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Sample records for drugs aspirin nimesulide

  1. Drug/drug interaction of common NSAIDs with antiplatelet effect of aspirin in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Aaruni; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Saxena, Anil K

    2013-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin at the level of the platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme. In order to examine the interference of common NSAIDs with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin the human platelet rich plasma from voluntary donors was used for arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and determination of thromboxane synthesis. Further, docking studies were used to explain the molecular basis of the NSAID/aspirin interaction. The experimental results showed that celecoxib, dipyrone (active metabolite), ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, naproxen, nimesulide, oxaprozin, and piroxicam significantly interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin, while diclofenac, ketorolac and acetaminophen do not. Docking studies suggested that NSAIDs forming hydrogen bonds with Ser530, Arg120, Tyr385 and other amino acids of the COX-1 hydrophobic channel interfere with antiplatelet activity of aspirin while non interfering NSAIDs do not form relevant hydrogen bond interactions within the aspirin binding site. In conclusion, docking analysis of NSAID interactions at the COX-1 active site appears useful to predict their interference with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin. The results, demonstrate that some NSAIDs do not interfere with the antiplatelet action of aspirin while many others do and provide a basis for understanding the observed differences among individual non-aspirin NSAIDs. PMID:24075938

  2. Liposomal Aloe vera trans-emulgel drug delivery of naproxen and nimesulide: A study

    PubMed Central

    Venkataharsha, Panuganti; Maheshwara, Ellutla; Raju, Y Prasanna; Reddy, Vayalpati Ashok; Rayadu, Bandugalla Sanjeev; Karisetty, Basappa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The present aim of this study was to formulate naproxen and nimesulide liposomal formulation for incorporation in Aloe vera transemulgel and to carry out in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the formulation. Material and Methods: A. vera gel was prepared and used as a gel base for formulation. Carbopol 934 is used as a gelling agent and Methyl paraben was used as a preservative for the formulation of the gel. Liposomes was formulated by using hydration method. The formulated naproxen and nimesulide liposomal formulation using A. vera trans-emul gel were evaluated for in vitro studies such as drug release, permeation study, and drug content and entrapment efficiency. Paw edema method in Wistar rats induced by carrageenan is used to study in vivo anti-inflammatory action. Result: From the in vitro studies such permeability drug release naproxen 65% (69.6), Nimesulide 65% (61.1), and commercial Nimsulide gel (60.82) at 240 min. In vivo data shows that formulated liposomal transemulgel formulation are superior in their efficacy compared to commercial and A. vera gel. The results are compared with the commercial formulations. Conclusion: From our results, it is concluded that the A. vera trans emul gel using nimesulide and naproxen liposomal formulation is stable and prepared gel base is effective for formulation with high drug release and drug content compared with commercial formulation with significant anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:25599030

  3. Molecular Dynamics and Physical Stability of Amorphous Nimesulide Drug and Its Binary Drug-Polymer Systems.

    PubMed

    Knapik, J; Wojnarowska, Z; Grzybowska, K; Tajber, L; Mesallati, H; Paluch, K J; Paluch, M

    2016-06-01

    In this article we study the effectiveness of three well-known polymers: inulin, Soluplus, and PVP in stabilizing the amorphous form of nimesulide (NMS) drug. The recrystallization tendency of pure drug as well as measured drug-polymer systems were examined at isothermal conditions by broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) and at nonisothermal conditions by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our investigation has shown that the crystallization half-life time of pure NMS at 328 K is equal to 33 min. We found that this time can be prolonged to 40 years after adding 20% w/w PVP to NMS. This polymer proved to be the best NMS stabilizer, while the worst stabilization effect was exhibited by inulin. Additionally, our DSC, BDS, and FTIR studies indicate that for suppression of NMS recrystallization in the NMS-PVP system, the two mechanisms are responsible: the polymeric steric hindrances and the antiplastization effect exerted by the excipient. PMID:27149568

  4. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide inhibits neutrophil adherence to and migration across monolayers of cytokine-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dapino, P; Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophil migration through the microvascular endothelium represents a fundamental event for the cell accumulation at sites of tissue injury. Owing to their capacity to modify the structural and functional characteristics of endothelial cells, inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) play a pivotal role in directing circulating neutrophils away from the bloodstream to the interstitial tissue. In order to study neutrophil transendothelial migration, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluence on the polycarbonate filter of two-compartment migration chambers. Pretreatment of the endothelial cell monolayers with TNF alpha for 4 h resulted in rapid migration of approximately 50% of subsequently added neutrophils across the layers. In contrast, < 10% of added neutrophils penetrated untreated endothelial monolayers. Using TNF alpha-treated endothelium, neutrophil transmigration was inhibited by the methane sulfonanilide anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. Moreover, neutrophil adherence to TNF alpha-treated endothelial monolayers, cultured in microtiter wells, was markedly reduced by nimesulide. A linear correlation between the drug-dependent inhibition of neutrophil transmigration and neutrophil adherence was found. Finally, nimesulide did not interfere with the TNF alpha ability to convert resting endothelium into a pro-adhesive and pro-locomotory cell layer. The data suggest that nimesulide reduces neutrophil transendothelial migration primarily by limiting the cell anchorage to the TNF alpha-activated endothelium. Therefore, the drug has the potential to down-regulate neutrophil extravasation and, in turn, the burden of neutrophil oxidants and proteases leading to tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:7824814

  5. Nimesulide as a downregulator of the activity of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase pathway. Focus on the histoprotective potential of the drug during inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Montagnani, G; Gatti, F; Guidi, G; Dallegri, F

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophils, recruited to tissue sites of inflammation, release a variety of oxidants and enzymes, which are responsible for tissue damage. Among the oxidants released are potent chlorinated compounds, such as hypochlorous acid and chloramines, which induce tissue cell damage and inactivate protease inhibitors, particularly alpha 1-antitrypsin, the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. In studying a rational approach to the pharmacological control of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury, we investigated the activity of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. This agent reduced the function of the myeloperoxidase pathway (which generates hypochlorous acid), by exerting a cell-directed inhibitory activity, as shown by measurement of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production. Nimesulide also inactivated hypochlorous acid directly and protected alpha 1-antitrypsin from the neutrophil-mediated oxidation. Thus, neutrophil elastolytic activity may be attenuated by nimesulide-spared alpha 1-antitrypsin. The prevention of oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by nimesulide strictly correlates with the drug's ability to suppress the extracellular availability of hypochlorous acid. Taken together, these data suggest that nimesulide may prevent tissue injury at sites of inflammation by maintaining natural host protective systems. PMID:7506191

  6. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the neutrophil promoted inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Sacchetti, C

    1992-03-01

    We investigated the effect of some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (aspirin, naproxen and nimesulide) on the ability of neutrophils to oxidatively inactivate the alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). Nimesulide prevented the inactivation of A1PI by effectively scavenging the hypochlorous acid released by neutrophils. Aspirin and naproxen were completely ineffective. We suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of nimesulide may be due at least in part to the rescue of A1PI from neutrophil oxidative attack. The rescue of A1PI may in fact alter the elastase-A1PI balance in favor of the inhibitor, with resulting tissue protection. PMID:1578457

  7. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... aches. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past or who have angina (chest ... are experiencing or who have recently experienced a heart attack. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent ischemic ...

  8. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough and cold medications. This monograph only includes information about the use of aspirin alone. If you are taking a combination product, read the information on the package or prescription label or ask ...

  9. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide rescues alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor from oxidative inactivation by phagocytosing neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Bevilacqua, M

    1992-01-01

    When neutrophils are recruited to tissue sites and exposed to phagocytosable targets, they release oxidants which may be responsible for the local inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). Consequently, A1PI becomes incapable of inhibiting the proteolytic activity of elastase, released at the same time by neutrophils as a result of leakage from phagocytic vacuoles. In the present paper we show that phagocytosing neutrophils inactivate A1PI via a process inhibitable by chemical agents known to interfere with the hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-generating myeloperoxidase pathway. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide (NMS), which is able to efficiently limit the extracellular availability of HOCl in the neutrophil surroundings, was found to prevent the inactivation of A1PI by neutrophils. The results provide evidence for a possible way to control neutrophil elastase activity by rescuing its natural inhibitor (A1PI) at inflamed tissue sites during infectious and noninfectious processes. PMID:1579712

  10. Drug Resistance and Pseudoresistance: An Unintended Consequence of Enteric Coating Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Tilo; Fries, Susanne; Lawson, John A.; Kapoor, Shiv C.; Grant, Gregory R.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of “aspirin resistance” has emerged and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. We aimed to determine the commonality of a mechanistically consistent, stable and specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin – such as might be explained by genetic causes. Methods and Results Healthy volunteers (n=400) were screened for their response to a single oral dose of 325 mg immediate release or enteric coated aspirin. Response parameters reflected the activity of aspirin's molecular target, cyclooxygenase-1. Individuals who appeared “aspirin resistant” on one occasion underwent repeat testing and if still “resistant” were exposed to low dose enteric coated aspirin (81 mg) and clopidogrel (75 mg) for one week each. Variable absorption caused a high frequency of apparent resistance to a single dose of 325 mg enteric coated aspirin (up to 49%) but not to immediate release aspirin (0%). All individuals responded to aspirin upon repeated exposure, extension of the post dosing interval or addition of aspirin to their platelets ex vivo. Conclusions Pharmacological resistance to aspirin is rare; this study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration. Clinical Trial Registration Information clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00948987. PMID:23212718

  11. Characterization and compaction behaviour of nimesulide crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Censi, Roberta; Barthélémy, Christine; Gobetto, Roberto; Joiris, Etienne; Masic, Admir; Odou, Pascal; Martelli, Sante

    2007-09-01

    Nimesulide is a typical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), widely used in solid oral formulations. By crystallizing nimesulide from an ethanol solution a crystalline form was obtained, different from the reference sample, as confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and solid cross polarization-magic angle spinning ((13)C-CPMAS) NMR. Moreover, when crystallized from dioxane nimesulide forms a solvate. The solvate was characterized by XRPD, IR-spectrometry, DSC, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and by (13)C-CPMAS NMR. In particular, through this technique, the presence of several conformational isomers was demonstrated. In addition to the physico-chemical characterization, the technological properties of nimesulide, namely densification and tableting, were evaluated. Contrarily to the other forms that are affected by capping phenomena at increasing compression pressures, the form obtained by desolvation of dioxane solvate has positive effect on tableting properties, increasing both compressibility and tabletability of nimesulide. PMID:17583450

  12. Stress modification of the toxicity of antimotion sickness drugs and Aspirin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, D.; Marra, C.; Goodwin, A.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of environmental temperature on the toxicity of cyclizine, trimethobenzamide, and Aspirin were studied in mice. LD-50s were compared at 30 C, 22 C, and 15 C. At 30 C the toxicity of all three drugs increased, with that to Aspirin being affected most. Cooling decreased the toxicity of cyclizine and had no significant effect on that of trimethobenzamide or aspirin. These findings indicate that alterations in environmental temperature markedly affect drug toxicity. They emphasize that such alterations, and particularly increases in temperature, do not have to be particularly drastic, but that 'mild' variations in the environment are effective in altering an animal's sensitivity to a drug.

  13. Electrochemical oxidation of drug residues in water by the example of tetracycline, gentamicine and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Weichgrebe, D; Danilova, E; Rosenwinkel, K H; Vedenjapin, A A; Baturova, M

    2004-01-01

    Electro-chemical oxidation as a method to destroy drug residues like aspirin, tetracycline or gentamicine in water was investigated with C-anodes (modified by manganese oxides) and Pt anodes. The mechanism of aspirin and tetracycline oxidation and the influence of the biocide effect was observed using GC-MS and three different microbiological tests. In general, the biological availability increases with progressive oxidation of the antibiotics. PMID:15077972

  14. Repurposing of Aspirin and Ibuprofen as Candidate Anti-Cryptococcus Drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogundeji, Adepemi O; Pohl, Carolina H; Sebolai, Olihile M

    2016-08-01

    The usage of fluconazole and amphotericin B in clinical settings is often limited by, among other things, drug resistance development and undesired side effects. Thus, there is a constant need to find new drugs to better manage fungal infections. Toward this end, the study described in this paper considered the repurposing of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and ibuprofen as alternative drugs to control the growth of cryptococcal cells. In vitro susceptibility tests, including a checkerboard assay, were performed to assess the response of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii to the above-mentioned anti-inflammatory drugs. Next, the capacity of these two drugs to induce stress as well as their mode of action in the killing of cryptococcal cells was determined. The studied fungal strains revealed a response to both aspirin and ibuprofen that was dose dependent, with ibuprofen exerting greater antimicrobial action. More importantly, the MICs of these drugs did not negatively (i) affect growth or (ii) impair the functioning of macrophages; rather, they enhanced the ability of these immune cells to phagocytose cryptococcal cells. Ibuprofen was also shown to act in synergy with fluconazole and amphotericin B. The treatment of cryptococcal cells with aspirin or ibuprofen led to stress induction via activation of the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, and cell death was eventually achieved through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated membrane damage. The presented data highlight the potential clinical application of aspirin and ibuprofen as candidate anti-Cryptococcus drugs. PMID:27246782

  15. Adverse respiratory reactions to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ronald A

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset condition that manifests as asthma, rhinosinusitis/nasal polyps, and sensitivity to aspirin and other cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-inhibitor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). There is no cross-sensitivity to highly selective COX-2 inhibitors. AERD is chronic and does not improve with avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors. The diagnosis of AERD is made through provocative challenge testing. Following a positive aspirin challenge, patients can be desensitized to aspirin and NSAIDs. The desensitized state can be maintained indefinitely with continued daily administration. After desensitization, there is an approximately 48-hour refractory period to adverse effects from aspirin. The pathogenesis of AERD remains unknown, but these patients have been shown to have multiple abnormalities in arachidonic acid metabolism and in cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptors. AERD patients can take up to 650 mg of acetaminophen for analgesic or antipyretic relief. Patients can also use weak COX-1 inhibitors, such as sodium salicylate or choline magnesium trisalicylate. Treatment of AERD patients with antileukotriene medications has been helpful but not preferential when compared with non-AERD patients. An alternative treatment for many AERD patients is aspirin desensitization. This is particularly effective in reducing upper-airway mucosal congestion, nasal polyp formation, and systemic steroids. PMID:14680616

  16. Chemoattractant-induced release of elastase by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed neutrophils; inhibitory effect of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Barbera, P; Dapino, P; Sacchetti, C; Dallegri, F

    1997-10-01

    Human neutrophils, pre-exposed to low concentrations (1-10 ng/ml) of bacterial LPS in the presence of 1% autologous serum, released elastase activity in response to N-formyl-met-leu-phe (fMLP). Both cell incubation with LPS without subsequent fMLP stimulus and fMLP stimulation without prior exposure to LPS failed to promote significant elastase release. Therefore, LPS primes neutrophils for the subsequent release of elastase in response to fMLP. Compared with fMLP, human recombinant C5a had a slight although not significant activity, whereas other chemoattractants such as IL-8, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 were ineffective. The fMLP-induced response of LPS-primed neutrophils was susceptible to suppression by the methane-sulphonanilide anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide and RO 20-1724, which selectively inhibit cAMP-catabolizing phosphodiesterase type IV. This suggests that the elastase release by LPS-primed neutrophils is likely to be controlled by intracellular cAMP, and raises the possibility of limiting pharmacologically the elastase-mediated tissue injury during neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:9353161

  17. Chemoattractant-induced release of elastase by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed neutrophils; inhibitory effect of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide

    PubMed Central

    OTTONELLO, L; BARBERA, P; DAPINO, P; SACCHETTI, C; DALLEGRI, F

    1997-01-01

    Human neutrophils, pre-exposed to low concentrations (1–10 ng/ml) of bacterial LPS in the presence of 1% autologous serum, released elastase activity in response to n-formyl-met-leu-phe (fMLP). Both cell incubation with LPS without subsequent fMLP stimulus and fMLP stimulation without prior exposure to LPS failed to promote significant elastase release. Therefore, LPS primes neutrophils for the subsequent release of elastase in response to fMLP. Compared with fMLP, human recombinant C5a had a slight although not significant activity, whereas other chemoattractants such as IL-8, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 were ineffective. The fMLP-induced response of LPS-primed neutrophils was susceptible to suppression by the methane-sulphonanilide anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide and RO 20-1724, which selectively inhibit cAMP-catabolizing phosphodiesterase type IV. This suggests that the elastase release by LPS-primed neutrophils is likely to be controlled by intracellular cAMP, and raises the possibility of limiting pharmacologically the elastase-mediated tissue injury during neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:9353161

  18. Use of Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increases Risk for Diverticulitis and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Liu, Yan L.; Huang, Edward S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, have been implicated in diverticular complications. We examined the influence of aspirin and NSAID use on risk of diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding in a large prospective cohort. METHODS We studied 47,210 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohort who were 40–75 years old at baseline, in 1986. We assessed use of aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and other risk factors biennially. We identified men with diverticulitis or diverticular bleeding based on responses to biennial and supplemental questionnaires. RESULTS We documented 939 cases of diverticulitis and 256 cases of diverticular bleeding during a 22-year period of follow-up. After adjustment for risk factors, men who used aspirin regularly (≥2 times per week) had a multivariable relative risk (RR) of 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.47) for diverticulitis and RR of 1.70 (95% CI, 1.21–2.39) for diverticular bleeding, compared with non-users of aspirin and NSAIDs. Use of aspirin at intermediate doses (2–5.9 standard, 325 mg, tablets per week) and frequency (4–6 days per week) were associated with the highest risk of bleeding (multivariable RR=2.32; 95% CI, 1.34–4.02, and multivariable RR=3.13; 95% CI, 1.82–5.38, respectively). Regular users of non-aspirin NSAIDs also had an increased risk of diverticulitis (multivariable RR=1.72; 95% CI, 1.40–2.11) and diverticular bleeding (multivariable RR=1.74; 95% CI, 1.15–2.64), compared with men who denied use of these medications. CONCLUSIONS Regular use of aspirin or NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk for diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding. Patients at risk of diverticular complications should carefully consider the potential risks and benefits of using these medications. PMID:21320500

  19. An Overview Of The Physiology And Pharmacology Of Aspirin And Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, I present an overview of the actions and effects of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although athletic trainers cannot prescribe or dispense prescription medications, they should be as aware of their effects as they are of other methods of injury treatment. To set the discussion in proper perspective, the inflammatory process and its mediators are reviewed briefly. The eicosanoids are a family of very active chemicals, which include: the prostaglandins, thromboxane, and the leukotrienes. They affect inflammation as well as numerous other body processes. Ingesting aspirin and NSAIDs blocks the production of prostaglandins and thromboxane, resulting in desired and undesired effects. The NSAIDs were developed to have the same action as aspirin, but with fewer adverse side effects. Many NSAIDs are currently available, and the decision as to which agent to use depends upon various factors. Surprisingly, recent studies suggest that some NSAIDs may hinder the healing process. Although not a NSAID, acetaminophen has many important clinical uses. Armed with an understanding of how these drugs act, and their potentially harmful aspects, the athletic trainer can assist the team physician in designing an aspirin- or NSAID-therapy regimen. PMID:16558240

  20. Inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor by neutrophil metalloproteinases. Crucial role of the myeloperoxidase system and effects of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1993-01-01

    Supernatants, obtained from normal neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), challenged with opsonized zymosan (OPZ), were found to inactivate the PMN elastase inhibitor, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). As the supernatants were treated with methionine to quench residual oxidants, primarily chloramines, the observed inactivation of A1PI appears to be due to enzymes. The activity of the supernatants was in fact inhibited by metal-chelators and by the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP), which is consistent with the intervention of metalloproteinases. Supernatants from normal PMN triggered by OPZ in the presence of inhibitors of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) system as well as supernatants from MPO-deficient PMN were inactive but displayed the capacity of inactivating A1PI after treatment with the metalloproteinases activator 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate. These data suggest that the A1PI inactivation is due to metalloenzymes released by PMN as latent molecules, in turn activated by the MPO system. The MPO-dependent autoactivation of latent metalloenzymes by PMN, with consequent A1PI inactivation, was inhibited by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide (NMS). As PMN-derived HOCl is well known to inactivate A1PI directly, through a process previously shown to be inhibitable by NMS, the present results suggest: (1) both the oxidative and proteolytic inactivation of A1PI depend on the HOCl-generating MPO system; (2) the tissue-destructive activity of PMN elastase could be controlled by interfering pharmacologically with the PMN-MPO system, directly and indirectly responsible for the breakdown of the tissue antielastase screen. PMID:8385794

  1. In-vitro assessment and pharmacodynamics of nimesulide incorporated Aloe vera transemulgel.

    PubMed

    Vandana, K R; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R; Sundaresan, C R; Sriramaneni, Raghava N; Vadlamudi, Harini C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the investigation was to prepare nimesulide emulsion for incorporation in Aloe vera gel base to formulate 'nimesulide - Aloe vera transemulgel' (NAE) and to carryout in-vitro assessment and in-vivo anti-inflammatory studies of the product. Although the use of nimesulide is banned for oral administration, due to its potential for inducing hepatotoxicity and thrombocytopenia, the use of nimesulide for topical delivery is prominent in the treatment of many inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis. The drug loading capacity of transdermal gels is low for hydrophobic drugs such as nimesulide. Nimesulide can be effectively incorporated into emulgels (a combination of emulsion and gel). Aloe vera has a mild anti-inflammatory effect and in the present study Aloe vera gel was formulated and used as a gel base to prepare NAE. The emulgels thus prepared were evaluated for viscosity, pH, in-vitro permeation, stability and skin irritation test. In-vivo anti-inflammatory studies were performed using carrageenan induced hind paw edema method in Wistar rats. The results were compared with that of commercial nimesulide gel (CNG). From the in-vitro studies, effective permeation of nimesulide from NAE (53.04 %) was observed compared to CNG (44.72 %) at 30 min indicating better drug release from NAE. Topical application of the emulgel found no skin irritation. Stability studies proved the integrity of the formulation. The percentage of inhibition of edema was highest for the prepared NAE (67.4 % inhibition after 240 min) compared to CNG (59.6 %). From our results, it was concluded that the Aloe vera gel acts as an effective gel base to prepare nimesulide emulgel with high drug loading capacity (86.4 % drug content) compared to CNG (70.5 % drug content) with significant anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24295369

  2. Comparison of analgesic effects of nimesulide, paracetamol, and their combination in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mushtaq; Upadhyaya, Prerna; Seth, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the analgesic activity of nimesulide and paracetamol alone and their combination in animal models for the degree of analgesia and the time course of action. Materials and Methods: Analgesia was studied in albino rats using formalin test and in albino mice using writhing test and the radiant heat method. For each test, four groups of six animals each were orally fed with a single dose of nimesulide, paracetamol, and combination of nimesulide + paracetamol and gum acacia as control, respectively. Results: In all the three test models, all three drug treatments showed significant analgesia (P < 0.001) as compared to control, but there was no significant difference in the analgesia produced by either drugs alone or in combination. The radiant heat method demonstrated a quicker onset and longer duration of action with nimesulide, whereas writhing test showed a quicker onset of action with paracetamol. In formalin test, greater degree of analgesia was seen with individual drugs than that of the combination, though this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Nimesulide and paracetamol combination offers no advantage over nimesulide alone or paracetamol alone, either in terms of degree of analgesia or onset of action. Therefore, our study supports the reports claiming irrationality of the fixed dose combination of nimesulide and paracetamol. PMID:21189904

  3. Open access gastroscopy findings are unrelated to the use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J C; Greenaway, J R; Contractor, B R; Idle, N; Bramble, M G

    1997-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether priority should be given to patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or aspirin when selecting which dyspeptic patients to refer for open access gastroscopy. A total of 8156 patients underwent gastroscopy, all of whom had upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients taking NSAIDs or aspirin showed no significant differences in the frequency of ulcer disease when age-matched groups were compared. Although NSAIDs and aspirin are frequently implicated in gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly, patients referred for investigation of dyspepsia show no increase in major endoscopic pathology. PMID:9463986

  4. Aspirin in dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the oldest drugs in the field of medicine, with a wide range of applications. In dermatology, aspirin has shown benefit in a variety of disorders. Recently, reduction of melanoma risk with aspirin has been demonstrated. Although an analgesic to begin with, aspirin has come a long way; after cardiology, it is now found to be useful even in dermatology. PMID:26753146

  5. Recent contributions to knowledge of the mechanism of action of nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, M; Magni, E

    1993-01-01

    Nimesulide is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the sulfonanilide class. Its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities have been demonstrated in several widely used animal experimental models and in numerous clinical trials. Nimesulide only weakly inhibits prostaglandin synthesis and appears to exert its effects through various mechanisms. It inhibits the release of oxidants from activated neutrophils and has a scavenging effect on hypochlorous acid without affecting neutrophil function. Nimesulide also decreases histamine release from tissue mast cells and inhibits the production of platelet-activating factor by human basophils. Furthermore, when added in vitro to cultures of human articular chondrocytes, nimesulide inhibits the release of stromelysin and blocks metalloproteinase activity. PMID:7506193

  6. Aspirin desensitization in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew A; Stevenson, Donald D

    2013-05-01

    Although aspirin desensitization was discovered in 1922, it was not until 1979 that a therapeutic use for aspirin treatment, under the protection of desensitization, was discovered. In the last 33 years, details of aspirin treatment have been refined to the point where it is now recognized and accepted as a major therapeutic intervention in the treatment of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, with therapeutic efficacy in approximately two-thirds of patients. It is only effective in patients who have aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease and none of the other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, despite their cross-reactive inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1, can effectively take the place of aspirin. PMID:23639709

  7. Aspirin overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002542.htm Aspirin overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An overdose of aspirin means you have too much aspirin in your ...

  8. Antioxidant activity of nimesulide and its main metabolites.

    PubMed

    Facino, R M; Carini, M; Aldini, G

    1993-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of nimesulide and its main metabolites, 4'-hydroxynimesulide (M1) and 2-(4'-hydroxyphenoxy)-4-N-acetylamino-methansulfonanilide (M2), was investigated using 2 in vitro models: NADPH-supported lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes (marker MDA formation) and xanthine/xanthine oxidase, iron-promoted depolymerisation of hyaluronic acid, determined by gel permeation chromatographic analysis (marker molecular weight distribution). In the lipid peroxidation model, all the compounds inhibited MDA formation in a concentration-dependent manner, although with different potencies; the maximum scavenging effect was observed for M1 [50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 30 mumol/L; M2 IC50 = 0.5 mmol/L; nimesulide = 0.8 mmol/L]. Nimesulide was more active than its metabolites in preventing OH-induced depolymerisation of hyaluronic acid, with a 50% effective concentration of approximately 230 mumol/L, which was fairly comparable to that of tenoxicam. This protective effect was due to the OH.-entrapping capacity of the drug, which, in the Fenton-driven model, is easily converted, via OH. attack, to M1 and putatively to 2-hydroxy-4-nitro-methansulfonanilide. PMID:7506157

  9. Photoacoustic study of the penetration kinetics of nimesulid into human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barja, P. R.; Veloso, D. J. D. V.

    2010-03-01

    The photoacoustic (PA) effect is observed when modulated (or pulsed) light is absorbed by a sample inside a closed chamber and converted in heat, generating acoustic waves; PA measurements have been employed to evaluate transdermal penetration of topically applied drugs. Phonophoresis is the utilization of ultrasonic (US) energy to enhance absorption of drugs across the epidermal barrier, and its usefulness has been shown by PA measurements. The aim of the present work was to determine the characteristic absorption times of the anti-inflammatory Nimesulid (gel) in human skin, with and without help of therapeutic phonophoresis. After local cleaning, measurements were performed in the forearm of each volunteer before Nimesulid application and for different times after application through massage with the US equipment head; the protocol was repeated for the opposite forearm, but without US emission. Curves of the PA signal level as a function of time were adjusted by a Boltzmann equation, leading to the determination of the characteristic absorption time (about 12 minutes). No significant gain was observed in Nimesulid absorption with the utilization of US radiation, indicating that topic application of Nimesulid does not require the use of phonophoresis, due to the natural fast penetration of the Nimesulid gel.

  10. Inhibition of the neutrophil oxidative response induced by the oral administration of nimesulide in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Dallegri, F

    1992-01-01

    The superoxide (O2) production by phagocytes (neutrophils plus monocytes) and the lactoferrin release by neutrophils were measured in normal volunteers before and after the oral administration of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. The chemotactic factor N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and opsonized zymosan particles (OPZ) were used as activating stimuli. The oral administration of nimesulide lowered the phagocyte ability to generate O2- in response to both FMLP (percent inhibition = 67.62) and OPZ (percent inhibition = 36.75). The lactoferrin release by neutrophils was unaffected, proving that the drug does not affect the exocytosis of specific granules. The results provide direct evidence that the oral administration of nimesulide efficiently reduces the oxidative potential of phagocytes, particularly neutrophils, without interfering with mechanisms related to exocytosis of specific granules and involved in the amplification of the cell responses to inflammatory mediators. PMID:1340506

  11. In vivo selectivity of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Laudanno, O M; Cesolari, J A; Esnarriaga, J; San Miguel, P; Bedini, O A

    2000-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study in vivo COX-2-COX-1 selectivity of 16 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in equipotent ulcerogenic doses in two in vivo experimental models. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, nimesulide, aceclofenac, aspirin, sodium diclofenac, meloxicam, naproxene, paracetamol, piroxicam, tenoxicam, nabumetone, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, etodolac, and ketorolac were administered to female Wistar rats (N = 10 each group). In experiment I, solid food plus subcutaneous NSAIDs were given. In experiment II, NSAIDs were given by oral gavage and in bolus. Macroscopic gastric antral ulcer area (30%) and intestinal erosiva area (295 mm2) in experiment I and necrotic gastric fundus area (65%) and erosive intestinal area (182 mm2), "in vivo" the NSAIDs COX-1 was showed. Neutrofilia assessed in gastric intestinal mucosa where also ibuprofen and paracetamol not given neotrophilic infiltration. In conclusion, COX-2-COX-1 selectivity was demonstrated in vivo with the drugs aceclofenac, nabumetone, meloxicam, nimesulide, and paracetamol. PMID:10961715

  12. Imidazolium ionic liquids as solvents of pharmaceuticals: influence on HSA binding and partition coefficient of nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana M O; Ribeiro, Diogo M G; Pinto, Paula C A G; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2013-02-25

    In this work, the influence of imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) on bio-chemical parameters that influence the in vivo behavior of nimesulide was evaluated. In this context, the binding of nimesulide to human serum albumin (HSA), in IL media, was studied. In parallel, the evaluation of the interaction of drug-IL systems, with micelles of hexadecylphosphocholine (HDPC), enabled the calculation of partition coefficients (K(p)). Both assays were performed in buffered media in the absence and in the presence of emim [BF(4)], emim [Ms] and emim [TfMs] 1%. Even though there was an increase of the dissociation constant (K(d)) in IL media, nimesulide still binds to HSA by means of strong interactions. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the interaction is spontaneous for all the tested systems. Moreover, the studied systems exhibited properties that are favorable to the interaction of the drug with biological membranes, with K(p) values 2.5-3.5 higher than in aqueous environment. The studied nimesulide-IL systems presented promising characteristics regarding the absorption and distribution of the drug in vivo, so that the studied solvents seem to be good options for drug delivery. PMID:23287776

  13. Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug-Exacerbated Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Dennis K; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA)-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized by upper airway congestion due to eosinophilic inflammation of the nasal and sinus membranes and nasal polyposis, associated with increased leukotriene production that is further accentuated by ASA or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ingestion. It occurs in 5% to 10% of subjects with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and in 15% to 40% of those with nasal polyposis. Although AERD with CRS is usually associated with asthma, this is not always the case. The eosinophilic airway inflammation and symptoms precede clinical reactions to ASA or other NSAIDs, but ultimately affected subjects experience worsening of symptoms with ingestion of ASA/NSAIDs. The endotypic mechanism for this worsening is related to a chronic increase in leukotriene and a decrease in prostaglandin production, particularly prostaglandin E2, that is further aggravated by the inhibition of cycloxgenase I. IgE does not likely play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease although nasal and sinus staphylococcal infection increases local IgE level and may increase total IgE and specific IgE levels. Genetic studies suggest that multiple genes may be involved, but the genetic abnormalities may differ in affected subjects from different ethnicities and candidate genes have not been confirmed in multiple studies. Genome-wide association studies have not been revealing. The phenotype is recognized by the mucosal inflammation and worsening of symptoms acutely with ASA/NSAID. There is clinical improvement with ASA desensitization followed by regular ingestion of ASA or other NSAIDs. Further understanding of this unique phenotype and endotype of CRS will likely improve the understanding of other eosinophilic airway diseases. PMID:27393773

  14. The Use of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Possible Carrier in Drug Delivery System for Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Alias Mohd.; Buang, Nor Aziah; Yean, Lee Sze; Ibrahim, Mohd. Lokman

    2009-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised great interest in a number of applications, including field emission, energy storage, molecular electronics, sensors, biochips and drug delivery systems. This is due to their remarkable mechanical properties, chemical stability and biofunctionalizability. This nanomaterial is low in weight, has high strength and a high aspect ratio (long length compared to a small diameter). This paper will present a brief overview of drugs adsorbed onto the surface of carbon nanotubes via sonication method. The surface area of carbon nanotubes was measured by methylene blue method, Carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method were purified and functionalized in a mixture of concentrated acids (H2SO4:HNO3 = 3:1) at room temperature (25° C) via sonication in water bath, yielding carboxylic acid group on the CNTs' surface. CNT was successfully loaded with 48 %(w/w) aspirin molecules by suspending CNTs in a solution of aspirin in alcohol. Analysis of loaded CNTs by Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum (FITR) and UV-visible Spectroscopy confirmed the loading of the drug onto the CNTs. The work presented is a prelude to the direction of using carbon nanotubes as a drug delivery system to desired sites in human body.

  15. Aspirin Desensitization

    MedlinePlus

    ... dust mites, cats, dogs, or pollen. Others believe sensitivity to aspirin results from a problem in certain ... examination is required to diagnose patients with aspirin sensitivity. Patients with severe asthma, chronic sinusitis, nasal polyps ...

  16. Aspirin revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, D.; Hu, X. K.; Loboda, A. V.; Mosey, N. J.; Lipson, R. H.

    2007-03-01

    Experiments are described where the experimental conditions have been optimized to detect aspirin by MALDI mass spectrometry. Although protonated aspirin was not observed by MALDI, sodium and potassium aspirin adducts could be found. Significantly better signals could be obtained by using Rb and Cs salts as cationization sources. Quantum calculations were carried out to determine the structure and energetics of the Li, K, Rb, and Cs alkali--aspirin adducts.

  17. Effect of nimesulide and indomethacin on contractility and the Ca2+ channel current in myometrial smooth muscle from pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Sawdy, Robert; Knock, Gregory A; Bennett, Philip R; Poston, Lucilla; Aaronson, Philip I

    1998-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin inhibits both constitutive and inducible forms of cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2, respectively), while nimesulide is a selective COX-2 inhibitor. Uterine COX-2 is upregulated before and during term and pre-term labour, and prostaglandins play a crucial role in parturition. We therefore evaluated the effects of these drugs on myometrial contractility and the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel current in tissue strips and isolated human myometrial smooth muscle cells (HMSMC) from myometrial biopsies taken with informed consent from women undergoing caesarean section at term (not in labour).Nimesulide and indomethacin caused almost complete inhibition of spontaneous myometrial contractions at concentrations of 100 and 300 μM, respectively. The Ca2+ channel current was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by both drugs, with a 40% reduction of the current at 100 μM nimesulide and 300 μM indomethacin. Nimesulide also accelerated the decay of the Ca2+ channel current.The inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current by 100 μM nimesulide and 300 μM indomethacin was unaffected by the presence of either PGF2α or PGE2 (30 μM), and was of similar magnitude whether 10 mM Ba2+ or 1.5 mM Ca2+ was used as the charge carrier.The concentrations of indomethacin and nimesulide required to suppress spontaneous contractility in human pregnant myometrium were much higher than those necessary to inhibit prostaglandin production. The results suggest that both nimesulide and indomethacin inhibit myometrial contractility via mechanisms independent of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. Blockade of the Ca2+ current may contribute to this effect. PMID:9863649

  18. 76 FR 53907 - Determination That TALWIN COMPOUND (Aspirin; Pentazocine Hydrochloride) Tablets, 325 Milligrams...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That TALWIN COMPOUND (Aspirin; Pentazocine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that TALWIN COMPOUND (aspirin; pentazocine... ANDA that does not refer to a listed drug. TALWIN COMPOUND (aspirin; pentazocine HCl) tablets, 325...

  19. [Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug and Aspirin-induced Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-06-25

    Despite decreasing Helicobacter pylori prevalence, the prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is increasing in the aged population, mainly due to increasing use of NSAIDs to manage pain and inflammation. In addition, low dose aspirin is employed as an anti-coagulant for those who have suffered or are at high risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. However, NSAIDs and aspirin are injurious to mucosa of stomach and duodenum. NSAID-induced inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis is thought to be a major mechanism of gastrointestinal mucosal injury. The proportion of elderly has increased rapidly in Korea, with the proportion over 65 years old expected to be 24.3% in 2030. In this higher-risk population, the strategy to reduce the incidence of NSAID-related peptic ulcers and complications such as bleeding, obstruction and perforation is very important. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can be used for reducing the risk of NSAID-related ulcers and upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications. However, continuous use of PPI has several problems. In addition, NSAID-related problems in the lower GI tract have increased, in contrast to the decrease of NSAID-related upper GI disease. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based knowledge regarding the mechanism, complications of treatment, and prevention strategies for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease in Korea. PMID:27312830

  20. Effects of indomethacin, nimesulide, and diclofenac on human MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; García-Martínez, Olga; Morales, Manuel Arroyo-; Rodríguez-Pérez, Laura; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; Ruiz, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide and serve as treatment of some degenerative inflammatory joint diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different concentrations of three NSAIDs on cell proliferation, differentiation, antigenic profile, and cell cycle in the human MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line, incubated for 24 hr. All NSAIDs had an inhibiting effect on osteoblastic proliferation. Treatments for 24 hr had small but significant effects on the antigenic profile. No treatment altered osteocalcin synthesis. Indomethacin and nimesulide treatments arrested the cell cycle at G(0)/G(1). These results suggest that indomethacin, nimesulide, and diclofenac appear to have no effects on osteocalcin synthesis and a slight effect on the antigenic profile. They may delay bone regeneration due to their inhibiting effect on osteoblast growth. Therefore, these drugs should only be used in situations that do not require rapid bone healing. PMID:21385796

  1. Design and content determination of nimesulide injectable formulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Tao, Wanfu; Bourkaib, Nadia; Luo, Yonghuang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate Nimesulide inject able solution, establish a method for content determination, and accumulate data for registration of a new Nimesulide formulation. The optimal Nimesulide inject able formulation was determined based on the results of single factor test and orthogonal test. Moreover, clarity, stability, pH, content and related substances of Nimesulide were used as the main study indicators. The content of Nimesulide in inject able solution was determined by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The mobile phase consisted of V (methanol): V (potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.2)=60:40 at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The detection was carried out with UV detector (λ(max) =254 nm) under a column temperature of 25°C and an injection volume of 20μL. The optimal inject able formulation was 4% Nimesulide, 4% ethanolamine, 0.1% L-cysteine, 0.01% EDTA-2Na, a suitable amount of lactic acid and water for injection. Nimesulide detection limits range from 20 to 80 μg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 and high average recovery 99.91% (RSD=0.06%). In conclusion, the formulation was suitable for Nimesulide inject able form, and the determination method was simple, sensitive and accurate. Therefore, the Nimesulide inject able formulation can be used for industrial production and effectively controlled. PMID:26142510

  2. Potential of prescription registries to capture individual-level use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Denmark: trends in utilization 1999–2012

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Morten; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to over-the-counter availability, no consensus exists on whether adequate information on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use can be obtained from prescription registries. Objectives To examine utilization of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs in Denmark between 1999 and 2012 and to quantify the proportion of total sales that was sold on prescription. Method Based on nationwide data from the Danish Serum Institute and the Danish National Prescription Registry, we retrieved sales statistics for the Danish primary health care sector to calculate 1-year prevalences of prescription users of aspirin or nonaspirin NSAIDs, and to estimate the corresponding proportions of total sales dispensed on prescription. Results Both low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs were commonly used in the Danish population between 1999 and 2012, particularly among elderly individuals. The 1-year prevalence of prescribed low-dose aspirin increased throughout the study period, notably among men. Nonaspirin NSAID use was frequent in all age groups above 15 years and showed a female preponderance. Overall, the prevalence of prescribed nonaspirin NSAIDs decreased moderately after 2004, but substantial variation according to NSAID subtype was observed; ibuprofen use increased, use of all newer selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors nearly ceased after 2004, diclofenac use decreased by nearly 50% after 2008, and naproxen use remained stable. As of 2012, the prescribed proportion of individual-level NSAID sales was 92% for low-dose aspirin, 66% for ibuprofen, and 100% for all other NSAIDs. Conclusion The potential for identifying NSAID use from prescription registries in Denmark is high. Low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use varied substantially between 1999 and 2012. Notably, use of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors nearly ceased, use of diclofenac decreased markedly, and naproxen use remained unaltered. PMID:24872722

  3. Aspirin overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) can be found in many prescription and over-the-counter pain relievers, including: Alka Seltzer Anacin Bayer Bufferin Ecotrin Excedrin Fiorinal Percodan St. Joseph's Note: This list may not be all-inclusive.

  4. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods. PMID:24691893

  5. Adenosine signalling mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Maione, Francesco; Morello, Silvana; Lapucci, Andrea; Paccosi, Sara; Steckel, Bodo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Parenti, Astrid; Iuvone, Teresa; Schrader, Jürgen; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine formation from ATP is controlled by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase/CD39) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (e-5NT/CD73); the latter converts AMP to adenosine and inorganic phosphate, representing the rate limiting step controlling the ratio between extracellular ATP and adenosine. Evidence that cellular expression and activity of CD39 and CD73 may be subject to changes under pathophysiological conditions has identified this pathway as an endogenous modulator in several diseases and was shown to be involved in the molecular mechanism of drugs, such as methotrexate, salicylates , interferon-β. We evaluated whether CD73/adenosine/A2A signalling pathway is involved in nimesulide anti-inflammatory effect, in vivo and in vitro. We found that the adenosine A2A agonist, 4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid hydrochloride (CGS21680, 2mg/kg ip.), inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and the effect was reversed by co-administration of the A2A antagonist -(2-[7-amino-2-[2-furyl][1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385; 3mg/kg i.p.). Nimesulide (5mg/kg i.p.) anti-inflammatory effect was inhibited by pre-treatment with ZM241385 (3mg/kg i.p.) and by local administration of the CD73 inhibitor, adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene)diphosphate (APCP; 400μg/paw). Furthermore, we found increased activity of 5'-nucleotidase/CD73 in paws and plasma of nimesulide treated rats, 4h following oedema induction. In vitro, the inhibitory effect of nimesulide on nitrite and prostaglandin E2 production by lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 cell line was reversed by ZM241385 and APCP. Furthermore, nimesulide increased CD73 activity in J774 macrophages while it did not inhibit nitrite accumulation by lipopolysaccharide-activated SiRNA CD73 silenced J774 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effect of nimesulide in part is mediated by CD73

  6. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician’s understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  7. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician's understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  8. Use of Aspirin, Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs, and Acetaminophen (Paracetamol), and Risk of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, nonaspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women (1991–2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95 540 participants during the follow-up. During 1 321 280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02–6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11–3.96) respectively for PsA. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs. PMID:24691893

  9. Temporal variability in the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel and aspirin after elective drug-eluting stent implantation. An ADAPT-DES substudy.

    PubMed

    Nührenberg, Thomas G; Stratz, Christian; Leggewie, Stefan; Hochholzer, Willibald; Valina, Christian M; Gick, Michael; Kirtane, Ajay J; Stone, Gregg W; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Trenk, Dietmar

    2015-11-01

    Given conflicting data on temporal variability in pharmacodynamic platelet responses to clopidogrel, we investigated platelet reactivity on clopidogrel and aspirin for up to six months after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents. Platelet reactivity was determined in 102 patients before loading with clopidogrel and aspirin, and on maintenance therapy after PCI on day 1, at one month and six months by VerifyNow™ P2Y12 and Aspirin assays and by residual platelet aggregation (RPA) on light transmission aggregometry using adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid. By VerifyNow testing, median (interquartile range) P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) on clopidogrel were 166 (90-234), 195 (124-257), and 198 (141-252) on day 1, one month and six months after PCI, respectively (p=0.005 day 1 to 1 month, and p=0.86 1 month to 6 months). Using a cut-off of > 208 PRU, 35 % of patients had high platelet reactivity (HPR) to clopidogrel on day 1, 43 % at one month, and 46 % at six months after PCI. Between day 1 and six months after PCI, 38.2 % of patients changed clopidogrel responder status at least once. Other cut-offs and RPA yielded similar results. Platelet inhibition by aspirin was consistent over time with only five patients being characterised as having HPR. Considerable variation in individual on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity was present during both the subacute and the late phases of maintenance therapy after elective PCI. Hence, the utility of contemporary platelet function testing to guide antiplatelet therapy may be limited. PMID:26305340

  10. Aspirin, paracetamol, and haematemesis and melaena.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Langman, M J; Spiegelhalter, D

    1982-01-01

    Aspirin and paracetamol consumption have been compared in 346 matched pairs of patients with haematemesis and melaena, and control individuals in the general community. Both aspirin and paracetamol intake were more common in patients than in controls, but the association for aspirin was stronger and was apparent with both recent and habitual intake, whereas for paracetamol the association was not detectable for habitual intake. The results for paracetamol suggests that patients with bleeding take analgesic drugs in part because of symptoms associated with bleeding, and such intake is not necessarily causal of bleeding. Failure to control investigations to take account of this point has exaggerated the possible risks of aspirin consumption. PMID:7076011

  11. Immunomodulatory treatments for aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Moebus, Rachel G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aspirin triad is a subclass of chronic sinusitis characterized by nasal polyposis, nonallergic induced asthma, and aspirin sensitivity. Also known as Samter's triad or aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, aspirin triad commonly affects the adult population and is seldom found in pediatric patients. Methods: This rhinosinusitis has multiple layers of pathological process, but the ultimate predicament is caused by cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs). Results: Pharmacotherapies include oral steroid, lipoxygenase inhibitor, and cysLT receptor inhibitor drugs, which can provide some relief for these patients. Conclusion: Immunomodulation via aspirin desensitization is considered when pharmacotherapy has failed. When aspirin triad is unmanageable with medical treatment alone, endoscopic sinus surgery with polypectomy can alleviate the patient's symptoms, allowing for a better response to postoperative medical management such as topical medication as well as delivery of topical medications. PMID:22487291

  12. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. 520.1409... Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains 0.5 milligram of methylprednisolone and 300 milligrams of aspirin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  13. Different effects of cytoprotective drugs on ethanol- and aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in pylorus-ligated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, K.; Nishiwaki, H.; Niida, H.; Okabe, S. )

    1990-02-01

    In anesthetized rats oral administration (2 ml) of both ethanol (50% in 150 mM HCl) and aspirin (80 mM in 150 mM HCl) produced bandlike lesions in the stomach, while more generalized lesions occurred in the pylorus-ligated stomach when the irritant was given intragastrically through the fistula prepared in the rumen and the mucosal folds were removed by stomach distension. The bandlike lesions induced in the intact stomach by both irritants were significantly and dose-dependently prevented by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2: 3 and 10 micrograms/kg, subcutaneously), cysteamine (30 and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or timoprazole (10 and 30 mg/kg, per os) at the doses which significantly inhibited gastric motility. In the pylorus-ligated stomach, however, neither of these agents showed any protection against the generalized lesions induced by ethanol, but such lesions caused by aspirin were significantly prevented only by dmPGE2. These agents also showed similar effects against the reduction of transmucosal PD in the pylorus-ligated stomach exposed to ethanol and aspirin. These results suggest that (1) the formation of bandlike lesions caused by ethanol and aspirin depends on the presence of mucosal folds and may be prevented by the agents that inhibit gastric motility, (2) the pathogenesis of the lesions induced by aspirin and ethanol may be different in the pylorus-ligated stomach, and (3) dmPGE2 has a unique protective ability that is not shared by usual cytoprotective agents.

  14. A review of analytical techniques for determination of oxicams, nimesulide and nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Starek, Małgorzata; Krzek, Jan

    2009-01-15

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the group most often used in human health care, since they are available without prescription for treatment of fever and minor pain. The present review submitted the use of various analytical techniques for the determination of oxicams, nimesulide and nabumetone. This review covers the time period from 1990 to 2008 during which over 200 analytical methods including all types of chromatographic, spectrophotometric and voltammetric techniques were reported. Presented application concerns analysis of chosen NSAIDs from pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples. PMID:19064072

  15. Tablet formulation studies on nimesulide and meloxicam-cyclodextrin binary systems.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Buchi N; Chowdary, K P R; Murthy, K V R; Becket, G; Crooks, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop tablet formulations of nimesulide-beta-cyclodextrin (NI-beta-CD) and meloxicam-gamma-cyclodextrin (ME-gamma-CD) binary systems. In the case of nimesulide, 3 types of binary systems--physical mixtures, kneaded systems, and coevaporated systems--were studied. In the case of meloxicam, 2 types of binary systems--physical mixtures and kneaded systems--were investigated. Both drug-CD binary systems were prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio (1:1M and 1:2M) and used in formulation studies. The tablet formulations containing drug-CD binary systems prepared by the wet granulation and direct compression methods showed superior dissolution properties when compared with the formulations of the corresponding pure drug formulations. Overall, the dissolution properties of tablet formulations prepared by the direct compression method were superior to those of tablets prepared by the wet granulation method. Selected tablet formulations showed good stability with regard to drug content, disintegration time, hardness, and in vitro dissolution properties over 6 months at 40 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C and 75% relative humidity. PMID:17622114

  16. Association of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongmei; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Lin, Yi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; White, Emily; Baron, John A.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Lindor, Noralane M.; Lemire, Mathieu; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ogino, Shuji; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Qu, Conghui; Rosse, Stephanie A.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Gauderman, W. James; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. Prior studies examining a potential differential relationship of aspirin and NSAIDs with colorectal cancer risk according to genetic factors have been limited to analyses of candidate genes or pathways. Objective To comprehensively identify common genetic markers that characterize individuals who may obtain differential benefit from aspirin and/or NSAID chemoprevention, we tested gene by environment (G X E) interactions between regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. Design Case-control study using the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) that enrolled cases of colorectal cancer ascertained between 1976 and 2011 and matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) of colorectal cancer and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using conventional logistic regression analysis and case-only interaction analysis, after adjusting for age, sex, center, the first three principal components to account for population structure, and known colorectal cancer risk factors. For all genome-wide analyses, a two-sided p-value<5.0×10-8, which yields a genome-wide significance level of 0.05, was considered statistically significant. Setting 10 observational studies (5 case-control and 5 cohort studies) that were initiated between 1976 and 2003 across the U.S., Canada, Australia and Germany. Participants 8,634 colorectal cancer cases and 8,553 controls of European descent. Exposures Genome-wide SNP data generated from genome-wide association scans and imputation to HapMap II, as well as information on regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and other colorectal cancer risk factors collected using in-person interviews and/or structured questionnaires. Main Outcomes and Measures

  17. From COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide to potent anti-cancer agent: synthesis, in vitro, in vivo and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Chennamaneni, Snigdha; Yi, Xin; Liu, lili; Pink, John J.; Dowlati, Afshin; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Aimin; Su, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor nimesulide inhibits the proliferation of various types of cancer cells mainly via COX-2 independent mechanisms, which makes it a good lead compound for anti-cancer drug development. In the presented study, a series of new nimesulide analogs were synthesized based on the structure–function analysis generated previously. Some of them displayed very potent anti-cancer activity with IC50s around 100nM to 200nM to inhibit SKBR-3 breast cancer cell growth. CSUOH0901 (NSC751382) from the compound library also inhibits the growth of the 60 cancer cell lines used at National Cancer Institute Developmental therapeutics Program (NCIDTP) with IC50s around 100nM to 500nM. Intraperitoneal injection with a dosage of 5mg/kg/d of CSUOH0901 to nude mice suppresses HT29 colorectal xenograft growth. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrate the good bioavailability of the compound. PMID:22119125

  18. Physicochemical impact studies of gamma rays on "aspirin" analgesics drug and its metal complexes in solid form: Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological assessment of Ca(II), Mg(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) aspirinate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Sharshar, T.; Elsabawy, Khaled M.; Heiba, Zein K.

    2013-09-01

    Metal aspirinate complexes, M2(Asp)4, where M is Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) or Ba(II) are formed by refluxed of aspirin (Asp) with divalent non-transition metal ions of group (II) and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic measurements (infrared, electronic, 1H NMR, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Elemental analysis of the chelates suggests the stoichiometry is 1:2 (metal:ligand). Infrared spectra of the complexes agree with the coordination to the central metal atom through three donation sites of two oxygen atoms of bridge bidentate carboxylate group and oxygen atom of sbnd Cdbnd O of acetyl group. Infrared spectra coupled with the results of elemental analyzes suggested a distorted octahedral structure for the M(II) aspirinate complexes. Gamma irradiation was tested as a method for stabilization of aspirin as well as their complexes. The effect of gamma irradiation, with dose of 80 Gy, on the properties of aspirinate complexes was studied. The aspirinate chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial activity than the free aspirin chelate.

  19. A brief review on the mechanisms of aspirin resistance.

    PubMed

    Du, Gang; Lin, Qiang; Wang, Jinhua

    2016-10-01

    Aspirin is the most widely prescribed drug for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, a large number of patients continue to experience thromboembolic events despite aspirin therapy, a phenomenon referred to as aspirin resistance or treatment failure. Aspirin resistance is often observed along with a high incidence of unstable plaque, cardiovascular events and cerebrovascular accident. Studies have shown that aspirin reduces the production of TXA2, but not totally inhibits the activation of platelets. In this review, we analyze current and past research on aspirin resistance, presenting important summaries of results regarding the potential contributive roles of single nucleotide polymorphisms, inflammation, metabolic syndrome and miRNAs. The aim of this article is to provide a brief review on aspirin resistance and platelet function, which will provide important insights into the research of aspirin resistance. PMID:27372038

  20. Quantification of nimesulide in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Application to bioequivalence studies.

