static state and under actuation. Parameters of interest include shape, dimensions, surface roughness, sidewall angles, film thickness, residual stress, feature volumes, response times, thermal properties, resonance frequencies, stiction, environmental immunity and more. This talk will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of techniques for MEMS surface metrology. Bright- and dark-field microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, contact and non-contact surface profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laser Doppler vibrometry and digital holography are some of the primary techniques used to evaluate MEMS surfaces and motion. While no single technique can fully characterize all MEMS devices, or even one device under all conditions, the utility of each of the different types of instruments is increasing as they are pushed by MEMS and other industries to provide more characterization capability. With a broad understanding of the various metrology techniques available, the one or few critical instruments to measure a given class of devices will hopefully be more easily understood.

  11. Techniques of Male Circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Abdulwahab-Ahmed, Abdullahi; Mungadi, Ismaila A.

    2013-01-01

    Male circumcision is a controversial subject in surgical practice. There are, however, clear surgical indications of this procedure. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends newborn male circumcision for its preventive and public health benefits that has been shown to outweigh the risks of newborn male circumcision. Many surgical techniques have been reported. The present review discusses some of these techniques with their merits and drawbacks. This is an attempt to inform the reader on surgical aspects of male circumcision aiding in making appropriate choice of a technique to offer patients. Pubmed search was done with the keywords: Circumcision, technique, complications, and history. Relevant articles on techniques of circumcision were selected for the review. Various methods of circumcision including several devices are in use for male circumcision. These methods can be grouped into three: Shield and clamp, dorsal slit, and excision. The device methods appear favored in the pediatric circumcision while the risk of complications increases with increasing age of the patient at surgery. PMID:24470842

  12. A comparison of tetrahedral mesh improvement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L.A.; Ollivier-Gooch, C.

    1996-12-01

    Automatic mesh generation and adaptive refinement methods for complex three-dimensional domains have proven to be very successful tools for the efficient solution of complex applications problems. These methods can, however, produce poorly shaped elements that cause the numerical solution to be less accurate and more difficult to compute. Fortunately, the shape of the elements can be improved through several mechanisms, including face-swapping techniques that change local connectivity and optimization-based mesh smoothing methods that adjust grid point location. The authors consider several criteria for each of these two methods and compare the quality of several meshes obtained by using different combinations of swapping and smoothing. Computational experiments show that swapping is critical to the improvement of general mesh quality and that optimization-based smoothing is highly effective in eliminating very small and very large angles. The highest quality meshes are obtained by using a combination of swapping and smoothing techniques.

  13. Palladium (II) Hydrazopyrazolone Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Maraghy, Salah B.; Salib, K. A.; Stefan, Shaker L.

    1989-12-01

    Palladium (II) complexes with 1-pheny1-3-methy1-4-(arylhydrazo)-5- pyrazolone dyes were studied spectrophotometrically. Pd (II) forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with the ligands by the replacement of their phenolic and hydrazo protons. The ligands behave as tridentate in the 1:1 complex and as bidentate in the 1:2 complex. The sability constants of these complexes are dependent on the type of substituents in the benzene ring of the arylazo moiety.

  14. Retinoblastoma-comparative analysis of external radiotherapy techniques, including an IMRT technique

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, Marcio Lemberg . E-mail: mreisner@uol.com.br; Viegas, Celia Maria Pais; Grazziotin, Rachele Zanchet; Santos Batista, Delano Valdivino; Carneiro, Tulio Meneses; Mendonca de Araujo, Carlos Manoel; Marchiori, Edson

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the numerous external radiotherapy (RT) techniques for the treatment of retinoblastoma, as well as an intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) technique. The latter was elaborated to evaluate the potential dose reduction in the surrounding tissue, as well as the potential avoidance of subdosage in the ora serrata retinae. Methods and Materials: A 2-year-old patient with unilateral retinoblastoma underwent CT. With the aid of an ophthalmologist, the ocular structures were delimited, and 13 techniques described in published reports were reproduced on three-dimensional planning software and identified according to their authors. A technique with four noncoplanar fields using IMRT was also elaborated. These techniques were compared according to the dose to the ora serrata retinae, lens, orbit (volume that received a dose of {>=}20 Gy), vitreous, optic nerve, lacrimal gland (volume that received a dose of {>=}34 Gy), and cornea and according to their ease of reproducibility. Results: The techniques that attained the therapeutic dose to the ora serrata retinae were the IMRT technique and the techniques of Haye, Cassady, Cormack, and al-Beteri. The Cormack technique had the lowest volume that received a dose of {>=}20 Gy in the orbit, followed by the IMRT technique. The IMRT technique also achieved the lowest volume that received a dose of {>=}34 Gy (14%) in the lacrimal gland. The Abramson/McCormick/Blach, Cassady, Reese, and Schipper techniques were the easiest to reproduce and the Chin the most complex. Conclusion: Retinoblastoma treatment with IMRT has an advantage over the other techniques, because it allows for the greatest reduction of dose to the orbit and lacrimal gland, while maintaining the therapeutic dose to the ora serrata retinae and vitreous.

  15. Fritting techniques in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Won Jo

    2014-03-01

    It is surprising that there has been no devoted review article for frits and relevant studies so far despite the long history of packed columns and the use of frits in them. This review was activated for such a reason. Both separate frits and in situ permanent frits have been covered since the appearance of primitive frits. The in situ fritting methods such as the formation of organic monoliths, sol-gel technology, sintering, fritless techniques such as tapered tip and capillary restrictors, and miscellaneous fritting techniques including magnetically trapped frits and single particle frits are introduced and discussed. In addition, frit-related studies and patents are also introduced. Finally, some conclusive comments on the choice of fritting technique in different situations and future perspectives are given. PMID:24510688

  16. Novel Foraminal Expansion Technique

    PubMed Central

    Senturk, Salim; Ciplak, Mert; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Sasani, Mehdi; Egemen, Emrah; Yaman, Onur; Suzer, Tuncer

    2016-01-01

    The technique we describe was developed for cervical foraminal stenosis for cases in which a keyhole foraminotomy would not be effective. Many cervical stenosis cases are so severe that keyhole foraminotomy is not successful. However, the technique outlined in this study provides adequate enlargement of an entire cervical foraminal diameter. This study reports on a novel foraminal expansion technique. Linear drilling was performed in the middle of the facet joint. A small bone graft was placed between the divided lateral masses after distraction. A lateral mass stabilization was performed with screws and rods following the expansion procedure. A cervical foramen was linearly drilled medially to laterally, then expanded with small bone grafts, and a lateral mass instrumentation was added with surgery. The patient was well after the surgery. The novel foraminal expansion is an effective surgical method for severe foraminal stenosis. PMID:27559460

  17. Novel Foraminal Expansion Technique.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ali Fahir; Senturk, Salim; Ciplak, Mert; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Sasani, Mehdi; Egemen, Emrah; Yaman, Onur; Suzer, Tuncer

    2016-08-01

    The technique we describe was developed for cervical foraminal stenosis for cases in which a keyhole foraminotomy would not be effective. Many cervical stenosis cases are so severe that keyhole foraminotomy is not successful. However, the technique outlined in this study provides adequate enlargement of an entire cervical foraminal diameter. This study reports on a novel foraminal expansion technique. Linear drilling was performed in the middle of the facet joint. A small bone graft was placed between the divided lateral masses after distraction. A lateral mass stabilization was performed with screws and rods following the expansion procedure. A cervical foramen was linearly drilled medially to laterally, then expanded with small bone grafts, and a lateral mass instrumentation was added with surgery. The patient was well after the surgery. The novel foraminal expansion is an effective surgical method for severe foraminal stenosis. PMID:27559460

  18. Digital vibration control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P.; Kim, B. K.; Boctor, W.

    1974-01-01

    Analog vibration control techniques are reviewed and are compared with digital techniques. The advantages of the digital methods over the analog methods are demonstrated. The following topics are covered: (1) methods of computer-controlled random vibration and reverberation acoustic testing; (2) methods of computer-controlled sinewave vibration testing; and (3) methods of computer-controlled shock testing. Basic concepts are stressed rather than specific techniques or equipment. General algorithms are described in the form of block diagrams and flow diagrams. Specific problems and potential problems are discussed. The material is computer sciences oriented but is kept at a level that facilitates an understanding of the basic concepts of computer-controlled induced environmental test systems.

  19. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent radar technique is reviewed with special emphasis to mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars operating in the VHF band. Some basic introduction to Doppler radar measurements and the radar equation is followed by an outline of the characteristics of atmospheric turbulence, viewed from the scattering and reflection processes of radar signals. Radar signal acquisition and preprocessing, namely coherent detection, digital sampling, pre-integration and coding, is briefly discussed. The data analysis is represented in terms of the correlation and spectrum analysis, yielding the essential parameters: power, signal-to-noise ratio, average and fluctuating velocity and persistency. The techniques to measure wind velocities, viz. the different modes of the Doppler method as well as the space antenna method are surveyed and the feasibilities of the MST radar interferometer technique are elucidated. A general view on the criteria to design phased array antennas is given. An outline of the hardware of a typical MST radar system is presented.

  20. Neuronavigation. Principles. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Marcel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Neuronavigation and stereotaxy are techniques designed to help neurosurgeons precisely localize different intracerebral pathological processes by using a set of preoperative images (CT, MRI, fMRI, PET, SPECT etc.). The development of computer assisted surgery was possible only after a significant technological progress, especially in the area of informatics and imagistics. The main indications of neuronavigation are represented by the targeting of small and deep intracerebral lesions and choosing the best way to treat them, in order to preserve the neurological function. Stereotaxis also allows lesioning or stimulation of basal ganglia for the treatment of movement disorders. These techniques can bring an important amount of confort both to the patient and to the neurosurgeon. Neuronavigation was introduced in Romania around 2003, in four neurosurgical centers. We present our five-years experience in neuronavigation and describe the main principles and surgical techniques. PMID:20108488

  1. Heuristic dynamic complexity coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škorupa, Jozef; Slowack, Jürgen; Mys, Stefaan; Lambert, Peter; Van de Walle, Rik

    2008-04-01

    Distributed video coding is a new video coding paradigm that shifts the computational intensive motion estimation from encoder to decoder. This results in a lightweight encoder and a complex decoder, as opposed to the predictive video coding scheme (e.g., MPEG-X and H.26X) with a complex encoder and a lightweight decoder. Both schemas, however, do not have the ability to adapt to varying complexity constraints imposed by encoder and decoder, which is an essential ability for applications targeting a wide range of devices with different complexity constraints or applications with temporary variable complexity constraints. Moreover, the effect of complexity adaptation on the overall compression performance is of great importance and has not yet been investigated. To address this need, we have developed a video coding system with the possibility to adapt itself to complexity constraints by dynamically sharing the motion estimation computations between both components. On this system we have studied the effect of the complexity distribution on the compression performance. This paper describes how motion estimation can be shared using heuristic dynamic complexity and how distribution of complexity affects the overall compression performance of the system. The results show that the complexity can indeed be shared between encoder and decoder in an efficient way at acceptable rate-distortion performance.

  2. Stochastic Feedforward Control Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1990-01-01

    Class of commanded trajectories modeled as stochastic process. Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research and development program conducted by NASA Langley Research Center aimed at developing capabilities for increases in capacities of airports, safe and accurate flight in adverse weather conditions including shear, winds, avoidance of wake vortexes, and reduced consumption of fuel. Advances in techniques for design of modern controls and increased capabilities of digital flight computers coupled with accurate guidance information from Microwave Landing System (MLS). Stochastic feedforward control technique developed within context of ATOPS program.

  3. Dermal exposure assessment techniques.

    PubMed

    Fenske, R A

    1993-12-01

    Exposure of the skin to chemical substances can contribute significantly to total dose in many workplace situations, and its relative importance will increase when airborne occupational exposure limits are reduced, unless steps to reduce skin exposure are undertaken simultaneously. Its assessment employs personal sampling techniques to measure skin loading rates, and combines these measurements with models of percutaneous absorption to estimate absorbed dose. Knowledge of dermal exposure pathways is in many cases fundamental to hazard evaluation and control. When the skin is the primary contributor to absorbed dose, dermal exposure measurements and biological monitoring play complementary roles in defining occupational exposures. Exposure normally occurs by one of three pathways: (i) immersion (direct contact with a liquid or solid chemical substance); (ii) deposition of aerosol or uptake of vapour through the skin; or (iii) surface contact (residue transfer from contaminated surfaces). Sampling methods fall into three categories: surrogate skin; chemical removal; and fluorescent tracers. Surface sampling represents a supplementary approach, providing an estimate of dermal exposure potential. Surrogate skin techniques involve placing a chemical collection medium on the skin. Whole-body garment samplers do not require assumptions relating to distribution, an inherent limitation of patch sampling. The validity of these techniques rests on the ability of the sampling medium to capture and retain chemicals in a manner similar to skin. Removal techniques include skin washing and wiping, but these measure only what can be removed from the skin, not exposure: laboratory removal efficiency studies are required for proper interpretation of data. Fluorescent tracer techniques exploit the visual properties of fluorescent compounds, and combined with video imaging make quantification of dermal exposure patterns possible, but the need to introduce a chemical substance (tracer

  4. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-02-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  5. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  6. Remote Raman Measurement Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donald A.

    1981-02-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  7. Suggestion and psychoanalytic technique.

    PubMed

    Levy, S T; Inderbitzin, L B

    2000-01-01

    The role of the analyst's suggestive influence on the course and outcome of psychoanalytic treatment is explored, and traditional and newer perspectives on analytic technique are contrasted. The intersubjective critique of the neutral, objective analyst in relation to suggestion is examined. The inevitable presence and need for suggestive factors in analysis, and the relationship of suggestion to transference susceptibility, are emphasized. The manner in which the analysis of suggestive factors is subsumed in transference analysis as part of traditional technique is highlighted. PMID:11059395

  8. Carbon isotope techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, D.C. ); Fry, B. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is a hands-on introduction to using carbon isotope tracers in experimental biology and ecology. It is a bench-top reference with protocols for the study of plants, animals, and soils. The {sup 11}C, {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, and {sup 14}C carbon isotopes are considered and standard techniques are described by established authors. The compilation includes the following features: specific, well-established, user-oriented techniques; carbon cycles in plants, animals, soils, air, and water; isotopes in ecological research; examples and sample calculations.

  9. Gisting technique development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, P. G.; Bahler, L. G.; Baker, J. M.; Kellett, H. G.

    1981-12-01

    This report documents the methods utilized to improve and simplify the procedure for operating reference templates and word models used in the key word recognition process. Commands necessary for the automatic generation of reference templates have been added and the procedure for word model generation has been automated. Test results show a modest performance improvement over previous methods. Recognition was improved with a 20-word English set from 33.5% to 41% operating at a threshold of 2.52 false alarms/hr/word. Techniques have also been developed for on-line reference generation that requires no auxiliary mass storage devices. These techniques are also described.

  10. Cost and schedule analytical techniques development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This contract provided technical services and products to the Marshall Space Flight Center's Engineering Cost Office (PP03) and the Program Plans and Requirements Office (PP02) for the period of 3 Aug. 1991 - 30 Nov. 1994. Accomplishments summarized cover the REDSTAR data base, NASCOM hard copy data base, NASCOM automated data base, NASCOM cost model, complexity generators, program planning, schedules, NASA computer connectivity, other analytical techniques, and special project support.

  11. Proper equipment, techniques ensure better drillstem tests

    SciTech Connect

    Brouse, M.

    1983-05-01

    Drillstem testing in today's deeper, more complex wells can be carried out safely and economically only if the field drilling representative is armed with comprehensive knowledge of equipment and techniques available. This article presents basic equipment lists and procedures for conducting open hole, short and extended tests using either a single or straddle packer. Also presented are cased hole procedures using a single packer and additional information specifically tailored to drillstem testing on floating rigs.

  12. Exodontia: tips and techniques for better outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dym, Harry; Weiss, Adam

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews and highlights exodontia tips as well as new techniques to make simple and complex exodontia more predictable and efficient with improved patient outcomes. A discussion of a powered periotome that has been developed to aid in the atraumatic extraction of teeth and another new device, the piezosurgery, increasingly used for outpatient oral surgery procedures are included. Physics forceps, a new type of exodontia forceps, is also discussed in this article. PMID:22117954

  13. SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX ANALYSIS IN GENETIC TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synaptonemal complex analysis provides a unique means of visualizing the behavior of meiotic chromosomes. he technique has been applied to the study of normal karyotypes and mutant stocks of mice. ecent work demonstrating the usefulness of SC analysis for the detection of chromos...

  14. Techniques of subjective workload assessment - A comparison of two methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, M. A.; Tsang, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    With increasing complexity of systems, evaluation techniques based on close examination of an operator's performance become more and more difficult to perform, and it is much easier to base on evaluation of a workload on the opinion of the operator involved in performing the task. The present paper has the objective to compare two of the general subjective workload assessment techniques which have been developed. One of these techniques, the Subjective Workload Assessment Technique (SWAT), has been developed primarily at the USAF Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory for use in cockpit environments. The second technique, the NASA weighted-bipolar technique, is a development tool to examine the underlying relationships among many factors. One of the two goals of the study is concerned with the general validity of subjective workload assessments, while, according to the second goal, any particular strengths or weaknesses with respect to either of the two techniques are to be observed. It is concluded that both techniques appear to be worthwhile.

  15. The Symbolic Identity Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goud, Nelson H.

    2001-01-01

    Explains the role of symbols in attaining total psychic growth by applying concepts of C. Jung, R. Assagiolo, and L. Kubie. Describes a new strategy, the symbolic identity technique, which involves environmental exploration in a relaxed, receptive manner in order to discover something in the outer environment that reflects one's inner nature.…

  16. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Macarthur, Duncan W; Langner, Diana; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Razinkov, Sergey; Livke, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  17. Study of coronagraphic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Aziz, Michael; Gonsalves, Robert A.; Korzennik, Sylvain; Labeyrie, Antoine; Lyon, Richard; Melnick, Gary; Schlitz, Ruth; Somerstein, Steve; Vasudevan, Gopal; Woodruff, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) has set up a program to study coronagraphic techniques. The program consists of the development of new fabrication methods of occulter masks, characterization of the manufactured masks, and application of the masks to study speckle reduction technique. Our occulter mask fabrication development utilizes a focused ion beam system to directly shape mask profiles from absorber material. Initial milling trials show that we can shape nearly Gaussian-shaped mask profiles. Part of this development is the characterization of absorber materials, poly(methyl methacrylate) doped with light-stable chromophores. For the characterization of the masks we have built a mask scanner enabling us to scan the transmission function of occulter masks. The real mask transmission profile is retrieved applying the maximum entropy method to deconvolve the mask transmission function from the beam profile of the test laser. Finally, our test bed for studying coronagraphic techniques is nearing completion. The optical setup is currently configured as a classical coronagraph and can easily be re-configured for studying speckle reduction techniques. The development of the test bed control software is under way. This paper we will give an update of the status of the individual program elements.

  18. DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food scientists use standards and calibrations to relate the concentration of a compound of interest to the instrumental response. The techniques used include classical, single point, and inverse calibrations, as well as standard addition and internal standards. Several fundamental criteria -- sel...

  19. Log10 technique charts.

    PubMed

    Stopford, J E

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a reliable and easily formulated alternative to random technique selection or control panel roulette when producing diagnostic radiographs. This system requires only minutes to complete and will reduce the radiation dose to patients, the radiographic film wasted, and the time lost repeating examinations. PMID:523624

  20. Values Concepts and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    This book contains 29 articles for elementary and secondary teachers dealing with fundamental concepts and teaching techniques in values education. Part one of the book deals with concepts. Louis E. Raths examines valuing and its relationship to freedom and intelligence. The cognitive developmental approach to moral education is discussed by…

  1. Merchandising Techniques and Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sylvie A.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that libraries employ modern booksellers' merchandising techniques to improve circulation of library materials. Using displays in various ways, the methods and reasons for weeding out books, replacing worn book jackets, and selecting new books are discussed. Suggestions for learning how to market and 11 references are provided. (RBF)

  2. Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson-Beck, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…

  3. Techniques for Vocal Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lori

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a series of simple yet effective practices, techniques, and tips for improving the singing voice and minimizing stress on the vocal chords. Describes the four components for producing vocal sound: respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation. Provides exercises for each and lists symptoms of sickness and vocal strain. (MJP)

  4. Correlative Techniques in Microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imaging is an important component in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in agricultural commodities and products. An array of microscopes and techniques can be used illustrate the structure and microchemistry of diverse samples. Examples of the var...