    PubMed

    Barrientos-Astigarraga, R E; Vannuchi, Y B; Sucupira, M; Moreno, R A; Muscará, M N; De Nucci, G

    2001-12-01

    A method based on liquid chromatography with negative ion electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry is described for the determination of nimesulide in human plasma. Liquid-liquid extraction using a mixture of diethyl ether and dichloromethane was employed and celecoxib was used as an internal standard. The chromatographic run time was 4.5 min and the weighted (1/x) calibration curve was linear in the range 10.0-2000 ng x ml(-1). The limit of quantification was 10 ng x ml(-1), the intra-batch precision was 6.3, 2.1 and 2.1% and the intra-batch accuracy was 3.2, 0.3 and 0.1% for 30, 300 and 1200 ng x ml(-1) respectively. The inter-batch precision was 2.3, 2.8 and 2.7% and the accuracy was 3.3, 0.3 and 0.1% for 30, 300 and 1200 ng x ml(-1) respectively. This method was employed in a bioequivalence study of one nimesulide drop formulation (nimesulide 50 mg x ml(-1) drop, Medley S/A Indústria Farmacêutica, Brazil) against one standard nimesulide drop formulation (Nisulid, 50 mg x ml(-1) drop, Astra Médica, Brazil). Twenty-four healthy volunteers (both sexes) took part in the study and received a single oral dose of nimesulide (100 mg, equivalent to 2 ml of either formulation) in an open, randomized, two-period crossover way, with a 2-week washout interval between periods. The 90% confidence interval (CI) for geometric mean ratios between nimesulide and Nisulid were 93.1-109.6% for C(max), 87.7-99.8% for AUC(last) and 88.1-99.7% for AUC(0-infinity). Since the 90% CI for the above-mentioned parameters were included in the 80-125% interval proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration, the two formulations were considered bioequivalent in terms of both rate and extent of absorption. PMID:11754119

  1. Effect of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on prostate cancer incidence and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been postulated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use leads to decreased prostate cancer (PCa) risk. In recent years, NSAIDs’ role in PCa development has been extensively studied; however, there is not yet a definitive answer. Moreover, the epidemiological results for NSAIDs’ effect on PCa-specific mortality have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to examine the controversy. Methods We performed a literature database search and included all published studies conducted in the general population exposed to any NSAID, extracting an odds ratio (OR) or a hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) that compared the incidence of PCa or PCa-specific mortality with non-exposure. We derived a pooled OR or HR using random or fixed effects models, as appropriate. Subgroup analyses were also performed. Results Thirty-nine studies (20 case–control and 19 cohort studies) were included in this analysis. Thirty-one studies were available concerning NSAID use and PCa incidence and eight studies on PCa-specific mortality. Compared to non-use, aspirin use was statistically significantly associated with PCa incidence risk, and the association was slightly stronger for advanced PCa than for total PCa (OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87 to 0.97 for total PCa; OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.89 for advanced PCa). Aspirin use seems also to be associated with a modest reduction in PCa-specific mortality (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.96 for total PCa; OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.71 to 0.92 for advanced PCa). Generally, the pooled effects for any NSAIDs, NA-NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors demonstrated no adverse or beneficial effects on PCa development or PCa-specific mortality, but the results were not consistent. The effect estimates did not vary markedly when stratified by study design and study quality but varied by geographic region. Furthermore, long-term aspirin use (≥4 years) was also significantly associated

  2. Aspirin: Pharmacology and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Paez Espinosa, Enma V.; Murad, John P.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2012-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy has been documented to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease after acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, and in chronic atrial fibrillation patients, amongst other risk factors. Conventional management of thrombosis-based disorders includes the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants, and the preferred antiplatelet agent aspirin. Interestingly, aspirin was not intended to be used as an antiplatelet agent; rather, after being repurposed, it has become one of the most widely prescribed antithrombotic drugs. To this end, there have been several milestones in the development of antiplatelet agents in the last few decades, such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors. However, given some of the limitations of these therapies, aspirin continues to play a major role in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders and is expected to do so for years to come. PMID:22195279

  3. Chemometrics-assisted Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Two Co-administered Drugs of Major Interaction, Methotrexate and Aspirin, in Human Urine Following Acid-induced Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Ragab, Marwa A A; El-Kimary, Eman I

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mostly along with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most common of which is aspirin or acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). Since NSAIDs impair MTX clearance and increase its toxicity, it was necessary to develop a simple and reliable method for the monitoring of MTX levels in urine samples, when coadministered with ASA. The method was based on the spectrofluorimetric measurement of the acid-induced hydrolysis product of MTX, 4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroic acid (AMP), along with the strongly fluorescent salicylic acid (SA), a product of acid-induced hydrolysis of aspirin and its metabolites in urine. The overlapping emission spectra were resolved using the derivative method (D method). In addition, the corresponding derivative emission spectra were convoluted using discrete Fourier functions, 8-points sin xi polynomials, (D/FF method) for better elimination of interferences. Validation of the developed methods was carried out according to the ICH guidelines. Moreover, the data obtained using derivative and convoluted derivative spectra were treated using the non-parametric Theil's method (NP), compared with the least-squares parametric regression method (LSP). The results treated with Theil's method were more accurate and precise compared with LSP since the former is less affected by the outliers. This work offers the potential of both derivative and convolution using discrete Fourier functions in addition to the effectiveness of using the NP regression analysis of data. The high sensitivity obtained by the proposed methods was promising for measuring low concentration levels of the two drugs in urine samples. These methods were efficiently used to measure the drugs in human urine samples following their co-administration. PMID:26234512

  4. Aspirin and colorectal cancer: the promise of precision chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Drew, David A; Cao, Yin; Chan, Andrew T

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has become one of the most commonly used drugs, given its role as an analgesic, antipyretic and agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Several decades of research have provided considerable evidence demonstrating its potential for the prevention of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer. Broader clinical recommendations for aspirin-based chemoprevention strategies have recently been established; however, given the known hazards of long-term aspirin use, larger-scale adoption of an aspirin chemoprevention strategy is likely to require improved identification of individuals for whom the protective benefits outweigh the harms. Such a precision medicine approach may emerge through further clarification of aspirin's mechanism of action. PMID:26868177

  5. Isomeric iodinated analogs of nimesulide: Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity, and transport across Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Arai, Jun; Hisa, Takuya; Saito, Yohei; Mukai, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Maeda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Fumihiko

    2016-08-15

    Isomeric iodinated derivatives of nimesulide, with an iodine substituent on the phenoxy ring, were prepared with the aim of identifying potential candidate compounds for the development of imaging agents targeting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the brain. Both the experimental logP7.4 and pKa values for these iodinated analogs were in the acceptable range for passive brain penetration. The para-iodo-substituted analog was a more potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor than nimesulide, with a potency that was comparable to the reference drug, celecoxib. Iodination at the ortho- or meta-position of the phenoxy ring was associated with a substantial loss of COX-2 inhibitory activity. Transport studies across Caco-2 cell monolayers in the presence and absence of a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor, verapamil, indicated that the para-iodo-substituted analog was not a P-gp transport substrate; this feature is a prerequisite for potential in vivo brain imaging compounds. The para-iodo-substituted analog of nimesulide appears to be an attractive candidate for the development of radioiodine-labeled tracers for in vivo brain imaging of COX-2 levels. PMID:27325447

  6. Safety of nimesulide, meloxicam and rofecoxib as alternative analgesics.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, G; Kalyoncu, A F

    2000-01-01

    Paracetamole and codeine are safe alternative analgesics for analgesic intolerant patients. Recently marketed selective and specific COX2 inhibitors are also considered to be safe for this group of patients. In this survey we wanted to disclose the safety of nimesulide and meloxicam and rofecoxib where they have been marketed recently in Turkey. PMID:11269899

  7. Experiments with Aspirin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa L.; Barry, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments that can be used to demonstrate how aspirin can be synthesized and characterized, how the hydrolysis of aspirin can be used as an introduction to kinetics, and how coordination chemistry (chelation) can be introduced by preparing and characterizing the copper complexes of aspirin and salicylic acid. (Contains over…

  8. Does aspirin use make it harder to collect seizures during elective video-EEG telemetry?

    PubMed

    Godfred, Rachel M; Parikh, Mihir S; Haltiner, Alan M; Caylor, Lisa M; Sepkuty, Jehuda P; Doherty, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Aspirin has shown promise as an anticonvulsant drug in animal models. Whether aspirin alters seizure frequency in humans remains unstudied. We retrospectively looked at adults with focal onset epilepsy who took aspirin daily while undergoing elective video-EEG monitoring and compared them with similar age- and sex-matched controls to see if seizure frequencies were different between those two populations. Significantly fewer seizures were seen on day two of monitoring for patients on aspirin therapies. Higher aspirin doses were correlated with fewer seizures collected during the monitoring stay. Further prospective study is needed to determine whether aspirin affects more robust seizure control. PMID:23399946

  9. Effects of nimesulide, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen and nabumetone on cyclooxygenase-1- and cyclooxygenase-2-mediated prostanoid production in healthy volunteers ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Markku; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Kosonen, Outi; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Sarna, Seppo; Moilanen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    : The beneficial actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), whereas some of their adverse effects are associated mainly with inhibition of COX-1. Selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce the risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, but increase the risk of thromboembolic events pointing to importance of optimal COX-1/COX-2 inhibition in drug safety. We compared the effects of acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, nabumetone and nimesulide on COX-1 and COX-2 pathways in healthy volunteers in an ex vivo set-up using single oral doses commonly used to treat acute pain. In a randomized, double-blind four-phase cross-over study, 15 healthy volunteers were given orally a single dose of either acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, nabumetone 1 g or nimesulide 100 mg. Blood samples were drawn before and 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr after the drug for the assessment of COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 activity was measured as thromboxane(2) production during blood clotting and COX-2 activity as endotoxin-induced prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in blood leucocytes. The data show that after a single oral dose these four NSAIDs have different profiles of action on COX-1 and COX-2. As expected, acetylsalicylic acid appeared to be COX-1-selective and ibuprofen effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2. Nabumetone showed only a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 and COX-2. Nimesulide caused almost complete suppression of COX-2 activity and a partial reduction of COX-1 activity. This confirms the relative COX-2 selectivity of nimesulide. PMID:19152549

  10. Antiplatelet therapy: aspirin resistance and all that jazz!

    PubMed

    Divani, Afshin A; Zantek, Nicole D; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Rao, Gundu H R

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. Aspirin used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs has been shown to offer significant benefit to patients at high risk of vascular events. Resistance to the action of aspirin may decrease this benefit. Aspirin resistance has been defined by clinical and/or laboratory criteria; however, detection by laboratory methods prior to experiencing a clinical event will likely provide the greatest opportunity for intervention. Numerous laboratory methods with different cutoff points have been used to evaluate the resistance. Noncompliance with aspirin treatment has also confounded studies. A single assay is currently insufficient to establish resistance. Combinations of results to confirm compliance and platelet inhibition may identify "at-risk" individuals who truly have aspirin resistance. The most effective strategy for managing patients with aspirin resistance is unknown; however, studies are currently underway to address this issue. PMID:22751909

  11. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug and Aspirin Use, and Mortality among Critically Ill Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Patients: an Exploratory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Holly; Vaughn, Frances L; Mosholder, Andrew D; Maloney, Elizabeth M; Rubinson, Lewis

    2016-05-20

    We explored nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and aspirin (ASA) use and mortality in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' registry of 683 adult and 838 pediatric critically ill pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza (pH1N1) patients. Among adults, 88 (12.9%) and 101 (14.8%) reported pre-admission use of an NSAID and ASA, respectively; mortality was similar (23-24%) regardless of NSAID or ASA use. Mortality among 89 pediatric NSAID users and 749 nonusers did not differ significantly (10.1% and 8.8%, respectively). One of 16 pediatric ASA users died. Among pediatric patients, the adjusted relative risk estimate for NSAID use and 90-day mortality was higher when influenza vaccination was included in the model (risk ratio [RR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-3.2), although not statistically significant. Among adults, RR estimates did not change appreciably after adjusting for age, sex, health status, or vaccine status. We found no compelling evidence that NSAID or ASA use influenced mortality in severe pH1N1. PMID:26255728

  12. Aspirin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs constitute a major medical concern worldwide. This article presents an overview of the observations that led to the discovery of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, as a prerequisite to better understand the basic concepts supporting seminal investigations carried out in order to elucidate the clinical features, pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and modern management of these common conditions. There are some unmet needs in this clinical area which will have to be solved in the future, especially concerning the pathogenesis of these reactions and the availability of novel in vitro diagnostic methods sparing both patient and physician of the risks inherent to in vivo provocation tests. PMID:24925393

  13. Purine pathway implicated in mechanism of resistance to aspirin therapy: pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Ellero-Simatos, S; Georgiades, A; Zhu, H; Lewis, J P; Horenstein, R B; Beitelshees, A L; Dane, A; Reijmers, T; Hankemeier, T; Fiehn, O; Shuldiner, A R; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2013-10-01

    Although aspirin is a well-established antiplatelet agent, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance remain poorly understood. Metabolomics allows for measurement of hundreds of small molecules in biological samples, enabling detailed mapping of pathways involved in drug response. We defined the metabolic signature of aspirin exposure in subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Many metabolites, including known aspirin catabolites, changed on exposure to aspirin, and pathway enrichment analysis identified purine metabolism as significantly affected by drug exposure. Furthermore, purines were associated with aspirin response, and poor responders had higher postaspirin adenosine and inosine levels than did good responders (n = 76; both P < 4 × 10(-3)). Using our established "pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics" approach, we identified genetic variants in adenosine kinase associated with aspirin response. Combining metabolomics and genomics allowed for more comprehensive interrogation of mechanisms of variation in aspirin response--an important step toward personalized treatment approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23839601

  14. Aspirin: History and Applications; Cross-Curricular Instructional Strategies, Ideas, and Applications for Teaching about Aspirin in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hademenos, George

    2005-01-01

    Of the thousands of drugs and medicines available for the prevention, treatment, and control of human disease and discomfort, the most widely used is aspirin. The primary reason for aspirin's popularity is its capabilities as a pain reliever, fever reducer, and anti-inflammatory agent. This article explores the historical development of aspirin…

  15. A phase III trial evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of nimesulide 1% spray in patients with soft-tissue injuries

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mazharuddin Ali; Rao, Madhusudhan; Reddy, Madan M.; Tamloorker, Datta; Gumdal, Vishesh; Latha, Moodahadu S.; Krishnankutty, Binny

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nimesulide 1% w/w spray in minor soft-tissue injuries in adult Indians through a multicentric, open-labeled, phase III trial. Materials and Methods: 125 eligible patients, who met the selection criteria and gave written informed consent, were screened, enrolled, and treated with nimesulide 1% spray for seven days. Patients were assessed at baseline, day 1, day 4, and day 8 for efficacy and safety. Primary efficacy variable pain intensity, was measured using a NRS 1-100 mm (numerical rating scale). Secondary efficacy variables were degree of inflammation and edema and degree of functional impairment; overall assessment of efficacy was done by patient (patient global assessment – PGA) and by investigator (investigator global assessment – IGA) on days 4 and 8. Result: There was a statistically significant reduction in the NRS score, degree of pain, edema (inflammation), and improvement in functional impairment on days 4 and 8 and in serum creatine kinase levels on day 8 in comparison with baseline. Global assessment of efficacy on day 8 was rated as “very good (21%),” “good (67.70%),” and “fair (11.30%)” by investigators and “very good (25%),” “good (58.90%),” and “fair (16.1%)” by patients. Two mild adverse events were reported in two patients, which resolved without any intervention. One (local irritation) was reported as not related, while the other (itching sensation) was probably related to the study drug. Conclusion: Nimesulide 1% spray was effective with a good safety profile and can be considered is a good alternative to oral analgesic therapy in minor soft-tissue injuries. PMID:23724380

  16. Aspirin and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Paola; Patrono, Carlo

    2016-08-30

    The place of aspirin in primary prevention remains controversial, with North American and European organizations issuing contradictory treatment guidelines. More recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended "initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years." This recommendation reflects increasing evidence for a chemopreventive effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal (and other) cancer. The intent of this paper is to review the evidence supporting a chemopreventive effect of aspirin, discuss its potential mechanism(s) of action, and provide a conceptual framework for assessing current guidelines in the light of ongoing studies. PMID:27561771

  17. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Amin; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin, resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally, non-opioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used non-opioid analgesics, interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk. PMID:26225198

  18. Aspirin Promotes Oligodendroglial Differentiation Through Inhibition of Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nanxin; Chen, Dong; Wu, Xiyan; Chen, Xianjun; Zhang, Xuesi; Niu, Jianqin; Shen, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin, one of the most commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, has been recently reported to display multiple effects in the central nervous system (CNS), including neuroprotection and upregulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression in astrocytes. Although it was most recently reported that aspirin could promote the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) after white matter lesion, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To dissect the effects of aspirin on oligodendroglial development and explore possible mechanisms, we here demonstrated the following: (i) in vitro treatment of aspirin on OPC cultures significantly increased the number of differentiated oligodendrocytes (OLs) but had no effect on the number of proliferative OPCs, indicating that aspirin can promote OPC differentiation but not proliferation; (ii) in vivo treatment of aspirin on neonatal (P3) rats for 4 days led to a nearly twofold increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), devoid of change in OPC proliferaion, in the corpus callosum (CC); (iii) finally, aspirin treatment increased the phosphorylation level of β-catenin and counteracted Wnt signaling pathway synergist QS11-induced suppression on OPC differentiation. Together, our data show that aspirin can directly target oligodendroglial lineage cells and promote their differentiation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings suggest that aspirin may be a novel candidate for the treatment of demyelinating diseases. PMID:26059811

  19. Molecular targets of aspirin and cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, L; Ai, G; Spitale, R C; Bhat, G J

    2014-07-01

    Salicylates from plant sources have been used for centuries by different cultures to treat a variety of ailments such as inflammation, fever and pain. A chemical derivative of salicylic acid, aspirin, was synthesised and mass produced by the end of the 19th century and is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Its cardioprotective properties are well established; however, recent evidence shows that it can also act as a chemopreventive agent. Its antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory actions occur through the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. The precise mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are not clearly established, although multiple mechanisms affecting enzyme activity, transcription factors, cellular signalling and mitochondrial functions have been proposed. This review presents a brief account of the major COX-dependent and independent pathways described in connection with aspirin's anticancer effects. Aspirin's unique ability to acetylate biomolecules besides COX has not been thoroughly investigated nor have all the targets of its primary metabolite, salicylic acid been identified. Recent reports on the ability of aspirin to acetylate multiple cellular proteins warrant a comprehensive study to investigate the role of this posttranslational modification in its anticancer effects. In this review, we also raise the intriguing possibility that aspirin may interact and acetylate cellular molecules such as RNA, and metabolites such as CoA, leading to a change in their function. Research in this area will provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms of action of this drug. PMID:24874482

  20. Prevention of dipyrone (metamizole) induced inhibition of aspirin antiplatelet effects.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Amin; Richter, Stefan; Schrör, Karsten; Rassaf, Tienush; Merx, Marc W; Kelm, Malte; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We have recently shown that dipyrone (metamizole), a non-opioid analgesic, can nullify aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) antiplatelet effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we analysed the aspirin and dipyrone drug-drug interaction in order to identify strategies to prevent the dipyrone induced inhibition of asprin antiplatelet effects. Platelet function was measured by arachidonic acid-induced light-transmission aggregometry, thromboxane (TX) B2- formation by immunoassay. Dipyrone metabolite plasma levels were determined by high-performance-liquid-chromatography (HPLC). In seven healthy individuals, in vitro ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM/ 300 µM/ 1,000 µM) and dipyrone (10 µM) coincubation revealed, that the aspirin and dipyrone interaction can be overcome by increasing doses of aspirin. In 36 aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients, addition of ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM) in vitro inhibited, but did not completely overcome the dipyrone induced reduction of aspirin antiplatelet effects. Notably, the inhibition of thromboxane formation in aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients coincided with dipyrone plasma levels. In a cross-over designed study in four healthy individuals, we were able to prove that inhibition of aspirin (100 mg/ day) effects by dipyrone (750 mg/ day) was reversible. Furthermore, aspirin (100 mg/ day) medication prior to dipyrone (750 mg/ day) intake prevented the inhibition of antiplatelet effects by dipyrone in 12 healthy individuals. In conclusion, aspirin medication prior to dipyrone intake preserves antiplatelet effects, circumventing the pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction at the level of cyclooxygenase-1. PMID:25789542

  1. Activation of the bile acid receptor GPBAR1 protects against gastrointestinal injury caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea; Bruno, Angela; Renga, Barbara; Distrutti, Eleonora; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low doses of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. GPBAR1 is a bile acid receptor expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we have investigated whether GPBAR1 was required for mucosal protection in models of gastrointestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs. Experimental Approch GPBAR1+/+ and GPBAR1−/− mice were given ASA (10–50 mg.kg−1) or naproxen. Gastric and intestinal mucosal damage was assessed by measuring lesion scores. Key Results Expression of GPBAR1, mRNA and protein, was detected in mouse stomach. Mice lacking GPBAR1 were more sensitive to gastric and intestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs and exhibited a markedly reduced expression of cystathionine-γ-liase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and endothelial NOS enzymes required for generation of H2S and NO, in the stomach. Treating GPBAR1+/+ mice with two GPBAR1 agonists, ciprofloxacin and betulinic acid, rescued mice from gastric injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs. The protective effect of these agents was lost in GPBAR1−/− mice. Inhibition of CSE by DL-propargylglycine completely reversed protection afforded by ciprofloxacin in wild type mice, whereas treating mice with an H2S donor restored the protective effects of ciprofloxacin in GPBAR1−/− mice. Deletion of GPBAR1 altered the morphology of the small intestine and increased sensitivity to injury caused by naproxen. Conclusion and Implications GPBAR1 is essential to maintain gastric and intestinal mucosal integrity. GPBAR1 agonists protect against gastrointestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs by a COX-independent mechanism. PMID:22881598

  2. [Asthma and aspirin].

    PubMed

    Schiappoli, Michele; Gani, Federica; Frati, Francesco; Marcucci, Francesco; Senna, Gianenrico

    2003-02-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is an important cause of asthma so that ASA induced asthma (AIA) is considered a disease. Its prevalence is of 0.3-0.6 in the general population but it raises to 21% in the asthmatic one. Middle aged female are the most affected. AIA generally begins with a non allergic rhinitis, complicated sometimes with polyps, that evolves secondarily in asthma. The disease is often so severe to need oral corticosteroids to be controlled. It persists independently to the intake of ASA. From a pathogenetic point of view the interaction of ASA with the arachidonic acid metabolism seems to be important. The inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) induces an activation of lypo-oxygenase with an increased synthesis of leukotrienes. In ASA intolerant patients there is also an activation of LTC4 synthetase, enzyme responsible for the synthesis of leukotrienes. Clinical history is very important to diagnose the disease but to confirm the diagnosis sometimes the provocation test is mandatory. Oral and bronchial challenges can be dangerous, while nasal challenge is safer even if must be better standardized. Patients must not use antiinflammatory drugs with the same mechanism of action of ASA; COX-2 inhibitors are generally well tolerated. Antileukotrienes are useful to treat asthma, in association with steroids. Desensitization can be used in very selected patients. PMID:12908375

  3. From COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide to potent anti-cancer agent: synthesis, in vitro, in vivo and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Bo; Cai, Xiaohan; Chennamaneni, Snigdha; Yi, Xin; Liu, Lili; Pink, John J; Dowlati, Afshin; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Aimin; Su, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor nimesulide inhibits the proliferation of various types of cancer cells mainly via COX-2 independent mechanisms, which makes it a good lead compound for anti-cancer drug development. In the presented study, a series of new nimesulide analogs were synthesized based on the structure-function analysis generated previously. Some of them displayed very potent anti-cancer activity with IC(50)s around 100 nM-200 nM to inhibit SKBR-3 breast cancer cell growth. CSUOH0901 (NSC751382) from the compound library also inhibits the growth of the 60 cancer cell lines used at National Cancer Institute Developmental therapeutics Program (NCIDTP) with IC(50)s around 100 nM-500 nM. Intraperitoneal injection with a dosage of 5  mg/kg/d of CSUOH0901 to nude mice suppresses HT29 colorectal xenograft growth. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrate the good bioavailability of the compound. PMID:22119125

  4. Aspirin-Exacerbated Diseases: Advances in Asthma with Nasal Polyposis, Urticaria, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney; Buchheit, Kathleen; Cahill, Katherine N

    2015-12-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated diseases are important examples of drug hypersensitivities and include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), aspirin- or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticaria/angioedema, and aspirin- or NSAID-induced anaphylaxis. While each disease subtype may be distinguished by unique clinical features, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these phenotypes are not fully understood. However, the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme is thought to play a significant role. Additionally, eosinophils, mast cells, and their products, prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been identified in the pathogenesis of AERD. Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for aspirin-exacerbated diseases remain limited, and continued research focusing on each of the unique hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin is essential. This will not only advance the understanding of these disease processes, but also lead to the subsequent development of novel therapeutics that patients who suffer from aspirin-induced reactions desperately need. PMID:26475526

  5. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism. PMID:26170841

  6. Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... This listing shows products containing aspirin or salicylate compounds. THIS IS NOT A COMPLETE LIST! Some medication ... and Aspirin Tablets Par Damason-P 5 Darvon Compound-65 9 Lily Disalcid Capsules and Tablets 3M ...

  7. Preparation and characterization of amorphous solid dispersions of nimesulide in cyclodextrin copolymers.

    PubMed

    Skiba, M; Skiba, M; Milon, N; Bounoure, F; Fessi, H

    2014-04-01

    A study to enhance the dissolution rate of nimesulide (NIM), a poorly water-soluble, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was carried out through developing new amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) based on soluble or insoluble water cyclodextrin copolymers (alpha-cyclodextrin, beta-cyclodextrin and y-cyclodextrin polymers) synthesized by direct melt polycondensation. Amorphous solid dispersions of NIM in cyclodextrin copolymers, obtained by solvent evaporation, were characterized by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These analyses provided the existence of interactions between amorphous drug and its carrier. A burst release of more than 80% NIM within approximately 70 minutes was seen with soluble alpha-cyclodextrin polymers (poly-alpha-sol) and insoluble gamma-cyclodextrin polymers (poly-gamma-insol) where no significant differences were observed with the other copolymers. Mathematical kinetic models such as zero order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer-Peppas were used to evaluate the kinetic and mechanism of release of NIM from the different ASD compared to lactose reference matrix. The kinetic of release of NIM from different ASD followed a Higuchi model and the mechanism of release was explained by Korsmeyer-Peppas model in which a fickian diffusion for lactose and soluble beta-cyclodextrin polymers (poly-beta-sol) was observed. However, an anomalous non-Fickian transport was found for the other copolymers. PMID:24734689

  8. Nimesulide-modified gum karaya solid mixtures: preparation, characterization, and formulation development.

    PubMed

    Babu, G V Murali Mohan; Kumar, N Ravi; Himasankar, K; Seshasayana, A; Murthy, K V Ramana

    2003-09-01

    Solid mixtures of nimesulide (NS) and modified gum karaya (MGK) were prepared to improve the dissolution rate of NS. The effect of drug-carrier ratio on dissolution rate of NS was investigated by preparing the solid mixtures of different ratios by cogrinding method. Solid mixtures were also prepared by physical mixing, kneading, and solid dispersion techniques to study the influence of method of preparation. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and equilibrium solubility studies were performed to explain the results of in vitro dissolution rate studies. It was clearly evident from the results that the NS dissolution rate was dependent on the concentration of MGK in the solid mixtures, and optimum weight ratio was found to be 1:4 (NS:MGK). Though the dissolution rate of NS from all solid mixtures prepared by different methods improved significantly, maximum improvement in dissolution rate was observed with solid dispersions. The order of methods basing on their effect on dissolution efficiency is solid dispersion > kneading > cogrinding > physical mixing > pure NS. Tablets of pure drug and solid mixtures (1:4 w/w, NS:MGK) were prepared. Though the best results from the dissolution test were obtained for the tablets containing solid dispersions, tablets containing cogrinding mixture were found to be suitable, from a practical point of view, for commercialization. PMID:14570306

  9. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Massimi, Isabella; Ciuffetta, Ambra; Temperilli, Flavia; Ferrandino, Francesca; Zicari, Alessandra; Pulcinelli, Fabio M; Felli, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin. PMID:26491233

  10. Nondestructive and Rapid Concurrent Estimation of Paracetamol and Nimesulide in Their Combined Dosage Form Using Raman Spectroscopic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lakhwani, Gargi R.; Sherikar, O. D.; Mehta, Priti J.

    2013-01-01

    A rapid, nondestructive Raman spectroscopic method was developed for quantitative estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form. A Raman univariate calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of paracetamol and nimesulide at 853 cm−1 and 1336 cm−1, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for in situ, concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage and method was also validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Thus, the developed Raman spectroscopic method can be applied for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form as a process analytical technology tool by pharmaceutical industries for routine quality control. PMID:24019571

  11. Efficacy and Tolerability of Conventional Nimesulide Versus Beta-Cyclodextrin Nimesulide in Patients with Pain After Surgical Dental Extraction: A Multicenter, Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy Study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Mildred; Seijas, Alberto; Yibirín, Maria González

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pain following extraction of an impacted third molar is widely used to assess analgesic efficacy, especially that of a single dose of a drug. The analgesic activity of conventional nimesulide (CN) has been documented in a variety of types of acute and chronic pain. Beta-cyclodextrin nimesulide (BN) is a new formulation in which nimesulide is included in a cyclodextrin molecule, which increases its solubility in water and its dilution rate, allowing extended, rapid absorption of the drug. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a single dose of BN compared with CN in patients with pain following extraction of an impacted third molar. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy study conducted at 3 dentistry centers in Venezuela. The patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups. One group received a single dose of BN (400-mg tablet, equivalent to 100 mg of nimesulide); the other group received a single dose of CN (100-mg tablet). Both groups also received a placebo. The efficacy variables were (1) pain intensity (PI), assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at the following times: 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, and 45 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours after drug administration; (2) time to first measurable difference in PI from baseline (PID) (PID ≥1 cm on the VAS; ie, the beginning of analgesic action); (3) maximum PID (max PID); (4) sum of PIDs in the 12-hour observation period; (5) pain relief (PR), as rated on a 5-point scale; (6) maximum PR; and (7) sum of the PR scores in the 12-hour observation period (ie, total PR). For the tolerability analysis, all adverse events (AEs) were to be recorded, and the investigators were to assess whether each AE was drug related. Results: Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, 62 patients (40 women, 22 men; mean [SD] age, 20.1 [5.9] years) were assessed; 35 were treated with BN and 27 with CN. PI reduction was more rapid and greater

  12. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  13. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances.

    PubMed

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  14. Aspirin sensitivity of platelet aggregation in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Albert, Stewart G; Hasnain, Bibi I; Ritter, Detlef G; Joist, J Heinrich; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2005-11-01

    Although aspirin is cardioprotective in high-risk populations, many with diabetes mellitus (DM) are unresponsive to these benefits. We questioned whether cardiovascular unresponsiveness might be demonstrated by lack of aspirin sensitivity to in vitro platelet functions especially in subjects with poorly controlled diabetes. Six women and 4 men (48+/-8 years [mean+/-S.D.]), selected for poor control (glycohemoglobin 11.9+/-2.2%) and 10 sex-age (+/-5 years) matched controls received 81 mg aspirin daily. There was a 2-week washout from aspirin and related drugs. After the aspirin dose on day-7, blood for platelet aggregation assays, and 24-h urine for 2,3 dinor thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and 2,3 dinor 6-keto (PGF1alpha) were obtained. Aspirin sensitivity was defined as inhibition (i.e., lower than expected) platelet aggregation after exposure to an agonist. Those with diabetes and controls were sensitive to aspirin inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by 1.6 mM arachidonic acid (9.5+/-3.9% versus 9.1+/-3.1%, normal range 40-100%) and by 0.83 microg/mL collagen (17.4+/-13.9% versus 13.2+/-9.3%, normal range 60-93%), respectively. Aspirin sensitivity to 2 microM ADP was present in five with diabetes and five controls. Urinary prostaglandin metabolites were suppressed below reference ranges, without differences between those with DM or controls for TxB2 (350+/-149 pg/mg versus 348+/-93 pg/mg creatinine) and PGF1alpha (255+/-104 pg/mg versus 222+/-88 pg/mg creatinine). In conclusion, in poorly controlled diabetes, there was no differential lack of aspirin sensitivity to platelet aggregation, or lack of aspirin suppression of urinary TxB2 or PGF1alpha, compared with controls on aspirin. Despite suppression of urinary prostaglandin metabolites, aspirin resistance was most apparent to ADP-mediated platelet aggregation. It is not known what level of inhibition of in vitro tests is necessary for the cardioprotective benefits of aspirin in diabetes mellitus. Thus, the lack of

  15. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the <010> growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites. PMID:23425247

  16. Aspirin failure in patients presenting with acute cerebrovascular ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Halawani, Saeed H M; Williams, David J P; Adefurin, Abiodun; Webster, John; Greaves, Michael; Ford, Isobel

    2011-08-01

    Aspirin is the most commonly used antiplatelet drug for prevention of ischaemic stroke. In order to determine the prevalence and nature of aspirin failure, we studied 51 adults admitted with suspected ischaemic stroke and already prescribed daily aspirin. Within 48 hours (h) of onset, blood and urine samples were collected to assess platelet aggregation, activation and aspirin response by a range of methods. All tests were then repeated on a second sample taken 24 h after witnessed administration of 75 mg or 150 mg aspirin. At entry to the study, incomplete response to aspirin, measured by arachidonic acid (AA)-stimulated platelet aggregation, was found in 43% of patients. Following in-hospital aspirin administration, there was a significant decrease in AA-aggregation (p=0.001) suggesting poor adherence to therapy prior to admission. However, residual aggregation (10-15%) persisted in 11 subjects - suggesting alternative causes. In incomplete responders on admission, platelet aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was significantly higher compared with responders (p<0.05) but there were no significant differences in collagen aggregation, platelet fibrinogen binding or P-selectin expression, plasma von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or the urinary metabolite, 11-dehydro-TxB2. Incomplete platelet inhibition is common around the time of acute cerebrovascular ischaemic events in patients prescribed aspirin. Up to 50% of these observations appear due to incomplete adherence to aspirin therapy. Intervention studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of measured platelet response to aspirin in terms of outcome, and the effectiveness of improved pharmacotherapy for stroke prevention. PMID:21544317

  17. Nimesulide-loaded nanoparticles for the potential coadjuvant treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Concepción; Aberturas, María del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús

    2015-09-30

    Nimesulide (NS)-loaded nanoparticles (NPNS) were prepared from polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and eventually coated with chitosan (NPNSCS). Nanoparticles (NP) were spherical with sizes 379 ± 59 nm for NPNS and 393 ± 66 nm for NPNSCS and zeta potentials of -15 ± 3 mV for NPNS to 10 ± 4 mV for NPNSCS, suggesting an efficient coating. Drug encapsulation rate was high (88 ± 5% and 83 ± 7% of added drug) for NPNS and NPNSCS, respectively. After NP washing and re-suspension, 98 ± 2% and 99 ± 1% of the drug initially entrapped remained associated to NP. NS was dispersed in amorphous state within the polymeric matrix. Two-fold dilution of NP with pH 7.4 PBS provoked no drug release. However, 30-40% NS was released after a 1/10 dilution. NPNSCS and NPNS diluted 1/100 reduced the encapsulated drug to around 30% and 70%, respectively. In contrast, 100% NS was released from NP under sink conditions in less than 2h. The permeability of free-NS (1-1.5 × 10(-5)cm/s) was compared with NPNS (NPNS = 6.4-8.1 × 10(-6)cm/s and NPNSCS = 5.5-7.0 × 10(-6)cm/s) using the PAMPA assay. The cytotoxicity of free-NS and NS in NP on model prostate cancer cells PC-3 and DU-145 showed the highest cytotoxic effect with NPNSCS on PC-3 cells (IC50 = 89 μM). PMID:26205513

  18. [Milestones of cardivascular pharmacotherapy: salicylates and aspirin].

    PubMed

    Jerie, P

    2006-01-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic effect of the bark of willow has been known in Egypt and Greece for canturies. The modem era of salicylates starts with a letter sent 1758 by Reverend Edward Stone to The Royal Society in London. He described "an account of the success of the bark of willow in the cure of agues". His report. erroneously attributed to Edmond Stone. was published five years later. The active ingredient of willow bark. "salicine". was first isolated 1828 by Joseph Buchner, then by Henri Leroux, and also prepared from the oil of wintergreen (Gaultheria) and meadowsweet (Spirea ulmaria) by J. W. Lowig 1833. and called "Spirsäure", which was already pure acetylsalicylic acid. It was also synthetised 1853 by Ch. Gerhardt and finally 1897 in Bayer's laboratoires by Felix Hoffman, who also demonstrated its antiinflammatory efficacy. After two years of clinical trials with low doses, Bayer's management decided to start the productions and launched Aspirin as an analgetic worldwide in summer 1899. The first ASPIRIN ERA bagun. A completely new epoch started when J. N. Vane and Priscilla Piner demonstrated 1971 that the main mechanism of action of aspirin-like drugs is the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. In later studies the potency to inhibit platelet aggregation with small doses of aspirin (30-125 mg) was demonstrated. The Physicians'Health Study 1988 confirmed this effect: aspirin significantly reduced the risk of both, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. and is now used in primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerosis. However the idea was not new: The use of salicylates and aspirin was throughly discussed more than 50 years ago: Paul C. Gibson published 1949 a well-documented case report on efficacy of aspirin in patients with angina, and Kl. Weber and P. Klein in Prague used Gibson's mixture successfully for patients with acute myocardial infarction (1951). Recently, the efficacy and security, the interactions and side-effects of low

  19. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners ...

  20. Risk of gastrointestinal complications associated to NSAIDs, low-dose aspirin and their combinations: Results of a pharmacovigilance reporting system.

    PubMed

    Rafaniello, Concetta; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Sessa, Maurizio; Sportiello, Liberata; Balzano, Antonio; Manguso, Francesco; Aiezza, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Francesco; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Capuano, Annalisa

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are one of the most limiting cause of use of NSAIDs. Beyond others well defined factors, history of peptic ulcer, older age, Helicobacter pylori infection and use of gastrotoxic drugs may affect their GI safety profile. In particular, the risk of GI complications associated to the use of antiplatelet drugs, especially low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (LDA) should deserve much attention. However, only few studies have focused on the effect of combination LDA/NSAIDs on the GI tract compared with the monotherapy and much less studies assessed this effect with multiple NSAIDs use. We aimed to characterize the GI safety profile of NSAIDs and LDA as monotherapy or their combinations in real-life conditions by analysing spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting system in a Southern Italy. We used the case/non-case method in the Italian Pharmacovigilance Network (RNF). Cases were reports of GI events in the RNF between January 2007 and December 2011. Non-cases were all other reports during the same period. The association between NSAID and suspected GI ADRs was calculated using the reporting odds ratio (ROR) with 95% confidence intervals as a measure of disproportionality while adjusting for age, and concomitant use of antineoplastic agents or drugs for cardiovascular diseases. Sub-analysis were performed within the NSAID class. Among the 2816 adverse drug reactions recorded, we identified 374 (13.3%) cases of GI complications. Upper GI complications were the most frequently reported type of events. The highest associations were found for the combined use of NSAIDs and/or LDA, whilst the lowest associations were for their respective monotherapy. Looking at individual NSAIDs the highest association with GI events was observed for ketorolac exposure followed by nimesulide, diclofenac, aspirin, ketoprofen, and ibuprofen. This study highlights the primary role of the national spontaneous reporting system to bring out potential signals

  1. Van der Waals Interactions in Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Anthony; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The ability of molecules to yield multiple solid forms, or polymorphs, has significance for diverse applications ranging from drug design and food chemistry to nonlinear optics and hydrogen storage. In particular, aspirin has been used and studied for over a century, but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  2. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang; He, Huabin; Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Jinghe

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  3. Microencapsulation: an acclaimed novel drug-delivery system for NSAIDs in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Manjanna, K M; Shivakumar, B; Pramod Kumar, T M

    2010-01-01

    Arthritis refers to different medical conditions associated with disorders of the primary structures that determine joint functioning, such as bones, cartilage, and synovial membranes. Drug discovery and delivery to retard the degeneration of joint tissues are challenging. Current treatment of different types of arthritis such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis involves the administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, diclofenac, aceclofenac, ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, indomethacin piroxicam, dexibuprofen, ketoprofen, nabumetone, nimesulide, and naproxen, mainly by the oral, parenteral, or topical route. However, the frequent dosing that is required with NSAIDs often leads to patient noncompliance, so drug-delivery technologies should be developed to reduce the frequency of dosing and to allow sustained release of medications. Microencapsulation is one of the novel drug-delivery technologies employed to sustain drug release. This method reduces dosing and eliminates gastrointestinal irritation, thus ultimately improving patient compliance in the pharmacotherapy of arthritis. We provide a comprehensive overview of several microencapsulation technologies used in the treatment of arthritis that may reduce the dose-related adverse effects caused by NSAIDs. PMID:21175420

  4. Comparative effects of aspirin and enteric-coated aspirin on loss of chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes from the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.C.; Schwartz, R.S.; Kutny, K.; Vallejo, G.; Horton, E.S.; Cotter, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium chromate Cr 51 was used to label red blood cells of 19 healthy male volunteers, whose stools were collected for four days before and four days during oral administration of either uncoated (N . 9) or enteric-coated (N . 10) aspirin. Each subject received 2.925 gm/day of aspirin, in three equal doses separated by eight-hour intervals, for a total of seven days. During drug use, stools were collected on days 4 through 7. Fecal blood content, estimated by measuring radioactivity in the stools, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) during use of either type of aspirin than at baseline, but losses measured during use of the coated aspirin (mean, 1.54 ml/day) were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than those measured during use of the uncoated aspirin (mean, 4.33 ml/day). The two types of aspirin produced equivalent serum concentrations of salicylates. We conclude that enteric-coated aspirin reduces gastrointestinal blood loss.

  5. Nimesulide Improves the Symptomatic and Disease Modifying Effects of Leflunomide in Collagen Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Nofal, Salwa M.; Khalifa, Amani E.; Williams, Richard O.; El-Eraky, Wafaa I.; Nagy, Ayman A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2014-01-01

    Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articular hyperalgesia were evaluated using a locomotor activity cage and the Hargreaves method, respectively. Disease progression was assessed via arthritic index scoring, X-ray imaging, myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and histopathologic examination. Nimesulide induced only transient symptomatic alleviation on the top of decreased leucocytic infiltration compared to arthritis group. However, nimesulide alone failed to induce any significant improvement in the radiological or pathological disease progression. Leflunomide alone moderately alleviates the symptoms of arthritis and moderately retarded the radiological and pathological disease progression. Combination of nimesulide and leflunomide significantly improved symptomatic (analgesia and joint stiffness) and arthritic disease progression (radiological, pathological and Myeloperoxidase enzyme activity) in collagen induced arthritis animal model. PMID:25375820

  6. Effect of Aspirin on Spinal Cord Injury: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Kermani, Hamed Reihani; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Fatahian, Reza; Najar, Ahmad Gholamhosseinian

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is an anti-inflammatory drug, peroxyl radical scavenger, and antioxidant agent that inhibits phospholipases, nitric oxide synthetases, and cyclooxygenase enzymes. The existing literature contains no studies on the effects of various doses of aspirin on spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, we sought to investigate the putative effects of aspirin on experimental SCI. The weight-drop injury model was used to produce SCI in 100 albino Wistar rats. The animals were allocated to five groups: a control group, where the rats did not undergo any surgical or medical intervention except for anesthesia; a sham-treated group, where laminectomy was performed without SCI and no further therapy was administered; and three other groups, where the rats with SCI received low-dose aspirin [20 mg/kg], high-dose aspirin [80 mg/kg], and a vehicle, respectively. Half of the rats were sacrificed 24 hours later, and their spinal cords were excised for biochemical studies. The other rats were subjected to Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scoring once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Aspirin decreased lipid peroxidation following SCI as the mean (± standard error) catalase level was significantly higher in the high-dose aspirin group (46.10±12.01) than in the sham-treated group (16.07±2.42) and the vehicle-treated group (15.31±3.20) (P<0.05; P<0.05, respectively). Both of the groups treated with high-dose and low-dose aspirin demonstrated a higher mean BBB score than did the control group (P<0.001) and the sham-treated group (P<0.001). Our data provide evidence in support of the potential effects of aspirin in biochemical and neurobehavioral recovery after SCI. PMID:27217606

  7. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Lin; Sun Jihong; Li Yuzhen

    2011-08-15

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation f{sub t}=kt{sup n} was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties. - Graphical abstract: Loading (A) and release profiles (B) of aspirin in N-BMMs and N-MCM-41 indicated that BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that MCM-41. Highlights: > Bimodal mesoporous silicas (BMMs) and MCM-41 modified with amino group via post-treatment procedure. > Loading and release profiles of aspirin in modified BMMs and MCM-41. > Modified BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that modified MCM-41.

  8. Prophylactic aspirin and risk of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, J.; Colin-Jones, D.; Langman, M.; Lawson, D.; Logan, R.; Murphy, M.; Rawlins, M.; Vessey, M.; Wainwright, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risks of hospitalisation for bleeding peptic ulcer with the current prophylactic aspirin regimens of 300 mg daily or less. DESIGN--A case-control study with hospital and community controls. SETTING--Hospitals in Glasgow, Newcastle, Nottingham, Oxford, and Portsmouth. SUBJECTS--1121 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer bleeding matched with hospital and community controls. RESULTS--144 (12.8%) cases had been regular users of aspirin (taken at least five days a week for at least the previous month) compared with 101 (9.0%) hospital and 77 (7.8%) community controls. Odds ratios were raised for all doses of aspirin taken, whether compared with hospital or community controls (compared with combined controls: 75 mg, 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.4); 150 mg, 3.2 (1.7 to 6.5); 300 mg, 3.9 (2.5 to 6.3)). Results were not explained by confounding influences of age, sex, prior ulcer history or dyspepsia, or concurrent non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Risks seemed particularly high in patients who took non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs concurrently. CONCLUSION--No conventionally used prophylactic aspirin regimen seems free of the risk of peptic ulcer complications. PMID:7711618

  9. Aspirin Delimits Platelet Life Span by Proteasomal Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Manasa K.; Dash, Ayusman; Singh, Nitesh; Dash, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin is widely used in clinical settings as an anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet drug due its inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase activity. Although the drug has long been considered to be an effective and safe therapeutic regime against inflammatory and cardiovascular disorders, consequences of its cyclooxygenase-independent attributes on platelets, the key players in thrombogenesis, beg serious investigation. In this report we explored the effect of aspirin on platelet lifespan in murine model and its possible cytotoxicity against human platelets in vitro. Aspirin administration in mice led to significant reduction in half-life of circulating platelets, indicative of enhanced rate of platelet clearance. Aspirin-treated human platelets were found to be phagocytosed more efficiently by macrophages, associated with attenuation in platelet proteasomal activity and upregulation of conformationally active Bax, which were consistent with enhanced platelet apoptosis. Although the dosage of aspirin administered in mice was higher than the therapeutic regimen against cardiovascular events, it is comparable with the recommended anti-inflammatory prescription. Thus, above observations provide cautionary framework to critically re-evaluate prophylactic and therapeutic dosage regime of aspirin in systemic inflammatory as well as cardiovascular ailments. PMID:25126950

  10. Two cases of oral aspirin overdose.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman and a 27-year-old man were found in a parked car after the man had telephoned his father to tell him of their suicide attempt. In spite of emergent hospitalization and intensive care, the woman died. Due to the possibility of his assisting her suicide, medicolegal autopsy and toxicological analysis were performed. On forensic autopsy, no external injuries or pathological findings were detected. The man recovered after 5 days of hospitalization. In spite of a negative toxicological screening test, the police investigation revealed that they may have taken 120 tablets (330 mg/tablet; 39,600 mg total dose) of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) orally; therefore, we analyzed the concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid and two kinds of metabolite in specimens obtained at autopsy and on emergent hospitalization using high performance liquid chromatography. Acetylsalicylic acid and/or the two metabolites were found in the woman's specimens. These substances were also present in the man's specimens. It is still unclear why the man survived in spite of what appeared to be a fatal aspirin overdose. It was very straightforward to diagnose aspirin poisoning in these cases; however, we have to be aware of poisoning by drugs which are not included in simple drug screening examinations. PMID:20569957

  11. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Li, Yuzhen

    2011-08-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation ft= ktn was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties.

  12. Salicylic acid: a link between aspirin, diet and the prevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Paterson, J R; Lawrence, J R

    2001-08-01

    Aspirin was introduced into clinical practice more than 100 years ago. This unique drug belongs to a family of compounds called the salicylates, the simplest of which is salicylic acid, the principal metabolite of aspirin. Salicylic acid is responsible for the anti-inflammatory action of aspirin, and may cause the reduced risk of colorectal cancer observed in those who take aspirin. Yet salicylic acid and other salicylates occur naturally in fruits and plants, while diets rich in these are believed to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. Serum salicylic acid concentrations are greater in vegetarians than non-vegetarians, and there is overlap between concentrations in vegetarians and those taking low-dose aspirin. We propose that the cancer-preventive action of aspirin is due to its principal metabolite, salicylic acid, and that dietary salicylates can have the same effect. It is also possible that natural salicylates contribute to the other recognized benefits of a healthy diet. PMID:11493722

  13. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159459.html Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation Blood thinners -- not aspirin -- dramatically cut the risk of stroke, researchers say ...

  14. Effect of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 on aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, S. M.; Bell, G. S.; Foster, S.; Spruce, K. E.; MacMillan, R.; Williams, A. J.; Lee, T. H.; Arm, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The cysteinyl leukotrienes may play a central part in the mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma. Previous work has shown that individuals with aspirin-sensitive asthma have high basal urinary LTE4 levels which increase further upon aspirin ingestion, and that sulphidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonists attenuate aspirin-induced airflow obstruction. If the cysteinyl leukotrienes cause aspirin-induced asthmatic reactions, inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway should prevent aspirin-induced bronchospasm. This hypothesis has been tested with ZD2138, a specific non-redox 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. METHODS--Seven subjects (four men) with aspirin-sensitive asthma with baseline FEV1 values > 67% were studied. ZD2138 (350 mg) or placebo was given on two separate occasions two weeks apart in a randomised double blind fashion. A single dose of aspirin was administered four hours after dosing and FEV1 was measured for six hours. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway by ZD2138 was assessed by measurements of urinary LTE4 levels and ex vivo calcium ionophore stimulated LTB4 generation in whole blood, before administration of drug or placebo and at regular time intervals after dosing and aspirin administration. RESULTS--ZD2138 protected against the aspirin-induced reduction in FEV1 with a 20.3 (4.9)% fall in FEV1 following placebo compared with 4.9 (2.9)% following ZD2138. This was associated with 72% inhibition of ex vivo LTB4 generation in whole blood at 12 hours and a 74% inhibition of the rise in urinary LTE4 excretion at six hours after aspirin ingestion. CONCLUSIONS--In aspirin-sensitive asthma the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 inhibits the fall in FEV1 induced by aspirin and this is associated with substantial inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. PMID:8091318

  15. Affordability Calculations on a Health Education Campaign to Promote the Use of Aspirin in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2008-01-01

    Aspirin has far-reaching public health potential in reducing the risk of heart attacks, ischemic strokes and possibly cancer. Balanced against this potential are undesirable effects of the drug. It seems reasonable to allow every individual over the age of 50 years to make an informed choice about whether or not to take aspirin. A health education…

  16. 75 FR 61503 - Determination That AZDONE (Hydrocodone Bitartrate and Aspirin) Tablet, 5 Milligrams/500...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Aspirin) Tablet, 5 Milligrams/500 Milligrams, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or... Administration (FDA) has determined that AZDONE (hydrocodone bitartrate and aspirin) Tablet, 5 milligrams (mg... allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for hydrocodone bitartrate and...

  17. Endobronchial biopsies on aspirin and prasugrel.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Kebbe, Jad

    2015-06-01

    Patients are generally required to stop antiplatelet therapy prior to elective invasive procedures. Some patients receive dual antiplatelet therapy for recent vascular procedures such as drug-eluting coronary stenting, and early discontinuation of antiplatelet agents could lead to a significant risk of stent thrombosis. Most bronchoscopic procedures are performed on patients using Aspirin but not on those using Clopidogrel or Prasugrel. In this report, we describe a unique case of a patient with a recent placement of drug-eluting stents, who required endobronchial biopsies for evaluation of lung cancer recurrence. The procedure was performed successfully and safely with no complications. PMID:25697386

  18. Can We Select Patients for Colorectal Cancer Prevention with Aspirin?

    PubMed

    Kraus, Sarah; Sion, Daniel; Arber, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been extensively investigated in the context of the prevention of cardiovascular disease. It has one of the strongest cumulative evidence supporting its use in colorectal cancer (CRC) chemoprevention. Epidemiological, clinical, and observational studies have demonstrated that aspirin and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including COX-2 inhibitors, can protect against CRC and significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, prospective randomized controlled trials of colorectal polyp recurrence and in patients with hereditary CRC syndromes have shown that aspirin can produce regression of existing colorectal adenomas and prevent the formation of new polyps. However, the lowest effective doses, treatment duration, target populations, and the effects on survival are not entirely clear. Although not common serious side effects and in particular gastrointestinal and intracerebral hemorrhage do occur, better selection of individuals who might benefit the most from aspirin use must be carefully performed in order to maximize their risk/benefit ratio. In the era of precision medicine, genetic information, blood and/or urinary biomarkers, could potentially help in tailoring chemopreventive therapeutic strategies, based on aspirin use, while limiting adverse toxic effects. The current review will cover the use of aspirin for the prevention of colorectal adenomas and CRC, potential markers for chemoprevention, and patient stratification. PMID:26369678

  19. Synergistic Drug-Cytokine Induction of Hepatocellular Death as an in vitro Approach for the Study of Inflammation-Associated Idiosyncratic Drug Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; King, Bracken M.; Hasan, Maya A.; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Farazi, Paraskevi A.; Hendriks, Bart S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Sorger, Peter K.; Tidor, Bruce; Xu, Jinghai J.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity represents a major problem in drug development due to inadequacy of current preclinical screening assays, but recently established rodent models utilizing bacterial LPS co-administration to induce an inflammatory background have successfully reproduced idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity signatures for certain drugs. However, the low-throughput nature of these models renders them problematic for employment as preclinical screening assays. Here, we present an analogous, but high-throughput, in vitro approach in which drugs are administered to a variety of cell types (primary human and rat hepatocytes and the human HepG2 cell line) across a landscape of inflammatory contexts containing LPS and cytokines TNF, IFNγ, IL-1α, and IL-6. Using this assay, we observed drug-cytokine hepatotoxicity synergies for multiple idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (ranitidine, trovafloxacin, nefazodone, nimesulide, clarithromycin, and telithromycin) but not for their corresponding non-toxic control compounds (famotidine, levofloxacin, buspirone, and aspirin). A larger compendium of drug-cytokine mix hepatotoxicity data demonstrated that hepatotoxicity synergies were largely potentiated by TNF, IL-1α, and LPS within the context of multi-cytokine mixes. Then, we screened 90 drugs for cytokine synergy in human hepatocytes and found that a significantly larger fraction of the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (19%) synergized with a single cytokine mix than did the non-hepatotoxic drugs (3%). Finally, we used an information theoretic approach to ascertain especially informative subsets of cytokine treatments for most highly effective construction of regression models for drug- and cytokine mix-induced hepatotoxicities across these cell systems. Our results suggest that this drug-cytokine co-treatment approach could provide a useful preclinical tool for investigating inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity. PMID:19362101

  20. Synergistic drug-cytokine induction of hepatocellular death as an in vitro approach for the study of inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; King, Bracken M; Hasan, Maya A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Farazi, Paraskevi A; Hendriks, Bart S; Griffith, Linda G; Sorger, Peter K; Tidor, Bruce; Xu, Jinghai J; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2009-06-15

    Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity represents a major problem in drug development due to inadequacy of current preclinical screening assays, but recently established rodent models utilizing bacterial LPS co-administration to induce an inflammatory background have successfully reproduced idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity signatures for certain drugs. However, the low-throughput nature of these models renders them problematic for employment as preclinical screening assays. Here, we present an analogous, but high-throughput, in vitro approach in which drugs are administered to a variety of cell types (primary human and rat hepatocytes and the human HepG2 cell line) across a landscape of inflammatory contexts containing LPS and cytokines TNF, IFN gamma, IL-1 alpha, and IL-6. Using this assay, we observed drug-cytokine hepatotoxicity synergies for multiple idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (ranitidine, trovafloxacin, nefazodone, nimesulide, clarithromycin, and telithromycin) but not for their corresponding non-toxic control compounds (famotidine, levofloxacin, buspirone, and aspirin). A larger compendium of drug-cytokine mix hepatotoxicity data demonstrated that hepatotoxicity synergies were largely potentiated by TNF, IL-1 alpha, and LPS within the context of multi-cytokine mixes. Then, we screened 90 drugs for cytokine synergy in human hepatocytes and found that a significantly larger fraction of the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (19%) synergized with a single cytokine mix than did the non-hepatotoxic drugs (3%). Finally, we used an information theoretic approach to ascertain especially informative subsets of cytokine treatments for most highly effective construction of regression models for drug- and cytokine mix-induced hepatotoxicities across these cell systems. Our results suggest that this drug-cytokine co-treatment approach could provide a useful preclinical tool for investigating inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity. PMID:19362101

  1. Synergistic drug-cytokine induction of hepatocellular death as an in vitro approach for the study of inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; King, Bracken M.; Hasan, Maya A.; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Farazi, Paraskevi A.; Hendriks, Bart S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Sorger, Peter K.; Tidor, Bruce; Xu, Jinghai J.

    2009-06-15

    Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity represents a major problem in drug development due to inadequacy of current preclinical screening assays, but recently established rodent models utilizing bacterial LPS co-administration to induce an inflammatory background have successfully reproduced idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity signatures for certain drugs. However, the low-throughput nature of these models renders them problematic for employment as preclinical screening assays. Here, we present an analogous, but high-throughput, in vitro approach in which drugs are administered to a variety of cell types (primary human and rat hepatocytes and the human HepG2 cell line) across a landscape of inflammatory contexts containing LPS and cytokines TNF, IFN{gamma}, IL-1{alpha}, and IL-6. Using this assay, we observed drug-cytokine hepatotoxicity synergies for multiple idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (ranitidine, trovafloxacin, nefazodone, nimesulide, clarithromycin, and telithromycin) but not for their corresponding non-toxic control compounds (famotidine, levofloxacin, buspirone, and aspirin). A larger compendium of drug-cytokine mix hepatotoxicity data demonstrated that hepatotoxicity synergies were largely potentiated by TNF, IL-1{alpha}, and LPS within the context of multi-cytokine mixes. Then, we screened 90 drugs for cytokine synergy in human hepatocytes and found that a significantly larger fraction of the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (19%) synergized with a single cytokine mix than did the non-hepatotoxic drugs (3%). Finally, we used an information theoretic approach to ascertain especially informative subsets of cytokine treatments for most highly effective construction of regression models for drug- and cytokine mix-induced hepatotoxicities across these cell systems. Our results suggest that this drug-cytokine co-treatment approach could provide a useful preclinical tool for investigating inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, improves radiation treatment against non-small cell lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Kristopher R; Warren, Graham W; Fang, Fang; Xu, Yong; St Clair, William H

    2006-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Despite improvements in radiation, surgery and chemotherapy the 5 year survival statistics of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have improved little over the past two decades. It has been proposed that NF-kappaB is a participant in the cytoprotection against several redox-mediated therapeutic agents including ionizing radiation. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition has become an attractive target for enhancing the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapy. Numerous mechanistic pathways have been proposed as the means through which COX-2 inhibition enhances the efficacy of radiation. We hypothesize that the COX-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, will improve the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT), at least in part, via the suppression of NF-kappaB mediated cytoprotective pathways. In this study we used the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide to improve the efficacy of RT when measured by tumor regrowth assays in vivo and clonegenic survival in vitro. For the in vivo assay, A549 tumor cells representing NSCLC were subcutaneously injected into the right flanks of female athymic nude mice (n=10/group). Mice were given nimesulide via drinking water at a concentration of 5 microg/g body weight (b.w.) and the water was replenished daily. Tumors were treated with 30 Gy fractionated radiation and measured bi-weekly. For our in vitro study, clonogenic survival assays were evaluated to determine the effect of nimesulide, radiation, and the combination. The NF-kappaB mediated mechanism of nimesulide was measured by Western blot analysis of NF-kappaB target genes, MnSOD and survivin. In vivo, mice that received combined treatments of 5 microg/g b.w. nimesulide and 30 Gy radiation (3 Gy/fraction, 10 daily fractions) had significant reduction in tumor size in comparison to the 30 Gy radiation control group (p<0.05). In vitro, nimesulide alone produced a significant decrease in clonogenic survival at doses from 0-300 micro

  3. [Physiopathology of aspirin intolerant asthma].