  5. Problem Solving Techniques Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. Six problem-solving techniques are developed in the booklet to assist individuals and groups in making better decisions: problem identification, data gathering, data analysis, solution analysis,…

  6. Blood Typing--Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, W. T., Jr.

    This instructional packet deals with the study of hematology. It is recommended for all high school students of biology. A general understanding of antigen-antibody reactions is necessary before attempting this learning activity. Behavioral objectives place emphasis on the techniques of and understanding of blood typing. The equipment and…

  7. Techniques in Adlerian Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jon, Ed.; Slavik, Steven, Ed.

    This book is a collection of classic and recent papers (published between 1964 and 1994) reprinted from the "Journal of Juvenile Psychology""Individual Psychologist," and "Individual Psychology." Each of the five sections is introduced by the editor's comments. "General Techniques" contains the following articles: (1) "I-Thou Relationship Versus…

  8. Mathematical techniques: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Articles on theoretical and applied mathematics are introduced. The articles cover information that might be of interest to workers in statistics and information theory, computational aids that could be used by scientists and engineers, and mathematical techniques for design and control.

  9. Suture techniques in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Ronald P; Chang, Edward; Buchanan, Edward

    2010-04-01

    Suture techniques are an indispensable means to biologically sculpt the cartilage of the nose. Here the authors review their use in tip-plasty and present a 4-suture algorithm that allows for simple, complete control in sculpting the shape of all nasal tips in primary rhinoplasty. After a standard cephalic trim of the lateral crus leaving it 6 mm wide, one or more of the four suture techniques are applied. One of the newest techniques that has yielded excellent results is the hemi-transdomal suture, a variation of the conventional transdomal suture. This technique narrows the dome but also everts the lateral crus slightly to avoid concavities of the nostril rim. The 4-suture algorithm is useful in both the open and closed approaches. A more general use of sutures is described and referred to as the "universal horizontal mattress suture," which can be applied to remove all unwanted convexities or concavities and can be used not only to straighten the cartilage but also strengthen it. This suture has applications for the crooked septum, the collapsed lateral crus (external valve), and the collapsed internal valve, as well as for converting ear cartilage grafts into straighter, stronger grafts than previously thought possible. PMID:20206741

  10. Art Appreciation and Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Diane R.; Milam, Debora

    1985-01-01

    Presents examples of independent study units for gifted high school students in a resource room setting. Both art appreciation and technique are covered in activities concerned with media (basics of pencil, India ink, pastels, crayons, oil, acrylics, and watercolors), subject matter (landscapes, animals, the human figure), design and illustration…

  11. Super Techniques for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Michael K.

    A variety of techniques can help a teacher create the atmosphere of a "quality circle," a Japanese management method in which each member of a group shares and contributes to the learning experience. "Creating a Commercial" allows students to create original oratory for presentation to the class. In "The Good News First," students improve their…

  12. Assessing physiological complexity.

    PubMed

    Burggren, W W; Monticino, M G

    2005-09-01

    Physiologists both admire and fear complexity, but we have made relatively few attempts to understand it. Inherently complex systems are more difficult to study and less predictable. However, a deeper understanding of physiological systems can be achieved by modifying experimental design and analysis to account for complexity. We begin this essay with a tour of some mathematical views of complexity. After briefly exploring chaotic systems, information theory and emergent behavior, we reluctantly conclude that, while a mathematical view of complexity provides useful perspectives and some narrowly focused tools, there are too few generally practical take-home messages for physiologists studying complex systems. Consequently, we attempt to provide guidelines as to how complex systems might be best approached by physiologists. After describing complexity based on the sum of a physiological system's structures and processes, we highlight increasingly refined approaches based on the pattern of interactions between structures and processes. We then provide a series of examples illustrating how appreciating physiological complexity can improve physiological research, including choosing experimental models, guiding data collection, improving data interpretations and constructing more rigorous system models. Finally, we conclude with an invitation for physiologists, applied mathematicians and physicists to collaborate on describing, studying and learning from studies of physiological complexity. PMID:16109885

  13. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-01-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  14. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Camilla; Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-12-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  15. Decision paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Complex real world action and its prediction and control has escaped analysis by the classical methods of psychological research. The reason is that psychologists have no procedures to parse complex tasks into their constituents. Where such a division can be made, based say on expert judgment, there is no natural scale to measure the positive or negative values of the components. Even if we could assign numbers to task parts, we lack rules i.e., a theory, to combine them into a total task representation. We compare here two plausible theories for the amalgamation of the value of task components. Both of these theories require a numerical representation of motivation, for motivation is the primary variable that guides choice and action in well-learned tasks. We address this problem of motivational quantification and performance prediction by developing psychophysical scales of the desireability or aversiveness of task components based on utility scaling methods (Galanter 1990). We modify methods used originally to scale sensory magnitudes (Stevens and Galanter 1957), and that have been applied recently to the measure of task 'workload' by Gopher and Braune (1984). Our modification uses utility comparison scaling techniques which avoid the unnecessary assumptions made by Gopher and Braune. Formula for the utility of complex tasks based on the theoretical models are used to predict decision and choice of alternate paths to the same goal.

  16. Analysis of Genetically Complex Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery of genes that influence risk for epilepsy. However, these gene discoveries have been in epilepsies with Mendelian modes of inheritance, which comprise only a tiny fraction of all epilepsy. Most people with epilepsy have no affected relatives, suggesting that the great majority of all epilepsies are genetically complex: multiple genes contribute to their etiology, none of which has a major effect on disease risk. Gene discovery in the genetically complex epilepsies is a formidable task. It is unclear which epilepsy phenotypes are most advantageous to study, and chromosomal localization and mutation detection are much more difficult than in Mendelian epilepsies. Association studies are very promising for the identification of complex epilepsy genes, but we are still in the earliest stages of their application in the epilepsies. Future studies should employ very large sample sizes to ensure adequate statistical power, clinical phenotyping methods of the highest quality, designs and analytic techniques that control for population stratification, and state-of-the-art molecular methods. Collaborative studies are essential to achieve these goals. PMID:16359464

  17. Metrology Techniques for the Assembly of NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    C. Priniski, T. Dodson, M. Duco, S. Raftopoulos, R. Ellis, and A. Brooks

    2009-09-24

    In support of the National Compact Stellerator Experiment (NCSX), stellerator assembly activities continued this past year at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in partnership with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The construction program saw the completion of the first two Half Field-Period Assemblies (HPA), each consisting of three modular coils. The full machine includes six such sub-assemblies. A single HPA consists of three of the NCSX modular coils wound and assembled at PPPL. These geometrically-complex threedimensional coils were wound using computer-aided metrology and CAD models to tolerances within +/- 0.5mm. The assembly of these coils required similar accuracy on a larger scale with the added complexity of more individual parts and fewer degrees of freedom for correction. Several new potential positioning issues developed for which measurement and control techniques were developed. To accomplish this, CAD coordinate-based computer metrology equipment and software similar to the solutions employed for winding the modular coils was used. Given the size of the assemblies, the primary tools were both interferometeraided and Absolute Distance Measurement (ADM)-only based laser trackers. In addition, portable Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) arms and some novel indirect measurement techniques were employed. This paper will detail both the use of CAD coordinate-based metrology technology and the techniques developed and employed for dimensional control of NSCX subassemblies. The results achieved and possible improvements to techniques will be discussed.

  18. Vertical bone augmentation procedures: basics and techniques in dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Draenert, F G; Huetzen, D; Neff, A; Mueller, W E G

    2014-05-01

    An appropriate bony situation is essential for dental implant placement and bony support of soft tissues (pink esthetic). Loss of teeth often results in complex horizontal and vertical alveolar ridge defects. They demand advanced bone augmentation techniques for reconstruction. We present the different techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentation. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. We present current techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentations. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. Applied techniques include stabilized-guided bone regeneration (GBR), autologous local block augmentation, modified techniques such as Gellrich shell technique including piezosurgery, pelvic bone blocks, complex materials such as graft-derived bone blocks and their unique handling problems. Successful basic principles are reduction of cortical bone healing due to long remodeling time and possible late loss; extended application of materials with interconnecting porous system and particulate material resulting in fast healing analogous to cancellous bone; mechanical stabilization of the augmentation to allow bony healing in vertical defect situations. GBR and autologous bone blocks with minimal cortical thickness and a high volume of particulated material are most favorable techniques. PMID:23733418

  19. Two giant stellar complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  20. Hypergraph coloring complexes.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Felix; Dall, Aaron; Kubitzke, Martina

    2012-08-28

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the notion of the coloring complex of a graph to hypergraphs. We present three different interpretations of those complexes-a purely combinatorial one and two geometric ones. It is shown, that most of the properties, which are known to be true for coloring complexes of graphs, break down in this more general setting, e.g., Cohen-Macaulayness and partitionability. Nevertheless, we are able to provide bounds for the [Formula: see text]- and [Formula: see text]-vectors of those complexes which yield new bounds on chromatic polynomials of hypergraphs. Moreover, though it is proven that the coloring complex of a hypergraph has a wedge decomposition, we provide an example showing that in general this decomposition is not homotopy equivalent to a wedge of spheres. In addition, we can completely characterize those hypergraphs whose coloring complex is connected. PMID:23483700

  1. Artistic forms and complexity.

    PubMed

    Boon, J-P; Casti, J; Taylor, R P

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the inter-relationship between various concepts of complexity by introducing a complexity 'triangle' featuring objective complexity, subjective complexity and social complexity. Their connections are explored using visual and musical compositions of art. As examples, we quantify the complexity embedded within the paintings of the Jackson Pollock and the musical works of Johann Sebastian Bach. We discuss the challenges inherent in comparisons of the spatial patterns created by Pollock and the sonic patterns created by Bach, including the differing roles that time plays in these investigations. Our results draw attention to some common intriguing characteristics suggesting 'universality' and conjecturing that the fractal nature of art might have an intrinsic value of more general significance. PMID:21382264

  2. Complexation of Optoelectronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Il‧in, M. Yu.; Konyaev, M. A.; Mikhailenko, A. S.; Morozov, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    Problems of increasing the efficiency and the functionality of complex optoelectronic systems for monitoring real atmospheric conditions and of their use are discussed. It is shown by the example of a meteorological complex comprising an infrared wind-sensing lidar and an X-range Doppler radar that the complexation of probing systems working in different electromagnetic-radiation ranges opens up new opportunities for determining the meteorological parameters of a turbulent atmosphere and investigating the interaction of radiation with it.

  3. Uranium extraction by complexation with siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahamonde Castro, Cristina

    One of the major concerns of energy production is the environmental impact associated with the extraction of natural resources. Nuclear energy fuel is obtained from uranium, an abundant and naturally occurring element in the environment, but the currently used techniques for uranium extraction leave either a significant fingerprint (open pit mines) or a chemical residue that alters the pH of the environment (acid or alkali leaching). It is therefore clear that a new and greener approach to uranium extraction is needed. Bioleaching is one potential alternative. In bioleaching, complexants naturally produced from fungi or bacteria may be used to extract the uranium. In the following research, the siderophore enterobactin, which is naturally produced by bacteria to extract and solubilize iron from the environment, is evaluated to determine its potential for complexing with uranium. To determine whether enterobactin could be used for uranium extraction, its acid dissociation and its binding strength with the metal of interest must be determined. Due to the complexity of working with radioactive materials, lanthanides were used as analogs for uranium. In addition, polyprotic acids were used as structural and chemical analogs for the siderophore during method development. To evaluate the acid dissociation of enterobactin and the subsequent binding constants with lanthanides, three different analytical techniques were studied including: potentiometric titration, UltraViolet Visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). After evaluation of three techniques, a combination of ITC and potentiometric titrations was deemed to be the most viable way for studying the siderophore of interest. The results obtained from these studies corroborate the ideal pH range for enterobactin complexation to the lanthanide of interest and pave the way for determining the strength of complexation relative to other naturally occurring metals. Ultimately, this

  4. Complexity and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Alberto; Gómez, Carlos; Hornero, Roberto; López-Ibor, Juan José

    2013-08-01

    Complexity estimators have been broadly utilized in schizophrenia investigation. Early studies reported increased complexity in schizophrenia patients, associated with a higher variability or "irregularity" of their brain signals. However, further investigations showed reduced complexities, thus introducing a clear divergence. Nowadays, both increased and reduced complexity values are reported. The explanation of such divergence is a critical issue to understand the role of complexity measures in schizophrenia research. Considering previous arguments a complementary hypothesis is advanced: if the increased irregularity of schizophrenia patients' neurophysiological activity is assumed, a "natural" tendency to increased complexity in EEG and MEG scans should be expected, probably reflecting an abnormal neuronal firing pattern in some critical regions such as the frontal lobes. This "natural" tendency to increased complexity might be modulated by the interaction of three main factors: medication effects, symptomatology, and age effects. Therefore, young, medication-naïve, and highly symptomatic (positive symptoms) patients are expected to exhibit increased complexities. More importantly, the investigation of these interacting factors by means of complexity estimators might help to elucidate some of the neuropathological processes involved in schizophrenia. PMID:22507763

  5. FRACTIONATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES USING AND ION-EXCHANGE METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fractionation of particle emission extracts captured from complex combustion mixtures gas performed upon environmental samples using an ion-exchange technique. aptured emissions from hazardous waste, municipal and medical/pathological incinerators along with urban air imputed by ...

  6. The integrated manual and automatic control of complex flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unified control synthesis methodology for complex and/or non-conventional flight vehicles are developed. Prediction techniques for the handling characteristics of such vehicles and pilot parameter identification from experimental data are addressed.

  7. Managerial Techniques in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, John J.

    1983-01-01

    Management techniques developed during the past 20 years assume the rational bureaucratic model. School administration requires contingent techniques. Quality Circle, Theory Z, and the McKenzie 7-Framework are discussed as techniques to increase school productivity. (MD)

  8. Laser beam shaping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    DICKEY,FRED M.; WEICHMAN,LOUIS S.; SHAGAM,RICHARD N.

    2000-03-16

    Industrial, military, medical, and research and development applications of lasers frequently require a beam with a specified irradiance distribution in some plane. A common requirement is a laser profile that is uniform over some cross-section. Such applications include laser/material processing, laser material interaction studies, fiber injection systems, optical data image processing, lithography, medical applications, and military applications. Laser beam shaping techniques can be divided into three areas: apertured beams, field mappers, and multi-aperture beam integrators. An uncertainty relation exists for laser beam shaping that puts constraints on system design. In this paper the authors review the basics of laser beam shaping and present applications and limitations of various techniques.

  9. Whole cell entrapment techniques.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Jorge A; Rivero, Cintia W

    2013-01-01

    Microbial whole cells are efficient, ecological, and low-cost catalysts that have been successfully applied in the pharmaceutical, environmental, and alimentary industries, among others. Microorganism immobilization is a good way to carry out the bioprocess under preparative conditions. The main advantages of this methodology lie in their high operational stability, easy upstream separation and bioprocess scale-up feasibility. Cell entrapment is the most widely used technique for whole cell immobilization. This technique-in which the cells are included within a rigid network-is porous enough to allow the diffusion of substrates and products, protects the selected microorganism from the reaction medium, and has high immobilization efficiency (100 % in most cases). PMID:23934817

  10. Network acceleration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Patricia (Inventor); Awrach, James Michael (Inventor); Maccabe, Arthur Barney (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Splintered offloading techniques with receive batch processing are described for network acceleration. Such techniques offload specific functionality to a NIC while maintaining the bulk of the protocol processing in the host operating system ("OS"). The resulting protocol implementation allows the application to bypass the protocol processing of the received data. Such can be accomplished this by moving data from the NIC directly to the application through direct memory access ("DMA") and batch processing the receive headers in the host OS when the host OS is interrupted to perform other work. Batch processing receive headers allows the data path to be separated from the control path. Unlike operating system bypass, however, the operating system still fully manages the network resource and has relevant feedback about traffic and flows. Embodiments of the present disclosure can therefore address the challenges of networks with extreme bandwidth delay products (BWDP).

  11. CTV rendezvous techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    The cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) requires the capability to perform automated rendezvous with Space Station Freedom (SSF) using onboard sensors and algorithms. The current approach to CTV rendezvous applies techniques developed during the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) program which have been mechanized for automatic, onboard execution. The initial catch up sequence can be described as a passive rendezvous without explicit time of arrival control. The ultimate requirement for this rendezvous technique is to place the CTV on the SSF V-bar axis at some specified downrange distance. The launch vehicle will use yaw steering during orbit injection to achieve the proper phantom plane for nodal biasing. This presentation describes the primary components of the CTV rendezvous scheme.

  12. CTV rendezvous techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) requires the capability to perform automated rendezvous with Space Station Freedom (SSF) using onboard sensors and algorithms. The current approach to CTV rendezvous applies techniques developed during the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) program which have been mechanized for automatic, onboard execution. The initial catch up sequence can be described as a passive rendezvous without explicit time of arrival control. The ultimate requirement for this rendezvous technique is to place the CTV on the SSF V-bar axis at some specified downrange distance. The launch vehicle will use yaw steering during orbit injection to achieve the proper phantom plane for nodal biasing. This presentation describes the primary components of the CTV rendezvous scheme.

  13. Data collection techniques.

    PubMed

    Morgan, G A; Harmon, R J

    2001-08-01

    We have provided an overview of techniques used to assess variables in the applied behavioral sciences. Most of the methods are used by both quantitative/positivist and qualitative/constructivist researchers but to different extents. Qualitative researchers prefer more open-ended, less structured data collection techniques than do quantitative researchers. Direct observation of participants is common in experimental and qualitative research; it is less common in so-called survey research, which tends to use self-report questionnaires. It is important that investigators use instruments that are reliable and valid for the population and purpose for which they will be used. Standardized instruments have manuals that provide norms and indexes of reliability and validity. However, if the populations and purpose on which these data are based are different from yours, it may be necessary for you to develop your own instrument or provide new evidence of reliability and validity. PMID:11501698

  14. Ozone flow visualization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Stedman, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques using ozone for tracing gas flows are proposed whereby ozone is detected through its strong absorption of ultraviolet light, which is easily made visible with fluorescent materials, or through its reaction with nitric oxide to form excited nitrogen dioxide, which in relaxing emits detectable light. It is shown that response speeds in the kHz range are possible with an ultraviolet detection system for initial ozone concentrations of about 1%.

  15. Site characterization techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1995-01-01

    Geoelectrical methods have been used since the 1920's to search for metallic ore deposits. During the last decade, traditional mining geophysical techniques have been adapted for environmental site characterization. Geoelectrical geophysics is now a well developed engineering specialty, with different methods to focus both on a range of targets and on depths below the surface. Most methods have also been adapted to borehole measurements.

  16. Endoscopic Techniques in Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anzola, Jesus Franco; Nogueira, João Flávio

    2016-10-01

    The endoscope has transformed the way we observe, understand, and treat chronic ear disease. Improved view, exclusive transcanal techniques, assessment of ventilation routes and mastoid tissue preservation have led to decreased morbidity and functional enhancement of minimally invasive reconstruction of the middle ear. The philosophical identity of endoscopic ear surgery is evolving; new research, long-term results, and widespread acknowledgement of its postulates will undoubtedly define its role in otology. PMID:27565390

  17. Particle-mesh techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macneice, Peter

    1995-01-01

    This is an introduction to numerical Particle-Mesh techniques, which are commonly used to model plasmas, gravitational N-body systems, and both compressible and incompressible fluids. The theory behind this approach is presented, and its practical implementation, both for serial and parallel machines, is discussed. This document is based on a four-hour lecture course presented by the author at the NASA Summer School for High Performance Computational Physics, held at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  18. [Histological techniques in oncodermatology].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Le Guellec, S; Courtade-Saïdi, M; Gangloff, D; Meresse, T; Chavoin, J-P; Grolleau, J-L; Garrido, I

    2012-04-01

    The skin oncology or "oncodermatology" requires a surgical treatment in most cases. For some surgeons, the oncodermatology takes a very important part of their practice. In the course of diagnostic and therapeutic of skin lesions, the pathologist plays now an essential role. He will guide our surgery. The techniques used by this specialist are numerous. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to review the different histological methods used to improve our management of skin tumors. PMID:22463986

  19. Weld braze technique

    DOEpatents

    Kanne, Jr., William R.; Kelker, Jr., John W.; Alexander, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    High-strength metal joints are formed by a combined weld-braze technique. A hollow cylindrical metal member is forced into an undersized counterbore in another metal member with a suitable braze metal disposed along the bottom of the counterbore. Force and current applied to the members in an evacuated chamber results in the concurrent formation of the weld along the sides of the counterbore and a braze along the bottom of the counterbore in one continuous operation.