    PubMed

    Carsin, A; Bienvenu, J; Pacheco, Y; Devouassoux, G

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in individuals with asthma following the ingestion of aspirin. AERD affects up to 20 % of adults with asthma. At present, no reliable in vitro test is available to confirm the diagnosis. The confirmation of the diagnosis of AERD therefore depends on the response to challenge testing with aspirin. The pathogenesis of AERD is linked to abnormalities in arachidonic acid metabolism. Prior to exposure to aspirin, respiratory mucosal inflammation is the result of a cell infiltration, an overproduction of leukotrienes, prostaglandins D2, 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid and an underproduction of lipoxins. After aspirin ingestion, patients with AERD synthesize excessive amounts of cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin metabolites involved in bronchoconstriction. New hypotheses concerning AERD pathogenesis have been added to the initial cyclooxygenase theory. These propose that AERD may be linked to the complement system, adenosine metabolism or angiotensin converting enzyme gene and IgE receptor gene polymorphisms. PMID:22405107

  4. Aspirin: from a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Caglar, Ilker M; Caglar, Fatma N Turhan; Ziyade, Sedat; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Yildiz, Yahya; Zencirci, Ertugrul; Ugurlucan, Funda Gungor; Arslan, Ahmet H; Korkmaz, Semra; Filizcan, Ugur; Cicek, Sertac

    2012-04-01

    Aspirin is one of the oldest medicines. Due to its wide range usage in different fields of medicine, we aimed to present the history, effects and different uses of aspirin in this review. Furthermore, recent patents of novel pharmaceutical interventions in the field of acetylsalicylic acid, expanding treatment options are presented. Literature search was performed in order to reach data and present information about aspirin from a historical perspective. Since its first use as a pain killer, aspirin has found a broad range of use in general medicine, cardiovascular medicine, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, dentistry, gastroenterology, oncology with its different effects. Aspirin, a painkilling gift of history to mankind, with a history dating back to BC and various healing effects, promises to be of greater use in different fields of medicine with the light of recent studies, inspiring more research and gaining more popularity. PMID:22257089

  5. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of aspirin with warfarin in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenlin; Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Jun; Zhang, Ping; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Tingting; Pappoe, Faustina; Huang, Jihan; Tang, Haiqin

    2016-01-01

    1. Warfarin and aspirin are widely used in a wide spectrum of thromboembolic and atherothrombotic diseases. Despite the potential efficacy of warfarin-aspirin therapy, the safety and side effect of combined therapy remains unclear. 2. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between warfarin and aspirin in beagles after single and multiple doses. 3. Coadministration of aspirin had no significant effects on the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC(0-t)) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of R- and S-warfarin after a single dose of warfarin, but significantly increase the AUC(0-t) and Cmax and dramatically decrease the clearance (CL) of R- and S-warfarin after multiple dose of warfarin. Accordingly, there was a slight increase in the AUEC(0-t) and Emax of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT) and international normalized ratio (INR) after multiple dose of warfarin. 4. Coadministration of warfarin had no markedly effects on the AUC(0-t) and Cmax of aspirin and its metabolite salicylic acid after single or multiple dose of aspirin. Meanwhile, the AUEC(0-t) and Emax of inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) were not significantly affected by warfarin. 5. Our animal study indicated that coadministration of aspirin with warfarin can cause significant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions in beagles. However, more studies are urgently needed to assess related information of warfarin-aspirin drug interactions in healthy volunteers or patients. PMID:26548565

  6. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally, and atherothrombosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy, including aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), reduces the risk of cardiovascular events and death. However, it is well-known that many patients experience cardiovascular events despite treatment with aspirin, often termed "aspirin low-responsiveness". This fact has caused considerable debate: does biochemical aspirin low-responsiveness have prognostic value? Can low-responders be reliably identified? And if so, should antithrombotic treatment be changed? Is the whole discussion of antiplatelet drug response merely a result of low compliance? Compliance should be carefully optimised, before evaluating the pharmacological effect of a drug. It is well-known that cardiovascular disease is multifactorial, and, therefore, total risk reduction is not feasible. Aetiological factors to the variable platelet inhibition by aspirin seem to include genetic factors, pharmacological interactions, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and increased platelet turnover. It is a captivating thought that antiplatelet therapy may be improved by individually tailored therapy based on platelet function testing. Ongoing studies are challenging the current one-size-fits-all dosing strategy, but the preceding evaluation of platelet function assays has not been adequate. The overall objective of this thesis was to evaluate the reproducibility of and aggreement between a number of widely used platelet function tests and to explore the importance of platelet turnover for the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease. In the intervention studies (studies 1, 3, and 4), optimal compliance was confirmed by measurements of serum thromboxane, which is the most sensitive assay to confirm compliance with aspirin. In study 1, platelet function tests widely used to measure the antiplatelet effect

  7. Formulation development of intermediate release Nimesulide tablets by CCRD for IVIVC studies.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Sattar, Shahnila; Nadeem, Muhammad; Hussain, Liaqat; MZia, Muhammad Usman; Muhammad, Iyad Naeem; Uzair, Muhammad; Qadir, Imran

    2014-07-01

    Simple and cost effective study consisting of three steps, comparison of micromeritic properties of different blends i.e. placebo without API and Nimesulide containing, Use of central composite design (CCRD) for intermediate release Nimesulide tablets and stability results of three selected Nimesulide tablet formulations which were calculated by using R Gui. Different concentrations of Avicel, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and magnesium stearate were used as variables in central composite design and two types blend i.e., with or without Nimesulide were selected for bulk density, tap density, percentage compressibility; angle of repose and Hausner's ratio. Blending rate constant was performed after applying the different mixing times like 3, 6, 9 and 12 minutes. Twenty intermediate release formulations were designed and three formulations were chosen for compression by direct compression method on the basis of compressibility index. Physicochemical properties and best release pattern in four hours in different dissolution medium were successfully measured. Relative densities, porosity of tablets were compared with tensile strength of tablet and weight variation, hardness, friability and dissolution was performed by simple experiments. Presence of Nimesulide in the bulk increased all micromeratic tests while 9 minutes was best mixing time. The hardness of NM containing tablets increased with the increase of relative density. The release pattern was further analyzed by model dependent i.e. zero order, first order and Higuchi, Korse-meyer and Pappas, Hixson Crowell and model independent kinetic model i.e., f2 value respectively. R Gui explained the F16 formulation shows the best result in stability studies with shelf life 72 months. PMID:25015441

  8. Per aspirin ad astra...

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Taking the 110th anniversary of marketing of aspirin as starting point, the almost scary toxicological profile of aspirin is contrasted with its actual use experience. The author concludes that we are lucky that, in 1899, there was no regulatory toxicology. Adding, for the purpose of this article, a fourth R to the Three Rs, i.e. Realism, three reality-checks are carried out. The first one comes to the conclusion that the tools of toxicology are hardly adequate for the challenges ahead. The second one concludes that, specifically, the implementation of the EU REACH system is not feasible with these tools, mainly with regard to throughput. The third one challenges the belief that classical alternative methods, i.e. replacing animal test-based tools one by one, is actually leading to a new toxicology - it appears to change only patches of the patchwork, but not to overcome any inherent limitations other than ethical ones. The perspective lies in the Toxicology for the 21st Century initiatives, which aim to create a new approach from the scratch, by an evidence-based toxicology and a global "Human Toxicology Programme". PMID:20105011

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and aspirin interact synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Hüls, Isabel; Sigler, Michael; Palani, Chithra D; Hong, Le Thi Thu; Völker, Uwe; Kroemer, Heyo K; Beck, James F

    2008-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin show promise as antineoplastic agents. The treatment with both HDIs and aspirin can result in hyperacetylation of proteins. In this study, we investigated whether HDIs and aspirin interacted in inducing anticancer activity and histone acetylation. We found that the HDIs, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium butyrate, and aspirin cooperated to induce cell death in the ovarian cancer cell line, A2780. The effect was synergistic, as evidenced by CI-isobologram analysis. However, aspirin had no effect on histone acetylation, neither in the absence nor presence of HDIs. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying the synergistic action of HDIs and aspirin, we employed the deacetylated metabolite of aspirin, salicylic acid, and the cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively. We found that HDIs and salicylic acid interacted synergistically, albeit less efficiently than HDIs and aspirin, to induce cancer cell death, suggesting that the acetyl and the salicyl moiety contributed to the cooperative interaction of aspirin with HDIs. SC-560 and NS-398 had little effect both when applied alone or in conjunction with HDIs, indicating that the combinatorial effect of HDIs and aspirin was not the result of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HDIs and aspirin synergize to induce cancer cell death and, thus, provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the potential of combining HDIs and aspirin as a strategy for anticancer therapy. PMID:18575740

  10. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  11. Variability in the Responsiveness to Low-Dose Aspirin: Pharmacological and Disease-Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Bianca; Petrucci, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The main pharmacological aspects of pharmacodynamics (PD) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of aspirin as antiplatelet agent were unravelled between the late sixties and the eighties, and low-dose aspirin given once daily has been shown to be a mainstay in the current treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disorders. Nevertheless, several PD and PK aspects of aspirin in selected clinical conditions have recently emerged and deserve future clinical attention. In 1994, the term “aspirin resistance” was used for the first time, but, until now, no consensus exists on definition, standardized assay, underlying mechanisms, clinical impact, and possible efficacy of alternative therapeutic interventions. At variance with an undefined aspirin-resistant status, in the last 5 years, the concept of variability in response to aspirin due to specific pathophysiological mechanisms and based on PK and/or PD of the drug has emerged. This growing evidence highlights the existence and possible clinical relevance of an interindividual variability of pharmacological aspirin response and calls for new, large studies to test new low-dose aspirin-based regimens which may ameliorate platelet acetylation, reduce variability in drug responsiveness, and improve clinical efficacy on selected populations. PMID:22288010

  12. Comparison of aspirin and indobufen in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Young; Sung, Ki-Chul; Choi, Hyo-In

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the extent and recovery of platelet inhibition after administration of indobufen and aspirin in healthy volunteers. Indobufen inhibits platelet aggregation by reversibly inhibiting the platelet cyclooxygenase enzyme, thereby suppressing thromboxane synthesis. Twenty healthy volunteers completed the study and received aspirin (200 mg/day for 2 weeks) followed by a 4-week washout period and then indobufen (200 mg twice a day for 2 weeks). The percent (%) inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) was assessed using arachidonic acid (0.5 mg/ml) and adenosine diphosphate (5 µM) at 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours after last dose of each drug. IPA assessed using arachidonic acid as the agonist was similar at 4 hours after the last dose of indobufen (81.07 ± 9.36%) and aspirin (96.99 ± 0.29%, p = 0.10), but significantly lower at 12 hours (74.04 ± 9.55% vs. 97.94 ± 0.28%, p = 0.02), 24 hours (33.39 ± 11.13% vs. 97.48 ± 0.32%, p < 0.001) and 48 hours (14.12 ± 9.74% vs. 98.22 ± 0.31%, p < 0.001) after indobufen, compared to the relative values for aspirin. IPA assessed using adenosine diphosphate as the agonist was similar in the two groups at 4, 12 and 24 hours after the last dose, but significantly lower 48 hours after the last dose of indobufen, compared to the relative value for aspirin (1.98 ± 3.57% vs. 12.61 ± 2.71%, p = 0.002). Indobufen (200 mg twice a day) caused equivalent initial inhibition of platelet aggregation to aspirin (200 mg daily), and the anti-aggregation effect diminished faster than after aspirin. PMID:26083594

  13. Pharmacometabolomics Reveals That Serotonin Is Implicated in Aspirin Response Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ellero-Simatos, S; Lewis, J P; Georgiades, A; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Beitelshees, A L; Horenstein, R B; Dane, A; Harms, A C; Ramaker, R; Vreeken, R J; Perry, C G; Zhu, H; Sànchez, C L; Kuhn, C; Ortel, T L; Shuldiner, A R; Hankemeier, T; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2014-01-01

    While aspirin is generally effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, considerable variation in drug response exists, resulting in some individuals displaying high on-treatment platelet reactivity. We used pharmacometabolomics to define pathways implicated in variation of response to treatment. We profiled serum samples from healthy subjects pre- and postaspirin (14 days, 81 mg/day) using mass spectrometry. We established a strong signature of aspirin exposure independent of response (15/34 metabolites changed). In our discovery (N = 80) and replication (N = 125) cohorts, higher serotonin levels pre- and postaspirin correlated with high, postaspirin, collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In a third cohort, platelets from subjects with the highest levels of serotonin preaspirin retained higher reactivity after incubation with aspirin than platelets from subjects with the lowest serotonin levels preaspirin (72 ± 8 vs. 61 ± 11%, P = 0.02, N = 20). Finally, ex vivo, serotonin strongly increased platelet reactivity after platelet incubation with aspirin (+20%, P = 4.9 × 10−4, N = 12). These results suggest that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability. PMID:25029353

  14. Pharmacometabolomics reveals that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability.

    PubMed

    Ellero-Simatos, S; Lewis, J P; Georgiades, A; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Beitelshees, A L; Horenstein, R B; Dane, A; Harms, A C; Ramaker, R; Vreeken, R J; Perry, C G; Zhu, H; Sànchez, C L; Kuhn, C; Ortel, T L; Shuldiner, A R; Hankemeier, T; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2014-01-01

    While aspirin is generally effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, considerable variation in drug response exists, resulting in some individuals displaying high on-treatment platelet reactivity. We used pharmacometabolomics to define pathways implicated in variation of response to treatment. We profiled serum samples from healthy subjects pre- and postaspirin (14 days, 81 mg/day) using mass spectrometry. We established a strong signature of aspirin exposure independent of response (15/34 metabolites changed). In our discovery (N = 80) and replication (N = 125) cohorts, higher serotonin levels pre- and postaspirin correlated with high, postaspirin, collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In a third cohort, platelets from subjects with the highest levels of serotonin preaspirin retained higher reactivity after incubation with aspirin than platelets from subjects with the lowest serotonin levels preaspirin (72 ± 8 vs. 61 ± 11%, P = 0.02, N = 20). Finally, ex vivo, serotonin strongly increased platelet reactivity after platelet incubation with aspirin (+20%, P = 4.9 × 10(-4), N = 12). These results suggest that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability. PMID:25029353

  15. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) and aspirin: a randomized, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic interaction study

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Michael; Krätzschmar, Jörn; Unger, Sigrun; Mück, Wolfgang; Wensing, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In preclinical studies, drugs that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels have been shown to influence platelet function/aggregation; however, the effect of riociguat on human platelets is unclear. Aspirin, a platelet inhibitor, is likely to be given concomitantly in patients receiving riociguat. It is therefore important to establish clinically whether (1) riociguat affects platelet function and (2) aspirin and riociguat interact. This randomized, open-label, crossover study investigated potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs in healthy male volunteers (N = 18). There were 3 treatment regimens: a single morning dose of riociguat 2.5 mg, aspirin 500 mg on 2 consecutive mornings, and both treatments together, with riociguat given on the second morning. Fifteen participants were available for pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no effect of riociguat alone on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, and serum thromboxane B2 levels. The effects of aspirin on these parameters were not influenced by concomitant administration of riociguat. The pharmacokinetic profile of riociguat showed interindividual variability, which was independent of aspirin coadministration. Six of 17 participants available for safety evaluation reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event. All adverse events were of mild severity, apart from 1 report of moderate headache. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, riociguat demonstrated no clinically relevant pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions with aspirin at the doses used in this study in healthy men; coadministration of riociguat and aspirin should therefore not require any dose adjustment for either drug. PMID:27162625

  16. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) and aspirin: a randomized, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic interaction study.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Reber, Michael; Krätzschmar, Jörn; Unger, Sigrun; Mück, Wolfgang; Wensing, Georg

    2016-03-01

    In preclinical studies, drugs that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels have been shown to influence platelet function/aggregation; however, the effect of riociguat on human platelets is unclear. Aspirin, a platelet inhibitor, is likely to be given concomitantly in patients receiving riociguat. It is therefore important to establish clinically whether (1) riociguat affects platelet function and (2) aspirin and riociguat interact. This randomized, open-label, crossover study investigated potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs in healthy male volunteers (N = 18). There were 3 treatment regimens: a single morning dose of riociguat 2.5 mg, aspirin 500 mg on 2 consecutive mornings, and both treatments together, with riociguat given on the second morning. Fifteen participants were available for pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no effect of riociguat alone on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, and serum thromboxane B2 levels. The effects of aspirin on these parameters were not influenced by concomitant administration of riociguat. The pharmacokinetic profile of riociguat showed interindividual variability, which was independent of aspirin coadministration. Six of 17 participants available for safety evaluation reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event. All adverse events were of mild severity, apart from 1 report of moderate headache. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, riociguat demonstrated no clinically relevant pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions with aspirin at the doses used in this study in healthy men; coadministration of riociguat and aspirin should therefore not require any dose adjustment for either drug. PMID:27162625

  17. Physicochemical characterization and dissolution properties of nimesulide-cyclodextrin binary systems.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Buchi N; Chowdary, K P R; Murthy, K V R; Hayman, A R; Becket, G

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this work is physicochemical characterization of nimesulide-cyclodextrin binary systems both in solution and solid state and to improve the dissolution properties of nimesulide (N) via complexation with alpha-, beta, and gamma-cyclodextrins (CDs). Detection of inclusion complexation was done in solution by means of phase solubility analysis, mass spectrometry, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopic studies, and in solid state using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder x-ray diffractometry (X-RD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in vitro dissolution studies. Phase solubility, mass spectrometry and 1H-NMR studies in solution revealed 1:1 M complexation of N with all CDs. A true inclusion of N with beta-CD at 1:2 M in solid state was confirmed by DSC, powder X-RD and SEM studies. Dissolution properties of N-CD binary systems were superior when compared to pure N. PMID:12916912

  18. Gastric erosions induced by analgesic drug mixtures in the rat.

    PubMed

    Seegers, A J; Jager, L P; Van Noordwijk, J

    1978-02-01

    Gastric erosions after oral administration of analgesics separately and in admixture have been examined in adult rats. After administration of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), phenacetin, paracetamol and caffeine as single drugs, gastric erosions were only observed with aspirin. The combination of aspirin with phenacetin did not change, that of aspirin with caffeine significantly increased, and aspirin with paracetamol significantly decreased the incidence of gastric lesions compared with aspirin alone. The results for aspirin with paracetamol did not differ from those for the vehicle. Addition of caffeine to the combination of aspirin and phenacetin caused a significant increase in erosions, but when given with aspirin and paracetamol no erosions occurred. The mechanisms underlying the effects of these drugs on aspirin-induced erosions are discussed. PMID:24109

  19. Aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: current knowledge and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Hennekens, Charles H; Dalen, James E

    2014-11-01

    In secondary prevention, among a very wide range of survivors of prior occlusive cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and those suffering acute myocardial infarction (MI) or occlusive stroke, aspirin decreases risks of MI, stroke, and CVD death. In these high risk patients, the absolute benefits are large and absolute risks are far smaller so aspirin should be more widely prescribed. In contrast, in primary prevention, aspirin reduces risks of first MI but the evidence on stroke and CVD death remain inconclusive. Based on the current totality of evidence from predominantly low risk subjects where the absolute benefits is low and side effects the same as in secondary prevention, any decision to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention should be an individual clinical judgment by the healthcare provider that weighs the absolute benefit in reducing the risk of a first MI against the absolute risk of major bleeding. If the ongoing trials of intermediate risks subjects show net benefits then general guidelines may be justified with several caveats. First, any decision to use aspirin should continue to be made by the healthcare provider. Second, therapeutic lifestyle changes and other drugs of life saving benefit such as statins should be considered with aspirin as an adjunct, not alternative. The more widespread and appropriate use of aspirin in primary prevention is particularly attractive, especially in developing countries where CVD is emerging as the leading cause of death. In addition, aspirin is generally widely available over the counter and is extremely inexpensive. PMID:25444455

  20. Decreased sensitivity to aspirin is associated with altered polyamine metabolism in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Cameron, Gary A; Wallace, Heather M

    2016-04-01

    Aspirin is a well-known analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic drug and is recognised as a chemopreventative agent in cardiovascular disease and, more recently, in colorectal cancer. Although several studies indicate that aspirin is capable of reducing the risk of developing cancers, there is a lack of convincing evidence that aspirin can prevent prostate cancer in man. In this study, aspirin was shown to be an effective inhibitor of the growth of human prostate cancer cells. In order to investigate the link between polyamine catabolism and the effects of aspirin we used a "Tet off" system that induced the activity of spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) in human prostate cancer cells (LNCap). Treatment with aspirin was found to decrease induced SSAT activity in these cells. A negative correlation was observed between increased polyamine catabolism via increased SSAT activity and the sensitivity to aspirin. In the presence of increased SSAT activity high amounts of N (1)-acetylspermidine and putrescine were observed. These cells were also found to grow more slowly than the non-induced cells. The results indicate that SSAT and its related polyamine metabolism may play a key role in sensitivity of cancer cells to aspirin and possibly other NSAIDs and this may have implications for the development of novel chemopreventative agents. PMID:26704566

  1. Targeting KSHV/HHV-8 Latency with COX-2 Selective Inhibitor Nimesulide: A Potential Chemotherapeutic Modality for Primary Effusion Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    George Paul, Arun; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Chandran, Bala

    2011-01-01

    The significance of inflammation in KSHV biology and tumorigenesis prompted us to examine the role of COX-2 in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), an aggressive AIDS-linked KSHV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using nimesulide, a well-known COX-2 specific NSAID. We demonstrate that (1) nimesulide is efficacious in inducing proliferation arrest in PEL (KSHV+/EBV-; BCBL-1 and BC-3, KSHV+/EBV+; JSC-1), EBV-infected (KSHV-/EBV+; Raji) and non-infected (KSHV-/EBV-; Akata, Loukes, Ramos, BJAB) high malignancy human Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) as well as KSHV-/EBV+ lymphoblastoid (LCL) cell lines; (2) nimesulide is selectively toxic to KSHV infected endothelial cells (TIVE-LTC) compared to TIVE and primary endothelial cells (HMVEC-d); (3) nimesulide reduced KSHV latent gene expression, disrupted p53-LANA-1 protein complexes, and activated the p53/p21 tumor-suppressor pathway; (4) COX-2 inhibition down-regulated cell survival kinases (p-Akt and p-GSK-3β), an angiogenic factor (VEGF-C), PEL defining genes (syndecan-1, aquaporin-3, and vitamin-D3 receptor) and cell cycle proteins such as cyclins E/A and cdc25C; (5) nimesulide induced sustained cell death and G1 arrest in BCBL-1 cells; (6) nimesulide substantially reduced the colony forming capacity of BCBL-1 cells. Overall, our studies provide a comprehensive molecular framework linking COX-2 with PEL pathogenesis and identify the chemotherapeutic potential of nimesulide in treating PEL. PMID:21980345

  2. Phytoremediation of aspirin and tetracycline by Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, Sonal; Gauba, Pammi

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing release of pharmaceutical drugs in the environment, research is in progress for investigating alternative methods for their remediation. Various studies have shown the phytoremediation potential of Brassica juncea for metals. The current study was aimed at evaluating the phytoremediation potential of B. juncea for two different pharmaceutical drugs i.e. aspirin and tetracycline in in-vitro conditions. The seeds of B. juncea were germinated and grown for a period of 28 and 24 days for aspirin and tetracycline, respectively. The study analyzed the remediation rate of B. juncea for the selected drugs in three different sets of varying concentration along with any phytotoxic effects exerted by the drugs on the seeds. Preliminary results showed that the average remediation rate of aspirin and tetracycline at the end of experiment was approximately 90% and 71%, respectively. As initial drug concentrations were increased in the media, the remediation rate also improved. However, at higher concentrations, the plants showed phytotoxicity as depicted by the decrease in shoot length of the germinated seeds. These preliminary results indicated that B. juncea could tolerate and remediate pharmaceutical drugs such as analgesics and antibiotics. PMID:26696522

  3. Breast ductal lavage for biomarker assessment in high risk women: rationale, design and methodology of a randomized phase II clinical trial with nimesulide, simvastatin and placebo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite positive results from large phase III clinical trials proved that it is possible to prevent estrogen-responsive breast cancers with selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors, no significant results have been reached so far to prevent hormone non-responsive tumors. The Ductal Lavage (DL) procedure offers a minimally invasive method to obtain breast epithelial cells from the ductal system for cytopathologic analysis. Several studies with long-term follow-up have shown that women with atypical hyperplasia have an elevated risk of developing breast cancer. The objective of the proposed trial is to assess the efficacy and safety of a daily administration of nimesulide or simvastatin in women at higher risk for breast cancer, focused particularly on hormone non-responsive tumor risk. The primary endpoint is the change in prevalence of atypical cells and cell proliferation (measured by Ki67) in DL or fine needle aspirate samples, after 12 months of treatment and 12 months after treatment cessation. Methods-Design From 2005 to 2011, 150 women with a history of estrogen receptor negative ductal intraepithelial neoplasia or lobular intraepithelial neoplasia or atypical hyperplasia, or unaffected subjects carrying a mutation of BRCA1 or with a probability of mutation >10% (according to BRCAPRO) were randomized to receive nimesulide 100mg/day versus simvastatin 20mg/day versus placebo for one year followed by a second year of follow-up. Discussion This is the first randomized placebo controlled trial to evaluate the role of DL to study surrogate endpoints biomarkers and the effects of these drugs on breast carcinogenesis. In 2007 the European Medicines Agency limited the use of systemic formulations of nimesulide to 15 days. According to the European Institute of Oncology Ethics Committee communication, we are now performing an even more careful monitoring of the study participants. Preliminary results showed that DL is a feasible

  4. Choline magnesium trisalicylate in patients with aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, A; Nizankowska, E; Dworski, R

    1990-05-01

    Treatment of inflammatory diseases of asthmatics can be a serious problem since some patients show intolerance to aspirin and other non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs that are cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Salicylates were believed to be well tolerated, but recent reports have demonstrated that diflunisal and salicylsalicylic acid can precipitate asthma attacks in aspirin-intolerant patients. This study was designed to determine the tolerance of choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a nonacetylated salicylate with potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, in 23 asthmatics with aspirin hypersensitivity confirmed by oral challenge. The study consisted of three phases: 1) patients received increasing doses (50-1,500 mg) of CMT under a single-blind protocol; 2) patients received either a placebo or CMT challenge in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over design; 3) patients received CMT at daily 3,000 mg doses for 1 week. Throughout the study, pulmonary function tests, peak nasal inspiratory flow, and serum salicylate and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) levels were monitored. Results showed no airway obstruction, nasal congestion or rhinorrhea after CMT. There was no significant decrease in serum TXB2 levels, indicating the absence of cyclooxygenase inhibition with CMT. We conclude that choline magnesium trisalicylate is a safe drug for treatment of different anti-inflammatory disorders in asthmatics with aspirin hypersensitivity. PMID:2198165

  5. Effects of nimesulide, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on cardiovascular function in 2 rat models of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joanne Y T; Pang, Catherine C Y

    2014-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been found to be activated in diabetes. We investigated whether nimesulide (selective COX-2 inhibitor) alters cardiovascular responses to adrenaline in 2 rat models of diabetes. Wistar rats (5-week old) were continuously fed a normal or high-fructose diet (60% of caloric intake). At week 2, half of the rats in each diet regimen were given streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg, intravenously). At week 6, cardiovascular effects of adrenaline (6 and 16 × 10 mol·kg·min, intravenously) were measured in 4 groups of thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats (control, fructose, STZ, and fructose-streptozotocin [F-STZ]) before and after the injection of nimesulide (3 mg/kg, intravenously). Both the STZ and F-STZ groups exhibited hyperglycemia and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced left ventricular contractility, mean arterial pressure, arterial and venous resistance, and mean circulatory filling pressure (index of venous tone) responses to adrenaline, relative to the control and fructose groups. Nimesulide did not affect responses in the control and fructose groups but increased the venous and, to a less extent, arterial constriction to adrenaline in both the groups of diabetic rats. The cardiac contractile responses, however, were not altered after nimesulide treatment. The results show that nimesulide partially restored arterial and venous constriction to adrenaline in rats with STZ- and F-STZ-induced diabetes. PMID:24621649

  6. A comparison of nimesulide and paracetamol in the treatment of fever due to inflammatory diseases of the upper respiratory tract in children.

    PubMed

    Polidori, G; Titti, G; Pieragostini, P; Comito, A; Scaricabarozzi, I

    1993-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of nimesulide were compared with those of paracetamol in a nonblind randomised study that recruited 110 children (64 males, 46 females; aged 3 to 6 years) with inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and fever. Nimesulide suspension (1.5 mg/kg 3 times daily) or paracetamol syrup (10 mg/kg 4 times daily) were administered orally until fever resolved. Body temperature was recorded and local pain and general discomfort assessed. Three patients treated with nimesulide and 6 patients treated with paracetamol withdrew from the study as a result of adverse events, and 1 paracetamol-treated patient discontinued because of a requirement for therapy with steroids. Nimesulide was as effective as paracetamol in reducing fever, local pain, and general discomfort. Nimesulide therefore appears to be at least as effective as paracetamol in terms of antipyretic and anti-inflammatory activity in children with inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and fever. PMID:7506180

  7. Female, but not male, mice show delayed cutaneous wound healing following aspirin administration.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jeanine S; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2013-02-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) is an enzyme that participates in the wound healing process. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, simultaneously inhibits the aromatase activity of COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms, which is needed for prostaglandin synthesis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether aspirin, and thus COX inhibition, distinctly affects cutaneous wound healing in female and male mice. Female and male BALB/c mice were treated with aspirin (25 mg/kg per day) for 16 days until they were killed. The control group received vehicle (saline) only. A full-thickness excisional lesion was made on the back, 2 days after aspirin administration started, and macroscopic, histological and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Sections were stained and immunostained for microscopic analysis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, hydroxyproline quantity and the protein expression of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also determined. Female control and aspirin-treated groups exhibited delayed wound closure and re-epithelization compared with the male control and aspirin-treated groups, respectively. The female control group exhibited reduced MPO activity and a decreased number of macrophage inhibitory factor-positive cells compared with the male control group. In the female aspirin-treated group, MPO activity and the number of F4/80-positive macrophages was higher than in the control group. Collagen was reduced only in the female aspirin-treated group. The expression of vWF and VEGF protein was increased in the female aspirin-treated group. In conclusion, aspirin administration impaired the wound healing process in BALB/c female, but not male, mice. PMID:23240590

  8. Aspirin counteracts cancer stem cell features, desmoplasia and gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyao; Liu, Li; Fan, Pei; Bauer, Nathalie; Gladkich, Jury; Ryschich, Eduard; Bazhin, Alexandr V.; Giese, Nathalia A.; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Hinz, Ulf; Gross, Wolfgang; Fortunato, Franco; Herr, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is characterized by an extremely poor prognosis. An inflammatory microenvironment triggers the pronounced desmoplasia, the selection of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and therapy resistance. The anti-inflammatory drug aspirin is suggested to lower the risk for PDA and to improve the treatment, although available results are conflicting and the effect of aspirin to CSC characteristics and desmoplasia in PDA has not yet been investigated. We characterized the influence of aspirin on CSC features, stromal reactions and gemcitabine resistance. Four established and 3 primary PDA cell lines, non-malignant cells, 3 patient tumor-derived CSC-enriched spheroidal cultures and tissues from patients who did or did not receive aspirin before surgery were analyzed using MTT assays, flow cytometry, colony and spheroid formation assays, Western blot analysis, antibody protein arrays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), immunohistochemistry and in vivo xenotransplantation. Aspirin significantly induced apoptosis and reduced the viability, self-renewal potential, and expression of proteins involved in inflammation and stem cell signaling. Aspirin also reduced the growth and invasion of tumors in vivo, and it significantly prolonged the survival of mice with orthotopic pancreatic xenografts in combination with gemcitabine. This was associated with a decreased expression of markers for progression, inflammation and desmoplasia. These findings were confirmed in tissue samples obtained from patients who had or had not taken aspirin before surgery. Importantly, aspirin sensitized cells that were resistant to gemcitabine and thereby enhanced the therapeutic efficacy. Aspirin showed no obvious toxic effects on normal cells, chick embryos or mice. These results highlight aspirin as an effective, inexpensive and well-tolerated co-treatment to target inflammation, desmoplasia and CSC features PDA. PMID:25846752

  9. Electronmicroscopic observations on the effects of orally administered aspirin and aspirin-bicarbonate mixtures on the development of gastric mucosal damage in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rainsford, K D

    1975-01-01

    The effects of administering a single dose of (200 mg to 50 mg/kg body weight) aspirin or an equimolar mixture of aspirin (200 mg/kg body wt) with sodium bicarbonate on the fine structure of the rat gastric mucosa were investigated in order to establish the role of particles of the drug in the development of gastric damage. The sequence of cellular events involved in the development of a lesion and the influence of short-term starvation were also investigated. Aspirin-bicarbonate solutions produced much less damage in starved rats than aspirin suspensions given at low (50 mg/kg body weight) or high therapeutic doses (200 mg/kg body weight). Also, when non-starved rats were given 200 mg/kg aspirin, only slight damage was observed. The presence of particles of the drug in intimate contact with the mucosa is thus important in the development of gastric damage. A sequence of events with time involving direct physical exfoliation of mucosal cells and selective structural damage to parietal cells followed by structural damage indicative of a disturbance to oxidative and biosynthetic functions in cells near the developing erosion was observed. The implications of these results on the development of aspirin-induced lesions are discussed. Images Fig 3a Fig 3b Fig 1a Fig 1b Fig 1c Fig 2a Fig 2b Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:1158188

  10. Comparative evaluation of antipyretic activity of ibuprofen and aspirin in children with pyrexia of varied aetiology.

    PubMed

    Kandoth, P W; Joshi, M K; Joshi, V R; Satoskar, R S

    1984-01-01

    The antipyretic activity of ibuprofen and aspirin was compared in sixteen children with pyrexia due to upper respiratory tract infection and in twelve with fever due to other causes. All 28 children received ibuprofen (7 mg/kg of body-weight) and aspirin (15 mg/kg of body-weight) in a single dose on 2 consecutive days in a crossover manner. Rectal temperature was recorded prior to and at regular intervals up to 8 hours after drug administration. Analysis of the results indicate that ibuprofen and aspirin effectively lower temperature and the two drugs are comparable in their antipyretic activity. In conclusion, significant antipyretic activity, good tolerance profile and availability in syrup form make ibuprofen a useful substitute for aspirin in children with fever. PMID:6500169

  11. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: possible mechanisms and clinical relevance. Part II: Potential causes and laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Vadász, Dávid; Sztriha, László K; Sas, Katalin; Vécsei, László

    2013-01-30

    Recent meta-analyses have indicated that patients with vascular disease demonstrated by laboratory tests to be aspirin or clopidogrel-resistant are at an increased risk of major vascular events. The suggested mechanisms of aspirin resistance include genetic polymorphism, alternative pathways of platelet activation, aspirin-insensitive thromboxane biosynthesis, drug interactions, or a low aspirin dose. Clopidogrel resistance is likely to develop as a result of a decreased bioavailability of the active metabolite, due to genetic variation or concomitant drug treatment. Additional work is required to improve and validate laboratory tests of platelet function, so that they may become useful tools for selection of the most appropriate antiplatelet therapy for an individual patient. Improvements in antiplatelet treatment strategies in the future should lead to a reduction in premature vascular events. PMID:23607225

  12. Aspirin-exacerbated cutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Caballero-Fonseca, Fernan; Capriles-Hulett, Arnaldo

    2013-05-01

    It has been recognized that a high proportion of chronic urticaria patients experience symptom aggravation when exposed to aspirin and NSAIDs. This clinical picture is known as Aspirin-exacerbated cutaneous disease. The pathogenesis of these exacerbations is related to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 leading to a decreased synthesis of PGE2 and an increased cysteinyl leukotriene production in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Patient management comprises the treatment of the underlying cutaneous disease with nonsedating antihistamines and other medications, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and the use of alternative NSAIDs that do not inhibit COX-1 for the relief of pain, inflammation and fever. PMID:23639712

  13. AMPK-mediated up-regulation of mTORC2 and MCL-1 compromises the anti-cancer effects of aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hui; Yin, Yancun; Wang, Jiao; Luo, Ting; Jiang, Yangfu

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy sensor that may inhibit cell proliferation or promote cell survival during stresses. Besides cyclooxygenase, AMPK is another target of the nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agent aspirin. Preclinical and clinical investigations demonstrate that aspirin can inhibit several types of cancer such as colorectal adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, little is known about the cellular response to aspirin that may lead to aspirin resistance. Here, we show that aspirin induces the expression of MCL-1 in HepG2 and SW480 cells through AMPK-mTOR-Akt/ERK axis. Treatment of HepG2 and SW480 cells with aspirin leads to increased MCL-1 expression, Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Inhibition of Akt/MEK abrogates the induction of MCL-1 by aspirin. Aspirin activates AMPK, which in turn up-regulates mTORC2 activity, Akt, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and MCL-1 expression. MCL-1 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to aspirin-induced apoptosis. Combination of aspirin and AMPK, Akt or MEK inhibitor results in more significant inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis than single agent. Moreover, sorafenib blocks aspirin-induced MCL-1 up-regulation. Combination of aspirin and sorafenib leads to much more cell death and less cell proliferation than each drug alone. Treatment of HCC and colon cancer xenografts with both aspirin and sorafenib results in more significant tumor suppression than single agent. These data demonstrate that AMPK-mediated up-regulation of mTORC2 and MCL-1 may compromise the anticancer effects of aspirin. Combination of aspirin and sorafenib may be an effective regimen to treat HCC and colon cancer. PMID:26918349

  14. AMPK-mediated up-regulation of mTORC2 and MCL-1 compromises the anti-cancer effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mei; Kong, Qingbin; Hua, Hui; Yin, Yancun; Wang, Jiao; Luo, Ting; Jiang, Yangfu

    2016-03-29

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy sensor that may inhibit cell proliferation or promote cell survival during stresses. Besides cyclooxygenase, AMPK is another target of the nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agent aspirin. Preclinical and clinical investigations demonstrate that aspirin can inhibit several types of cancer such as colorectal adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, little is known about the cellular response to aspirin that may lead to aspirin resistance. Here, we show that aspirin induces the expression of MCL-1 in HepG2 and SW480 cells through AMPK-mTOR-Akt/ERK axis. Treatment of HepG2 and SW480 cells with aspirin leads to increased MCL-1 expression, Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Inhibition of Akt/MEK abrogates the induction of MCL-1 by aspirin. Aspirin activates AMPK, which in turn up-regulates mTORC2 activity, Akt, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and MCL-1 expression. MCL-1 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to aspirin-induced apoptosis. Combination of aspirin and AMPK, Akt or MEK inhibitor results in more significant inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis than single agent. Moreover, sorafenib blocks aspirin-induced MCL-1 up-regulation. Combination of aspirin and sorafenib leads to much more cell death and less cell proliferation than each drug alone. Treatment of HCC and colon cancer xenografts with both aspirin and sorafenib results in more significant tumor suppression than single agent. These data demonstrate that AMPK-mediated up-regulation of mTORC2 and MCL-1 may compromise the anticancer effects of aspirin. Combination of aspirin and sorafenib may be an effective regimen to treat HCC and colon cancer. PMID:26918349

  15. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A; Perkins, James R; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation. PMID:27489545

  16. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A.; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A.; Perkins, James R.; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation. PMID:27489545

  17. Nimesulide Silver Metallodrugs, Containing the Mitochondriotropic, Triaryl Derivatives of Pnictogen; Anticancer Activity against Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Banti, Christina N; Papatriantafyllopoulou, Constantina; Manoli, Maria; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J; Hadjikakou, Sotiris K

    2016-09-01

    Novel silver(I) metallo-drugs of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide (nim) and the mitochondriotropic triaryl derivatives of pnictogen ligands (tpE, E = P (tpp, tptp, or totp), As (tpAs), Sb (tpSb)) with the formulas {[Ag(nim) (tpp)2]DMF} (1), [Ag(nim) (tptp)2] (2), [Ag(nim) (totp)] (3), [Ag(nim) (tpAs)2] (4), and [Ag(nim) (tpSb)3] (5) ((tpp = triphenyphosphine, tptp = tri(p-tolyl)phosphine, totp = tri(o-tolyl)phosphine, tpAs = triphenylarsine, tpSb = triphenylantimony, and DMF = dimethylformamide) were synthesized and characterized by melting point, vibrational spectroscopy (mid-Fourier transform IR), (1)H NMR, UV-visible spectroscopic techniques, and X-ray crystallography. The in vitro cytotoxic activity of 1-5 against human breast adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines: MCF-7 (estrogen receptor (ER) positive) and MDA-MB-231 (ER negative) was determined. The genotoxicity on normal human fetal lung fibroblast cells (MRC-5) caused by 1-5 was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. The absence of micronucleus in MRC-5 cells confirms the in vitro non toxicity behavior of the compounds. Because of the morphology of the cells, an apoptotic pathway was concluded for the cell death. The apoptotic pathway, especially though the mitochondrion damage, was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, cell cycle arrest, and permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane tests. The molecular mechanism of action of 1-5 was further studied by (i) the binding affinity of 1-5 toward the calf thymus (CT) DNA, (ii) the inhibitory activity of 1-5 against lipoxygenase (an enzyme that oxidizes polyunsaturated fatty acids to leukotrienes or prostaglandins), and (iii) the catalytic activity of 1-5 on the oxidation of linoleic acid (an acid that partakes in membrane fluidity, membrane enzyme activities, etc.) to hyperoxolinoleic acid by oxygen. PMID:27513311

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi: In vitro effect of aspirin with nifurtimox and benznidazole.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Faúndez, Mario; Klein, Sebastián; Escanilla, Sebastián; Torres, Gloria; Lee-Liu, Dasfne; Ferreira, Jorge; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Orellana, Myriam; Morello, Antonio; Ferreira, Arturo; Maya, Juan D

    2010-02-01

    Nifurtimox and benznidazole are the only active drugs against Trypanosoma cruzi; however, they have limited efficacy and severe side effects. During primoinfection, T. cruzi infected macrophages mount an antiparasitic response, which the parasite evades through an increase of tumor growth factor beta and PGE(2) activation as well as decreased iNOS activity. Thus, prostaglandin synthesis inhibition with aspirin might increase macrophage antiparasitic activity and increase nifurtimox and benznidazole effect. Aspirin alone demonstrated a low effect upon macrophage antiparasitic activity. However, isobolographic analysis of the combined effects of aspirin, nifurtimox and benznidazole indicated a synergistic effect on T. cruzi infection of RAW cells, with combinatory indexes of 0.71 and 0.61, respectively. The observed effect of aspirin upon T. cruzi infection was not related with the PGE(2) synthesis inhibition. Nevertheless, NO() levels were restored by aspirin in T. cruzi-infected RAW cells, contributing to macrophage antiparasitic activity improvement. Thus, the synergy of aspirin with nifurtimox and benznidazole is due to the capability of aspirin to increase antiparasitic activity of macrophages. PMID:19735656

  19. Aspirin and Acetaminophen Use and the Risk of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Grace; Liu, Cici S.; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna V.; Hampras, Shalaka S.; Kruszka, Bridget; Schmitt, Kristina; Cannioto, Rikki A.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Moysich, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated whether regular use of aspirin or acetaminophen was associated with risk of cervical cancer in women treated at an American cancer hospital. Methods This case-control study included 328 patients with cervical cancer and 1,312 controls matched on age and decade enrolled. Controls were women suspected of having but not ultimately diagnosed with a neoplasm. Analgesic use was defined as regular (at least once per week for ≥6 months), frequent (≥7 tablets/week), very long term (≥11 years), or frequent, long term (≥7 tablets per week for ≥5 years). Results Compared to nonusers, frequent aspirin use was associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer (odds ratio, 0.53; 95%confidence interval, 0.29–0.97). A slightly larger association was observed with frequent, long-term use of aspirin (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.22–0.95). Acetaminophen use was not associated with the risk of cervical cancer. Conclusions Our findings suggest that frequent and frequent, long-term use of aspirin is associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first US-based study examining these associations. Given the widespread use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen worldwide, further investigations of the possible role of analgesics in cervical cancer, using a larger sample size with better-defined dosing regimens, are warranted. PMID:25856123

  20. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  1. Impacts of metformin and aspirin on life history features and longevity of crickets: trade-offs versus cost-free life extension?

    PubMed

    Hans, Harvir; Lone, Asad; Aksenov, Vadim; Rollo, C David

    2015-01-01

    We examined the impacts of aspirin and metformin on the life history of the cricket Acheta domesticus (growth rate, maturation time, mature body size, survivorship, and maximal longevity). Both drugs significantly increased survivorship and maximal life span. Maximal longevity was 136 days for controls, 188 days (138 % of controls) for metformin, and 194 days (143 % of controls) for aspirin. Metformin and aspirin in combination extended longevity to a lesser degree (163 days, 120 % of controls). Increases in general survivorship were even more pronounced, with low-dose aspirin yielding mean longevity 234 % of controls (i.e., health span). Metformin strongly reduced growth rates of both genders (<60 % of controls), whereas aspirin only slightly reduced the growth rate of females and slightly increased that of males. Both drugs delayed maturation age relative to controls, but metformin had a much greater impact (>140 % of controls) than aspirin (~118 % of controls). Crickets maturing on low aspirin showed no evidence of a trade-off between maturation mass and life extension. Remarkably, by 100 days of age, aspirin-treated females were significantly larger than controls (largely reflecting egg complement). Unlike the reigning dietary restriction paradigm, low aspirin conformed to a paradigm of "eat more, live longer." In contrast, metformin-treated females were only ~67 % of the mass of controls. Our results suggest that hormetic agents like metformin may derive significant trade-offs with life extension, whereas health and longevity benefits may be obtained with less cost by agents like aspirin that regulate geroprotective pathways. PMID:25833406

  2. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  3. Synergistic apoptosis-inducing effect of aspirin and isosorbide mononitrate on human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Diao, Yuwen; Liu, Yu; Gao, Ningning; Gao, Dong; Wan, Yanyan; Zhong, Jingjing; Jin, Guangyi

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin and isosorbide mononitrate (ISMN) are two commonly used drugs, which are clinically applied for the treatment of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases, respectively. Recently, aspirin has attracted interest due to its potential application for the treatment of cancer, particularly colon cancer. NO-aspirin, an aspirin derivative containing a covalently bound NO-donating moiety, has been proven to be an effective anti‑tumor agent with apoptosis-inducing ability. In the present study, ISMN was used as an NO donor and its synergic effect with aspirin was assessed in human colon cancer cells. In vitro, an MTT assay demonstrated that ISMN had a synergistic effect on the growth inhibitory effects of aspirin on HCT116 and SW620 colon cancer cells, while the growth of EA.hy926 normal endothelial cells was unaffected. This synergistic anti‑tumor effect was further validated in vivo using nude mouse HCT116 cell xenograft model. Observation of nuclear morphology, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining and a caspase-3 activity assay suggested that the combination of the two drugs induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of the apoptotic effect of the drugs was assessed using an NO release assay, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, western blot analysis and a luciferase reporter assay. It was certified that the increase in the amount of NO release, the decrease in the luciferase promoter activity and the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc in HCT116 cells were affected by aspirin and ISMN in a synergistic manner. In conclusion, the present study was the first, to the best of our knowledge, to report on the synergistic apoptosis-inducing effects of aspirin and ISMN in human colon cancer cells, which were mediated via Wnt and NO signaling pathways. The results of the present study will facilitate the development of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:26094902

  4. Gastric-sparing nitric oxide-releasable 'true' prodrugs of aspirin and naproxen.

    PubMed

    Gund, Machhindra; Gaikwad, Parikshit; Borhade, Namdev; Burhan, Aslam; Desai, Dattatraya C; Sharma, Ankur; Dhiman, Mini; Patil, Mohan; Sheikh, Javed; Thakre, Gajanan; Tipparam, Santhosh G; Sharma, Somesh; Nemmani, Kumar V S; Satyam, Apparao

    2014-12-15

    Nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) are gaining attention as potentially gastric-sparing NSAIDs. Herein, we report a novel class of '1-(nitrooxy)ethyl ester' group-containing NSAIDS as efficient NO releasing 'true' prodrugs of aspirin and naproxen. While an aspirin prodrug exhibited comparable oral bioavailability and antiplatelet activity (i.e., TXB2 inhibition) to those of aspirin, a naproxen prodrug exhibited better bioavailability than naproxen. These promising NO-NSAIDs protected experimental rats from gastric damage. We therefore believe that these promising NO-NSAIDs could represent a new class of potentially 'Safe NSAIDs' for the treatment of arthritic pain, inflammation and cardiovascular disorders in the case of NO-aspirin. PMID:25466180

  5. Impact of Aspirin and Clopidogrel Interruption on Platelet Function in Patients Undergoing Major Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Le Manach, Yannick; Kahn, David; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Le Sache, Frederic; Smadja, David M.; Remones, Veronique; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Coriat, Pierre; Gaussem, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate functional platelet recovery after preoperative withdrawal of aspirin and clopidogrel and platelet function 5 days after treatment resumption. Methods/Results We conducted an observational study, which prospectively included consecutive patients taking aspirin, taking clopidogrel, and untreated controls (15 patients in each group). The antiplatelet drugs were withdrawn five days before surgery (baseline) and were reintroduced two days after surgery. Platelet function was evaluated by optical aggregation in the presence of collagen, arachidonic acid (aspirin) and ADP (clopidogrel) and by VASP assay (clopidogrel). Platelet-leukocyte complex (PLC) level was quantified at each time-point. At baseline, platelet function was efficiently inhibited by aspirin and had recovered fully in most patients 5 days after drug withdrawal. PLC levels five days after aspirin reintroduction were similar to baseline (+4±10%; p = 0.16), in line with an effective platelet inhibition. Chronic clopidogrel treatment was associated with variable platelet inhibition and its withdrawal led to variable functional recovery. PLC levels were significantly increased five days after clopidogrel reintroduction (+10±15%; p = 0.02), compared to baseline. Conclusions Aspirin withdrawal 5 days before high-bleeding-risk procedures was associated with functional platelet recovery, and its reintroduction two days after surgery restored antiplaletet efficacy five days later. This was not the case of clopidogrel, and further work is therefore needed to define its optimal perioperative management. PMID:25141121

  6. Effect of Opium Addiction on Aspirin Resistance in Stable Angina Pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Forood, Afsaneh; Malekpour-Afshar, Reza; Sarnevesht, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Background The rate of cardiovascular diseases in developing countries is approximately 60% and it is still has an increasing trend. The clinical effectiveness of aspirin in preventing cardiovascular events has been well proven. Although aspirin is an effective and inexpensive drug, its consumption is not equally beneficial for all patients. Many factors can be affective on the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin. Methods This study was carried out on 260 patients who had stable angina pectoris and coronary artery disease was approved by coronary angiography. Based on opium addiction, the patients were divided into two groups. Opium addiction was diagnosed base on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria. The mid-stream morning urinary sample were collected for measuring the urinary 11-dehydroxy thromboxane B2 level (UTXB2). Urinary level of UTXB2 was considered as an aspirin resistance index. Findings The mean age of patients was 57.3 ± 8.9; and 44.6% of them were females. The aspirin resistance rate was 41.5%. Significant difference in aspirin resistance was observed between the opium addicts and non-addicts. (51.5% vs. 31.5%) (P = 0.001). The effects of confounding variables such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia were eliminated by regression logistic multivariable analysis. Conclusion The prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with stable angina pectoris was 41.5%. The prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with stable angina pectoris who had opium addiction was significantly higher them non-addicts. PMID:25140212

  7. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day Browse Sections The Basics Overview Benefits and Risks ... sure why this works. Can taking aspirin every day cause any side effects? Taking aspirin daily isn' ...

  8. Anti-platelet therapy and aspirin resistance - clinically and chemically relevant?

    PubMed

    Rafferty, M; Walters, M R; Dawson, J

    2010-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of the atherothrombosis which ultimately causes myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Commonly used oral anti-platelet drugs include aspirin (an irreversible inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase), clopidogrel (an ADP receptor antagonist), other thienopyridines such as ticlopidine and prasgruel, and dipyridamole (an inhibitor of adenosine reuptake and platelet phosphodiesterase). Newer agents are in development and one, ticagrelor, a reversible ADP receptor antagonist has shown promise. Despite their proven benefit, recurrent vascular events still occur in those taking anti-platelet drugs. This has led to the concept of anti-platelet resistance, most commonly aspirin resistance as this drug is the cornerstone of most regimens. The causes of aspirin resistance are numerous but potential mechanisms include lack of patient adherence, non COX-1 mediated thromboxane A2 synthesis, increased activity of alternate platelet activation pathways, interference of aspirin action by other drugs and probably pharmacogenetic factors. Measurement of platelet response to aspirin is made possible using a number of in-vitro laboratory assays of platelet function which include measurement of thromboxane A2 metabolites as well as newer point-of-care assays of platelet aggregation. The phenomenon of aspirin resistance is important as it raises the possibility of developing strategies to identify those who respond best to a particular anti-platelet regimen, or to development of newer anti-platelet therapies to which more patients respond. This review discusses important aspects of aspirin resistance both in terms of clinical medicine, alternative anti-platelet strategies, and the potential to overcome its various causes. PMID:21062249

  9. Aspirin in diabetic retinopathy. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bergerhoff, Karla; Clar, Christine; Richter, Bernd

    2002-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for eye disease that can lead to blindness. There have been both concerns that aspirin use might worsen diabetic retinopathy, as well as hopes that aspirin might be beneficial in treating it. We investigated whether there are beneficial effects of aspirin alone and in combination with other antiplatelet agents in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, and the relative hazards for the development of high-risk proliferative retinopathy following aspirin treatment. We conducted a sensitive search for randomized controlled trials combined with index terms for identifying studies on aspirin treatment in diabetic retinopathy in the Cochrane Library (issue 4, 2001) and Medline (1966 to October, 2001). We examined randomized controlled clinical trials in diabetic patients with (non) proliferative diabetic retinopathy and aspirin treatment alone or in combination with dipyramidole versus placebo administration. Two independent reviewers judged trial eligibility, collected details of study population, interventions, and outcomes using a standard data extraction form. One reviewer assessed the quality of trial reporting. We identified six publications pertinent to our objective. Aspirin dosages ranged from 650 mg to 990 mg daily, the dose of dipyridamole, used in only one trial, was 225 mg per day. Studies lasted 8 weeks to 5 years. All trials showed that aspirin alone or in combination with dipyridamole neither lowered nor increased the risk of the development of diabetic retinopathy. The results suggest that there are no ocular contraindications to taking aspirin if required as part of a treatment for cardiovascular diseases or other medical indications. PMID:12227131

  10. Development and validation of RP-HPLC method for simultaneous estimation of nimesulide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate and caffeine anhydrous in pharmaceutical dosage form.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Rishbha; Nair, Anroop; Saini, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a simple, specific and accurate reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of nimesulide (NS), phenylephrine hydrochloride (PE), chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) and caffeine anhydrous (CF) in pharmaceutical dosage forms. A reversed phase Hypersil phenyl column (4.6 mm x 25 cm) with mobile phase having pH 5.5 consisting of methanol and buffer (55:45, v/v) was used. The flow rate was 1.0 mL per minute and the effluents were monitored at 214 nm. The retention times of all the drugs were found to be 7.47 min (NS), 3.944 min (PE), 4.55 min (CF) and 17.15 min (CPM), respectively. The linearity for all the drugs was obtained in the range of 300-800 microg/mL (NS), 15-32 microg/mL (PE), 16-32 microg/mL (CPM) and 30-180 microg/mL (CF), respectively. The results of analysis have been well validated according to guidelines of International Conference of Harmonisation of technical requirements for registration of pharmaceuticals for human use. The method was found to be simple, precise, economical, less time consuming and reproducible. Hence, the suggested procedure could be used for the determination of all the four drugs in commercial preparations. PMID:23285660

  11. Effects of Aspirin on Gastroduodenal Permeability in Alcoholics and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Ashkan; Keshavarzian, Ali; Kwasny, Mary J.; Shaikh, Maliha; Fogg, Louis; Lau, Cynthia; Fields, Jeremy Z.; Forsyth, Christopher B.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are noxious agents that can disrupt the integrity of the gastroduodenal mucosal and damage the epithelial barrier, and lead to increased gastroduodenal permeability. Moreover, it is not uncommon that patients are exposed to these two barrier stressors at the same time. It is thus important to know how simultaneous exposure affects the gastroduodenal barrier, and acquiring that knowledge was the goal of this study. We used a method that has been widely used for the assessment of injury to the gastroduodenal barrier induced by these noxious agents – measurement of gastroduodenal permeability as indicated by urinary excretion of ingested sucrose. We used gas chromatography to measure the amount of sucrose excreted in the urine over the 5–12 h following ingestion of a bolus of sucrose. The 148 participants in the study included 92 alcoholics and 56 healthy controls. All study subjects had a baseline permeability test. To determine whether addition of a second noxious agent, in addition to chronic alcohol, further decreases gastroduodenal barrier integrity, a subset of 118 study subjects participated in another permeability test in which they were exposed to aspirin. For this test, participants ingested 1300 mg aspirin twice, 12 hours and 1 hour before the final permeability test. The baseline permeability test showed that alcoholics have significantly higher gastroduodenal permeability than controls. Aspirin caused a significant within group absolute increase in gastroduodenal permeability in both alcoholics and controls (+7.72%, p=0.003 and +2.25%, p = 0.011, respectively) but the magnitude of these increases were not significantly different from each other. Baseline permeability did vary by gender, self-reported illegal drug use, and employment type. The extent of the permeability increase after aspirin ingestion varied with illegal drug use and recruitment site (a surrogate marker of socioeconomic status

  12. Simultaneous determination of nimesulide and its four possible metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application in a study of pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Xue, Kai-Lu; Jiao, Xin-Yue; Chen, Qian; Xu, Li; Zheng, Heng; Ding, Yu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this study, it was the first time that we simultaneously quantified nimesulide and its possible metabolites M1, M2, M3 and M4 by employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Nimesulide-d5 was used as internal standard (IS) for validation. Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Prepared plasma samples were analyzed under the same LC-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was realized by using an Ultimate C18 column, with run time being 5min for each sample. Our results showed that various analytes within their concentration ranges could be quantified accurately by using the method. Mean intra- and inter-day accuracies ranged from -4.8% to 4.8% (RE), and intra- and inter-assay precision ≤6.2% (RSD). The following parameters were validated: specificity, recovery, matrix effects, dilution integrity, carry-over, sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw and post-preparative) and stock solution stability. Pharmacokinetics of nimesulide and its metabolites were calculated based on the analysis of samples collected from twelve Chinese healthy volunteers after single oral dose of 100mg nimesulide tablets. By applying the pharmacokinetic determination into human samples, we preliminarily detected a new metabolite of nimesulide (M4*), and the concentration of M4* was relatively higher in plasma. Furthermore, we predicted part of conceivable metabolism pathway in plasma of after oral administration of 100mg nimesulide tablets. This research provided an experimental basis for further studies on metabolic activation and biotransformation of nimesulide, and for more comprehensive conjecture of its metabolic pathways. PMID:27284972

  13. Evaluation of nitrate-substituted pseudocholine esters of aspirin as potential nitro-aspirins.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, John F; Moriarty, Louise M; Clancy, John M

    2007-06-01

    Herein we explore some designs for nitro-aspirins, compounds potentially capable of releasing both aspirin and nitric oxide in vivo. A series of nitrate-bearing alkyl esters of aspirin were prepared based on the choline ester template preferred by human plasma butyrylcholinesterase. The degradation kinetics of the compounds were followed in human plasma solution. All compounds underwent hydrolysis rapidly (t(1/2) approximately 1min) but generating exclusively the corresponding nitro-salicylate. The one exception, an N-propyl, N-nitroxyethyl aminoethanol ester produced 9.2% aspirin in molar terms indicating that the nitro-aspirin objective is probably achievable if due cognisance can be paid to the demands of the activating enzyme. Even at this low level of aspirin release, this compound is the most successful nitro-aspirin reported to date in the key human plasma model. PMID:17376682

  14. An evaluation of different doses of soluble aspirin and aspirin tablets in postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, I S; Seymour, R A; Ward-Booth, R P; Ord, R A; Lim, K L; Hoare, R C

    1988-01-01

    1. The efficacy of three different single doses (600, 900 and 1200 mg of soluble aspirin and aspirin tablets) was determined in a randomized placebo-controlled parallel study in 140 patients (70 females) with postoperative pain after removal of impacted third molars. 2. Patients treated with soluble aspirin 600 mg, 900 mg, 1200 mg and aspirin tablet 1200 mg reported significantly less pain (P less than 0.01) throughout the investigation period than those treated with placebo. 3. Overall pain scores after treatment with aspirin tablets 600 and 900 mg did not differ significantly from those after treatment with placebo (P greater than 0.05). 4. On a comparative dose basis, soluble aspirin was significantly more potent (P less than 0.05) than aspirin tablets. PMID:3190996

  15. Mechanisms of aspirin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Picado, César

    2006-05-01

    In some asthma patients, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce bronchospasm, rhinorrhea, and nasal obstruction. NSAID-induced reactions appear to be caused by the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1); this in turn activates the lipoxygenase pathway, which eventually increases the release of cysteinyl leukotrienes (Cys-LTs) that induces bronchospasm and nasal obstruction. With regard to the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) in NSAID-intolerant asthmatic patients, the following changes have been observed: 1) A low production of prostaglandin E2, seemingly due to deficient Cox-2 regulation; 2) an increased expression of leukotriene-C4 synthase; and 3) a reduced production of metabolites (lipoxins) released through the transcellular metabolism of AA. NSAID-intolerant asthmatics have higher basal levels of Cys-LT than NSAID-tolerant asthmatics. Moreover, Cys-LT levels in NSAID-intolerant asthmatics increase remarkably following NSAID provocation testing. There has been no explanation to date that connects all these findings, although an anomaly in the regulation of Cox-2 is probably accountable. PMID:16579869

  16. Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  17. Aspirin-triggered metabolites of EFAs.

    PubMed

    Makriyannis, Alexandros; Nikas, Spyros P

    2011-10-28

    Aspirin triggers the biosynthesis of oxygenated metabolites from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. In a preceding issue, Serhan et al. (2011) describe a novel aspirin-triggered DHA pathway for the biosynthesis of a potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving molecule. PMID:22035788

  18. Sustained release of aspirin and vitamin C from titanium nanotubes: An experimental and stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weihu; Deng, Conghui; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yan; Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong

    2016-07-01

    Anodization is a promising method to change the topography and wettability of titanium (Ti) implant. The formed TiO2 nanotubes (TiNTs) arrays could enhance the biological properties of Ti implants. In this study, to investigate the possibility of TiNTs arrays on a Ti implant surface as nano-reservoirs for small molecular drugs when using in orthopedic and dental prosthesis, TiNTs on a Ti implant surface were prepared. Then, aspirin and/or vitamin C were loaded into TiNTs as model drugs. Meanwhile, low molecular weight polylactic acid (PLA, Mw=3000) was synthesized and loaded alternately along with aspirin or vitamin C. The release rates of aspirin and vitamin C with/or without PLA loading were investigated by using a UV-Vis spectrometer. The results showed that when loading without PLA, drugs released quickly with presence of burst release. However, when loading with PLA, the cumulative release duration of aspirin and vitamin C was prolonged to over 240h. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation results proved that when loading with PLA, PLA molecules aggregated gradually and formed clusters or micelles in these nanotubes. Meanwhile, drug molecules were captured and distributed inside the PLA matrix, which retarding the release of drugs. Only when PLA micelles degrade gradually in body fluid, drugs could be released slowly from nanotubes. These knowledge laid ground basis for the following biological experiments. PMID:27127038

  19. Impact of concomitant low-dose aspirin on the safety and tolerability of naproxen and esomeprazole magnesium delayed-release tablets in patients requiring chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy: an analysis from 5 Phase III studies.

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Datto, Catherine; Raines, Shane; Yeomans, Neville D

    2014-07-01

    Patients receiving chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and concomitant low-dose aspirin (LDA) are at increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. A fixed-dose combination of enteric-coated (EC) naproxen and immediate-release esomeprazole magnesium (NAP/ESO) has been designed to deliver a proton-pump inhibitor followed by an NSAID in a single tablet. To examine safety data from 5 Phase III studies of NAP/ESO in LDA users (≤ 325 mg daily, administered at any time during the study), and LDA non-users, data were analyzed from 6-month studies assessing NAP/ESO versus EC naproxen in patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis (n = 2), 3-month studies assessing NAP/ESO vs celecoxib or placebo in patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 2), and a 12-month, open-label, safety study of NAP/ESO (n = 1). In an analysis of two studies, incidences of endoscopically confirmed gastric ulcers (GUs) and duodenal ulcers (DUs) were summarized by LDA subgroups. In the pooled analysis from all five studies, incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) (including prespecified NSAID-associated upper GI AEs and cardiovascular AEs), serious AEs, and AE-related discontinuations were stratified by LDA subgroups. Overall, 2,317 patients received treatment; 1,157 patients received NAP/ESO and, of these, 298 received LDA. The cumulative incidence of GUs and DUs in the two studies with 6-month follow-up was lower for NAP/ESO vs EC naproxen in both LDA subgroups [GUs: 3.0 vs 27.9%, respectively, for LDA users, 6.4 vs 22.4%, respectively, for LDA non-users (both P < 0.001); DUs: 1.0 vs 5.8% for LDA users, 0.6 vs 5.3% for LDA non-users]. The incidence of erosive gastritis was lower in NAP/ESO- vs EC naproxen-treated patients for both LDA users [18.2 vs 36.5%, respectively (P = 0.004)] and LDA non-users [19.8 vs 38.5%, respectively (P < 0.001)]. Among LDA users, incidences of NSAID-associated upper GI AEs were: NAP/ESO, 16.1%; EC

  20. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid has enhanced chemo-preventive properties compared to aspirin, is gastrointestinal safe with all the classic therapeutic indications.

    PubMed

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-15

    Aspirin is chemopreventive; however, side effects preclude its long-term use. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel hybrid that releases nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide, was designed to be a safer alternative. Here we compare the gastrointestinal safety, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, anti-platelet, and chemopreventive properties of aspirin and NBS-1120 administered orally to rats at equimolar doses. Gastrointestinal safety: 6h post-administration, the number and size of hemorrhagic lesions in stomachs were counted; tissue samples were frozen for PGE2, SOD, and MDA determination. Anti-inflammatory: 1h after drug administration, the volume of carrageenan-induced rat paw edemas was measured for 5h. Anti-pyretic: fever was induced by LPS (ip) an hour before administration of the test drugs, core body temperature was measured hourly for 5h. Analgesic: time-dependent analgesic effects were evaluated by carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Antiplatelet: anti-aggregatory effects were studied on collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma. Chemoprevention: nude mice were gavaged daily for 25 days with vehicle, aspirin or NBS-1120. After one week, each mouse was inoculated subcutaneously in the right flank with HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Both agents reduced PGE2 levels in stomach tissue; however, NBS-1120 did not cause any stomach ulcers, whereas aspirin caused significant bleeding. Lipid peroxidation induced by aspirin was higher than that exerted by NBS-1120. SOD activity was significantly inhibited by aspirin but increased by NBS-1120. Both agents showed similar anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, and anti-platelet activities. Aspirin increased plasma TNFα more than NBS-1120-treated animals. NBS-1120 was better than aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; it dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth and tumor mass. PMID:26394025

  1. The effects of aspirin and dimethyl sulphoxide on the latency of lysosomes in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Zodrow, J; Rogers, S H

    1984-05-14

    Lysosomal preparations were exposed to various concentrations of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and aspirin singularly and in combination. Acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase activities were measured and utilized as an indication of lysosomal membrane stability under experimental conditions in the presence and absence of these drugs. Extremely low concentrations of each drug were employed in an attempt to mimic the levels which might be feasible in vivo. There was a significant decrease of enzyme activity (increased structure-linked latency) in the presence of DMSO. Aspirin had no significant effect on the latency of the lysosomes. There was no indication of synergism between DMSO and aspirin. It was concluded that some of the therapeutic advantages attributed to DMSO in the treatment of arthritis and other musculoskeletal diseases may come from the stabilization of lysosomes in cells that contribute to the pathological condition. Aspirin did not seem to exert a therapeutic effect through this mechanism. PMID:6727549

  2. Evaluation of antioxidant activity and electronic structure of aspirin and paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motozaki, W.; Nagatani, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Endo, K.; Takemura, T.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and antioxidant activity of phenolic antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol). X-ray photoelectron and emission spectra of the antioxidants have been simulated by deMon density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the molecules. The chemical bonding of aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen 'lone-pair' π-orbitals which can neutralize free radicals and thus be related to antioxidant properties of the drug. In the case of paracetamol the additional nitrogen 'lone pair' is formed which can explain toxicity of the drug. We propose an evaluation method of antioxidant activity based on the relationship between experimental half-wave oxidation potential ( Ep/2 ) and calculated ionization potentials ( IP) by the DFT calculations, and can conclude that paracetamol has the higher antioxidant activity than aspirin.