  20. Amoco technique gains support

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Amoco Corp.`s low-cost horizontal drilling technique and equipment are gaining acceptance in the oilpatch after five years of design and fine-tuning work. The system is purely mechanical, and it`s designed to operate with a workover rig instead of a drilling rig. It`s engineered to drill short-radius horizontal wells with lateral sup to 1,000 feet, so far.

  1. Miniaturization Techniques for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, James E.

    2003-05-27

    The possibility of laser driven accelerators [1] suggests the need for new structures based on micromachining and integrated circuit technology because of the comparable scales. Thus, we are exploring fully integrated structures including sources, optics (for both light and particle) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip (AOC). Tests suggest a number of preferred materials and techniques but no technical or fundamental roadblocks at scales of order 1 {micro}m or larger.

  2. Electronic Packaging Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A characteristic of aerospace system design is that equipment size and weight must always be kept to a minimum, even in small components such as electronic packages. The dictates of spacecraft design have spawned a number of high-density packaging techniques, among them methods of connecting circuits in printed wiring boards by processes called stitchbond welding and parallel gap welding. These processes help designers compress more components into less space; they also afford weight savings and lower production costs.

  3. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  4. [Progress in imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuaki; Otsuka, Tsukasa

    2013-05-01

    Today it is common to perform real-time diagnosis and treatment via live broadcast as a method of education and to spread new technology for diagnosis and therapy in medical fields. Live medical broadcasts have developed along with broadcast technology. In the early days, live video feeds were sent from operating rooms to classrooms and lecture halls in universities and hospitals. However, the development of imaging techniques and communication networks enabled live broadcasts that bi-directionally link operating rooms and meeting halls during scientific meetings and live demonstration courses. Live broadcasts therefore became an important method for education and the dissemination of new medical technologies. The development of imaging techniques has contributed to more realistic live broadcasts through such innovative techniques as three-dimensional viewing and higher-definition 4K technology. In the future, live broadcasts will be transmitted on personal computers using regular Internet connections. In addition to the enhancement of image delivery technology, it will also be necessary to examine the entire image delivery environment carefully, including issues of security and privacy of personal information. PMID:23789334

  5. Covariance mapping techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  6. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  7. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  8. Forecasting in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Graves, W. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Complex nonlinear systems are typically characterized by many degrees of freedom, as well as interactions between the elements. Interesting examples can be found in the areas of earthquakes and finance. In these two systems, fat tails play an important role in the statistical dynamics. For earthquake systems, the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency is applicable, whereas for daily returns for the securities in the financial markets are known to be characterized by leptokurtotic statistics in which the tails are power law. Very large fluctuations are present in both systems. In earthquake systems, one has the example of great earthquakes such as the M9.1, March 11, 2011 Tohoku event. In financial systems, one has the example of the market crash of October 19, 1987. Both were largely unexpected events that severely impacted the earth and financial systems systemically. Other examples include the M9.3 Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004, and the Great Recession which began with the fall of Lehman Brothers investment bank on September 12, 2013. Forecasting the occurrence of these damaging events has great societal importance. In recent years, national funding agencies in a variety of countries have emphasized the importance of societal relevance in research, and in particular, the goal of improved forecasting technology. Previous work has shown that both earthquakes and financial crashes can be described by a common Landau-Ginzburg-type free energy model. These metastable systems are characterized by fat tail statistics near the classical spinodal. Correlations in these systems can grow and recede, but do not imply causation, a common source of misunderstanding. In both systems, a common set of techniques can be used to compute the probabilities of future earthquakes or crashes. In this talk, we describe the basic phenomenology of these systems and emphasize their similarities and differences. We also consider the problem of forecast validation and verification

  9. Trapping mammalian protein complexes in viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Eyckerman, Sven; Titeca, Kevin; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Cloots, Eva; Verhee, Annick; Samyn, Noortje; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Timmerman, Evy; De Sutter, Delphine; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Gevaert, Kris; Tavernier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cell lysis is an inevitable step in classical mass spectrometry–based strategies to analyse protein complexes. Complementary lysis conditions, in situ cross-linking strategies and proximal labelling techniques are currently used to reduce lysis effects on the protein complex. We have developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach that obviates the need for cell homogenization and preserves the protein complexes during purification. By fusing a bait protein to the HIV-1 GAG protein, we show that interaction partners become trapped within virus-like particles (VLPs) that bud from mammalian cells. Using an efficient VLP enrichment protocol, Virotrap allows the detection of known binary interactions and MS-based identification of novel protein partners as well. In addition, we show the identification of stimulus-dependent interactions and demonstrate trapping of protein partners for small molecules. Virotrap constitutes an elegant complementary approach to the arsenal of methods to study protein complexes. PMID:27122307

  10. Controlling synchronous patterns in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weijie; Fan, Huawei; Wang, Ying; Ying, Heping; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Although the set of permutation symmetries of a complex network could be very large, few of them give rise to stable synchronous patterns. Here we present a general framework and develop techniques for controlling synchronization patterns in complex network of coupled chaotic oscillators. Specifically, according to the network permutation symmetry, we design a small-size and weighted network, namely the control network, and use it to control the large-size complex network by means of pinning coupling. We argue mathematically that for any of the network symmetries, there always exists a critical pinning strength beyond which the unstable synchronous pattern associated to this symmetry can be stabilized. The feasibility of the control method is verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and real-world networks and demonstrated experimentally in systems of coupled chaotic circuits. Our studies show the controllability of synchronous patterns in complex networks of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  11. Water soluble complexes of carotenoids with arabinogalactan.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Nikolay E; Leshina, Tatyana V; Meteleva, Elizaveta S; Dushkin, Alexander V; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Kispert, Lowell D

    2009-01-01

    We present the first example of water soluble complexes of carotenoids. The stability and reactivity of carotenoids in the complexes with natural polysaccharide arabinogalactan were investigated by different physicochemical techniques: optical absorption, HPLC, and pulsed EPR spectroscopy. Compared to pure carotenoids, polysaccharide complexes of carotenoids showed enhanced photostability by a factor of 10 in water solutions. A significant decrease by a factor of 20 in the reactivity toward metal ions (Fe(3+)) and reactive oxygen species in solution was detected. On the other hand, the yield and stability of carotenoid radical cations photoproduced on titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) were greatly increased. EPR measurements demonstrated efficient charge separation on complex-modified TiO(2) nanoparticles (7 nm). Canthaxanthin radical cations are stable for approximately 10 days at room temperature in this system. The results are important for a variety of carotenoid applications, in the design of artificial light-harvesting, photoredox, and catalytic devices. PMID:19061372

  12. Low-Complexity Adaptive Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    A low-complexity, adaptive predictive technique for lossless compression of hyperspectral imagery is described. This technique is designed to be suitable for implementation in hardware such as a field programmable gate array (FPGA); such an implementation could be used for high-speed compression of hyperspectral imagery onboard a spacecraft. The predictive step of the technique makes use of the sign algorithm, which is a relative of the least mean square (LMS) algorithm from the field of low-complexity adaptive filtering. The compressed data stream consists of prediction residuals encoded using a method similar to that of the JPEG-LS lossless image compression standard. Compression results are presented for several datasets including some raw Airborne Visible/ Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) datasets and raw Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) datasets. The compression effectiveness obtained with the technique is competitive with that of the best of previously described techniques with similar complexity.

  13. Performance Improvement Assuming Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Individual performers, work teams, and organizations may be considered complex adaptive systems, while most current human performance technologies appear to assume simple determinism. This article explores the apparent mismatch and speculates on future efforts to enhance performance if complexity rather than simplicity is assumed. Included are…

  14. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-28

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  15. Complexity and Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Jeanette Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A central feature of complexity is that it is based on non-linear, recursive relations. However, in most current accounts of complexity such relations, while non-linear, are based on the reductive relations of a Newtonian onto-epistemological framework. This means that the systems that are emergent from the workings of such relations are a…

  16. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  17. Gold trifluoromethyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Gil-Rubio, Juan; Vicente, José

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the synthesis, reactivity and applications of gold trifluoromethyl complexes, which are the only isolated perfluoroalkyl complexes of gold. The most reported examples are neutral Au(i) complexes of the type [Au(CF3)L], whereas only two Au(ii) trifluoromethyl complexes have been reported, both being diamagnetic and containing a strong Au-Au bond. A number of Au(iii) trifluoromethyl complexes have been prepared by oxidative addition of halogens or iodotrifluoromethane to Au(i) complexes or, in a few cases, by transmetallation reactions. Owing to the limitations of the available synthetic methods, a lower number of examples is known, particularly for the oxidation states (ii) and (iii). Gold trifluoromethyl complexes present singular characteristics, such as thermal stability, strong Au-C bonds and, in some cases, reactive α-C-F bonds. Some of the Au(iii) complexes reported, show unusually easy reductive elimination reactions of trifluoromethylated products which could be applied in the development of gold-catalyzed processes for the trifluoromethylation of organic compounds. PMID:26169553

  18. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  19. COMPLEXITY IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The enormous complexity of ecosystems is generally obvious under even the most cursory examination. In the modern world, this complexity is further augmented by the linkage of ecosystems to economic and social systems through the human use of the environment for technological pu...

  20. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  1. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2015-01-09

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  2. Visual Complexity: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donderi, Don C.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of visual complexity, the history of its measurement, and its implications for behavior are reviewed, starting with structuralism and Gestalt psychology at the beginning of the 20th century and ending with visual complexity theory, perceptual learning theory, and neural circuit theory at the beginning of the 21st. Evidence is drawn from…

  3. Complexity in Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierschynski, Jarek; Louie, Belinda; Pughe, Bronwyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the key requirements of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts is that students are able to read and access complex texts across all grade levels. The CCSS authors emphasize both the limitations and lack of accuracy in the current CCSS model of text complexity, calling for the development of new frameworks. In response…

  4. Biologically-Inspired Concepts for Self-Management of Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, G.

    2006-01-01

    Inherent complexity in large-scale applications may be impossible to eliminate or even ameliorate despite a number of promising advances. In such cases, the complexity must be tolerated and managed. Such management may be beyond the abilities of humans, or require such overhead as to make management by humans unrealistic. A number of initiatives inspired by concepts in biology have arisen for self-management of complex systems. We present some ideas and techniques we have been experimenting with, inspired by lesser-known concepts in biology that show promise in protecting complex systems and represent a step towards self-management of complexity.