  3. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route. PMID:26826555

  4. Management of low-dose aspirin and clopidogrel in clinical practice: a gastrointestinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel; Gargallo, Carla J

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose aspirin, alone or combined with other antiplatelet agents, is increasingly prescribed for cardiovascular prevention. However, the cardiovascular benefits should be evaluated together with the gastrointestinal risks. Low-dose aspirin is associated with upper and lower gastrointestinal injury, although lower gastrointestinal effects are poorly characterized. This gastrointestinal risk differs among antiplatelets drugs users. The most important risk factors are history of peptic ulcer, older age, and concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or dual antiplatelet therapy. Effective upper gastrointestinal prevention strategies are available and should be used in at-risk patients taking low-dose aspirin or clopidogrel. Proton pump inhibitors seem to be the best gastroprotective agents, whereas the benefits of Helicobacter pylori eradication are still unclear. Low-dose aspirin has additional effects in the gastrointestinal tract. A large body of evidence indicates that it can protect against different cancers, in particular colorectal cancer. This effect could modify the future indications for use of low-dose aspirin and the risk-benefit balance. PMID:25595209

  5. Differences in Esterase Activity to Aspirin and p-Nitrophenyl Acetate among Human Serum Albumin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Akitoshi; Okada, Masaya; Inagaki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Sachiyo; Hamaguchi, Tsuneo; Iwakawa, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has two major ligand-binding sites, sites I and II, and also hydrolyzes some compounds at both sites. In the present study, we investigated differences in esterase activity among HSA preparations, and also the effects of warfarin, indomethacin, and naproxen on the hydrolytic activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate. The esterase activities of HSA to aspirin or p-nitrophenyl acetate were measured from the pseudo-first-order formation rate constant (kobs) of salicylic acid or p-nitrophenol by HSA. Inter-lot variations were observed in the esterase activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate; however, the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin did not correlate with that to p-nitrophenyl acetate. The inhibitory effects of warfarin and indomethacin on the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin were stronger than that of naproxen. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of naproxen on the esterase activity of HSA to p-nitrophenyl acetate was stronger than those of warfarin and indomethacin. These results suggest that the administration of different commercial HSA preparations and the co-administration with site I or II high-affinity binding drugs may change the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs that are hydrolyzed by HSA. PMID:27476944

  6. Chemopreventive effects of aspirin at a glance.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad Waqas; Luo, Fuwen; Cheng, Hailing; Zhao, Jean J; Liu, Pixu

    2015-04-01

    Experimental, epidemiological, and clinical data from the last two decades have each supported the hypothesis that aspirin possesses anticancer properties, and that its use may also reduce the lifetime probability of developing or dying from a number of cancers. Aspirin's ability to act on multiple key metabolic and signaling pathways via inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme, as well as through COX-independent mechanisms, makes it particularly relevant in the fight against cancer. A growing body of evidence indicates that aspirin may not only reduce cancer risk, but also prevent metastasis and angiogenesis while slowing the rate of mutation-inducing DNA damage. These emerging benefits of aspirin are offset to some extent by the known risks of treatment, such as cardiovascular events and gastrointestinal bleeding. However, it has been shown that pre-treatment risk assessment of individual patients and the use of proton pump inhibitors or Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy concomitantly with aspirin treatment can reduce these potential risks. Thus, the significant benefits of aspirin treatment, coupled with recent data concerning its risks, may prove to tip the balance in favor of aspirin use in cancer prevention. PMID:25842298

  7. (Nitrooxyacyloxy)methyl esters of aspirin as novel nitric oxide releasing aspirins.

    PubMed

    Lazzarato, Loretta; Donnola, Monica; Rolando, Barbara; Chegaev, Konstantin; Marini, Elisabetta; Cena, Clara; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Biondi, Stefano; Ongini, Ennio; Gasco, Alberto

    2009-08-27

    A series of (nitrooxyacyloxy)methyl esters of aspirin were synthesized and evaluated as new NO-donor aspirins. Different amounts of aspirin were released in serum from these products according to the nature of nitrooxyacyloxy moiety present. In the aromatic series, there is a rather good linear correlation between the amount of aspirin released and the potencies of the products in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by collagen. Both the native compounds and the related nitrooxy-substituted acid metabolites were able to relax rat aorta strips precontracted with phenylephrine, in keeping with a NO-induced activation of the sGC as a mechanism that underlies the vasodilator effect. The products here described are new improved examples of NO-donor aspirins containing nitrooxy groups. They could represent an alternative to the use of aspirin in a variety of clinical applications. PMID:20560642

  8. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidelines . Circulation . 2011 ; 123 : 2022 – 2060 . OpenUrl FREE Full Text 4. ↵ Antithrombotic Trialists' (ATT) Collaboration , Baigent C , Blackwell ... BMJ . 2002 ; 324 : 71 – 86 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text 6. ↵ Furie KL , Kasner SE , Adams RJ , Albers ...

  9. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  10. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  11. Aspirin may influence cellular energy status.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Pratibha; Litvinov, Dmitry; Aluganti Narasimhulu, Chandrakala; Jiang, Xueting; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2015-02-15

    In our previous findings, we have demonstrated that aspirin/acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) might induce sirtuins via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah receptor). Induction effects included an increase in cellular paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) gene expression. As predicted, ASA and salicylic acid (SA) treatment resulted in generation of H2O2, which is known to be an inducer of mitochondrial gene Sirt4 and other downstream target genes of Sirt1. Our current mass spectroscopic studies further confirm the metabolism of the drugs ASA and SA. Our studies show that HepG2 cells readily converted ASA to SA, which was then metabolized to 2,3-DHBA. HepG2 cells transfected with aryl hydrocarbon receptor siRNA upon treatment with SA showed the absence of a DHBA peak as measured by LC-MS/MS. MS studies for Sirt1 action also showed a peak at 180.9 m/z for the deacetylated and chlorinated product formed from N-acetyl lε-lysine. Thus an increase in Sirt4, Nrf2, Tfam, UCP1, eNOS, HO1 and STAT3 genes could profoundly affect mitochondrial function, cholesterol homeostasis, and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting that ASA could be beneficial beyond simply its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenase. PMID:25557764

  12. Aspirin may influence cellular energy status

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Pratibha; Litvinov, Dmitry; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Jiang, Xueting; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2015-01-01

    In our previous findings, we have demonstrated that aspirin/acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) might induce sirtuins via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah receptor). Induction effects included an increase in cellular paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) gene expression. As predicted, ASA and salicylic acid (SA) treatment resulted in generation of H2O2, which is known to be an inducer of mitochondrial gene Sirt4 and other downstream target genes of Sirt1. Our current mass spectroscopic studies further confirm the metabolism of the drugs ASA and SA. Our studies show that HepG2 cells readily converted ASA to SA, which was then metabolized to 2,3-DHBA. HepG2 cells transfected with aryl hydrocarbon receptor siRNA upon treatment with SA showed the absence of a DHBA peak as measured by LC-MS/MS. MS studies for Sirt1 action also showed a peak at 180.9 m/z for the deacetylated and chlorinated product formed from N-acetyl Lε-lysine. Thus an increase in Sirt4, Nrf2, Tfam, UCP1, eNOS, HO1 and STAT3 genes could profoundly affect mitochondrial function, cholesterol homeostasis, and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting that ASA could be beneficial beyond simply its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenase. PMID:25557764

  13. The effect of prostaglandin synthase inhibitor, aspirin on the rat intestinal membrane structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kaur, G; Kaur, J; Mittal, N; Nath Sanyal, S

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was found to decrease the activity of the rat intestinal brush border membrane (BBM) - associated enzymes such as the sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase. Aspirin treatment also led to a decrease in the microviscosity in the native as well as the benzyl alcohol treated membrane which might be due to the lipid peroxidative damage in the membrane. Physical correlation of the membrane oxidative damage was evident as the Fourier Transformation Infra Red (FTIR) study of the Aspirin treated membrane, which include an increased proportion of gauche to trans conformer, shift in the methylene C-H asymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies, C = O double bond stretching, NH bending, antisymmetric (N)-CH3 bending, C-N stretching and antisymmetric CNC stretching while there was no change in the CH2 wagging and twisting as well as in NH-bending amide bond I and II. Aspirin treatment also caused an alteration in the glucose and histidine transport, as evident by a decreased Vmax value while the apparent Km remaining unchanged in the control and Aspirin-treated animals confirming that there was no change in the substrate affinity constant of the membrane transport proteins for the glucose and the basic amino acid, although the rate of transport decreased considerably. There was a decrease noted in the energy of activation of glucose and histidine transport when studied at different temperature but no change in the temperature of phase transition in the BBM with Aspirin treatment, thus implying that perhaps the thermotropic phase transition in the membrane may have relatively little effect on the transport processes. The result suggests an underlying molecular mechanism indicating the implied membrane damage by Aspirin, an important member of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) family which could possibly through an oxidative damage may lead to an altered molecular structure, physical state and biological

  14. How to test the effect of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy?

    PubMed

    Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Homoródi, Nóra; Kovács, Emese Gyöngyvér; Sarkady, Ferenc; Csiba, László; Édes, István; Muszbek, László

    2016-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin is frequently used for the prevention of recurrent ischemic events. Various laboratory methods are used to detect the effect of these drugs administered in monotherapy, however their value in dual therapy has not been explored. Here, we determined which methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel or aspirin are influenced by the other antiplatelet agent. One arm of the study included 53 ischemic stroke patients being on clopidogrel monotherapy showing effective inhibition of the P2Y12 ADP receptor. Laboratory tests routinely used for the detection of aspirin resistance (arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation/secretion, AA-induced thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production in platelet-rich plasma and VerifyNow Aspirin assay) were carried out on samples obtained from these patients. The other arm of the study involved 52 patients with coronary artery disease being on aspirin monotherapy. Methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel (ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, flow cytometric analysis of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and a newly developed P2Y12-specific platelet aggregation (ADP[PGE1] test)) were performed on samples obtained from these patients. Clopidogrel monotherapy significantly inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, moreover, AA-induced TXB2 production was also significantly decreased. VASP phosphorylation and AA-induced platelet aggregation showed fair correlation in patients taking clopidogrel only. Clopidogrel did not inhibit the VerifyNow Aspirin test significantly. Aspirin monotherapy influenced ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, but did not have an effect on VASP phosphorylation and on the ADP[PGE1] platelet aggregation test. PMID:26083485

  15. Analysis of the Interaction between Clopidogrel, Aspirin, and Proton Pump Inhibitors Using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yukiya; Suzuki, Honami; Umetsu, Ryogo; Uranishi, Hiroaki; Abe, Junko; Nishibata, Yuri; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Miyamura, Nobuteru; Hara, Hideaki; Tsuchiya, Teruo; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet agent widely used in combination with aspirin to limit the occurrence of cardiovascular (embolic/thrombotic) events. Consensus guidelines recommend proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as a gastrointestinal (GI) prophylactic measure for all patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of the simultaneous use of clopidogrel, aspirin, and PPIs on hemorrhagic and embolic/thrombotic events using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. Reports of hemorrhagic and embolic/thrombotic events between 2004 and 2013 were analyzed with a reporting odds ratio (ROR) algorithm and logistic regression methods. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms was used to identify such events. Regarding hemorrhagic events, the adjusted RORs of the concomitant use of aspirin and clopidogrel and those of PPIs prescribed with aspirin and clopidogrel were 4.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.02-4.81) and 3.40 (95% CI, 2.84-4.06), respectively. For embolic/thrombotic events, the adjusted RORs of the concomitant use of aspirin and clopidogrel and those of PPIs prescribed with aspirin and clopidogrel were 2.37 (95% CI, 2.16-2.59) and 2.38 (95% CI, 2.00-2.84), respectively. Among patients included in the FAERS database, the concurrent use of aspirin and clopidogrel with PPIs reduced the adjusted ROR of GI hemorrhagic events. PPIs had little influence on the adjusted ROR of embolic/thrombotic events. These results support the use of PPIs as a preventive measure against GI hemorrhagic events for patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin. PMID:25947914

  16. Method Development for Analysis of Aspirin Tablets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Develops a lab experiment for introductory instrumental analysis that requires interference studies and optimizing of conditions. Notes the analysis of the aspirin is by visible spectrophotometric assay. Gives experimental details and discussion. (MVL)

  17. In Vivo Platelet Activation and Aspirin Responsiveness in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zaccardi, Francesco; Rizzi, Alessandro; Petrucci, Giovanna; Ciaffardini, Flavia; Tanese, Luigi; Pagliaccia, Francesca; Cavalca, Viviana; Ciminello, Angela; Habib, Aida; Squellerio, Isabella; Rizzo, Paola; Tremoli, Elena; Rocca, Bianca; Pitocco, Dario; Patrono, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Platelet activation is persistently enhanced, and its inhibition by low-dose aspirin is impaired in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated in vivo thromboxane (TX) and prostacyclin (PGI2) biosynthesis and their determinants, as well as aspirin responsiveness, in young adult subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) without overt cardiovascular disease and stable glycemic control. The biosynthesis of TXA2 was persistently increased in subjects with T1DM versus matched healthy subjects, with females showing higher urinary TX metabolite (TXM) excretion than male subjects with T1DM. Microalbuminuria and urinary 8-iso-PGF2α, an index of in vivo oxidative stress, independently predicted TXM excretion in T1DM. No homeostatic increase in PGI2 biosynthesis was detected. Platelet COX-1 suppression by low-dose aspirin and the kinetics of its recovery after drug withdrawal were similar in patients and control subjects and were unaffected by glucose variability. We conclude that patients with T1DM and stable glycemic control display enhanced platelet activation correlating with female sex and microvascular and oxidative damages. Moreover, aspirin responsiveness is unimpaired in T1DM, suggesting that the metabolic disturbance per se is unrelated to altered pharmacodynamics. The efficacy and safety of low-dose aspirin in T1DM warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:26470782

  18. Significant Modules and Biological Processes between Active Components of Salvia miltiorrhiza Depside Salt and Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yanming; Wang, Lianxin; Zhang, Yingying; Gu, Hao; Chai, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine and compare the similarities and differences between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin using perspective of pharmacological molecular networks. Active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin's related genes were identified via the STITCH4.0 and GeneCards Database. A text search engine (Agilent Literature Search 2.71) and MCODE software were applied to construct network and divide modules, respectively. Finally, 32, 2, and 28 overlapping genes, modules, and pathways were identified between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin. A multidimensional framework of drug network showed that two networks reflected commonly in human aortic endothelial cells and atherosclerosis process. Aspirin plays a more important role in metabolism, such as the well-known AA metabolism pathway and other lipid or carbohydrate metabolism pathways. S. miltiorrhiza depside salt still plays a regulatory role in type II diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and adipocytokine signaling pathway. Therefore, this study suggests that aspirin combined with S. miltiorrhiza depside salt may be more efficient in treatment of CHD patients, especially those with diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidemia. Further clinical trials to confirm this hypothesis are still needed. PMID:27069488

  19. New Insights into the Mechanism of Action of Aspirin in the Prevention of Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Luigia; López Contreras, Luilli Antonio; Sacco, Angela; Patrignani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical studies have shown that the chronic administration of aspirin, even at the lowdoses (75-100 mg daily) recommended for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanism of action of aspirin as an antineoplastic agent remains controversial. However, data of clinical pharmacology and several features of the chemopreventive effect of aspirin, emerged from clinical trials, suggest that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin plays a central role in its anticancer effects. In addition to their contribution to tumor metastasis, platelets may play a role in the early phases of tumorigenesis. In response to lifestyle and environment factors, intestinal epithelial damage/ dysfunction may be associated with platelet activation, initially as a mechanism to repair the damage. However, if the platelet response is unconstrained, it may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation. Altogether these events lead to alter the normal functions of intestinal epithelial cells and may translate into cellular transformation through several mechanisms, including the overexpression of cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which are considered early events in colorectal tumorigenesis. Thus, antiplatelet agents may play a role in the prevention of CRC by modifying epigenetic events involved in early phases of colorectal tumorigenesis. Finally, we carried out a critical review of the literature on off-target mechanisms of aspirin action as anticancer drug. PMID:26369679

  20. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  1. Rectal ulcers and massive bleeding after hemorrhoidal band ligation while on aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Shahzad, Ghulamullah; Rizvon, Kaleem; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Viswanathan, Prakash; Mustacchia, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic hemorrhoidal band ligation is a well-established nonoperative method for treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids (grade 1 to 3). It is a safe and effective technique with a high success rate. Complications with this procedure are uncommon. Although rectal ulceration due to band ligation is a rare complication, it can cause life-threatening hemorrhage especially when patients are on medications which impair hemostasis like aspirin or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We present 2 cases of massive lower gastro-intestinal bleeding in patients who had a band ligation procedure performed 2 wk prior to the presentation and were on aspirin at home. Both the patients were hemodynamically unstable requiring resuscitation. They required platelet and blood transfusions and were found to have rectal ulcers on colonoscopy done subsequently. The rectal ulcers corresponded to the site of band ligation. The use of aspirin by these patients would have caused defects in the hemostasis and may have predisposed them to massive bleeding in the presence of rectal ulcers occurring after the band ligation procedure. Managing aspirin before and after the ligation may be difficult especially since adequate guidelines are unavailable. Stopping aspirin in all the cases might not be safe and the decision should be individualized. PMID:24749117

  2. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  3. Significant Modules and Biological Processes between Active Components of Salvia miltiorrhiza Depside Salt and Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Lianxin; Zhang, Yingying; Gu, Hao; Chai, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine and compare the similarities and differences between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin using perspective of pharmacological molecular networks. Active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin's related genes were identified via the STITCH4.0 and GeneCards Database. A text search engine (Agilent Literature Search 2.71) and MCODE software were applied to construct network and divide modules, respectively. Finally, 32, 2, and 28 overlapping genes, modules, and pathways were identified between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin. A multidimensional framework of drug network showed that two networks reflected commonly in human aortic endothelial cells and atherosclerosis process. Aspirin plays a more important role in metabolism, such as the well-known AA metabolism pathway and other lipid or carbohydrate metabolism pathways. S. miltiorrhiza depside salt still plays a regulatory role in type II diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and adipocytokine signaling pathway. Therefore, this study suggests that aspirin combined with S. miltiorrhiza depside salt may be more efficient in treatment of CHD patients, especially those with diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidemia. Further clinical trials to confirm this hypothesis are still needed. PMID:27069488

  4. Aspirin chemoprevention of gastrointestinal cancer in the next decade. A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Helena; Hooper, Patricia; Jankowski, Janusz A

    2010-10-01

    Together, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers now account for 25% of neoplastic deaths in the West. In Poland, GI cancer rates are likely to increase further as westernization progresses. Given that conventional cancer therapies have made only modest reductions in cancer mortality, there is a great interest in chemoprevention to prevent or slow malignant transformation from premalignant lesions. The financial pressures in the immediate future require even more stringent criteria for chemopreventive agents - they must be cheap but also safe and efficacious. In this regard, several reviews have indicated that aspirin possesses many favorable qualities for chemoprevention. Furthermore, meta-analyses indicate that aspirin may decrease cancer by approximately 30%. Several large clinical trials are underway, including AspECT (Aspirin and Esomeprazole Chemoprevention Trial) that aims not only to prevent cancer but also decrease the gastric side effects by combining aspirin with potent acid-suppressing drugs. In conclusion, whether aspirin will be the world's first proven chemopreventive agent is currently unknown but the evidence looks hopeful. PMID:20980946

  5. Potential therapeutic applications of aspirin and other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Farah, A. E.; Rosenberg, F.

    1980-01-01

    1 The ubiquitous actions of the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors are described. 2 These include the inhibitory effect on prostaglandin synthesis and the direct effect of aspirin on lymphocytes and their ability to produce lymphokines. 3 Aspirin reduces some types of platelet aggregation possibly involving inhibition of the precursors of thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin. 4 The therapeutic implications in relation to transient ischaemic attacks, coronary artery disease and reno-allograft rejection are discussed. 5 The beneficial and adverse effects on the gastro-intestinal tract are described. 6 The effects of aspirin-like drugs on the genito-urinary tract are described with particular reference to their adverse effects on labour and their therapeutic effect on dysmenorrhoea. PMID:6776977

  6. Low-dose aspirin use does not diminish the immune response to monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccine in older adults.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M L; Bellamy, A; Wolff, M; Hill, H; Jackson, L A

    2016-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may inhibit antibody production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells; one consequence of this could be decreased effectiveness of vaccines in NSAID users. Because many older adults use low-dose aspirin for primary or secondary prevention of coronary events, any inhibitory effect of aspirin on vaccine immune response could reduce the benefits of vaccination programmes in older adults. We tested whether immune response to vaccination differed between users vs. non-users of low-dose aspirin, using data from four randomized trials of monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccine. Geometric mean haemagglutination inhibition antibody titres were not significantly lower in low-dose aspirin users compared to non-users. Our results provide reassurance that influenza vaccination effectiveness is probably not reduced in older adults taking chronic low-dose aspirin. PMID:26330204

  7. 21 CFR 201.326 - Over-the-counter drug products containing internal analgesic/antipyretic active ingredients...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) or steroid drug take other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs (aspirin... ulcers or bleeding problems takes a blood thinning (anticoagulant) or steroid drug takes other drugs... (anticoagulant) or steroid drug takes other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs...

  8. 21 CFR 201.326 - Over-the-counter drug products containing internal analgesic/antipyretic active ingredients...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) or steroid drug take other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs (aspirin... ulcers or bleeding problems takes a blood thinning (anticoagulant) or steroid drug takes other drugs... (anticoagulant) or steroid drug takes other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs...

  9. 21 CFR 201.326 - Over-the-counter drug products containing internal analgesic/antipyretic active ingredients...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) or steroid drug take other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs (aspirin... ulcers or bleeding problems takes a blood thinning (anticoagulant) or steroid drug takes other drugs... (anticoagulant) or steroid drug takes other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs...

  10. Influence of Low-Dose Aspirin on Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yorito; Maki, Takakuni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-04-12

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is one of the most important features of Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by Aβ accumulation in the walls of cerebral arteries and capillaries, and is present in over 90% of patients with AD. Several novel agents for AD/CAA developed around the amyloid hypothesis have shown positive signs in animal studies but have failed in clinical trials due to adverse events and/or lack of efficiency. As CAA is presumably caused by a failure in Aβ clearance, drugs that promote Aβ clearance may hold promise in the treatment of CAA and possibly AD. With this in mind, cilostazol, an anti-platelet drug with vasodilating action, has been found to promote Aβ clearance along perivascular drainage pathway, reduce Aβ accumulation in the brain, and restore memory impairment in Tg-SwDI mice, an animal model of CAA. We therefore tested whether the most common anti-platelet agent, aspirin, also reduced Aβ and rescued cognitive impairment in Tg-SwDI mice, and also whether aspirin affected hemorrhagic complications that can occur in Tg-SwDI mice. Mice aged 4 months were assigned into vehicle-treated and low-dose aspirin-treated groups. Low-dose aspirin for 8 months did not increase hemorrhagic lesions, nor increase resting cerebral blood flow or cerebral vascular reserve in response to hypercapnia or acetylcholine. Subsequently, aspirin did not restore cognitive dysfunction. These results suggest that low-dose aspirin does not have a direct influence on cerebrovascular Aβ metabolism nor aggravate hemorrhagic complications in CAA. PMID:27079719

  11. Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mastalerz, L.; Sanak, M.; Kumik, J.; Gawlewicz-Mroczka, A.; Celejewska-Wójcik, N.; Ćmiel, A.; Szczeklik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Special regulatory role of eicosanoids has been postulated in aspirin-induced asthma. Objective. To investigate effects of aspirin on exhaled breath condensate (EBC) levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma. Methods. We determined EBC eicosanoid concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS2) or both. Determinations were performed at baseline and following bronchial aspirin challenge, in two well-defined phenotypes of asthma: aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-tolerant patients. Results. Aspirin precipitated bronchial reactions in all aspirin-sensitive, but in none of aspirin-tolerant patients (ATAs). At baseline, eicosanoids profile did not differ between both asthma groups except for lipoxygenation products: 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 15-HETE) which were higher in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) than inaspirin-tolerant subjects. Following aspirin challenge the total levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs) remained unchanged in both groups. The dose of aspirin had an effect on magnitude of the response of the exhaled cys-LTs and prostanoids levels only in AIA subjects. Conclusion. The high baseline eicosanoid profiling of lipoxygenation products 5- and 15-HETE in EBC makes it possible to detect alterations in aspirin-sensitive asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes, and eoxins levels in EBC after bronchial aspirin administration in stable asthma patients cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic index for aspirin hypersensitivity. PMID:22291720

  12. Papillary Necrosis in Rats Caused by Aspirin and Aspirin-containing Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Nanra, Ranjit S.; Kincaid-Smith, Priscilla

    1970-01-01

    Nearly half the rats gavage-fed with aspirin and aspirin-containing mixtures developed papillary necrosis in 20 weeks. This incidence is similar to that found in rats on A.P.C. mixtures with high and low concentrations of p-chloracetanilide, an impurity of phenacetin. Aspirin alone produced necrosis in 7 out of 19 rats (36·8%) whereas phenacetin in the same dose had failed to cause any renal damage over six to nine months. If these results also apply to man they suggest that aspirin and not phenacetin may be the major factor in analgesic nephropathy in patients taking A.P.C. mixtures. An augmented clearance of aspirin appeared to afford some protection to the medulla, and it is suggested that this observation may have important clinical and epidemiological applications. Imagesp560-a PMID:5454357

  13. The Aspirin Foundation Scientific Conference: the history, the present state and the future of aspirin prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tom; Elwood, Peter; Keating, Conrad; Rothwell, Peter; Detering, Elmar; Freedman, Andrew; Langley, Ruth; Logan, Richard; Phillips, Ceri; DeCensi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Aspirin Foundation Conference covered a range of topics from clinical and medical history, epidemiology, health economics, and the current uses of aspirin in general practice and in the treatment and prevention of cancer. The use of aspirin as primary prevention in people at risk of atherosclerotic events is now well known, but its use as a preventative agent in some cancer types is still under discussion, and data on colorectal and lung cancer were presented at this meeting. The potential use of aspirin in preventing vascular disease in HIV patients was also discussed. The cost effectiveness of aspirin as a primary prevention strategy was discussed for the first time in this series of meetings. PMID:24678343

  14. Aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Chao; Li, Yuan; Fan, Yong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Bin; Sang, Hong-Xun

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin is a commonly used medicine as an effective antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. Previous studies have demonstrated its potential effects of anti-postmenopausal osteoporosis, while the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of aspirin on receptor‑activator of nuclear factor κB (NF‑κB) ligand (RANKL)‑induced osteoclasts were investigated in RAW264.7 cells in the current study. Using tartrate‑resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, it was observed that aspirin inhibited the differentiation of RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells. The mRNA expression of osteoclastic marker genes, including cathepsin K, TRAP, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calcitonin receptor, were suppressed by aspirin as identified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that aspirin markedly inhibited NF‑κB p65 translocation to the nucleus in RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells. In addition, aspirin also suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs), observed by western blot analysis. Taken together, these data identified that aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF‑κB and MAPKs in RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells, implying that aspirin may possess therapeutic potential for use in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27430169

  15. Are the current recommendations for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease applicable in low-income countries?

    PubMed

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence has accumulated that long-term aspirin therapy is beneficial in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a lot of controversies persist regarding the benefit of aspirin use in primary prevention of CVD. In low-income countries (LIC) specifically, the decision to prescribe aspirin for primary CVD prevention is more problematic, as there is a dearth of evidence in this regard. Aspirin has been shown to have relative beneficial effects in preventing a first myocardial infarction, but not stroke. However, as stroke is the prevailing CVD in many LIC, especially in Africa, the benefit of aspirin in these settings is therefore questionable. Indeed, there is no published trial that has evaluated the benefits and risks of continuous aspirin therapy in populations of LIC. Furthermore, though cardiovascular risk assessment is crucial in decision-making for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD, there are no risk assessment tools that have been validated in African populations. Studies are urgently warranted, to determine the usefulness of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD in low-income settings where the drug is highly available and affordable, as CVD is becoming the leading cause of deaths in LIC. PMID:26345154

  16. Aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Chao; Li, Yuan; Fan, Yong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Bin; Sang, Hong-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is a commonly used medicine as an effective antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. Previous studies have demonstrated its potential effects of anti-postmenopausal osteoporosis, while the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of aspirin on receptor-activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclasts were investigated in RAW264.7 cells in the current study. Using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, it was observed that aspirin inhibited the differentiation of RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells. The mRNA expression of osteoclastic marker genes, including cathepsin K, TRAP, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calcitonin receptor, were suppressed by aspirin as identified using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that aspirin markedly inhibited NF-κB p65 translocation to the nucleus in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells. In addition, aspirin also suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), observed by western blot analysis. Taken together, these data identified that aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells, implying that aspirin may possess therapeutic potential for use in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27430169

  17. Intestinal toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with differential cyclooxygenase inhibition selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S; Saini, R Kishore; Sanyal, S Nath

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the gastrointestinal side effects of cycloxygenase (COX) inhibitor with varying selectivity, called the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) viz., non-selective COX-1 & 2 inhibitor--aspirin, prefentially selective COX-2 inhibitor--nimesulide and highly selective COX-2 inhibitor-celecoxib. Treatment with NSAIDs exhibited a decrease in the activity of rat intestinal brush border membrane associated enzymes such as sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase as compared to the control in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The uptake of D-glucose and L-histidine in the everted intestinal sac was found to be decreased. Also the decease of glucose and histidine uptake was found to be dependent on the substrate concentration, temperature and the time interval of incubation. The physical state and composition of brush border membrane was found to be altered as evident in the FTIR spectrum, by appearance of new peaks while disappearance of certain peaks occurred which were characteristics of the control membrane. The changes in wave number as well as peaks height were also noticed. Alterations in protein profile of the membrane were demonstrated using SDS-PAGE analysis where disappearance of few bands and change in the relative intensities of the bands were noticed and correlated with the alterations that have taken place at the molecular level. Histological studies have depicted a marked decrease in the absorption surface area such as the villi height of the intestinal segment. In addition, crypt number also deceased in the treated animals, an indication that such changes also correlate well with the changes in the transport of the end product nutrients. PMID:17970535

  18. Does high serum uric acid level cause aspirin resistance?

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir S; Ozkan, Emel; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Ozkan, Hayrettin; Bilgin, Murat; Kilic, Ismail D; Ergin, Ahmet; Kaftan, Havane A; Evrengul, Harun

    2016-06-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), though aspirin inhibits platelet activation and reduces atherothrombotic complications, it does not always sufficiently inhibit platelet function, thereby causing a clinical situation known as aspirin resistance. As hyperuricemia activates platelet turnover, aspirin resistance may be specifically induced by increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels. In this study, we thus investigated the association between SUA level and aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. We analyzed 245 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who in coronary angiography showed more than 50% occlusion in a major coronary artery. According to aspirin resistance, two groups were formed: the aspirin resistance group (Group 1) and the aspirin-sensitive group (Group 2). Compared with those of Group 2, patients with aspirin resistance exhibited significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, SUA levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, and fasting blood glucose levels. After multivariate analysis, a high level of SUA emerged as an independent predictor of aspirin resistance. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 6.45 mg/dl for SUA to predict aspirin resistance with 79% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Hyperuricemia may cause aspirin resistance in patients with CAD and high SUA levels may indicate aspirin-resistant patients. Such levels should thus recommend avoiding heart attack and stroke by adjusting aspirin dosage. PMID:26656902

  19. [The saga of aspirin: centuries-old ancestors of an old lady who doesn't deserve to die].

    PubMed

    Queneau, P

    2001-01-01

    Where do analgics come from? If their ancestors are many centuries old, we observe that the four main drugs of modern analgesia, morphine (1816), codeine (1832), paracetamol (1893) and aspirin (1897) were discovered during the 19th century. And through what 'sagas'! The first known prescriptions, written on earthenware shelves in Mesopotamia 3 centuries BC, already mentioned medications derived from willow to cure headaches. The Greeks dedicated to Asclepios, god of therapeutics, a statue carved in a willow trunk as a symbol! Thus, before becoming a drug, aspirin was born from the willow, which grows with its feet in water 'without suffering', as the ancestors put it. But before it walked on the moon with Neil Armstrong in 1969, the discovery of aspirin as a drug was the consequence of the filial love of a young researcher, Felix Hoffmann, who wanted to decrease the resistant pain of his rheumatic old father. PMID:11878097

  20. Lallemantia reylenne seeds as superdisintegrant: Formulation and evaluation of nimesulide orodispersible tablets

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Karan; Arora, Gurpreet; Singh, Inderbir; Arora, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Orodispersible tablets also known as fast dissolving tablets disintegrate instantaneously within the mouth and thus can be consumed without water. The present study was aimed to formulate orodispersible tablets of nimesulide by using Lallemantia reylenne seeds as natural superdisintegrant. Materials and Methods: Powdered lallemantia seeds were characterized for powder flow properties (bulk density, tapped density, carr's consolidation index, hausner ratio, angle of repose), swelling index, viscosity, pH, and loss on drying. The prepared tablets were evaluated for different tablet parametric tests, wetting time, water absorption ratio, effective pore radius, porosity, packing fraction, in vitro and in vivo disintegration time, in vitro dissolution and stability studies. Results and Discussion: Increase in Lallementia reylenne concentration had an appreciable effect on tablet hardness and friability which clearly indicated binding potential of the seeds. Water absorption ratio increased with increase in Lallemantia reylenne concentration from batch A1 to A4. Water uptake coupled natural polymer swelling could be the most probable mechanism for concentration dependent reduction in disintegration time by the Lallemantia reylenne seeds. Porosity of the formulated tablets was found to increase from batch A1-A4. The in vitro disintegration results were in line with in vivo disintegration results. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Lallemantia reylenne seeds could be used as natural superdisintegrant in the formulation of orodispersible tablets. PMID:23071942

  1. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues. PMID:26314861

  2. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous section Overview 2 of 5 sections Take Action! Take Action: Talk with Your Doctor Take these steps to ... Benefits and Risks 3 of 5 sections Take Action: Aspirin Tips Use aspirin safely. If you and ...

  3. Beware of Bleeding Risks with Antacids Containing Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159221.html Beware of Bleeding Risks With Antacids Containing Aspirin Alka Seltzer, Bromo Seltzer among over- ... 6, 2016 MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antacids that contain aspirin may cause stomach or intestinal ...

  4. Synthesis of Aspirin: A General Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmsted, John A., III

    1998-10-01

    An experiment is described that is suitable for the early portion of the laboratory in a general chemistry course and integrates organic examples. It is the two-step synthesis of aspirin starting from oil of wintergreen. The mechanism for this synthesis provides examples of three major classes of chemical reactions: hydrolysis, condensation, and proton transfer. To understand the chemistry, the student must be able to recognize the common molecular framework shared by oil of wintergreen, salicylic acid, and aspirin and to identify the -OH and -CO2 sites where chemical changes occur. The experiment differs in three ways from traditional aspirin synthesis experiments for general chemistry. It is designed to be performed early rather than late; it starts from a naturally occurring material and requires two steps rather than one; and it utilizes FTIR spectroscopy to distinguish among oil of wintergreen starting material, salicylic acid intermediate, and aspirin product. The use of FTIR spectroscopy introduces students to a modern analytical technique that is currently used in research involving aspirin.

  5. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: An Overview of Cardiovascular Risks

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Inger L.; van de Laar, Mart A.F.J.; Vonkeman, Harald E.

    2010-01-01

    While aspirin may offer protection, other non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious cardiovascular side effects and complications. This has led to a general "black box" warning for cardiovascular adverse events for NSAIDs. This review explores the different mechanisms underlying the protective effects of aspirin, the NSAID associated renovascular effects causing hypertension, edema and heart failure, the cardiovascular effects causing myocardial infarction and stroke, and the possible deleterious interaction between NSAIDs and aspirin.

  6. Comparative efficacy of in vitro and in vivo metabolized aspirin in the DeBakey ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Girdhar, Gaurav; Chiu, Wei-Che; Jesty, Jolyon; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are implanted in patients with end-stage heart failure to provide both short- and long-term hemodynamic support. Unfortunately, bleeding and thromboembolic complications due to the severely disturbed, dynamic flow conditions generated within these devices require complex, long-term anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapy. While several studies have examined the effectiveness of one such agent, aspirin, under flow conditions, data comparing the efficacy of in vitro and in vivo metabolized aspirin is lacking. Two sets of studies were conducted in vitro with purified human platelets circulating for 30 min in a flow loop containing the DeBakey VAD (MicroMed Cardiovascular, Houston, TX, USA): (a) 20 μM aspirin was added exogenously in vitro to platelets isolated from aspirin-free subjects, and (b) platelets were obtained from donors 2 h (n = 14) and 20 h (n = 13) after ingestion of 1,000 mg aspirin. Near real-time platelet activation state (PAS) was measured with a modified prothrombinase-based assay. Platelets exposed to aspirin in vitro and in vivo (metabolized) showed 28.2 and 25.3 % reduction in platelet activation rate, respectively, compared to untreated controls. Our results demonstrate that in vitro treatment with antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin is as effective as in vivo metabolized aspirin in testing the effect of reducing shear-induced platelet activation in the VAD. Using the PAS assay provides a practical in vitro alternative to in vivo testing of antiplatelet efficacy, as well as for testing the thrombogenic performance of devices during their research and development. PMID:24043375

  7. Feasibility of clinoptilolite application as a microporous carrier for pH-controlled oral delivery of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Tondar, Mahdi; Parsa, Mohammad Javad; Yousefpour, Yaser; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite which due to high surface area/volume ratio has found many applications in industries and medicine. Aspirin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is currently used as an anticoagulant, antinociceptive, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory drug. It is an acidic drug which induces gastric irritation due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase I located in gastric mucosa. In the present work, adsorption and desorption of aspirin on Iranian clinoptilolite micronized particles were studied in acidic and relatively alkaline pHs. Effect of particle size of clinoptilolite was also investigated on adsorption and desorption of aspirin. Specific surfaces, particle sizes, and zeta potentials of clinoptilolite particles were also determined. Scanning electron micrograph was used to study the morphology and crystallinity of clinoptilolite particles. The results showed that adsorption and desorption of aspirin on clinoptilolite are particle size- and pH-dependent. The present work proposes clinoptilolite as an inexpensive, efficient, and non-toxic natural available microporous material for aspirin oral delivery. PMID:25551707

  8. Aspirin overutilization for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Miller, Aaron W; Rezkalla, Shereif H

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is commonly used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the US. Previous research has observed significant levels of inappropriate aspirin use for primary CVD prevention in some European populations, but the degree to which aspirin is overutilized in the US remains unknown. This study examined the association between regular aspirin use and demographic/clinical factors in a population-based sample of adults without a clinical indication for aspirin for primary prevention. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was performed using 2010–2012 data from individuals aged 30–79 years in the Marshfield Epidemiologic Study Area (WI, USA). Regular aspirin users included those who took aspirin at least every other day. Results There were 16,922 individuals who were not clinically indicated for aspirin therapy for primary CVD prevention. Of these, 19% were regular aspirin users. In the final adjusted model, participants who were older, male, lived in northern Wisconsin, had more frequent medical visits, and had greater body mass index had significantly higher odds of regular aspirin use (P<0.001 for all). Race/ethnicity, health insurance, smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels had negligible influence on aspirin use. A sensitivity analysis found a significant interaction between age and number of medical visits, indicating progressively more aspirin use in older age groups who visited their provider frequently. Conclusion There was evidence of aspirin overutilization in this US population without CVD. Older age and more frequent provider visits were the strongest predictors of inappropriate aspirin use. Obesity was the only significant clinical factor, suggesting misalignment between perceived aspirin benefits and cardiovascular risks in this subgroup of patients. Prospective studies that examine cardiac and bleeding events associated with regular aspirin use among obese samples (without CVD) are needed to refine clinical

  9. The effect of simvastatin, aspirin, and their combination in reduction of atheroma plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniati, Neng Fisheri; Permatasari, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by high level of cholesterol especially low density lipoprotein (LDL) and accumulation of neutrophil and macrophage in the artery wall. Thickness of aortic wall is an early stage of atherosclerosis plaque formation. Identification of atherosclerosis plaque formation was done by measuring level of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, interleukin-18 (IL-18), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and measuring the thickness of aortic wall. Atherosclerosis's model induced by high fat diet and CCT (cholesterol, cholic acid, and propyltiouracil) oral administration. Rats induced cholesterol divided into positive control, simvastatin 25 mg/kg bw, aspirin 20 mg/kg bw, and combination simvastatin 25 mg/kg and aspirin 20 mg/kg bw group for 3 weeks. In the third week, therapy was given to atherosclerosis's model. Then, in the fourth and fifth week, therapy was given but induction of high cholesterol was stopped due to the massive loss of body weight. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, MPO, and IL-18 measured by uv-vis spectrophotometry and ELISA. In the end of therapy, aorta's rats was isolated to identify the thickness of aorta wall. In the fourth week, after 1 week of treatment, only combination group showed significantly higher total cholesterol, LDL and MPO compared to positive control group. Level of triglycerides and HDL in all groups did not significantly differ compared to positive control group. After 2 weeks continuing drug treatment, the level of total cholesterol, MPO, and IL-18 were decreased in all groups, and aspirin group showed the lowest level. The level of triglycerides was decreased in simvastatin and aspirin group, and aspirin group showed the lowest. Only combination group showed the lowest level of LDL. Based on histopathology result, the thickness of aortic wall was reduced in all groups and aspirin group showed the lowest.

  10. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid and aspirin increase lifespan of genetically heterogeneous male mice.

    PubMed

    Strong, Randy; Miller, Richard A; Astle, Clinton M; Floyd, Robert A; Flurkey, Kevin; Hensley, Kenneth L; Javors, Martin A; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Nelson, James F; Ongini, Ennio; Nadon, Nancy L; Warner, Huber R; Harrison, David E

    2008-10-01

    The National Institute on Aging's Interventions Testing Program was established to evaluate agents that are purported to increase lifespan and delay the appearance of age-related disease in genetically heterogeneous mice. Up to five compounds are added to the study each year and each compound is tested at three test sites (The Jackson Laboratory, University of Michigan, and University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio). Mice in the first cohort were exposed to one of four agents: aspirin, nitroflurbiprofen, 4-OH-alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). Sample size was sufficient to detect a 10% difference in lifespan in either sex,with 80% power, using data from two of the three sites. Pooling data from all three sites, a log-rank test showed that both NDGA (p=0.0006) and aspirin (p=0.01) led to increased lifespan of male mice. Comparison of the proportion of live mice at the age of 90% mortality was used as a surrogate for measurement of maximum lifespan;neither NDGA (p=0.12) nor aspirin (p=0.16) had a significant effect in this test. Measures of blood levels of NDGA or aspirin and its salicylic acid metabolite suggest that the observed lack of effects of NDGA or aspirin on life span in females could be related to gender differences in drug disposition or metabolism. Further studies are warranted to find whether NDGA or aspirin, over a range of doses,might prove to postpone death and various age-related outcomes reproducibly in mice. PMID:18631321

  11. Do we need a statin-nicotinic acid-aspirin mini-polypill to treat combined hyperlipidaemia?

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Pagourelias, Efstathios D; Kakafika, Anna I; Skaperdas, Athanasios; Hatzitolios, Apostolos; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2007-10-01

    This review considers the treatment for combined hyperlipidaemia (CH) with a combination formulation of three drugs: a statin, nicotinic acid (NA) and aspirin--a mini-polypill. CH is a highly atherogenic dyslipidaemia manifested either as familial combined hyperlipidaemia or dyslipidaemia related to the metabolic syndrome or Type 2 diabetes mellitus. These types of dyslipidaemia are highly prevalent in the general population. Statin plus extended-release NA is a promising treatment option for the normalisation of these atherogenic lipid alterations, regression of atherosclerosis, as well as for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The addition of aspirin might prove a useful adjunct that might reduce the cutaneous side effects of NA while also acting as an antiplatelet agent in high-CVD-risk patients. However, the effective dose of aspirin may need to be at least 160 mg/day. This triple combination might improve patient compliance when compared with the three drugs administered separately. PMID:17927482

  12. Antiplatelet drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, I S; Coughtrie, M W H; MacDonald, T M; Wei, L

    2010-12-01

    Both laboratory studies in healthy volunteers and clinical studies have suggested adverse interactions between antiplatelet drugs and other commonly used medications. Interactions described include those between aspirin and ibuprofen, aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and the thienopyridine, clopidogrel, and drugs inhibiting CYP2C19, notably the proton pump inhibitors (PPI) omeprazole and esomeprazole. Other interactions between thienopyridines and CYP3A4/5 have also been reported for statins and calcium channel blockers. The ibuprofen/aspirin interaction is thought to be caused by ibuprofen blocking the access of aspirin to platelet cyclo-oxygenase. The thienopyridine interactions are caused by inhibition of microsomal enzymes that metabolize these pro-drugs to their active metabolites. We review the evidence for these interactions, assess their clinical importance and suggest strategies of how to deal with them in clinical practice. We conclude that ibuprofen is likely to interact with aspirin and reduce its anti-platelet action particularly in those patients who take ibuprofen chronically. This interaction is of greater relevance to those patients at high cardiovascular risk. A sensible strategy is to advise users of aspirin to avoid chronic ibuprofen or to ingest aspirin at least 2 h prior to ibuprofen. Clearly the use of NSAIDs that do not interact in this way is preferred. For the clopidogrel CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5 interactions, there is good evidence that these interactions occur. However, there is less good evidence to support the clinical importance of these interactions. Again, a reasonable strategy is to avoid the chronic use of drugs that inhibit CYP2C19, notably PPIs, in subjects taking clopidogrel and use high dose H2 antagonists instead. Finally, anti-platelet agents probably interact with other drugs that affect platelet function such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and clinicians should probably judge

  13. [The use of nimesulide in the treatment of acute low back pain].

    PubMed

    Shikhkerimov, R K

    2016-01-01

    The objective is to study the efficacy and safety of nimesulide (nemulex) in the treatment of acute low back pain (LBP). The medical documentation of 54 patients with primary syndrome of LBP, which were treated in a polyclinic with nemulex at a dose of 200 mg per day had been studied. The assessment of patients' condition and efficacy and safety of the treatment was conducted based on the information after three visits (1-st, 5-th and 10-th day). The analysis took into account the data of clinical-neurological examination and the assessment of pain intensity at rest and at movement according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the severity of Lasegue symptom and limitation of movements in the lumbar spine. Safety of the therapy was evaluated on the basis of accounting of undesirable side reactions and data analysis and physical examination and laboratory testing. Cardiovascular safety was assessed by blood pressure and blood lipid profile on day 10. The use of nemulex at a dose of 200 mg per day resulted in relief of pain and increase of mobility in the lumbar spine on the 5th day of treatment that indicates the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory therapy to restore the previous functional status of patients with LBP. The use of nemulex was accompanied not only by statistically significant analgesic effect (0,78±0,14 points alone; 1,12±0,18 points when moving by VAS on the 10th day of the treatment) and high security (only 1 of the 54 patients was recorded to have elevation of hepatic transaminases; and 2 patients with dyspepsia without endoscopic changes of gastrointestinal tract). PMID:27240177

  14. Salicylate pre-treatment attenuates intensity of bronchial and nasal symptoms precipitated by aspirin in aspirin-intolerant patients.

    PubMed

    Nizankowska, E; Dworski, R; Soja, J; Szczeklik, A

    1990-11-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which are cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, precipitate asthmatic attacks in ASA-intolerant patients, while sodium salicylate, hardly active on COX by itself, is well tolerated by these patients. However, salicylate moiety appears to interfere with aspirin inhibitory action on platelets and vascular COX. Such interaction, if present at the level of respiratory tract, may be of interest to pathogenesis of ASA-induced asthma. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study on the effect of choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT, trilisate) pre-treatment on ASA-induced adverse reactions in nine patients. Pulmonary function tests, nasal symptoms score, PNIF and serum salicylate levels were monitored following challenges with threshold doses of ASA. Trilisate administered at a dose of 3000 mg daily for 3 days, offered a moderate protection against ASA-induced symptoms; it diminished the severity and/or delayed the appearance of FEV1 fall. Maximal decreases in FEV1 as well as reaction intensity indexes were significantly lower (P less than 0.02 and P less than 0.002, respectively) after trilisate pre-treatment as compared to placebo. Trilisate also attenuated nasal symptoms in three out of five patients. Although the precise mechanism of the protective action of trilisate is unknown, our data support the possibility of interaction between salicylate and ASA on cyclo-oxygenase locus in the respiratory tract in ASA-intolerant patients. PMID:2083404

  15. Aspirin Use Associated With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Total Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Lee, Johnny Kuang-Wu; Lee, Charles Tzu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of aspirin use and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk is unclear. This study determined whether use of any individual compound is associated with ALS risk by conducting a total population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Methods A total of 729 patients with newly diagnosed ALS who had a severely disabling disease certificate between January 1, 2002, and December 1, 2008, comprised the case group. These cases were compared with 7290 sex-, age-, residence-, and insurance premium-matched controls. Drug use by each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code was analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. False discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P values were reported in order to avoid inflating false positives. Results Of the 1336 compounds, only the 266 with use cases exceeding 30 in our database were included in the screening analysis. Without controlling for steroid use, the analysis failed to reveal any compound that was inversely associated with ALS risk according to FDR criteria. After controlling for steroid use, we found use of the following compounds to be associated with ALS risk: aspirin, diphenhydramine (one of the antihistamines), and mefenamic acid (one of the NSAIDs). A multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was independently inversely associated with ALS risk after controlling for diphenhydramine, mefenamic acid, and steroid use. The inverse association between aspirin and ALS was present predominately in patients older than 55 years. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that aspirin use might reduce the risk of ALS, and the benefit might be more prominent for older people. PMID:25721071

  16. Analysis of a Suspected Drug Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schurter, Eric J.; Zook-Gerdau, Lois Anne; Szalay, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This general chemistry laboratory uses differences in solubility to separate a mixture of caffeine and aspirin while introducing the instrumental analysis methods of GCMS and FTIR. The drug mixture is separated by partitioning aspirin and caffeine between dichloromethane and aqueous base. TLC and reference standards are used to identify aspirin…

  17. Aspirin metabolism and efficacy in postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, R A; Williams, F M; Ward, A; Rawlins, M D

    1984-01-01

    Aspirin 1200 mg was compared with placebo in a randomised, double-blind, crossover study in 15 patients with postoperative pain after removal of impacted lower third molars. Over a 5 h investigation period, patients reported significantly less pain (P less than 0.01) after treatment with aspirin, than after treatment with placebo. Peak concentrations of aspirin occurred at 15 min after dosage. Significant negative correlations were observed between plasma aspirin esterase activity and both AUC aspirin (r = -0.904, P less than 0.001) and AUC analgesia (r = -0.91, P less than 0.001). Similarly, a significant correlation was observed between AUC aspirin and AUC analgesia (r = 0.96, P less than 0.001). Evidence from this study would suggest that an individual's pain relief in postoperative dental pain is determined by the rate of aspirin hydrolysis to salicylate. PMID:6378231

  18. [Metabolic changes in arachidonic acid during aspirin desensitization].

    PubMed

    Salazar Villa, R M; Zambrano Villa, S

    1996-01-01

    Aspirin sensitivity occurs in 10% of all asthmatics patients. In this subset of asthmatics, nasal congestion and bronchospasm occurs between 30-180 minutes after ingestion of aspirin. Following a respiratory reaction to aspirin, all patients can be desensitized to aspirin by repetitively introducing small and then larger doses of aspirin until the asthmatic subject can ingest 650 mg of aspirin without adverse effect. The mechanism of aspirin sensitivity are incompletely understood. And the reasons why ASA desensitization occurs universally are unknown. In this study, known ASA sensitive and control insensitive asthmatics were challenged with ASA. Urine was collected before, during induced bronchospasm, and after ingestion of 650 mg of ASA when the adverse effect (ie., acute desensitization) had subsided. Excretion levels of cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products in the urine were determined. PMID:8963642

  19. A General Chemistry Laboratory Theme: Spectroscopic Analysis of Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Houston; O'Donnell, Stephen E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the introduction of spectroscopy into the general chemistry laboratory using a series of experiments based on a common substance, aspirin. In the first lab the students synthesize and recrystallize aspirin and take melting points of their product, an aspirin standard, and salicylic acid. The students perform the remaining experiments on a rotating basis where the following four labs run simultaneously: structural characterization of the synthesized aspirin by IR and NMR; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by UV vis spectroscopy; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by HPLC; and analysis of calcium in commercial buffered aspirin tablets by AAS. In each of the analysis experiments, students collect, graph, and analyze their data using a spreadsheet. We have found that this series of labs has been very beneficial to our students. From the course evaluations, students indicate that they are beginning to understand how chemistry is applied outside of the classroom.

  20. Relief of Dental Pain: A Controlled 12-Hour Comparison of Etodolac, Aspirin, and Placebo

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sharon L.; Bergman, Stewart A.

    1985-01-01

    Single doses of the study drugs were evaluated for 12 hours by 201 out-patients reporting moderate or severe pain following oral surgery. The results of this double-blind study indicated that 50, 100, and 200 mg of etodolac as well as 650 mg of aspirin were significantly more effective than placebo. A dose-response relationship was found for the three doses of etodolac, which was significant for summed pain relief scores for up to 8 hours. In terms of total analgesic effect, etodolac 200 mg was significantly superior to placebo for 8 hours, while aspirin and the two lower doses of etodolac were similarly effective in the range of 3-6 hours postdrug. All doses showed a favorable onset of analgesia (½-1 hour). Etodolac 200 mg resulted in a duration of action which was approximately twice as long as aspirin's and also produced a peak pain relief which was significantly greater than the lower doses of etodolac and aspirin. All study medications were well tolerated with no reports of significant adverse side effects. No dose-related effects were observed with etodolac PMID:2934008

  1. A study of aspirin and clopidogrel in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robbins, I M; Kawut, S M; Yung, D; Reilly, M P; Lloyd, W; Cunningham, G; Loscalzo, J; Kimmel, S E; Christman, B W; Barst, R J

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is characterised by in situ thrombosis and increased thromboxane (Tx) A2 synthesis; however, there are no studies of antiplatelet therapy in IPAH. The aim of the current study was to determine the biochemical effects of aspirin (ASA) and clopidogrel on platelet function and eicosanoid metabolism in patients with IPAH. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of ASA 81 mg once daily and clopidogrel 75 mg once daily was performed. Plasma P-selectin levels and aggregometry were measured after exposure to adenosine diphosphate, arachidonic acid and collagen. Serum levels of TxB2 and urinary metabolites of TxA2 and prostaglandin I2 (Tx-M and PGI-M, respectively) were assessed. A total of 19 IPAH patients were enrolled, of whom nine were being treated with continuous intravenous epoprostenol. ASA and clopidogrel significantly reduced platelet aggregation to arachidonic acid and adenosine diphosphate, respectively. ASA significantly decreased serum TxB2, urinary Tx-M levels and the Tx-M/PGI-M ratio, whereas clopidogrel had no effect on eicosanoid levels. Neither drug significantly lowered plasma P-selectin levels. Epoprostenol use did not affect the results. In conclusion, aspirin and clopidogrel inhibited platelet aggregation, and aspirin reduced thromboxane metabolite production without affecting prostaglandin I2 metabolite synthesis. Further clinical trials of aspirin in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension should be performed. PMID:16507859

  2. Aspirin- and Indomethacin-Induced Ulcers and their Antagonism by Anthihistamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Patricia A.; Sawrey, James M.; Vernikos, Joan

    1978-01-01

    Gastric ulceration produced by aspirin and indomethacin was compared in acutely stressed and non-stressed rats. We found a synergism between these anti-inflammatory agents and acute stress in the production of gastric ulcers. Even at relatively high doses, neither agent caused appreciable gastric damage in non-stressed rats, whereas moderate doses of both agents produced massive ulceration in stressed rats. The synergism appears unrelated to the effect of these agents on the pituitary-adrenal response. The size and regional distribution of ulcers produced by aspirin and indomethacin in stressed rats were comparable. However, the dose--response curves of the two drugs were markedly dissimilar. Furthermore, the ulceration produced by indomethacin was attenuated by both H(sub 1) and H(sub 2) histamine receptor antagonists, whereas ulceration produced by aspirin was attenuated only by an H(sub 2) antagonist. The results suggest that the ulcerogenic mechanism of indomethacin may differ from that of aspirin and add to the growing evidence on the importance of endogenous histamine in various forms of gastric ulceration.

  3. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  4. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance using the cone and plate(let) analyser in Indian patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Sudeep Kurien; Salahuddin, Salman; Karunakaran, Bijoy; Nalakath, Sajid Yoonus; Bhaskaran, Jayesh; Haridas, Padinjare Veloor; Mandalay, Asishkumar; Faizal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to antiplatelet drugs is a well-known entity. However, data for aspirin and clopidogrel resistance, and its clinical significance, in Indian patients are meagre. Aims and objectives We sought to determine the prevalence of resistance to aspirin and clopidogrel in Indian patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), using the cone and plate(let) analyser (CPA) technology. Setting and design A single centre prospective study in a cohort of patients with stable CHD on chronic aspirin and clopidogrel therapy attending the cardiology outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Southern India. Methods Platelet function was measured using the Impact-R device (DiaMed, Cressier, Switzerland). Resistance to aspirin and clopidogrel was measured in a cohort of 100 patients with stable documented CHD. Relation of antiplatelet resistance to various clinical comorbidities was also assessed. Results Of the 100 patients, 85% were men, and 15% were above 65 years of age. 47% patients had diabetes, 29% of patients were hypertensive and 16% were smokers. Using the CPA, 12 patients (12%) were found to be resistant to aspirin and 19 patients (19%) were clopidogrel resistant. In addition, 10 patients (10%) were resistant to both aspirin and clopidogrel. There was no significant correlation between the presence of antiplatelet resistance and several baseline clinical variables, including age, sex, diabetes, hypertension and smoking. Conclusions Resistance to aspirin and clopidogrel and dual antiplatelet resistance are prevalent in Indian patients, comparable with the prevalence worldwide. The CPA is a feasible assay to determine antiplatelet resistance. PMID:27326196

  5. Neuroprotection by Aspirin and Sodium Salicylate Through Blockade of NF-kappaB Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Mariagrazia; Pizzi, Marina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, Pierfranco

    1996-11-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a commonly prescribed drug with a wide pharmacological spectrum. At concentrations compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy, acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolite sodium salicylate were found to be protective against neurotoxicity elicited by the excitatory amino acid glutamate in rat primary neuronal cultures and hippocampal slices. The site of action of the drugs appeared to be downstream of glutamate receptors and to involve specific inhibition of glutamate-mediated induction of nuclear factor kappa B. These results may contribute to the emerging theme of anti-inflammatory drugs and neurodegeneration.

  6. Coxibs interfere with the action of aspirin by binding tightly to one monomer of cyclooxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Gilad; Sidhu, Ranjinder S.; Lauver, D. Adam; Lee, Jullia Y.; Sharma, Narayan P.; Yuan, Chong; Frieler, Ryan A.; Trievel, Raymond C.; Lucchesi, Benedict R.; Smith, William L.

    2010-02-11

    Pain associated with inflammation involves prostaglandins synthesized from arachidonic acid (AA) through cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways while thromboxane A{sub 2} formed by platelets from AA via cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) mediates thrombosis. COX-1 and COX-2 are both targets of nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) including aspirin whereas COX-2 activity is preferentially blocked by COX-2 inhibitors called coxibs. COXs are homodimers composed of identical subunits, but we have shown that only one subunit is active at a time during catalysis; moreover, many nsNSAIDS bind to a single subunit of a COX dimer to inhibit the COX activity of the entire dimer. Here, we report the surprising observation that celecoxib and other coxibs bind tightly to a subunit of COX-1. Although celecoxib binding to one monomer of COX-1 does not affect the normal catalytic processing of AA by the second, partner subunit, celecoxib does interfere with the inhibition of COX-1 by aspirin in vitro. X-ray crystallographic results obtained with a celecoxib/COX-1 complex show how celecoxib can bind to one of the two available COX sites of the COX-1 dimer. Finally, we find that administration of celecoxib to dogs interferes with the ability of a low dose of aspirin to inhibit AA-induced ex vivo platelet aggregation. COX-2 inhibitors such as celecoxib are widely used for pain relief. Because coxibs exhibit cardiovascular side effects, they are often prescribed in combination with low-dose aspirin to prevent thrombosis. Our studies predict that the cardioprotective effect of low-dose aspirin on COX-1 may be blunted when taken with coxibs.

  7. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  8. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  9. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  10. Multi-parameter assessment of platelet inhibition and its stability during aspirin and clopidogrel therapy

    PubMed Central

    Timur, A. Anil; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Zhang, Li; Barnard, John; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Poor response to antiplatelet drugs is associated with adverse outcomes. We assessed platelet inhibition and its stability and tested correlation and agreement between platelet function assays. Methods Peripheral blood from 58 patients on both aspirin and clopidogrel who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was collected at hospital discharge (visit-1) and at 30–90 days (visit-2). Platelet function was measured using light transmission aggregometry (LTA-AA and LTA-ADP), VerifyNow (Aspirin; ARU and P2Y12; PRU), ex vivo TxB2, urinary 11dhTxB2, and VASP (PRI) assays. Data were analyzed as continuous, quartiles and binary. Patients were defined as aspirin poor responder (PR) with ARU ≥550, LTA-AA maximum ≥20%, TxB2 ≥1 ng/mL or 11dhTxB2 ≥1,500 pg/mg of creatinine and as clopidogrel PR with PRU ≥240, PRU ≥208, LTA-ADP maximum ≥40%, PRI ≥50%, or PRI ≥66%. Results Aspirin PR was 3–33% and clopidogrel PR was 10–35% in visit-1. LTA-AA, 11dhTxB2, and all clopidogrel-response measures showed correlation and agreement between visit-1 and visit-2. The highest agreement between two visits was revealed by PRU ≥240 and PRI ≥66% (PRU-κ=0.7, 95% CI=0.47, 0.93; PRI-κ=0.69, 95% CI=0.42, 0.95, p-values<0.001). Comparison of platelet function assays in a single visit (Visit-1) revealed a poor correlation between LTA-AA and 11dhTxB2 assays and no agreement among aspirin-response assays. The highest correlation and agreement were obtained between VerifyNow P2Y12 and VASP assays (rho=0.7, p-value<0.001 and PRU ≥208-PRI-κ=0.41–0.42, 95% CI=0.13, 0.69, p-values<0.001). Conclusions Platelet inhibition is stable during aspirin and clopidogrel treatment. Clopidogrel-response assays correlate and agree with each other better than aspirin-response assays. PMID:24852729

  11. PA32540 for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients at risk for aspirin-associated gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Danielle; Rooney, Bridget; Adams, Suzanne; Whellan, David J

    2014-01-01

    Prescribed in patients with a history of myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, coronary intervention or bypass surgery, aspirin is one of the medications most commonly used in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. It has become a mainstay of therapy after years of solid evidence supporting its efficacy in clinical trials. However, a number of risks and side effects accompany its benefits, including the notable risk of bleeding and gastrointestinal side effects. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to attenuate these effects to promote adherence and to expand the population for which aspirin is a reasonable treatment option. A polypill or combination formulation that includes a proton pump inhibitor, a drug commonly prescribed alongside aspirin, is one potential avenue of therapy. One such combination pill, PA32540, has undergone Phase I and Phase III trials and shows promising safety and efficacy results in these preliminary trials. PMID:25300316

  12. Spontaneous Early Recanalization after Acute Innominate Artery Thromboembolic Occlusion Secondary to Abrupt Aspirin and Statin Discontinuation A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C-K; Lee, J-T; Wu, Y-C; Peng, G-S

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Statin and antiplatelet drugs are widely used for prevention of ischaemic stroke and other cardiovascular diseases in high-risk patients. We report a rare case of a 49-year old man with a history of myocardial infarction and hyperlipidaemia who suffered an acute occlusion of his innominate artery (IA) accompanied by subclavian steal syndrome and cerebral infarction, on day seven after abrupt cessation of aspirin and statin, as confirmed by magnetic resonance and computed tomographic angiography of head and neck, and colour-coded Duplex ultrasonography (CCDU). Aspirin and atorvastatin were immediately re-started on admission. Spontaneous recanalization of IA was shown on repeat CCDU and digital subtraction angiography on day 10 after stroke onset. This case serves as a reminder that abrupt discontinuation of both aspirin and statin in patients with previous history of cardiovascular disease may increase the risk of ischaemic stroke. PMID:25781297

  13. Radial basis function neural networks in non-destructive determination of compound aspirin tablets on NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ying; Mi, Hong; Zhao, Lingzhi; Ren, Yuqiu; Ren, Yulin

    2006-09-01

    The application of the second most popular artificial neural networks (ANNs), namely, the radial basis function (RBF) networks, has been developed for quantitative analysis of drugs during the last decade. In this paper, the two components (aspirin and phenacetin) were simultaneously determined in compound aspirin tablets by using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and RBF networks. The total database was randomly divided into a training set (50) and a testing set (17). Different preprocessing methods (standard normal variate (SNV), multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), first-derivative and second-derivative) were applied to two sets of NIR spectra of compound aspirin tablets with different concentrations of two active components and compared each other. After that, the performance of RBF learning algorithm adopted the nearest neighbor clustering algorithm (NNCA) and the criterion for selection used a cross-validation technique. Results show that using RBF networks to quantificationally analyze tablets is reliable, and the best RBF model was obtained by first-derivative spectra.

  14. Metformin combined with aspirin significantly inhibit pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by suppressing anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wen; Zheng, Xi; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chung S.; Xu, Qing; Carpizo, Darren; Huang, Huarong; DiPaola, Robert S.; Tan, Xiang-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Metformin and aspirin have been studied extensively as cancer preventive or therapeutic agents. However, the effects of their combination on pancreatic cancer cells have not been investigated. Herein, we evaluated the effects of metformin and aspirin, alone or in combination, on cell viability, migration, and apoptosis as well as the molecular changes in mTOR, STAT3 and apoptotic signaling pathways in PANC-1 and BxPC3 cells. Metformin and aspirin, at relatively low concentrations, demonstrated synergistically inhibitory effects on cell viability. Compared to the untreated control or individual drug, the combination of metformin and aspirin significantly inhibited cell migration and colony formation of both PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. Metformin combined with aspirin significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and STAT3, and induced apoptosis as measured by caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. Remarkably, metformin combined with aspirin significantly downregulated the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Puma, as well as interrupted their interactions. The downregulation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 was independent of AMPK or STAT3 pathway but partially through mTOR signaling and proteasome degradation. In a PANC-1 xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that the combination of metformin and aspirin significantly inhibited tumor growth and downregulated the protein expression of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 in tumors. Taken together, the combination of metformin and aspirin significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating the pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, supporting the continued investigation of this two drug combination as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26056043

  15. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  16. Cilostazol, Not Aspirin, Prevents Stenosis of Bioresorbable Vascular Grafts in a Venous Model

    PubMed Central

    Tara, Shuhei; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; de Dios Ruiz Rosado, Juan; Best, Cameron A.; Shoji, Toshihiro; Mahler, Nathan; Yi, Tai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Hibino, Narutoshi; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective— Despite successful translation of bioresorbable vascular grafts for the repair of congenital heart disease, stenosis remains the primary cause of graft failure. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of long-term treatment with the antiplatelet drugs, aspirin and cilostazol, in preventing stenosis and evaluated the effect of these drugs on the acute phase of inflammation and tissue remodeling. Approach and Results— C57BL/6 mice were fed a drug-mixed diet of aspirin, cilostazol, or normal chow during the course of follow-up. Bioresorbable vascular grafts, composed of poly(glycolic acid) mesh sealed with poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone), were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition conduits and followed up for 2 weeks (n=10 per group) or 24 weeks (n=15 per group). Both aspirin and cilostazol suppressed platelet activation and attachment onto the grafts. On explant at 24 weeks, well-organized neotissue had developed, and cilostazol treatment resulted in 100% graft patency followed by the aspirin (67%) and no-treatment (60%) groups (P<0.05). Wall thickness and smooth muscle cell proliferation in the neotissue of the cilostazol group were decreased when compared with that of the no-treatment group at 24 weeks. In addition, cilostazol was shown to have an anti-inflammatory effect on neotissue at 2 weeks by regulating the recruitment and activation of monocytes. Conclusions— Cilostazol prevents stenosis of bioresorbable vascular graft in a mouse inferior vena cava implantation model up to 24 weeks and is accompanied by reduction of smooth muscle cell proliferation and acute inflammation. PMID:26183618

  17. [Aspirin treatment for patients with Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiromichi

    2014-09-01

    Aspirin was first used for patients with Kawasaki disease(KD) at 1970s. Favorable outcomes of KD patients treated with aspirin were reported in 1970-80s and now it is one of the standard therapeutic agents for KD. Its anti-inflammation effects suppress vascular wall inflammation of KD at acute phase. In addition, its antiplatelet effects heal endothelial dysfunction and prevent clot formation in coronary arteries at sub-acute and convalescent phase. Long-term dosage for patients with coronary artery aneurysms(CAA) is also important, however, there are few evidences of risk-benefit assessment for its long-term use especially for middle-aged and senior adults with KD and CAA. PMID:25518411

  18. Rhinosinusitis and Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Cruz, Maria L.; Jimenez-Chobillon, M. Alejandro; Teran, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a feature of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which in the initial phase is manifested as nasal congestion, mostly affecting females at the age of around 30 years on average. Subsequently, nasal inflammation progresses to chronic eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, asthma, nasal polyposis, and intolerance to aspirin and to other NSAIDs. While it has been long established that NSAIDs cause inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), leading to excessive metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) to cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs), there is now evidence that both cytokines and staphylococcus superantigens amplify the inflammatory process exacerbating the disease. This paper gives a brief overview of the development of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in sensitive patients, and we share our experience in the diagnosis and management of CRS in AERD. PMID:22829846

  19. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... q What are my chances of having a heart attack? q Would I benefit from taking aspirin? q ... Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks Did you know that aspirin can be an ...

  20. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts Share Tweet Linkedin ... example, using aspirin to lower the risk of heart attack and clot-related strokes. In these cases, the ...

  1. Phospho-Aspirin (MDC-22) Prevents Pancreatic Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mattheolabakis, George; Papayannis, Ioannis; Yang, Jennifer; Vaeth, Brandon M; Wang, Ruixue; Bandovic, Jela; Ouyang, Nengtai; Rigas, Basil; Mackenzie, Gerardo G

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal 5-year survival rate of <6%. The currently limited treatment options for pancreatic cancer underscore the need for novel chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. Accumulating evidence indicates that aspirin use is associated with a decreased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, the anticancer properties of aspirin are restricted by its gastrointestinal toxicity and its limited efficacy. Therefore, we developed phospho-aspirin (MDC-22), a novel derivative of aspirin, and evaluated its chemopreventive efficacy in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Phospho-aspirin inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cell lines 8- to 12-fold more potently than aspirin; based on the 24-hour IC50 values. In a Panc-1 xenograft model, phospho-aspirin, at a dose of 100 mg/kg/d 5 times per week for 30 days, reduced tumor growth by 78% (P < 0.01 vs. vehicle control). Furthermore, phospho-aspirin prevented pancreatitis-accelerated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in mice with activated Kras. In p48-Cre;Kras(G12D) mice, cerulein treatment (6 hourly injections two times per week for 3 weeks) led to a significant increase in ductal metaplasia, replacing the majority of the exocrine compartment. Administration of phospho-aspirin 100 mg/kg/day five times per week for 21 days (starting on the first day of cerulein injection) inhibited the acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, reducing it by 87% (P < 0.01, vs. cerulein-treated control). Phospho-aspirin appeared to be safe, with the animals showing no signs of toxicity during treatment. Mechanistically, phospho-aspirin inhibited EGFR activation in pancreatic cancer, an effect consistently observed in pancreatic cancer cells, primary acinar explants and in vivo In conclusion, our findings indicate that phospho-aspirin has strong anticancer efficacy in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer, warranting its further evaluation. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 624-34. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27138793

  2. Aspirination of α-Aminoalcohol (Sarpogrelate M1).

    PubMed

    Park, Sunhwa; Lee, Jiyun; Shin, Kye Jung; Seo, Jae Hong

    2016-01-01

    Aspirination of α-aminoalcohol (sarpogrelate M1) has been performed under various general esterification conditions. In most cases, the desired aspirinate ester was obtained at a low yield with unexpected byproducts, the formation of which was mostly derived from the chemical properties of the tertiary α-amino group. After systematic analysis of those methods, the aspirinated sarpogrelate M1 was prepared using a two-step approach combining salicylate ester formation and acetylation. PMID:27571053

  3. Aspirin as Primary Prevention of Acute Coronary Heart Disease Events

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Stephen P.; Hovater, Martha; Brown, Todd M.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Aspirin for primary prophylaxis is controversial. This study evaluated associations between prophylactic aspirin use and incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods and Results The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study was accessed for aspirin use examining black and white hazards for incident CHD, for men and women, each adjusting incrementally for sampling, sociodemographics, and CHD risk factors. Stratified models examined risks across strata of the Framingham risk score, and all-cause mortality. 23,949 participants (mean 64 yo), had 503 incident events over a 3.5 year follow-up. Prophylactic aspirin use was not associated with incident acute CHD, HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.86, 1.29). Modeling had little impact on the HR (1.09 {95% CI 0.89, 1.33) nor did the addition of risk factors (HR 1.00 {95% CI 0.81, 1.23). Aspirin use was not associated with incident CHD for any Framingham risk level. Findings were similar when including all aspirin users (not just those taking aspirin prophylactically), and when examining associations with all-cause mortality. There was no excess hospitalized bleeding in the aspirin users. Conclusion Aspirin was not associated with lower risk for incident acute CHD overall, or within race, gender, or Framingham Risk Score. PMID:26413491

  4. Crystal structure and electronic properties of two nimesulide derivatives: A combined X-ray powder diffraction and quantum mechanical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Abir; Ghosh, Soumen; Kankanala, Kavitha; Reddy, Vangala Ranga; Mukkanti, Khagga; Pal, Sarbani; Mukherjee, Alok K.

    2010-06-01

    Crystal structures of two nimesulide derivatives, C 13H 14O 3N 2S ( 2) and C 21H 16O 5N 2S ( 3), have been determined from X-ray powder diffraction data and their electronic structures were calculated at the DFT level. The optimized molecular geometries of 2 and 3 correspond closely to that obtained from the crystallographic analysis. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds and π… π stacking interactions form supramolecular assembly in both compounds. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap (>2.2 eV) indicates a high kinetic stability of both compounds. Although the compound 2 does not exhibit any anti-inflammatory activity, 3 can induce 34% edema inhibition in rat paws.

  5. Radiochromium (chromium-51) evaluation of gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; LeBel, E.

    1987-10-30

    Gastrointestinal blood loss is one of the most serious clinical events induced by drugs. To date, almost no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug has been shown to be devoid of that side effect in a strictly controlled study. The objective of this study was to assess quantitatively, by use of radioactive chromium (chromium-51)-labeled red blood cells, gastrointestinal blood loss associated with nabumetone (1000 mg daily), aspirin (3.6 g daily), and placebo. A total of 37 normal subjects, divided among the three treatment groups and a fourth group that received no treatment, were assessed clinically and quantitatively for gastrointestinal blood loss over a period of 28 days of active treatment. The results with chromium-51, analyzed on a logarithmic scale, revealed no statistically significant differences between the nabumetone, placebo, and control groups. Gastrointestinal blood loss in the aspirin group, however, was elevated when compared with all other groups at a high level of statistical significance (p less than 0.001). It is concluded that, under conditions in which aspirin causes substantial gastrointestinal microbleeding, nabumetone is not significantly different from placebo.

  6. Reduction of indium-111 platelet deposition on Dacron vascular grafts in humans by aspirin plus dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ritchie, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    Aspirin plus dipyridamole reduces platelet accumulation on short-term Dacron vascular grafts in man. To determine whether drug inhibition of platelet deposition is sustained on older grafts, we studied 18 men aged 41 to 87 years who had Dacron aortic bifurcation grafts in place a mean of 43.4 months (range 9.8 to 121.0) before and during short-term therapy with aspirin (325 mg tid) plus dipyridamole (75 mg tid). During both the baseline and drug studies, indium-111 (/sup 111/In) platelet deposition was quantitated by two techniques, standard planar imaging performed at 24, 48, and 72 hr after injection of platelets and single photon emission computed tomographic imaging performed at 24 and 72 hr after injection. All analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. On both the planar and tomographic images, platelet accumulation on the graft was quantitated by a graft/blood ratio that compared activity in the graft to simultaneously collected whole blood /sup 111/In platelet activity. Aspirin plus dipyridamole reduced the tomographic graft/blood ratio at 24 hr (20.6 +/- 3.5 vs 17.3 +/- 2.5) (+/-SEM) and at 72 hr (29.0 +/- 4.8 vs 25.0 +/- 4.1) after injection of platelets (p = .02). Dacron vascular grafts. Similarly, the planar graft/blood ratio was reduced at 24 hr (2.7 +/- 0.5 vs 2.4 +/- 0.5), 48 hr (3.7 +/- 0.9 vs 3.1 +/- 0.7), and 72 hr (4.0 +/- 0.9 vs 3.6 +/- 0.8) (p = .04). We conclude that aspirin (325 mg tid) plus dipyridamole (75 mg tid) reduces platelet accumulation on long-term Dacron vascular grafts.

  7. Aspirin absorption rates and platelet inhibition times with 325-mg buffered aspirin tablets (chewed or swallowed intact) and with buffered aspirin solution.

    PubMed

    Feldman, M; Cryer, B

    1999-08-15

    Large clinical trials such as the second International Study of Infarct Survival routinely gave patients with myocardial infarction a chewed aspirin, yet there are no data to show whether chewing of aspirin is better, or worse, than swallowing a whole tablet. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled study to determine whether chewing aspirin or administering it in solution accelerates its absorption and antiplatelet activity. On separate days, 12 fasting volunteers ingested 325 mg of buffered aspirin, either by chewing a tablet for 30 seconds before swallowing it with 4 ounces of water, swallowing a whole tablet with 4 ounces of water, or drinking 4 ounces of Alka Seltzer. Frequent blood samples were obtained for serum aspirin, salicylate, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) concentrations. With all formulations of aspirin, serum TxB2 decreased 50% when the plasma aspirin concentration reached approximately 1,000 ng/ml. A 50% and 90% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred more quickly after chewing a tablet than after a tablet was swallowed whole. For example, the t 50% for serum TxB2 inhibition was 5.0 +/- 0.6 minutes with the chewed tablet versus 12.0 +/- 2.3 minutes when the tablet was swallowed (p = 0.01). A 50% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred 7.6 +/- 1.2 minutes after Alka Seltzer solution (p = 0.04 vs chewing a tablet; p = 0.13 vs swallowing a whole tablet). Chewing an aspirin tablet is the most effective way of accelerating absorption of aspirin into the blood and shortening the time required for an antiplatelet effect. PMID:10468077

  8. COX-2, aspirin and metabolism of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids and their physiological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Poorani, R; Bhatt, Anant N; Dwarakanath, B S; Das, Undurti N

    2016-08-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are vital for normal growth and development and physiological function of various tissues in humans. PUFAs have immunomodulatory actions in addition to their ability to modulate inflammation, vascular reactivity, neurotransmission and stem cell biology. PUFAs and their metabolites possess both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties that underlie their actions and involvement in several diseases. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), possesses both cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory action and enhances the production of anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 {(called as epi-lipoxin A4, aspirin-triggered lipoxins (ATLs))}. In addition, at low doses aspirin may not interfere with the production of prostacyclin (PGI2). Both lipoxin A4 and PGI2 have vasodilator, platelet anti-aggregator and anti-inflammatory actions that may underlie the beneficial actions of aspirin. Paradoxically, other NSAIDs may not have the same actions as that of aspirin on PUFA metabolism. Similar anti-inflammatory compounds are formed from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) by the action of aspirin termed as resolvins (from EPA and DHA) and protectins and maresins from DHA. PUFAs: arachidonic acid (AA), EPA and DHA and their various products modulate not only inflammation and immune response but also possess actions on various genes, nuclear factors, cyclic AMP and GMP, G-protein coupled receptors (GPRs), hypothalamic neurotransmitters, hormones, cytokines and enzymes, and interact with nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide to regulate their formation and action and to form new compounds that have several biological actions. These pleiotropic actions of PUFAs and their metabolites may explain their ability to play a role in several physiological actions and diseases. The big challenge is to harness these actions to prevent and manage clinical conditions. PMID:26335394

  9. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. PMID:26201059

  10. Aspirin Risks in Perspective: A Comparison against Marathon Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has public health potential to reduce the risk of ischaemic vascular events and sporadic cancer. One objection to the wider use of aspirin for primary prevention, however, is the undesirable effects of the medicine, which include increasing risk of bleeding and haemorrhagic stroke. Marathons also carry risks of serious events such as…

  11. Pathogenetic role of cyclooxygenase-2 in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome: therapeutic use of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Nüsing, R M; Reinalter, S C; Peters, M; Kömhoff, M; Seyberth, H W

    2001-10-01

    Patients with hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome typically have renal salt wasting, hypercalciuria with nephrocalcinosis, and secondary hyperaldosteronism. Antenatally, these patients have fetal polyuria, leading to polyhydramnios and premature birth. Hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome is accompanied by a pathologically elevated synthesis of prostaglandin E(2), thought to be responsible for aggravation of clinical symptoms such as salt and water loss, vomiting, diarrhea, and failure to thrive. In this study administration of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) specific inhibitor nimesulide to patients with hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome blocked renal prostaglandin E(2) formation and relieved the key parameters hyperprostaglandinuria, secondary hyperaldosteronism, and hypercalciuria. Partial suppression of serum thromboxane B(2) synthesis resulting from platelet COX-1 activity and complete inhibition of urinary 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha), reflecting endothelial COX-2 activity, indicate preferential inhibition of COX-2 by nimesulide. Amelioration of the clinical symptoms by use of nimesulide indicates that COX-2 may play an important pathogenetic role in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome. Moreover, on the basis of our data we postulate that COX-2-derived prostaglandin E(2) is an important mediator for stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the kidney. PMID:11673754

  12. The mechanism of aspirin reactions in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Alan; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Sohlberg, Karl; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2001-03-01

    We report first-principles (density functional theory) calculations of possible reaction pathways for the break-up of aspirin that leads to pain relief in the human body. An aspirin molecule consists of an acetyl group attached to a salicylate. Upon entering a membrane protein known as COX, the aspirin molecule is pulled apart. The acetyl group of the aspirin molecule attaches to SER-530, a serine residue that is located near the entrance of the COX protein channel. The resulting acetyl-serine residue effectively forms a gate within the COX channel blocking certain fatty acids from reaching the protein active site where they are converted into prostaglandins, the molecules that are responsible for the sensation of pain. An important new finding is that the aspirin molecule undergoes a transformation prior to breaking up.

  13. Willow species and aspirin: different mechanism of actions.

    PubMed

    Vlachojannis, J; Magora, F; Chrubasik, S

    2011-07-01

    Many believe that willow is the natural source of aspirin. However, willow species contain only a low quantity of the prodrug salicin which is metabolized during absorption into various salicylate derivatives. If calculated as salicylic acid, the daily salicin dose is insufficient to produce analgesia. Salicylic acid concentrations following an analgesic dose of aspirin are an order of magnitude higher. Flavonoids and polyphenols contribute to the potent willow bark analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect. The multi-component active principle of willow bark provides a broader mechanism of action than aspirin and is devoid of serious adverse events. In contrast to synthetic aspirin, willow bark does not damage the gastrointestinal mucosa. An extract dose with 240 mg salicin had no major impact on blood clotting. In patients with known aspirin allergy willow bark products are contraindicated. PMID:21226125

  14. Aspirin decreases platelet uptake on Dacron vascular grafts in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, W.C.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.; Keough, E.M.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; McCullough, J.L.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Melaragno, A.; Valeri, C.R.; Weiblen, B.

    1984-07-01

    The influence of a single dose of aspirin (5.4-7.4 mg/kg) on platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron interposition grafts was studied in a baboon model using gamma camera scanning for 111-Indium labeled platelets. In vitro assessment of platelet function after aspirin administration revealed that in the baboon, as in the human, aspirin abolished arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation, prolonged the lag time between exposure to collagen and aggregation, and decreased plasma thromboxane B2 levels. Aspirin also prolonged the template bleeding time. Scans for 111-Indium labeled platelets revealed that pretreatment with a single dose of aspirin decreased platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron carotid interposition grafts. This decrease in platelet uptake was associated with a significant improvement in 2-hour graft patency and with a trend toward improved 2-week patency.

  15. Aspirin: a history, a love story.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2012-05-01

    Most pharmacists know that aspirin's origins lie with willow bark, but they may be unaware of its role in the development of the pharmaceutical industry. Evolving from salacin (the active ingredient in many plant remedies) to salicylic acid (an analgesic in its own right) to the more effective, less toxic acetylsalicylic acid, this pain reliever cornered the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory market for more than 70 years. It helped the dye industry branch into pharmaceuticals, and is now used in multiple indications. PMID:22591976

  16. Comparison of Three Aspirin Formulations in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nordt, Sean Patrick; Clark, Richard F; Castillo, Edward M; Guss, David A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) includes the administration of aspirin. Current guidelines recommend chewing aspirin tablets to increase absorption. While this is intuitive, there are scant data supporting this recommendation. The purpose of this study is to assess which of 3 different aspirin formulations is most rapidly absorbed after ingestion. Methods A prospective, open-label, 3-way crossover volunteer study at a tertiary university medical center with human subjects 18 years or older. Fasted subjects were randomly assigned to receive aspirin 1,950 mg as (1) solid aspirin tablets swallowed whole, (2) solid aspirin tablet chewed then swallowed, or (3) a chewable aspirin formulation chewed and swallowed. Serum salicylate measurements were obtained over a period of 180 minutes. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined. Results Thirteen males and 1 female completed all 3 arms of study. Peak serum salicylate concentrations were seen at 180 minutes in all groups. Mean peaks were 10.4, 11.3, and 12.2 mg/dL in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Mean area under the time concentration was 1,153, 1,401, and 1,743 mg-min/dL in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. No measurable salicylate concentrations were seen in 6 subjects in group 1 at 60 minutes as compared to 1 subject in group 2. All subjects in group 3 had measurable levels at 45 minutes. There were no adverse effects in any of the subjects during the study period. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that the chewable aspirin formulation achieved the most rapid rate of absorption. In addition, the chewable formulation absorption was more complete than the other formulations at 180 minutes. These data suggest that in the treatment of ACS, a chewable aspirin formulation may be preferable to solid tablet aspirin, either chewed or swallowed. PMID:22224124

  17. Modulation of carcinogen metabolism by nitric oxide-aspirin 2 is associated with suppression of DNA damage and DNA adduct formation.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Christopher J; Cheng, Robert Y S; Roberts, David D; Wink, David A; Yeh, Grace Chao

    2009-08-14

    Nitric oxide (NO)-donating non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) represent a promising new class of drugs developed to provide a safer alternative than their conventional NSAID counterparts in chemoprevention. We tested the effects of NO-aspirin 2 on Phase I and Phase II carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes. In HepG2 human hepatoma cells and in LS180 colonic adenocarcinoma cells, NO-aspirin 2 inhibited 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity and CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNA expression. These effects were further characterized as being mediated through transcriptional regulation: NO-aspirin 2 inhibited binding of ligand (TCDD)-activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor to the CYP1A1 enhancer sequence; additionally, NO-aspirin 2 suppressed carcinogen-induced expression of CYP1A heterogeneous nuclear RNA. The fate of carcinogen metabolites depends not only on activation by CYP enzymes but also detoxification by Phase II enzymes. Both HepG2 and LS180 cells treated with NO-aspirin 2 showed an increase in glutathione S-transferase-P1 (GST-P1), glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) expression. Compared with two other NO-releasing compounds, diethylenetriamine-NO and the organic nitrate, isosorbide dinitrate, the inhibitory effects of NO-aspirin 2 on TCDD-induced CYP activity and mRNA expression were considerably more potent. Furthermore, aspirin alone had no inhibitory effect on TCDD-induced CYP activity, nor did aspirin up-regulate GCL, GST-P1, or NQO1 expression. Consequent to the effects on carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes, NO-aspirin 2 inhibited [3H]benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct formation and DNA damage elicited by TCDD or benzo[a]pyrene. Our results demonstrate that NO-aspirin 2 may be an effective chemopreventive agent by favorably affecting the inhibitory and enhancing effects of Phase I and Phase II carcinogen metabolism, thereby protecting DNA from carcinogenic insult. PMID:19542225

  18. Drug therapy reviews: antirheumatic agents.

    PubMed

    Evens, R P

    1979-05-01

    The pathophysiology, symptoms and drug treatment of rheumatic disease are reviewed. Antirheumatic drugs reviewed are salicylates (including aspirin, sodium salicylate, choline salicylate, choline magnesium salicylate, salsalate), phenylpropionic acid derivatives (fenoprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen), indole derivatives (sulindac, tolmetin and indomethacin), pyrazolone derivatives (phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone), gold compounds, penicillamine, antimalarials mefenamic acid, corticosteroids and immunosuppressives. Simple analgesic therapy (acetaminophen, aspirin, propoxyphene) is used in the early stage of the disease. As the disease progresses, aspirin remains the drug of choice for antiinflammatory activity but the phenylpropionic acid or indole derivatives may be preferred in patients unable to tolerate salicylates. If such nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents are not effective, parenteral therapy with gold compounds or oral penicillamine usually is indicated. Indomethacin or phenylbutazone, then antimalarials, are resorted to next. Corticosteroids or immunosuppressives are reserved for patients who are unsuccessfully controlled or who have major side effects with the other drugs. Mefenamic acid occupies a very secondary place in rheumatoid arthritis treatment. PMID:377958

  19. Combination of Praziquantel and Aspirin Minimizes Liver Pathology of Hamster Opisthorchis viverrini Infection Associated Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sudsarn, Pakkayanee; Boonmars, Thidarut; Ruangjirachuporn, Wipaporn; Namwat, Nisana; Loilome, Watcharin; Sriraj, Pranee; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Nadchanan, Wonkchalee; Jiraporn, Songsri

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis is one of the major risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in northeastern Thailand. An effective drug for killing this parasite is praziquantel. Recently, several reports have shown that with frequent use, praziquantel may itself be a CCA risk and can cause liver cell damage from an immunopathological response after parasite death. Aspirin has many properties including anti-inflammation and anti-cancer. Therefore, we use of aspirin (As) and praziquantel (Pz) to improve hepatobiliary system function in hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) and or administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (ND). Livers of OVNDAsPz, appeared healthy macroscopically, suggesting slow progression of cholangiocarcinoma evident by extent of fibrosis and bile duct cell proliferation was less than OVND although aggregations of inflammatory cells remained. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), and cancer antigen (CA19-9) staining were strongly positive in OVND, but were only slight in OVNDAs. Moreover, OVNDAsPz, appeared a few inflammatory infiltrations, bile duct proliferation, fibrosis and CCA area than the OVNDAs group. Thirty seven point five percent of hamster in this group could not develop CCA. These findings suggest that using aspirin combination with praziquantel treatment can improve the hepatobiliary system after O. viverrini infection and reduce the risk of CCA. PMID:26277607

  20. Probing Vitamine C, Aspirin and Paracetamol in the Gas Phase: High Resolution Rotational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, S.; Cabezas, C.; Varela, M.; Pena, I.; Nino, A.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2011-06-01

    A solid sample of Vitamin C (m.p. 190°C) vaporized by laser ablation has been investigated in gas phase and characterized through their rotational spectra. Two spectroscopy techniques has been used to obtain the spectra: a new design of broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with in-phase/quadrature-phase-modulation passage-acquired-coherence technique (IMPACT) and conventional laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW). Up to now, two low-energy conformer have been observed and their rotational constants determined. Ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G (d,p) level of theory predicted rotational constants which helped us to identify these conformers unequivocally. Among the molecules to benefit from the LA-MB-FTMW technique there are common important drugs never observed in the gas phase through rotational spectroscopy. We present here the results on acetyl salicylic acid and acetaminophen (m.p. 136°C), commonly known as aspirin and paracetamol respectively. We have observed two stable conformers of aspirin and two for paracetamol. The internal rotation barrier of the methyl group in aspirin has been determined for both conformers from the analysis of the A-E splittings due to the coupling of internal and overall rotation. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  1. Platelets in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.; Boyce, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized clinically by the triad of asthma, nasal polyposis, and pathognomonic respiratory reactions after ingestion of aspirin. It is a distinct syndrome associated with eosinophilic infiltration of respiratory tissues and excessive production of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Despite the consistent clinical phenotype of the respiratory disease, the underlying pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear. In addition to their role in hemostasis, platelets have the capacity to influence the activation state and function of other immune cells during inflammation, and to facilitate granulocyte recruitment into the tissues. Platelets also possess a repertoire of potent pre-formed mediators of inflammation that are released upon activation, and are a rich source of newly-synthesized lipid mediators that alter vascular permeability and smooth muscle tone. Accordingly, the activity of platelets has been linked to diverse inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Both human and animal studies strongly suggest that platelet activity is uniquely associated with the pathophysiology of AERD. This article summarizes the evidence supporting an effector role for platelets in asthma in general and in AERD in particular, and considers the potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26051947

  2. Clinical Risk Factors for Gastroduodenal Ulcer in Romanian Low-Dose Aspirin Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Valeriu; Bataga, Simona; Pantea, Monica; Sarkany, Kinga; Tatar, Cristina; Mocan, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aspirin use for cardiovascular or cancer prevention is limited due to its gastrointestinal side effects. Objective. Our prospective, observational case-control study aims to identify the predictive factors for ulcers in low-dose aspirin consumers (75–325 mg/day). Methods. The study included patients who underwent an upper digestive endoscopy and took low-dose aspirin treatment. Results. We recruited 51 patients with ulcer (ulcer group) and 108 patients with no mucosal lesions (control group). In univariate analysis, factors significantly associated with ulcers were male gender (p = 0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.029), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (p = 0.013), heart failure (p = 0.007), liver (p = 0.011) or cerebrovascular disease (p = 0.004), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.043), ulcer history (p = 0.044), and alcohol consumption (p = 0.018), but not Helicobacter pylori infection (p = 0.2). According to our multivariate regression analysis results, history of peptic ulcer (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.06–8.86), cotreatment with NSAIDs (OR 8, 95% CI 2.09–30.58) or anticoagulants (OR 4.85, 95% CI 1.33–17.68), male gender (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.77–15.34), and stroke (OR 7.27, 95% CI 1.40–37.74) remained predictors for ulcer on endoscopy. Conclusions. Concomitant use of NSAIDs or anticoagulants, comorbidities (cerebrovascular disease), and male gender are the most important independent risk factors for ulcer on endoscopy in low-dose aspirin consumers, in a population with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. PMID:27579036

  3. Role of Aspirin and Dexamethasone against Experimentally Induced Depression in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shailendra; Shukla, Priyanka; Raval, Jibril; Goswami, Sunita

    2016-07-01

    A large number of current studies indicate that inflammatory mediators may contribute to depression in experimental models as well as in human beings. Nevertheless, the subject, whether anti-inflammatory treatments can prevent depression still remains controversial. In the present study, a chronic mild stress (CMS) model of male Sprague Dawley rats was used to investigate the role of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of depression. All the animals in different groups, except the normal control group, were exposed to CMS procedure for 28 days and concurrently treated with aspirin (10 mg/kg, p.o.), dexamethasone (1 mg/kg p.o.) and amitriptyline (10 mg/kg p.o., reference standard), respectively. Amitriptyline was also used in combination with aspirin and dexamethasone to inspect any synergistic effects. Tests performed towards the end of the study included sucrose preference test, behavioural tests like forced swim test, elevated plus-maze, light/dark box, locomotor activity and biochemical estimations like serum cortisol and brain neurotransmitters. Disease control group (CMS-treated) produced significant depressive behaviour in rats. The animals treated with aspirin showed increased sucrose preference, decreased immobility time in forced swim test, decreased serum cortisol and increased brain serotonin levels signifying antidepressant action. In contrast, there was aggravation of depressive behaviour in rats treated with dexamethasone. Together, these findings suggest that aspirin can serve as a potential antidepressant both individually and as adjunctive agent in the treatment of depression. Inhibition of the inflammatory mediators during stress procedures or any other potential physiological and biochemical mechanisms may be involved in its antidepressant effect. PMID:26645736

  4. Clinical Risk Factors for Gastroduodenal Ulcer in Romanian Low-Dose Aspirin Consumers.

    PubMed

    Negovan, Anca; Iancu, Mihaela; Moldovan, Valeriu; Voidazan, Septimiu; Bataga, Simona; Pantea, Monica; Sarkany, Kinga; Tatar, Cristina; Mocan, Simona; Banescu, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aspirin use for cardiovascular or cancer prevention is limited due to its gastrointestinal side effects. Objective. Our prospective, observational case-control study aims to identify the predictive factors for ulcers in low-dose aspirin consumers (75-325 mg/day). Methods. The study included patients who underwent an upper digestive endoscopy and took low-dose aspirin treatment. Results. We recruited 51 patients with ulcer (ulcer group) and 108 patients with no mucosal lesions (control group). In univariate analysis, factors significantly associated with ulcers were male gender (p = 0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.029), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (p = 0.013), heart failure (p = 0.007), liver (p = 0.011) or cerebrovascular disease (p = 0.004), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.043), ulcer history (p = 0.044), and alcohol consumption (p = 0.018), but not Helicobacter pylori infection (p = 0.2). According to our multivariate regression analysis results, history of peptic ulcer (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.06-8.86), cotreatment with NSAIDs (OR 8, 95% CI 2.09-30.58) or anticoagulants (OR 4.85, 95% CI 1.33-17.68), male gender (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.77-15.34), and stroke (OR 7.27, 95% CI 1.40-37.74) remained predictors for ulcer on endoscopy. Conclusions. Concomitant use of NSAIDs or anticoagulants, comorbidities (cerebrovascular disease), and male gender are the most important independent risk factors for ulcer on endoscopy in low-dose aspirin consumers, in a population with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. PMID:27579036

  5. Implications of Altered Glutathione Metabolism in Aspirin-Induced Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH)-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), prior to ASA treatment, cytotoxicity of the drug is augmented. On the other hand, when GSH-depleted cells were treated with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), cytotoxicity/apoptosis caused by ASA was attenuated with a significant recovery in oxidative stress, GSH homeostasis, DNA fragmentation and some of the mitochondrial functions. NAC treatment, however, had no significant effects on the drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity and ATP synthesis in GSH-depleted cells. Our results have confirmed that aspirin increases apoptosis by increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory functions. These effects were further amplified when GSH-depleted cells were treated with ASA. We have also shown that some of the effects of aspirin might be associated with reduced GSH homeostasis, as treatment of cells with NAC attenuated the effects of BSO and aspirin. Our results strongly suggest that GSH dependent redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells is critical in preserving mitochondrial functions and preventing oxidative stress associated complications caused by aspirin treatment. PMID:22558435

  6. Aspirin therapy and thromboxane biosynthesis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Ingrid; Chung, Cecilia P; Oeser, Annette; Milne, Ginger L; Borntrager, Holly; Morrow, Jason D; Raggi, Paolo; Solus, Joseph; Stein, C Michael

    2007-01-01

    Incomplete suppression of thromboxane biosynthesis during aspirin therapy is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Since systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with platelet activation and increased cardiovascular mortality, we compared thromboxane and prostacyclin biosynthesis in patients with SLE and control subjects, and measured inhibition of thromboxane excretion in aspirin-treated subjects. We measured the urinary excretion of 11-dehydro thromboxane B( 2) (TXB(2)) and 2,3-dinor 6-ketoPGF(1alpha) (PGI-M), the stable metabolites of thromboxane A(2) and prostacyclin, respectively, in 74 patients with SLE and 70 controls. In subjects who were not receiving aspirin, TXB(2) excretion was higher in patients with SLE [0.40 ng/mg creatinine (0.26-0.64), median (interquartile range)] than controls [0.31 ng/mg creatinine (0.23-0.44)] (P = 0.04), and in these patients, TXB(2) excretion correlated with disease activity (rho = 0.28, P = 0.03) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (rho = 0.48, P < 0.001). Aspirin therapy resulted in significantly lower TXB(2) excretion in controls (P = 0.01), but not in patients with SLE (P = 0.10), compared with subjects not receiving aspirin. Prostacyclin biosynthesis did not differ among patients and controls, and was not affected by aspirin (P all >0.35). Thromboxane biosynthesis is increased in SLE and is associated with disease activity. Additionally, response to aspirin may be attenuated in some patients with SLE. PMID:18042592

  7. The postulated mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on the aspirin induced gastric ulcer: Histological and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Salah Khalil, Mahmoud

    2015-07-01

    There are many available drugs for treating gastric ulcer, but they have various side effects. Ginger is a folk, herbal medicine, which is used for treatment of various diseases including gastric ulcer. This study investigates the possible mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on aspirin induced gastric ulcer. Forty adult male albino rats were randomized into four groups (10 animal per each group) and orally received the followings once daily for 5 days: Group I: 3 ml of 1% carboxymethyl cellulose; Group II: ginger powder (200 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 mL of 1% carboxymethylcellulose; Group III: aspirin (400 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 ml of 1% carboxymethylcellulose in water. Group IV: ginger and 30 minutes later, received aspirin suspended in 1% carboxymethylcellulose, in similar doses as received in groups II and III. On day 6, rats were sacrificed. The animals were anesthetized and the stomach was removed for the macroscopic, histological (Haematoxylin & Eosin and Periodic Acid Shiff) and immunohistochemical investigations (Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase and heat shock protein 70). Aspirin induced a significant increase of the macroscopic ulcer score, shed and disrupted epithelium, mucosal hemorrhage, submucosal edema and leukocyte infiltration, loss of the mucus of the mucosal surface significantly increased expression of apoptosis regulator Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Ginger ameliorated the histological changes by reducing Bax and iNOS and increasing HSP70 expressions. PMID:25652595

  8. Dose- and time-dependent antiplatelet effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Perneby, Christina; Wallén, N Håkan; Rooney, Cathy; Fitzgerald, Desmond; Hjemdahl, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Aspirin is widely used, but dosages in different clinical situations and the possible importance of "aspirin resistance" are debated. We performed an open cross-over study comparing no treatment (baseline) with three aspirin dosage regimens--37.5 mg/day for 10 days, 320 mg/day for 7 days, and, finally, a single 640 mg dose (cumulative dose 960 mg)--in 15 healthy male volunteers. Platelet aggregability was assessed in whole blood (WB) and platelet rich plasma (PRP). The urinary excretions of stable thromboxane (TxM) and prostacyclin (PGI-M) metabolites, and bleeding time were also measured. Platelet COX inhibition was nearly complete already at 37.5 mg aspirin daily, as evidenced by >98% suppression of serum thromboxane B2 and almost abolished arachidonic acid (AA) induced aggregation in PRP 2-6 h after dosing. Bleeding time was similarly prolonged by all dosages of aspirin. Once daily dosing was associated with considerable recovery of AA induced platelet aggregation in WB after 24 hours, even after 960 mg aspirin. Collagen induced aggregation in WB with normal extracellular calcium levels (hirudin anticoagulated) was inhibited <40% at all dosages. TxM excretion was incompletely suppressed, and increased <24 hours after the cumulative 960 mg dose. Aspirin treatment reduced PGI-M already at the lowest dosage (by approximately 25%), but PGI-M excretion and platelet aggregability were not correlated. Antiplatelet effects of aspirin are limited in WB with normal calcium levels. Since recovery of COX-dependent platelet aggregation occurred within 24 hours, once daily dosing of aspirin might be insufficient in patients with increased platelet turnover. PMID:16601836

  9. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Kathleen M; Laidlaw, Tanya M

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  10. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  11. [Oral exposure testing in non-aspirin-induced analgesic intolerance].

    PubMed

    Wiedow, O; Brasch, J; Christophers, E

    1996-12-01

    Although intolerance reaction to analgesics are not uncommon, there is still a lack of standardized procedures to diagnose the problem. We retrospectively analyzed results of scratch tests as well as oral challenges with analgesics in order to evaluate risk and diagnostic relevance of these procedures. In 1987-1992 a total of 650 patients with supposed intolerance to drugs were tested by oral challenge. Among them were 98 patients with a positive history of intolerance to non-aspirin analgesics. In 56 patients the intolerance could be verified by oral challenge. In order of decreasing frequency, the most likely agents were propyphenazone, diclofenac, metamizole, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, indomethacin, phenazone (antipyrine), and paracetamol (acteaminophen). Oral provocation showed clear dose-response relationships. For propyphenazone, the half-effective provocation dose was the same for all symptoms (cutaneous, nasal, bronchial, anaphylactoid). Scratch testing was not of diagnostic significance. Standardized test protocols starting with low dose oral challenges are suitable and helpful in minimizing the risk of severe side effects. PMID:9081936

  12. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation. PMID:27055402

  13. A nimesulide derivative with potential anti-inflammatory activity: Synthesis, X-ray powder structure analysis and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Abir; Kankanala, Kavitha; Pal, Sarbani; Mukherjee, Alok K.

    2010-06-01

    A nimesulide derivative, N-[4-(2,5-dioxo-2,5-dihydropyrrol-1-yl)-2-phenoxyphenyl]methanesulfonamide ( 2), was synthesized and its crystal structure has been determined from X-ray powder diffraction data following direct-space global optimization technique and refined by the Rietveld method. The molecular geometry and electronic structure of the title compound were calculated at the DFT level using the hybrid exchange-correlation functional, BLYP. The optimized molecular geometry of 2 corresponds closely to that obtained from the X-ray structure analysis. Intermolecular N-H···O and C-H···O hydrogen bonds in 2 form one-dimensional polymeric chains of R22(8) rings propagating along the [1 0 0] direction. Further linking between parallel chains via C-H···π (arene) hydrogen bonds generates a two-dimensional supramolecular assembly in the (1 1 0) plane. The title compound exhibits potential anti-inflammatory activity and can induce 64% edema inhibition in rat paws.

  14. Calculations of aspirin reaction mechanisms in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Alan; Sohlberg, Karl; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    1999-11-01

    We report quantum mechanical calculations of possible reaction pathways for the breakup of aspirin that lead to pain relief in the human body. Animations of the reactions will be shown. An aspirin molecule consists of an acetyl group attached to a salicylate. Upon entering a membrane protein known as COX, the aspirin molecule is pulled apart. The acetyl group of the aspirin molecule attaches to SER-530, a serine residue that is located near the entrance of the COX protein channel. The resulting acetyl-serine residue effectively forms a gate within the COX channel blocking certain fatty acids from reaching the protein active site where the fatty acids are converted into prostaglandins, the molecules that are responsible for inflammation and the sensation of pain.

  15. Low-Dose Aspirin Tied to Longer Colon Cancer Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... used aspirin were 15 percent less likely to die of the disease over the next several years. ... diagnosis: They were 23 percent less likely to die of colon cancer -- and 14 percent less likely ...

  16. Aspirin use and survival after coronary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W D; Kayser, K L; Hartz, A J; Saedi, S F

    1992-03-01

    From Jan. 1, 1968, through Dec. 31, 1981, 5618 patients in a single cardiovascular surgery practice underwent coronary bypass surgery. Detailed clinical information was obtained during hospitalization and entered into a data base. All surviving patients were surveyed for aspirin use four times: in 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987. A subgroup of 2395 patients gave consistent answers on every returned survey. The group that answered consistently "yes" had a 5-year survival rate of 79%; those who answered consistently "no" had a 5-year survival rate of 67%. Stepwise logistic regression showed that, after adjusting for patient characteristics, the relative risk of death was 58% (confidence interval 47% to 70%) for consistent aspirin users compared with consistent non-aspirin users. This study provides evidence that regular aspirin use after bypass surgery may enhance survival. PMID:1539511

  17. [Family study of patients with aspirin intolerance and rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    May, A; Wagner, D; Langenbeck, U; Weber, A

    2000-09-01

    The high prevalence of aspirin intolerance in asthmatics and patients with nasal polyps as well as reports of familial clustering suggest a genetic disposition of this disease. Our study aimed at obtaining further evidence of hereditary factors in this disease. We included 33 unselected patients from 28 families with aspirin intolerance and rhinosinusitis in this study. Controls were recruited from individuals treated in our ENT clinic for diseases other than aspirin intolerance (n = 52). A questionnaire focused on family histories as well as reports on diseases of the upper respiratory tract or allergies. ASS intolerance was verified either by bronchial or nasal provocation tests. We found cases of aspirin intolerance among parents, siblings, and children of ASS intolerant probands. The children of probands had nasal polyps and rhinosinusitis more often than the children of controls. We propose that ASS intolerance with nasal polyps and asthma represents a complex phenotype, with genetic and environmental factors contributing to its manifestation. PMID:11056852

  18. Effects of Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy on Thermoregulation in Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    McEntire, Serina J.; Reis, Steven E.; Suman, Oscar E.; Hostler, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart attack is the most common cause of line-of-duty death in the fire service. Daily aspirin therapy is a preventative measure used to reduce the morbidity of heart attacks but may decrease the ability to dissipate heat by reducing skin blood flow. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, firefighters were randomized to receive 14 days of therapy (81-mg aspirin or placebo) before performing treadmill exercise in thermal-protective clothing in a hot room [38.8 ± 2.1°C, 24.9 ± 9.1% relative humidity (RH)]. Three weeks without therapy was provided before crossing to the other arm. Firefighters completed a baseline skin blood-flow assessment via laser Doppler flowmetry; skin was heated to 44°C to achieve maximal cutaneous vasodilation. Skin blood flow was measured before and after exercise in a hot room, and at 0 minutes, 10 minutes, 20 minutes, and 30 minutes of recovery under temperature conditions (25.3 ± 1.2°C, 40.3 ± 13.7% RH). Platelet clotting time was assessed before drug administration, and before and after exercise. Results Fifteen firefighters completed the study. Aspirin increased clotting time before and after exercise compared with placebo (p = 0.003). There were no differences in absolute skin blood flow between groups (p = 0.35). Following exercise, cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was 85 ± 42% of maximum in the aspirin and 76 ± 37% in the placebo groups. The percentage of maximal CVC did not differ by treatment before or after recovery. Neither maximal core body temperature nor heart rate responses to exercise differed between trials. Conclusion There were no differences in skin blood flow during uncompensable heat stress following exercise after aspirin or placebo therapy. PMID:26929836

  19. An Efficient Microscale Procedure for the Synthesis of Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandita, Sangeeta; Goyal, Samta

    1998-06-01

    The synthesis of aspirin is a part of many undergraduate organic synthesis labs and is frequently used in qualitative organic analysis laboratory for the identification of salicylic acid. We have found that aspirin can be synthesized on microscale by a simple and efficient procedure that eliminates the heating step employed in literature procedures and gives a pure, ferric-negative product (no purple color with alcoholic ferric chloride solution).

  20. Small bowel injury in low-dose aspirin users.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroki; Sakai, Eiji; Kato, Takayuki; Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is well known to be associated with an increased risk of serious upper gastrointestinal complications, such as peptic ulceration and bleeding. Until recently, attention was mainly focused on aspirin-induced damage of the stomach and duodenum. However, recently, there has been growing interest among gastroenterologists on the adverse effects of aspirin on the small bowel, especially as new endoscopic techniques, such as capsule endoscopy (CE) and balloon-assisted endoscopy, have become available for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Preliminary CE studies conducted in healthy subjects have shown that short-term administration of LDA can induce mild mucosal inflammation of the small bowel. Furthermore, chronic use of LDA results in a variety of lesions in the small bowel, including multiple petechiae, loss of villi, erosions, and round, irregular, or punched-out ulcers. Some patients develop circumferential ulcers with stricture. In addition, to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal lesions in LDA users, it is important for clinicians to confirm the differences in the gastrointestinal toxicity between different types of aspirin formulations in clinical use. Some studies suggest that enteric-coated aspirin may be more injurious to the small bowel mucosa than buffered aspirin. The ideal treatment for small bowel injury in patients taking LDA would be withdrawal of aspirin, however, LDA is used as an antiplatelet agent in the majority of patients, and its withdrawal could increase the risk of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. Thus, novel means for the treatment of aspirin-induced enteropathy are urgently needed. PMID:25501289

  1. Bleeding after tooth extraction in patients taking aspirin and clopidogrel (Plavix®) compared with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Ghahrody, Mohsen; Yousefi-Malekshah, Seyed Hamid; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Yazdanpanah, Hamid; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Yavarahmadi, Mohammadhosein

    2016-06-01

    The risk of perioperative bleeding is high in patients who take aspirin and clopidogrel after a percutaneous coronary intervention, and whether to stop the drugs is a matter of concern for dentists. The aim of this study was to answer the specific question: should aspirin and clopidogrel bisulphate (Plavix®) be discontinued during a conventional forceps extraction? We studied 64 patients during the first year after percutaneous insertion of coronary stents who were taking aspirin (ASA) 80mg and clopidogrel (Plavix(®)) 75mg, and 50 healthy patients who were to have a conventional forceps extraction at this polyclinic in 2013-2014 and acted as controls. Clinical details (underlying diseases; number of roots; type of tooth; type of haemostasis; and bleeding immediately, 30minutes, and 48hours after intervention) were compared. We evaluated 114 patients with the mean (range) age of 56 (43-76) years, and there were no significant differences in demographic data, underlying diseases, type of tooth, number of roots, and dose of anaesthetic between the groups. There were also no significant differences in the number of bleeds immediately and 30minutes after intervention (P=0.310 and 0.205). The time that the last dose of aspirin had been taken correlated with 30-minute haemostasis (20 compared with 12hours, p=0.037). During the 48hours after the intervention, there were no uncontrolled bleeds or emergency referrals. We conclude that using aspirin and Plavix® simultaneously has no considerable effect on the risk of bleeding in patients having conventional forceps extraction of a single tooth. PMID:26975576

  2. Novel Resveratrol-Based Aspirin Prodrugs: Synthesis, Metabolism, and Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Fu, Junsheng; Shurlknight, Kelly L; Soroka, Dominique N; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-08-27

    Regular aspirin use has been convincingly shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, long-term use of aspirin leads to gastrotoxicity. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel class of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs to simultaneously release aspirin and resveratrol to attenuate the side effects caused by aspirin. Prodrug RAH exerted enhanced anticancer activities which are better than a physical mixture of aspirin and resveratrol as well as each individually. Metabolism of RAH in mice showed that the majority of RAH is decomposed to release resveratrol and aspirin or salicylic acid either in the intestine or after absorption. Mechanistic studies demonstrate RAH inhibits cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclins and induces apoptosis by activation of caspase-3 in cancer cells. These findings highlighted the improved anticancer properties of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs. RAH may represent novel and safe alternatives of aspirin for the purpose of daily use in the future. PMID:26204233

  3. Rationale and design of a Phase II clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: ASA-STAT

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Bagiella, Emilia; Shimbo, Daichi; Lederer, David J.; Al-Naamani, Nadine; Roberts, Kari E.; Barr, R. Graham; Post, Wendy; Horn, Evelyn; Tracy, Russell; Hassoun, Paul; Girgis, Reda

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease which causes exercise limitation, heart failure, and death. Aspirin and simvastatin are highly effective and safe therapies for other cardiovascular diseases characterized by platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction, but have not been formally studied in PAH. Methods ASA-STAT is a Phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 2 × 2 factorial clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin in patients with PAH. A total of 92 subjects were to be randomized to aspirin or aspirin placebo and simvastatin or simvastatin placebo. The primary outcome is the distance walked in six minutes at six months after randomization. Secondary measures include brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, circulating biomarkers of platelet and endothelial function, functional class, quality-of-life, and time to clinical end points. The incidence of adverse events will be compared between treatment groups. Screening and Enrollment We screened a total of 712 individuals with PAH. Sixty-five subjects were enrolled when the trial was terminated for futility in reaching the primary end point for simvastatin. Conclusions This study aims to determine whether aspirin or simvastatin have beneficial biologic or clinical effects in patients with PAH. The safety and side effects of these commonly prescribed cardiovascular drugs will also be assessed. PMID:21146637

  4. Low-dose aspirin as treatment for central serous chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Caccavale, Antonio; Romanazzi, Filippo; Imparato, Manuela; Negri, Angelo; Morano, Anna; Ferentini, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin for the treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Patients and methods: Patients with classical or multifocal CSCR were treated with aspirin 100 mg per day orally for 1 month followed by 100 mg on alternate days for 5 months. Treated patients were compared with historic controls consisting of patients with classical or multifocal CSCR previously followed up at our institution. Results: Mean visual acuity in the group treated with aspirin started to improve after the first week of therapy and continued to improve throughout the following 3 months. Visual recovery was slower in the untreated control group than in the treated group and achieved better visual acuity between the first and third month from the onset of the disease. There were no adverse events related to the administration of aspirin. Conclusion: The results indicate that treatment with low-dose aspirin may result in more rapid visual rehabilitation with fewer recurrences in patient with CSCR compared with untreated historic controls. The effectiveness of treatment with aspirin supports our hypothesis regarding the role of impaired fibrinolysis and increased platelet aggregation in the choriocapillaris in the pathogenesis of CSCR. PMID:20714368

  5. [Platelets, atherothrombosis, antiplatelet drugs and cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2013-02-01

    Platelets play a much more important role in myocardial ischemia than in cerebral ischemia, because atherothrombosis - the underlying cause of the vast majority of myocardial infarcts - is responsible for only 25-30% of cerebral infarcts. Aspirin is the only effective antiplatelet drug for primary prevention of ischemic events, especially those affecting the heart. For secondary prevention of cerebral infarction, clopidogrel and the combination of aspirin with extended-release dipyridamole are both marginally better than aspirin alone, but aspirin remains the gold standard worldwide because of its remarkable cost/benefit/tolerability ratio. The clopidogrel-aspirin combination is to be avoided because of the risk of hemorrhage, particularly in the brain and gastrointestinal tract. Revascularization strategies and the choice of antiplatelet drugs for the acute phase of myocardial and cerebral ischemia are very different, consisting of endovascular treatment and aggressive platelet inhibition for coronary infarcts, versus intravenous thrombolysis and / or aspirin for cerebral infarcts. None of the new antiplatelet drugs used in acute coronary syndromes has so far been studied in acute cerebral ischemia. PMID:24919368

  6. Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, Here Is What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, What You Should Know Share Tweet ... use of aspirin will help to prevent a heart attack or stroke in your particular case. Aspirin can ...

  7. The Effect of Xuefuzhuyu Oral Liquid on Aspirin Resistance and Its Association with rs5911, rs5787, and rs3842788 Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Yang, Lin; Kou, Na; Miao, Yu; Wang, Mingming; Zhao, Quanli; Ren, Junhua; Zhang, Shaoyan; Shi, Dazhuo; Chen, Keji

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin should be continued indefinitely in patients after interventional therapy, but 10% to 40% of patients experience recurrent vascular events despite adequate aspirin therapy, a condition known as aspirin resistance (AR). Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid, derived from the classic recipe Xuefuzhuyu decoction, has been well documented to inhibit platelet aggregation and to improve hemorheology. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid on AR in patients with chronic stable angina after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and the possible genetic markers related to the drug response. 43 patients diagnosed as having aspirin resistance or semi-resistance were randomly divided into control and treatment groups after screening 207 stable CHD patients. Platelet aggregation rate was determined using turbidimetry. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms in COX-1 (rs5787, rs3842788) and GP IIb (rs5911) were genotyped in whole blood samples using ABI PRISM 7900 HT Fast Real-Time instrument and ABI PRISM 3730 DNA Sequencer. The results showed that Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid could effectively improve blood stasis syndrome and AR by inhibiting ADP-induced platelet aggregation and that patients with the rs5911 genetic variant exhibited better drug response upon treatment with Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid, which suggests Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid as a new possible drug for the prevention of AR. PMID:26495016

  8. Inhaled lysine-aspirin as a bronchoprovocation procedure in aspirin-sensitive asthma: its repeatability, absence of a late-phase reaction, and the role of histamine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D; Foord, R; Holgate, S T

    1989-08-01

    Inhalation of an aerosolized solution of lysine-aspirin has previously been described as a safer technique than oral challenge with aspirin for the diagnosis of aspirin-sensitive asthma. We describe a modification of this method that involves inhalation of serially doubling incremental concentrations of lysine-aspirin by a standardized technique and allows construction of concentration-response curves. In 11 subjects with asthma, mean (SEM) age 48.2 (2.9) years, the geometric mean (range) provocation concentrations of histamine and lysine-aspirin required to produce a 20% decrease in FEV1 from baseline were 0.6 (0.04 to 3.2) and 48.3 (15.5 to 219) mg/ml, respectively. No relationship was found between these values. In seven of nine subjects investigated on two consecutive occasions, bronchoconstriction with lysine-aspirin was repeatable to within a single doubling concentration difference. Bronchoconstriction provoked by lysine-aspirin was more rapid than with oral aspirin and was not followed by any late asthmatic reaction or increase in nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness. In six subjects, premedication with the selective H1 histamine-receptor antagonist, terfenadine, had no significant effect on bronchoconstriction provoked by inhaled lysine-aspirin, indicating little role for release of histamine in the response. We conclude that inhalation of lysine-aspirin may be used as a bronchoprovocation procedure for the diagnosis and investigation of aspirin-sensitive asthma. PMID:2503553

  9. Antioxidative effect of aspirin on vascular function of aged ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Buket; Demir, Omer; Dost, Turhan; Birincioglu, Mustafa

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the vascular effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the very late stage of postmenopausal vascular aging and looked for a better choice of anti-inflammatory drug for women in reducing the cardiovascular risk by decreasing the oxidant status in this term. The rat aorta isolated from young and old rats that were treated with either aspirin (10 mg/kg/day) or indomethacin (INDO, 1 mg/kg/day) within last 10 weeks after 16-month overiectomy (OVX) follow-up. Endothelium-dependant acetylcholine (Ach, 0.001-30 μM) and independent sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 0.0001-3 μM) relaxant; α-receptor phenylephrine (PE, 0.001-30 μM) and voltage-dependant high potassium (KCl; 40 mM) contractile responses were assessed. Total oxidant and antioxidant status were measured from the serum samples. Aged OVX rat's both aortic endothelium and smooth muscle relaxation were significantly less than of younger ones, whereas their contractile functions tended to decrease. INDO did not treat the Ach, SNP responses, whereas it increased the PE and KCl contractility. Aspirin improved the relaxation function and antioxidant capacity and decreased the oxidant status. These data demonstrate that even if they are in the very late stage of life and menopause, the analgesic choices could restore the well established endothelial dysfunction, vascular stiffness, and oxidant status. PMID:23872923

  10. Histopathological evaluation of gastro protective effect of Berberis vulgaris (Zereshk) seeds against aspirin induced ulcer in albino mice.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Wafa; Aslam, Bilal; Javed, Ijaz; Khaliq, Tanweer; Muhammad, Faqir; Ali, Asghar; Raza, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the antiulcer activity of Berberis vulgaris (Zereshk) seeds in albino mice. After acclimatization, animals were divided into six equal groups. Aspirin 150 mg/kg was used to induce gastric ulcer in all groups except normal control. Omeprazole 20mg/kg was used as synthetic anti ulcer drug in study. Three dose levels of B. vulgaris seed powder 300 mg/kg, 600 mg/kg and 900 mg/kg were used respectively orally. Histopathological analysis was carried out to evaluate the gastroprotective activity of B. vulgaris seed powder. Results of the study showed that in case of aspirin treated mice gastric luminal mucosa villi were decreased in height or were absent. In the glandular region there was connective tissue proliferation and also infiltration of cells. Similar infiltration of cells was present on muscularis mucosa. In esophageal region tumor cells were present. However three dose levels of B. vulgaris significantly reduced the tissue proliferation, infiltration of cells and sloughing induced by aspirin. Highest dose of B. vulgaris (900 mg/kg) showed similar results as synthetic antiulcer drug omeprazole. PMID:26639472

  11. Aspirin resistance: a clinical review focused on the most common cause, noncompliance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Kenneth A

    2011-04-01

    Aspirin is an inexpensive, readily available medication that reduces the risk of subsequent vascular disease by about 25% in patients with known occlusive vascular disease. Aspirin's beneficial effect is mediated via inhibition of arachidonic acid (AA) activation of platelets and is detected by demonstrating a decrease in platelet function and/or a decrease in prostaglandin metabolites. Patients who are assumed to be taking their aspirin, but who do not demonstrate an aspirin effect are labeled as, "aspirin resistant." This is an unfortunate designation as the vast majority of patients labeled as "aspirin resistant" are noncompliant. Noncompliance is demonstrated in multiple studies that use repeat testing for platelet inhibition in patients with an initial inadequate response to aspirin. When the test is repeated under condition where ingestion of the test aspirin is assured, the patients' platelets are inhibited. Instead of using the term "aspirin resistance," this review will use "inadequate response to aspirin." Patients with an inadequate aspirin response have an increased likelihood for subsequent vascular events. Detection and treatment of an inadequate aspirin response would be facilitated by the development of a bedside assay that uses whole blood, is technically simple, inexpensive, sensitive, specific, reproducible, and provides an answer in a few minutes. Future research in patients with an inadequate response to aspirin should focus on mechanisms to improve compliance, which should decrease their risk of future vascular events. PMID:23983843

  12. The effect of aspirin nanoemulsion on TNFα and iNOS in gastric tissue in comparison with conventional aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fatma Abd Elhalim; Hashem, Khalid S; Hussein Elkelawy, Asmaa Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    Background No dose of aspirin is free of bleeding risk. Even at a dose as low as 75 mg/day, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is twice as high as among nonusers. Nanoemulsions (NEs) are emulsion systems with droplet size in nanometer scale in which oil or water droplets are finely dispersed in the opposite phase with the help of a suitable surfactant to stabilize the system. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin NE in comparison to conventional aspirin. Materials and methods A total of 24 male rats were used in the study and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given saline. Group 2 was given blank NE 1.5 mL/kg orally. Group 3 was given aspirin 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Group 4 was given aspirin NE 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Rats were killed, and gastric tissue was quickly excised after dissection of the animals. The tissues were divided into three pieces. The first one was kept in formalin 10% for pathological investigation. The second piece was kept in liquid nitrogen for molecular investigation. The third piece was homogenized in ten volumes of ice-cold phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7) using a Teflon homogenizer until a uniform suspension was obtained. The homogenate was centrifuged at 4,000 rpm for 30 minutes at 4°C to separate the supernatant from cellular debris. The supernatant was then used for the estimation of biochemical assays. Results The present study shows that aspirin has a toxic effect on the stomach as a result of inducing marked oxidative damage and the release of reactive oxygen species. This was shown by the significant increase in TNFα, iNOS, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels, and also a significant decrease in glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. In the aspirin-treated group compared to the control group, the NE had a protective effect on the stomach and caused less injury than

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, crystallographic studies and antibacterial assays of new copper(II) complexes with sulfathiazole and nimesulide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Julia Helena Bormio; de Paiva, Raphael Enoque Ferraz; Cuin, Alexandre; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria; Lustri, Wilton Rogério; Corbi, Pedro Paulo

    2016-05-01

    New ternary copper(II) complexes of sulfathiazole (SFT, C9H8N3O2S2) or nimesulide (NMS, C13H11N2O5S) and 2,2‧-bipyridine (bipy) were synthesized, and characterized by chemical and spectroscopic techniques. Elemental analyses indicated a 2:1:1 sulfonamide/copper/bipy composition for both complexes. Mass spectrometric measurements permitted identifying the molecular ions [Cu(SFT)2(bipy)+H]+ and [Cu(NMS)2(bipy)+H]+ at m/z 728 and 835, respectively, confirming the proposed compositions. Crystal structure of the [Cu(SFT)2(bipy)] complex was solved by powder X-ray diffraction analysis (PXRD), attesting that the Cu(II) ion is hexacoordinated in a distorted octahedral geometry. Each SFT molecule coordinates to the metal ion by the nitrogen atoms of the SO2-N group and of the heterocyclic ring. The coordination sphere is completed by a bipyridine. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were carried out for the [Cu(NMS)2(bipy)] complex, indicating a tetragonal environment around the metal ion. It was suggested that NMS coordinates to Cu(II) by the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the SO2-N group, which was confirmed by infrared spectroscopic studies. Biological studies showed the antibacterial activity of both Cu-SFT and Cu-NMS complexes, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.10 to 0.84 mmol L-1 against Gram-negative bacteria for [Cu(SFT)2(bipy)], and from 1.50 to 3.00 mmol L-1 against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria for [Cu(NMS)2(bipy)].