  5. Techniques for video compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chwan-Hwa

    1995-01-01

    In this report, we present our study on multiprocessor implementation of a MPEG2 encoding algorithm. First, we compare two approaches to implementing video standards, VLSI technology and multiprocessor processing, in terms of design complexity, applications, and cost. Then we evaluate the functional modules of MPEG2 encoding process in terms of their computation time. Two crucial modules are identified based on this evaluation. Then we present our experimental study on the multiprocessor implementation of the two crucial modules. Data partitioning is used for job assignment. Experimental results show that high speedup ratio and good scalability can be achieved by using this kind of job assignment strategy.

  6. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  7. Nickel Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Nathan A; Guan, Hairong

    2016-08-10

    Nickel hydride complexes, defined herein as any molecules bearing a nickel hydrogen bond, are crucial intermediates in numerous nickel-catalyzed reactions. Some of them are also synthetic models of nickel-containing enzymes such as [NiFe]-hydrogenase. The overall objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of this specific type of hydride complexes, which has been studied extensively in recent years. This review begins with the significance and a very brief history of nickel hydride complexes, followed by various methods and spectroscopic or crystallographic tools used to synthesize and characterize these complexes. Also discussed are stoichiometric reactions involving nickel hydride complexes and how some of these reactions are developed into catalytic processes. PMID:27437790

  8. [Complexity: an introduction].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Jaramillo, Francisco Luis Ochoa

    2011-01-01

    Complexity appears in the twentieth century as a way to understand many phenomena that are perceived as chaotic and complex from classical thought, which still persist in our way of explaining the world. Its purpose is to study the complex and adaptive systems that are sensitive to initial conditions. Some of the characteristics of complex thought are systemic perspective, autopoiesis, self-organization, emergent properties, unpredictability of the systems, analogic thought, and the complementarity of the phenomena, among others. Living systems respond to a complex logic, and in that sense, our vision of human populations and patients, and how we try to solve problems and human diseases, should be open to the possibilities that arise from this form of understand the world. PMID:21503430

  9. Complex Electrical Resistivity for Monitoring DNAPL Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Brown; David Lesmes; John Fourkas

    2003-09-12

    Nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have landfills and buried waste areas. Of the various contaminants present at these sites, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are particularly hard to locate and remove. There is an increasing need for external or non-invasive sensing techniques to locate DNAPLs in the subsurface and to track their spread and monitor their breakdown or removal by natural or engineered means. G. Olhoeft and colleagues have published several reports based on laboratory studies using the complex resistivity method which indicate that organic solvents, notably toluene, PCE, and TCE, residing in clay-bearing soils have distinctive electrical signatures. These results have suggested to many researchers the basis of an ideal new measurement technique for geophysical characterization of DNAPL pollution. Encouraged by these results we proposed to bring the field measurement of complex resistivity as a means of pollution characterization from the conceptual stage to practice. We planned to document the detectability of clay-organic solvent interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further understanding of the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms, and then apply these observations to develop field techniques. As with any new research endeavor we note the extreme importance of trying to reproduce the work of previous researchers to ensure that any effects observed are due to the physical phenomena occurring in the specimen and not due to the particular experimental apparatus or method used. To this end, we independently designed and built a laboratory system, including a sample holder, electrodes, electronics, and data analysis software, for the measurement of the complex electrical resistivity properties of soil contaminated with organic solvents. The capabilities and reliability of this technique were documented. Using various standards we performed measurement accuracy, repeatability, and noise immunity

  10. Noncausal telemetry data recovery techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, H.; Lee, R.; Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1995-01-01

    Cost efficiency is becoming a major driver in future space missions. Because of the constraints on total cost, including design, implementation, and operation, future spacecraft are limited in terms of their size power and complexity. Consequently, it is expected that future missions will operate on marginal space-to-ground communication links that, in turn, can pose an additional risk on the successful scientific data return of these missions. For low data-rate and low downlink-margin missions, the buffering of the telemetry signal for further signal processing to improve data return is a possible strategy; it has been adopted for the Galileo S-band mission. This article describes techniques used for postprocessing of buffered telemetry signal segments (called gaps) to recover data lost during acquisition and resynchronization. Two methods, one for a closed-loop and the other one for an open-loop configuration, are discussed in this article. Both of them can be used in either forward or backward processing of signal segments, depending on where a gap is specifically situated in a pass.

  11. The role of artificial intelligence techniques in scheduling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geoffroy, Amy L.; Britt, Daniel L.; Gohring, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques provide good solutions for many of the problems which are characteristic of scheduling applications. However, scheduling is a large, complex heterogeneous problem. Different applications will require different solutions. Any individual application will require the use of a variety of techniques, including both AI and conventional software methods. The operational context of the scheduling system will also play a large role in design considerations. The key is to identify those places where a specific AI technique is in fact the preferable solution, and to integrate that technique into the overall architecture.

  12. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  13. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution. PMID:23729251

  14. Optical Techniques in Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Lakshminarayananan, Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics is an innovative technique for optical control of cells. This field has exploded over the past decade or so and has given rise to great advances in neuroscience. A variety of applications both from the basic and applied research have emerged, turning the early ideas into a powerful paradigm for cell biology, neuroscience and medical research. This review aims at highlighting the basic concepts that are essential for a comprehensive understanding of optogenetics and some important biological/biomedical applications. Further, emphasis is placed on advancement in optogenetics-associated light-based methods for controlling gene expression, spatially-controlled optogenetic stimulation and detection of cellular activities. PMID:26412943

  15. Monovision techniques for telerobots

    SciTech Connect

    Goode, P.W.; Cornils, K.

    1987-01-01

    The primary task of the vision sensor in a telerobotic system is to provide information about the position of the system's effector relative to objects of interest in its environment. The subtasks required to perform the primary task include image segmentation, object recognition, and object location and orientation in some coordinate system. The accomplishment of the vision task requires the appropriate processing tools and the system methodology to effectively apply the tools to the subtasks. This paper describes the functional structure of the telerobotic vision system used in the Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory (ISRL) and discusses two monovision techniques for accomplishing the vision subtasks. 11 references.

  16. Monovision techniques for telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, P. W.; Carnils, K.

    1987-01-01

    The primary task of the vision sensor in a telerobotic system is to provide information about the position of the system's effector relative to objects of interest in its environment. The subtasks required to perform the primary task include image segmentation, object recognition, and object location and orientation in some coordinate system. The accomplishment of the vision task requires the appropriate processing tools and the system methodology to effectively apply the tools to the subtasks. The functional structure of the telerobotic vision system used in the Langley Research Center's Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory is discussed as well as two monovision techniques for accomplishing the vision subtasks.

  17. Synthetic battery cycling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Synthetic battery cycling makes use of the fast growing capability of computer graphics to illustrate some of the basic characteristics of operation of individual electrodes within an operating electrochemical cell. It can also simulate the operation of an entire string of cells that are used as the energy storage subsystem of a power system. The group of techniques that as a class have been referred to as Synthetic Battery Cycling is developed in part to try to bridge the gap of understanding that exists between single cell characteristics and battery system behavior.

  18. Formulation techniques for nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I; Payán-Rodríguez, Luis A; García-Cuéllar, Alejandro J; Ramón-Raygoza, E D; L Cadena-de-la-Peña, Natalia; Medina-Carreón, David

    2013-11-01

    Fluids with suspended nanoparticles, commonly known as nanofluids, may be formulated to improve the thermal performance of industrial heat transfer systems and applications. Nanofluids may show enhanced thermal and electrical properties such as thermal conductivity, viscosity, heat transfer coefficient, dielectric strength, etc. However, stability problems may arise as nanoparticles usually have the tendency to agglomerate and sediment producing deterioration in the increment of these properties. In this review, we discuss patents that report advances in the formulation of nanofluids including: production methods, selection of components (nanoparticles, base fluid and surfactants), their chemical compositions and morphologies, and characterization techniques. Finally, current and future directions in the development of nanofluid formulation are discussed. PMID:24330043

  19. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  20. RFI emitter location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the location of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter location within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.

  1. Brief inpatient psychotherapeutic technique.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michelle B; Jacobo, Michelle C

    2013-09-01

    Trainees rotate onto the medical psychiatric inpatient unit at Massachusetts General Hospital every 6 weeks to learn how to conduct brief inpatient psychotherapy from two staff psychologists and one staff psychiatrist. This article focuses on four key therapeutic principles/techniques used when teaching these trainees about brief inpatient psychotherapy. These include support, affective experience and expression, chain analysis, and identification of relational styles/maladaptive relational patterns. We also briefly discuss our approach to training. Theoretical rationale, numerous clinical examples, and empirical support (of inpatient psychotherapy) are provided. PMID:24000872

  2. Principles of Electromigration Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziubakiewicz, Ewelina; Buszewski, Bogusław

    Electromigration techniques provide the separation of analyzed sample components owing to external voltage generating electrokinetic phenomena—electrophoresis and electroosmosis. Taking into account the relatively large number of parameters dealt with during electrophoretic analyses, it is essential to know their influence on the achieved separation of analytes. In this chapter the theoretical and practical aspects of a resolution optimization, as well as the effect of different separation parameters on the migration behavior are described. These, among others, include migration time, efficiency, selectivity, and resolution. The influence of electrods polarization, applied voltage, temperature, capillary, background electrolyte, and various additives on the separation is also discussed.

  3. Techniques in protein methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Cheng, Donghang; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-01-01

    Proteins can be methylated on the side-chain nitrogens of arginine and lysine residues or on carboxy-termini. Protein methylation is a way of subtly changing the primary sequence of a peptide so that it can encode more information. This common posttranslational modification is implicated in the regulation of a variety of processes including protein trafficking, transcription and protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we will use the arginine methyltransferases to illustrate different approaches that have been developed to assess protein methylation. Both in vivo and in vitro methylation techniques are described, and the use of small molecule inhibitors of protein methylation will be demonstrated. PMID:15173617

  4. Monovision techniques for telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Plesent W.; Cornils, Karin

    1987-01-01

    The primary task of the vision sensor in a telerobotic system is to provide information about the position of the system's effector relative to objects of interest in its environment. The subtasks required to perform the primary task include image segmentation, object recognition, and object location and orientation in some coordinate system. The accomplishment of the vision task requires the appropriate processing tools and the system methodology to effectively apply the tools to the subtasks. This paper describes the functional structure of the telerobotic vision system used in the Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory (ISRL) and discusses two monovision techniques for accomplishing the vision subtasks.