  14. In vivo and in vitro metabolism of aspirin eugenol ester in dog by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Youming; Liu, Xiwang; Yang, Yajun; Li, Jianyong; Ma, Ning; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) is a promising drug candidate for treatment of inflammation, pain and fever and prevention of cardiovascular diseases with fewer side effects than its precursor, aspirin. Investigation into its metabolic process in target animal species will help to illustrate its mechanism of action and to establish its residual mark compound to formulate its dosage. Six beagle dogs were orally given a dose of 20 mg kg(-1) of AEE and one dog was used to prepare blank liver microsomes. Their liver microsomes were prepared for in vitro study and their plasma and urine were collected for in vivo metabolic analysis using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. In this study we identified 10 metabolites, M1, M2, M3, M4, M5 in phase I and M6, M7, M8, M9, M10 in phase II. Based on the metabolites of AEE, the pathways of AEE metabolism in dog were demonstrated. PMID:24935248

  15. Building a better aspirin: gaseous solutions to a century-old problem

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, J L

    2007-01-01

    The gastrointestinal adverse effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been recognized since shortly after the introduction of aspirin to the marketplace over a century ago. However, the underlying pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastropathy remains incompletely understood. Advances in understanding some of the factors that contribute to the mucosal injury have provided clues for the development of safer NSAIDs. The inhibitory effects of nitric oxide (NO) on NSAID-induced leukocyte adherence were exploited in the development of NO-releasing NSAIDs. As well as eliciting less gastrointestinal damage than conventional NSAIDs, these drugs do not elevate blood pressure and show anti-inflammatory effects, additional to those of the parent drugs. Modification of other drugs in a similar manner (i.e., NO-releasing derivatives) has similarly resulted in more effective drugs. More recently, hydrogen sulphide-releasing derivatives of NSAIDs and of other drugs, have been developed, based on the observed ability of H2S to reduce inflammation and pain in experimental models. H2S-releasing NSAIDs produce negligible gastric damage and exhibit enhanced anti-inflammatory potency as compared to the parent drugs. The NO-NSAIDs and H2S-releasing NSAIDs represent examples of new anti-inflammatory drugs with greatly reduced toxicity and improved therapeutic activity, both created through the concept of exploiting the beneficial effects of endogenous gaseous mediators. PMID:17641669

  16. Aspirin and probenecid inhibit organic anion transporter 3-mediated renal uptake of cilostazol and probenecid induces metabolism of cilostazol in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Cang, Jian; Sun, Huijun; Peng, Jinyong; Ma, Xiaochi; Huo, Xiaokui; Liu, Kexin

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the transporter-mediated renal excretion mechanism for cilostazol and to characterize the mechanism of drug-drug interaction (DDI) between cilostazol and aspirin or probenecid. Concentrations of cilostazol and its metabolites OPC-13015 [6-[4-(1-cyclohexyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl)butoxy]-2(1H)-quinolinone] and OPC-13213 [3,4-dihydro-6-[4-[1-(trans-4-hydroxycyclohexyl)-1H-tetrazol-5-yl]butoxy]-2-(1H)-quinolinone] in rat biologic or cell samples were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Coadministration with probenecid, benzylpenicillin, or aspirin decreased the cumulative urinary excretion of cilostazol and renal clearance. Concentrations of cilostazol and OPC-13213 in plasma decreased, and the concentration of OPC-13015 increased in the presence of probenecid. By contrast, rat plasma cilostazol, in combination with benzylpenicillin or aspirin, sharply increased, and concentrations of OPC-13015 and OPC-13213 did not change. In urine, OPC-13015 was below the level of detection. The cumulative urinary excretion of OPC-13213 decreased in the presence of probenecid, benzylpenicillin, or aspirin. Cilostazol was distributed in the kidney and liver, with tissue to plasma partition coefficient (Kp) values of 8.4 ml/g and 16.3 ml/g, respectively. Probenecid and aspirin reduced cilostazol distribution in the kidney. Probenecid did not affect cilostazol metabolism in the kidney but increased cilostazol metabolism in the liver, and aspirin had no effect on cilostazol metabolism. Benzylpenicillin, aspirin, and cyclo-trans-4-l-hydroxyprolyl-l-serine (JBP485) reduced cilostazol uptake in kidney slices and human organic anion transporter 3 (hOAT3)-human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, whereas p-aminohippuric acid did not. Compared with the vector, hOAT3-HEK293 cells accumulated more cilostazol, whereas hOAT1-HEK293 cells did not. OAT3 and Oat3 play a major role in cilostazol renal excretion, whereas OAT1 and Oat1 do not. Oat3 and Cyp

  17. Preventive Effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on Thrombosis in κ-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Xi-Wang; Yang, Ya-Jun; Li, Jian-Yong; Mohamed, Isam; Liu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the prodrug principle, aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) was synthesized, which can reduce the side effects of aspirin and eugenol. As a good candidate for new antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory medicine, it is essential to evaluate its preventive effect on thrombosis. Preventive effect of AEE was investigated in κ-carrageenan-induced rat tail thrombosis model. AEE suspension liquids were prepared in 0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na). AEE was administrated at the dosage of 18, 36 and 72 mg/kg. Aspirin (20 mg/kg), eugenol (18 mg/kg) and 0.5% CMC-Na (30 mg/kg) were used as control drug. In order to compare the effects between AEE and its precursor, integration of aspirin and eugenol group (molar ratio 1:1) was also designed in the experiment. After drugs were administrated intragastrically for seven days, each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg BW κ-carrageen dissolved in physiological saline to induce thrombosis. The length of tail-thrombosis was measured at 24 and 48 hours. The blank group just was given physiological saline for seven days without κ-carrageenan administrated. The results indicated that AEE significantly not only reduced the average length of thrombus, PT values and FIB concentration, but also reduced the red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT). The effects of AEE on platelet aggregation and anticoagulant in vitro showed that AEE could inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation as dose-dependence but no notable effect on blood clotting. From these results, it was concluded that AEE possessed positive effect on thrombosis prevention in vivo through the reduction of FIB, PLT, inhibition of platelet aggregation and the change of TT and PT values. PMID:26193677

  18. Preventive Effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on Thrombosis in κ-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Xi-Wang; Yang, Ya-Jun; Li, Jian-Yong; Mohamed, Isam; Liu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the prodrug principle, aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) was synthesized, which can reduce the side effects of aspirin and eugenol. As a good candidate for new antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory medicine, it is essential to evaluate its preventive effect on thrombosis. Preventive effect of AEE was investigated in κ-carrageenan-induced rat tail thrombosis model. AEE suspension liquids were prepared in 0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na). AEE was administrated at the dosage of 18, 36 and 72 mg/kg. Aspirin (20 mg/kg), eugenol (18 mg/kg) and 0.5% CMC-Na (30 mg/kg) were used as control drug. In order to compare the effects between AEE and its precursor, integration of aspirin and eugenol group (molar ratio 1:1) was also designed in the experiment. After drugs were administrated intragastrically for seven days, each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg BW κ-carrageen dissolved in physiological saline to induce thrombosis. The length of tail-thrombosis was measured at 24 and 48 hours. The blank group just was given physiological saline for seven days without κ-carrageenan administrated. The results indicated that AEE significantly not only reduced the average length of thrombus, PT values and FIB concentration, but also reduced the red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT). The effects of AEE on platelet aggregation and anticoagulant in vitro showed that AEE could inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation as dose-dependence but no notable effect on blood clotting. From these results, it was concluded that AEE possessed positive effect on thrombosis prevention in vivo through the reduction of FIB, PLT, inhibition of platelet aggregation and the change of TT and PT values. PMID:26193677

  19. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  20. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  1. Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158240.html Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer Guideline applies ... of heart disease should take a low-dose aspirin each day to reduce their risk of both ...

  2. Aspirin Prevents Colorectal Cancer by Normalizing EGFR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haitao; Zhu, Feng; Boardman, Lisa A.; Wang, Lei; Oi, Naomi; Liu, Kangdong; Li, Xiang; Fu, Yang; Limburg, Paul J.; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin intake reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the molecular underpinnings remain elusive. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in about 80% of CRC cases, is implicated in the etiology of CRC. Here, we investigated whether aspirin can prevent CRC by normalizing EGFR expression. Methods Immunohistochemistry staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections from normal colon mucosa, adenomatous polyps from FAP patients who were classified as regular aspirin users or nonusers. The interplay between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and EGFR was studied in primary intestinal epithelial cells isolated from ApcMin mice, immortalized normal human colon epithelial cells (HCECs) as well as murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Results Immunohistochemistry staining results established that EGFR overexpression is an early event in colorectal tumorigenesis, which can be greatly attenuated by regular use of aspirin. Importantly, EGFR and COX-2 were co-overexpressed and co-localized with each other in FAP patients. Further mechanistic studies revealed that COX-2 overexpression triggers the activation of the c-Jun-dependent transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), which binds to the Egfr promoter. Binding facilitates the cellular accumulation of EGFR and lowers the threshold required for pre-neoplastic cells to undergo transformation. Conclusion Aspirin might exert its chemopreventive activity against CRC, at least partially, by normalizing EGFR expression in gastrointestinal precancerous lesions. PMID:26097892

  3. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C; Voelker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer's clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:26247959

  4. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C.; Voelker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer’s clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:26247959

  5. Aspirin Suppresses the Acquisition of Chemoresistance in Breast Cancer by Disrupting an NFκB-IL6 Signaling Axis Responsible for the Generation of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shilpi; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Khan, Poulami; Kajal, Kirti; Mazumdar, Minakshi; Manna, Argha; Mukherjee, Sanhita; De, Sunanda; Jana, Debarshi; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Das, Tanya

    2016-04-01

    Acquired chemoresistance has curtailed cancer survival since the dawn of chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests a major role for cancer stem cells (CSC) in chemoresistance, although their involvement in acquired resistance is still unknown. The use of aspirin has been associated with reduced cancer risk and recurrence, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory drug may exert effects on CSCs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of CSCs to acquired chemoresistance of breast cancer and the avenues for reversing such effects with aspirin. We observed that the residual risk of recurrence was higher in breast cancer patients who had acquired chemoresistance. Treatment of preexisting CSCs with a genotoxic drug combination (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide) generated an NFκB-IL6-dependent inflammatory environment that imparted stemness to nonstem cancer cells, induced multidrug resistance, and enhanced the migration potential of CSCs. Treatment with aspirin prior to chemotherapy suppressed the acquisition of chemoresistance by perturbing the nuclear translocation of NFκB in preexisting CSCs. Therefore, disruptions to the NFκB-IL6 feedback loop prevented CSC induction and sensitized preexisting CSCs to chemotherapy. Collectively, our findings suggest that combining aspirin and conventional chemotherapy may offer a new treatment strategy to improve recurrence-free survival of breast cancer patients. Cancer Res; 76(7); 2000-12. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26842876

  6. Aspirin use for the prevention of cardiovascular disease: the British Women's Heart and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, D A; Bedford, C; Taylor, M; Ebrahim, S

    2001-09-01

    Low dose aspirin is effective, safe, and economical in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. We have found that only one-third of post-menopausal women with cardiovascular disease are using aspirin and that the majority of women who are using aspirin are doing so for primary prevention. Improvements in this area of medical practice are both necessary and feasible. PMID:11593836

  7. Effect of aspirin cessation before endoscopy in Japanese patients with low-dose-aspirin-associated gastroduodenal mucosal injury

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoshitsugu; Noguchi, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Sumiharu; Okaniwa, Noriko; Tanabe, Atsushi; Noda, Hisatsugu; Yanamoto, Kenichiro; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Masui, Ryuta; Izawa, Shinya; Iida, Akihito; Mizuno, Mari; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Funaki, Yasushi; Kasugai, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of upper gastrointestinal injury by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has increased. Objective We aimed to clarify the risk factors and prevention strategies associated with LDA-induced gastroduodenal ulcer in Japanese patients. Methods A retrospective study involving 284 LDA users who underwent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy between January and December 2010 were included. We investigated the patients’ clinical characteristics and endoscopic findings. Results Of 284 patients, 29 (10.2%) had gastro and/or duodenal ulcers. Male gender, peptic ulcer history, abdominal symptoms, half-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), complete-dose PPIs, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with LDA-induced gastro and/or duodenal ulcers: odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 3.62 (1.06–12.27), 6.60 (1.84–23.62), 3.06 (1.12–8.40), 0.16 (0.03–0.94), 0.07 (0.01–0.61), and 9.68 (1.64–57.18), respectively. PPI significantly reduced gastric ulcers and/or duodenal ulcers (p = 0.03). The modified Lanza score for gastric mucosal lesion in the LDA cessation group was significantly lower than in the LDA noncessation group (0.53 vs. 1.02; p = 0.008). Conclusions Half-dose PPIs as well as complete-dose PPIs were effective for preventing LDA-induced gastric and/or duodenal ulcers. The cessation of LDA before endoscopy may lead to an underestimation of LDA-induced gastric injury. PMID:24917970

  8. Effervescent metoclopramide and aspirin (Migravess) versus effervescent aspirin or placebo for migraine attacks: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Olesen, J

    1984-06-01

    Aspirin 650 mg and metoclopramide 10 mg in an effervescent preparation (Migravess) were compared with effervescent aspirin 650 mg (Alka-Seltzer) and placebo for common migraine attacks with a double-blind cross-over design. One hundred and eighteen patients with common migraine were entered. Eighty-five patients completed all three forms of treatment, eleven completed two, and six completed one. Medicine was taken when patients were sure they had a migraine attack and not just interval headache. After each form of treatment, they mailed a report form to the investigators. Additional medication was allowed after 2 h and was taken for 79/95 placebo treated attacks, 63/92 Migravess treated attacks, and 51/86 aspirin treated attacks (p less than 0.01). Aspirin was significantly better than placebo for pain but not quite significant for nausea. Migravess was significantly better than placebo for pain and for nausea. There was no significant difference between aspirin and Migravess with regard to analgesic effectiveness (p = 0.33) or to antinausea effect (p = 0.18). PMID:6375873

  9. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  10. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  11. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  12. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  13. Risk and preventive factors of low-dose aspirin-induced gastroduodenal injuries: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Akiko; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Sakakibara, Takashi; Haruma, Ken

    2012-04-01

    The risk of peptic ulcer complications, particularly bleeding, is increased in association with the use of low-dose aspirin (LDA). Risk factors for upper gastrointestinal (GI) ulcer or bleeding among LDA users include a history of prior GI events, older age, chronic renal failure, combined antithrombotic therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Helicobacter pylori and aspirin seem to be independent risk factors for peptic ulcer and bleeding. The studies report conflicting findings about the effect of H. pylori infection on NSAID-related ulcers, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) seem to be superior to eradication only to prevent recurrent ulcer bleeding with LDA. Previous studies indicate that hypoacidity related to corpus atrophy, as well as taking PPIs and co-treatment with angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) and statins seem to reduce peptic ulcer among LDA users. In addition, the interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-511 T allele and angiotensinogen (AGT)-20 CC, which work as the high-producer allele of IL-1β and AGT, are significantly associated with ulcer or ulcer bleeding. The SLCO1B1*1b haplotype, which has the highest transport activity, may diminish the preventive effect of statins or ARBs. The data are still lacking and further prospective studies are needed to identify the specific risk or protective factors for upper GI ulcer and its complications associated with LDA. PMID:22486865

  14. Therapeutic potential of choline magnesium trisalicylate as an alternative to aspirin for patients with bleeding tendencies.

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; Saniabadi, A R; Russell, R I; Lowe, G D

    1987-12-01

    We have compared the effects of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) and choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a non-acetylated salicylate product, on platelet aggregation in human whole blood ex-vivo. Using a whole blood platelet counter, platelet aggregation was quantified by measuring the fall in the number of single platelets at peak aggregation in response to collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), as well as spontaneous aggregation. In double blind and random order, 12 healthy volunteers received, on two separate occasions 10 days apart, a single oral dose of 652 mg ASA or 655 mg CMT. Despite a comparable absorption of salicylic acid from the two drugs, ingestion of ASA resulted in a marked inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by collagen (p less than 0.005), AA (p less than 0.01) and spontaneous aggregation (p less than 0.01), whereas such effects were not observed after CMT ingestion. We suggest that CMT may have therapeutic potential as an alternative to aspirin when inhibition of platelet aggregation can induce bleeding complications. PMID:3329766

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) to lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and 15-epi-LXA₄. However, it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE₂, TXB₂ and leukotriene B₄ (LTB₄) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE₂, but increased LTB₄, LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE₂, and TXB₂. The increments in LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE₂ and TXB₂ suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  16. [Melatonin production in thrombocytes and their functional activity in patients with aspirin asthma].

    PubMed

    Evsiukova, E V; Muraia, E V; Zubzhitskaia, L B; Kveshnoĭ, I M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study melatonin production in thrombocytes and their functional activity in correlation with 6-sulfatoximelatonin (6-SOM) urinary excretion in patients with aspirin-induced bronchial asthma (AIBA). Forty-three patients with bronchial asthma (BA) were examined. The main group consisted of 26 AIBA patients; the comparison group consisted of 17 BA patients with no intolerance to aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; 30 practically healthy individuals constituted the control group. The study found no melatonin production in thrombocytes of AIBA patients: only 13.0 +/- 1.3% of platelets expressed melatonin, while in healthy people 97.7 +/- 0.6% of the cells did. Besides, daytime urinary excretion of 6-SOM, the main melatonin metabolite, was lower in AIBA patients. Lower daytime and higher nighttime melatonin production in AIBA patients correlated with the acceleration of the 1st phase and increased intensity of thrombocyte aggregation, which evidences high thrombocyte reactivity to the inducing agent. The presence of a pathologic reaction of thrombocytes to exogenous melatonin, manifesting by changes in the 1st stage of aggregation, suggests the presence of pathology in thrombocyte membrane-receptor complex and the calcium homeostasis of the cell, which determines constant activation and the participation of thrombocytes in the development of asthmatic syndrome. PMID:18154178

  17. The Role of Aspirin, Vitamin D, Exercise, Diet, Statins, and Metformin in the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Amikar; O'Neil, Bert H

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a worldwide health problem leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Several strategies based on either lifestyle modifications or pharmacological interventions have been developed in an attempt to reduce the risk of CRC. In this review article, we discuss these interventions including aspirin (and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), vitamin D, exercise, diet, statins, and metformin. Depending upon the risk of developing CRC, the current evidence supports the beneficial role of aspirin, vitamin D, diet, and exercise especially in high-risk individuals (advanced adenoma or CRC). However, even with these established interventions, there are significant knowledge gaps such as doses of aspirin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D are not well established. Similarly, there is no convincing data from randomized controlled trials that a high fiber diet or a low animal fat diet reduces the risk of CRC. Some potential interventions, such as statins and metformin, do not have convincing data for clinical use even in high-risk individuals. However, these may have emerging roles in the prevention and treatment of CRC. Greater understanding of molecular mechanisms and the application of genomic tools to risk stratify an individual and tailor the interventions based on that individual's risk will help further advance the field. Some of this work is already underway and is a focus of this article. PMID:26187794

  18. Modulation of alpha-interferon's antiviral and clinical effects by aspirin, acetaminophen, and prednisone in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, C W; Petty, B G; Woods, A; Kuwahara, S K; Witter, F R; Soo, W; Griffin, D E; Lietman, P S

    1995-10-01

    The magnitude and duration of the antiviral and clinical effect of alpha-interferon was measured in healthy volunteers. A single 3 million unit intramuscular dose of interferon was given either alone (controls) or after 72 h of concomitant medications. These medications included either aspirin (650 mg every 4 h), acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 h), or prednisone (40 mg per day). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed for resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection and induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity as evidence of interferon's antiviral effect. Co-administration of acetaminophen increased both antiviral parameters by more than 70% (P < 0.05) and reduced symptoms after interferon dosing, compared to controls. Aspirin and prednisone did not demonstrate any significant differences from controls in antiviral effect. As a group, acetaminophen, aspirin, and prednisone reduced the clinical symptoms by 47% compared to controls (P = 0.03) after interferon dosing, although individual drug comparisons failed to reach statistical significance. Independent of treatment group, the changes in antiviral markers after interferon dosing correlated closely with each other (r = 0.72, P < 0.001), but neither correlated with symptoms or fever (r < 0.30, P > 0.05). Acetaminophen enhances the antiviral effects of a single intramuscular dose of alpha-interferon, considering the parameters measured in these healthy volunteers. PMID:8585766

  19. The effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug choline magnesium trisalicylate on gastric mucosal cell exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, K G; Hearns, J; Crean, G P

    1984-01-01

    Gastric mucosal cell exfoliation was measured in 10 normal subjects taking choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), aspirin and placebo. Both drugs resulted in significantly elevated rates of exfoliation although the serum salicylate levels achieved with aspirin were lower than those achieved by CMT. Side-effects of tinnitus, nausea and increased faecal blood loss were more common while subjects were taking CMT. PMID:6691886

  20. Can Aspirin Reduce the Risk of Endometrial Cancer?: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongyu; Bai, Bei; Xi, Yuzhi; Zhao, Yuqian

    2016-07-01

    Current evidences suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can reduce the risk of several types of cancer, including breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. However, evidences regarding the chemopreventive effect of aspirin to endometrial cancer are inconsistent. Therefore, we aimed to further explore the association. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Scopus to identify potentially eligible studies. After title/abstract screening and full-text review, we identified 7 cohort studies and 6 case-control studies. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed independently, and a random-effects model was used for data synthesis. Subgroup analysis was conducted based on obesity, hormone replacement therapy use, and cancer subtype; sensitivity analysis was conducted by pooling risk ratios of the highest dosage or longest duration of use. Dose-response relationship was assessed by a 2-stage linear dose-response model. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by the I value and a χ test for the Cochrane Q statistic. In overall meta-analysis, the pooled risk ratio was 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.99), and no substantial statistical heterogeneity was observed (I = 0.0%, P = 0.550). In subgroup analysis, a negative association was observed for obese women and type I endometrial cancer. Higher dosage or frequency of aspirin use was significantly associated with a reduced risk, and long-term aspirin use was protective only for obese women. In conclusion, our study suggests that the use of aspirin can reduce the risk of endometrial cancer, particularly for obese women. However, the generalizability of our conclusion should be further studied for premenopausal women and type II endometrial cancer. PMID:27177285

  1. Endothelial dysfunction in young healthy men is associated with aspirin resistance.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Janus, Agnieszka; Jakubowski, Maciej; Turek, Aleksandra; Ilnicka, Paulina; Szuba, Andrzej; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between endothelial dysfunction and aspirin response in a young healthy population (102 men aged 18-40). Initial concentrations of the NO pathway metabolites (ADMA, l-arginine, SDMA), cardiovascular risk markers, oxidative stress markers (MDA, thiol index), sICAM1, sVCAM1, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sP-selectin, VEGF, thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF1α and arachidonate-induced platelet aggregation (to separate aspirin resistant from sensitive group) were measured. Flow-mediated-vasodilation (FMD) was measured before and after intravenous infusion of 16.0 g of l-arginine. Measurements were repeated following aspirin administration (75 mg/24 h) for 4 days. Both groups were homogenous regarding demographic and biochemical characteristics reflecting cardiovascular risk. Aspirin resistant subjects were characterized by lower baseline FMD and higher FMD following aspirin and l-arginine treatment, as compared to aspirin sensitive control. MDA and nitrotyrosine were greater, whereas thiol index was lower in aspirin resistant men. The sICAM1, sVCAM1, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sP-selectin and VEGF levels were similar in the analyzed groups. Thromboxane in aspirin resistant subjects was greater both at baseline and following aspirin therapy. However, a significant decrease following aspirin treatment was present in both groups. Aspirin resistance in young men is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which could be due to oxidative stress resulting from lipid peroxidation. PMID:25697550

  2. Preparation and analysis of deuterium-labeled aspirin: application to pharmacokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, A.K.; FitzGerald, G.A.

    1985-02-01

    Inhibition of endogenous prostacyclin and thromboxane biosynthesis by aspirin is critically dose-dependent in humans. Gastrointestinal and hepatic hydrolysis may limit systemic availability of aspirin, especially in low doses, perhaps contributing to the biochemical selectivity of aspirin. Existing analytical methods do not permit determination of systemic bioavailability when low (less than 100 mg) doses of aspirin are administered. Deuterium-labeled aspirin (2-acetoxy(3,4,5,6-/sup 2/H4)benzoic acid) was synthesized from salicylic acid by catalytic exchange and subsequent acetylation. Analysis of the compounds as benzyl esters by GC-MS followed extractive alkylation from plasma. Heptadeuterated compounds were used as internal standards. Simultaneous administration of tetradeuterated aspirin intravenously with native aspirin orally to anesthetized dogs permitted kinetic studies of both aspirin and salicylic acid. The sensitivity of the method is superior to published methods using HPLC and, thus, more applicable to studies of low dose aspirin. Pulse administration of stable isotope-labeled aspirin permits detailed and repeated studies of dose-related aspirin pharmacokinetics in humans.

  3. In vivo prostacyclin biosynthesis and effects of different aspirin regimens in patients with essential thrombocythaemia.

    PubMed

    Cavalca, V; Rocca, B; Squellerio, I; Dragani, A; Veglia, F; Pagliaccia, F; Porro, B; Barbieri, S S; Tremoli, E; Patrono, C

    2014-07-01

    Essential thrombocythaemia (ET) is characterised by enhanced platelet generation and thrombosis. Once daily (od) aspirin incompletely inhibits platelet thromboxane (TX)A2 production in ET. A twice daily (bid) dosing is necessary to fully inhibit TXA2. Whether this dosing regimen affects in vivo prostacyclin (PGI2) biosynthesis is unknown. PGI2 biosynthesis was characterised in 50 ET patients on enteric-coated (EC) aspirin 100 mg od, by measuring its urinary metabolite, 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1α (PGI-M). Moreover, in a crossover study 22 patients poorly responsive to standard aspirin based on serum TXB2 levels (≥4 ng/ml) were randomised to different seven-day aspirin regimens: EC aspirin 100 mg od, 100 mg bid, 200 mg od, or plain aspirin 100 mg od. PGI-M measured 24 hours after the last aspirin intake (EC, 100 mg od) was similar in patients and healthy subjects both on (n=10) and off (n=30) aspirin. PGI-M was unrelated to in vivo TXA2 biosynthesis, and not affected by EC aspirin 100 mg bid or 200 mg od as compared to EC 100 mg od. PGI2 biosynthesis in aspirin-treated ET patients appears unrelated to TXA2 biosynthesis, and not affected by an improved aspirin regimen, demonstrating its vascular safety for future trials. PMID:24671522

  4. High prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaxin; Chen, Xiuying; Liu, Lin; Fan, Li; Cao, Jian; Li, Xiaoli; Hu, Guoliang; Hu, Yixin; Zhu, Bingpo; Liu, Xianfeng; Gao, Yan; Ma, Cong; Leng, Wenxiu

    2014-01-01

    Although aspirin resistance is well reported in CVD, little is known about aspirin response in elderly patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia. The aim of the present study was to explore the prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD and hyperhomocysteinaemia. A total of 370 elderly patients with CVD were recruited. The study included 216 patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia and 154 patients with normohomocysteinaemia receiving daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over 1 month. The effect of aspirin was assessed using by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid induced aggregation according to LTA. Aspirin resistance was defined in 48 (13.0%) of 370 patients. The prevalence of aspirin resistance was higher in hyperhomocysteinaemic patients than normohomocysteinaemic patients (16.7% vs. 7.8%, odds ratio (OR)=2.367; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.188-4.715, p=0.012). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, hyperhomocysteinaemia (OR=2.406, 95% CI=1.201-4.820, p=0.013) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance. A significant number of CVD patients with hyperhomocysteinemia are resistant to aspirin therapy. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD. PMID:24880196

  5. Aspirin acetylates wild type and mutant p53 in colon cancer cells: identification of aspirin acetylated sites on recombinant p53.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-05-01

    Aspirin's ability to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines is considered to be an important mechanism for its anti-cancer effects. We previously demonstrated that aspirin acetylated the tumor suppressor protein p53 at lysine 382 in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we extended these observations to human colon cancer cells, HCT 116 harboring wild type p53, and HT-29 containing mutant p53. We demonstrate that aspirin induced acetylation of p53 in both cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Aspirin-acetylated p53 was localized to the nucleus. In both cell lines, aspirin induced p21(CIP1). Aspirin also acetylated recombinant p53 (rp53) in vitro suggesting that it occurs through a non-enzymatic chemical reaction. Mass spectrometry analysis and immunoblotting identified 10 acetylated lysines on rp53, and molecular modeling showed that all lysines targeted by aspirin are surface exposed. Five of these lysines are localized to the DNA-binding domain, four to the nuclear localization signal domain, and one to the C-terminal regulatory domain. Our results suggest that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may involve acetylation and activation of wild type and mutant p53 and induction of target gene expression. This is the first report attempting to characterize p53 acetylation sites targeted by aspirin. PMID:26596838

  6. Flow Cytometry-Assisted Basophil Activation Test as a Safe Diagnostic Tool for Aspirin/NSAID Hypersenstivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Shin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ASA/NSAIDs) are common causes of drug hypersensitivity. An oral provocation test is the only definitive diagnostic test. This study assessed the reliability of a flow cytometry-assisted basophil activation test (FAST) as a safe diagnostic method for ASA/NSAID-induced hypersensitivity, as its high sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated for many other drugs. Methods Eighteen patients and 11 controls were enrolled. Using a Flow-CAST kit® (Bühlmann Laboratories AG, Schönenbuch, Switzerland), 29 analyses with aspirin, ibuprofen, and diclofenac were performed by flow cytometry to detect double-positive staining of anti-IgE and anti-CD63. The stimulation index was defined as the activated basophil percentage after drug stimulation/basally active basophil percentage. A stimulation index≥2 and an absolute activated basophil percentage≥5 were considered positive. Results Patients with hypersensitivity to ASA/NSAIDs were predominantly female, and the prevalence of atopy was higher in patients than in controls. A sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 91%, positive predictive value of 92%, and negative predictive value of 59% were achieved. Conclusions FAST is a useful additional method for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions to ASA/NSAIDs. Further development is required to increase the sensitivity of the test. PMID:22548206

  7. Why we should not skip aspirin in cardiovascular prevention.

    PubMed

    Schrör, K

    2016-01-01

    Since more than 20 years, aspirin is an approved and established first-line antiplatelet medication in cardiovascular prevention. This is partially due to ist unique mode of action which is not shared with any other antiplatelet agent as well by the reliability of its pharmacological efficacy: inhibition of platelet COX-1 and subsequent thromboxane formation in almost every patient. Aspirin acts synergistic with ADP-antagonists in dual antiplatelet therapy of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and is also approved for long-term secondary prevention. Patients with atrial fibrillation are an exception and benefit more from anticoagulants. After the introduction of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), i.e. direct inhibitors of factor Xa or thrombin formation, there is a renewed discussion about the role of antiplatelet agents, specifically if additional dual antiplatelet treatment is still necessary for an optimum clinical effect or whether one component, such as aspirin might be skipped in favor of other classes of oral antiplatelet agents, such as ADP-antagonists. The available data are insufficient to recommend this because of a low number of studies and a still uncertain benefit/risk (bleeding) ratio. More research on aspirin as a chemopreventive appears also to be necessary and is going on, in particular in individuals at high-risk for vascular thrombotic diseases (diabetics, preeclampsia, venous thromboembolism). PMID:25891122

  8. Aspirin use for primary prevention in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Terrosu, Pierfranco

    2016-01-01

    The net clinical benefit of aspirin in primary prevention is uncertain as the reduction in occlusive events needs to be balanced against the increase in gastro-intestinal and cerebral bleedings. The meta-analysis of ATT (Anti Thrombotic Trialists) Collaboration in 2009 showed that aspirin therapy in primary prevention was associated with 12% reduction in cardio-vascular events, due mainly to a reduction in non-fatal myocardial infarction (0.18% vs 0.23% per year, p<0.0001). However, the benefit in term of coronary events was almost balanced by the increase in major bleedings. The balance between potential benefit and harm of aspirin differs in each person and appears to be favorable in subjects at higher cardio-vascular risk. Older people have increased risk of hemorrhage as well as increased risk of heart attack and stroke. As a consequence, it is important consider both likelihoods of benefits as well as harm within the lifespan and functioning of the person. The older people who most likely benefit from aspirin in primary prevention are those at higher cardio-vascular risk, with preserved functional abilities, low comorbidity, low risk of bleeding and a prolonged life expectancy. PMID:27374042

  9. The role of aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2016-08-01

    Considerable interest has emerged over the last decade regarding the role of aspirin in prevention of colorectal cancer. This disease is one of the commonest cancers in the Western World, therefore, the existence of a simple "everyday" agent, which could have the ability to prevent the disease, represents an invaluable opportunity clinicians may be able to exploit. Evidence from case-control and cohort studies, and recent updates of randomised controlled trials have been very encouraging-indicating benefit from long term use of aspirin at low dose. Possible mechanisms of chemoprevention include inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, or COX-independent mechanisms, for example, the PIK3CA pathway, or therapy-induced senescence of cancer cells. The most serious side effect of prolonged aspirin treatment is haemorrhage, especially from the GI tract. This is likely to be less of a problem with chemoprevention at lower doses. One also needs to consider the impact if aspirin resistance, an increasingly recognised clinical entity. PMID:27289249

  10. Class Projects in Physical Organic Chemistry: The Hydrolysis of Aspirin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise that provides a hands-on demonstration of the hydrolysis of aspirin is presented. The key to understanding the hydrolysis is recognizing that all six process may occur simultaneously and that the observed rate constant is the sum of the rate constants that one rate constant dominates the overall process.

  11. Simultaneous Treatment with Statins and Aspirin Reduces the Risk of Prostate Cancer Detection and Tumorigenic Properties in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Olivan, M.; Rigau, M.; Colás, E.; Garcia, M.; Montes, M.; Sequeiros, T.; Regis, L.; Celma, A.; Planas, J.; Placer, J.; Reventós, J.; de Torres, I.; Doll, A.; Morote, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays prostate cancer is the most common solid tumor in men from industrialized countries and the second leading cause of death. At the ages when PCa is usually diagnosed, mortality related to cardiovascular morbidity is high; therefore, men at risk for PCa frequently receive chronic lipid-lowering and antiplatelet treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze how chronic treatment with statins, aspirin, and their combination influenced the risk of PCa detection. The tumorigenic properties of these treatments were evaluated by proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and migration assays using different PCa cell lines, in order to assess how these treatments act at molecular level. The results showed that a combination of statins and aspirin enhances the effect of individual treatments and seems to reduce the risk of PCa detection (OR: 0.616 (95% CI: 0.467–0.812), P < 0.001). However, if treatments are maintained, aspirin (OR: 1.835 (95% CI: 1.068–3.155), P = 0.028) or the combination of both drugs (OR: 3.059 (95% CI: 1.894–4.939), P < 0.001) represents an increased risk of HGPCa. As observed at clinical level, these beneficial effects in vitro are enhanced when both treatments are administered simultaneously, suggesting that chronic, concomitant treatment with statins and aspirin has a protective effect on PCa incidence. PMID:25649906

  12. Metabolism of aspirin and procaine in mice pretreated with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate or O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, J.M.; Brown, T.M.

    1986-07-01

    Concentrations of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine in blood of mice were increased threefold for 27 min by exposure to O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate 2 hr prior to (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine injection ip, while there was no effect of O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate pretreatment. There was no effect of either organophosphinate on the primary hydrolysis of (acetyl-l-/sup 14/C)aspirin when assessed by the expiration of (/sup 14/C)carbon dioxide; however, O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreatment produced transient increases in blood concentrations of both (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin and (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)salicylic acid following administration of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin. Liver carboxylesterase activity in O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreated mice was 11% of control activity. These results indicate the potential for drug interaction with O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate but not with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate. It appears that liver carboxylesterase activity has a minor role in hydrolysis of aspirin in vivo, but may be more important in procaine metabolism.

  13. Effect of Dipyridamole plus Aspirin on Hemodialysis Graft Patency

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley S.; Beck, Gerald J.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Greenberg, Arthur; Delmez, James A.; Allon, Michael; Dember, Laura M.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Greene, Tom; Radeva, Milena K.; Davidson, Ingemar J.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Braden, Gregory L.; Fenves, Andrew Z.; Kaufman, James S.; Cotton, James R.; Martin, Kevin J.; McNeil, James W.; Rahman, Asif; Lawson, Jeffery H.; Whiting, James F.; Hu, Bo; Meyers, Catherine M.; Kusek, John W.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Arteriovenous graft stenosis leading to thrombosis is a major cause of complications in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Procedural interventions may restore patency but are costly. Although there is no proven pharmacologic therapy, dipyridamole may be promising because of its known vascular antiproliferative activity. METHODS We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of extended-release dipyridamole, at a dose of 200 mg, and aspirin, at a dose of 25 mg, given twice daily after the placement of a new arteriovenous graft until the primary outcome, loss of primary unassisted patency (i.e., patency without thrombosis or requirement for intervention), was reached. Secondary outcomes were cumulative graft failure and death. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed with the use of a Cox proportional-hazards regression with adjustment for prespecified covariates. RESULTS At 13 centers in the United States, 649 patients were randomly assigned to receive dipyridamole plus aspirin (321 patients) or placebo (328 patients) over a period of 4.5 years, with 6 additional months of follow-up. The incidence of primary unassisted patency at 1 year was 23% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18 to 28) in the placebo group and 28% (95% CI, 23 to 34) in the dipyridamole–aspirin group, an absolute difference of 5 percentage points. Treatment with dipyridamole plus aspirin significantly prolonged the duration of primary unassisted patency (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P = 0.03) and inhibited stenosis. The incidences of cumulative graft failure, death, the composite of graft failure or death, and serious adverse events (including bleeding) did not differ significantly between study groups. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with dipyridamole plus aspirin had a significant but modest effect in reducing the risk of stenosis and improving the duration of primary unassisted patency of newly created grafts. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00067119.) PMID

  14. A novel hybrid aspirin-NO-releasing compound inhibits TNFalpha release from LPS-activated human monocytes and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Catriona M; Marcarino, Paolo; Sheldrake, Tara A; Lazzarato, Loretta; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Fox, Sarah; Megson, Ian L; Rossi, Adriano G

    2008-01-01

    was not shared by 10 μM DEA/NO, B7, the furazans, aspirin or NCX4016. LDH assessment revealed none of the treatments caused significant cell lysis. LPS stimulated loss of cytoplasmic IκBα and nuclear translocation of the p65 NF-κB subunit was inhibited by the active NO-furoxans. Conclusion Here we show that furoxan-aspirin, B8, significantly reduces TNFα release from both monocytes and macrophages and suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activation is a likely mechanism for the effect. This anti-inflammatory action highlights a further therapeutic potential of drugs of this class. PMID:18671842

  15. Differential inhibition of tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation by the nicotinate aspirin prodrug (ST0702) and aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Harmon, Shona; Inkielewicz, Iwona; Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Jones, Michael; Cantwell, Paula; Bazou, Despina; Ledwidge, Mark; Radomski, Marek W; Gilmer, John F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) facilitates cancer cell invasion, angiogenesis and the formation of metastatic foci. TCIPA can be modulated by pharmacological inhibitors of MMP-2 and ADP; however, the COX inhibitor aspirin did not prevent TCIPA. In this study, we have tested the pharmacological effects of a new group of isosorbide-based aspirin prodrugs on TCIPA. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH TCIPA was induced in human platelets by mixing with human adenocarcinoma or fibrosarcoma cells under no flow and flow conditions. The release of gelatinases and P-selectin expression during TCIPA were studied by zymography and flow cytometry respectively. KEY RESULTS Tumour cells caused platelet aggregation. This aggregation resulted in the release of MMP-2 and a significant up-regulation of P-selectin on platelets, indicative of platelet activation. Pharmacological modulation of TCIPA revealed that ST0702, one of the aspirin prodrugs, down-regulated TCIPA while aspirin was ineffective. The deacetylated metabolite of ST0702, 5-nicotinate salicylate (ST0702 salicylate), down-regulated both ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation and TCIPA. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that ST0702 was an effective inhibitor of TCIPA in vitro. Its deacetylated metabolite may contribute to the effects of ST0702 by inhibiting ADP-mediated TCIPA. PMID:22122360

  16. Aspirin for cancer is no mere antiplatelet prototype. There is potential in its ancient roots.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, James R; Baxter, Gwendoline J; Paterson, John R

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin (ASA), increasingly accepted as predominantly a cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 inhibitor, is a prodrug for salicylic acid (SA) which has no such activity. SA is widespread in nature, vital in plants, and present in drug free serum from animals and man. Evolutionary conserved SA receptors are found in human tissues. Very low doses of ASA will, on repeat dosing, produce near maximal platelet COX-1 inhibition. Evidence for cancer prophylaxis is based on ASA doses of at least 75mg/day. Pleiotropic mechanisms underlie low dose ASA's undoubted efficacy in preventive medicine but the key barrier to its more widespread use is gastrointestinal toxicity. ASA/SA combination formulations may improve the current risk/benefit ratio of chemo-prophylactic preparations. There is well established methodology for, and should be few regulatory barriers to, their evaluation. PMID:27515206

  17. Network reconstruction of platelet metabolism identifies metabolic signature for aspirin resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alex; Rahmanian, Sorena; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has not been a systematic, objective assessment of the metabolic capabilities of the human platelet. A manually curated, functionally tested, and validated biochemical reaction network of platelet metabolism, iAT-PLT-636, was reconstructed using 33 proteomic datasets and 354 literature references. The network contains enzymes mapping to 403 diseases and 231 FDA approved drugs, alluding to an expansive scope of biochemical transformations that may affect or be affected by disease processes in multiple organ systems. The effect of aspirin (ASA) resistance on platelet metabolism was evaluated using constraint-based modeling, which revealed a redirection of glycolytic, fatty acid, and nucleotide metabolism reaction fluxes in order to accommodate eicosanoid synthesis and reactive oxygen species stress. These results were confirmed with independent proteomic data. The construction and availability of iAT-PLT-636 should stimulate further data-driven, systems analysis of platelet metabolism towards the understanding of pathophysiological conditions including, but not strictly limited to, coagulopathies.

  18. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    PubMed Central

    SORIANO-HERNANDEZ, ALEJANDRO D.; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; MARTINEZ-FIERRO, MARGARITA L.; VALDEZ-VELAZQUEZ, LAURA L.; ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ, FRANCISCO; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; GUZMAN-ESQUIVEL, JOSE; RODRIGUEZ-SANCHEZ, IRAM P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; DELGADO-ENCISO, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC in vitro and in vivo. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, dexamethasone, meclofenamic acid, flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid were tested in UCC HeLa, VIPA, INBL and SiHa cell lines. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was evaluated in vitro. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid presented with slight to moderate toxicity (10–40% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM) in certain cell lines, while meclofenamic acid exhibited significant cytotoxicity in all essayed cell lines (50–90% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM). The meclofenamic acid was tested in murine models (immunodeficient and immunocompetent) of UCC, which manifested a significant reduction in tumor growth and increased mouse survival. It was demonstrated that of the evaluated anti-inflammatory drugs, meclofenamic acid was the most cytotoxic, with a significant antitumor effect in murine models. Subsequent studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of this drug. PMID:26622892

  19. Sulphonamides as anti-inflammatory agents: old drugs for new therapeutic strategies in neutrophilic inflammation?

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Scirocco, M C; Balbi, A; Bevilacqua, M; Dallegri, F

    1995-03-01

    1. It is well known that neutrophils act as mediators of tissue injury in a variety of inflammatory diseases. Their histotoxic activity is presently thought to involve proteinases and oxidants, primarily hypochlorous acid (HOCl). This oxidant is also capable of inactivating the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (alpha 1-antitrypsin), thereby favouring digestion of the connective matrix. 2. In the present work, we found that sulphanilamide and some sulphanilamide-related anti-inflammatory drugs such as dapsone, nimesulide and sulphapyridine reduce the availability of HOCl in the extracellular microenvironment of activated neutrophils and prevent the inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by these cells in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of each drug to prevent alpha 1-antitrypsin from inactivation by neutrophils correlates significantly with its capacity to reduce the recovery of HOCl from neutrophils. Five other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were completely ineffective. 3. Therefore, sulphanilamide-related drugs, i.e. dapsone, nimesulide and sulphapyridine, have the potential to reduce the bioavailability of neutrophil-derived HOCl and, in turn, to favour the alpha 1-antitrypsin-dependent control of neutrophil elastolytic activity. These drugs appear as a well-defined group of agents which are particularly prone to attenuate neutrophil histotoxicity. They can also be viewed as a previously unrecognized starting point for the development of new compounds in order to plan rational therapeutic strategies for controlling tissue injury during neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:7736703

  20. Dissimilar effects of chronic treatment with aspirin, flubiprofen and indomethacin on renal prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    Quilley, C.P.; McGiff, J.C.; Quilley, J.

    1986-03-01

    Inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) excretion is not sustained during long-term aspirin administration. The authors compared the effects of 9d treatment of SHR rats with aspirin (A), 200 mg/kg/d s.c., flubiprofen (F), 2.5 mg/kg/12h s.c., and indomethacin (I), 2.5 mg/kg/12 s.c. on excretion of radioimmunoassayable PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C) arachidonic acid (AA) by renal papillae was also examined. In vehicle-treated control rats (C) PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ excretion varied from 32.2 +/- 6.2 (mean +/- SEM) to 41.6 +.- 7.3 ng/6h, 3-fold higher than that of PGE/sub 2/. Within 6h of administration all 3 drugs reduced excretion of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ to less than 20% and 35% of C rats. Although urinary concentrations of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ in A-treated rats remained depressed, a 2-fold increase in urine volume resulted in excretion rates similar to C rats. In contrast, urine volume in I- and F-treated rats was unaffected while PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ excretion rates in I-treated rats were 50''% of C rats and were also lower than control in F-treated rats. Paradoxically, metabolism of AA to PGs by by renal papillae dissected on day 10, 2-4h after the last drug dose, was markedly inhibited by A (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ by 62% and PGE/sub 2/ by 82%), but unaffected by I and F. As the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors differ on in vivo and indices of PG production, their intended action should be verified by measuring PG levels in biological fluids.

  1. Ascorbic Acid may Exacerbate Aspirin-Induced Increase in Intestinal Permeability.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ivana R; Kruger, Marlena C; Hurst, Roger D; Lentle, Roger G

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid in combination with aspirin has been used to prevent aspirin-induced oxidative GI damage. We aimed to determine whether ascorbic acid reduces or prevents aspirin-induced changes in intestinal permeability over a 6-hr period using saccharidic probes mannitol and lactulose. The effects of administration of 600 mg aspirin alone, 500 mg ascorbic acid alone and simultaneous dosage of both agents were compared in a cross-over study in 28 healthy female volunteers. These effects were also compared with that of a placebo. The ability of ascorbic acid to mitigate the effects of aspirin when administered either half an hour before or after dosage with aspirin was also assessed in 19 healthy female volunteers. The excretion of lactulose over the 6-hr period was augmented after consumption of either aspirin or ascorbic acid compared with that after consumption of placebo. Dosage with ascorbic acid alone augmented the excretion of lactulose more than did aspirin alone. Simultaneous dosage with both agents augmented the excretion of lactulose in an additive manner. The timing of dosage with ascorbic acid in relation to that with aspirin had no significant effect on the excretion of the two sugars. These findings indicate that ascorbic acid does not prevent aspirin-induced increase in gut permeability rather that both agents augment it to a similar extent. The additive effect on simultaneous dosage with both agents in augmenting the absorption of lactulose suggests that each influences paracellular permeability by different pathways. PMID:25641731

  2. Simultaneous quantitation of aspirin, amlodipine and simvastatin in a fixed dose combination of encapsulated tablet formulation by HPLC-UV method.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Faisal; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Ahmed, Farrukh Rafiq; Salam, Faseeh A; Nasiri, Muhammad Iqbal; Khan, Muhammad Atif; Manzoor, Saeed

    2014-09-01

    A high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV) based simple and specific method for simultaneous quantitative determination of aspirin, amlodipine besylate and simvastatin in a capsule formulation has been developed and validated according to ICH guidelines. Chromatographic separation of the three drugs was carried out by aSpherisorbODS2 reverse phase column (4.6 x 250 mm; 5 μm) using amobile phase, which consisted of 70: 30 (v/v) mixture of acetonitrile and triethylamine phosphate buffer (pH 3; 0.015 M) with final pH adjusted to 2.5 using dilute ortho-phosphoric acid, at a flow rate of 1mL/min. The eluents were detected at UV wavelength of 237 nm and the retention times for aspirin, amlodipine besylate and simvastatin were ~2.7 mins, ~6.1 mins and ~10.5mins, respectively. This method is suitable and specific for the three drugs and was found to be linear (R2>0.995), accurate, specific, reproducible and robust in the concentration range of 375 to 1125mcg/ml for aspirin, 25 to 75mcg/ml for amlodipine besylate and 50 to 150mcg/ml for simvastatin. This simple and convenient method could be easily utilized for the characterization and quantitation of the three drugs in a single formulation for combination therapy of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25176250

  3. [Induced sputum supernatant prostaglandin E2 during oral aspirin challenge of asthmatic patients with and without aspirin hypersensitivity and healthy controls--pilot study].

    PubMed

    Ignacak, Maria; Celejewska-Wójcik, Natalia; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Sałapa, Kinga; Konduracka, Ewa; Sanak, Marek; Tyrak, Katarzyna; Sładek, Krzysztof; Musiał, Jacek; Mastalerz, Lucyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate changes in the concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in induced sputum supernatant in 3 groups: sub- jects with NSAID-exacerbated respira- tory disease (NERD), aspirin tolerant asthma (ATA) and healthy controls (HC), before and after oral aspirin chal- lenge test. The study was conducted in the years 2014-2015 at the Clinical Department of the Pulmonology Clinic at the University Hospital in Cracow. 43 patients were enrolled in the study (NERD - n = 15, ATA - n = 15 and HC - n = 13). All of them underwent a placebo-controlled oral aspirin challenge. Sputum was induced 24 hours before the challenge and immediately after the test. Induced sputum was processed in order to obtain cystospin slides to depict inflammatory cell patterns and supernatants, in which PGE2 was measured. The concentration of PGE2 was determined using mass spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry - GC/MS). After aspirin challenge, the concentration of PGE2 in induced sputum supernatant decreased in both asthmatics hypersensitive to aspirin (p = 0.01) and those who tolerated aspirin well (p = 0.17). The change in the healthy control group was not statistically significant. These results support the cyclooxygenase theory of PGE2 inhibition by aspirin. However, the mechanism of bronchoconstriction after aspirin administration alone in patients with NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease remains unclear. PMID:27197430

  4. Aspirin Increases Nitric Oxide Formation in Chronic Stable Coronary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Scott; DeMets, David; Schneider, Ricky; Borzak, Steven; Schneider, Wendy; Serebruany, Victor; Schröder, Henning; Hennekens, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are no published randomized data on secondary prevention in humans about whether aspirin affects nitric oxide (NO) formation. In patients with chronic stable coronary disease, we tested whether aspirin at clinically relevant doses increases NO formation. Materials and Methods In a randomized, double-blind trial, 37 patients from 2 cardiology office practices were assigned to daily doses of 81, 162.5, 325, 650, or 1300 aspirin for 12 weeks. Primary prespecified outcome measures were changes in heme oxygenase (HO-1), a downstream target of NO formation, and asymmetrical dimethyl arginine (ADMA), a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase. Results There were no significant differences for HO-1 or ADMA between any of the clinically relevant doses of aspirin tested, so all were combined. For HO-1, there was a significant increase (10.29 ± 2.44, P < .001) from baseline (15.37 ± 1.85) to week 12 (25.66 ± 1.57). The mean ratio (MR) of week 12 to baseline for HO-1 was significantly higher than 1.0 (1.67, confidence interval [CI] from 1.60 to 1.74, P < .001). For ADMA, there was a significant decrease (−0.24 ± 0.11, P < .001) from baseline (0.78 ± 0.08) to week 12 (0.54 ± 0.07). The MR of week 12 to baseline for ADMA was significantly lower than 1.0 (0.69, CI from 0.66 to 0.73, P < .001). Conclusions In patients with chronic stable coronary disease, all clinically relevant daily doses of aspirin tested, from 81 to 1300 mg, produce similar and statistically significant increases in HO-1 and decreases in ADMA. These are the first randomized data on secondary prevention patients. These data support the hypothesis that aspirin has additional beneficial effects mediated through NO formation. Further research, including direct randomized comparisons on atherosclerosis using noninvasive techniques as well as on occlusive vascular disease events, is necessary. PMID:23524841

  5. Potentiation of LPS-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells by Aspirin via ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Protection by N-Acetyl Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Shafarin, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxicity and inflammation-associated toxic responses have been observed to be induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in vitro and in vivo respectively. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, has been reported to be beneficial in inflammation-associated diseases like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Their precise molecular mechanisms, however, are not clearly understood. Our previous studies on aspirin treated HepG2 cells strongly suggest cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we have further demonstrated that HepG2 cells treated with LPS alone or in combination with aspirin induces subcellular toxic responses which are accompanied by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and apoptosis. The LPS/Aspirin induced toxicity was attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Alterations in oxidative stress and glutathione-dependent redox-homeostasis were more pronounced in mitochondria compared to extra- mitochondrial cellular compartments. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with NAC exhibited a selective protection in redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the altered redox metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells play a critical role in LPS/aspirin-induced cytotoxicity. These results may help in better understanding the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic properties of NSAIDs in cancer cells exposed to bacterial endotoxins. PMID:27441638

  6. Evaluative comparison of systemic aspirin therapy effects on gingival bleeding in post non-surgical periodontal therapy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sundram, Elanchezhiyan; Kharaharilal, Panishankar; Ilavarasu, Sugumari; Renukadevi; Nalini, Esther; Karunamoorthy, Venilla

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gingival bleeding is considered as an important clinical sign for diagnosis of periodontal disease pathogenesis. Immune inflammatory reactions caused by local factors are considered as essential reasons for gingival bleeding, as also for the systemic bleeding disorders. In disease-free conditions of gingiva, the bleeding disorders are considered to be the main contender for bleeding. Other than these variables, many systemic drugs including systemic aspirin could also cause gingival bleeding. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of buffered aspirin therapy on gingival bleeding. Materials and Methods: Totally, 36 systemically healthy individuals were included in the 15-day randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The 15 days were divided as: control period for the first 7 days and study period for the following 7 days. On the 1st day, all individuals were given oral prophylaxis after recording gingival parameters such as Plaque Index, probing depth, and Bleeding Index, and then blood samples were collected for hematological investigations. Then, all individuals were administered placebo capsules for 1 week as once daily dose. On the 8th day, all procedures were repeated and the individuals were prescribed with 325 coated aspirin capsules for 1 week. On the 15th day, all parameters were repeated and the results were statistically analyzed. Results: In the study period, the parameters such as Bleeding Index, bleeding time, and prothrombin time were increased significantly, compared to the control period. Conclusion: The variables such as systemic drug therapy should be considered for the examination of gingiva while the diagnosis is considered mainly based on gingival bleeding. PMID:23066256

  7. A Balanced View of Efficacy and Safety of Aspirin in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Casado-Arroyo, Rubén; Lanas, Angel; Brugada, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights practical aspects related to aspirin therapy in cardiovascular diseases, specifically, the benefits and hazards in different clinical settings. Aspirin reduces one fourth of all major cardiovascular events but also increases major gastrointestinal bleeds by about half. As with other cardiovascular prevention strategies, the absolute benefit of aspirin is linearly related to the cardiovascular risk of the patient. The risk-benefit of aspirin can vary substantially in different settings: in secondary prevention, the benefits usually outweigh the excess of major bleeding complications. In primary prevention, it is not unusual that the number of vascular events avoided equals the number of major bleeds induced by aspirin. Finally, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that aspirin may interfere with the early stages of cancer, metastasis and mortality. For all these reasons, in this article new developments in the field directed towards individualized risk assessment strategies are also discussed. PMID:26369681

  8. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  9. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  10. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  11. Statins and aspirin: do they really work in women?

    PubMed

    Desai, Hemal; Hollingsworth, Paula W; Chugh, Atul R

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the most common cause of mortality in women in the USA. As a result, greater emphasis has been placed on preventive measures. Studies examining the role of aspirin and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have shown important clinical differences in men versus women in the preventive realm. This has led to inconsistent recommendations by guideline committees and clinicians alike. This review presents a summary of the past and current guidelines. In addition, important clinical trials influencing current era practice are also discussed. Both strengths and limitations of these studies are described in detail, along with recommendations regarding future directions and the scope of aspirin and statin use for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25812803

  12. Aspirin vs Heparin for the Prevention of Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Kanellopoulou, Theoni; Makris, Thomas; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Nomikou, Efrosyni; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that remains a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Preeclampsia can be resolved by delivery, and most of the proposed preventive treatment approaches are based on processes involved in placental development in early pregnancy. Yet, none of these has been established in clinical practice. Low-dose aspirin is the most promising candidate, nevertheless; while some individual randomized controlled trials showed minimal or no statistically significant benefit, recent metanalyses showed that early initiation before 16 weeks of gestation is associated with prevention of early-onset preeclampsia and reduction in prevalence of perinatal death or morbidity of pregnant women. Heparin could be an alternative antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory median to prevent preeclampsia either alone or in combination with aspirin; however, results are conflicting concerning efficacy. PMID:27251704

  13. Lipoxins and aspirin-triggered lipoxins in resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Cianci, Eleonora; Simiele, Felice; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The resolution of the inflammatory response is highly regulated by the timely biosynthesis of a number of endogenous lipid mediators. Among these, lipoxins (LX) and their 15-epimers, aspirin triggered lipoxins (ATL) derived by the lipoxygenase (LO) route of arachidonic acid metabolism. In particular, they are formed and released by cells expressing 5-, 12- and 15-LO such as leukocytes, platelets, vascular endothelium and epithelium, alone or during transcellular interactions. ATL biosynthesis requires cyclooxygenase-2 acetylation by aspirin. LX and ATL exert potent bioactions on leukocytes, vascular and epithelial cells to stop inflammation and promote resolution. They have shown to be beneficial in a broad spectrum of preclinical models of disease as well as in some clinical trials. Counter-regulatory signaling by LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 follows the activation of a G protein-coupled receptor, termed ALX/FPR2, which is emerging as a key anti-inflammatory receptor. PMID:25895638

  14. Trans Fat, Aspirin, and Ischemic Stroke in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yaemsiri, Sirin; Sen, Souvik; Tinker, Lesley; Rosamond, Wayne; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; He, Ka

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between dietary fat intake and ischemic stroke among postmenopausal women. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 87,025 generally healthy postmenopausal women (age 50–79 years) enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Repeated and validated dietary assessments were done using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of ischemic stroke based on quintiles of the cumulative average of fat intake. Results We documented 1,049 incident cases of ischemic stroke over 663,041 person-years of follow-up. Women in the highest quintile of trans fat intake had a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (HR 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–1.79, P-trend = 0.048) compared with women in the lowest quintile, while controlling for multiple covariates. The observed association was modified by aspirin use (P-interaction=0.02). The HR was 1.66 (95% CI 1.21–2.36, P-trend<0.01) among baseline non-aspirin users (n=67,288) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.60–1.48, P-trend=0.43) among aspirin users (n=19,736). No significant associations were found between intakes of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat and ischemic stroke or any ischemic stroke subtypes. Interpretation In this large cohort of postmenopausal women, higher intake of trans fat was associated with incident ischemic stroke independent of major lifestyle/dietary factors. Aspirin use may attenuate the potential adverse effect of trans fat intake on ischemic stroke. PMID:22383309

  15. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Neha M; Katial, Rohit K

    2016-08-01

    Patients with severe asthma and concomitant chronic rhinosinusitis often have severe, refractory upper and lower airway inflammation. This inflammation has been proposed to be similar throughout the upper and lower airways leading to the unified airways concept. This article reviews chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps, and the subgroup with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, while focusing on the relationship with asthma. Additionally, diagnosis and treatment with current and newer therapies are discussed. PMID:27401622

  16. Aspirin Prevention of Cholesterol Gallstone Formation in Prairie Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sum P.; Carey, Martin C.; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1981-03-01

    When prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are fed a diet containing cholesterol, a marked increase in gallbladder mucin secretion parallels the evolution of cholesterol supersaturated bile. Gelation of mucin precedes the precipitation of cholesterol liquid and solid crystals and the development of gallstones. Aspirin given to prairie dogs inhibited mucin hypersecretion and gel accumulation and prevented gallstone formation without influencing the cholesterol content of supersaturated bile. This suggests that gallbladder mucin is a nucleation matrix for cholesterol gallstones.

  17. Aspirin for Primary Cardiovascular Prevention: When Is It Worth the Risks?

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose aspirin is widely used by individuals to prevent first myocardial infarction and stroke. Although many health care professionals and patients believe that aspirin is safe and effective, the evidence is far from conclusive. As a result, current practice guidelines are inconsistent and leave practitioners with many unanswered questions. Because aspirin is available without prescription, pharmacists may often be the only health care professional positioned to advise and educate the patient. PMID:24958966

  18. Clopidogrel responsiveness in stroke patients on a chronic aspirin regimen.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Zohara; Ching, Marilou; Sawyer, Robert N; Chichelli, Trevor; Li, Fan; Janicke, David; Radovic, Vladan; Mehta, Bijal; Farooq, Osman; Munschauer, Frederick E

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel (CPG) in patients sustaining acute ischemic stroke who were already receiving chronic outpatient aspirin therapy (81-325 mg/day). Platelet function was measured using 3 different "point-of-care" platelet function analyzers: the Thrombelastograph hemostasis system, the Accumetrics VerifyNow system, and the Chronolog 570VS impedance aggregometer. Platelet function was assessed before administration of a 300-mg CPG loading dose and again at 26 hours and 64 hours after this loading dose along with a 75-mg daily maintenance dose. All 3 instruments detected marked inhibition of platelet function at 26 hours and 64 hours after CPG administration. There were significant variations among the 3 instruments in monitoring antiplatelet responses to aspirin and CPG; however, these variations were eliminated when the platelet function results were corrected for baseline platelet variability. The percentage of patients who were poor responders to CPG after switching from aspirin depended on the measurement instrument used, but was higher at 26 hours after CPG administration than at 64 hours after CPG administration. Our findings indicate that poor response to antiplatelet agents in general, and to CPG in particular, is a function of the measuring instrument. The correction for baseline platelet variability results in similar levels of platelet inhibition measured by the 3 platelet function analyzers. Future studies are warranted to examine the association between ex vivo CPG-induced platelet inhibition and clinical outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:22209644

  19. The neuroprotective effects of aspirin following crush injury to rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yueliang; Tang, Hui; He, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been reported to be neuroprotective and produce some benefits for central nervous system diseases. However, the possibility of using aspirin as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injuries has rarely been reported thus far. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibly beneficial effects of aspirin on sciatic nerve crush injury therapy in rats. Crush injury animal model was prepared with Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were evenly divided into high-dose aspirin group, low-dose aspirin group, and vehicle group. Aspirin solution or normal saline were intraperitoneally injected once a day for 28 days after sciatic nerve crush injury. A sham-operative group was also added as normal control. The results from walking track analysis and electrophysiological assessment indicated that motor functional recovery in the aspirin groups were better than that in the vehicle group. Morphometric analysis of regenerated nerves and Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing demonstrated that axonal regeneration in the aspirin groups was superior to that in the vehicle group. Our findings suggest that aspirin might be used as a neuroprotective agent for treating peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26770418

  20. Aspirin as a risk factor for hemorrhage in patients with head injuries.

    PubMed

    Reymond, M A; Marbet, G; Radü, E W; Gratzl, O

    1992-01-01

    The role of aspirin as a risk factor in the occurrence of intracranial bleeding following head injury was investigated. Chronic subdural hematoma appears to be a suitable model for the evaluation of risk factors in the development of hemorrhage. The most common risk factors found in our study were, apart from age, chronic alcohol abuse (28%), consumption of cumarin-derivates (21%), aspirin (13%), and heparin (5%). A patient undergoing aspirin treatment must be considered at risk of development of chronic subdural hematoma. Aspirin should not be prescribed to patients with post-traumatic headaches. PMID:1584433

  1. High prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Gao, Ying-Hui; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Hua-Xin; Fan, Li; Hu, Guo-Liang; Hu, Yi-Xin; Li, Xiao-Li; Zou, Xiao; Li, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is known to be a prothrombotic state. We undertook this study to examine a hypothesis that aspirin resistance may be associated with metabolic syndrome, and to assess other potential determinants of aspirin resistance in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A total of 469 elderly patients with CVD were recruited. One hundred and seventy-two patients with metabolic syndrome and 297 without metabolic syndrome (control group) received daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over one month. Platelet aggregation was measured by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid (AA)- and ≥ 70% adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation according to LTA. Aspirin semi-responders were defined as meeting one (but not both) of these criteria. Results By LTA, 38 of 469 (8.1%) patients were aspirin resistant. The prevalence of aspirin resistance was higher in the metabolic syndrome group compared with the control group [11.6 % vs. 6.6%, odds ratio (OR) = 2.039; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.047–3.973]. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome (OR = 4.951, 95% CI: 1.440–17.019, P = 0.011) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance. Conclusions A significant number of patients with CVD and metabolic syndrome are resistant to aspirin therapy. This might further increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:27582771

  2. Effect of aspirin on DNA damage induced by MMC in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-06-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of antigenotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the protective effects of aspirin against the genotoxicity of MMC with the DNA repair test in Drosophila melanogaster. Three types of treatment of aspirin were performed as co-, post- and pre-treatment. Aspirin co-treatment suppressed effectively the genotoxicity of MMC in a dose-dependent manner and the sex ratio at a dose of aspirin 10mg/bottle elevated from 0.01 (without aspirin) to 0.65 at sc z(1) w(+(TE)) mei-9(a) mei-41(D5)/-C(1)DX, y f [mei-9 mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female] consists of DNA repair-deficient (Rec(-)) males and -proficient (Rec(+)) females. The antigenotoxic effect of aspirin on [mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female] was similar to that on [mei-9, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female]. But post- and pre-treatment by aspirin did not affect the genotoxicity of MMC on [mei-9 mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female]. PMID:17336029

  3. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-05-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men.

  4. Prostaglandin D2: A dominant mediator of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Katherine N.; Bensko, Jillian C.; Boyce, Joshua A.; Laidlaw, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy is routinely performed for patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). Little is known about the contributions of mediators other than cysteinyl leukotrienes to aspirin reactions and to the therapeutic benefit of high-dose aspirin therapy. Objective We investigated differences in urinary eicosanoid metabolites and blood eosinophils in subjects with AERD who tolerate and those who fail aspirin desensitization, and also in AERD subjects who were successfully treated with high-dose aspirin therapy. Methods 29 subjects with AERD were stratified into those who tolerated aspirin desensitization (Group I) and those who did not (Group II). Urine was analyzed for eicosanoid metabolites at baseline, during aspirin reactions, and on high-dose aspirin therapy. Blood was analyzed for cell differentials at baseline and on aspirin therapy. Results Basal prostaglandin D2 metabolite (PGD-M) (13.6±2.7 vs. 7.0±0.8 pmol/mg Cr; P<.05), and thromboxane metabolite (TX-M) levels (1.4±0.3 vs. 0.9±0.1 pmol/mg Cr; P<.01) were higher in Group II than in Group I. During aspirin reactions, PGD-M remained unchanged while TX-M (0.7±0.1 pmol/mg Cr; P=.07) tended to decrease in Group I. In contrast, PGD-M rose dramatically in Group II (61.3±19.9 pmol/mg Cr; P<.05), while TX-M did not change. The decrease in FEV1 inversely correlated with basal urinary levels of both LTE4 and PGD-M. Blood eosinophil and basophil levels rose while urinary PGD-M (2.2±0.8 pmol/mg Cr, P<.001) decreased on two months of high-dose aspirin therapy in Group I. Conclusion Failure to tolerate aspirin desensitization in a subset of subjects with AERD is associated with PGD2 overproduction. The increase in blood eosinophils and basophils while on high-dose aspirin therapy may reflect the functional consequences of decreased PGD2 release and the therapeutic benefit of aspirin. PMID:25218285

  5. Use of aspirin associates with longer primary patency of hemodialysis grafts.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Bradley S; Beck, Gerald J; Dember, Laura M; Vazquez, Miguel A; Greenberg, Arthur; Delmez, James A; Allon, Michael; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Hu, Bo; Greene, Tom; Radeva, Milena K; Davidson, Ingemar J; Ikizler, T Alp; Braden, Gregory L; Lawson, Jeffrey H; Cotton, James R; Kusek, John W; Feldman, Harold I

    2011-04-01

    Extended-release dipyridamole plus low-dose aspirin (ERDP/ASA) prolongs primary unassisted graft patency of newly created hemodialysis arteriovenous grafts, but the individual contributions of each component are unknown. Here, we analyzed whether use of aspirin at baseline associated with primary unassisted graft patency among participants in a randomized trial that compared ERDP/ASA and placebo in newly created grafts. We used Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for prespecified baseline comorbidities and covariates. Of all participants, 43% reported use of aspirin at baseline; of these, 82% remained on nonstudy aspirin (i.e., excluding ERDP/ASA) at 1 year. After 1 year of follow-up, the incidence of primary unassisted patency among participants using aspirin at baseline was 30% (95% CI: 24 to 35%) and among those not using aspirin was 23% (95% CI: 18 to 27%). Use of aspirin at baseline associated with a dose-dependent prolongation of primary unassisted graft patency that approached statistical significance (adjusted HR, 0.83; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.01; P=0.06). Use of aspirin at baseline did not associate with prolongation of cumulative graft patency or participant survival. In conclusion, use of aspirin associates with a trend toward longer primary unassisted patency of newly placed hemodialysis grafts similar to that observed for ERDP/ASA. PMID:21415156

  6. Use of Aspirin Associates with Longer Primary Patency of Hemodialysis Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Gerald J.; Dember, Laura M.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Greenberg, Arthur; Delmez, James A.; Allon, Michael; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Hu, Bo; Greene, Tom; Radeva, Milena K.; Davidson, Ingemar J.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Braden, Gregory L.; Lawson, Jeffrey H.; Cotton, James R.; Kusek, John W.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2011-01-01

    Extended-release dipyridamole plus low-dose aspirin (ERDP/ASA) prolongs primary unassisted graft patency of newly created hemodialysis arteriovenous grafts, but the individual contributions of each component are unknown. Here, we analyzed whether use of aspirin at baseline associated with primary unassisted graft patency among participants in a randomized trial that compared ERDP/ASA and placebo in newly created grafts. We used Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for prespecified baseline comorbidities and covariates. Of all participants, 43% reported use of aspirin at baseline; of these, 82% remained on nonstudy aspirin (i.e., excluding ERDP/ASA) at 1 year. After 1 year of follow-up, the incidence of primary unassisted patency among participants using aspirin at baseline was 30% (95% CI: 24 to 35%) and among those not using aspirin was 23% (95% CI: 18 to 27%). Use of aspirin at baseline associated with a dose-dependent prolongation of primary unassisted graft patency that approached statistical significance (adjusted HR, 0.83; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.01; P = 0.06). Use of aspirin at baseline did not associate with prolongation of cumulative graft patency or participant survival. In conclusion, use of aspirin associates with a trend toward longer primary unassisted patency of newly placed hemodialysis grafts similar to that observed for ERDP/ASA. PMID:21415156

  7. The effects of aspirin plus cisplatin on SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hanzhang; Liu, Gaogao; Jiang, Biao; Guo, Jiubing; Tao, Guoquan; Yiu, Wei; Zhou, Jingsong; Li, Guoxin

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin plus cisplatin (CDDP) in the chemotherapy of gastric cancer. We cultured SGC7901/CDDP cells by long-term exposure of SGC7901 cells to small doses of CDDP in vitro. The cells were treated with aspirin, CDDP or aspirin plus CDDP for 24 h and cell growth was assessed by the MTT assay, the apoptotic rate by flow cytometry, the survivin mRNA expression by RT-PCR and the survivin protein expression by western blotting. The results revealed that the cell growth in the aspirin plus CDDP group was significantly inhibited. The apoptotic rate in the aspirin plus CDDP was significantly higher compared to that in the other groups. The survivin mRNA and protein expression were also significantly reduced in the aspirin plus CDDP group. Our data suggest that the combination of aspirin and CDDP exhibited a higher degree of toxicity against SGC7901/CDDP cells compared to that of aspirin or CDDP alone. Thus, the combination of aspirin plus CDDP may reduce the expression of survivin and induce the apoptosis of SGC7901/CDDP cells. PMID:24748972

  8. In Vitro Cytotoxic Effects of Celecoxib, Mefenamic Acid, Aspirin and Indometacin on Several Cells Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, Hoda; Falsafi, Farideh; Tahmasebi Arashlo, Mehrnaz; Rajabalian, Saied; Gandjalikhan Nassab, Sayed Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors as chemotherapy agents has attracted the attention of a large number of investigators in recent years. Given the importance of cancer therapy, only a limited number of studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on specific cell lines. Purpose This research aimed to determine the in vitro cytotoxic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors) on KB, Saos-2, 1321N, U-87MG, SFBF-PI 39 cell lines. Materials and Method Powders of celecoxib, mefenamic acid, aspirin and indometacin were dissolved in the appropriate solvent. The viability of cell lines was carried out by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay technique. Data gathered from four separate experiments were expressed as mean±SD. Statistical significance was defined at p< 0.05 by using analysis of variance. Significant treatment mean values were subjected to post-hoc Tukey’s test. Results Celecoxib showed marked cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Celecoxib was not effective in killing U-87MG cell line. Mefenamic acid exerted cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, where the viability was approximately 75%. U-87MG cells were resistant to mefenamic acid. Indometacin had the highest rate of activity on U-87MG cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Aspirin did not exhibit any activity on these cell lines and was not effective in killing U-87MG, KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells. Conclusion This research showed that celecoxib, indometacin, and mefenamic acid have the cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, 1321N and U-87MG cell lines. Therefore, it appears that these drugs can be considered as anti-neoplastic agents in the experimental phase. PMID:27602398

  9. Glucuronidation of the aspirin metabolite salicylic acid by expressed UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Gwendolyn E; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2006-02-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for treatment of pain and arthritis. In the body, acetylsalicylic acid is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid. Both compounds have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Major metabolites of salicylic acid are its acyl and phenolic glucuronide conjugates. Formation of these conjugates, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), decreases the amount of pharmacologically active salicylic acid present. We aimed to identify the UGTs catalyzing the glucuronidation of salicylic acid using both heterologously expressed enzymes and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify glucuronidation activity of UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17 Supersomes. All UGTs tested, except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17, catalyzed salicylic acid phenolic and acyl glucuronidation. Ratios of salicylic acid phenolic to acyl glucuronide formation varied more than 12-fold from 0.5 for UGT1A6 to 6.1 for UGT1A1. These results suggest that all UGTs except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17 might be involved in the glucuronidation of salicylic acid in vivo. From comparisons of apparent Km values determined in pooled HLMs and in expressed UGTs, UGT2B7 was suggested as a likely catalyst of salicylic acid acyl glucuronidation, whereas multiple UGTs were suggested as catalysts of phenolic glucuronidation. The results of this UGT screening may help target future evaluation of the effects of UGT polymorphisms on response to aspirin in clinical and population-based studies. PMID:16258079

  10. Is there an association between low dose aspirin and anemia (without overt bleeding)?: narrative review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Overt bleeding associated with low dose aspirin (LDA) is well-recognized, little attention is given to the possibility of association between LDA and occult bleeding, although this is known to occur in healthy volunteers. LDA is used increasingly in primary and secondary prevention of a number of medical conditions, many of which are common in older people, as is anemia. Anemia in older people is associated with adverse outcomes including disability, morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to review the evidence that LDA might cause anemia without overt bleeding. Methods An extensive narrative review was carried out. Electronic searching (including database links) and reference lists of reports were used to identify studies reporting on use of aspirin ≤325 mg/day and anemia or change in hemoglobin (Hb) without overt bleeding. Data were extracted from reports of trials, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and prevalence studies of adults aged ≥18 years, published since 1980. Results There are few relevant data, with considerable heterogeneity among trial designs, duration, and patient characteristics in studies of LDA. In five randomised trials (n = 5879) in (mostly secondary) prevention, the majority of patients were men without peptic ulcer disease aged 50-70 years and no consistent association between LDA and change in Hb was found. In two smaller studies (n = 609) of primary prevention in healthy patients aged ≥70 years, there was a small but statistically significant fall in Hb with LDA. Observational studies, and data from trials in which use of LDA was not a primary focus of the study, were inconclusive. Conclusions It is not clear whether there is an association between LDA and anemia in the absence of overt bleeding, but there may be an association between LDA and fall in Hb in (a subset of) older patients. The available evidence has significant limitations, which are discussed; studies including more older patients, and

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and 15-epi-LXA4. However it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE2, TXB2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE2, but increased LTB4, LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE2, and TXB2. The increments in LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE2 and TXB2 suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  12. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior heart attack: ticagrelor plus aspirin versus aspirin monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amico, Frank; Schlesinger, Alex; Mazzoni, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Bonaca MP, Bhatt DL, Cohen M, et al. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:1791-1800. This Practice Pearl reviews the recent study Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared With Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54 (PEGASUS-TIMI 54). It challenges the current standard of care of 12 months of dual antiplatelet followed by aspirin indefinitely. The study demonstrated that patients who received ticagrelor, either the 60 mg or 90 mg twice daily plus aspirin, showed a decreased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial also proved that the benefit of ticagrelor was seen early and continued to accrue over time, with a median of 33 months of follow-up, meaning that the benefit persists over time. It is important to note that both doses of the ticagrelor were associated with higher incidence of bleeding, but the rates of fatal bleeding did not show any difference between the ticagrelor or placebo. PMID:26689345

  13. Studies on Aspirin Crystals Generated by a Modified Vapor Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit; Malhotra, Deepak; Jain, Preeti; Kalia, Anupama; Shunmugaperumal, Tamilvanan

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of the current investigation were (1) to study the influence of selected two different non-solvents (diethylether and dichloromethane) on the drug crystal formation of a model drug, aspirin (ASP-I) by the modified vapor diffusion method and (2) to characterize and compare the generated crystals (ASP-II and ASP-III) using different analytical techniques with that of unprocessed ASP-I. When compared to the classical vapor diffusion method which consumes about 15 days to generate drug crystals, the modified method needs only 12 h to get the same. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that the internal structures of ASP-II and ASP-III crystals were identical when compared with ASP-I. Although the drug crystals showed a close similarity in X-ray diffraction patterns, the difference in the relative intensities of some of the diffraction peaks (especially at 2θ values of around 7.7 and 15.5) could be attributed to the crystal habit or crystal size modification. Similarly, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study speculates that only the crystal habit modifications might occur but without involving any change in internal structure of the generated drug polymorphic form I. This is further substantiated from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures that indicated the formation of platy shape for the ASP-II crystals and needle shape for the ASP-III crystals. In addition, the observed slow dissolution of ASP crystals should indicate polymorph form I formation. Thus, the modified vapor diffusion method could routinely be used to screen and legally secure all possible forms of other drug entities too. PMID:26729528

  14. The Use of Drugs in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Steven

    Indications, precautions, contraindications, and side effects of drugs most frequently used by athletic trainers in treating injuries are discussed: (1) aspirin; (2) arylalkanoic derivatives; (3) butazolidin and tandearil; (4) corticosteroids; (5) oral corticosteroids; (6) muscle relaxants; (7) analgesics; (8) cold medications; (9) antidiarrheal…

  15. Asplatin enhances drug efficacy by altering the cellular response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qinqin; Shi, Hongdong; Wang, Hongxia; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yangzhong

    2016-07-13

    Aspirin, a widely used anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to be effective for the prevention and remission of cancers (Science, 2012, 337(21) 1471-1473). Asplatin, a Pt(iv) prodrug of cisplatin with the ligation of aspirin (c,c,t-[PtCl2(NH3)2(OH)(aspirin)]), demonstrates significantly higher cytotoxicity than cisplatin towards tumor cells and almost fully overcomes the drug resistance of cisplatin resistant cells. In this work, we have studied the molecular mechanism of asplatin by investigating the cellular response to this compound in order to understand the prominent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of cancer cells. The apoptosis analyses and the related gene expression measurements show that aspirin released from asplatin significantly modulates the cellular response to the platinum agent. Asplatin promotes the apoptosis via the BCL-2 associated mitochondrial pathway. The down-regulation of BCL-2 along with the up-regulation of BAX and BAK enhances the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, resulting in the cytochrome c release from mitochondria into the cytosol. This event promotes the apoptosis by activation of caspase processing. Consequently, the ligation of aspirin significantly enhances the drug efficacy of the platinum complex in the low micromolar range. The alteration of the cellular response is probably responsible for the circumvention of the cisplatin resistance by asplatin. These results provide an insight into the mechanism of asplatin and provide information for designing new classic platinum drugs. PMID:27125788

  16. High On-Aspirin Platelet Reactivity and Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Results From ASCET (Aspirin Nonresponsiveness and Clopidogrel Endpoint Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Alf-Åge R.; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Abdelnoor, Michael; Arnesen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with stable coronary artery disease on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin are still at risk for atherothrombotic events, and high on-aspirin residual platelet reactivity (RPR) has been suggested as a risk factor. Methods and Results In this randomized trial, the association between platelet function determined by the PFA100 platelet function analyzer system (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Germany) and clinical outcome in 1001 patients, all on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin (160 mg/d) was studied. Patients were randomized to continue with aspirin 160 mg/d or change to clopidogrel 75 mg/d. A composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and unstable angina was used. At 2-year follow-up, 106 primary end points were registered. The prevalence of high RPR was 25.9%. High on-aspirin RPR did not significantly influence the primary end point in the aspirin group (13.3% versus 9.9%, P=0.31). However, in post hoc analysis, patients with von Willebrand factor levels or platelet count below median values and high on-aspirin RPR had a statistically significant higher end point rate than that of patients with low RPR (20% versus 7.5%, P=0.014, and 18.2% versus 10.8%, P=0.039, respectively). The composite end point rate in patients with high on-aspirin RPR treated with clopidogrel was not different from that of patients treated with aspirin (7.6% versus 13.3%, P=0.16). Conclusions In stable, aspirin-treated patients with coronary artery disease, high on-aspirin RPR did not relate to clinical outcome and did not identify a group responsive to clopidogrel. Post hoc subgroup analysis raised the possibility that high on-aspirin RPR might be predictive in patients with low von Willebrand factor or platelet count, but these findings will require confirmation in future studies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT00222261. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e000703 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112

  17. Thumbnail Sketches: Consumer Application of Chemical Principles: Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John W.; Jones, Susan M.

    1985-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry can be made more meaningful to beginning students by using familiar drugs as examples. They include: (1) drugs (nicotine, cocaine, and aspirin); (2) general anesthesia (nitrous oxide, enflurane, isoflurane, and halothane); (3) local anesthetics (procaine, lidocaine, and cocaine); and (4) intravenous anesthetics (thiopental,…

  18. Differential Sex Response to Aspirin in Decreasing Aneurysm Rupture in Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Correa, Tatiana; Jabbour, Pascal M; Zanaty, Mario; Brown, Robert D; Torner, James C; Hasan, David M

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that aspirin decreases the risk of cerebral aneurysm rupture in humans. We aim to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin and confirm these observations in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysm. A nested case-control analysis from the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms was performed to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin. A series of experiments were subsequently performed in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysms were induced with hypertension and elastase injection into mice basal cisterns. We found that aspirin decreased the risk of aneurysm rupture more significantly in men than in women in the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms. In mice, aspirin and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor did not affect cerebral aneurysm formation but significantly decreased the incidence of rupture. The incidence of rupture was significantly lower in male versus female mice on aspirin. Gene expression analysis from cerebral arteries showed higher 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase levels in male mice. The rate of cerebral aneurysm rupture was similar in male mice receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase inhibitor compared with females receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase agonist, signaling a reversal of the sex-differential response to aspirin. Aspirin decreases aneurysm rupture in human and mice, in part through cyclooxygenase-2 pathways. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests a consistent differential effect by sex. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activation in females reduces the incidence of rupture and eliminates the sex-differential response to aspirin. PMID:27296993

  19. Aspirin induces cell death and caspase-dependent phosphatidylserine externalization in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, E; Dalmau, M; Barragán, M; Pueyo, G; Bartrons, R; Gil, J

    1999-01-01

    The induction of cell death by aspirin was analysed in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. Aspirin induced two hallmarks of apoptosis: nuclear chromatin condensation and increase in phosphatidylserine externalization. However, aspirin did not induce either oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA, decrease in DNA content or nuclear fragmentation. The effect of aspirin on Annexin V binding was inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases in the apoptotic action of aspirin. However, aspirin did not induce proteolysis of PARP, suggesting that aspirin does not increase nuclear caspase 3-like activity in HT-29 cells. This finding may be related with the ‘atypical’ features of aspirin-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496355

  20. Selective inhibition by aspirin and naproxen of mainstream cigarette smoke-induced genotoxicity and lung tumors in female mice.

    PubMed

    Balansky, Roumen; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Micale, Rosanna T; La Maestra, Sebastiano; D'Oria, Chiara; Steele, Vernon E; De Flora, Silvio

    2016-05-01

    The role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in smoke-related lung carcinogenesis is still controversial. We have developed and validated a murine model for evaluating the tumorigenicity of mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) and its modulation by chemopreventive agents. In the present study, the protective effects of the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors aspirin and naproxen were investigated by using a total of 277 Swiss H neonatal mice of both genders. Groups of mice were exposed whole-body to MCS during the first 4 months of life, followed by an additional 3.5 months in filtered air in order to allow a better growth of tumors. Aspirin (1600 mg/kg diet) and naproxen (320 mg/kg diet) were given after weanling until the end of the experiment. After 4 months of exposure, MCS significantly enhanced the frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of mice, and naproxen prevented such systemic genotoxic damage in female mice. After 7.5 months, exposure of mice to MCS resulted in the formation of lung tumors, both benign and malignant, and in several other histopathological lesions detectable both in the respiratory tract and in the urinary tract. Aspirin and, even more sharply, naproxen significantly inhibited the formation of lung tumors in MCS-exposed mice, but this protective effect selectively occurred in female mice only. These results lend support to the views that estrogens are involved in smoke-related pulmonary carcinogenesis and that NSAIDs have antiestrogenic properties. The two NSAIDs proved to be safe and efficacious in the experimental model used. PMID:26104855

  1. Aspirin and atenolol enhance metformin activity against breast cancer by targeting both neoplastic and microenvironment cells.

    PubMed

    Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Reggiani, Francesca; Mancuso, Patrizia; Calleri, Angelica; Gregato, Giuliana; Labanca, Valentina; Rossi, Teresa; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana; Bertolini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can induce breast cancer (BC) cell apoptosis and reduce BC local and metastatic growth in preclinical models. Since Metformin is frequently used along with Aspirin or beta-blockers, we investigated the effect of Metformin, Aspirin and the beta-blocker Atenolol in several BC models. In vitro, Aspirin synergized with Metformin in inducing apoptosis of triple negative and endocrine-sensitive BC cells, and in activating AMPK in BC and in white adipose tissue (WAT) progenitors known to cooperate to BC progression. Both Aspirin and Atenolol added to the inhibitory effect of Metformin against complex I of the respiratory chain. In both immune-deficient and immune-competent preclinical models, Atenolol increased Metformin activity against angiogenesis, local and metastatic growth of HER2+ and triple negative BC. Aspirin increased the activity of Metformin only in immune-competent HER2+ BC models. Both Aspirin and Atenolol, when added to Metformin, significantly reduced the endothelial cell component of tumor vessels, whereas pericytes were reduced by the addition of Atenolol but not by the addition of Aspirin. Our data indicate that the addition of Aspirin or of Atenolol to Metformin might be beneficial for BC control, and that this activity is likely due to effects on both BC and microenvironment cells. PMID:26728433

  2. Aspirin and atenolol enhance metformin activity against breast cancer by targeting both neoplastic and microenvironment cells

    PubMed Central

    Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Reggiani, Francesca; Mancuso, Patrizia; Calleri, Angelica; Gregato, Giuliana; Labanca, Valentina; Rossi, Teresa; Noonan, Douglas M.; Albini, Adriana; Bertolini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can induce breast cancer (BC) cell apoptosis and reduce BC local and metastatic growth in preclinical models. Since Metformin is frequently used along with Aspirin or beta-blockers, we investigated the effect of Metformin, Aspirin and the beta-blocker Atenolol in several BC models. In vitro, Aspirin synergized with Metformin in inducing apoptosis of triple negative and endocrine-sensitive BC cells, and in activating AMPK in BC and in white adipose tissue (WAT) progenitors known to cooperate to BC progression. Both Aspirin and Atenolol added to the inhibitory effect of Metformin against complex I of the respiratory chain. In both immune-deficient and immune-competent preclinical models, Atenolol increased Metformin activity against angiogenesis, local and metastatic growth of HER2+ and triple negative BC. Aspirin increased the activity of Metformin only in immune-competent HER2+ BC models. Both Aspirin and Atenolol, when added to Metformin, significantly reduced the endothelial cell component of tumor vessels, whereas pericytes were reduced by the addition of Atenolol but not by the addition of Aspirin. Our data indicate that the addition of Aspirin or of Atenolol to Metformin might be beneficial for BC control, and that this activity is likely due to effects on both BC and microenvironment cells. PMID:26728433

  3. Aspirin-intolerant asthma: a comprehensive review of biomarkers and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan R; Teran, Luis M

    2013-08-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is a tetrad of nasal polyps, chronic hypertrophic eosinophilic sinusitis, asthma, and sensitivity to aspirin. Unawareness of this clinical condition by patients and physicians may have grave consequences because of its association with near-fatal asthma. The pathogenesis of aspirin-intolerant asthma is not related with an immunoglobin E mechanism, but with an abnormal metabolism of the lipoxygenase (LO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways. At present, a diagnosis of aspirin sensitivity can be established only by provocative aspirin challenge, which represents a health risk for the patient. This circumstance has encouraged the search for aspirin intolerance-specific biomarkers. Major attempts have focused on mediators related with inflammation and eicosanoid regulation. The use of modern laboratory techniques including high-throughput methods has facilitated the detection of dozens of biological metabolites associated with aspirin-intolerant asthma disease. Not surprisingly, the majority of these is implicated in the LO and COX pathways. However, substantial amounts of data reveal the participation of many genes deriving from different ontologies. Biomarkers may represent a powerful, noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of aspirin sensitivity; moreover, they could provide a new way to classify asthma phenotypes. PMID:23184151

  4. Aspirin Use on Incidence and Mortality of Gastrointestinal Cancers: Current State of Epidemiological Evidence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kuan; Tu, Hui-Tzu; See, Lai-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the most widely used medications since its first synthesis more than 100 years ago. In addition to short-term use for pain and fever relief, regular use of aspirin has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases and strokes. The issue of regular aspirin use in cancer prevention is definitely promising, which has been supported by growing evidence from a number of observational studies and post-trial follow-up data. Among all cancers, aspirin is showing to be the most effective in reducing the risk of colorectal cancer, and even at lower doses demonstrates a 30-40% effectiveness in preventing colorectal cancer. Esophagus and stomach cancers are two cancers getting increased attention from emerging evidence of meta-analyses. Given the common side effects of aspirin, such as gastrointestinal complications, whether it is ready to take aspirin regularly for general population remains controversial since more studies are needed to clarify the net balance between harm and benefit. The decision might become more complicated since recently one molecular epidemiology study showed that different genetic traits may impact the effect of aspirin on colorectal cancer. Here we summarize recent evidence from meta-analyses related to gastrointestinal cancers. We reviewed updated observational studies and post-trial follow up data from randomized controlled trials focusing on the role of aspirin in the incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26369680

  5. Aspirin After Mini-Stroke May Help Prevent Full-Blown Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158939.html Aspirin After Mini-Stroke May Help Prevent Full-Blown Stroke Study finds risk is reduced by as much ... HealthDay News) -- Taking aspirin immediately after a mini-stroke significantly reduces the risk of a major stroke, ...

  6. Aspirin Promotes Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Proliferation and Differentiation after White Matter Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Zuo, Shilun; Wang, Jing; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yunxia; Zhao, Jun; Han, Junliang; Xiong, Lize; Shi, Ming; Liu, Zhirong

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral white matter lesion (WML) is one of the main causes for cognitive impairment and is often caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. A line of evidence has shown that aspirin has neuroprotective effects and produces some benefits in long-term outcome and survival for ischemic stroke patients. However, whether aspirin exerts a protective effect against WML is still largely unknown. Here, we showed that aspirin could promote oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and differentiation into oligodendrocytes after WML. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, a well-established model for WML. Four weeks later, Morris water maze test showed an impairment of learning and memory ability of rat while aspirin treatment improved behavioral performance. Low dose of aspirin (25 mg/kg) was found to elevate the number of OPCs while relatively high doses (100–200 mg/kg) increased that of oligodendrocytes, and ameliorated WML-induced the thinning of myelin, as revealed by the electron microscope. Similarly, our in vitro study also showed that relatively low and high doses of aspirin enhanced OPC proliferation and differentiation into oligodendrocytes, respectively. Furthermore, we revealed that aspirin enhanced extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) but inhibited RhoA activities. In summary, we provided the first evidence that aspirin can promote oligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte myelination after WML, which may involve ERK and RhoA pathways. PMID:24478700

  7. Aspirin and Zileuton and Biomarker Expression in Nasal Tissue of Current Smokers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies the effects of aspirin and zileuton on genes related to tobacco use in current smokers. Smokers are at increased risk for developing lung and other cancers. Aspirin and zileuton may interfere with genes related to tobacco use and may be useful in preventing lung cancer in current smokers. |

  8. The ADAPTABLE Trial and Aspirin Dosing in Secondary Prevention for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Abigail; Jones, W Schuyler; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the underlying cause of death in one out of seven deaths in the USA. Aspirin therapy has been proven to decrease mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with CAD. Despite a plethora of studies showing the benefit of aspirin in secondary prevention of cardiovascular events, debate remains regarding the optimal dose due to relatively small studies that had disparate results when comparing patients taking different aspirin dosages. More recently, aspirin dosing has been thoroughly studied in the CAD population with concomitant therapy (such as P2Y12 inhibitors); however, patients in these studies were not randomized to aspirin dose. No randomized controlled trial has directly measured aspirin dosages in a population of patients with established coronary artery disease. In 2015, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) developed a network, called PCORnet, that includes patient-powered research networks (PPRN) and clinical data research networks (CDRN). The main objective of PCORnet is to conduct widely generalizable observational studies and clinical trials (including large, pragmatic clinical trials) at a low cost. The first clinical trial, called Aspirin Dosing: A Patient-centric Trial Assessing Benefits and Long-term Effectiveness (ADAPTABLE), will randomly assign 20,000 subjects with established coronary heart disease to either low dose (81 mg) or high dose (325 mg) and should be able to finally answer which dosage of aspirin is best for patients with established cardiovascular disease. PMID:27423939

  9. Syrup formulations for post-tonsillectomy analgesia: a double-blind study comparing ibuprofen, aspirin and placebo.

    PubMed

    Parker, D A; Gibbin, K P; Noyelle, R M

    1986-09-01

    Post-tonsillectomy analgesia from ibuprofen, aspirin and placebo is compared in a double-blind study. The results are reported showing ibuprofen to have greater therapeutic benefit than placebo whereas aspirin did not. Methods of providing pain relief after tonsillectomy and the relative clinical merits of ibuprofen and aspirin are discussed. PMID:3531373

  10. The in vitro effects of Xancor, a synthetic astaxanthine derivative, on hemostatic biomarkers in aspirin-naïve and aspirin-treated subjects with multiple risk factors for vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor; Malinin, Alex; Goodin, Thomas; Pashkow, Fredric

    2010-01-01

    Astaxanthine is a polar carotenoid metabolite derived from a proprietary prodrug, Xancor, which aligns parallel with the membrane phospholipids exhibiting potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cell protective properties, although the precise mechanism of action is unknown. This prodrug is currently under development for hepatic, neurologic, and vascular disease indications. Considering established links between heart disease and stroke with platelets, coagulation cascade, and fibrinolysis, the aim of the study was to assess the effect of asthaxantine on human biomarkers of hemostasis. The rationale was to test a hypothesis that the drug may diminish activation of hemostasis, making it a potentially attractive addition to treat patients with vascular disease. In vitro effects of whole blood preincubation with escalating concentrations of asthaxantine (0.3 microM, 1 microM, 3 microM, 10 microM, 30 microM, and 100 microM) were assessed from 12 aspirin-naïve and eight aspirin-treated volunteers with multiple risk factors for vascular disease. A total of 25 biomarkers were measured, of which 12 were related to platelet function, 10 to coagulation, and three to fibrinolysis. Platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and arachidonic acid and expression of CD31, CD41, GP IIb/IIIa, CD51/61, P-selectin, CD63, CD107a, CD151+CD14, and CD154 were not affected. Coagulation indices such as aPTT, prothrombin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, antithrombin III (antigen and activity), Protein C, Protein S (free and activity), and von Willebrand factor remained unchanged after incubation with astaxanthine. Fibrinolytic activity biomarkers such as plasminogen, D-dimer, and FDP were also not affected after in vitro pretreatment of blood samples with astaxanthine. In the projected subclinical (less than 1 microM), therapeutic (3 microM to 30 microM), and supratherapeutic concentration (100 microM), astaxanthine in vitro does not affect platelet, coagulation, or fibrinolytic

  11. Exonic Variants Associated with Development of Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, HunSoo; Park, Jong Sook; Bae, Da-Jeong; Song, Hyun-Ji; Choi, Inseon S.; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Park, Hea-Sim; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Namgoong, Suhg; Kim, Ji On; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is one phenotype of asthma, often occurring in the form of a severe and sudden attack. Due to the time-consuming nature and difficulty of oral aspirin challenge (OAC) for AERD diagnosis, non-invasive biomarkers have been sought. The aim of this study was to identify AERD-associated exonic SNPs and examine the diagnostic potential of a combination of these candidate SNPs to predict AERD. DNA from 165 AERD patients, 397 subjects with aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA), and 398 normal controls were subjected to an Exome BeadChip assay containing 240K SNPs. 1,023 models (210-1) were generated from combinations of the top 10 SNPs, selected by the p-values in association with AERD. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was calculated for each model. SNP Function Portal and PolyPhen-2 were used to validate the functional significance of candidate SNPs. An exonic SNP, exm537513 in HLA-DPB1, showed the lowest p-value (p = 3.40×10−8) in its association with AERD risk. From the top 10 SNPs, a combination model of 7 SNPs (exm537513, exm83523, exm1884673, exm538564, exm2264237, exm396794, and exm791954) showed the best AUC of 0.75 (asymptotic p-value of 7.94×10−21), with 34% sensitivity and 93% specificity to discriminate AERD from ATA. Amino acid changes due to exm83523 in CHIA were predicted to be “probably damaging” to the structure and function of the protein, with a high score of ‘1’. A combination model of seven SNPs may provide a useful, non-invasive genetic marker combination for predicting AERD. PMID:25372592

  12. Low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia (GISP).

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    In this pilot study, aimed at exploring the feasibility of a large-scale trial of low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera (PV), 112 PV patients (42 females, 70 males. aged 17-80 years) were selected for not having a clear indication for, or contraindication to, aspirin treatment and randomized to receive oral aspirin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up duration was 16 +/- 6 months. Measurements of thromboxane A2 production during whole blood clotting demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity in patients receiving aspirin. Aspirin administration was not associated with any bleeding complication. Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study indicates that a biochemically effective regimen of antiplatelet therapy is well tolerated in patients with polycythaemia vera and that a large-scale placebo-controlled trial is feasible. PMID:9163613

  13. Warfarin and low-dose aspirin for stroke prevention from severe intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Sila, C A; Furland, A J

    1999-01-01

    Management of symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial atherosclerosis is controversial. We assessed the safety and efficacy of combining warfarin and low-dose aspirin to prevent stroke from intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis failing prior treatment with either aspirin or warfarin. Patients with severe intracranial stenosis were prescribed combination therapy, warfarin (international normalized ratio [INR] 2 to 3) and aspirin 81 mg daily. Ten men and six women treated with combination therapy had one recurrent ischemic event during 382 months of therapy. No patient suffered a myocardial infarction or sudden vascular death. No serious hemorrhagic complication occurred. The combination of warfarin and low-dose aspirin seems safe and effective in preventing recurrent stroke from symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial occlusive disease after failure with either aspirin or warfarin monotherapy. PMID:17895135

  14. Cost-effective prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism after total joint arthroplasty: warfarin versus aspirin.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi Tabatabaee, Reza; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-02-01

    Although recent guidelines suggest aspirin for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in low risk patients following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are no cost-effectiveness studies comparing aspirin and warfarin. In a Markov cohort cost-effectiveness analysis, we found that aspirin cost less and saved more quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) than warfarin in all age groups. Cost per QALY gained by aspirin was $24,506.20 at age of 55 and $47,148.10 at the age of 85 following THA and $15,117.20 and $24,458.10 after TKA, which were greater than warfarin. In patients undergoing THA/TKA without prior VTE, aspirin is more cost-effective prophylactic agent than warfarin. Warfarin might be a better prophylaxis in TKA patients with high probability of VTE and very low probability of bleeding. PMID:25534862

  15. Direct Costs of Aspirin versus Warfarin for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis after Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Zmistowski, Benjamin M; Lonner, Jess H; Purtill, James J; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-09-01

    Interest in aspirin as an alternative strategy for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after arthroplasty has grown, as studies have suggested improved clinical efficacy and lower complication rates with aspirin compared to warfarin. The goal of this study was to compare the direct costs of an episode of arthroplasty care, when using aspirin instead of warfarin. The charts of patients who either received aspirin or warfarin after arthroplasty from January 2008 to March 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Charges were recorded for their index admission, and for subsequent admissions related to either VTE or complications of prophylaxis. Multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was an independent predictor of decreased cost of index hospitalization, and total episode of care charges, achieved largely through a shorter length of hospitalization. PMID:26073347

  16. Antiplatelet Agents in Cardiology: A Report on Aspirin, Clopidogrel, Prasugrel, and Ticagrelor.

    PubMed

    Dobesh, Paul P; Varnado, Sara; Doyle, Meagan

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are the cornerstone of therapy in many cardiovascular conditions. With the current success and increased use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), the use of antiplatelet therapy is considered part of the medical therapy for these patients. Clinicians caring for these patients need to have a thorough understanding of the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic, and clinical efficacy and safety of commonly used antiplatelet therapy. While aspirin therapy is widely used, dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel has become part of standard of care. Despite the extensive experience with clopidogrel, there are limitations such as drug interactions, metabolism genetic polymorphisms, and variability in the antiplatelet response. More predictable and more potent antiplatelet agents, prasugrel and ticagrelor, have demonstrated superior reductions in ischemic endpoints as part of dual antiplatelet therapy compared to clopidogrel, but at the cost of more major bleeding in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Significant research needs to be conducted in the setting of TAVI to help define the optimal antiplatelet regimen. PMID:26642781

  17. β-Cyclodextrin inclusion complex: preparation, characterization, and its aspirin release in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui-Yun; Jiang, Ling-Juan; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Jun-Bo

    2012-09-01

    In this work, the optimal clathration condition was investigated for the preparation of aspirin-β-cyclodextrin (Asp-β-CD) inclusion complex using design of experiment (DOE) methodology. A 3-level, 3-factor Box-Behnken design with a total of 17 experimental runs was used. The Asp-β-CD inclusion complex was prepared by saturated solution method. The influence on the embedding rate was investigated, including molar ratio of β-CD to Asp, clathration temperature and clathration time, and the optimum values of such three test variables were found to be 0.82, 49°C and 2.0 h, respectively. The embedding rate could be up to 61.19%. The formation of the bonding between -COOH group of Asp and O-H group of β-CD might play an important role in the process of clathration according to FT-IR spectra. Release kinetics of Asp from inclusion complex was studied for the evaluation of drug release mechanism and diffusion coefficients. The results showed that the drug release from matrix occurred through Fickian diffusion mechanism. The cumulative release of Asp reached only 40% over 24 h, so the inclusion complex could potentially be applied as a long-acting delivery system.

  18. Aspirin for the Prevention of Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Stephanie; Odibo, Anthony O; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been used for several years for the prevention of preeclampsia (PE). LDA started in early pregnancy is associated with improvement of placental implantation. The best evidence suggest that LDA can prevent more than half of PE cases in high-risk women when started before 16 weeks of gestation. Moreover, LDA started in early pregnancy reduces the risk of other placenta-mediated complications such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and perinatal death. The efficacy of LDA has been demonstrated in women with abnormal first-trimester uterine artery Doppler or with prior history of chronic hypertension or preeclampsia. PMID:27235915

  19. Effect of Several Drugs on Gastric Potential Difference in Man

    PubMed Central

    Murray, H. S.; Strottman, M. P.; Cooke, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of gastric mucosal potential difference was used to study the effect on the gastric mucosal barrier in six volunteer subjects of several drugs known to provoke ulcers. Potential differences were also recorded in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis being treated with long-term aspirin and five patients on long-term prednisone. Unbuffered aspirin and ethanol “broke” the barrier as shown by a rapid fall in potential difference. The effects of aspirin were dose related, with 600 mg causing a greater reduction than 300 mg. The effects of aspirin and ethanol given together were additive and caused the greatest fall in potential difference. Sodium acetylsalicylate did not alter the normal potential difference. Indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone all failed to cause any change in potential difference. The patients on long-term aspirin and prednisone had readings within the normal range and responded the same as normal subjects to an acute challenge. These studies show that aspirin and ethanol will damage the gastric mucosal barrier but that indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone do not. PMID:4808815

  20. Aspirin use for primary prophylaxis: Adverse outcomes in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Souk, Karina M; Tamim, Hani M; Abu Daya, Hussein A; Rockey, Don C; Barada, Kassem A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) taking aspirin for primary prophylaxis to those not taking it. METHODS: Patients not known to have any vascular disease (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease) who were admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 1993 and 2010 with NVUGIB were included. The frequencies of in-hospital mortality, re-bleeding, severe bleeding, need for surgery or embolization, and of a composite outcome defined as the occurrence of any of the 4 bleeding related adverse outcomes were compared between patients receiving aspirin and those on no antithrombotics. We also compared frequency of in hospital complications and length of hospital stay between the two groups. RESULTS: Of 357 eligible patients, 94 were on aspirin and 263 patients were on no antithrombotics (control group). Patients in the aspirin group were older, the mean age was 58 years in controls and 67 years in the aspirin group (P < 0.001). Patients in the aspirin group had significantly more co-morbidities, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension [25 (27%) vs 31 (112%) and 44 (47%) vs 74 (28%) respectively, (P = 0.001)], as well as dyslipidemia [21 (22%) vs 16 (6%), P < 0.0001). Smoking was more frequent in the aspirin group [34 (41%) vs 60 (27%), P = 0.02)]. The frequencies of endoscopic therapy and surgery were similar in both groups. Patients who were on aspirin had lower in-hospital mortality rates (2.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.002), shorter hospital stay (4.9 d vs 7 d, P = 0.01), and fewer composite outcomes (10.6% vs 24%, P = 0.01). The frequencies of in-hospital complications and re-bleeding were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who present with NVUGIB while receiving aspirin for primary prophylaxis had fewer adverse outcomes. Thus aspirin may have a protective effect beyond its cardiovascular benefits. PMID:27462392

  1. Use of antiplatelet drugs after cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Victor A; Bolanos, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Unfortunately, venous bypass grafts still have a prominent role in operative coronary revascularization (coronary artery bypass graft [CABG]). Venous grafts develop pathologically occlusive disease that limits the effectiveness of CABG, and antiplatelet drugs following operation may limit this problem. The types and indications of antiplatelet drugs following CABG generate some controversy in the recent literature. This review surveys relevant evidence about the use of antiplatelet drugs following CABG to identify the controversial issues, define appropriate questions, and attempt to provide evidence-based interventions that may be helpful in limiting graft occlusion after CABG. Evidence suggests that, in most CABG patients, dual antiplatelet drugs (aspirin and clopidogrel), given after operation, minimizes early (within 1 year) graft failure and improves intermediate-term outcomes, better than single antiplatelet therapy with aspirin alone. There are gaps in the knowledge base that supports this contention, and future clinical trials will likely augment or alter this recommendation. PMID:25527016

  2. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study: Variation in Platelet Response to Clopidogrel and Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Laura M.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Ryan, Kathy A.; Herzog, William R.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Horenstein, Richard B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are commonly prescribed anti-platelet medications indicated for patients who have experienced, or are at risk for, ischemic cardiovascular events. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study was designed to characterize determinants of clopidogrel and dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) response in a healthy cohort of Old Order Amish from Lancaster, PA. Following a loading dose, clopidogrel was taken once a day for 7 days. One hour after the last dose of clopidogrel, 325 mg of aspirin was given. Ex vivo platelet aggregometry was performed at baseline, post-clopidogrel, and post-DAPT. Platelet aggregation measurements were significantly lower after both interventions for all agonists tested (p <0.05), although there was large inter-individual variation in the magnitude of anti-platelet response. Female sex and older age were associated with higher platelet aggregation at all three time-points. Change in aggregation was correlated among the various agonists at each time point. Heritability (h2) of change in platelet aggregation was significant for most traits at all time-points (range h2=0.14–0.57). Utilization of a standardized, short-term intervention provided a powerful approach to investigate sources of variation in platelet aggregation response due to drug therapy. Further, this short-term intervention approach may provide a useful paradigm for pharmacogenomics studies. PMID:26374108

  3. Synthesis and Chemical and Biological Comparison of Nitroxyl and Nitric Oxide Releasing Diazeniumdiolate-based Aspirin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Basudhar, Debashree; Bharadwaj, Gaurav; Cheng, Robert Y.; Jain, Sarthak; Shi, Sa; Heinecke, Julie L.; Holland, Ryan J.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Caceres, Viviane M.; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina C.; Paolocci, Nazareno; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wink, David A.; Miranda, Katrina M.

    2013-01-01

    Structural modifications of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have successfully reduced the side effect of gastrointestinal ulceration without affecting anti-inflammatory activity, but may increase risk of myocardial infarction with chronic use. That nitroxyl (HNO) reduces platelet aggregation, preconditions against myocardial infarction and enhances contractility led us to synthesize a diazeniumdiolate-based HNO releasing aspirin and to compare it to an NO-releasing analogue. Here, the decomposition mechanisms are described for these compounds. In addition to protection against stomach ulceration, these prodrugs also exhibited significantly enhanced cytotoxcity compared to either aspirin or the parent diazeniumdiolate toward non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549) but were not appreciably toxic toward endothelial cells (HUVECs). The HNO-NSAID prodrug inhibited cylcooxgenase-2 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and triggered significant sarcomere shortening compared to control on murine ventricular myocytes. Together, these anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplasic and contractile properties suggest the potential of HNO-NSAIDs in the treatment of inflammation, cancer or heart failure. PMID:24102516

  4. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study: Variation in Platelet Response to Clopidogrel and Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Bozzi, Laura M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Lewis, Joshua P; Ryan, Kathy A; Herzog, William R; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Horenstein, Richard B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are commonly prescribed anti-platelet medications indicated for patients who have experienced, or are at risk for, ischemic cardiovascular events. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study was designed to characterize determinants of clopidogrel and dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) response in a healthy cohort of Old Order Amish from Lancaster, PA. Following a loading dose, clopidogrel was taken once a day for 7 days. One hour after the last dose of clopidogrel, 325 mg of aspirin was given. Ex vivo platelet aggregometry was performed at baseline, post-clopidogrel, and post-DAPT. Platelet aggregation measurements were significantly lower after both interventions for all agonists tested (p <0.05), although there was large inter-individual variation in the magnitude of anti-platelet response. Female sex and older age were associated with higher platelet aggregation at all three time-points. Change in aggregation was correlated among the various agonists at each time point. Heritability (h2) of change in platelet aggregation was significant for most traits at all time-points (range h2=0.14-0.57). Utilization of a standardized, short-term intervention provided a powerful approach to investigate sources of variation in platelet aggregation response due to drug therapy. Further, this short-term intervention approach may provide a useful paradigm for pharmacogenomics studies. PMID:26374108

  5. Minocycline and aspirin in the treatment of bipolar depression: a protocol for a proof-of-concept, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, Jonathan; Preskorn, Sheldon; Teague, T Kent; Drevets, Douglas; Yates, William

    2012-01-01

    Introduction New medication classes are needed to improve treatment effectiveness in the depressed phase of bipolar disorder (BD). Extant evidence suggests that BD is characterised by neural changes such as dendritic remodelling and glial and neuronal cell loss. These changes have been hypothesised to result from chronic inflammation. The principal aims of the proposed research is to evaluate the antidepressant efficacy in bipolar depression of minocycline, a drug with neuroprotective and immune-modulating properties, and of aspirin, at doses expected to selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1). Methods and analysis 120 outpatients between 18 and 55 years of age, who meet DSM-IV-TR criteria for BD (type I or II) and for a current major depressive episode will be recruited to take part in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, proof-of-concept clinical trial following a 2×2 design. As adjuncts to existing treatment, subjects will be randomised to receive one of the four treatment combinations: placebo-minocycline plus placebo-aspirin, active-minocycline plus placebo-aspirin, placebo-minocycline plus active-aspirin or active-minocycline plus active-aspirin. The dose of minocycline and aspirin is 100 mg twice daily and 81 mg twice daily, respectively. Antidepressant response will be evaluated by assessing changes in the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores between baseline and the end of the 6-week trial. As secondary outcome measures, the anti-inflammatory effects of minocycline and aspirin will be tested by measuring pre-treatment and post-treatment levels of C reactive protein and inflammatory cytokines. Ethics and dissemination Minocycline has been widely used as an antibiotic in doses up to 400 mg/day. Low-dose aspirin has been safely used on a worldwide scale for its role as an antithrombotic and thrombolytic. The study progress will be overseen by a Data, Safety and Monitoring Board, which will meet once every

  6. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  7. Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kirthi, Varo; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 10 March 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using aspirin to treat a discrete migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Thirteen studies (4222 participants) compared aspirin 900 mg or 1000 mg, alone or in combination with metoclopramide 10 mg, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 50 mg or 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes, all active treatments were superior to placebo, with NNTs of 8.1, 4.9 and 6.6 for 2-hour pain-free, 2-hour headache relief, and 24-hour headache relief with aspirin alone versus placebo, and 8.8, 3.3 and 6.2 with aspirin plus metoclopramide versus placebo. Sumatriptan 50 mg did not differ from aspirin alone for 2-hour pain-free and headache relief, while sumatriptan 100 mg was better than the combination of aspirin plus metoclopramide for 2-hour pain-free, but not headache relief; there were no data for 24-hour headache relief. Associated symptoms of nausea, vomiting

  8. Can Aspirin and Cancer Prevention be Ageless Companions?

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the rate of cancer diagnosis has increased worldwide due to the increase in population and average life expectancy, and also, due to the advances in diagnostic medical technology that facilitate early cancer detection and recognition. Nonetheless, the treatment options have not been developed proportional to this increase, with a huge number of patients frequently being diagnosed with different types of fatal cancer. This has prompted different health organizations to search for novel strategies to prevent cancer, or even halt its progression. Having failed to provide optimum vascular protection benefits, especially with the introduction of relatively superior antiplatelets, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors; clopidogrel and ticagrelor, regular aspirin use was proposed to reduce the risk of common cancers like colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer and haematological malignancies, as suggested by epidemiological studies. However, it is difficult to draw any firm conclusions on such weak data, as this could raise false hopes among patients and physicians and could potentially mislead scientific research. Clearly, current evidence highlights a gap in medical research and emphasizes the need to carry out interventional studies in high risk for cancer patients using specific aspirin doses in order to validate the data. This should also shed some light on the risk-benefit profile in view of the potential for bleeding complications, especially with the higher doses. PMID:25738074

  9. Evaluation of aspirin hypersensitivity in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kwun, Chul; Kim, Su Il; Lee, Kun Hee; Kim, Sung Wan

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion The recurrence rates of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) were higher in the aspirin nasal provocation test (ANPT)-positive group, regardless of the presence of nasal polyps. Thus, a careful endoscopic examination is required during follow-up in ANPT-positive patients with CRS. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and prognosis after surgical treatment in patients with CRS and aspirin hypersensitivity. Methods In a prospective study, 100 patients were analyzed with CRS who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery at the hospital from October 2012 to March 2013. This study measured changes in nasal volume and symptoms before and after the ANPT and examined patient's asthma history, allergy, Lund-Mackay score (LMS), total immunoglobulin E, percentage of peripheral eosinophils, and objectively measured relapse at 6 months. Results Patients wwith CRS and nasal polyps (CRSwNP) were more likely to have a positive ANPT test result compared to those without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) (21.4% vs 5.5%). The ANPT-positive group had a higher LMS and required more revision endoscopic sinus surgery than those in the ANPT-negative group. The results were that similar results were observed in CRSwNP and CRSsNP. PMID:26924187

  10. The comparative study of acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) and aspirin in the prevention of intestinal adenomatous polyposis in APC(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqi; Wang, Yan; Gao, Zuhua; Qu, Xianjun

    2014-02-01

    Acetyl-11-keto-beta-BA (AKBA), a component of the gum resin of Boswellia serrata, has been recognized as a promising agent for the prevention of intestinal tumorigenesis. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has also been considered to have the activity against intestinal tumorigenesis. However, the prevention of colonic cancer is insufficient and no definitive recommendation has been made for clinic use. Herein, we compared the efficacy of AKBA with that of aspirin in an adenomatous polyposis coli intestinal neoplasia consecutive weeks. Mice were sacrificed by anesthetizing. The whole intestine was removed from each mouse. The number, size and histopathology of intestinal adenomatous polyps were examined under microscopy. The adenomatous polyps were removed for further analysis by the assays of western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. AKBA significantly prevented the formation of intestinal adenomatous polyps without toxicity to mice. Statistical analysis indicated that AKBA's activity both in the prevention of small intestinal and colonic polyps was more potently than aspirin. Histopathologic examination revealed that AKBA's effect, that is the reduction of polyp size and degree of dysplasia, was more prominent in larger sized polyps, especially those originating in colon. These effects of AKBA were associated with its role in the induction of apoptosis in carcinomas. The assays of western blotting and immunohistochemistry staining indicated that the efficacy of AKBA might arise from its activity in the modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and NF-κB/COX-2 pathway in adenomatous polyps. Conclusion, AKBA by oral application prevented intestinal tumorigenesis more potential than aspirin. PMID:24647155

  11. Nimesulide, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, suppresses obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic insulin resistance through the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Kishina, Manabu; Koda, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kohei; Harada, Yusuke; Yoshida, Akio; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors suppress non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine how the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide suppresses NAFLD in a murine model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NC), an HFD, or HFD plus nimesulide (HFD-nime) for 12 weeks. Body weight, hepatic COX-2 mRNA expression and triglyceride accumulation were significantly increased in the HFD group. Triglyceride accumulation was suppressed in the HFD-nime group. The mRNA expression of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the natural PPARγ agonist 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) were significantly increased in the HFD group and significantly suppressed in the HFD-nime group. Glucose metabolism was impaired in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and it was significantly improved in the HFD-nime group. In addition, the plasma insulin levels in the HFD group were increased compared with those in the NC group, and were decreased in the HFD-nime group. These results indicate that HFD-induced NAFLD is mediated by the increased hepatic expression of COX-2. We suggest that the production of 15d-PGJ2, which is mediated by COX-2, induces NAFLD and hepatic insulin resistance by activating PPARγ. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), procollagen-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as the number of F4/80-positive hepatic (Kupffer) cells, were significantly increased in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and they were reduced by nimesulide. In conclusion, COX-2 may emerge as a molecular target for preventing the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in diet-related obesity. PMID:27431935

  12. Use of Health Care System-Supplied Aspirin by Veterans With Postoperative Heart Attack or Unstable Angina.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Cathleen M; Copeland, Laurel A; McNeal, Catherine J; Mortensen, Eric M; Pugh, Mary J; MacCarthy, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the use of aspirin in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease events are well established. Despite this, the prevalence of aspirin use for secondary prevention is suboptimal. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of aspirin use for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease events when it is dispensed as a prescription, as is performed in the Veterans Affairs (VA) managed care system. VA patients who had undergone major surgery and experienced a postoperative myocardial infarction (MI) or unstable angina between the years 2005 and 2009 were identified from administrative databases. VA pharmacy records were used to determine whether a prescription for aspirin was filled after the postoperative MI or unstable angina. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated odd ratios of filling aspirin prescriptions for the predictors of interest. Of the 321,131 men and women veterans who underwent major surgery, 7,700 experienced a postoperative MI or unstable angina. Among those 7,700, 47% filled an aspirin prescription. Only 59% of veterans with no co-pay filled an aspirin prescription. Aspirin fills were more common in younger veterans, Blacks, Hispanics, males, hypertensive veterans, mentally ill patients, those with no co-pay and those prescribed antiplatelets/anticoagulants in addition to aspirin postoperatively. These findings suggest that the impact of dispensing aspirin as a prescription may not be significant in increasing the appropriate use of aspirin for secondary prevention. PMID:26351774