  5. Propeller flow visualization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, G. L.; Paulovich, F. J.; Greissing, J. P.; Walker, E. D.

    1982-01-01

    Propeller flow visualization techniques were tested. The actual operating blade shape as it determines the actual propeller performance and noise was established. The ability to photographically determine the advanced propeller blade tip deflections, local flow field conditions, and gain insight into aeroelastic instability is demonstrated. The analytical prediction methods which are being developed can be compared with experimental data. These comparisons contribute to the verification of these improved methods and give improved capability for designing future advanced propellers with enhanced performance and noise characteristics.

  6. Optical techniques in optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Lakshminarayananan, Vasudevan

    2015-07-01

    Optogenetics is an innovative technique for optical control of cells. This field has exploded over the past decade or so and has given rise to great advances in neuroscience. A variety of applications both from the basic and applied research have emerged, turning the early ideas into a powerful paradigm for cell biology, neuroscience, and medical research. This review aims at highlighting the basic concepts that are essential for a comprehensive understanding of optogenetics and some important biological/biomedical applications. Further, emphasis is placed on advancement in optogenetics-associated light-based methods for controlling gene expression, spatially controlled optogenetic stimulation and detection of cellular activities.

  7. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  8. Applicability of Complex Organization Theory to Small Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolch, Norman A.; Heffernan, William D.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews research literature and describes a study concerning the applicability of complex organization theory to small organizations. Finds that organizational-structural properties can be measured in small organizations; complex organization theory can be used to better understand small organizations; and certain measurement techniques used in…

  9. AFLP: a new technique for DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, P; Hogers, R; Bleeker, M; Reijans, M; van de Lee, T; Hornes, M; Frijters, A; Pot, J; Peleman, J; Kuiper, M

    1995-01-01

    A novel DNA fingerprinting technique called AFLP is described. The AFLP technique is based on the selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments from a total digest of genomic DNA. The technique involves three steps: (i) restriction of the DNA and ligation of oligonucleotide adapters, (ii) selective amplification of sets of restriction fragments, and (iii) gel analysis of the amplified fragments. PCR amplification of restriction fragments is achieved by using the adapter and restriction site sequence as target sites for primer annealing. The selective amplification is achieved by the use of primers that extend into the restriction fragments, amplifying only those fragments in which the primer extensions match the nucleotides flanking the restriction sites. Using this method, sets of restriction fragments may be visualized by PCR without knowledge of nucleotide sequence. The method allows the specific co-amplification of high numbers of restriction fragments. The number of fragments that can be analyzed simultaneously, however, is dependent on the resolution of the detection system. Typically 50-100 restriction fragments are amplified and detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. The AFLP technique provides a novel and very powerful DNA fingerprinting technique for DNAs of any origin or complexity. Images PMID:7501463

  10. Complexity scalable motion-compensated temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerckx, Tom; Verdicchio, Fabio; Munteanu, Adrian; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Devos, Harald; Eeckhaut, Hendrik; Christiaens, Mark; Stroobandt, Dirk; Verkest, Diederik; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Computer networks and the internet have taken an important role in modern society. Together with their development, the need for digital video transmission over these networks has grown. To cope with the user demands and limitations of the network, compression of the video material has become an important issue. Additionally, many video-applications require flexibility in terms of scalability and complexity (e.g. HD/SD-TV, video-surveillance). Current ITU-T and ISO/IEC video compression standards (MPEG-x, H.26-x) lack efficient support for these types of scalability. Wavelet-based compression techniques have been proposed to tackle this problem, of which the Motion Compensated Temporal Filtering (MCTF)-based architectures couple state-of-the-art performance with full (quality, resolution, and frame-rate) scalability. However, a significant drawback of these architectures is their high complexity. The computational and memory complexity of both spatial domain (SD) MCTF and in-band (IB) MCTF video codec instantiations are examined in this study. Comparisons in terms of complexity versus performance are presented for both types of codecs. The paper indicates how complexity scalability can be achieved in such video-codecs, and analyses some of the trade-offs between complexity and coding performance. Finally, guidelines on how to implement a fully scalable video-codec that incorporates quality, temporal, resolution and complexity scalability are proposed.

  11. The Autonomy of Technique Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2004-01-01

    Jacques Ellul's claim that technique became an autonomous phenomenon during the middle of the 20th century, and subsequently a system, means that the influence people have on technique is much less decisive than the influence technique has on people. As a sociohistorical description of the relationship between technique and society, it can be…

  12. Synthesis of Cobalt-Acyl-Complexes of the Type MeC(O)Co(CO)3PR3; Characterization of Reactive Intermediates Using TR IR Techniques, Torsten Buetner, Diplom thesis submitted to the Univ. Jena, Germany based on DOE supported studies at UCSB, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Peter C.

    2000-12-31

    OAK-B135 Mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Time-resolved spectroscopic investigations of rhodium and iridium halo carbonyl complex intermediates proposed in methanol carbonylation catalysts.

  13. Profil'-1 measuring complex

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, V.R.; Petrov, A.P.

    1985-04-01

    This paper describes the Profil'-1 hydroacoustic measuring complex. The complex provides documentary information on the bottom profile of reservoirs, the configuration and geometric dimensions of underwater trenches, the spatial position of pipes in uncovered or washedout trenches, the thickness of a layer covering underwater pipes, etc. The complex can also be used to solve other industrial problems such as hydraulic exploration and searching for sunken objects. The Profil'-1 complex is designed for use on board small craft under field conditions with periodic transportation from storage bases to the operating location and back. The complex uses an echo-pulse method for determining the distance and coordinates of objects with the aid of an ultrasonic transceiver in an aqueous medium. Structurally, the complex consists of four main units: a BA-1 vertical sounding antenna unit; a BAS-1 antenna scanning unit; a BFOS-1 signal shaping and processing unit, and a BR-1 recording unit. Use of the complex in pipeline construction and the oil and gas industry will provide a considerable economic gain by reducing the number of diver inspections of underwater pipelines.

  14. PAPR Reduction with Low Computational Complexity for OFDM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gao, Jing; Wang, Jinkuan; Song, Xin; Wang, Bin

    The partial transmit sequence (PTS) technique has received much attention in reducing the high peak to average power ratio (PAPR) of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals, but its exhaustive search of phase factors causes high computational complexity. To solve this problem, a novel method based on optimization algorithm is proposed to reduce the complexity by searching the weighting factors suboptimally. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can not only reduces the PAPR significantly, but also decreases the computational complexity.

  15. Neutron detection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, N.S.; Poon, A.W.P.

    2000-09-14

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has the ability to measure the total flux of all active flavors of neutrinos using the neutral current reaction, whose signature is a neutron. By comparing the rates of the neutral current reaction to the charged current reaction, which only detects electron neutrinos, one can test the neutrino oscillation hypothesis independent of solar models. It is necessary to understand the neutron detection efficiency of the detector to make use of the neutral current reaction. This report demonstrates a coincidence technique to identify neutrons emitted from the {sup 252}Cf neutron calibration source. The source releases on average four neutrons when a {sup 252}Cf nucleus spontaneously fissions. Each neutron is detected as a separate event when the neutron is captured by a deuteron, releasing a gamma ray of approximately 6.25 MeV. This gamma ray is in turn detected by the photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. By investigating the time and spatial separation between neutron-like events, it is possible to obtain a pure sample of neutrons for calibration study. Preliminary results of the technique applied to two calibration runs are presented.

  16. Velocimetry Using Heterodyne Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, O T; Berzins, L V; Goosman, D R; Kuhlow, W W; Sargis, P D; Whitworth, T L

    2004-08-10

    At LLNL, we have been using heterodyne techniques for the past year and a half to measure velocities up to several kilometers-per-second on different types of experiments. We assembled this diagnostic, which we call the Heterodyne Velocimeter (HetV), using commercially available products developed for the communications industry. We use a 1550 nm fiber laser and single mode fibers to deliver light to and from the target. The return Doppler-shifted light is mixed with the original laser light to generate a beat frequency proportional to the velocity. At a velocity of 1000 m/s, the beat signal has a frequency of 1.29 GHz. We record the beat signals directly onto fast digitizers. The maximum velocity is limited by the bandwidth of the electronics and the sampling rate of the digitizers. The record length is limited by the amount of memory contained in the digitizers. This paper describes our approach to measuring velocities with this technique and presents recent data obtained with the HetV.

  17. Code Optimization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    MAGEE,GLEN I.

    2000-08-03

    Computers transfer data in a number of different ways. Whether through a serial port, a parallel port, over a modem, over an ethernet cable, or internally from a hard disk to memory, some data will be lost. To compensate for that loss, numerous error detection and correction algorithms have been developed. One of the most common error correction codes is the Reed-Solomon code, which is a special subset of BCH (Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem) linear cyclic block codes. In the AURA project, an unmanned aircraft sends the data it collects back to earth so it can be analyzed during flight and possible flight modifications made. To counter possible data corruption during transmission, the data is encoded using a multi-block Reed-Solomon implementation with a possibly shortened final block. In order to maximize the amount of data transmitted, it was necessary to reduce the computation time of a Reed-Solomon encoding to three percent of the processor's time. To achieve such a reduction, many code optimization techniques were employed. This paper outlines the steps taken to reduce the processing time of a Reed-Solomon encoding and the insight into modern optimization techniques gained from the experience.

  18. Clipping techniques in cerebral aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Acciarri, Nicola; Toniato, Giovanni; Raabe, Andreas; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The history of cerebral aneurysm surgery owes a great tribute to the tenacity of pioneering neurosurgeons who designed and developed the clips used to close the aneurysms neck. However, until the beginning of the past century, surgery of complex and challenging aneurysms was impossible due to the lack of surgical microscope and commercially available sophisticated clips. The modern era of the spring clips began in the second half of last century. Until then, only malleable metal clips and other non-metallic materials were available for intracranial aneurysms. Indeed, the earliest clips were hazardous and difficult to handle. Several neurosurgeons put their effort in developing new clip models, based on their personal experience in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Finally, the introduction of the surgical microscope, together with the availability of more sophisticated clips, has allowed the treatment of complex and challenging aneurysms. However, today none of the new instruments or tools for surgical therapy of aneurysms could be used safely and effectively without keeping in mind the lessons on innovative surgical techniques provided by great neurovascular surgeons. Thanks to their legacy, we can now treat many types of aneurysms that had always been considered inoperable. In this article, we review the basic principles of surgical clipping and illustrate some more advanced techniques to be used for complex aneurysms. PMID:26657306

  19. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.J.