  13. Mutations in PIK3CA sensitize breast cancer cells to physiologic levels of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Sanja B; Najor, Matthew S; Ruby, Carl E; Cobleigh, Melody A; Abukhdeir, Abde M

    2016-02-01

    A review of the literature finds that women diagnosed with breast cancer, who were on an aspirin regimen, experienced a decreased risk of distant metastases and death. Several recent studies have reported an improvement in overall survival in colorectal cancer patients who harbored mutations in the oncogene PIK3CA and received a daily aspirin regimen. Breast cancer patients on a daily aspirin regimen experienced decreased risk of distant metastases and death. PIK3CA is the most frequently mutated oncogene in breast cancer, occurring in up to 45 % of all breast cancers. In order to determine if mutations in PIK3CA sensitized breast cancers to aspirin treatment, we employed the use of isogenic cellular clones of the non-tumorigenic, breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A that harbored mutations in either PIK3CA or KRAS or both. We report that mutations in both PIK3CA and KRAS are required for the greatest aspirin sensitivity in breast cancer, and that the GSK3β protein was hyperphosphorylated in aspirin-treated double knockin cells, but not in other clones/treatments. A more modest effect was observed with single mutant PIK3CA, but not KRAS alone. These observations were further confirmed in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Our findings provide the first evidence that mutations in PIK3CA sensitize breast cancer cells to aspirin. PMID:26915040

  14. Aspirin, acetaminophen and proton transport through phospholipid bilayers and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, J

    1992-09-01

    Mechanisms of proton transport were investigated in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes exposed to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), acetaminophen (4-acetamidophenol), benzoic acid and three aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid and salicyluric acid). The objectives were to characterize the conductances and permeabilities of these weak acids in lipid bilayer membranes and then predict their effects on mitochondrial membranes. Of the compounds tested only aspirin, benzoate and salicylate caused significant increases in membrane conductance. The conductance was due mainly to proton current at low pH and to weak acid anion current at neutral pH. Analysis of the concentration and pH dependence suggests that these weak acids act as HA-2-type proton carriers when pH approximately pK and as lipid soluble anions at neutral pH. Salicylate is much more potent than aspirin and benzoate because salicylate contains an internal hydrogen bond which delocalizes the negative charge and increases the permeability of the anion. Model calculations for mitochondria suggest that salicylate causes net H+ uptake by a cyclic process of HA influx and A- efflux. This model can explain the salicylate-induced uncoupling and swelling observed in isolated mitochondria. Since ingested aspirin breaks down rapidly to form salicylate, these results may clarify the mechanisms of aspirin toxicity in humans. The results may also help to explain why the ingestion of aspirin but not acetaminophen is associated with Reye's syndrome, a disease characterized by impaired energy metabolism and mitochondrial swelling. PMID:1334228

  15. Bioavailability of aspirin and salicylamide following oral co-administration in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, M S; Reddi, A S; Curro, F A; Turkall, R M; Kadry, A M; Hansrote, J A

    1991-10-01

    BC powder (I) is a commercially available analgesic containing the active ingredients aspirin and salicylamide. The kinetics of I, BC powder minus aspirin (II), and BC powder minus salicylamide (III) were evaluated in 13 volunteers. Ten minutes after administration of I, aspirin reached a maximum concentration of 12.9 micrograms/mL, while salicylamide concentration reached a peak value of 3.4 micrograms/mL. However, when III was administered, aspirin was not detected at 10 min and only reached a concentration of 0.4 microgram/mL at 2 and 6 h. Furthermore, the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve for aspirin when III was administered was sixfold less compared with treatment with I. The area under the curve for aspirin metabolites was significantly different in I versus III. After treatment with II, a delay in salicylamide peak concentration was observed. Gentisamide was not detected throughout the study. This study demonstrates that salicylamide significantly enhances plasma levels of aspirin with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:1777842

  16. Luteolin supplementation adjacent to aspirin treatment reduced dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Osman, Neamt H A; Said, Usama Z; El-Waseef, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Esraa S A

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that aspirin is used in colon cancer treatment. However, long-term of Aspirin usage is limited to gastric and renal toxicity. Luteolin (LUT) has cancer prevention and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of LUT supplementation and Aspirin treatment in dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced carcinogenesis in rats. DMH (20 mg/kg BW/week) treated rats received gavages with Aspirin (50 mg/kg BW/week) and LUT (0.2 mg/kg BW/day) for 15 weeks. DMH injections induce colon polyps and renal bleeding, significantly increasing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), oxidative stress, and kidney function tests and reducing antioxidant markers. Either Aspirin or LUT gavages alone or combined produce a significant decrease in colon polyp number and size, significantly decreasing CEA, COX-2, and oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant markers. In conclusion, the supplementations of LUT adjacent to Aspirin in the treatment of DMH-induced carcinogenesis in rats reflect a better effect than the use of Aspirin alone. PMID:25342594

  17. Pharmacokinetics of salicylic acid following administration of aspirin tablets and three different forms of soluble aspirin in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Gatti, G; Barzaghi, N; Attardo Parrinello, G; Vitiello, B; Perucca, E

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of an innovative formulation of soluble aspirin (l-ornithine acetylsalicylate, ldB 1003) was compared with that of conventional tablets and two other soluble dosage forms (d, l-lysine acetylsalicylate and a buffered effervescent formulation of acetylsalicylic acid) after administration of single oral doses in six normal volunteers. All soluble forms showed a rapid absorption profile, peak plasma salicylic acid levels being attained after about 30 min on average and without statistically significant differences among the solutions tested. As compared to the soluble formulations, acetylsalicylic acid given as tablets resulted in slower absorption, with peak plasma salicylic acid levels being reached more than 1 h after dosing. Despite these differences in time course of plasma level profiles, the extent of absorption was similar for all formulations. Apart from the potential advantages in terms of improved gastric tolerability, the increased rate of absorption of aspirin solutions is therapeutically useful whenever a rapid onset of action is required. In this respect, the kinetic pattern of the innovative formulation compares favourably with that of other available soluble dosage forms. PMID:2517497

  18. Platelet inhibition by aspirin 81 and 325 mg/day in men versus women without clinically apparent cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Rehan; Becker, Diane M; Yanek, Lisa R; Moy, Taryn F; Becker, Lewis C; Faraday, Nauder; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2008-05-01

    Compared with men, women have greater platelet aggregation before and after low-dose aspirin. It is not known whether high-dose aspirin therapy brings residual platelet aggregation in women closer to that in men. Our objective was to compare inhibition of platelet aggregation in women and men after low- and high-dose aspirin. We enrolled healthy subjects (n=106) in a trial of 14 days of aspirin 81 mg/day followed by 14 days of 325 mg/day. Platelet function was measured at baseline and after the 2 aspirin doses. Women had greater baseline platelet activation measurements. After the 2 aspirin doses, men and women had near complete suppression of platelet aggregation to arachidonic acid in whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the direct cyclo-oxygenase-1 pathway affected by aspirin. For indirect pathways, women had significantly greater residual platelet activation to collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in whole blood after the 2 aspirin doses and in response to collagen and ADP in PRP after aspirin 325 mg/day only. After aspirin 325 mg/day, women continued to have greater residual platelet aggregation compared with men after aspirin 81 mg/day in response to collagen (p=0.016 in whole blood, p=0.037 in PRP), ADP (p<0.001 in whole blood, p=0.012 in PRP), and epinephrine (p=0.03 in PRP). Excretion of urinary thromboxane metabolite (urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2) decreased after aspirin to a similar extent in men and women. In conclusion, women continue to have greater residual platelet activity after high-dose aspirin compared with men treated with a lower dose of aspirin. PMID:18435972

  19. Aspirin in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia: current facts and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Landolfi, R; Patrono, C

    1996-09-01

    The role of aspirin in the antithrombotic strategy of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) is highly controversial. Long considered unsafe on the basis of a single clinical trial testing very high doses in PV patients, aspirin is being increasingly used at lower dosage. The rationale for the use of aspirin in patients with PV and ET is provided by the efficacy of this agent in the treatment of microcirculatory disturbances of thrombocythemic states associated with myeloproliferative disorders and by recent evidence that asymptomatic PV and ET patients have persistently increased thromboxane (TX) A2-biosynthesis. This increase, which most likely reflects enhanced platelet activation in vivo, is independent of the platelet mass and blood viscosity and largely supressed by a short term low-dose aspirin regimen (50 mg/day for 7 days). Since enhanced TXA2 biosynthesis may play a role in transducing the increased thrombotic risk associated with PV and ET, long-term low-dose aspirin administration has been proposed as a possible antithombotic strategy in these subjects. The safety of this treatment in PV patients has been recently reassessed by the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Policitemia Vera (GISP) which has followed for over one year 112 patients randomized to receive 40 mg/day aspirin or placebo. In the same study, serum TXB2 measurements provided evidence that the low-dose aspirin regimen tested was fully effective in inhibiting platelet cyclooxygenase activity. On this basis, a large scale trial aimed at assessing the antithrombotic efficacy of this approach is currently being organized. In patients with ET both the minimal aspirin dose required for complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase and the safety of long-term aspirin administration need to be established prior to extensive clinical evaluation of this strategy. PMID:8951777

  20. Genetic Determinants of On-Aspirin Platelet Reactivity: Focus on the Influence of PEAR1

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Morten; Nissen, Peter H.; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment displays considerable inter-individual variability. A genetic etiology likely exists, but it remains unclear to what extent genetic polymorphisms determine platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated individuals. Aim To identify platelet-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influencing platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment. Furthermore, we explored to what extent changes in cyclooxygenase-1 activity and platelet activation may explain such influence. Methods We included 985 Danish patients with stable coronary artery disease treated with aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Patients were genotyped for 16 common SNPs in platelet-related genes using standard PCR-based methods (TaqMan). Platelet aggregation was evaluated by whole blood platelet aggregometry employing Multiplate Analyzer (agonists: arachidonic acid and collagen) and VerifyNow Aspirin. Serum thromboxane B2 was measured to confirm aspirin adherence and was used as a marker of cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Soluble P-selectin was used as marker of platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, cyclooxygenase-1 activity, and platelet activation were compared across genotypes in adjusted analyses. Results The A-allele of the rs12041331 SNP in the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor-1 (PEAR1) gene was associated with reduced platelet aggregation and increased platelet activation, but not with cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Platelet aggregation was unaffected by the other SNPs analyzed. Conclusion A common genetic variant in PEAR1 (rs12041331) reproducibly influenced platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated patients with coronary artery disease. The exact biological mechanism remains elusive, but the effect of this polymorphism may be related to changes in platelet activation. Furthermore, 14 SNPs previously suggested to influence aspirin efficacy were not associated with on-aspirin platelet aggregation. Clinical Trial Registration

  1. The Population Impact of Long-term Use of Aspirin and Risk of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Nishihara, Reiko; Wu, Kana; Wang, Molin; Ogino, Shuji; Willett, Walter C.; Spiegelman, Donna; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended the use of aspirin to prevent colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease among many U.S adults. However, the association of aspirin on risk of other cancer types, and aspirin’s potential population-wide impact on cancer, particularly within the context of screening, remain uncertain. Objective To examine potential benefits of aspirin use for overall and subtype-specific cancer prevention, at a range of doses and duration of use, and estimate the absolute benefit of aspirin in the context of screening. Design Two large prospective cohort studies: the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS, 1980–2010) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS, 1986–2012). Setting Health professionals in the United States Participants 88,084 women and 47,881 men participating in the NHS and HPFS who reported aspirin use biennially. Main Outcome Measures Relative risks (RRs) for incident cancers and population attributable risk (PAR). Results During up to 32 years of follow-up, we documented 20,414 cancers among women and 7,571 among men. Compared with nonregular use, regular aspirin use was associated with lower risk of overall cancer (RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94, 0.99), which was primarily due to a lower incidence of gastrointestinal cancers (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.80, 0.91), especially colorectal cancers (RR 0.81; 95% CI 0.75, 0.88). The benefit of aspirin on gastrointestinal cancers appeared evident with use of at least 0.5 to 1.5 standard aspirin tablets per week; the minimum duration of regular use associated with lower risk was 6 years. Among individuals aged over 50, regular aspirin use could prevent 33 colorectal cancers (PAR 17.0%) among those who have not undergone a lower endoscopy and 18 colorectal cancers per 100,000 person-years (PAR 8.5%) among those who have. Regular aspirin use was not associated with risk of breast, advanced prostate, or lung cancer. Conclusions and Relevance Long-term aspirin use was

  2. Antiinflammatory, gastrosparing, and antiplatelet properties of new NO-donor esters of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Cena, Clara; Lolli, Marco L; Lazzarato, Loretta; Guaita, Elena; Morini, Giuseppina; Coruzzi, Gabriella; McElroy, Stuart P; Megson, Ian L; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2003-02-27

    A new series of NSAIDs in which aspirin is joined by an ester linkage to furoxan moieties, with different ability to release NO, were synthesized and tested for NO-releasing, antiinflammatory, antiaggregatory, and ulcerogenic properties. Related furazan derivatives, aspirin, its propyl ester, and its gamma-nitrooxypropyl ester were taken as references. All the products described present an antiinflammatory trend, maximized in derivatives 12, 16, and 17, they are devoid of acute gastrotoxicity, principally due to their ester nature, and show an antiplatelet activity primarily determined by their ability to release NO. They do not behave as aspirin prodrugs in human serum. PMID:12593655

  3. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ticagrelor co-administered with aspirin in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Teng, Renli; Maya, Juan; Butler, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The results of two independent, randomized, two-period crossover, single-center studies, conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor ± aspirin, inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) with ticagrelor/aspirin vs. clopidogrel/aspirin, and safety, tolerability, and bleeding times are reported here. In Study A (open-label), 16 volunteers received ticagrelor (50 mg bid Days 1-5; 200 mg bid Days 6-9; one 200 mg dose on Day 10) ± 300 mg qd aspirin (Days 1-10). In Study B (double-blind, double-dummy), 16 volunteers received aspirin (300 mg loading dose/75 mg qd Days 2-9) with either ticagrelor (200 mg bid Days 4-8, one 200 mg dose on Day 9) or clopidogrel (300 mg loading dose Day 4, 75 mg qd Days 5-9). At steady-state ticagrelor (50 mg bid, or 200 mg bid), concomitant aspirin (300 mg qd) had no effect on mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), median time to Cmax (tmax), or mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve for the dosing interval (AUC0-τ) for ticagrelor and its primary metabolite, AR-C124910XX. Following 200 mg bid ticagrelor, mean Cmax and AUC0-τ for both parent and metabolite were comparable with co-administration of aspirin at 75 mg and 300 mg qd. Aspirin (300 mg qd) had no effect on IPA (ADP-induced) by ticagrelor. However, aspirin and ticagrelor had an additive effect on IPA (collagen-induced). Ticagrelor/aspirin increased bleeding times vs. baseline. Ticagrelor/aspirin co-administration was well tolerated at all dose combinations evaluated. In summary, the findings of this study demonstrate that co-administration of aspirin (300 mg qd) with ticagrelor (50 mg bid, or 200 mg bid) had no effect on ticagrelor pharmacokinetics or IPA (ADP-induced) by ticagrelor. PMID:23249161

  4. Elastic properties of aspirin in its crystalline and glassy phases studied by micro-Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Sei; Ike, Yuji; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-11-01

    The acoustic waves propagating along the direction perpendicular to the (1 0 0) cleavage plane of aspirin crystal were investigated using micro-Brillouin spectroscopy from which C11, C55 and C66 were obtained. The temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic waves could be explained by normal anharmonic lattice models, while the transverse acoustic waves showed an abnormal increase in the hypersonic attenuation at low temperatures indicating their coupling to local remnant dynamics. The sound velocity as well as the attenuation of the longitudinal acoustic waves of glassy aspirin showed a substantial change at ˜235 K confirming a transition from glassy to supercooled liquid state in vitreous aspirin.

  5. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  6. A spectroscopic study of phenylbutazone and aspirin bound to serum albumin in rheumatoid diseases.

    PubMed

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M; Sułkowska, A; Bojko, B; Równicka-Zubik, J; Sułkowski, W W

    2011-11-01

    Interaction of phenylbutazone (PBZ) and aspirin (ASA), two drugs recommended in rheumatoid diseases (RDs), when binding to human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, has been studied by quenching of fluorescence and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR) techniques. On the basis of spectrofluorescence measurements high affinity binding sites of PBZ and ASA on albumin as well as their interaction within the binding sites were described. A low affinity binding site has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using fluorescence spectroscopy the location of binding site in serum albumin (SA) for PBZ and ASA was found. Association constants K(a) were determined for binary (i.e. PBZ-SA and ASA-SA) and ternary complexes (i.e. PBZ-[ASA]-SA and ASA-[PBZ]-SA). PBZ and ASA change the affinity of each other to the binding site in serum albumin (SA). The presence of ASA causes the increase of association constants K(aI) of PBZ-SA complex. Similarly, PBZ influences K(aI) of ASA-SA complex. This phenomenon shows that the strength of binding and the stability of the complexes increase in the presence of the second drug. The decrease of K(aII) values suggests that the competition between PBZ and ASA in binding to serum albumin in the second class of binding sites occurs. The analysis of (1)HNMR spectral parameters i.e. changes of chemical shifts and relaxation times of the drug indicate that the presence of ASA weakens the interaction of PBZ with albumin. Similarly PBZ weakens the interaction of ASA with albumin. This conclusion points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic effects. PMID:21856214

  7. A spectroscopic study of phenylbutazone and aspirin bound to serum albumin in rheumatoid diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2011-11-01

    Interaction of phenylbutazone (PBZ) and aspirin (ASA), two drugs recommended in rheumatoid diseases (RDs), when binding to human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, has been studied by quenching of fluorescence and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1HNMR) techniques. On the basis of spectrofluorescence measurements high affinity binding sites of PBZ and ASA on albumin as well as their interaction within the binding sites were described. A low affinity binding site has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using fluorescence spectroscopy the location of binding site in serum albumin (SA) for PBZ and ASA was found. Association constants Ka were determined for binary (i.e. PBZ-SA and ASA-SA) and ternary complexes (i.e. PBZ-[ASA]-SA and ASA-[PBZ]-SA). PBZ and ASA change the affinity of each other to the binding site in serum albumin (SA). The presence of ASA causes the increase of association constants KaI of PBZ-SA complex. Similarly, PBZ influences KaI of ASA-SA complex. This phenomenon shows that the strength of binding and the stability of the complexes increase in the presence of the second drug. The decrease of KaII values suggests that the competition between PBZ and ASA in binding to serum albumin in the second class of binding sites occurs. The analysis of 1HNMR spectral parameters i.e. changes of chemical shifts and relaxation times of the drug indicate that the presence of ASA weakens the interaction of PBZ with albumin. Similarly PBZ weakens the interaction of ASA with albumin. This conclusion points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic effects.

  8. Structure, molecular simulation, and release of aspirin from intercalated Zn-Al-layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zilin; Li, Xiaowei; Lv, Fengzhu; Zhang, Qian; Chu, Paul K; Zhang, Yihe

    2015-11-01

    Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid (AA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is intercalated into Zn-Al-layered double hydroxides (ZnAl-LDHs) by co-precipitation and reconstruction methods. The composition, structure, and morphology of the intercalated products as well as their release behavior are determined experimentally and theoretically by Material Studio 5.5. Experimental results disclose the strong interaction between the LDHs sheets and AA in the intercalated ZnAl-LDHs produced by co-precipitation and slow release of AA from the intercalated ZnAl-LDHs in both phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and borate buffered saline (BBS) solutions. The percentage of AA released from the ZnAl-LDHs prepared by both methods in PBS (96.87% and 98.12%) are much more than those in BBS (68.59% and 81.22%) implying that both H4BO4(-) and H2PO4(-) can exchange with AA in the ZnAl-LDHs. After AA is released to PBS, ZnAl-LDHs break into small pieces. The experimental results are explained theoretically based on the calculation of the bonding energy between the anions and LDHs sheets as well as the AlO bond length change in the LDHs sheets. PMID:26263219

  9. Comparative gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone as assessed by radiochromium (/sup 51/Cr)

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; Davis, A.; Lussier, Y.; Lebel, E.

    1989-03-01

    Nabumetone differs from most other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It is presented to the gut as a nonacidic prodrug, and is metabolized to its active form after absorption. Studies in animals and humans suggest it is less irritating to the gastrointestinal mucosa. This study compared the gastrointestinal microbleeding induced by nabumetone to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), and placebo in a double blind parallel study using chromium /sup 51/Cr labelled red cells to quantitate fecal blood loss (FBL) in healthy volunteers. Thirty subjects were randomized to treatment with nabumetone (2000 mg), ASA (3.6 g) or placebo for 21 days following a 7 day placebo period. Six subjects served as untreated controls. FBL in nabumetone treated subjects was not significantly different to placebo or untreated subjects. In contrast, ASA-treated subjects exhibited significantly increased FBL than the other 3 groups (P less than .0001).

  10. Comparison of the effect of aspirin and choline magnesium trisalicylate on thromboxane biosynthesis in human platelets: role of the acetyl moiety.

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; McLaren, M; Russell, R I; Lowe, G D; Forbes, C D

    1989-01-01

    Parameters of platelet thromboxane biosynthesis were measured 24 h after ingestion of equivalent salicylate doses (500 mg) of aspirin (ASA) and choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a non-acetylated salicylate. In random order, 10 healthy volunteers received these drugs on 2 separate days, 2 weeks apart. While ASA significantly prolonged bleeding time, and decreased plasma thromboxane generation and serum thromboxane B2 levels, CMT failed to produce such effects. Thus CMT, which lacks an acetyl moiety in its structure, has no inhibitory effect on platelet thromboxane biosynthesis, and may therefore be considered safer than ASA for therapeutic use, when inhibition of platelet function can be hazardous. PMID:2744633

  11. A pharmacokinetic comparison of choline magnesium trisalicylate and soluble aspirin.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, M; Gibson, T; Berry, D; Volans, G

    1984-11-01

    Claims that twice-daily dosage of choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT) may alter salicylate disposal kinetics and result in sustained plasma levels were examined. Plasma levels, urine excretion and pharmacokinetics of salicylate were estimated in six men following the recommended twice-daily dose of CMT and a smaller dose of soluble aspirin. The plasma salicylate levels achieved with CMT were lower than those seen in previous studies but this probably reflected differences of methodology. Salicylate levels were not sustained between doses and elimination rates and half-life were similar for both preparations. No major alteration of disposal kinetics could be demonstrated for CMT with the dose used in the present study. PMID:6487934

  12. Thermodynamics of surface defects at the aspirin/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Julian; Zheng, Chen; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    We present a simulation scheme to calculate defect formation free energies at a molecular crystal/water interface based on force-field molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we adopt and modify existing approaches to calculate binding free energies of biological ligand/receptor complexes to be applicable to common surface defects, such as step edges and kink sites. We obtain statistically accurate and reliable free energy values for the aspirin/water interface, which can be applied to estimate the distribution of defects using well-established thermodynamic relations. As a show case we calculate the free energy upon dissolving molecules from kink sites at the interface. This free energy can be related to the solubility concentration and we obtain solubility values in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  13. Severe hepatoxicity caused by aspirin overdose: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhuping; Liu, Shiqi; Niu, Jianhua; Wei, Bing; Xu, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We report here the rare case of a 61-year-old man with multiple organ dysfunction caused by an aspirin overdose (4 g orally). The patient presented with a fever that reached 39.2 °C, a peptic ulcer, and massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. His blood test results were as follows: white blood cell count, 1.8 × 10(9)/L; absolute lymphocytes, 0.4 × 10(9)/L; absolute neutrophils, 1.2 × 10(9)/L; and electrolyte disturbances. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed evidence of bilateral inferior pulmonary infection and acute pancreatitis. Thick dark bile with visible floccule was drawn via a percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD). Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected in microbiological bile tests. Two years later, the patient died of chronic liver failure. PMID:26085469

  14. Effect of sodium bicarbonate on aspirin-induced damage and potential difference changes in human gastric mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Bruce K; Krause, William J; Ivey, Kevin J

    1977-01-01

    Two aspirin tablets in 100 ml fluid will produce microscopical damage to the human stomach. A study was performed to determine whether a small amount of sodium bicarbonate (equivalent to one-third of a teaspoonful of baking soda) could protect against this damage. Sequential gastric biopsy specimens were taken from 15 healthy subjects before, during, and after intragastric instillation of one of the following isotonic solutions: saline; sodium bicarbonate; 600 mg aspirin suspended in sodium bicarbonate; and aspirin suspended in saline. On a separate day the same solutions were instilled, but gastric transmucosal potential differences were monitored. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the biopsy specimens showed occasional mucous degranulation of mucosal surface cells, but no cell damage during instillation of sodium bicarbonate. Light microscopy studies 10 minutes after aspirin in saline showed damage in 20% of surface cells, with focal areas of cellular disruption and microscopic erosions, but only 3·4% of cells were damaged after aspirin in bicarbonate and there were no erosions. Electron microscopy showed a damaged honeycombed appearance of surface epithelium after aspirin in saline and a normal cobblestone appearance after aspirin in bicarbonate. Aspirin dissolved in bicarbonate failed to induce the usual fall in potential difference. These findings indicate that sodium bicarbonate in amounts equivalent to one-third of a teaspoonful of baking soda protects the gastric mucosa against aspirin-induced damage and prevents the usual fall in potential difference after aspirin. ImagesFIG 2FIG 3FIG 4 PMID:922417

  15. The use of aspirin and opiates by Dumfries and Galloway general practitioners in the management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Strachan, D A; Robertson, S

    1995-10-01

    In March 1994 a study in the British Medical Journal indicated a low rate of administration of aspirin and opiates by general practitioners in cases of suspected myocardial infarction. A retrospective analysis was made of 120 consecutive admissions to the medical intensive care unit of Dumfries and Galloway Royal Infirmary, by general practitioners, with a primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Of these 120 cases, 24% were given aspirin by their G.P. prior to admission and 64% were given opiate (IV or IM). Thirty-three percent were already on regular aspirin and of these 18% received further aspirin prior to admission. These figures were considerably better than those previously quoted and they showed that prior regular aspirin therapy did influence the GPs' decision on further administration of aspirin in the acute event. A questionnaire sent to all GPs in Dumfries and Galloway revealed that 100% carried aspirin in their medical bags, 62% claimed to give aspirin to patients with suspected MI, 95% used a British Heart Foundation approved dose of aspirin and 83.3% administered the aspirin using one of the approved methods. PMID:8578305

  16. Evaluation of aspirin metabolites as inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Benoit M; Conejo-García, Ana; Stolze, Ineke; Loenarz, Christoph; Oldham, Neil J; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2008-12-21

    Known and potential aspirin metabolites were evaluated as inhibitors of oxygen-sensing hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) hydroxylases; some of the metabolites were found to stabilise HIF-alpha in cells. PMID:19048166

  17. Effects of prednisone, aspirin, and acetaminophen on an in vivo biologic response to interferon in humans.

    PubMed

    Witter, F R; Woods, A S; Griffin, M D; Smith, C R; Nadler, P; Lietman, P S

    1988-08-01

    In healthy volunteers receiving a single intramuscular dose of 18 X 10(6) U interferon alone or after 24 hours of an 8-day course of prednisone (40 mg/day), aspirin (650 mg every 4 hours), or acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 hours), the magnitude of the biologic response to interferon was quantified by measuring the time course of the induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Prednisone decreased the AUC of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity (p less than 0.05), whereas administration of aspirin or acetaminophen did not affect this biologic response. No measurable effect was seen during administration of prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen on the duration or intensity of vesicular stomatitis virus yield reduction. The side effects seen with interferon administration at the dose tested were not altered in a clinically meaningful manner by prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen. PMID:2456175

  18. Role of Dispersion Interactions in the Polymorphism and Entropic Stabilization of the Aspirin Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Aspirin has been used and studied for over a century but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  19. Study Shows Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer in Those at High Risk

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from the first large clinical trial of its kind indicate that taking high doses of aspirin daily for at least 2 years substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer among people at increased risk of the disease.

  20. Cross-reactivity between aspirin and ibuprofen in an asthmatic--a case report.

    PubMed

    Merritt, G J; Selle, R I

    1978-10-01

    A case of an adverse reaction occurring in a 53-year-old, aspirin-sensitive asthmatic male with nasal polyps following administration of a 400-mg ibuprofen tablet is reported. Symptoms of the adverse reaction included an urticarial rash, labored breathing, laryngeal edema and tightness of the chest. Treatment consisted of isoproterenol inhalant (self-administered), subcutaneous epinephrine 0.25 mg, intramuscular diphenhydramine hydrochloride 50 mg and intravenous hydrocortisone 250 mg. The pathogenesis of the patient's adverse reaction and the possible fole of aspirin, of other analgesics and of tartrazine in its development are discussed. The adverse reaction was not mediated immunologically but rather resulted from the prostaglandin synthetase (PGS)-inhibitor activity shared by aspirin, ibuprofen and other analgesics. Selection of an analgesic for an aspirin-sensitive patient should be based on the analgesic's PGS-inhibitor activity. PMID:696734

  1. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  2. Aspirin, NSAID and risk of prostate cancer: Results from the REDUCE study

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Adriana C.; Howard, Lauren E.; Moreira, Daniel M.; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A recent meta-analysis showed aspirin was associated with reduced prostate cancer (PC) risk. As anti-inflammatory medications lower PSA levels, whether these findings reflect reduced PC detection or lower PC risk is unknown. We tested the association between aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID on PC diagnosis in REDUCE, where all men received biopsies at 2- and 4-years largely independent of PSA. REDUCE tested dutasteride for PC risk reduction in men with a PSA of 2.5-10.0 ng/mL and a negative pre-study biopsy. Experimental Design We examined the association between aspirin, NSAID or both and total, low-grade (Gleason<7), or high-grade (Gleason≥7) PC vs. no PC using multinomial logistic regression among 6,390 men who underwent ≥1 on-study biopsy. Multivariable analyses were adjusted for age, race, geographic region, PSA, prostate volume, digital rectal examination, BMI, treatment arm, smoking, alcohol, statins, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Results Overall, 3,169 men (50%) were non-users, 1,368 (21%) used aspirin, 1,176 (18%) used NSAID, and 677 (11%) used both. In unadjusted models, aspirin was associated with reduced PC risk (OR=0.85, p=0.036). In multivariable analyses, aspirin was associated with reduced total PC risk (OR=0.81, p=0.015). Use of NSAID or NSAIDs and aspirin was not associated with total, low- or high-grade PC, though all ORs were <1 (all p≥0.08). Therefore, we created a dichotomous variable of aspirin and/or NSAID user vs. not. On multivariable analysis, the use of aspirin and/or NSAID was significantly associated with decreased total (OR=0.87, p=0.030) and high-grade (OR=0.80, p=0.040), but not with low-grade PC risk (OR=0.90, p=0.15). Results were similar in placebo and dutasteride arms. Conclusions Among men with a negative biopsy, aspirin and/or NSAID use was associated with decreased PC risk. Additional studies are warranted. PMID:25520389

  3. Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients With Sinus Rhythm and Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated With Warfarin or Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Siqin; Cheng, Bin; Lip, Gregory Y H; Buchsbaum, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L; Levin, Bruce; Di Tullio, Marco R; Qian, Min; Mann, Douglas L; Pullicino, Patrick M; Freudenberger, Ronald S; Teerlink, John R; Mohr, J P; Graham, Susan; Labovitz, Arthur J; Estol, Conrado J; Lok, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; Thompson, John L P; Homma, Shunichi

    2015-09-15

    We sought to assess the performance of existing bleeding risk scores, such as the Hypertension, Abnormal Renal/Liver Function, Stroke, Bleeding History or Predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/Alcohol Concomitantly (HAS-BLED) score or the Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI), in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin or aspirin. We calculated HAS-BLED and OBRI risk scores for 2,305 patients with HFrEF in SR enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial. Proportional hazards models were used to test whether each score predicted major bleeding, and comparison of different risk scores was performed using Harell C-statistic and net reclassification improvement index. For the warfarin arm, both scores predicted bleeding risk, with OBRI having significantly greater C-statistic (0.72 vs 0.61; p = 0.03) compared to HAS-BLED, although the net reclassification improvement for comparing OBRI to HAS-BLED was not significant (0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.18 to 0.37). Performance of the OBRI and HAS-BLED risk scores was similar for the aspirin arm. For participants with OBRI scores of 0 to 1, warfarin compared with aspirin reduced ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.98, p = 0.042) without significantly increasing major bleeding (HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.66 to 2.30, p = 0.51). For those with OBRI score of ≥2, there was a trend for reduced ischemic stroke with warfarin compared to aspirin (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.27 to 1.15, p = 0.12), but major bleeding was increased (HR 4.04, 95% CI 1.99 to 8.22, p <0.001). In conclusion, existing bleeding risk scores can identify bleeding risk in patients with HFrEF in SR and could be tested for potentially identifying patients with a favorable risk/benefit profile for antithrombotic therapy with warfarin. PMID:26189039

  4. Hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin, ACS14, attenuates high glucose-induced increased methylglyoxal and oxidative stress in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Wu, Lingyun; Desai, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a gasotransmitter with vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Aspirin is an irreversible cyclooxygenase inhibitor anti-inflammatory drug. ACS14 is a novel synthetic hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin which inhibits cyclooxygenase and has antioxidant effects. Methylglyoxal is a chemically active metabolite of glucose and fructose, and a major precursor of advanced glycation end products formation. Methylglyoxal is harmful when produced in excess. Plasma methylglyoxal levels are significantly elevated in diabetic patients. Our aim was to investigate the effects of ACS14 on methylglyoxal levels in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. We used cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells for the study. Methylglyoxal was measured by HPLC after derivatization, and nitrite+nitrate with an assay kit. Western blotting was used to determine NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression. Dicholorofluorescein assay was used to measure oxidative stress. ACS14 significantly attenuated elevation of intracellular methylglyoxal levels caused by incubating cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with methylglyoxal (30 µM) and high glucose (25 mM). ACS14, but not aspirin, caused a significant attenuation of increase in nitrite+nitrate levels caused by methylglyoxal or high glucose. ACS14, aspirin, and sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor), all attenuated the increase in oxidative stress caused by methylglyoxal and high glucose in cultured cells. ACS14 prevented the increase in NOX4 expression caused by incubating the cultured VSMCs with MG (30 µM). ACS14, aspirin and NaHS attenuated the increase in iNOS expression caused by high glucose (25 mM). In conclusion, ACS14 has the novel ability to attenuate an increase in methylglyoxal levels which in turn can reduce oxidative stress, decrease the formation of advanced glycation end products and prevent many of the known deleterious effects

  5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs stimulate secretion of non-amyloidogenic precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Avramovich, Yael; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2002-08-30

    Chronic inflammatory processes are associated with the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has been proposed that treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk for AD. Here we report that various NSAIDs, such as the cyclooxygenase inhibitors, nimesulide, ibuprofen and indomethacin, as well as thalidomide (Thal) and its non-teratogenic analogue, supidimide, significantly stimulated the secretion of the non-amyloidogenic alpha-secretase form of the soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP alpha) into the conditioned media of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and PC12 cells. These NSAIDs markedly reduced the levels of the cellular APP holoprotein, further accelerating non-amyloidogenic processes. sAPP alpha release, induced by nimesulide and Thal, was modulated by inhibitors of protein kinase C and Erk mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Furthermore, in results complementary to the inhibitor studies, we show for the first time that NSAIDs can activate the Erk MAP kinase signaling cascade, thus identifying a novel pharmacology mechanism of NSAIDs. Our findings suggest that NSAIDs and Thal might prove useful to favor non-amyloidogenic APP processing by enhancing alpha-secretase activity, thereby reducing the formation of amyloidogenic derivatives, and therefore are of potential therapeutic value in AD. PMID:12070143

  6. Association between aspirin and upper gastrointestinal complications: Systematic review of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Luis A García; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; de Abajo, Francisco J

    2001-01-01

    Aims Because of the widespread use of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular diseases, side-effects associated with thromboprophylactic doses are of interest. This study summarizes the relative risk (RR) for serious upper gastrointestinal complications (UGIC) associated with aspirin exposure in general and with specific aspirin doses and formulations in particular. Methods After a systematic review, 17 original epidemiologic studies published between 1990 and 2001 were selected according to predefined criteria. Heterogeneity of effects was explored. Pooled estimates were calculated according to different study characteristics and patterns of aspirin use. Results The overall relative risk of UGIC associated with aspirin use was 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1, 2.4) for cohort studies and nested case-control studies and 3.1 (95% CI: 2.8, 3.3) for non-nested case-control studies. Original studies found a dose–response relationship between UGIC and aspirin, although the risk was still elevated for doses lower or up to 300 mg day−1. The summary RR was 2.6 (95% CI: 2.3, 2.9) for plain, 5.3 (95% CI: 3.0, 9.2) for buffered, and 2.4 (95% CI: 1.9, 2.9) for enteric-coated aspirin formulations. Conclusions Aspirin was associated with UGIC even when used at low doses or in buffered or enteric-coated formulations. The latter findings may be partially explained by channeling of susceptible patients to these formulations. PMID:11736865

  7. Individual and Population Benefits of Daily Aspirin Therapy: A Proposal for Personalizing National Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Jeremy B.; Johnson, Robert Wood; Vijan, Sandeep; Choi, HwaJung; Hayward, Rodney A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines that help clinicians and patients understand the magnitude of expected individual risks and benefits would help patient-centered decision-making and prioritization of care. We assessed the net benefit from daily aspirin in individuals to estimate the individual and public health implications of a more individualized decision-making approach. Methods and Results We use data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) representing all U.S. persons aged 30 to 85 years with no history of myocardial infarction and applied a Markov Model based on randomized evidence and published literature to estimate lifetime effects of aspirin treatment in quality adjusted life years (QALYs). We show that treatment benefit varies greatly by an individual's cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Almost all adults have fewer major clinical events on aspirin, but for most, events prevented would be so rare that even a very small distaste for aspirin use would make treatment inappropriate. With minimal dislike of aspirin use (disutility = 0.005 QALY per year), only those with a 10-year cardiac event risk greater than 6.1% would have a net benefit. A disutility of 0.01 QALY moves this benefit cut-point to 10.6%. Multiple factors altered the absolute benefit of aspirin, but the strong relationship between CVD risk and magnitude of benefit was robust. Conclusions The benefits of aspirin therapy depend substantially on an individual's risk of CVD and adverse treatment effects. Understanding who benefits from aspirin use and how much can help clinicians and patients develop a more patient-centered approach to preventive therapy. PMID:21487091

  8. Esomeprazole and aspirin fixed combination for the prevention of cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Katelyn W; Cheng, Judy WM; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2013-01-01

    Low dose aspirin therapy plays a fundamental role in both the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Although the evidence using low dose aspirin for secondary prevention is well-established, the decision to use aspirin for primary prevention is based on an evaluation of the patient’s risk of cardiovascular events compared to their risk of adverse events, such as bleeding. In addition to the risk of bleeding associated with long term aspirin administration, upper gastrointestinal side effects, such as dyspepsia often lead to discontinuation of therapy, which places patients at an increased risk for cardiovascular events. One option to mitigate adverse events and increase adherence is the addition of esomeprazole to the medication regimen. This review article provides an evaluation of the literature on the concomitant use of aspirin and esomeprazole available through February 2013. The efficacy, safety, tolerability, cost effectiveness, and patient quality of life of this regimen is discussed. A summary of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between aspirin and esomeprazole, as well as other commonly used cardiovascular medications are also reviewed. The addition of esomeprazole to low dose aspirin therapy in patients at high risk of developing gastric ulcers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, significantly reduced their risk of ulcer development. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies suggested that esomeprazole did not affect the pharmacokinetic parameters or the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Therefore, for those patients who are at a high risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, the benefit of adding esomeprazole likely outweighs the risks of longer term proton pump inhibitor use, and the combination can be recommended. Administering the two agents separately may also be more economical. On the other hand, for those patients at lower risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, both the additional risk

  9. Oxidative stress-related mechanisms affecting response to aspirin in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Lapenna, Domenico; La Barba, Sara; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Persistent platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in T2DM. However, current antiplatelet treatments appear less effective in T2DM patients vs nondiabetics at similar risk. A large body of evidence supports the contention that oxidative stress, which characterizes DM, may be responsible, at least in part, for less-than-expected response to aspirin, with multiple mechanisms acting at several levels. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms related to oxidative stress and contributing to suboptimal aspirin action or responsiveness. These include: (1) mechanisms counteracting the antiplatelet effect of aspirin, such as reduced platelet sensitivity to the antiaggregating effects of NO, due to high-glucose-mediated oxidative stress; (2) mechanisms interfering with COX acetylation especially at the platelet level, e.g., lipid hydroperoxide-dependent impaired acetylating effects of aspirin; (3) mechanisms favoring platelet priming (lipid hydroperoxides) or activation (F2-isoprostanes, acting as partial agonists of thromboxane receptor), or aldose-reductase pathway-mediated oxidative stress, leading to enhanced platelet thromboxane A2 generation or thromboxane receptor activation; (4) mechanisms favoring platelet recruitment, such as aspirin-induced platelet isoprostane formation; (5) modulation of megakaryocyte generation and thrombopoiesis by oxidative HO-1 inhibition; and (6) aspirin-iron interactions, eventually resulting in impaired pharmacological activity of aspirin, lipoperoxide burden, and enhanced generation of hydroxyl radicals capable of promoting protein kinase C activation and platelet aggregation. Acknowledgment of oxidative stress as a major contributor, not only of vascular complications, but also of suboptimal response to antiplatelet agents in T2DM, may open the way to designing and testing novel antithrombotic strategies, specifically targeting

  10. Aspirin inhibits growth of ovarian cancer by upregulating caspase-3 and downregulating bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    LI, LIN; MAO, XIAOGANG; QIN, XIAOMIN; ZHOU, MIN; XING, HUI; DONG, FAN; JIANG, XIAOYUAN; ZHUANG, WENHUI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of different concentrations of aspirin in inhibiting the ovarian cancer of p53N236S gene knock-in mice. In total, 28 male p53S mice, with an age range of 4–6 weeks and weight of 20–25 g were selected. The animals were transplanted with SKOV3 cells to establish subdermal human ovarian cancer. The mice were randomly divided into different groups according to the aspirin concentrations (mmol/l) used, i.e., 0, 1, 2 and 3. Subsequently, intraperitoneal injection was performed once every two days for 3 weeks. The tumor volume, lifetime, tumor cell proliferation inhibition rates, caspase-3 protein and bcl-2 protein expression of the four groups were analyzed and compared. Following aspirin treatment for 1, 2 and 3 weeks, the tumor volume of the 3 mmol/l aspirin group was significantly smaller than the other groups (P<0.05). The higher concentration of aspirin led to a smaller tumor size (P<0.05). The cell proliferation inhibition rate of the 3 mmol/l aspirin group was significantly larger than that of other groups (P<0.05). The relative expression level of caspase-3, bcl-2 protein of the 3 mmol/l aspirin group was significantly improved and reduced, respectively. In conclusion, aspirin can inhibit the growth of ovarian cancer of p53S rats due to its upregulation of the expression of caspase-3 protein and downregulation of the expression of bcl-2 protein. PMID:27347106

  11. The association between regular use of aspirin and the prevalence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wan-Ting; Erickson, Steven R.; Hansen, Richard A.; Wu, Chung-Hsuen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is prevalent with significant morbidity in the United States. Aspirin previously has been found to be associated with reduced carcinogenesis of prostate cells. However, it remains unclear whether regularly taking aspirin could lower the risk of prostate cancer. Therefore, our aim was to examine the association between self-reported regular use of aspirin and the prevalence of prostate cancer in a national sample of the US adult population. The National Health Interview Survey is an annual survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics to investigate health and healthcare use of the US population. The current study is a population-based cross-sectional study using the 2010 National Health Interview Survey data. Adult male respondents who self-reported regularly taking aspirin at least 3 times per week were grouped as regular users. The prostate cancer prevalence was measured by respondents’ self-report of prostate cancer. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between these 2 factors by adjusting for covariates selected based on Andersen Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. An estimated 23 million (23.7%) males in the United States reported that they took aspirin regularly. Of them, 5.0% had prostate cancer. Regular aspirin use was significantly associated with a lower self-reported prevalence of prostate cancer after adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need factors (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.38–0.94). Regular aspirin use was found to be significantly associated with a lower self-reported prevalence of prostate cancer in the United States in 2010. Further clinical trials and longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the causality between regular aspirin use and prostate cancer. PMID:27336878

  12. Modulation of leukocyte adhesion in rat mesenteric venules by aspirin and salicylate.

    PubMed

    Asako, H; Kubes, P; Wallace, J; Wolf, R E; Granger, D N

    1992-07-01

    Erythrocyte velocity, vessel diameter, leukocyte rolling velocity, and number of adherent and emigrated leukocytes were measured in postcapillary venules both before and during superfusion of rat mesentery with either aspirin or sodium salicylate. In some experiments, animals were treated with either a leukotriene (LT)-synthesis inhibitor (L-663,536), an LTD4 antagonist (MK-571), an LTB4 antagonist (SC-41930), misoprostol, or prostaglandin (PG) I2, then the aspirin protocol was repeated. Superfusion of aspirin but not sodium salicylate resulted in increased leukocyte adherence and a reduced leukocyte rolling velocity but did not affect leukocyte emigration. Aspirin-induced leukocyte adhesion was effectively prevented by the LT-synthesis inhibitor and LTB4 antagonist but not by the LTD4 antagonist. Misoprostol and PGI2 also prevented the aspirin-induced adhesion responses. Superfusion of the mesentery with either platelet-activating factor (PAF) or LTB4 enhanced leukocyte adherence and emigration while reducing leukocyte rolling velocity. Sodium salicylate prevented all of the adhesion responses elicited by LTB4. Although salicylate did not affect the PAF-induced leukocyte adherence and rolling responses, it completely prevented the increased leukocyte emigration. These results indicate that aspirin promotes, whereas sodium salicylate inhibits, leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions at therapeutically relevant concentrations. PMID:1319367

  13. Effect of Aspirin Supplementation on Hemostatic Responses in Firefighters Aged 40 to 60 Years.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denise L; Horn, Gavin P; Woods, Jeffrey; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Fernhall, Bo

    2016-07-15

    Sudden cardiovascular events account for approximately 45% to 50% of all duty-related deaths among firefighters and a disproportionate number of these fatalities occur after strenuous fire suppression activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute and chronic aspirin supplementation on hemostatic function before and after live firefighting activities in older firefighters. A double-blind, crossover design included 4 treatments: a 2-week aspirin/placebo treatment ("chronic") and a single prefirefighting aspirin/placebo treatment ("acute"). Hemostatic function was assessed in 24 male firefighters (mean age = 48.2 ± 5.9 years) immediately before and after 18 minutes of live-fire firefighting activity. An acute bout of firefighting activity significantly decreased platelet aggregation time and decreased activated partial thromboplastin time. Compared with placebo, acute aspirin supplementation resulted in a significant increase in epinephrine closure time, which was further augmented by chronic supplementation. Aspirin supplementation had no effect on coagulatory or fibrinolytic factors. Our findings suggest that an acute bout of firefighting leads to increased coagulatory potential in older firefighters. In conclusion, aspirin supplementation had an antiplatelet effect that decreased platelet aggregability at rest and after an acute bout of firefighting compared with placebo. PMID:27241836

  14. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies on aspirin : An experimental and theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, R.; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Parameswari, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on aspirin molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were investigated by experimental and density functional theory approach. The AgNPs were synthesized by the solution-combustion method and characterized by the X-ray diffraction and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques. The averaged particle size of synthesized AgNPs was calculated as ˜55 nm. The normal Raman spectrum (nRs) and SERS spectrum of the aspirin were recorded. The molecular structure of the aspirin and aspirin adsorbed on silver cluster were optimized by the DFT/ B3PW91 method with LanL2DZ basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation. The calculated nRs and SERS frequencies were correlated well with the observed frequencies. The flat-on orientation was predicted from the nRs and SERS spectra, when the aspirin adsorbed on the AgNPs. Hence, the present studies lead to the understanding of adsorption process of aspirin on the AgNPs, which paves the way for biomedical applications.

  15. Effect of aspirin on chromosome aberration and DNA damage induced by X-rays in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikawa, M.; Chuuriki, K.; Shibuya, K.; Seo, M.; Nagase, H.

    In order to reveal the anticlastogenic potency of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray. Aspirin at doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally or orally at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation. The anticlastogenic activity of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray was determined in the mouse micronucleus test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay in vivo. The frequency by polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCEs) was decreased by about 19-61% at 0.5 h after and about 23-62% at 0.5 h before the X-ray irradiation. DNA damage by X-ray was significantly decreased by oral administration of aspirin at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation for the SCG assay. We consider aspirin can be used as preventive agents against exposure of X-ray.

  16. Effects of aspirin on expression of iron transport and storage proteins in BV-2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan Xin; Du, Fang; Jiang, Li Rong; Gong, Jing; Zhou, Yu-Fu; Luo, Qian Qian; Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2015-12-01

    In the light of recent studies, we hypothesized that aspirin might have the functions to regulate the expression of iron transport proteins and then affect cellular iron levels. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of aspirin on expression of iron uptake protein transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), iron release protein ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) and iron storage protein ferritin using Western blot analysis and on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-αlpha, interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-10 and hepcidin using quantitative real-time PCR in BV-2 microglial cells treated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We found that aspirin significantly down-regulated TfR1, while also up-regulated Fpn1 and ferritin expressions in BV-2 microglial cells in vitro. We also showed that TfR1 and Fpn1 expressions were significantly higher, while ferritin contents, IL-6, TNF-alpha and hepcidin mRNA levels were lower in cells treated with aspirin plus LPS than those in cells treated with LPS only. We concluded that aspirin has a negative effect on cell iron contents under 'normal' conditions and could partly reverse LPS-induced-disruption in cell iron balance under in vitro inflammatory conditions. Our findings also suggested that hepcidin might play a dominant role in the control of TfR1 expression by aspirin in the cells treated with LPS. PMID:26522688

  17. Aspirin triggers previously undescribed bioactive eicosanoids by human endothelial cell-leukocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Clària, J; Serhan, C N

    1995-10-10

    Aspirin [acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)], along with its analgesic-antipyretic uses, is now also being considered for cardiovascular protection and treatments in cancer and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although many of ASA's pharmacological actions are related to its ability to inhibit prostaglandin and thromboxane biosynthesis, some of its beneficial therapeutic effects are not completely understood. Here, ASA triggered transcellular biosynthesis of a previously unrecognized class of eicosanoids during coincubations of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and neutrophils [polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)]. These eicosanoids were generated with ASA but not by indomethacin, salicylate, or dexamethasone. Formation was enhanced by cytokines (interleukin 1 beta) that induced the appearance of prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 (PGHS-2) but not 15-lipoxygenase, which initiates their biosynthesis from arachidonic acid in HUVEC. Costimulation of HUVEC/PMN by either thrombin plus the chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or ionophore A23187 leads to the production of these eicosanoids from endogenous sources. Four of these eicosanoids were also produced when PMN were exposed to 15R-HETE [(15R)-15-hydroxy-5,8,11-cis-13-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid] and an agonist. Physical methods showed that the class consists of four tetraene-containing products from arachidonic acid that proved to be 15R-epimers of lipoxins. Two of these compounds (III and IV) were potent inhibitors of leukotriene B4-mediated PMN adhesion to HUVEC, with compound IV [(5S,6R,15R)-5,6,15-trihydroxy-7,9,13-trans-11-cis-eicosatetraenoi c acid; 15-epilipoxin A4] active in the nanomolar range. These results demonstrate that ASA evokes a unique class of eicosanoids formed by acetylated PGHS-2 and 5-lipoxygenase interactions, which may contribute to the therapeutic impact of this drug. Moreover, they provide an example of a drug's ability to pirate endogenous biosynthetic

  18. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  19. Antiplatelet Drugs: Do You Need One to Help Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientific review by the Oregon Health and Science University-based Drug Effectiveness Review Project. This is a summary of a longer, more detailed report you can find at www.CRBestBuyDrugs.org . Best Buy Generic Name Brand Name Pills per Cost per & Strength Day Month 1 Recommended Use Aspirin ...

  20. Drugs in the Womb: College Student Perceptions of Maternal v. Fetal Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vener, Arthur M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 523 undergraduates regarding drug use during pregnancy. Rank order of relative safety of drugs existed for respondents. Tobacco, alcohol, and aspirin were perceived as similar in their consequences to fetus. Cocaine was considered most deleterious and Accutane was considered least deleterious. Seventy-five percent would imprison pregnant…

  1. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 520.1409 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1409... status. The conditions of use have been NAS/NRC reviewed and found effective. New animal...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 520.1409 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1409... status. The conditions of use have been NAS/NRC reviewed and found effective. New animal...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 520.1409 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1409... status. The conditions of use have been NAS/NRC reviewed and found effective. New animal...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 520.1409 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1409... status. The conditions of use have been NAS/NRC reviewed and found effective. New animal...

  5. Suboptimal inhibition of platelet cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1) by aspirin in lupus erythematosus: Association with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Vivian K.; Avalos, Ingrid; Oeser, Annette; Oates, John A.; Milne, Ginger L.; Solus, Joseph F.; Chung, Cecilia P.; Stein, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Low-dose aspirin prevents platelet aggregation by suppressing thromboxane A2 synthesis. However, in some individuals thromboxane A2 suppression by aspirin is impaired, indicating suboptimal inhibition of platelet COX-1 by aspirin. Because patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have increased risk of thrombotic events, many receive aspirin; however, the efficacy of aspirin in SLE has not been determined. We examined the hypothesis that aspirin response is impaired in SLE. Methods We assessed the effect of aspirin by measuring concentrations of the stable metabolite of thromboxane A2 - serum thromboxane B2 (sTxB2), before and after treatment with 81 mg daily aspirin for 7 days in 34 patients with SLE and 36 control subjects. The inability to suppress sTxB2 synthesis to <10 ng/ml represents suboptimal inhibition of platelet COX-1 by aspirin. Results Aspirin almost completely suppressed sTXB2 in control subjects to 1.5, [0.8–2.7] ng/ml (median and interquartile ranges [IQR]), but had less effect in patients with SLE (3.1, [2.2–5.3] ng/ml) (P=0.002). A suboptimal effect of aspirin was present in 15% (5/34) of the patients with SLE but not in control subjects (0/36) (P=0.023). Incomplete responders were more likely to have metabolic syndrome (P=0.048), obesity (P=0.048) and higher concentrations of CRP (P=0.018). Conclusion The pharmacologic effect of aspirin is suboptimal in 15% of patients with SLE but in none of the control subjects, and the suboptimal response was associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, and higher CRP concentrations. PMID:24022862

  6. ASPIRIN DOSE AND DURATION OF USE AND RISK OF COLORECTAL CANCER IN MEN

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Long-term data on the risk of colorectal cancer according to dose, duration, and consistency of aspirin therapy are limited. Methods We conducted a prospective study of 47,363 male health professionals who were ages 40–75 years at enrollment in 1986. Biennially, we collected data on aspirin use, other risk factors, and diagnoses of colorectal cancer. We confirmed all reports of colorectal cancer through 2004 by review of medical records. Results During 18 years of follow-up, we documented 975 cases of colorectal cancer over 761,757 person-years. After adjustment for risk factors, men who regularly used aspirin (≥2 times/week) had a multivariate relative risk (RR) for colorectal cancer of 0.79 (95% confidence interval, [CI], 0.69–0.90), compared with non-regular users. However, significant risk reduction required at least 6–10 years of use (Ptrend=0.008) and was no longer evident within 4 years of discontinuing use (multivariate RR, 1.00; CI, 0.72–1.39). The benefit appeared related to increasing cumulative average dose: compared to men who denied any aspirin use, the multivariate RRs for cancer were 0.94 (CI, 0.75–1.18) for men who used 0.5–1.5 standard aspirin/week, 0.80 (CI, 0.63–1.01) for 2–5 aspirin/week, 0.72 (CI, 0.56–0.92) for 6–14 aspirin/week, and 0.30 (CI, 0.11–0.81) for >14 aspirin/week (Ptrend=0.004). Conclusions Regular, long-term aspirin use reduces risk of colorectal cancer among men. However, the benefit of aspirin necessitates at least 6 years of consistent use with maximal risk reduction at doses greater than 14 tablets/week. The potential hazards associated with long-term use of such doses should be carefully considered. PMID:18005960

  7. The differential effects of aspirin on platelets, leucocytes and vascular endothelium in an in vivo model of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Y; Tsujioka, Y; Hashimoto, M; Giddings, J C; Yamamoto, J

    1999-02-01

    Unanswered questions remain with regard to the therapeutic use of aspirin and the selective inhibition of thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin in platelets and endothelial cells. In the present study, the effects of aspirin on platelets and endothelial cells in vivo were examined using a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser-induced thrombosis model. Single intravenous injections of aspirin at concentrations of more than 0.5 mg/kg body weight mediated a dose dependent inhibition of thrombus formation in arterioles but not in venules. This antithrombotic effect was optimum after 15 min and declined after 90 min. Potent antithrombotic activity in arterioles was manifest at doses of 2.5 mg/kg to 50 mg/kg, and initial inhibition of thrombogenesis in vivo was most pronounced at high doses. Oral aspirin also inhibited thrombus formation in arterioles but not in venules, although the antithrombotic effects were delayed and prolonged. Maximum inhibition of ex vivo, collagen induced platelet aggregation by aspirin was observed approximately 180 min after intravenous injection. The results demonstrated that, although aspirin might have differential effects on platelets and endothelial cells, potent antithrombotic activity was manifest in arterioles at all concentrations. The findings suggest that the concept of the aspirin dilemma might be ignored for therapeutic purposes in many clinical circumstances. The antithrombotic effects of aspirin were unchanged in granulocyte-depleted animals, indicating that leucocyte-related mechanisms including neutrophil superoxide anion production did not modulate the potency of aspirin in this model. PMID:10197261

  8. Effects of alcohol on human carboxylesterase drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert B.; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Meibohm, Bernd; Laizure, S. Casey

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Human carboxylesterase-1 (CES1) and human carboxylesterase-2 (CES2) play an important role in metabolizing many medications. Alcohol is a known inhibitor of these enzymes but the relative effect on CES1 and CES2 is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of alcohol on the metabolism of specific probes for CES1 (oseltamivir) and CES2 (aspirin). Methods The effect of alcohol on CES1- and CES2-mediated probe drug hydrolysis was determined in vitro using recombinant human carboxylesterase. To characterize the in vivo effects of alcohol, healthy volunteers received each probe drug alone and in combination with alcohol followed by blood sample collection and determination of oseltamivir, aspirin, and respective metabolite pharmacokinetics. Results Alcohol significantly inhibited oseltamivir hydrolysis by CES1 in vitro but did not affect aspirin metabolism by CES2. Alcohol increased the oseltamivir area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0-6 h by 27% (range 11-46%, p=0.011) and decreased the metabolite/oseltamivir AUC 0-6 h ratio by 34% (range 25-41%, p<0.001). Aspirin pharmacokinetics were not affected by alcohol. Conclusions Alcohol significantly inhibited the hydrolysis of oseltamivir by CES1 both in vitro and in humans, but did not affect the hydrolysis of aspirin to salicylic acid by CES2. These results suggest that alcohol's inhibition of CES1 could potentially result in clinically significant drug interactions with other CES1-substrate drugs, but it is unlikely to significantly affect CES2-substrate drug hydrolysis. PMID:25511794

  9. NAC Attenuates LPS-Induced Toxicity in Aspirin-Sensitized Mouse Macrophages via Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Shafarin, Jasmin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. Our aim was to study the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant precursor of GSH synthesis, on aspirin-sensitized macrophages treated with LPS. We investigated the effects of LPS alone and in conjunction with a sub-toxic concentration of ASA, on metabolic and oxidative stress, apoptosis, and mitochondrial function using J774.2 mouse macrophage cell line. Protection from LPS-induced toxicity by NAC was also studied. LPS alone markedly induced ROS production and oxidative stress in macrophage cells. When ASA was added to LPS-treated macrophages, the increase in oxidative stress was significantly higher than that with LPS alone. Similarly, alteration in glutathione-dependent redox metabolism was also observed in macrophages after treatment with LPS and ASA. The combination of LPS and ASA selectively altered the CYP 3A4, CYP 2E1 and CYP 1A1 catalytic activities. Mitochondrial respiratory complexes and ATP production were also inhibited by LPS-ASA treatment. Furthermore a higher apoptotic cell death was also observed in LPS-ASA treated macrophages. NAC pre-treatment showed protection against oxidative stress induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. These effects are presumed, at least in part, to be associated with alterations in NF-κB/Nrf-2 mediated cell signaling. These results suggest that macrophages are more sensitive to LPS when challenged with ASA and that NAC pre-treatment protects the macrophages from these deleterious effects. PMID:25075522

  10. Determinants of Reduced Antiplatelet Effect of Aspirin in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin is a cornerstone in management of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, considerable variability in the antiplatelet effect of aspirin has been reported. Aim To investigate independent determinants of reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin in stable CAD patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study including 900 stable, high-risk CAD patients. Among these, 795 (88%) had prior myocardial infarction, 250 (28%) had type 2 diabetes, and 170 (19%) had both. All patients received 75 mg aspirin daily as mono antiplatelet therapy. The antiplatelet effect of aspirin was assessed by measurement of platelet aggregation emp