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the {eta}{sup 5}- and the {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The {sup 77}Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of {eta}{sup 1}(S)-bound thiophenes, {eta}{sup 1}(S)-benzothiophene and {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh{sub 3})Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O{sub 3}SCF{sub 3} was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  20. Genre Complexes in Popular Music

    PubMed Central

    Childress, C. Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the sociology of music suggests a declining importance of genre categories. Yet other work in this research stream and in the sociology of classification argues for the continued prevalence of genres as a meaningful tool through which creators, critics and consumers focus their attention in the topology of available works. Building from work in the study of categories and categorization we examine how boundary strength and internal differentiation structure the genre pairings of some 3 million musicians and groups. Using a range of network-based and statistical techniques, we uncover three musical “complexes,” which are collectively constituted by 16 smaller genre communities. Our analysis shows that the musical universe is not monolithically organized but rather composed of multiple worlds that are differently structured—i.e., uncentered, single-centered, and multi-centered. PMID:27203852

  1. Genre Complexes in Popular Music.

    PubMed

    Silver, Daniel; Lee, Monica; Childress, C Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the sociology of music suggests a declining importance of genre categories. Yet other work in this research stream and in the sociology of classification argues for the continued prevalence of genres as a meaningful tool through which creators, critics and consumers focus their attention in the topology of available works. Building from work in the study of categories and categorization we examine how boundary strength and internal differentiation structure the genre pairings of some 3 million musicians and groups. Using a range of network-based and statistical techniques, we uncover three musical "complexes," which are collectively constituted by 16 smaller genre communities. Our analysis shows that the musical universe is not monolithically organized but rather composed of multiple worlds that are differently structured-i.e., uncentered, single-centered, and multi-centered. PMID:27203852

  2. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  3. Complexity and robustness

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J. M.; Doyle, John

    2002-01-01

    Highly optimized tolerance (HOT) was recently introduced as a conceptual framework to study fundamental aspects of complexity. HOT is motivated primarily by systems from biology and engineering and emphasizes, (i) highly structured, nongeneric, self-dissimilar internal configurations, and (ii) robust yet fragile external behavior. HOT claims these are the most important features of complexity and not accidents of evolution or artifices of engineering design but are inevitably intertwined and mutually reinforcing. In the spirit of this collection, our paper contrasts HOT with alternative perspectives on complexity, drawing on real-world examples and also model systems, particularly those from self-organized criticality. PMID:11875207

  4. Controllability of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2013-03-01

    We review recent work on controllability of complex systems. We also discuss the interplay of our results with questions of synchronization, and point out key directions of future research. Work done in collaboration with Yang-Yu Liu, Center for Complex Network Research and Departments of Physics, Computer Science and Biology, Northeastern University and Center for Cancer Systems Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Albert-László Barabási, Center for Complex Network Research and Departments of Physics, Computer Science and Biology, Northeastern University; Center for Cancer Systems Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

  5. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice. PMID:26372537

  6. Complex intuitionistic fuzzy sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkouri, Abdulazeez (Moh'd. Jumah) S.; Salleh, Abdul Razak

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a new concept of complex intuitionistic fuzzy set (CIFS) which is generalized from the innovative concept of a complex fuzzy set (CFS) by adding the non-membership term to the definition of CFS. The novelty of CIFS lies in its ability for membership and non-membership functions to achieve more range of values. The ranges of values are extended to the unit circle in complex plane for both membership and non-membership functions instead of [0, 1] as in the conventional intuitionistic fuzzy functions. We define basic operations namely complement, union, and intersection on CIFSs. Properties of these operations are derived.

  7. Complex equiangular tight frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, Joel A.

    2005-08-01

    A complex equiangular tight frame (ETF) is a tight frame consisting of N unit vectors in Cd whose absolute inner products are identical. One may view complex ETFs as a natural geometric generalization of an orthonormal basis. Numerical evidence suggests that these objects do not arise for most pairs (d, N). The goal of this paper is to develop conditions on (d, N) under which complex ETFs can exist. In particular, this work concentrates on the class of harmonic ETFs, in which the components of the frame vectors are roots of unity. In this case, it is possible to leverage field theory to obtain stringent restrictions on the possible values for (d, N).

  8. Climate Science Communications - Video Visualization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, J. P.; Mann, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Communicating Climate science is challenging due to it's complexity. But as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. Visualization techniques can be merely graphical or combine multimedia so as to make graphs come alive in context with other visual and auditory cues. This can also make the information come alive in a way that better communicates what the science is all about. What types of graphics to use depends on your audience, some graphs are great for scientists but if you are trying to communicate to a less sophisticated audience, certain visuals translate information in a more easily perceptible manner. Hollywood techniques and style can be applied to these graphs to give them even more impact. Video is one of the most powerful communication tools in its ability to combine visual and audio through time. Adding music and visual cues such as pans and zooms can greatly enhance the ability to communicate your concepts. Video software ranges from relatively simple to very sophisticated. In reality, you don't need the best tools to get your point across. In fact, with relatively inexpensive software, you can put together powerful videos that more effectively convey the science you are working on with greater sophistication, and in an entertaining way. We will examine some basic techniques to increase the quality of video visualization to make it more effective in communicating complexity. If a picture is worth a thousand words, a decent video with music, and a bit of narration is priceless.

  9. Fourier technique for studying ammonoid sutures

    SciTech Connect

    Gildner, R.F.; Ackerly, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Suture patterns have long been recognized as being of primary importance in the study of ammonoids. The authors have developed a technique to use Fourier analysis to study these structures by using a simple transformation: x-y data of a digitized suture are transformed to angle of slope versus position along the suture's length. A Fast Fourier Transform applied to the data produces a power spectrum (amplitude versus wave number) providing a precise and accurate measure of suture shape. The authors have applied this technique to the analysis of ontogenetic change in suture morphology. In goniatitic, ceratitic and preadult ammonitic patterns most of the change is exhibited in the amplitudes of the lowest ten wave numbers. Their Fourier coefficients clearly show trends not readily apparent by visual inspection. The more complex ammonitic patterns are reflected in increased amplitudes of higher wave numbers (a broader peak of the power spectrum) and their analysis is necessarily more complex. The Fourier approach presents the opportunity to quantitatively measure and describe the tempo and mode of evolution in the Ammonoidea. Potential applications of the new technique, as well as limitations, are discussed with special attention to investigations of ammonoid ontogeny and phylogeny.

  10. PNNL researcher explores behavior of complex molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Manke, Kristin L.

    2007-11-19

    From cold winters in St. Petersburg, Russia, to sweltering summers in southeastern Washington State, Dr. Julia Laskin’s career in science has been an interesting journey. Her latest trip landed her on the steps of the White House for a photo-op with the President. Laskin received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for her research on the fundamental aspects of the reaction kinetics and dynamics of activating and dissociating complex molecular ions. Her work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides a basis for the development of analytical techniques for improved characterization of synthetic and natural polymers, petroleum, biofuels and other complex samples using mass spectrometry.

  11. Selecting model complexity in learning problems

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, K.L.; Kumar, P.R.

    1993-10-01

    To learn (or generalize) from noisy data, one must resist the temptation to pick a model for the underlying process that overfits the data. Many existing techniques solve this problem at the expense of requiring the evaluation of an absolute, a priori measure of each model`s complexity. We present a method that does not. Instead, it uses a natural, relative measure of each model`s complexity. This method first creates a pool of ``simple`` candidate models using part of the data and then selects from among these by using the rest of the data.

  12. Compression of Complex-Valued SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel P.; Ives, R.W.

    1999-03-03

    Synthetic Aperture Radars are coherent imaging systems that produce complex-valued images of the ground. Because modern systems can generate large amounts of data, there is substantial interest in applying image compression techniques to these products. In this paper, we examine the properties of complex-valued SAR images relevant to the task of data compression. We advocate the use of transform-based compression methods but employ radically different quantization strategies than those commonly used for incoherent optical images. The theory, methodology, and examples are presented.

  13. Study of Coronagraphic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, V.; Aziz, M.; Gonsalves, R.; Korzennik, S.; Labeyrie, A.; Lyon, R.; Melnick, G.; Somerstein, S.; Vasudevan, G.; Woodruff, R.

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets is important for determining the properties of individual planets, for studying multi-planet systems, and for observing the spatial structure of debris disks. Obtaining spectra of extra-solar planets enables us to constrain the composition of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, their climates, and their rotation periods. The techniques required to isolate and detect an extra-solar planet next to its host star are quite challenging and require significant improvement. SAO has set up a testbed to study coronagraphic techniques, starting with Labeyrie's multi-step speckle reduction technique. The testbed consists of a classical coronagraph with high precision optics. A telescope is simulated by a 2 inch spherical mirror with lambda/1000 surface quality. The focal length (1 meter) of this mirror was chosen that spherical aberration can be neglected. A spatially-filtered laser simulates the host star and an optional attenuated second laser simulates the planet. As an additional option, we can incorporate apodizing masks to further improve the performance of the coronagraph. The output signal of the coronagraph is fed into a single Labeyrie correction stage. It consists of a mirror to relay the light onto a 140-element MEMS deformable mirror (DM) for the phase correction. The reflected light is then focused onto a second occulter to block most of the speckle light and finally imaged onto a CCD. The phase correction function and, thus, the drive signal for the DM, is derived from images taken in and slightly out of the focal plane using phase diversity. The expected performance improvement is about one order of magnitude. An advanced concept utilizing phase and amplitude correction promises an even higher degree of speckle light suppression. In addition, we are using the testbed to characterize occulter masks developed in collaboration with Harvard University and Lockheed Martin Corp. At Harvard University we are developing a method

  14. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  15. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  16. A complex legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Cristopher

    2011-11-01

    In his tragically short life, Alan Turing helped define what computing machines are capable of, and where they reach inherent limits. His legacy is still felt every day, in areas ranging from computational complexity theory to cryptography and quantum computing.

  17. Specialist complex care.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Susan

    2016-08-01

    I agree with your editorial on how NHS England and the Department of Health (DH) have failed to realise that specialist care for complex diseases requires experienced and knowledgeable support. PMID:27484551

  18. Complexity at mesoscopic lengthscale.

    PubMed

    Egami, T

    2015-09-01

    Modern materials are often complex in the structure at mesoscale. The method of pair-density function (PDF) is a powerful tool to characterize mesoscopic structure, bridging short- and long-range structures. PMID:26306189

  19. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  20. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.